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GRIFFIN

CHRONICLES

470th Military Intelligence Brigade's Quarterly Magazine Spring 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2

Brigade, three battalions change commanders

14th MI Battalion journey to readiness

NEW BEGINNINGS

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

470th welcomes 206th, 306th Battalions

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Contents

3 Up Front 4-5 Command's Message 6 Command Sergeant Major's Message 7-12 14th Military Intelligence Battalion 13-14 201st Military Intelligence Battalion 15-18 204th Military Intelligence Battalion 19-20 206th Military Intelligence Battalion 19-21 306th Military Intelligence Battalion 22 338th Military Intelligence Battalion (USAR) 23-25 717th Military Intelligence Battalion 26-27 401st Military Intelligence Company 28-29 Headquarters and Headquarters Det. 30-31 Equal Opportunity 31 Chaplain 32 Safety 33 Force Protection 34 Distinction 35-37 Community Service 38-43 Physical Fitness

Cover

Maj. Gen. Mary Legere, commanding general of Intelligence and Security Command, presents the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade colors to Col. Pierre Gervais, incoming brigade commander, symbolizing the change of command during a ceremony on MacArthur Field at Fort Sam Houston June 29. (Photo by Spc. Natalie Sampson)

470th Military Intelligence Brigade

Commander Col. James D. Lee Command Sergeant Major Command Sgt. Maj. Charles Totoris Editor and Designer Gregory N. Ripps

The Griffin Chronicles is an Armyfunded publication authorized in accordance with Army Regulation 360-1 for the members of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. Contents of The Griffin Chronicles are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of the Army or the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade commander. The Griffin Chronicles is a quarterly offset publication printed through the Government Printing Office and published by the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, DSN 471-6074. All material submitted for publication is subject to editing and rewrite. For questions or comments about The Griffin Chronicles call (210) 295-6458 or e-mail [email protected]

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Up Front

Brigade changes commander

By Gregory Ripps

470th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

In a ceremony including the traditional passing of the unit colors, Col. Pierre Gervais succeeded Col. Jim Lee as commander of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade on June 29 at Fort Sam Houston. Maj. Gen. Mary A. Legere, commanding general of Intelligence and Security Command, presided at the ceremony where an impressive assembly gathered on MacArthur Field to witness and participate in the change of command. Contingents representing the brigade's subordinate units formed up along both sides of the 717th MI Battalion Color Guard. On the field flew the colors of all the brigade's nine subordinate battalions -two of whose main bodies are deployed overseas ­ plus a military intelligence company, and the brigade's headquarters and headquarters detachment. "Heroes all, thank you for your service in your silent war on terrorism," said Legere to the military intelligence professionals. The seats in the pavilion were filled with many family and friends and Soldiers and civilians from the brigade and other organizations who attended to wish the outgoing commander well and to offer congratulations to the incoming commander. The 323rd Medical Command

Col. Jim Lee (left), outgoing commander of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade; Maj. Gen. Mary Legere, commanding general of Intelligence and Security Command; and Col. Pierre Gervais, incoming brigade commander, salute during part of the change of command ceremony on MacArthur Field at Fort Sam Houston June 29. (Photos by Gregory Ripps)

Band provided music to the pomp and circumstance of the ceremony, and local celebrity Patsy Torres sang the national anthem. In his farewell speech, Lee noted that the brigade included 2,300-plus Soldiers and civilians who have deployed for duty to Afghanistan, Iraq, Colombia and as far south as Paraguay, in South America, and recently began missions for Army North. "They deployed [as] interrogation battalions, aerial Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance detachments, cryptologic support teams, Low Level Voice Intercept teams, counterintelligence agents and human intelligence teams," said Lee. "Moreover, ... they developed, trained and

Reviewing the troops in formation are (from left) Col. Pierre Gervais, incoming commander of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade; Maj. Kevin Hosier, brigade S3 (operations and training officer); Col. Jim Lee, outgoing brigade commander; and Maj. Gen. Mary Legere, Intelligence and Security Command commander.

certified Forces Command's intelligence multi-functional teams while balancing requirements and developing future doctrine and TTP [tactics, techniques and procedures]. "The challenges are -- and will continue to be -- significant, and the task is daunting for the 470th as your missions in Southern Command, Central Command and Northern Command continue to evolve," Lee continued. "But it is our solemn duty and our sacred trust to continue to improve our units, as the nation is counting on us all." Lee moves on to become G2 (assistant chief of staff for intelligence) for U.S. Army Europe. Gervais, whom Legere termed as "a Soldier, a leader and an intelligence professional," comes to the 470th MI Brigade after serving as executive officer for the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. Gervais joined the Army in 1989 and immediately pursued a career in military intelligence. "To the men and women of the 470th Griffins, there is no greater honor for me than to serve as commander," said Gervais. "I recognize and understand all of your sacrifices, and those of your families, and I deeply appreciate your commitment, dedication and willingness to put service above self. As I look out on this formation, I see the values and professionalism that make our Army great."

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Commander's Message

New beginnings

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commanders, NCOs and staffs caring more about the various aspects of individual Soldier growth and accountability, but we have to retrain some of the processes with how we care." Similarly, Lt. Gen. Don Campbell, commander, III Corps, Fort Hood, said, "The key to success is engaged leadership ... making sure that our younger leaders are as invested in this as we are." It is with all of this in mind that I believe the true meaning of this edition of the Griffin Chronicles theme "new beginnings" is defined. Since yesterday is history and tomorrow is a mystery, then today our gift is the journey we will continue on together. My road map for the journey is the command philosophy. The world is moving fast. As we work together to face present and future challenges, I will focus on my Character Traits and "Global Six" as a guide. I would like us collectively to embody them, but allow it to evolve throughout the intelligence enterprise we belong to ­ they will be our signature. These tools are fundamental to my approach, and I do not anticipate changing them. CHARACTER TRAITS: Winston Churchill once said, "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give." Not only does our reputation mandate it, but our character drives it. This is why we must strive to make these a part of our daily routine: Civility: Be kind. Share credit. And keep a sense of humor! Above all, please do not lose your temper ­ it only clouds your judgment and diminishes performance from everyone around you. Quiet Confidence: Also known as healthy arrogance. Work to establish a superb reputation

By Col. Pierre Gervais

470th Military Intelligence Brigade commander

"A beginning is only the start of a journey to another beginning." ­ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe n June 29, the 470th postured itself for a new beginning. Let's be clear though, that this is only a continuation of a journey started by the Soldiers, civilians and, most importantly, the families of this brigade well before my arrival. The theme "New Beginnings" should not imply the creation of something novel, but more aptly describes a reinvestment in those core fundamentals and principles we hold true in our Army Values, the Soldier's Creed and the Military Intelligence Creed. The Army Values ­ Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage -- set the foundation for Soldiers in our ranks. Set on that foundation are the words of the Soldier's Creed, with a component stating, "I am a Warrior and a member of a team ... I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills." The glue holding it all together is the Military Intelligence Creed noting, "with a sense of urgency and of tenacity, professional and physical fitness, and above all, integrity, for in truth lies victory." These are the basic tenets that all Soldiers must use as a springboard for our Profession of Arms. In a recent Army Times article titled "Crackdown on Discipline," Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling, commander, U.S. Army Europe, suggests that leaders want to do the right thing: "It's just that some aspects of leadership have been overcome by other priorities associated with steady combat," he said. "We can improve our Army by

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

through deeds and low-key professionalism. Be calm and steady always, without overselling, bragging, or letting ego become part of the equation. Creativity: Be a sparkplug. Always ask the question, "How can I do this better?" Send your ideas forward constantly. Think your way through problems by innovating. Teamwork and Collaboration: Work together. What we do requires cooperation and fusion across areas of expertise and organizational boundaries. We are far more effective working as a team than as individuals. Determination: I respect people with true grit. It is easy to shine when everything goes your way, but the true measure of a professional can be found in observing how one reacts to and overcomes failure. Never, never give up! Honesty and Integrity: Don't ever do anything that violates law or regulation. Tell the truth unflinchingly. Above all, these two qualities must define our team. Discipline! GLOBAL SIX: These are the foundation to my life and professional career. Plan on seeing and discussing these frequently.

Commander's Message

intelligence practitioners supporting full-spectrum operations at all levels. Empower your Soldiers to train individual to collective tasks; focused training is absolute!

TEAMWORK No single person or unit is better than the other. Retired Gen. Eric Shinseki once said, "If you have a great idea ... that's `C' work. A great idea that you tell me about and share with your peers is outstanding ... but that's still only `B' work. You earn an `A' when you have a great idea, share it, and don't tell me about it. If it's that good, I'll hear about it from others." TRAINING Battle focused ­ doing routine things routinely. Our ability to coherently plan and train for contingencies is fundamental to the brigade's ability to succeed. We must think through what to train on and instill the idea of

The theme "New Beginnings" should not imply the creation of something novel, but more aptly describes a reinvestment in those core fundamentals and principles we hold true in our Army Values, the Soldier's Creed, and the Military Intelligence Creed.

MAINTENANCE AND LOGISTICS Care of and handling of our vital toolsets is primary to any unit success. There is no accurate way to predict exactly where or when we will be called upon to undertake operations. We must be prepared now to provide timely, accurate and relevant intelligence that will enable others to make operational decisions. DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT Lead

the way! When in charge, take charge, especially when no one is looking. You must all lead by example in bearing, appearance, conduct, fitness and professionalism. Look for me to do the same.

peak performance always.

no substitute for wellbalanced physical, emotional and spiritual fitness. You cannot separate the mind from the body, and as intelligence professionals, our METL demands that both are operating at

FITNESS There is

CARING Serve our people and their families. Leadership at every level must focus on caring for and empowering them. In particular, think about recruitment, retention, promotions and awards. By carefully managing them, we can do the most to contribute to the quality of life and service of our most important national treasure ­ our Soldiers and their families. Our mission is critical. I look forward to serving you. "Truth, Security, Loyalty." Hooah! Griffins!

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CSM's Message

Transformation through professionalism

By Command Sgt. Maj. Charles Totoris 470th Military Intelligence Brigade command sergeant major

he brigade's operations temp has not slowed down since the last issue of the Griffin Chronicles. This issue's theme is "New Beginnings," but it is really not a new beginning or starting over; it is simply the next chapter in our storied unit. Just like the next chapter that will be written into our Army's history with the changing of our leadership from Gen. George Casey to Gen. Martin Dempsey to now Gen. Raymond Odierno (Chief of Staff), and our new Command Sergeant Major of the Army Raymond Chandler, so too begins the next chapter for our brigade. Through several changes at brigade-, battalion- and company-level leadership the nucleus or foundation of that unit remains constant -- and the officers, Soldiers and civilians who make up the unit and continue to accomplish our missions every day. As with every book, the next chapter usually contains new developments that build the plot of the story. The same can be said for how we pursue our vision. The Army's 2011 posture statement it states, "In the coming years, our top priorities will be to maintain our combat edge while we reconstitute the force for other missions and build resilience in our people." The constant for our Army mission is to fight and win our nation's wars by providing prompt, sustained land dominance across the full range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of combatant commanders. The posture statement assists our leaders in the development of plans and training needed for the Army to adapt and react to

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any challenges throughout the world or in our own backyard. Despite these changes in leadership and vision, our responsibilities as professional Soldiers remain the same. A key component to our Profession of Arms is the coaching, teaching and mentorship of our Soldiers and future leaders and trainers of this great organization. The process is realized by setting and enforcing standards and discipline within our ranks. We plan and conduct training using the Army's eightstep training model and ensure our Soldiers know the Task, Conditions and Standards on everything we train on or require of them. We ensure that they are counseled both professionally and personally, good and bad, and that we listen as good as we direct. We realize that, no matter the circumstances, our Soldiers are our nation's most cherished treasure and we as leaders are directly responsible for their and our Army's success. Another key component to our profession is that Soldiers realize their own personal responsibility in upholding the same tenants we profess: trust, discipline, fitness. Our profession demands it, and our organization will thrive on it. There is an amazing transformation that occurs in any organization, despite the changes we experience. That transformation perpetuates throughout and creates an aura that demands excellence from each and every one of us and attracts others to follow and join. So continue to thrive and learn from each other and gain an appreciation from each other's experiences and use those opportunities to learn, grow and expand your knowledge.

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Trust your training

By Staff Sgt. Raymond Deliz

14th Military Intelligence Battalion

14th MI Battalion

and tiring, but we also learned how to react to direct and indirect fire. We can now properly conduct full spectrum operations while remaining consolidated and cohesive. Do you believe the training you have received thus far is adequate enough for you to safely return home to your loved ones? Do you have faith in your leadership to properly train you in all you need to know in order to survive in a hostile environment? Do you have confidence in your comrades to know how to assist and save you should the need arise? If you have answered yes to any of these questions, you are ready to deploy to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

rust the pre-deployment training you are receiving as a means of getting back safely to your loved ones. Our training methods are designed in such a way as for you, the Soldier, to correctly react to any given incident without losing precious time to thought. When I first entered the U.S. Navy on September 15, 1986, I received a lot of training. At the time I believed that my command, the U.S.S. Wainwright, just had us train as a means of filling our days with useless rubbish. We were trained on how to subdue and extinguish shipboard fires, how to run and operate submersible pumps for extracting water-filled compartments, shoring damaged bulkheads, and how to properly plug ruptured pipes. From January to June of 1988, we deployed to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Earnest Will. We were to escort merchant ships via shipping lanes. On 14 April 2008, the U.S.S. Roberts struck a mine that was on a shipping lane less than 36 hours. Intel reports stated that Iran was using an oil platform as a strategic point to place mines in the water. In the pre-dawn of 18 April 2008, the alert of general quarters was called out over the ship's public address circuit kicking off the commencement of Operation Praying Mantis. We were to engage the oil platform, responsible for the damage sustained to the U.S.S. Roberts, in order to put an end to the placement of these mines. Iran did not take this well and had their naval ships attempt to defend their assets. Throughout the skirmish, we were fired upon by an Iranian ship with a harpoon missile which narrowly missed us. Had we been hit, I feel confident that through the training I received, I would have been able to do my part in saving my ship and my shipmates. For our upcoming deployment to Afghanistan, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, we have seen our fair share of training. Keep in mind that we prepare for the worst and hope for the best. We participated in the HMMWV Egress Assistance Trainer (HEAT) in which we all learned how to evacuate ourselves, and injured Soldiers, from a rolled over vehicle. The Convoy Trainer taught us the proper method, and importance, of maintaining communication with other Truck Commanders within the convoy and what to do in the event the Convoy Commander is lost in battle. We have been taught how to identify and react to Improvised Explosive Devices, how to clear, cordon, control, and call in a 9-line IED/UXO Report. It was extremely physical

