Read Microsoft Word - Number the Stars Final text version

Number the Stars hi

By Lois Lowry

ISBN 13: 978-0-9789204-3-2 ISBN 10: 0-9789204-3-0

© 2008 Secondary Solutions. All rights reserved. A classroom teacher who has purchased this guide may photocopy the materials in this publication for his/her classroom use only. Use or reproduction by a part of or an entire school or school system, by for-profit tutoring centers and like institutions, or for commercial sale, is strictly prohibited. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, translated or stored without the express written permission of the publisher. Created and printed in the United States of America.

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g in by Mary Pat Mahoney Literature Guide Developed py o Cfor Secondary Solutions LY N

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The First Solution for the Secondary Teacher® www.4secondarysolutions.com

Secondary

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©2008 Secondary Solutions

Number the Stars Literature Guide

Number the Stars Literature Guide

Table of Contents

About This Literature Guide ............................................................................................................. 4 How to Use Our Literature Guides ................................................................................................... 5 Pre-Reading Preparation ................................................................................................................. 10

Sample Teacher Agenda ................................................................................................................. 6 Notes to the Teacher ...................................................................................................................... 9

Standards Focus: Genre ................................................................................................................... 13 Standards Focus: Historical Context ................................................................................................ 15

Standards Focus: Author Biography ................................................................................................. 10 Standards Focus: Exploring Expository Writing--Author Biography ...................................................... 11 Anticipation/Reaction Activity--What is Bravery? ............................................................................... 12 Sorting Literature ........................................................................................................................... 13 Different Types of Fiction ................................................................................................................ 14 Hitler's Plan ................................................................................................................................... 15 Standards Focus: Exploring Expository Writing--Hitler's Plan .............................................................. 16 Map of Europe............................................................................................................................................... 17

hi Vocabulary List................................................................................................................................. 18 ro Allusions and Terminology to Know................................................................................................. 19 P Chapters One ­ Three ...................................................................................................................... 21 n Comprehension Check .................................................................................................................... 21 tio Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing--Sample ................................................................. 22 u Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing ............................................................................... 23 ib r Standards Focus: Flashback ........................................................................................................... 26 ist Assessment Preparation: Comma Usage ........................................................................................... 27 D Chapters Four ­ Six .......................................................................................................................... 29 d Comprehension Check .................................................................................................................... 29 Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing ............................................................................... 30 an Standards Focus: Setting ............................................................................................................... 33 g in Assessment Preparation: Semi-Colon and Colon ................................................................................ 35 y Chapters Seven ­ Nine ..................................................................................................................... 36 op Comprehension Check .................................................................................................................... 36 Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing ............................................................................... 37 -C Standards Focus: Imagery .............................................................................................................. 40 Assessment Preparation: Precise Word Choice .................................................................................. 41 LY Chapters Ten ­ Twelve ..................................................................................................................... 42 N Comprehension Check .................................................................................................................... 42 O and Summarizing ............................................................................... 43 Standards Focus: Note-Taking E Standards Focus:L Conflict ................................................................................................................ 46 P Assessment Preparation: Indefinite Pronouns.................................................................................... 48 M ­ Fifteen ............................................................................................................. 50 Chapters Thirteen Comprehension Check .................................................................................................................... 50 SA

Map of Denmark ............................................................................................................................................ 34

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Chapters Sixteen ­ Afterword .......................................................................................................... 57

Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing ............................................................................... 51 Standards Focus: Foreshadowing ..................................................................................................... 54 Assessment Preparation: Misused Verbs--Lay and Lie ........................................................................ 56 Comprehension Check .................................................................................................................... 57 Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing ............................................................................... 58 Standards Focus: Analysis of Chapter Names and Novel Title ............................................................. 61 Assessment Preparation: Using Vocabulary in Context ....................................................................... 62 Vocabulary Review Crossword: Chapters 1-9 .................................................................................... 63 Vocabulary Review Crossword: Chapters 10-Afterword ...................................................................... 64

Quiz: Chapters 1-3 ........................................................................................................................... 65 Quiz: Chapters 4-6 ........................................................................................................................... 66 Quiz: Chapters 7-9 ........................................................................................................................... 67 ©2008 Secondary Solutions

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Number the Stars Literature Guide

Quiz: Chapters 10-12 ....................................................................................................................... 68 Quiz: Chapters 13-15 ....................................................................................................................... 69 Quiz: Chapters 16-Afterword ........................................................................................................... 70 Final Exam ........................................................................................................................................ 71 Final Exam: Multiple Choice Version ................................................................................................ 74 Teacher Guide ............................................................................................................................... 78