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TRAINING

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Passing the torch

By Sgt. Tyler Arreola

14th Military Intelligence Battalion

14th MI Battalion

TEAMWORK

n October 2008 the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion activated with a deployment on the horizon. Lt. Col. Greg Meyer and his command team inherited a group of competent non-commissioned officers along with a company of fresh, slick-sleeved interrogators. Many of the NCOs of the 14th at this time came from a completely different world: combat arms. These NCOs had their work cut out for them, it was their duty to sculpt and mold these young men and women into intelligence professionals. These Soldiers needed to be mentored on how to trust and be trusted by their fellow Soldiers to enhance unit cohesion. They needed to be shown what discipline was so they could meet and enforce the standard. Along with the mental aspect of being intelligence professionals, these Soldiers also needed to be physically tough. The NCOs had to make these Soldiers mission ready so they could handle the strains a deployment can take on the mind and body. It was these NCOs' duty to train and develop the future leaders of the 14th MI Battalion. In June 2011, the 14th MI Battalion is back and sees another deployment on the horizon, this time to Afghanistan. Those once sleek-sleeved privates now have a deployment under their belt and have been passed the torch to lead. The leaders of the 14th are expected now to teach what they were taught in the past in order to prepare each other and the new Soldiers of the 14th for their interrogation mission. The standard in the 14th could never be higher as they come down the final stretch to board the aircraft and cross "the pond," but the 14th defines determination and is always accepting challenge whether it is mental of physical. The 14th has come together, and cohesion is at an all-time high Experienced Soldiers are showing younger counterparts the standard and how to achieve it. The command team and Soldiers are taking

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lessons learned from each exercise conducted and focusing on them so they can eliminate weaknesses, while concurrently sharpening skills already developed. It is essential in the intelligence mission that the Soldiers and leaders have confidence in each other; working together as a team has definitely increased the unit's effectiveness. As the 14th trains for the deployment, Soldiers are able to become closer within each section, learn each other's strengths and weaknesses, and have the ability to teach and be taught to increase proficiency in certain areas. As a team, the 14th sits eagerly awaiting the deployment like a well oiled machine. The 14th has the privilege of having many former combat arms Soldiers within the command team and ranks, which increases the units discipline and military bearing. This standard is enforced with a little tough love and a lot of mentorship. Soldiers in the 14th have seen the standard presented to them and understand anything less is completely unacceptable. This discipline will help the 14th by allowing Soldiers to maintain composure, follow correct orders and always present themselves in a professional manner during their deployment. The leaders in the 14th not only understand this discipline is essential for the unit's success but also find pride in having well disciplined Soldiers or the sharpest looking formation come formation time. Over the course of the last fiscal year, the 14th could claim

two brigade Soldiers of the year and two brigade NCOs of the year, which directly reflects the 14th's leadership and discipline. When it comes to physical fitness, the bar for the 14th has been set at 260 on the physical training test and nothing less. Leaders in the 14th have shown the importance of Physical Readiness Training and have studied and conducted the proper way it should be conducted. The 14th has a very athletic and competitive team. Whether it is for the commander's cup competition, an obstacle course, or the Steel Challenge, members of the 14th are always putting in hard work and laying everything on the line in order to obtain a higher standard than those set before. The commander's cup seems to switch hands from company to company, which has increased friendly rivalries between companies that will no doubt carry over to Afghanistan. The obstacle course was a well orchestrated idea to increase the confidence and competitiveness of Soldiers while at the same time promoting teamwork and building physical strength. The Steel Challenge, which recently opened to brigade level, promotes discipline to train for a goal, the physical and mental strength to compete for that goal, and unit cohesion to motivate others to accomplish that goal. The Steel Challenge will follow the 14th to Afghanistan, adding to unit cohesion and enhancing the Soldiers' physical strength while on deployment. As the 14th prepares to embark on its next deployment, maintaining success in the three areas of trust, discipline and physical fitness will be essential in ensuring a job well done and a safe return home. The leaders are ready to lead, the Soldiers are ready to learn, and the unit together is ready to accomplish its mission.

Three Soldiers on a detachment from the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion prepared to move out during an exercise to validate their human intelligence gathering capabilities at Camp Bullis April 7. (U.S. Army photo by Gregory Ripps)

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DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT

14th Military Intelligence Battalion

By Sgt. Kevin Mason

Trust, discipline and fitness

14th MI Battalion

he art of war is something currently practiced by less than one percent of the population of the United States. Due to this low number, awareness regarding military training and readiness is low among the U.S. population. This is not a field you can study for four years and be considered an "expert"; the military and the conflicts it's involved in are constantly changing and evolving. There are several key elements that need to be present in any military organization in order for it to be effective during an armed conflict or war. Discipline is defined as training that corrects, molds, or perfects the mental faculties or moral character. Quite simply, a soldier that lacks discipline will not be able to function in any sort of team, much less a team deployed in a combat environment. In Bravo Company, 14th Military Intelligence Battalion, we employ human intelligence collectors and analysts in roles that require extensive training. Without a notion of discipline, soldiers would be unwilling and unable to learn new abilities. The ability to learn and maintain new skill sets while retaining what you've learned previously is an indicator of a high level of discipline. Fitness is an all-encompassing topic, and can be defined as having the ability to proficiently do all tasks that the Army asks of you as a Soldier. Whether this means being able to adequately pass the Army Physical Fitness Test or run an effective approach on a detainee, fitness means having the physical and mental acuity to perform at a level that benefits the United States Army. Bravo Company places an emphasis on fitness, as without it, we do a disservice to the men and women of the United States that we

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swore an oath to protect. Of the three topics covered, trust is easily the most important. Without trust, the Army as a whole would crumble. So much of what we do as Soldiers is based upon trusting another Soldier with your life. Whether you're jumping off a plane with a parachute packed by another Soldier or searching a detainee while another Soldier provides security, we work as a team. Without the notion of trust, we would not be able to do our job. Our ability to find and destroy the enemy would be crippled, as would any sense of fitness or discipline. Due to the unique job description of the military, we rely on each other more than anyone else in the world. If we lose that bond that has held us together for more than 200 years, it will be a sad day indeed. It's important for leaders to recognize these three key aspects, as they are the glue that holds the military together. Due to our mission constantly changing, leaders should be seeking out new levels of fitness to attain, as well as maintaining discipline to encourage Soldiers to take on new roles that will benefit the brigade. Command teams have such an important job, in that they influence every single soldier underneath them. It's important for the command climate to be positive, as a positive climate brews morale and eagerness to train and please leaders, which is exactly the kind of atmosphere that's needed to deploy and effectively fight the enemy.

Mental fitness within the ranks

By Sgt. Rachelle Shand

B Company intelligence analyst

he Army stresses Soldiers be physically fit so they'll have the strength to perform their missions and take care of themselves and their buddies in combat. However, there is another component to fitness, which is just as important. Pvt. 2 Brittany Muldrow said, "Fitness is more than just the physical. You have to be mentally fit as well." What exactly does being mentally fit mean? Mental fitness is having the ability and freedom to efficiently and successfully manage stress, problems, and the full range of emotions on a daily basis. As an intelligence analyst supporting an interrogator, being mentally fit is essential to complete the mission successfully. Mental fitness, like physical fitness, is something Soldiers need to work on daily. They need both physical and mental stamina to handle all the challenges of everyday life, not to mention the increased challenges of combat. To be mentally fit, Soldiers need to be focused, persistent, confident and determined. With proper mental fitness training, life becomes simpler, more satisfying and productive. A major factor in mental fitness is establishing good communication

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FITNESS

between the commander and his subordinates. If the NCOs are buying into it and living it, it will catch on with the Soldiers. If the Soldiers trust in their leadership, this fosters a feeling of unit cohesion. Having confidence in their leaders at all levels allows the Soldiers to perform at a higher level. Providing support to the interrogator is the analyst's job. With this support, the interrogator, in turn, is able to gather actionable intelligence and push it to the units on the ground. The ground unit takes that intelligence and builds an operation, to prevent those trying to harm U.S. Soldiers and take them out, saving lives in the process. If Soldiers are not mentally fit, and aren't able to provide their piece of the picture, What happens to the operation? The reality of the importance of fitness to the Soldiers, unit, and mission is this: with a balanced mind, body and heart, accomplishment of the mission will be effortless.

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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14th MI Battalion

Exercise tests human intelligence capabilities

By Capt. Lauren Greenup

14th Military Intelligence Battalion plans officer

TRAINING

he 14th Military Intelligence Battalion conducted an exercise on Camp Bullis April 4-7 in preparation for a deployment to Afghanistan. The purpose of the exercise was to validate a 55-Soldier detachment from the Fort Sam Houston-based battalion that would be capable of executing full-spectrum human intelligence operations with a focus on interrogation. The detachment consisted of several sections and teams that included: a Detachment Operations, which provided operational oversight; a Human Intelligence Operations Cell that managed requirements and taskings for the teams; an Operations Management Team that provided operational and technical control; a Collection Management and Dissemination Section that managed the intelligence requirements; and a Document Exploitation Section that exploited any media captured from the detainees. "The training exercise not only was a great opportunity to train the functionality of a deployable detachment, but also gave the sections an opportunity to train on their standard operating procedures," said Lt. Col. Kris Arnold, the battalion commander, who added, "Each interrogator had an opportunity to work with an analyst to achieve a more focused and refined interrogation product." The detachment trained several mission-essential tasks to include: conduct tactical deployment, command and control, sustainment operations, protection operations, unit movement operations, and crisis action planning. The battalion's headquarters and headquarters detachment, led by Capt. Charles McMillian, provided critical support to the exercise and simulated a forward operating base to provide more realism to the training. His detachment was instrumental to the success of the battalion's exercise by establishing "retransmission" sites crucial to communications, sustaining elements throughout the battlefield, conducting services on three vehicles (putting them ahead of their vehicle services schedule), and executing "mayoral"

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Two Soldiers of the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion conduct preliminary questioning of a "detainee."

duties in the cantonment area and at the forward operating base. Bravo Company supported the exercise with analysts embedded in the detachment, serving as tiger team members, and also supplied role players at the villages and observer/trainers to evaluate the training. During the exercise, the detachment, led by Maj. Chad Wetherill, conducted 13 Human Collection Team missions, eight screenings and 18 interrogations, produced 14 Intelligence Information Reports, submitted 10 Requests for Information, executed four "walk-ins," and answered one Source Directed Requirement. "This was a great training event that not only validated a detachment, but just as important, trained the battalion staff and support elements on critical tasks such as planning, resourcing, coordinating and supporting," said Arnold. "It proves that if the battalion staff can plan and command and control an exercise of this magnitude and detail, we can easily plan and successfully conduct real-world missions down range."

Soldiers on a detachment from the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion consider a "person of interest" in a simulated village on Camp Bullis. (Photos by Gregory Ripps)

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Capt. Chad Wetherill briefs Soldiers of a detachment from the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion prior to its next human intelligence training mission.

14th MI Battalion

Left: Soldiers scramble to safely change a tire. Above: Soldiers pull a Humvee for 50 meters. (Photos by 2nd Lt. Eric Guerrero)

Rodeo validates maintenance program

By Staff Sgt. Jamila Leary 14th Military Intelligence Battalion he 14th Military Intelligence Battalion performed its first Battalion Maintenance Rodeo May 9 on MacArthur Parade Field on Fort Sam Houston. This was an event filled with esprit de corps, enthusiasm and dedication. There were five tasks that each 20-Soldier team had to accomplish. The task included preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) for vehicle faults; trailer backing; a Humvee pull; a tire change challenge; fireman's carry with the donning of M40 gas mask; and, finally, weapons disassembly, reassembly and functions check. This was conducted as a relay where preparation, proficiency, time management and teamwork were paramount in the overall success of each team. Penalties were hard to avoid and proved which teams took the competition and preparation seriously. PMCS was performed on a M1097 to identify four faults that had been strategically placed on the vehicles by the 14th MI Battalion's skilled motor sergeants. Soldiers had to identify all faults by going through all of the technical manual's item numbers. Once the observer-controller at that station cleared them, they could move on to the next task. Backing up a trailer is no simple task, and the Soldiers at this station had to pull the trailer to the Humvee. The Humvee was then connected. The Soldiers had to perform an S-curve, backing the trailer into a predestinated parking space without touching any cones. The Humvee pull was a test of endurance, strength and teamwork that these Soldiers had to accomplish using wretcher straps and physical strength. They moved the M1097 50 meters before they could move on to the next task. The tire change challenge included knowing how to use the jack and jack stand, remove the tire and roll the tire around the vehicle without dropping it. Then the Soldiers replaced the tire and released the truck from the jack stand. Once the tire was secure, the observer-controller would release the Soldiers to begin the next task. The fireman's carry consisted of Soldiers simulating having to carry an incapacitated casualty for 25 meters to a secure vehicle. While en route to the end of the lane, a replication of gas was produced and the participant had to don his or her protective mask

MAINTENANCE AND LOGISTICS / TEAMWORK

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along with their "casualty's." The final event was showing proficiency on their assigned weapon system. For this task the Soldiers had to disassemble and reassemble two M16s, one M49 and one M9, and complete a functions check in order to take their team to the finish line. This was an individual task, and the team could not head to the finish line until all members were clear. The rodeo was the culminating event to close out the brigade's command maintenance program prior to the unit's upcoming deployment. It was used to build up a sense of unit cohesion within the battalion. The winner of this competition was Bravo Company. The company members' preparation and training for the Maintenance Rodeo helped them to succeed in seizing the title as the winners. The 14th MI Battalion's maintenance program was a grand success. The unit started with four vehicles and expanded into a full-fledged functioning maintenance program. This program successfully sustained vehicles, keeping them ready to function in any key mission or training presented to the battalion. The battalion's ,maintenance program will continue to flourish and develop as more vehicles become a part of the fleet. It also helped the unit to understand that, without a well-developed maintenance program, success in any mission is not possible.

Soldiers race to move a tire at the tire changing station.

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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14th MI Battalion

Above: Todd Huston doesn't allow amputation of his right leg to prevent him from excelling in mountain climbing. (Courtesy photo)

Taking a different approach to safety

By 1st Lt. Matthew Barry

14th Military Intelligence Battalion

TRAINING

Above: Spc. Demetrios Green takes his place behind the wheel of the San Antonio Police Department's drunken driver simulator car under the direction of Officer Ralph Delgado. Left: Col. Joseph Molloy discusses injury prevention and performance enhancement during his Safety Stand Down Day presentation. (Photo by Gregory Ripps)

very Soldier is expected to take risks. However, if the Soldier understands the risks and knows how to properly mitigate potential hazards, they are more likely to succeed in their mission. In May the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion invited three guest speakers to emphasize the importance of safety and risk management. The first speaker was Todd Huston. He lays claim to being the world's only disabled athlete to hold a world record in an ablebodied sport: mountain climbing. At the age of 14 his legs were caught in a boat propeller during an afternoon of waterskiing with his family. He almost died on the way to the hospital. He had one of his legs amputated because of infection. He allowed the experience to show him his limits and discovered that he could push himself beyond those limitations and achieve excellence. Hutton's compelling discussion with 14th MI Battalion Soldiers gave them a healthy respect for the importance of safety, whether having fun or doing their jobs. We are all capable of being remarkable if we practice preparing, planning and taking time to ensure necessary precaution.

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The second speaker was Officer Ralph Delgado from the San Antonio Police Department. Delgado was able to give his first-hand experience about the dangers of drunken driving and recklessness on San Antonio highways. Additionally, he and his officers brought out a drunken driver simulator so that Soldiers could better understand the driving mistakes people make under the influence of alcohol. The Soldiers were able to have some fun with the simulator and laugh at the expense of their fellow Soldiers, but they did not forget about the seriousness of having a designated driver and driving defensively ­ especially on the weekends or during rush hour. The last speaker was Col. Joseph Molloy from Medical Command on Fort Sam Houston. Molloy gave a detailed presentation to the Soldiers about sports injury prevention and how to train our bodies to make them durable for the rigors of combat. "I thought Colonel Molloy's brief was very informative," said one Soldier. "There was a lot about sports training I hadn't realized. The 14th MI Battalion Soldiers found Safety Stand Down Day very useful. It is important to bring outside experts who are willing to share their knowledge with our Soldiers because it enhances training and encourages our Soldiers to think about training in new and different ways.

Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

By Spc. Blair Jones

The value of trust

201st MI Battalion

may or may not have returned, but that experience should help you understand how the presence or lack of trust determines the viability of any unit. Those of you who have spent time in foxholes, trenches, or any situation where your life truly depends on the person next to you, know full well the importance of trust and how damaging it can be if it's absent. The existence of trust between subordinates and their leaders is especially important to the growth and success of a unit. Trust cannot be expected nor given but rather must be earned by leaders who consistently demonstrate they have their Soldier's wellbeing in mind. As we all know, trust is not earned overnight but it can be lost in an instant. It takes sincere effort to become a person who is trusted by the people with whom he or she works. Whether as a Soldier, noncommissioned officer or officer, all of us have a responsibility to embody the values that the Army claims and that distinguish us from every other organization. It is the embodiment of those values that will enable us to earn each other's trust. In the Army, the success of every mission is contingent upon people, not a person. Since none of us can accomplish a mission alone, we must have trust in one other. As Soldiers, we have all taken an oath to defend our nation and its constitution. Doing that takes a strength that exceeds the capacity of any individual; it requires the strength of an army. Our collective strength is only as great as the trust that binds us.

201st Military Intelligence Battalion

s members of the Army, we are connected to people both personally and professionally. Regardless of the type of relationship, each one needs trust. The amount of trust you have in the people you work with will directly correspond to the effectiveness of your team. In the context of relationships, trust affects everything, but for the purposes of this article we'll look at two things in particular: first, the willingness of one party to be vulnerable to the actions of another; and second, the risk of harm to the trustor if the trustee does not behave appropriately. If you look over these particular aspects of trust, what word stands out? For me, it's the word "risk." Anytime we place trust in someone, we take a risk. We are depending on that individual to accomplish something that, for whatever reason, we cannot do alone. It may be something as innocuous as a ride home from work or something as life-changing as a mission in a foxhole. Whatever the circumstances, it is our ability to trust and be trusted that allows us to function as human beings in general, and as Soldiers in particular. For many of you, perhaps all of you, there has been a time when you lost the ability to trust someone you know. That trust

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TEAMWORK

HONOR UNIT

The 201st Military Intelligence Battalion (behind color guard) received recognition as honor unit during the 2011 Fort Sam Houston Fiesta Military Ceremony April 10 on MacArthur Parade Field. The master of ceremonies read the following: "The 201st MI Battalion, 470th MI Brigade, a specially created, uniquely missioned and expertly trained organization of all-source analyst, seasoned debriefers and skilled interrogators conducted, over the past year, detainee screening, interrogations, media exploitation and analysis to provide timely intelligence to commanders in support of the International Security Assistance Force. While deployed and often at great personal risk, the Soldiers of the "Black Knight" battalion developed hundreds of timely intelligence assessments that led to the capture or kill of hostile fighters, intermediaries and enablers associated with Al Qaeda and the Taliban. Measured against any standard, the combat-tested and battleseasoned 201st MI Battalion continues to set and exceed the standard." (Photo by Robert Ramon, U.S. Army South) Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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201st MI Battalion

Safety training, family fun combine

By Staff Sgt. Linda R. Carlisle

Headquarters and Headquarters Company

TRAINING

he 201st Military Intelligence Battalion spent the summer of 2010 deployed to Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, and endured extreme temperatures reaching well into the 100s, but something was missing, the fun of summertime activities with friends and family. This year unit and family members are taking full advantage of the season and all it has to offer. The week of June 13 marked the beginning of the Army's 101 Critical Days of Summer (Memorial Day through Labor Day) and annual summer safety campaign. In recognition of this campaign, unit and family members of the 201st Military Intelligence Battalion spent June 24 at Canyon Lake for a fun-filled day of sun, swimming, camaraderie and summer safety education. Water safety was the top of the agenda for the event and a priority for 201st Battalion Commander Lt. Col. Joseph Barber to ensure unit and family members are armed with essential safety information to thoroughly enjoy summertime water activities. Participants in this year's summer safety day received comprehensive and well delivered classes in scuba, water and boating safety. Sure, scuba diving sounds dangerous to some, but as Staff Sgt. Devon Spratling, of B Company, explained, knowledge of the right practices, safety concerns, and the right equipment should help make sure all your dives are safe ones. No stranger to the sport of scuba, Spratling has explored the waters of Belize and completed

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numerous dives locally. Armed with an array of personal scuba gear, Spratling walked participants through equipment essentials, safety practices, and explained how rewarding scuba can be if proper precautions are taken. Water safety is no laughing matter, but with the comedic help of Warrant Officer 1 John Flores of HHC, A Company's Sgt. Brandon Avolin demonstrated life-saving techniques in the event of a drowning and resuscitation if necessary. Sgt. Brandon Avolin, a former lifeguard, also emphasized the importance of keeping an eye on small children as they are especially drawn to water and generally do not have the same swimming abilities as most adults. Overall his instruction left safety day participants with the ability to take control in the event of a water related incident. Staff Sgt. William Cropper, of A Company, provided a class on boating safety, tackling basic rules of the water and operational musts according to state laws. Upon completion of the boating safety course, participants were given the opportunity to take a 70-question test that would certify and license them to rent and operate boats from Morale, Welfare, and Recreation. Last, but not least, participants received an opportunity to take to the water for an on-boat block of instruction. Learning the basics of scuba, water and boating safety was the main objective of summer safety day for the 201st Military Intelligence Battalion. Overall, unit and family members spent a fun-filled and educational day at Canyon Lake learning the safety measures and musts to safely enjoy summertime activities to the fullest.

Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

`Vigilant Hunters' welcome LaPoint as new commander

By Jade Fulce

Fort Bliss Monitor

204th MI Battalion

CARING

t. Col. Todd E. Brucker relinquished command of the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion (Aerial Reconnaissance)to Lt. Col. Glenn E. LaPoint during a ceremony outside a Biggs Army Airfield hangar on Fort Bliss July 14. The 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss commanding general, Maj. Gen. Dana J. H. Pittard, joined service members, families and friends for the change of command. "Much of what [the battalion's Soldiers] have tirelessly achieved will never be read about in the newspaper or seen on the news," said Brucker, who commanded the battalion for two years. "But rest assured, the impacts they have made around the world are significant and make the liberties that we enjoy daily even more sacred and secure." Col. Pierre D. Gervais, 470th MI Brigade commander, congratulated the battalion for their safety record of no aviation accidents, loss of life or serious injury as they conducted more than 1,100 missions for various commands, which totaled more than 7,000 hours flown and nearly 3,000 intelligence reports disseminated while managing the Army's only Aircraft Qualification Course for the DH-7 program and transforming their capability to the new Diamondback system. LaPoint assumed this command after serving as executive officer to the deputy commanding general of support with the 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas. LaPoint is not new to the 204th as he previously served as D Company commander and

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Col. Pierre D. Gervais, commander of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade, passes the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion (Aerial Reconnaissance) colors to incoming commander Lt. Col. Glenn E. LaPoint during the battalion's change-of-command ceremony July 14 at Biggs Army Airfield. (Photo by Jade Fulce) mission operations officer. In his speech, LaPoint thanked Brucker for his leadership, creation of a resilient team and setting a standard of service during war, contingency operations, transformation and equipment modernization. The Soldiers of the 204th MI Battalion are known as the "Vigilant Hunters" with the motto "Silently We Defend."

Nation continues to thrive because of intelligence 204th MI Battalion produces

By Lt. Col. Todd Brucker

204th MI Battalion commander

CARING

s I write this article I am three days away from handing over the leadership responsibility of the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion (Aerial Reconnaissance). Throughout the past two years the Soldiers, noncommissioned officers, warrant officers, officers, civilians and contractors have come together to conduct aerial reconnaissance operations across the globe supporting our warfighting commanders, host nation partners, and national intelligence consumers. Throughout these two years the unit has continually improved our collection and reporting capability and implemented the first multi-intelligence collection on a single Air Reconnaissance-Low mission. The successes of the unit are a direct result of the hard work, ingenuity, and dedication of all

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the 204th personnel. Daily, they are given the task of conducting missions simultaneously in three different areas of responsibility, and they always exceed the standard. The 204th Military Intelligence Battalion family is clearly the best I have ever had the privilege to serve with. Although its accomplishment may not make front page news, rest assured that because of the intelligence it produces, our nation continues to thrive. My heartfelt thanks to all of the 204th family and best

wishes for continued success in the future. Fly safe!

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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204th MI Battalions

New beginnings: welcome understatement

By Capt. Troy Feltis

C Company commander

FITNESS

ew beginnings" is a welcome understatement for me as I join the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion family as the new C Company Commander. Years ago I caught wind of this organization, but it was more recent that I was able to confirm that it existed. No doubt this is the best military intelligence aerial reconnaissance battalion to serve with and the best company to command. The uniqueness of our mission is our stand-alone quality. As I have traveled to the various locations from which C Company operates, it became very apparent to me that the Soldiers are extremely decentralized. They must be trusted that their discipline will cause them to do the right thing all the time and see to the company's mission. Furthermore, physical fitness must be accomplished with minimal guidance. In order to complete our mission, C Company must conduct split-base operations from five locations. We have Soldiers outside the continental United States in Apiay and Bogota; we also have Soldiers within U.S. borders in San Antonio and El Paso; in addition, at any time, we have a C12 aircraft crew somewhere between Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico or Columbia. Each Soldier is contributing to the mission that provides the best multi-intelligence Aerial Reconnaissance Support Team and aerial logistical support. The first sergeant and I trust that C Company Soldiers are conducting their duties in the most professional manner and the Soldiers trust that we, the first sergeant and I, trust them. It is a symbiotic relationship, and it works very well. Our Soldiers must rise each day, in their respective locations, and complete the mission. Each Soldier understands the contribution he or she provides. It is their personal discipline that causes them to drive to mission execution. It is a very impressive

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sight to see the work that they do and to know that it is being used by someone ... somewhere. Fitness is extremely important for C Company. It is essential for mission accomplishment. I once overheard a leader of mine saying, "PT is the most important thing I do every day." Upon hearing this I thought to myself, "You have to be kidding me, PT is the most important thing he does?" I have seen this guy do many things great, frankly, almost everything he did was great. He could get out in front of the formation and run us into the dirt, he could do flutter kicks until everybody quit, he was calm as the entire unit was in contact during a training exercise, and he always seemed to say the right thing at the right time to inspire or to praise. But then it dawned on me. Physical fitness was his bedrock. A strong body is a strong mind and vice versa. I have overheard Soldiers in our ranks say, "I don't need PT, I use my brain," or "I'm a pilot, I don't need to run." Physical fitness is not only a requirement for the infantry; it is a requirement across the entire spectrum of military professions. The research is out there to prove it. Just search the Internet for "health benefits of fitness," and a plethora of articles immediately appear. Furthermore, our army is even in the process of changing the physical fitness test to capture a more relevant fitness measure. Physical fitness is our personal and professional obligation to each other. At any time, any Soldier, at any level, may have to rely on their physical fitness to complete the mission or aid another Soldier. Leaders and subordinates can instantly lose credibility with each other if they cannot "hang". The ability to perform analyst duties, fly long hours, or perform tactical operations center duties is tied to fitness. In closing, trust, discipline and fitness are integral elements of C Company's mission accomplishment.

Battalion takes language training to a new level

By Sgt. Skyler T. Cooper

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he 204th Military Intelligence Battalion held its first Spanish Scrabble tournament for language development March 23. The tournament was held as an alternative form of language training, to increase morale and provide a different learning environment for its linguists. Participants came from all three of the battalion's companies and ranged from private first class all the way up to captain. . "It was nice to do something a little different," said Spc. Juan Luis Sierra, who won the tournament. "It definitely was a fun event. I would love to do it again in the future." The event organizer noted that people have different learning structures: "This is definitely a way to reach out to those that have difficulties learning in a classroom environment," he said. Capt. Maribel Cisneros from Headquarters Support Company and Spc. Arturo Tovar from C Co. tied for second place. Spc. Christian Rivera from C Co. came in third.

Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

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TRAINING

204th MI Battalion

hours to familiarize themselves with the system, making for easy integration. By providing the most professional Soldiers to the program, the battalion benefited the overall assessment for Empire Challenge. Firebird provided a new engineering design to fit the high demands of an ISR platform. The basic payload while fielding the Firebird aircraft was running four sensors at the same time; there were several variations that Firebird could operate and where easily interchangeable. When the sensor had to be swapped out, it would take no longer than 80 minutes and was not limited to being built around one specific sensor. The Firebird had the ability to switch from a manned to an unmanned asset. The gimbals were able to be operated by a ground station and controlled through the asset in Line of Sight and Beyond Line of Sight modes. This design allowed Firebird to be a multifunction aircraft in the true sense. The engineering of the aircraft takes a huge direction toward the ISR field and adapting to the various sensors that can be placed on an airborne asset. With limited time the Firebird made it possible to field a fully functional ISR platform. The Firebird incorporated many futuristic ideas in the asset. The most notable ability fielded was to take control of a Full Motion Video (FMV) sensor on a convoy. I operated the he first recorded field test; with a team of Firebird representatives and Army representatives to include Sgt. 1st Class Cogan and Lt. Col. John Watters, Firebird successfully controlled an FMV sensor in a vehicle. On the next day of testing, the Firebird team drove the vehicle to meet up with a Reserve unit to test the reliabilities of the system. Each vehicle in the convoy was able to pull the FMV feed I was operating. It was a great feeling to be on the convoy and operate the FMV sensor, knowing my analysis and sensor can potentially save lives. The Firebird team was able to make a very real and futuristic platform to support the wartime fighter. The military has an active role in building the future of the war fighter in ISR operations. Platforms such as Firebird may be the future for the military someday; but one thing is certain as the MI community continues to send the most professional and capable Soldiers to events such as Empire Challenge: we will be able to successfully support the wartime fighter.