Answer Key ...................................................................................................................................... 88

Novel Summary .............................................................................................................................. 78 Vocabulary with Definitions ............................................................................................................. 81 Pre-Reading Ideas and Activities ...................................................................................................... 82 Research/ Technology/ Cross-Curricular Activities ............................................................................................ 82 Post-Reading Ideas and Alternative Assessment ................................................................................ 83 Essay/Writing Ideas ........................................................................................................................ 84 Sample Project Rubric ..................................................................................................................... 85 Sample Response to Literature Rubric .............................................................................................. 86

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Number the Stars Literature Guide

About This Literature Guide

separate set of teacher materials at an Secondary Solutions® is the additional cost. Other units provided the endeavor of a high school English teacher who teacher with student materials only, and very could not seem to find appropriate materials to often, the content standards were ignored. help her students master the necessary Secondary Solutions® provides all of the concepts at the secondary level. She grew necessary materials for complete coverage of tired of spending countless hours researching, the literature units of study, including author creating, writing, and revising lesson plans, biographies, pre-reading activities, numerous worksheets, quizzes, tests and extension and varied vocabulary and comprehension activities to motivate and inspire her students, activities, study - guide questions, graphic and at the same time, address those ominous organizers, literary analysis and content standards! critical thinking activities, essay and Materials that were Understanding and writing ideas, extension activities, available were either juvenile appreciating the literature quizzes, unit tests, alternative in nature, skimpy in content, and having the tools to assessment, online teacher or were only moderately teach it are two very assistance, and much, much more. engaging activities that did not different things. We Each guide is designed to come close to meeting the understand that. So we address the unique learning styles content standards on which have taken what you and comprehension levels of every her students were being tested. know about the literature student in your classroom. All Frustrated and tired of trying and written Literature materials are written and presented to get by with inappropriate, Guides that bridge the at the grade level of the learner, inane lessons, she finally gap between knowing and include extensive coverage decided that if the right and loving the literature of the content standards. As an materials were going to be and teaching your added bonus, all teacher materials available to her and other students to love and are included! teachers, she was going to appreciate it like you do. As a busy teacher, you don't have to make them herself! have time to waste reinventing the Mrs. Bowers set to wheel. You want to get down to the business work to create one of the most comprehensive of teaching! With our professionally developed and innovative Literature Guide sets on the teacher-written literature guides, Secondary market. Joined by a middle school teacher with Solutions® has provided you with the answer 21 years of secondary school experience, to your time management problems, while Secondary Solutions® began, and has matured into a specialized team of intermediate saving you hours of tedious and exhausting and secondary teachers who have developed work. Our guides will allow you to focus on the for you a set of materials unsurpassed by all most important aspects of teaching--the others. personal, one-on-one, hands-on instruction you Before the innovation of Secondary enjoy most--the reason you became a teacher Solutions®, materials that could be purchased in the first place. offered a reproducible student workbook and a

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The First Solution for the Secondary Teacher®

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Number the Stars Literature Guide

Name ________________________________________

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Pre-Reading Preparation Standards Focus: Author Biography

Lois Lowry What do you like in a story? Adventure? Interesting characters? Unusual problems? These are some of the same reasons readers enjoy novels by Lois Lowry. Her books are full of characters in situations you won't soon forget. Lois Lowry was born on March 20, 1937 in Honolulu, Hawaii. After Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1941, her father, who was a dentist in the army, was assigned to work on a ship. While her father was stationed on the ship, her family moved to Pennsylvania to live with her grandparents.

r Pa love for books, and As a little girl, she developed learned to read at aniearly age. In fact, she was on such an excellent ut reader that she skipped second b with math. grade. Even though she excelled in reading and writing, she struggled tri s When World War II ended, her father was stationed in Japan, i Since D and her entire family moved there. Japan they lived in a community with other Americans, it felt familiar. But Lois was curious about life in outside of her American neighborhood. She would sneak away from home to explore the nearby city. nd of a different country. Eventually, Lois's She loved experiencing the new sights, sounds, and a smells g school and then college to study to become a writer. family returned to America where she went to high n After two years in college, though, she left to i married. She was nineteen years old. yget p She and her husband had four children. o When her children grew older, Lois decided to go back to college. She still held onto her dream of becoming a writer. She finished college and began writing - C read her stories and asked Lois to write a novel. In 1976, stories. An editor of a publishing company LY she published her first novel A Summer To Die. The book was loosely based onN experience with her The Newbery Medal O her sister's death, and the book received several awards. In 1922, the first Newbery Medal was LEthat first novel, and in 1990, awarded. Since then, each year the Many books followed P the Stars. The book received is awarded Lois wrote Number M including the Newbery Medal. She medal that receiveto one children's book. Books the award are numerousA awards recognized as excellent literature for S