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

Aircraft such as the Northrup Grumman Firebird offers a platform for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance operations. (Northrup Grumman release photo)

Empire challenge

By Sgt. Joshua Bremerman

204th MI Battalion standardization instructor

TRAINING

s the military contributing to the future war fighter in Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations? Empire Challenge was a joint training exercise where several organizations came together to further the high demand of ISR capabilities. A group of personnel from the 204th MI Battalion were assigned to the Firebird Program. The engineering design of Firebird was to give a futuristic way of building ISR platforms. The Firebird Program fielded several ideas to help support the wartime fighter. The 204th MI Battalion sent the most professional and knowledgeable Soldier to the Empire Challenge. Two groups of Soldiers were sent for the two week

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fielding exercise where they were attached to the Firebird Asset. Sgt. Daneion Shore and Spc. Richard Lund from C Company began the first week of training; Spc. William Vaughan from D Company and I conducted the second week of the exercise. The battalion sent various skill levels in order to give the Firebird Program the best possible feedback. The first group of Soldiers had little or no experience operating an ISR asset but were fully trained in the occupational specialty. This group had little or no difficulty with learning the platform, and after 12 operating hours was fully functional. The second group came with experience operating an ISR asset; the experience combined nearly 2,000 combat flight hours and five deployments in the Central Command region. This group of highly experienced operators took less two

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Course takes trainee outside comfort zone

By 2nd Lt. Ashley Bain

204th Military Intelligence Battalion

204th MI Battalion

TRAINING

ometimes stepping out of your comfort zone proves to be beneficial, not only for you but for your team as well. As a leader, it is valuable to gain an insight and have an understanding of your Soldiers' mission, capabilities and knowledge. As leader of the imagery platoon of Delta Company, I find that I am able to learn new skills daily that most of my fellow officers do not have an opportunity to experience. Professional development is crucial for any officer, and occasionally training opportunities arise that benefit career development for both officers and enlisted personnel. I had the opportunity last month to partake in a training session that proved to be a truly unique experience. I was enrolled into a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) class taught by instructors from the National Geospatial Agency (NGA) College. The term SAR was already familiar to an enlisted Soldier from my platoon also enrolled in the class. I immediately realized I would have a lot of catching up to do. The class is designed as a fundamental concepts course, allowing those needing a basis to develop understanding time to learn the concepts while providing those already with the knowledge an opportunity to refresh their skills. The instructors were well prepared for the different levels of knowledge within the 14-person class.

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Even though I was the only officer enrolled in the course, I was able to use the collective knowledge of the Soldiers around me. Utilizing the Soldiers' individual talents inspired a sense of confidence within me regarding the tasks they perform on a daily basis. By the conclusion of the course, I had developed a newly found respect for what my Soldiers accomplish daily to successfully meet mission criteria. Two more courses were offered after the fundamentals class, each one providing an opportunity to progress in individual knowledge further than the one prior. I was fortunate to attend these other two courses. Although I cannot talk specifics of the course curriculum, I can say that the instruction allowed me to gain knowledge that I may never have had the chance to learn. The class did not directly aid me in my own daily duties, but it did prove an excellent chance to develop an understanding of my Soldiers' responsibilities. As an officer, I believe one of my key duties is to look out for my Soldiers and set them up for success to the best of their abilities. While in the course I was able to network with individuals within the NGA from various imagery backgrounds. This rapport and support system I established has allowed me to give further resources to my Soldiers, should they ever need them. The course has helped me, as leader of an imagery platoon, to become a better resource for my Soldiers. The 204th MI Battalion continues to send Soldiers to the NGA College SAR training courses. Soldiers are required to possess a Top Secret clearance to attend the training. Classes are held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the New Mexico State University campus. Class length is four days, starting on Tuesday and concluding on Friday. Soldiers are required to take the fundamentals course before progressing to the other courses offered through NGA College. The battalion is able to send Soldiers based on seating availability and prior mission-specific training requirements. The SAR curriculum provides an excellent working basis to allow Soldiers to maintain skills within their Military Occupational Specialty that they may not be able to use on a daily basis.

ntelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) has honored a 204th Military Intelligence Battalion imagery analyst and standardization instructor with the Commander's Plaque for Operational Achievement. Sgt. Joshua Bremerman received the plaque at INSCOM headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Va., on July 21. As a standardization instructor, Bremerman conducts qualification and refresher training for nonrated crew members of the aircraft flown to perform intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) operations. "Nonrated crew members are individuals -- other than aviators who perform duties aboard an aircraft -- who are essential to the operation of the aircraft," Bremerman explained. The standardization instructor ensures crew members progress to their appropriate readiness level. He also acquires the training and the ability to train others within Central Command's, Southern Command's and Northern Command's respective areas of operation. Bremerman joined the Army in June 2007. Upon graduation from the imagery analyst course at Fort Huachuca, Ariz.,

INSCOM recognizes Soldier for operational achievement

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he received assignment to the 204th MI Battalion. Since then he deployed four times in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation New Dawn. In the last half of 2010, he flew 408 missions aboard an Airborne Reconnaissance Low-Multifunctional platform -- an aircraft with multiple intelligence capabilities, including the means of capturing images in various formats. After obtaining imagery of areas on the ground, Bremerman analyzed it, produced imagery-derived products, and provided initial phase and supplemental imagery reports for real-world targets. Consequently, he was instrumental in the dissemination of more than 100 images to Joint Task Force commanders. Bremerman also supported Operation Hunter Sentry, an ISR mission involving the Department of Homeland Security, Joint Task Force North and the 204th MI Battalion. "I am very honored to be receiving this award," Bremerman said of the commander's plaque. "But an operational achievement is marked by the caliber of Soldiers that the 204th produces. I may have been recognized as the recipient, but it is the entire battalion whose dedication and work ethic drives this mission."

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

By Gregory Ripps

470th MI Brigade welcomes Task Force Odin

TEAMWORK

206th/306th MI Battalions

470th Military Intelligence Brigade

he 470th Military Intelligence (MI) Brigade grew by two battalions April 29 when the 206th and 306th MI Battalions "activated" during a ceremony at Fort Hood. Approximately 140 Soldiers formed up in the small field next to their barracks while friends, family members and representatives of the brigade gathered to observe the proceedings. Col. Lamb, 21st Cavalry Brigade (Air Combat) commander, presided at the ceremony. With the activations, the 470th MI Brigade, headquartered at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, officially assumes administrative control of the two battalions, whose Soldiers were previously identified as members of Task Force ODIN. "Task Force ODIN has always been known as a unit of milestones, and today we mark another," said Lt. Col. Paul "Dave" Rogers, 306th MI Battalion commander. "This will not be the last milestone. The name has changed, but the mission remains the same." ODIN is an acronym for Observe, Detect, Identify and Neutralize. The task force was created in 2006 as an Army aviation battalion for conducting reconnaissance and surveillance and targeting "acquisition operations" to combat insurgent operators of improvised explosive devices in Iraq.

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Lt. Col. John Tussing (right), 206th Military Intelligence Battalion commander, completes uncasing the unit colors with the assistance of battalion Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Mason. (U.S. Army photos by Gregory Ripps) ODIN's major components include an Unmanned Aircraft System company and a C-12 fixed-wing aircraft company. In addition, the Aerial Reconnaissance Support Team, a platoon of analysts, provides real-time mission analysis of imagery gathered by the aircraft. Shortly after forming at Fort Hood, Task Force ODIN deployed to Iraq under the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade. Then, in 2007, the 21st Cavalry Brigade was tasked to receive, train and deploy ODIN troops. With the activation of the two battalions under the 470th MI Brigade, Task Force ODIN Soldiers take the last step in realigning under the Intelligence and Security Command. While under the 21st Cavalry, task force members completed fives deployments to Iraq and two to Afghanistan. Now the Soldiers are preparing to deploy overseas again, this time as members of the 206th and 306th MI Battalions, to Iraq and Afghanistan respectively. "I'd like to thank the 21st Cavalry Brigade for helping to man, equip and train our formation as we prepare to deploy," said Lt. Col. Jon Tussing, 206th MI Battalion commander. "We've got an important mission ahead of us, and we're ready to get after it."

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

Lt. Col. Paul "Dave" Rogers, 306th Military Intelligence Battalion commander, uncases the unit colors with the assistance of battalion Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph Depenhart.

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206th MI Battalion

206th MI Battalion assumes ODIN mission

he 206th Military Intelligence Battalion officially took over the Task Force ODIN mission at Contingency Operation Base Speicher, Tikrit, Iraq, June 14 with the uncasing of the battalion colors. The ceremony was attended by representatives of other units on the base, including the United States Forces-Iraq deputy chief of staff and the 4th Infantry Division commander. Lt. Col. John Tussing, 206th MI Battalion commander, spoke of the battalion's short but profound "road to war" and assured those in attendance that the 206th was more than ready to assume the mission. "I won't talk long, but I did want to tell you two things," Tussing said to battalion members. "The first is, I wanted to say `Thank you. Thank you for serving.' The other thing I wanted to say was `Congratulations.'" Battalion Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Mason later said, "As our battalion's colors were uncased during the ceremony, I could sense the environment fill with extreme pride from our Soldiers' piercing stares and stoic expressions that told the story of a well trained combat unit ready to do great things in support of the warfighter in Iraq." (Compiled from items in the 206th Military Intelligence Battalion newsletter.)

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Above: Lt. Col. John Tussing, 206th Military Intelligence Battalion commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Mason uncase the unit colors. Right: The command team stands proudly with the color guard after the uncasing.

306th MI Battalion

Redeployment experience

By Sgt. Bradlee Burton

306th Military Intelligence Battalion

CARING

n July 18, at approximately 9 p.m., the remaining Soldiers from 306th Military Intelligence Battalion ­ Afghanistan-2 arrived at Fort Hood, Texas. The 183 Soldiers of Task Force ODIN Afghanistan were "boots on the ground" for one year providing vital support to ground units across the country via aerial operations. At the homecoming ceremony, morale was high and it was evident in the eyes of the Soldiers. It was also evident in the eyes of the family members and friends who witnessed the experience of their return. Soldiers were welcomed home with signs, applause and plenty of attention. After a brief motivational speech from their battalion commander, the Soldiers were reunited with their families and friends for an overdue reception. Although the ceremony was seamless, there was much preparation involved in the group's return. Echo Company took the responsibility of delegating and completing significant arrangements back home. Echo Company also teamed up with members of the Family Readiness Group (FRG) to provide a

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comfortable homecoming for these Soldiers. Special attention was given to the barracks so even the Soldiers who were not returning to a house were still returning to a home. The FRG welcomed the Soldiers who returned to the barracks by making "welcome home" bags that included personal hygiene items, bottles of water, sports drinks and snacks. These Soldiers looked forward to a much-deserved block leave; to relax and spend time with loved ones. Since the unit is designated as a task force, the Soldiers must say "goodbye" to one another upon returning from their leave, before they advance to their next duty assignment. Some Soldiers may stay on Fort Hood, and others will move on to different duty stations. No matter where these Soldiers serve, the bond among them will never be broken. Yet again, we are indebted to a group of people who left as Soldiers and returned as heroes.

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT

306th MI Battalion

Principles create successful unit

By Pfc. Shante Reed

306th Military Intelligence Battalion

rust, as defined in Merriam-Webster, is the "reliance of character ability, strength, and truth of someone or something." Trust is the key to a unit, if you cannot trust your chain of command to help or guide you in a situation, then who can you trust? Putting trust in your supervisors, platoon sergeant, or even your first sergeant and commander means that you as a Soldier believe that they would not lead you in the wrong direction -- which may lead to destruction. Discipline, as defined in Merriam-Webster, is the "training that corrects, molds, or perfects the mental faculties or moral character." Discipline comes down from the noncommissioned officer to the Soldier, if there is no form of discipline in a unit then you will have a unit that is uncontrollable. If there is no respect between the NCO and the Soldier then the unit could not function because we as Soldiers are the driving force that makes the unit functional and successful, whether it is a controlled environment or a unit that is substandard. Fitness, as defined in Merriam-Webster, is a "condition of being sound in body." This can be physical, mental, or spiritual. A Soldier needs to be fit in all of these aspects. If a Soldier is not physically fit to complete a task, it not only can put them in danger but it can also put the people with them in danger as well. That's why it is important to participate in PT with 100 percent effort and on your personal time to make sure that you are keeping up with the standards, not only for the Army but for yourself also. Being mentally fit is inherently important because if you do not have the mental capabilities to handle the situation at hand then how can you help a fellow Soldier cope the stressors of being a Soldier? Last but not least, being spiritually fit will help you in the future because religion and faith helps to keep a Soldier's mind at peace and focused on the mission. How the 306th Military Intelligence Battalion displays these key points are solely through dedication and diligence displayed when completing the many roles we are tasked to do. It also involves the movement of deploying over 200 Soldiers to combat and redeploying over 180 Soldiers safely and soundly. Other tasks include,

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but are not limited to, funeral honors, color guard, or even the simplest tasks such as doing police call around our building. During these taskings, there is a high call for disciplines displayed as you, a Soldier, are representing the United States Army. Staff Sgt. Nathan Mendoza believes that a successful unit has to have trust within the leadership. He is quoted as saying, "If there is no trust within the leadership then we as NCOs have failed to convey that we care about the situation our Soldiers are going through. Physically, Soldiers and leaders alike must maintain physical fitness in order to be prepared for any mission or task that is handed down. Mentally, Soldiers within our ranks must maintain their composure to filter the many stressors of our unit including deployment, re-deployment, and maintaining a functional rear detachment to receive returning Soldiers and assist outgoing Soldiers." Staff Sgt. James Berry said, "Trust is the root of respect. If a Soldier respects their NCOs, they will never question the authority of their leaders and will have faith that their leaders will not steer them into adverse situations. Discipline's importance is controlled more by the mission description than Army doctrine." Berry uses the example, "Would you want your finance clerk to behave as an infantry squad leader?" Yet discipline plays a vital role in completing tasks without hesitation. It is a delicate balance between motivation and overdrive. Fitness has to include mental, physical, and spiritual as all three are required for a Soldier to remain well rounded. Trust, discipline, and fitness each play an essential role in any unit. Without these three key points, a unit will not stand up against the turmoil that may arise in the future. This would result in depleted unit capabilities and the lack of mission readiness. Future commands will be able to assume the control of the unit with little or no effort when all these tenets are equally addressed and constantly reviewed for improvement. As the unit focuses its changes, so should the unit's efforts to maintain its structure and effectiveness.