received the Newbery Medal again in 1994 for her book The Giver. Lois continues to write today from her home in Massachusetts. She has written over thirty books. Her stories are full of adventure, interesting characters, and problems that captivate readers. children. A book that has won the Newbery Medal receives a bronze medal printed on the front of the book. Newbery Honor books are the "runnerup" titles for the year, and receive a silver seal on the book cover.

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Standards Focus: Genre Sorting Literature

Literature is a big topic. There are all kinds of books ­ just take a look at all the choices in the library! People figured out a system of classifying literature. It is divided into different groups: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. The technical name for these categories is genre (jahn-ruh), which means kind or type. Each genre can be further divided into categories called sub-genre. You probably already know that "fiction" means that the stories are made up. But, there are many sub-genres of fiction. Some of the most common include fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, mystery, realistic fiction, westerns, folk tales, and fairy tales.

The prefix "sub" means "under."

Check the dictionary for other "sub" words like "submarine."

Number the Stars belongs to the sub-genre of historical fiction. This

means the historical framework of the novel is true. The novel is based on things real people actually did during that time and place. However, the characters (and what they do) are made up. In other words, the author creates characters and puts them in a real, historical setting. Historical fiction is a fun way to learn more about history. Well written historical fiction is accurate, and the author often does a great amount of research to make sure the facts in the story are correct.

s Di Potter books, you've read something What other sub-genres have your read? If you've read any Harry from the fantasy sub-genre. Fantasy usually includes "fantastic" elements like magical creatures, but it ndnever happen in real life. Realistic fiction a can also include amazing adventures that probably could g happen seem real; Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor includes stories that are about real life. Events that n is a realistic fiction novel. Science fiction is i about yyou've how science might influence our world. If you've read science fiction. Science fiction novels often read My Teacher is an Alien by Bruce Coville, op include stories about space and life on other planets. -C The Genres of Literature: Y L Directions: Complete the chart below by filling in the sub-genres of fiction. Use the paragraphs above Ndone for you. You should have seven more sub-genres listed. to help you. The first one is O LE Poetry NonP Fiction Drama Fiction M SA

fantasy

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Sub-Genre

Autobiography Biography Memoirs History Science etc.

Haiku Free Verse Limerick Sonnet etc.

Comedy Tragedy Historical etc.

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Different Types of Fiction

Directions: Complete the chart below by matching each item with its sub-genre. Some items may fit into more than one sub-genre, so be able to defend your answer. The first one has been done for you.

a magic wand aliens from another planet magic spells kids riding bikes skyscrapers flying saucers Historical Fiction mythical creatures George Washington dragons a one-room schoolhouse a soccer tournament time travel Realistic Fiction Fantasy the Civil War a city on Mars the Titanic computers talking pencils

Science Fiction

A magic wand

LY like the best? Why? What stories or books have you read that are a Which sub-genre of fictionN you do part of this particular sub-genre? What, in particular, do you like about these stories? O LE P M SA

What do you think? Please write your answers in complete sentences.

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Standards Focus: Historical Context Hitler's Plan

Food shortages, few jobs, money troubles -- those were some of the problems the German people faced in the 1930s. Many people were unhappy and angry. Then, in 1933 a man named Adolf Hitler came to power. He promised a bright future for Germany. Many Germans were ready to listen to him and follow his ideas. Adolf Hitler and the Nazi political party believed that Germany could become a great nation. They believed that one way to do this would be to get rid of the Jewish people. The Nazis blamed the Jews for Germany's troubles. As scapegoats, the Jewish people were the target of many injustices. Their property was taken or destroyed; Jewish students were barred from public schools. Jews weren't allowed in public swimming pools and stores. They were required to sew a Star of David patch on their clothes so they could easily be identified. Eventually, the Nazis gathered the Jews and shipped them to concentration camps where they either worked in horrible conditions or were executed. Hitler also believed that Germany would become a great nation when it expanded its borders. The Nazi's strong military began invading its neighboring countries. By 1939, Czechoslovakia and Austria had come under Germany's power. When Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, France and Britain felt Germany was getting out of control, and World War II began. But Hitler was not just interested in taking over Poland. The Nazis continued invading their neighboring countries. Its powerful military was no match for smaller, weaker nations. In April of 1940, the Nazis invaded Denmark and Norway. In May of 1940, the Nazis occupied France, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. In 1941, the Nazis took over Greece and Yugoslavia. As the Nazi military moved from country to country in Europe, Jews were herded up and sent to concentration camps. Not everyone believed that Hitler and the Nazis were right. Some people, either alone or in groups, worked against the Nazis. These resistance fighters helped Jews escape or hide; some destroyed railroad lines, and some wrote anti-Nazi newspapers. No matter what they did, though, being a member of the resistance was dangerous. Often the punishment for helping a Jew was death. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1941, the United States entered World War II. The war continued until 1945 when Germany surrendered. By the time the war ended, 6 million Jews had lost their lives.