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338th MI Battalion changes commander

By Sgt. Maj. Ellen Doyle

338th MI Battalion sergeant major

338th MI Battalion (USAR)

CARING

he 338th Military Intelligence Battalion (U.S. Army Reserve) held a change of command ceremony at Camp Bullis June 4, at which time Lt. Col. Nelson Irizarry relinquished command to Maj. Jay P. Otken. Col. Jim Lee, the 470th MI Brigade commander at the time, officiated at the ceremony for the brigade's subordinate battalion during its weekend Battle Drill Assembly. The 338th MI Battalion numbers approximately 130 Army Reservists and draws from a large area with A Company in Shoreham, N.Y., B Company in Lawrence, Kans., and the headquarters and headquarters detachment located at Camp Bullis. These Soldiers deploy individually or incrementally to support

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brigade intelligence missions, chiefly in support of U.S. Army South. The 338th MI Battalion is operationally aligned to the 470th MI Brigade. "When you put on your uniform, you represent the U.S. Army," Lee reminded the Reservists who gathered in the camp's vintage theater. "You represent this great nation [whose Soldiers] are deployed in over 40 other nations." In emphasizing the important role Reservists play, Lee also pointed out that, of 300 million U.S. citizens, less than 1 percent belong to the military "that protects their freedom and liberty." Irizarry leaves the 338th MI Battalion to attend the International War College. Otken, the incoming commander whom Lee described as well qualified and possessing "boundless energy," discussed the importance of Selfless Service. "I just want you to think about the Army value of Selfless Service and what it means to you," said Otken. "Army Reservists work a lot of nights and weekends, and this is a part of Selfless Service and what we will need to continue to remember as we focus on our mission and prepare for the future."

Lt. Col. Nelson Irizarry addresses the 338th Military Intelligence Battalion as its outgoing commander. (Photos by Gregory Ripps)

Maj. Jay Otken (left) receives the colors of the 338th Military Intelligence Battalion from Col. Jim Lee, 470th MI Brigade commander, symbolically accepting command of the battalion. The change of command took place at Camp Bullis June 4

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

717th MI Battalion

By Lt. Col. James C. "Jamey" Royse

Set the next Soldier up for success

717th Military Intelligence Battalion commander

ransitions in the U.S. Army are much discussed. We make deliberate plans to transition responsibility in combat operations from one unit to the next. Because of the Army's deployment tempo in the past 10 years, most Soldiers are familiar with this concept of the "right seat, left seat." The unique nature of the 717th MI Battalion and others like ours in the national cryptologic enterprise is that no new unit replaces ours after a year of continuous operations so that we can redeploy for a couple of years to re-set, train and certify to deploy again for another year of continuous operations. We are continuously available and employed worldwide by our operational headquarters in our daily intelligence production mission in support of national intelligence, national defense, and homeland security. Our transitions occur one Soldier at a time as individuals arrive and depart. Our mission capacity suffers only when the rate of arrivals falls too far below the rate of departures for Soldiers performing our sensitive, toppriority, national intelligence missions. We overcame this kind of deficit in 2010 and will manage low-density personnel shortfalls to ensure future mission success. The lack of qualified Soldiers for our missions is no longer a concern. The only way our mission will suffer now is if we fail to meet our individual obligations as leaders, sponsors, mentors, and battle buddies to effectively transition those who eventually arrive to take our place in this formation. The ability of our Soldiers to integrate new teammates and continue the tradition of excellence in the Alamo Station battalion hinges on each of us doing our part to set the next Soldier up for success. Every list of personal goals for any position I have in the Army includes setting the next officer up for success. You should do this as well. It is a professional obligation to ensure the continued success of the mission and, more important, the success of the Soldiers we lead or work alongside. The better we do this, the easier it is for that Soldier to contribute to mission accomplishment. This also forms the bond of trust and cohesion from the outset of the Soldier's assignment. Sponsors play their part by helping the new Soldier (and family) become familiar with their new environment and get to know their new unit. Mentors help by putting the Soldier on the path to professional success and developing habits of excellence by example and assistance. Leaders do their part by instilling knowledge of standards to ensure the new Soldier adheres to unit standards of training, discipline, and ethical

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CARING

behavior and knows where to turn for assistance. When we do this well it sets our newest unit members up for success. Otherwise, we place newly arrived Soldiers at risk to fall short of the standard. Gen. Martin Dempsey is right that the Army is "really good." We stay that way only by making our unit and our small corner of the Army our daily focus and by ensuring that whoever falls in to take our place can do the same -- as simply as moving from the right seat to the left seat to continue the mission. As I write this, I know I will depart our unit within the next month. By the time you read it I may very well be hard at work in my new assignment at the V Corps G2 shop in Wiesbaden, Germany. Each of my remaining days in this assignment will continue with the same intensity to ensure two things: that I set your next commander up for success, and that I enable you to get better every day. You have achieved a vision of professional Soldiers and civilians as part of a joint interagency and multinational team who successfully execute signals intelligence and computer network operations that reduce uncertainty for decision-makers and commanders and develop opportunities for operations against our nation's enemies and threats to homeland security. With no doubt in my professional estimate and no ambivalence in my personal admiration, I am assured that the Soldiers and civilians who are the 717th MI Battalion and those who arrive in months and years to come will continue to enjoy the kind of success for which this unit is known. We were honored in 2010 as part of National Security Agency/ Central Security Service Texas by being awarded the Travis Trophy from the Director of NSA for the best cryptologic site in the enterprise. Our Low Level Voice Intercept teams were recognized with the Director's Team Excellence Award for demonstrating our unit's ability to adapt as SIGINT warriors. Individual awards also abounded in every category. Be proud of these accomplishments, but know they rest on the shoulders of disciplined professionals who trusted each other and their chain of command to accomplish the mission and take care of each other. The skyward vector of this unit in every aspect is a testament to the leadership and professional excellence of each of our Soldiers. This can only continue if each of us does our small part to ensure the next Soldier to take our seat is ready to meet the challenges of an uncertain future. Truth for victory! Knowledge for action!

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717th MI Battalion

By Spc. Natalie Sampson

717th MI Battalion command changes

TEAMWORK

470th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

ith the grounds of the historic Alamo as the setting, command of the 717th Military Intelligence Battalion passed from Lt. Col. James Royse to Lt. Col. Joseph Kushner July 28 in a ceremony that included the traditional passing of the unit colors. Col. Pierre Gervais, commander of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade, based at Fort Sam Houston, presided at the ceremony, which was attended by distinguished guests, friends and family, and observed by curious tourists visiting the famous landmark. Troops from the subordinate battalion's Headquarters and Headquarters Company, A Company and B Company comprised a formation flanking the 717th's Color Guard. They represented the approximately 350 Soldiers who comprise the signals intelligence battalion headquartered on the Lackland Air Force Base Annex. "I have been persistently impressed by the Soldiers and leaders in this battalion," said Gervais. "They are ready, tough, smart and incredibly talented." After the invocation, the command team, led by Gervais as reviewing officer, inspected the troops. Following the singing of the national anthem, the colors were passed to signify the official change of command from the outgoing to the incoming commander. In his farewell speech, Royse praised the Alamo Station unit by highlighting their contributions to the community and their individual and collective accomplishments and accolades. "They improved mission effectiveness through deliberate mentorship, a refined training and education model, and a focus on rapidly helping Soldiers overcome deficiencies and demonstrate their talent and potential," he said. "Individually, our Soldiers are consistently selected as the best Soldiers, NCOs and officers in boards and competitions. ... "Our Low Level Voice Intercept [LLVI] teams ... were awarded our Director's Team Award for 2010 for learning and then executing a tactical mission set, [recently] deployed in support of special forces and an infantry brigade in Southern Afghanistan,"

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Lt. Col. Joseph Kushner (left) receives the colors of the 717th Military Intelligence Battalion from Col. Pierre Gervais, 470th MI Brigade commander, signifying the battalion's change of command. (U.S. Army photo by Gregory Ripps) Royse continued as he looked out into the formation. "Our LLVI team with the 101st Infantry Division was also part of the platoon that won the Director's Cup for a small unit." The unit traces its lineage to Monitor Station One, established in 1942. After the field station relocated to San Antonio in 1973, the unit obtained permission the following year from the Daughters of the Republic of Texas to designate itself as the Alamo Station. The battalion continues to identify with the Alamo and incorporates the famous façade in its unit insignia. "It has been my privilege to serve the Soldiers of this battalion," said Royse, who will move on to an assignment in Germany. "I have witnessed their courage, selflessness and teamwork ... seen them band together to shoulder each others' burdens and celebrate triumphs. They impressed me daily but never surprised me because I understand their enormous potential." As customary for incoming commanders, Kushner's comments were brief. "It's an honor and a privilege to serve as your commander," he said.

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Barbarian Fury shows B Company at its best

By Sgt. Bonifield

B Company

717th MI Battalion

TEAMWORK / TRAINING

ravo Company, 717th MI Battalion, conducted its quarterly training exercise, Barbarian Fury, on Lackland Air Force Base June 11 within the Air Force chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) and improvised explosive device (IED) training area. This training event showed the Bravo Company Barbarians at their best. Motivation shown on all of their faces as they encountered the various demanding and arduous scenarios. This Barbarian Fury was conducted in the inhospitable heat and humidity of the San Antonio area. These conditions tested the endurance of our Soldiers during an evaluated unit training event. However, these conditions did not hinder the ability of Soldiers to complete three lanes that contained realistic combat scenarios. The three lanes were not only a culmination of a year of training but also an excellent team building and leadership event. Bravo Company not only had to master individual tasks but had to work as a team to be successful. The exercise was conducted at the platoon level where the Soldiers and their leaders were challenged and evaluated together. Each platoon and squad was responsible for their own preparation and training. Junior leaders were responsible for the training and team building of their Soldiers. Although the day was hot and the tasks complex, what showed was a year of training and mentoring. It was the junior leader that had to have the discipline to conduct physical training to ensure that the Soldiers were physically able to complete the tasks. The regular Sergeant's Time Training taught Soldiers how to complete each task and allowed practice and refinement of those skills. Most of all, leaders and Soldiers had the confidence in each other that resulted in the success of the event. The first challenge was to react to an IED and perform first aid and coordinate medical evacuation of a casualty. The Soldiers completed tasks that allowed reporting of unexploded ordnance, sending of Size, Activity, Location, Unit, Time and Equipment reports and Situation reports, and removing casualties from the battlefield. Soldiers had to be fit and work as a team to complete the tasks. Leaders had to trust their subordinates would make the correct decisions if they became the casualty. Leaders had to instill the discipline to all the members of their unit to accomplish the tasks in their absence. This lane built confidence that the Soldiers could survive some of the most deadly and chaotic situations of a combat zone. Lane two tested Bravo Company Soldiers on combat outpost operations. Conducting vehicle searches, reacting to indirect fire, and performing base security was the main focus. The forward operating base is one of the few places that Soldiers can rest in a combat zone, but it offers its own challenges. Soldiers have to trust in the discipline of the members of their team so they prepare for the next mission. The tasks focused on security and reacting to attacks. Overall, the Barbarian Soldiers showed quick reaction to indirect fire and were quick to maintain combat outpost security even when the worst was placed in front of them.

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In the third and last lane of Barbarian Fury, Soldiers faced a confrontation with the enemy involving direct fire. Each member of the team had to be physically and mentally fit to stay alert in a CBRN environment with hostile forces present. The scenario then moved on to a complex ambush that tested their ability to coordinate a response and work as a team. Even as they were successful in a combat action, their mission was not yet complete. Soldiers had to secure the area and assess the enemy casualties and prisoners by searching them for items of intelligence value or suspicious equipment. The sense of urgency and efficiency in which Bravo Company Soldiers executed lane three showed a high level of discipline and fitness that was the result of a year of preparation and training. Barbarian Fury was a complete success in showing Bravo Company's attention to detail and determination to complete the mission. Even throughout the worst that was presented to them, they actively presented strict discipline through intense concentration of both how to accomplish the mission and survive the environment. The Barbarian Soldiers proved themselves physically fit to handle even the most demanding tasks that required them to use every muscle in their bodies to accomplish the mission. Bravo Barbarians, trained for battle, ready for war.

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401st MI Company

By Capt. David Sinclair

History as a guide to the future

CARING

401st Military Intelligence Company commander

s a new commander, I find myself spending most of my time learning about the people in my company and what jobs each of them do. Once I get to know them all, I hope to gain a deeper understanding of how military intelligence supports our national defense. To my good fortune, the Soldiers and civilians who call the 401st MI Company home hail from across the MI community ­ from HUMINTers to imagery analysts, linguists and counterintelligence agents, SIGINTers of various stripes, and the indispensable all-source analysts. When all their efforts are properly synchronized, the result is high-quality, relevant, actionable intelligence that supports boots on the ground. By becoming expert in current operations, we intelligence professionals can better anticipate and plan for future operating environments. This in fact goes to the core of what intelligence is supposed to do: know the battlefield and predict the opponent's moves. But doing that successfully in the real world is a daunting task. Our Army's leaders have recently directed us to reflect upon the profession of arms and its key attributes: expertise, trust, leadership, character and duty. By studying history, we can better discern what makes the profession of military intelligence unique, fascinating and vitally important. Though signals intelligence (SIGINT) today is one of the most technologically advanced disciplines on the planet, its origins lay in antiquity, when in addition to early cryptographic methods such as the Greek scytale, one technique involved tattooing a message onto the shaved head of a courier, then waiting until his hair grew back before sending him on his journey. Today messages are hidden in online forums and even images, but the principle is the same. The quandary of secure communications has remained the same for millennia ­ how to send messages easily read by the planned recipient but indecipherable to others in transit. SIGINT successes are legendary, from contributing to America's entrance in World

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War I -- when intercepting the Zimmerman telegram led to war with Germany ­ to turning the tides of war ­ when breaking Japanese codes led to success at the Battle of Midway. Harriet Tubman is rightly remembered as a great abolitionist who rescued scores of slaves through the Underground Railroad. But her role as a Union spy in the Civil War is less known. The same tactics, techniques and procedures she used to ferry men, women and children north into freedom were invaluable when working behind enemy lines. She scouted areas in South Carolina, mapped unfamiliar terrain, and developed sources for information that helped lead to battlefield successes for the U.S. Army. She was trusted to establish safe houses across the South and showed character by time and again risking her own life to help others, all while never forgetting to bring valuable intelligence back to military leaders who put it to great use. Failures in intelligence analysis often make the news, but major successes do happen. They just seem so obvious after the fact. In the lead-up to the first Gulf War, Saddam Hussein's vaunted million-man army seemed to most external observers to present a considerable challenge to the U.S. military and its allies. The battle-tested Iraqis had Scud ballistic missiles, chemical weapons and a vast array of air and ground defensive weapons systems bought from the USSR. Yet U.S. intelligence studied the Iraqi military and assessed its weaknesses. So before any U.S. Soldiers crossed the berm from Saudi Arabia, Allied aircraft pounded Iraqi C2 nodes and logistics lines for six weeks with up to 2,500 sorties a day, destroying the Iraqi Army as an effective fighting force. It then took just 100 hours for ground operations to liberate Kuwait and end the war. These examples are but a few of the amazing intelligence exploits that the past can teach us about the same type of work we continue today. By studying what came before, we become better professionals, better Soldiers and better leaders.