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Pr Countries Neutral on and Switzerland ti Sweden neutral countries remained

during the war. That means they didn't become involved in fighting with or against the Germans. Scapegoat The term "scapegoat" comes from an ancient Jewish practice. People's sins would be symbolically placed on a goat. The goat was then sent out into the desert. By doing this, people believed their sins left them. Today, the word "scapegoat" means a person or thing that is blamed for another's troubles or mistakes. Nazi The word Nazi is a German abbreviation for the National Socialist German Workers' Party.

Star of David

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Standards Focus: Exploring Expository Writing--Hitler's Plan

Directions: After reading the article, complete the following activities.

1. Working with a partner, use the chart below and the events from the article to create a World War II timeline. In the first column, write the date. In the second column, record a brief description of what happened. The first date has been done for you.

Event Date What Happened?

1933

Hitler came to power in Germany

2. Using the article and your timeline, locate the countries the Nazis invaded on the map on page 17. Using colored pencils, indicate the different years the countries were invaded. Create a key at the top of the page. 3. What does the word scapegoats mean in the following sentence? Circle the correct answer.

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As scapegoats, the Jewish people were the target of many injustices.

Scapegoats means: a. b. c. d. the the the the victims who are blamed for something they didn't do people who blamed others for doing something wrong true reason there are problems in the world people who were responsible for Germany's problems 16

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Standards Focus: Exploring Expository Writing--Hitler's Plan

Map of Europe

KEY

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Number the Stars Literature Guide

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Number the Stars Vocabulary List

Directions: Use a dictionary or the author's words to find the meanings of the following words from Number the Stars. Your teacher will direct you to do this lesson either as you read each chapter, or as a pre-reading activity. Whatever method your teacher chooses, be sure to keep this list and your definitions to use in vocabulary exercises and to study for quizzes and tests.

Chapters 1 - 3 1. stocky 2. lanky 3. defiantly 4. obstinate 5. impassive 6. intricate 7. padlock Chapters 4 - 6 1. sophisticated 2. disdainfully 3. belligerently 4. submerged 5. imperious 6. winced 7. scornfully Chapters 7 - 9 1. awe 2. haze 3. specter 4. deft 5. reluctantly

Chapters 10 - 12 1. recurring 2. staccato 3. condescending 4. encased 5. gnarled Chapters 13 - 15 1. faltered 2. sprawling 3. wry 4. donned 5. brusque 6. tantalize 7. insolently

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g in Chapters 16 - Afterword 1. warily py o 2. roam C 3. unoccupied 4. devastating 5. deprivation 6. permeated

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Number the Stars Allusions and Terminology to Know

Chapter 1 - 3 1. Copenhagen: the capital of Denmark 2. Østerbrogade: the name of a street; the Ø is a letter in the Danish alphabet, which has 29 letters. 3. Halte: the German word for "stop" 4. Nazi occupation: In 1940, Germany's military invaded and established military troops in Denmark. Hitler was the leader of the Nazi political party that believed in creating a "pure" German race of people by persecuting Jews and others. 5. Resistance incidents: activities that disrupted the Nazis

6. Hans Christian Anderson: a story teller who wrote The Little Mermaid and much more 7. trousseau: a collection of clothing and linens a bride would take to her new home 8. trunk: a large chest used for storage

9. "electricity was rationed":residents were only allowed to use a certain amount of electricity each day

g in 11. swastika: the symbol of the Nazi party py Co must be in their homes; people on the street after curfew 12. curfew: a specific time when citizens risked being arrested LY N Chapter 4 - 6 O 1. Gone With the Wind: a novel about the American South during the Civil War LE 2. carousel: Pmerry-go-round, usually with music and horses to ride a AM 3. Jewish New Year: The celebration of the New Year according to the Jewish calendar. It usually S takes place in September or October; also called Rosh Hashanah

10. kroner: Danish money 4. Sabbath: The seventh day of the week for Jews: Friday evening to Saturday evening. A special day for prayer and worship; a religious day of rest 5. Synagogue: A Jewish house of worship, similar to a church or temple 6. relocation: the term the Nazis used to refer to moving the Jews to concentration camps 7. blackout curtains: dark curtains pulled over windows at night so no light would come through the window; this was to keep enemy airplanes from finding cities at night

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Number the Stars Literature Guide

Name ________________________________________ _ 8. Star of David: a six pointed star that symbolizes Judaism 9. Gilleleje: the town in Denmark where Uncle Henrik lives

Period ___

Chapter 7 - 9 1. "she didn't often look at them with fresh eyes": Annemarie was used to the scenery at her Uncle's house; Ellen was seeing the scene for the first time, and Annemarie was reminded how beautiful it was 2. "The gleaming wooden casket rested on supports in the middle of the living room": People would bring the body of the deceased back to their home, where the mourners gathered Chapter 10 - 12 1. typhus: a highly infectious disease that can lead to death 2. Godspeed: a wish of good luck for a person beginning a journey 3. sure-footed: confident Chapter 13 - 15 1. "It may all have been for nothing": all of their efforts may fail 2. herring: a type of fish

s Dias she tried to figure out what to do 3. "Annemarie's mind raced": her mind was working fast nd a Chapter 16 - Afterword g Germans in the public square": captives were 1. "... had been captured and executed by the often publicly executed to frighten citizens in an attempt to keep them from working with resistance yin groups op -C 2. "flight of an author's fancy": the wild imagination of an author LY N O LE P M SA

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Chapters One ­ Three Comprehension Check

Directions: Answer the following questions to help guide your understanding of the events in each chapter. Write your answers in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper.

Chapter One 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. How does Annemarie challenge Ellen at the opening of the chapter? Who are the three girls and how is each one described? Who stops the girls? How long have the soldiers been in their country? Use your pre-reading timeline to figure out the year. Who is with Mrs. Johansen when Annemarie gets home? What is their reaction to what Kirsti tells them? Who are Resistance fighters? Based on what the women drink for "coffee" and Kirsti's wish for a pink cupcake, what might have happened to the food supplies? Mrs. Rosen tells Annemarie, "It is important to be one of the crowd, always....Be sure they never have reason to remember your face" (p. 9). Why does Mrs. Rosen say this? Why is it so important that the girls are "one of the crowd"?

Chapter Two

nd 1. As they get into bed, what does Kirsti want Annemarie to tell her? a 2. Who is the king of Denmark? What does he do each morning? g 3. How does the boy respond when the soldier asks who the king's bodyguard is? yin 4. Who was Lise? p 5. How does Papa answer when o Annemarie asks why the King couldn't protect them from the Nazis? -C 6. What happened to Lise? LY 7. Who is Peter Neilsen? What does he look like? N 8. Why might Annemarie have said, "The whole world had changed. Only the fairy tales O remained the same"? LE 9. Analyze how Annemarie feels at the end of the chapter. Come up with three adjectives P describing her feelings toward the king and three adjectives describing her feelings MLise's death. How are her feelings about the two people similar? How are they about SA different?

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Why did the Johansens install a stove in the chimney? What did Annemarie discover when she went to Mrs. Hirsch's button shop? Why do you think Annemarie's parents woke her up to hear Peter's news? What news does Peter share about the Nazis' plans? Who does Annemarie think should be the bodyguard for the Jews? What is Annemarie unsure about after she returns to bed? Based on what you have learned about the Holocaust, what do you think might have happened to the Hirsch family?

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Chapter Three

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Standards Focus: Note-Taking and Summarizing--Sample

For some students, reading can be a difficult, unpleasant task. Many students do not have the strategies they need to read for meaning, and they lose interest in the story because they cannot follow the action, do not understand the words, or do not relate to the characters. Below is a chart you will be completing as you read Number the Stars. It will guide you in understanding the plot, the changes in the characters, how the author uses the setting, and the lessons the author wants you to learn. It will help you remember things your teacher expects you to retain as you read the book.