Brigade offers new beginnings

By Sgt. Joshua Postma TRAINING Analysis and Control Element, Signals Intelligence he 470th Military Intelligence Brigade is my third assigned unit in the military. As my third unit, the 470th presented me with multiple opportunities for new beginnings, everything from finding and moving into my family's first actual home -- as opposed to an Army-provided apartment -- to becoming a noncommissioned officer to new

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Soldiers. At every level, the Soldiers of the 470th MI Brigade have helped to make the transition into the unit as painless as possible. In particular, the Soldiers of the 401st MI Company went out of their way repeatedly to assist in the process. The 470th is also the beginning of my career as an NCO and has been an outstanding place to be an NCO. The unit has afforded me the chance to lead Soldiers as well as to teach new Soldiers from my own experiences. The tools available to an NCO here with the 470th make instruction one of the simplest responsibilities of an NCO's duties. Recently I attended marksmanship training with several other Soldiers utilizing (Continued on next page)

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Warrant brings a fresh start

By Chief Warrant Officer-2 Zachary Smith

Officer in Charge, Analysis and Control Element Signals Intelligence Fusion

401st MI Company

CARING

hoosing to become a warrant officer was a decision that was nearly seven years in the making. In the summer of 2000, I felt as though I was really going nowhere. I was working for my alma mater as a resident director and taking classes in search of something to point me in a new direction. I had graduated with a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1996 but had never really used it. So one day I made a decision: I walked into the recruiting station in Nampa, Idaho, to see about becoming an aviation warrant officer. The recruiter must have seen me coming from miles down the road. He was chomping at the bit to get me to sign along the dotted line. He promptly informed me that, without any prior experience, it was highly unlikely that I would be able to become an aviation warrant. So I asked about officer candidate school, but he quickly convinced me that wouldn't be in my best interest and that it would be much better to come in enlisted. So I did just that; I entered the delayed entry program as a 98X and would become either a signals intelligence (SIGINT) analyst or voice interceptor upon completion of my language training at the Defense Language Institute (DLI). Thus began the first steps for me and my family in our life in the military. I graduated basic training Sept. 14, 2001, three days after 9/11. In 2003, I graduated from the Korean school at DLI, and the Army promptly made me a 98C Signals Intelligence Analyst. At first I was disappointed, but honestly, it has been for the best. The Army has allotted me many different opportunities I never would have dreamed possible for a Military Intelligence Soldier. 2007 was probably the most rewarding and stressful year of my life. In only a matter of five months I graduated the Static Line Jump Masters course, led a Special Operations Team-Alpha (SOT-A) through the five-week Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat (Continued from previous page) the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST). At the completion of the exercise, I had a conversation with the facility operators and was pleasantly surprised with the simplicity and ease of scheduling an EST exercise. One of the key aspects of being a Soldier is working with other Soldiers. One of the perks of Army service is the chance to work with new Soldiers every two to four years. The 470th offers an opportunity for all incoming personnel to forge new relationships both personally and professionally. Among these relationships is that of Soldier and superior. The 470th has an outstanding pool of leaders from its NCOs to its warrant officers and all the way through the brigade staff. The author has personally experienced leadership at all levels working on his behalf to solve some very pressing issues and that came up in some cases with very little notice.

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Course with each member of the team receiving a first-time go in each event, and the year culminated in level C of Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape training at Fort Rucker, Ala., the most mentally challenging school I have ever had the privilege to attend. Each school was a new beginning, a new challenge. Never in my wildest dreams would I have imagined stepping off into nothingness from the back of a CH-47 aircraft with 12 parachuteequipped Soldiers in tow as I shout, "Follow me!" But the Army gave me that chance. If there is one thing I have learned over and over again in my Army career, it's that every few years it's time for a new beginning. So after two deployments to Iraq, one as a member of SOT-A 131 and the other as the Senior SIGINT analyst for B Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (SFG) (A), it was time for me to take the next step in my career. I applied and was selected to be a warrant officer in the United States Army, I still remember the day I received the welcome letter from Chief Warrant Officer-5 Paul O'Meara, the senior warrant officer of the Military Intelligence Corps. Two months later I received my Request for Orders and was assigned to the 470th MI Brigade at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Of all places, it had to be Texas. In summer 2009 my family and I moved half way across the country to San Antonio, and it has been one of the greatest experiences of our lives. I am so thankful that the 401st MI Company was my first assignment as a warrant officer; I couldn't have asked for better mentors than the senior warrants we have here in this brigade. In just a little over a month from now, I will move my family across this great nation of ours once again in search of another new beginning. This time I return to 1st SFG (A) at Fort Lewis, Wash., as the senior SIGINT warrant for the group. I take with me the lessons I have learned here at the 401st MI Company, 470th MI Brigade, my first assignment as a warrant officer. I can hardly wait to see what this new beginning has in store for us! Fort Sam Houston is called "America's Biggest Small Town" and has much to offer Soldiers in terms of new experiences. So much of a unit's character comes from the area in which it resides, and the 470th is no different in that it provides Soldiers with an outstanding chance to experience many cultures and traditions within its ranks. The unit is in many ways a scale model of the "melting pot" that the United States has always prided itself upon being, and much of the culture contained therein is supported by the city around it. San Antonio offers historic sites, a zoo, theme parks including one of the few Sea Worlds in the country and a world-famous water park among other attractions -- although this writer is still looking for the definitive barbecue restaurant in town. Even a day out on the River Walk offers a plethora of potentially new experiences. For a Soldier of the 470th MI Brigade, all this is available. So look around, reach out and experience the new beginnings that the 470th offers.

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HQ and HQ Detachment

Some enlisted Soldiers of the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment play football (above) while others try their hands at fishing together as part of their team building. (Photos by Sgt. Dwayne Hardy)

TEAMWORK

Enlisted Team building

Above: First Sgt. Heather Green (right) mentors Soldiers on the importance of team building. Right: Enlisted Soldiers socialize at Salado Park June 30.

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DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT / FITNESS

Refocusing the azimuth

By Captain Gina Aviles

Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment commander

HQ and HQ Detachment

"A professional force is a well trained force. As one of my mentors used to tell me, sometimes because of competing priorities you have to `fight to train.' We're counting on Army leaders to take the [unit training and leader development] principles . . . and apply them with the same passion and enthusiasm they have exhibited in our recent conflicts to keep us the well trained, versatile force we must be for the Nation." -- General Martin E. Dempsey, FM 7-0: Training Units and Developing Leaders For Full Spectrum Operations rust, Discipline, Fitness: These three guiding principles lay the foundation for the tenets of the Army's future training and leader development agenda. In a previous edition of Griffin Chronicles I described a new era of `persistent conflict' where the next generation of leadership will be charged with embracing and implementing counterinsurgency doctrine and adapting to the emerging threats to American interests worldwide. I described how "GWOT leaders" will operate with a common operational picture focused on economies, governments, public works, reconstruction, security, and nation building in lieu of kinetic operations of a previous generation; concepts that are all second nature to the many of us who came of age as leaders engaged at the tactical level in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. What I failed to mention was `how' we would move forward into a new era of the modern military. In keeping with the "New Beginnings" theme of this installment of Griffin Chronicles, it is appropriate to visit the tenets of trust, discipline, and fitness as they apply to our current mission set. This mission of a Brigade Headquarters element is often thankless and unglamorous. However, the work the Soldiers on the staff perform is vital to the mission of the unit and subordinate battalions. Conducting command and control; sustaining the headquarters functions logistically and administratively; performing individual, team, and unit deployments, and protecting the force is no small feat and requires professionalism, devotion to duty, technical expertise in highly specialized areas, and teamwork. Accomplishing brigade priorities while maintaining individual Soldier Warrior Tasks and Drills, weapons qualification, physical fitness requirements, and mandatory training requires an intricate balance of planning, resourcing, executing and assessing training. Trust is one of the most critical elements of effective leadership. Within the scope of the brigade headquarters, I observe trust displayed primarily in three ways: competence, leadership and communication. Competence in my mind is the willingness to keep learning, keep teaching, keep making decisions, and keep empowering others to make decisions. I see leadership as the ability to manage expectations, delegate authority, keeping one's word, and remaining consistent and fair. Key communication characteristics include the willingness to tell the truth, admit mistakes, and be willing to give and receive honest and respectful feedback. I intentionally left out mention of rank or experience requirements. These attributes are easily observed by anyone from junior enlisted to senior officer. The level of responsibility and authority may differ

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according to rank structure but the key attributes related to competence, leadership, and communication are easily observed by everyone alike. I charge each of you to embrace these attributes in order to build trust among individuals, teams, sections, and units. Trust is the foundation of any effective organization. The word "discipline" has its roots in the Latin word discere, which means to learn. The discipline to learn and perform at one's best is at the core of leader development. In another previous edition of the Griffin Chronicles we talked about Soldiers being our strongest link. Are your Soldiers performing to their maximum potential? Have you talked to your Soldier about his/her career progression or desire to attend civilian schooling? Have you considered another degree or researched ways to make improve your technical expertise or leadership tactics, techniques and procedures? Discipline does not always need to be used in the context of dealing with poor performers. I ask each of you to re-think how we view discipline and focus on standards required to improve Soldiers' capabilities as well as your own. Strong Soldiers and leaders are hallmarks of the well trained and versatile force necessary for the future security of our Nation. Fitness is our ethos as Soldiers. A recent article in Army Times discusses being fit in today's military refers to more than just being physically fit. It applies to a more holistic concept of general well being that is vital to a resilient military force. Mental, emotional, family, and a sense of community are just as important as physical fitness. Well rounded service members are vital to mission effectiveness. As leaders, we inherently understand this concept; however, implementing it is sometimes more challenging. We often become consumed with the immediate stressor in front of us and take a reactive approach. It is important to impress upon our Soldiers and leaders (and of course, ourselves) that a more proactive and balanced approach to well being will help us deal with those stressors; whether in the heat of battle, at the office, or at home; more effectively and efficiently while increasing the quality of our lives and the quality of our mission accomplishment. Pay attention to your battle buddy and take care of him/her. Some day the favor will be returned. Trust, discipline, and fitness are the foundation for an effective leadership development program which will lay the framework for an effective training plan. We must reframe the way we think about, plan, resource, execute, and assess training as we transition to a more modern military. Ten years of war has created a significant strain on the Army, units, and individual Soldiers. We should be proud of our past accomplishments but never be complacent in past victories. It's time to refocus the azimuth. I ask each of you from junior enlisted Soldier to senior officer to focus on the tenants of trust, discipline, and fitness as they apply to you, your battle buddy, your team, your section, and your unit and move forward into the future; a future focused on relevant and rigorous training that will sustain our Army through another decade of war if called upon.

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Equal Opportunity

Left: Chief Warrant Officer 2 Chad Brown appears to enjoy himself after volunteering to perform an impromptu hula dance number. Above right: Members of Jones and Korean Dance Group perform a traditional Korean dance. (Photos by Spc. Natalie Sampson)

Brigade embraces both celebration, remembrance

By Sgt. 1st Class Mina Vasquez

470th Military Intelligence Brigade equal opportunity adviser

CARING / TEAMWORK

Right: Mimi Yu, associate director of the East Asian Institute at the University of Texas in San Antonio, addresses "Diversity, Leadership, Empowerment and Beyond." (Photo by Gregory Ripps)

uring the second quarter of the calendar year, the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade observed two events: Holocaust Days of Remembrance and Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. This year's theme for the Holocaust Days of Remembrance was "Justice and Accountability in the Face of Genocide: What Have We Learned?" The 65th anniversary of the verdicts at the first Nuremberg trial, and the 50th anniversary of the trial of Adolf Eichmann occurred this year. These anniversaries have formed a new understanding of justice as a tool for seeking accountability for those who commit genocide. The brigade was educated during the commemoration by a Holocaust survivor from Poland who gave a detailed description of her experience as a teenager during the Holocaust. May was also designated as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month which 470th MI Brigade hosted the installation event. The event included dancers from Korea and Hawaii; there was also a demonstration of martial arts. The guest speaker outlined the role that Asian Pacific Americans have played in the military. Food samples from Thailand, Korea, Hawaii and Japan were available for the attendees of the event.

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Left: Jones and Traditional Korean Dance studio use colorful drums in a booming finale. Below: Jennifer Cox, a third degree black belt with Kuk Sool Won, offers a demonstration in Korean traditional martial art with knives. (Photos by Gregory Ripps

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Workshops focus on strengthening marriage, family, ministry teams

By Chaplain (Maj.) Gregory Jackson

470th Military Intelligence Brigade chaplain

Ministry

CARING

e have had a productive few months as a Unit Ministry Team. In May we finished our Marriage 101 classes. This workshop involved marriage training from the book "Love and Respect," which was an eyeopening book a couple needs to not only be loved, but respected in a relationship. We offered six sessions culminating with a financial class given by a financial planner that works with Army Community Services. This was a very productive workshop that our Unit Ministry Team will look toward doing again in the fall. May was also geared toward our battalion Unit Ministry Teams. We included our Unit Ministry Training by inviting the families to come along. The training was located on a 500-acre ranch through which the Guadelupe River runs. During this training we focused on conflict resolution and team building, for not only for the Unit Ministry teams but also for the spouses. One thing

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I have found is that couples are so busy that they fail to take time communicating with each other in a relaxing environment. To allow our families to be involved with our teambuilding events, child care was offered for those that wanted to participate but who needed someone to watch their children. If we take care of our families, and get them on the right track, this will pay large dividends for our military. This will truly make our Army "Army Strong." This particular weekend was very successful because it allowed our great battalion Unit Ministry Teams an opportunity to get away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, participate in some good training, and work together as a team. This event will hopefully continue as part of our Unit Ministry Team training.