Directions: To help you remember the events of each chapter, use the following graphic organizer as you read. You may find it helpful to write your notes as bullet points. Write the title of the chapter on the line. The following sample from The Three Little Pigs will help you.

d te i Chapter One: The First Little Pig Builds a House and Meets the Wolf ib h The characters involved in this chapter: The conflicts (problems) in this o rchapter: P · The first little pig · The first little pig's straw house isn't n the pig from strong enoughito protect · The big, bad wolf to the wolf u · The second little pig · The wolfib tr blows down the house · The s has to run to his brother's house pig Di nd a g yin op -C LY N Othe characters in this Choose one of these phrases to fill in the space The settings (where are chapter): below. Please make your sentence specific and LE P detailed. "I wonder what will happen next" is not specific enough. · TheM forest A · I predict ... S

· I wonder ... · A question I have ... · This chapter reminds me of ... · I wonder what will happen to the first and

second little pigs now that they're in the house of sticks. I know that sticks might not be very strong and probably won't offer much protection against a wolf who can blow a house down. I wonder if it was a good decision to build their houses out of flimsy materials like straw and sticks.

Number the Stars Literature Guide

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Assessment Preparation: Comma Usage

Have you ever been told you'd written a run-on sentence or a sentence that contains a comma splice? These terms mean you've made an error in comma usage.

Definition: An independent clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb and expresses a complete thought. We commonly refer to an independent clause as a sentence.

Take a look at the examples below. How many independent clauses are in each sentence? If you've hooked two (or more) independent clauses together with a comma, you've created a comma splice. If you haven't used a comma to join the two, that is a run-on sentence. Example of a comma splice: Frank looked critically at the rusted bike, it didn't look sturdy. (independent clause) (independent clause) Example of a run-on: Frank looked critically at the rusted bike it didn't look sturdy. (independent clause) (independent clause) It's easy to fix a run-on sentence or a comma splice. You have four choices: 1. Break the sentence into two short sentences. · Frank looked critically at the rusted bike. It

didn't look sturdy.

2. Use a semicolon to join the ideas if they are closely related. · Frank looked critically at the rusted bike; it

g in 3. Use a comma and coordinating conjunction. py at · Frank looked criticallyo the rusted bike, but it didn't look sturdy. C 4. Use a subordinating conjunction. If the subordinating LY conjunction begins N sentence, use a comma at the end O the of the dependent clause. · Frank looked critically at the rusted bike LE it didn't look sturdy. P becauseFrank wanted to buy a new bike, he · Before AM looked critically at his old one. S

didn't look sturdy.

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For And Nor But Or Yet So

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Conjunctions

Some common Subordinating Conjunctions:

since, because, although, while, though, before, when, if, until, after, unless

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Assessment Preparation: Comma Usage

Directions: Use the page number for each example below to help you find the following quotes from Number the Stars. Using a red pen or colored pencil, write the punctuation marks Lois Lowry used in the novel. Choose from rules 1-4 on page 27 and decide which of the four choices she used to avoid a comma splice or run-on, and write the rule on the line. Draw a circle around the word and/or punctuation mark that solves the problem of the comma splice or run-on.

1. (page 1) "Annemarie's silvery blond hair flew behind her and Ellen's dark pigtails bounced against her shoulders."

2. (page 7) "The Copenhagen neighborhood was quiet it looked the same as always..."

3. (page 7) "Although she pretended to be absorbed in unpacking her schoolbooks Annemarie listened and she knew what her mother was referring to." (first comma) (second comma)

s Diof Denmark had mourned." 4. (page 16) "For days they thought he would die and all nd a g yin 5. (page 21) "There were no pink cupcakes there hadn't been for months." op -C 6. (page 22) "Peter's hereY L Papa and I want to talk to you." N O LE In the paragraph below, you will find errors in both punctuation and capitalization. P M the paragraph below. Use proofreaders' marks to indicate Directions: Revise what changes you want to make. Try to use each of the four ways to correct SA

run-on sentences. Then write your new paragraph on the back of this page or on a separate sheet of paper.

Lucy trudged down the school hall she could barely see over the stack of books she carried she finally made it to her locker at the end of the hall she opened it a landslide of papers and old lunches tumbled out onto the floor Lucy smiled now she had enough room for her books

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Proofreaders' marks

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^ insert = capitalize

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Chapters Four ­ Six Comprehension Check

Directions: Answer the following questions to help guide your understanding of the events in each chapter. Write your answers in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper.

Chapter Four

1. Why does Kirsti come home in tears? 2. What does Ellen offer to do to the shoes? 3. What does Kirsti insist happened on her birthday? 4. What had really happened? 5. By destroying their own navy, what "message" did the Danish people send the Nazis? 6. Why does Ellen have to help her mother with the housekeeping? 7. What happens after Mrs. Rosen comes to the Johansens' door? 8. What does Papa tell Annemarie after dinner? 9. Why does this news frighten the Rosens? 10. Who helped Ellen's parents? 11. How does Papa plan to hide Ellen? 12. What do you think would happen if the Johansens were caught hiding her?

Chapter Five

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

What does Ellen want to be when she grows up? What does Annemarie tell Ellen happened to Lise? Who pounds on their door in the middle of the night? Why? Why does Annemarie pull off Ellen's necklace? How were these soldiers different from the street soldiers? What does Papa do to prove to the soldiers that the girls are his daughters? How does the soldier respond? Why does Annemarie have an icy feeling when she realizes why Papa tore the pictures from the album? 9. Why do you think the chapter ends with Annemarie noticing the Start of David imprinted on her hand?

Chapter Six

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

AM S

Where does Papa want to take the girls? Who is Henrik? What two odd statements does Papa say to Henrik? What did Annemarie guess that one of the strange statements meant? Why doesn't Papa go with them to Henrik's? Who appears on the train? What was Annemarie afraid Kirsti was going to tell the soldiers? What path do they take to get to Uncle Henrik's house? Compare the city of Copenhagen with Gilleleje. How are they different? What sensory details are used to describe Gilleleje?

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Standards Focus: Setting

Map of Denmark

Skagen

Frederikshavn

Holstebro

Viborg

Heming

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North Sea

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Gilleleje

Helsingør Klampenborg

Copenhagen

Koge

Odense Fakse

Tønder

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Standards Focus: Conflict

Which would you rather watch: A movie about a tree...just a tree...growing in a field. That's it! A movie about vicious scoundrels and virtuous citizens in a race to find a long-lost treasure. If you are like most people, you would probably choose the second movie. Watching a tree grow isn't very interesting because nothing much is happening. But, watching people who are good and evil compete to find a treasure sounds like it might be an exciting story. That movie would have conflict. Like movies, good stories have conflict. Conflict is the problem or problems that move the story forward, make it exciting and keep you reading. Conflict creates the tension that makes a novel a "page turner" because we want to know how the conflict is resolved. There are two main types of conflict: internal and external.

Internal conflict is the problem a character has within himself or herself. An example of internal conflict is a character deciding whether or not to tell the truth. External conflict is a problem a character has with someone or something else. An example of external conflict is a character who always fights with his sister.

Part I Directions: Identify the following scenes as having external or internal conflict. Explain the reasoning for your answer. The first one has been done for you.

nd The Conflict Internal? External? My Reasoning a I chose internal because the conflict is just g Should I do my don't in between me and my conscience. Iagainstwant homework or go play X y to be ashamed of myself for going my with my friends? parents' wishes, but I really want to go play. op -C A man cannot fix the car. LY N O Sally cannot decide what LE to wear to the football P game. M SA like a snack Clyde would

before dinner, but he knows it will spoil his appetite. Stanley is neat and Fred is sloppy. They share a locker.

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Name ________________________________________ The Conflict Internal? External? The Jones family must agree on a place to go for vacation. Gloria thinks her school should change the recess policy. She has started a campaign and plans to speak to the principal.

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Period ___ My Reasoning

Pr 1. Review the end of Chapter Three. What internal conflict is Annemarie experiencing? n io ut rib 2. Think back over the chapters you've already read. Name twotexternal conflicts that Annemarie and s the Danes experience. Di nd a g yin Part III p ocalled conflict resolution. Sometimes, the conflict lasts for The conclusion or solution of a conflict is nearly the entire novel; other times, the conflict ends quickly. Sometimes a new conflict will begin as - C following questions about conflict resolution. soon as another is resolved. Answer the LY N 3. When Mama buys Kirsti the fish shoes, how do Kirsti's actions create conflict? O LE P M SA

4. How is the conflict resolved?

conflict in the novel. You may want to work with a partner.

Part II Number the Stars contains both internal and external conflict. Answer the following questions about

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Assessment Preparation: Indefinite Pronouns

"Someone left the door open, and everyone is cold. Then everybody found a sweater. Now, no one is chilly." Who are the people in this scene? Though we may never know, we do know that the pronouns used don't tell us very much. Who is "someone"? These pronouns don't give us definite information about the nouns they are replacing. Because of that, they are called indefinite pronouns. Like personal pronouns (he, she, it, they, etc.), indefinite pronouns must agree with the verb. Plural indefinite pronouns must have a plural verb and singular indefinite pronouns must have a singular verb. · Singular Indefinite Pronouns: another, anybody, anyone, anything, each, either, everybody, everyone, everything, neither, nobody, no one, nothing, one, somebody, someone, something Something in these lockers smells strange!