Equal Opportunity training takes added dimension

201st MI Battalion

By Sgt. Jose Martinez

TRAINING / CARING

lpha Company, 201st Military Intelligence Battalion, conducted its quarterly Equal Opportunity training in a very unique way June 6. Spearheaded by Staff Sgt. Kenton Haase, Soldiers took to the Barshop Jewish Community Center of San Antonio. In an octagonal room on the second floor of the community center, Soldiers found themselves surrounded by paneled walls of pictures, newspaper articles and quotations from world leaders and other well known people of the era. The panels provided a visually stunning time-line depicting the Holocaust from Adolph Hitler's rise to power in 1933 until Germany's final defeat 12 years later. In this room replete with history, Soldiers had the opportunity to listen to the community center's docent, Gene Festa, a Holocaust subject matter expert and long-time educator. Mr. Festa, with his great depth of knowledge and personal experience studying abroad, gave Alpha Company Soldiers a different and more personal perspective of the events of the Holocaust and how those terrible events could be avoided in the future if individuals were simply more accepting of one another. Finally, Alpha Company Soldiers were treated to a once ina-lifetime opportunity to hear Rose Williams speak. A Holocaust survivor, she is one of only three people in San Antonio who still

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(Photo by Staff Sgt. Frank Wilkes) speaks to public audiences about her personal experiences and the atrocities perpetrated against Europe's Jewish population during World War II. Recalling each day in detail, Mrs. Williams described the horrors she witnessed and how it felt to be a prisoner at the Auschwitz Concentration Camp. She ended on a happy note by talking about her reunion with siblings she thought had died and her camp's liberation by Allied forces. Her account was powerful and touched every Alpha Company Soldier present that day.

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Safety

Learning alcohol's effect on driving

Driver Capt. Alberto Frias squashes an innocent bystander cone as he attempts to maneuver a simple obstacle course while wearing "beer goggles." Both he and passenger Staff Sgt. David Waren belong to the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade, which sponsored the demonstration during Fort Sam Houston's Summer Safety Day, June 22. The goggles simulate what a driver sees after consuming even a modest amount of alcohol.

TRAINING

Learning motorcycle safety by riding

Left: Capt. Lauren Nowak receives a few tips on motorcycle upkeep from Sgt. 1st Class David Zannini at the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion's quarterly Motorcycle Safety Day/Ride, July 15. Below: Motorcyclists from the 470th MI Brigade, accompanied by members of the American Legion Riders, Post 593, begin a 135-mile trip to Bandera and back to Fort Sam Houston via Converse. (Photos by Gregory Ripps)

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Force Protection

FPD conference takes `enterprise' approach

By Robert Rendon

470th Military Intelligence Brigade Military Intelligence Civilian Excepted Career Program senior adviser

TRAINING

he 470th Military Intelligence Brigade hosted the annual Latin American Force Protection Detachment (FPD) Conference in Fajardo, Puerto, Rico, April 3-7. The theme was "Enterprise Perspectives on Regional Force Protection." The conference provided the perfect venue for the Army, Navy, Air Force, U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), Transportation Command, Special Operations Command, Defense Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence Center, U.S. Intelligence and Security Command, U.S. Embassy Military Group, Regional Security Offices, and senior Department of Defense officials, and other DOD and U.S. government representatives to convene and debate operations and support strategies. Objectives for the SOUTHCOM FPD community of interest were to discuss and implement best business practices, identify common objectives and processes, and establish requirements and force providing solutions. Most importantly, the conference allowed our FPD personnel, dispersed across the SOUTHCOM Area of Responsibility (AOR) to put a voice to their concerns and ideas, and a face on that voice. In the end, the FPD network was significantly enhanced, which in turn will provide tangible results in the mission to provide counterintelligence support to force protection for thousands of DOD forces transiting Latin America. Though hosted by the Brigade, the conference was not Service specific. The brigade is uniquely positioned and able to host such an event, acting as the executive agent for the largest number of FPDs in the AOR, while the SOUTHCOM AOR also contains the largest number of FPDs in DOD, in fact more than all other combatant commands combined. There are singular issues in the AOR, deserving of careful attention, which served as the basis for this event. Attendance and participation were the greatest yet experienced for a Latin American FPD conference and the results justified its conduct; with advanced inter-service collaboration, improved administrative support, and we opened a dialogue to better provide augmentation when FPD requirements temporarily surpass the resident FPD ability to provide support. By taking an "enterprise" approach, meaning a cooperative one, we at a minimum expended our energies in the common pursuit of accomplishing shared objectives. Many of the issues were not specific to an individual service but were shared across the AOR -- issues not only peculiar to the AOR but also which did not fit well into a worldwide conference agenda, and which were easily resolved at an immediate level of interest and concern. Thus far, our experience with this regional approach has been positive and has yielded good results. This is particularly true when we host these events no more frequently than once a year to provide our FPDs and other invitees the time to meet and thoroughly discuss and resolve or reach agreement on a wide range of issues.

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Edgardo Ortiz, Force Protection Detachment coordinator for the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade, leads discussion on results of a breakout group meeting during the Latin American Force Protection Detachment Conference.

Bob Rendon (right), senior adviser for the 470th MI Brigade's Military Intelligence Civilian Excepted Career Program, presents a brigade coin to Prenston Gale in appreciation to him for conducting a class for Force Protection Detachment agents during the Latin American Force Protection Detachment Conference. (Photos by 1st Sgt. Carlton Green)

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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Outstanding Soldier, NCO named

By Gregory Ripps

470th Military Intelligence Brigade

Distinction

he first three days of June put a select group of noncommissioned officers and Soldiers from the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade under unique pressure. They were competing for recognition as the brigade's outstanding NCO and Soldier for the year.

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Spc. Luis Paulino, of the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion, performs first aid on an "injured" Soldier during the warrior task segment of the Soldier of the Year competition

The first day found them hot and dusty on Camp Bullis for the land navigation course and hands-on warrior tasking ­ after undergoing the Army Physical Fitness Test on Fort Sam Houston. That was just the beginning; on the subsequent days they wrote an essay, completed a written examination on general military knowledge, and appeared before the board. Weapons qualification also figured into the scores. And there was the surprise event: a six-mile ruck march. When the scores were tallied, the brigade's NCO of the Year was Staff Sgt. Adam Beitz, a Spanish cryptologic linguist with the 717th Military Intelligence Battalion, and the brigade's Soldier of the Year was Spc. Luis Paulino, of the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion. Paulino, who traveled from his battalion's base on Fort Bliss, said one of the hardest parts of the competition was the land navigation. "The terrain [on Camp Bullis] is very different from that in El Paso," he explained. Nevertheless, Paulino said completing the Camp Bullis events gave him the most satisfaction. "It's not like a written test or a board," he observed. "During warrior tasking, one has to actually get dirty to accomplish the task." Beitz, whose battalion operates on Lackland Air Force Base, found the board

to be the hardest part. "It's the only part of the competition that still makes me a little nervous," said Beitz, who has belonged to the Army for eight years. "Doing it over and over again definitely makes it a lot easier, but it still feels a little uncomfortable to sit in front of all those sergeants major." Completing the physical fitness test and the ruck march gave Beitz the most satisfaction. "I do pretty well on these events," he said. "I get a sense of accomplishment for completing them to the best of my ability." Beitz and Paulino encourage other NCOs and Soldiers to participate in competitions when they have the opportunity. "In order to do well in competitions at this level, you must be a well rounded Soldier," Beitz advised. "Everyone has areas in which they excel, but the winner is the one who doesn't really have any weak areas. You need to focus on every event and make sure you're proficient on each on in order to do well in the overall competition." Paulino concurred. "Competition like this will push a Soldier to a higher level of knowledge, confidence and leadership," he said. "I recommend every single Soldier be ready for everything and anything that might come up." A few days after their win at brigade level, both Beitz and Paulino journeyed to Fort Belvoir, Va., to compete at the Intelligence and Security Command level. Beitz came home as INSCOM NCO of the Year. "It's a humbling experience," said Beitz. "All those Soldiers who are competing at that level are truly outstanding all around. I'm sure it was only a few points that separated me from the rest of the field."

Staff Sgt. Adam Beitz, of the 717th MI Battalion, checks coordinates during the land navigation segment of the NCO of the Year competition. (Photos by Gregory Ripps)

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Community Service

Spc. Jodie Griffith

Jessica Hess

Nikki Longoria

Fort Sam Houston recognizes volunteers

CARING

By Gregory Ripps 470th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs he Fort Sam Houston community recently honored three members of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade family. Spc. Jodie Griffith, Jessica Hess and Nikki Longoria received individual awards at the Installation Volunteer Recognition Ceremony May 4 at the Sam Houston Club. Griffith, a Soldier of the 717th MI Battalion at Lackland Air Force Base, serves as vice president for the unit's Better Opportunity for Single Soldiers (BOSS) program, which encourages single Soldier involvement in both recreational and community service activities. In her twoyear involvement with BOSS, battalion Soldiers have focused on helping Soldiers' Angels, where volunteers assemble and prepare packages for mailing to deployed Soldiers, and Habitat for Humanity, where volunteers help build affordable housing in the local community. "The work we have done with Soldiers' Angels as well as Habitat for Humanity

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are the two accomplishments I love to talk about," said Griffith. "We changed dozens if not hundreds [of people] with the volunteer service we provided, and it was rewarding for anyone involved." Griffith wants BOSS volunteers can raise awareness about the program and the benefits it provides during the transition to Joint Base San Antonio. "I hope we can pull together and do something that gets recognition across the different bases that opens people's eyes to volunteering and being part of such a great program," she said. Griffith's nomination letter said she "devoted much of her free time to the BOSS Program, and through her countless hours of volunteer work and complete dedication to the program she has helped make the BOSS program the quality U.S. Army single Soldier program that it is." Jessica Hess, who is married to Spc. Daniel Hess of the 201st Military Intelligence Battalion, has been involved with the Family Readiness Group (FRG) for five years and has led B Company's FRG for the last two. She has helped to plan and execute a number of social activities, resiliency training sessions and other special events, totaling more than

700 volunteer hours. One of her initiatives was a "play group" in which spouses of deployed Soldiers could visit together while they let their children play together. "We met twice a month at the playground and let the kids burn off some energy," Hess explained. "The parents could use this time to ask questions, bounce around ideas, or just get some much needed adult conversation." Her nomination letter called her a vital component in the flow of information during the battalion's deployment: "She ensured that all of the information from the battalion, the rear detachment and the FRG was passed to each family quickly and accurately. Her efforts made certain that every family felt connected to the unit and secure in the knowledge that they were valued members of the FRG." Hess hopes more people become involved in the FRG. "I would like the FRG to be as strong as our Soldiers," said Hess. Longoria has volunteered with the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion FRG for two and a half years. In addition to supporting

(See Volunteers on next page) Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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201st MI Battalion volunteers deliver meals to elderly

By Capt. Colin Pascal

201st Military Intelligence Battalion

Community Service

dozen Army members found fitting community service when they went "rolling along" with Meals on Wheels June 3. The volunteers, who belong to A Company of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade's 201st Military Intelligence Battalion, hooked up with the local Meals on Wheels program to deliver 70 meals to home-bound elderly people in the San Antonio area. In addition to delivering the meals, the Soldiers took time to visit with the people to whom they brought the food. "Volunteering for Meals on Wheels ... reminded us that there are many forgotten people outside our little worlds," said Staff Sgt. Alicia Lister, who led the company volunteer effort. "These people aren't just physically hungry; they're emotionally hungry as well." The few minutes the Soldiers spent with them may have been the only direct, personal interaction they had with other people that day. Many of them were veterans who seemed to relish the chance to speak with a Soldier. The volunteers felt extraordinarily well received by the people to whom they delivered meals. Now they and others in the unit are looking for more ways to perform community service. "Ever since we got back from delivering those meals, people from my company have come to me with more volunteer ideas," said Lister. "That's what happens when you volunteer: you realize how great it is."

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CARING

Staff Sgt. Tricia Yamagata loads meals into a vehicle prior to making the rounds. She and other Soldiers of the 201st Military Intelligence Battalion volunteered to help Meals on Wheels.. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Lynn Schweigert)

Action photos

The Griffin Chronicles likes to publish "action shots" and other photographic images that are out of the ordinary. Please contact the editor by calling (210) 295-6458 or e-mailing [email protected] for photo image guidelines.

Volunteers continued from previous page

her husband, Staff Sgt. Peter Longoria, and taking care of their two children, she has found time to serve the A Company FRG as a key caller, as a mentor for new spouses, and as an organizer of fundraisers and other events, including weekly meals for new mothers. "I didn't want the new moms to feel as though they were going to be without help," she related. "It can be extremely daunting when you are away from your family during such a monumental part of your life." Longoria welcomes new families to the unit and mentors the younger spouses. As the 201st MI Battalion anticipates another deployment, she said she wants spouses to know there are others who have gone through the same issues they will and who can share how they have learned to cope with them. "They don't have to feel alone," said Longoria. "The FRG does some really neat functions for the families and lets them enjoy some time with people who know their situation. I hope we can have that sense of togetherness that is so hard to find when you are separated from your loved ones." At the recognition ceremony Maj. Gen. Perry Wiggins, Army North deputy commander, and Col. Mary Garr, 502nd Mission Support Group commander, presented individual awards to Griffith, Hess, Longoria and 24 other volunteers. Their words applied to all. Wiggins termed them heroes because they "volunteer to give a portion of their lives to something bigger than themselves." Garr said volunteers were important pieces in the Fort Sam Houston team. "Much could not go on without our volunteers," she said, adding that they not only assist in mission accomplishment but also help ensure quality of life. "We can't do without you, and we appreciate you."

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Community Service

Col. Jim Lee (second from left), flanked by 1st Lt. Ron Johnson, brigade headquarters and headquarters detachment (HHD) executive officer, and Capt. Gina Aviles, HHD commander, presents an oversized check for $4,868 to Mike Mathews, Army Support Activity deputy manager, who accepts it on behalf of Army Emergency Relief, while brigade Command Sgt. Maj. Charles Totoris stands at right. (Photos by Gregory Ripps)

Golf scramble benefits Army Emergency Relief

By Gregory Ripps

470th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

CARING

Sgt. Ralph Brown watches his golf ball take off after a tee-off on the Palmer Course at La Cantera May 6.

A foursome strategizes their approach to a hole on one of the greens

Teams and players recognized at the conclusion of the day included: First place team: 1st Lt. Patrick Beverly, Dennis Beverly, Rusty Beverly and Cole Crowder; Second place team: Sgt. Joshua Burkhart, Eric Kinsey, Brian Thorne and Brian Hankinson; Third place team: Senovia Martinez, Chris Crowell, Dirton and Laura Becker; Last place team: Capt. Gino Orezzoli, 1st Lt. Christa Martin, Staff Sgt. Justin Norton and Sgt. Kendrell Marshall; Men's long drive: Corey Burkhart; Closest to pin 4: Swafford Williams; Ladies' longest drive: Laura Baker; Closest to pin 16: John Percic; Longest putt: Palmer Moe.