Pr phrase, the subject **Notice that even though the subject is separated from the verb by a prepositional n and verb must still agree. io ut · Plural Indefinite Pronouns: both, few, many, several rib ist Examples: Many of them run in the annual school track event. D Several in my class train all year for the race. d an · Singular or Plural: These pronouns can be either singular or plural depending on how they are used in theg in sentence: all, any, more, most, none, some py Examples: Most of the girls are ready for P.E. class. (Because Cothe verb must be plural.) most is referring to girls, which is plural, Most of this gym locker is clean. (Most is referring to LY locker, which is singular, so the verb must be singular.) N O if the verb is singular or plural, replace the indefinite pronoun with a Hint: When trying to determine E personal pronoun.L P MSeveral in my class (practices, practice) for the race. For example: Since youA S know "several" is a plural pronoun, substitute a plural personal pronoun for "several" then attach the verb: They practice. Now you know the correct verb is practice.

Fortunately, someone classified indefinite pronouns, so everyone can use them correctly.

Examples: Everybody from the class is going to the library.

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Several in my class practice for the race.

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Assessment Preparation: Indefinite Pronouns

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Period ___

Directions: Look at Chapter Ten, pages 83 ­ 84. This is the section where the suspicious Nazi soldiers come to Uncle Henrik's house. Begin with the paragraph in which Mama is bringing tea to the guests, and end with the paragraph in which Annemarie tells the officer who died. Look for sentences that use indefinite pronouns. Write those sentences below. Underline the subject once and the verb twice. Write the page number in parentheses after the sentence. An example has been done for you.

"No one spoke." (83)

u ib "Then he moved his gaze, focusing on each person in turn." (84) r ist D d sentences below. Then circle the correct verb. More Practice: Underline the indefinite pronouns in n a theis singular or plural. Write S or P on the line to indicate whether the pronoun g inmusic lessons. 1. _____ Many of my cousins (take, takes) py o 2. _____ Someone (play, plays) C piano. the 3. _____ In the fall, most of them (compete, competes) in music festivals. LY N 4. _____ Several (win, wins) awards. O 5. _____ Everyone in my family (attends, attend) the festivals. LE P Extra Practice: Write five of your own sentences using indefinite pronouns. Underline the subject M once and A verb twice. (Challenge yourself: Write at least one sentence in which you include a S the prepositional phrase (as in "of my cousins" in number 1 above) after the pronoun.)

Challenge question: Why isn't "each" in the following sentence considered an indefinite pronoun?

________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

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Chapters Thirteen ­ Fifteen Comprehension Check

Directions: Answer the following questions to help guide your understanding of the events in each chapter. Write your answers in complete sentences on a separate sheet of paper.

Chapter Thirteen

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. What happened to Mama? Where are the Rosens? What does Annemarie find in the grass? How does Mama react when she finds it? What does Annemarie do with the packet before leaving? How does Mama tell Annemarie to act if she is stopped? Why do you think Mama tells her to act this way?

Chapter Fourteen

1. What story does Annemarie think about while she's running down the path? 2. List three other things Annemarie thinks about as she runs along the path. 3. What event happens in the Little Red Riding Hood story that mirrors what really happens to Annemarie as she reaches the end of the path? 4. What is in front of her at the end of the path? 5. Based on what you already know about the behavior of the soldiers, what do you think they will do?

Chapter Fifteen

g in 1. Who does Annemarie will herself to be like? Why? py 2. What does the soldier do with the lunch? Co smell? 3. What does the soldier say the dogs 4. What is in the packet? Y 5. How do the soldiers react to it? NL 6. Why do you think the handkerchief is so important? What do you think it might be used for? O 7. What does Annemarie notice when she arrives at the boat? 8. What does Uncle Henrik tell her? LE P M SA

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Number the Stars Vocabulary Review Crossword: Chapters 1-9

1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 12 13 14 10 7

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ACROSS 2 3 5 12 14 15 16 17 18 19

under the water with disregard or dislike a strong lock with a key stubborn in a hostile or aggressive manner flinched or moved away as in pain fog or smoke in a rebellious manner a feeling of wonder or admiration with disregard; without respect

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DOWN 1 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 emotionless highly complex or refined in a skillful or agile manner having lean, long limbs short and heavily built hesitantly a ghost or vision complicated commanding; overbearing

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