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

embers and friends of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade donned their golfing outfits and opened their wallets for the brigade's biannual charity golf tournament May 6. Thirty-six four-person teams took to the greens on the Palmer Golf Course at La Cantera. Players competed for awards and prizes, but the big payoff was the $4,868 the scramble raised on behalf of Army Emergency Relief, a private nonprofit organization that helps Soldiers and their dependents when they find themselves in a financial crisis. The amount was a record for a tournament sponsored by brigade volunteers. Organizers and participants raised the funds not only from entry fees but also through raffle tickets and corporate donations. Mike Mathews, Army Support Activity deputy manager, accepted the symbolic check on behalf of Army Emergency Relief.

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717th MI Battalion golfers achieve excellence

By Staff Sgt. Eric Kinsey

717th Military Intelligence Battalion

Physical Training

FITNESS / TEAMWORK

sk anyone who has ever picked up a golf club and tried to hit a golf ball "What's the hardest sport?" Almost every one of them will tell you that golf is. While you'll find that most intramural teams are usually even, this year's Alamo Station Golf team is showing that is not always the case. The team has done a complete turnaround from last year when they did not have a winning record. The Alamo Station Golf Team has started this season with an imposing record of six wins and no losses. The golfers play every Tuesday for nine weeks and the tenth week is a one day playoff which determines who is the best golf team on Lackland Air Force Base. This year's team has also competed at the 470th Military

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Intelligence Brigade spring golf tournament taking second place only to a team that was comprised of one service member and three civilians that actually worked in the golf industry. This goes to show that not only is the Alamo Station Golf team the best set of military golfers on Lackland Air Force base, but they are also the best from within the Brigade. The team consists of; Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hankinson, Staff Sgt. Eric Kinsey, Staff Sgt. Senovio Martinez, Sgt. Chris Lester, Sgt. Joshua Burkhart, Spc. Chris Crowell, Spc. Mark Thomas, and anchored by Sgt. Brian Thorne. Thorne has excelled this year as the team's most valuable player. Not only is he a great golfer himself, he also helps the rest of the team by giving them pointers on their golf swing. The matches last about four and a half hours, which doesn't give the team time to practice. Most of the golfers do play golf on the weekends for fun, but there is no organized practice. Most people don't realize the amount of concentration and determination that it takes to become a skilled golfer. It takes years of practice and dedication to become a competitive golfer. It is not just something you can pick up one day and be good at. The team has shown that their years of dedication to the game have paid off by their winning season at Lackland.

Members of the 717th MI Battalion golf team receive trophies from Col. Jim Lee and Command Sgt. Maj. Charles Totoris during the 470th MI Brigade spring golf tournament. From left are Staff Sgt. Joshua Burkhart, Sgt. Brian Thorne, Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hankinson and Staff Sgt. Eric Kinsey. Sgt. Brian Thorne rips a drive down the fairway during one of the 717th Military Intelligence Battalion's multiple tournament wins.

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Physical Training

having developed a long-standing practice of running almost every morning. Even then, I was not prepared for the physical demands of the Army. I had never done a push-up in my life ­ at least not a proper one ­ and I soon realized that my `run' was more accurately described as a leisurely jog. Despite my initial lack of strength and endurance, the physical aspects of Basic Training became less and less difficult, until I had reached undeniably the best shape of my life. At that level of our careers, as a trainee, we are heavily pushed to succeed, as Drill Sergeants are wont to do. But even then, it is our personal refusal to quit that keeps us going. I still needed to know how far to push myself, but only I could make myself achieve that goal. I believe that it's once we leave the training environment that the real test of fitness begins, and a new obstacle emerges for us to overcome. The challenge lies in the fact that we are now more personally responsible for setting our fitness goals, and it becomes a choice to meet or exceed the standard. As our freedom to accept negligence and indulgence increases, the value and need for selfdiscipline intensifies. No one is going to make you go to the gym an extra day if you need to shed a pound from the scale or a minute from your run. No one is going to tell you not to eat fast food for supper every night ­ no one, except for yourself. Being part of a strategic military intelligence unit, it would seem as though we are more prone to such a lack of discipline and fitness. We sit at our computers for most of the day, perhaps munching on various sugar-laden snacks or downing energy drinks like they are water. During the summer months, outside exercise is unpleasant at times and downright deadly at others. Complacency can come easily, and what at first seemed like a slight drop on your run time can suddenly become your first Army Physical Fitness Test failure. Sometimes, the key to maintaining self-discipline comes not only from within, but from your peers, subordinates and leaders. As a noncommissioned officer, I find that I push myself further when I'm also leading my Soldiers to a shared goal. I am not only maintaining my own physical fitness, but I am fostering the trust of my subordinates. As a Soldier, I need to be able to place trust in my NCOs, and trust only emerges as physical training becomes a collaborative effort. I cannot ask a Soldier to attempt something that I wouldn't also do, and nor would I trust a leader who asked such things of me. Trusting our leaders/trainers is an integral part of any physical fitness routine, but sometimes it is even more important to develop trust in yourself. The discipline to maintain yourself physically has to be coupled with the confidence that you can. At the same time, confidence is only strengthened by accomplishments, thus creating a momentum which can propel an individual beyond previously unreachable goals. Many of us will encounter obstacles in regards to fitness. Often the path beyond these barriers involve a combination of selfdiscipline and trust ­ both in yourself, your leaders and your peers. As members of the military, we are fortunate to have support from our left and right, urging us to push past the point where we would otherwise quit. Our potential is fully realized when we are able to combine our drive to succeed with the confidence that we can, while also trusting that someone will offer a hand-up if we fall. And at that point, any wall is surmountable.

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

New beginnings: trust, discipline and fitness

By Sgt. Ashley Toca

717th Military Intelligence Battalion

FITNESS

hen our hands rose to accept the Oath of Enlistment, each of us began a new chapter in our lives. Even if you had been a military brat doing flutter-kicks at six, perhaps knowing for years that you wanted to become a Soldier; or someone more like myself, having very little grasp of the life you were choosing to lead ­ no matter what your background, the enormity of that moment cannot be denied. You are shedding your civilian life and stepping toward the life of a Soldier. And while that moment is a new beginning for all, it is hardly the last that will define us. Obstacles are a part of every life, but even more so for Soldiers. It is how we face these moments which set us apart as Soldiers and leaders. And to climb these hurdles demands that we look within and without -- seeking guidance from our left and our right, while pushing forward from within. At the time that I joined the military, I had grown accustomed to a rather casual relationship with fitness. I had lived a majority of my life in New Orleans, Louisiana, where the local fare is normally fried, and pub crawls often supersede exercise. Nonetheless, I considered myself a comparatively healthy person,

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Physical Training

FITNESS

14th MI Battalion Soldiers accept Steel Challenge

By Sgt. Javin Williams

14th Military Intelligence Battalion

ave you seen the Steel Warriors? Have you seen the Soldiers, noncommissioned officers and officers of the 14th Military Intelligence Battalion clad in the gray, steel-colored, moisture-wicking T-shirts adorned with the 14th unit crest? If you've seen them, you've seen individuals who don't perform at a minimum fitness level, but strive to maximize their potential and set an example for their Soldiers and the rest of the 470th MI Brigade. Since the inaugural Steel Challenge in April 2009, the 14th MI Battalion has conducted the quarterly event that has the following minimum standards for qualification (performed consecutively): n Achieve 270 on the Army Physical Fitness Test; n Eight pull-ups, eight chin-ups and 15 dips; n Bench press 80 percent of body weight 10 times; n Leg press 150 percent of body weight 10 times; and n Complete a six-mile ruck march in less than 90 minutes. Beginning in November 2010, the battalion took this high standard of fitness and discipline to the next level by instituting new categories of elevated achievement: Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum. Only one has achieved Gold ­ no one Platinum. On May 18, the following personnel became Steel Warriors:

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Bronze: Pfc. Jeremi Johnson, Sgt. Enrique Barajas, Sgt. William Cauthen, Sgt. William McGuire, Sgt. Cris Garcia, Staff Sgt. Peter Longoria and Capt. Chuck McMillian. Silver: Sgt. Javin Williams, Capt. Matthew Barry and Lt. Col. Kris Arnold. Training for the Steel Challenge needs to be tough. Many Soldiers can't do many, if any, pull-ups until they spend some time on those pull-up bars. Also, you can't just head out for a six-mile ruck march and expect to walk it. You must move. Once you've gone above and beyond your normal routine and trained for the Steel Challenge, earned your blisters and calluses, and "steeled"

your body, you are ready. Like any other training, if it's been tough enough, you will have confidence, you will travel faster and stronger than before. You will trust your trainers, your training and yourself. The Steel Challenge is an event that symbolizes a unit that has achieved much since being constituted as a Joint Interrogation Debriefing Center. Our achievements on the PT field mirror our mission accomplishments in that they will not plateau, but will continue to multiply. The 14th will continue to train and deploy warriors who will be tremendous assets to the MI corps and the Army for years to come. Are you up to the challenge?

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Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

Physical Training

FITNESS / TEAMWORK

Brigade run

June 28, 2011

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

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Football team wins post championship

By Gregory Ripps

470th Military Intelligence Brigade

Physical Training Physical Training

FITNESS / TEAMWORK

ith 44 seconds left in the game, the Navy team has possession of the ball. The team breaks with a big play to place them five yards from a touchdown and an extra point to win the game. As time runs out, the Navy team takes the shot. It's intercepted by the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade Team. The referee calls the game to an end, and the final score stands at 18-13. The 470th wins the Fort Sam Houston 2011 Intramural Football Post Championship. The road to the June 7 championship game began three months earlier when Soldiers from the brigade's headquarters and headquarters detachment (HHD), 14th and the 201st MI Battalions, and 401st MI Company began dedicating their Monday and Tuesday evenings to football practice on MacArthur Field. The first game of the season was a learning experience. Interestingly, the 470th lost it to the Navy team, 20-22. But the 470th never looked back, winning the next eight games in a row. "The true colors of the Soldiers showed, and they did not disappoint," said 1st Lt. Ron Johnson, who coached the team. "Leaders of both offense and defense rose to the opportunity to display forgotten talents."

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The 470th Military Intelligence Brigade Football Team rejoices after its victory in the Fort Sam Houston 2011 Intramural Football Post Championship game June 7. (Courtesy photos by Mallory Johnson) Teamwork was tested by the fact that throughout the season Soldiers were sent to school, took leave, or fulfilled other obligations to the brigade. However, one Soldier's absence offered an opportunity to another. "Over the season the team grew together as a battle-hardened gridiron unit, and defense led the way," said Johnson. "They did not allow any opponents more than 14 points after the first lost. As a defensive unit, they combined for over 12 interceptions, 27 points, and two shutouts." During the playoffs, the team's offense hit its stride by maintaining drives and scoring. "Their ability to move the ball and score helped keep the defense fresh and ready to go," Johnson continued. "But the decision of the championship game would come down to the success of the defense." Johnson predicted the defense's hard work would be the deciding factor in the championship game. He was right.

Quarterback Spc. Brice Bell (gray shirt) runs for the first down in the 2011 Intramural Football Post Championship game June 7.

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Members of the 470th MI Brigade Football Team included (by unit): Spc. Brice Bell, Spc. Lamont Binett, Cpl. Joseph Casiano, Spc. Corey Dufner, Sgt. Daniel Faucett and Spc. Rondell Love, all HHD; Pfc. Jeremi Johnson, 14th MI Battalion; Staff Sgt. Carlos DeLaRosa, Spc. Chaz Maichuk, Staff Sgt. Jason Mejia, Spc. William Mueller, Sgt. 1st Class Caleb Quidera, Sgt. Ismail Salahuddin, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Sibley and Staff Sgt. Bennett Starling, all 201st MI Battalion; and Pfc. Kuwan Barnes, 401st MI Company.

Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

FITNESS / TEAMWORK

Soccer team triumphs in final game

The 470th Military Intelligence Brigade Soccer Team overcame a stalemate in the Fort Sam Houston Soccer Championship game July 28 to beat the post's Navy team, winning 3-1 in a penalty kick shoot-out. When the brigade's team members arrived at MacArthur Field, things looked bleak. "We began one goal down and had to play the entire game one man down at all times," said Capt. Alberto Frias, one of the team members. "This was due to us not having our female players, who had previous engagements." Six players against seven players wasn't the only handicap. "We had only one substitute, and the Navy brought three substitutions for every player," said Maj. Peter Rangel, who coached the team. "Furthermore, the brigade's ­ and the league's ­ leading scorer, Spc. Oscar Marroquin, was on temporary duty at Fort Hood." With a quick push on offense, the brigade team scored two goals in 10 minutes, but Navy tied the score going into half time. The second half of the game mirrored the first, with the brigade team again scoring two goals and Navy scoring two as well. Because the Sailors made their last goal with less than three minutes remaining, the play went into overtime, but at the end of overtime, both teams were still tied. "After the referee blew his whistle signaling the end of overtime, we began to line up our players for the much anticipated penalty kick shoot out," said Rangel. "The

Physical Training

Posing with their trophies are members of the 470th Military Intelligence Brigade Soccer Team. (Courtesy photo) 470th won the coin toss, and we elected to kick first." Ultimately, the brigade team won 3-1 on penalty kicks. Ironically, the brigade's high scorer for the game was Petty Officer 2 Luis Ibarra, from the Navy Medicine Training Center, who was part of the brigade's full team In addition to players already named, the brigade team roster for the season included Sgt. 1st Class Mina Vasquez, 1st Lt. Bryan Philpott, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Andres Toledo (Army South), Sgt. Maj. Jorge Rodriguez, (Army Medical Department), Sgt. Patricia Ceballos (Warrior Transition Battalion), Spc. Alex Acla, Pavel Caudillo and Ferdy Ramirez (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). Prior to the championship game, the brigade soccer team's record stood at 3-21. The team then won the semi-final game against the Brooke Army Medical Center team the previous week.

Soldiers who receive an award or promotion are encouraged to submit a Hometown News Release (Defense Department Form 2266). The Hometown News Program can be used for such events as decorations and awards (achievement medals and higher), reenlistments and retirements, and promotions. Soldiers assigned to Fort Sam Houston can fill out the Hometown News Release online at: http:// www.samhouston.army.mil/pao/hometown.aspx. Or fill out a Form 2266 and turn it in to 470th MI Brigade Public Affairs Office. Either way, the information will be submitted electronically to Hometown News, which will format the information into a short news release and send it to print media serving the localities identified on the form. A photo image can also be submitted.

Spring 2011 Griffin Chronicles

Hometown News

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The 717th Military Intelligence Battalion Color Guard presents arms for the singing of the national anthem at the battalion's change of command ceremony July 28 on the rounds of the Alamo. (Photo by Gregory Ripps)

Griffin Chronicles Spring 2011

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