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THINKING OF COMING TO JOHN MUIR COLLEGE? This greeting was written especially for prospective students (and their "support staff"). Continuing students may linger and read, or jump directly to the specific info they seek. We'll presume that other UCSD webpages have, by now, convinced you to add UCSD to your short list. Your next challenge is to rank UCSD's six undergraduate colleges in order of preference. This may seem next to impossible, even after browsing through many pages. If at all possible, visit campus, or talk or correspond with students at several UCSD colleges. Write to the e-mail address at the bottom of this page and we'll connect you with a first year (or new transfer) Muir e-pen-pal. Should you apply to UCSD and not rank the colleges, you certainly will not end up as a Muir student. Each year Muir fills its entering class with students who made it their top choice. So nota bene, it behooves the UCSD applicant to devote extra time to surfing UCSD's College sites. In your early college years, that decision may have a greater impact on you than your choice of major. Many UCSD students either enter "undeclared", or change their major once or twice. But it is very unusual for students to change their college. What distinguishes Muir? In a nutshell, a cheerful sense of self-irreverence; an "everyone can play" attitude towards extracurricular activities; and UCSD's broadest array of college involvement and leadership opportunities. And rather than having these distract students "from their appointed rounds", Muirons graduate UCSD in the greatest numbers, with top academic honors, and they typically move on to awesome accomplishments. Your mileage may vary. How do you learn more? If you have any questions regarding academics, please forward these to [email protected] Peruse Muir's website, and then forward any questions regarding student life to [email protected] - Patricia Mahaffey, John Muir College Dean of Student Affairs

Muir is popular because of its general education program which combines a variety of year-long sequences in four major academic areas and two expository writing courses. A sequence is three courses, normally in a single subject or discipline (e.g., three courses of American History). An area is a broad area of study such as the humanities or the social sciences. Muir's requirements accommodate a wide range of interests and aptitudes and prepare you for a broad array of majors. The openness and flexibility of the curriculum make Muir College particularly attractive to exceptionally able and well-prepared students as well as to students with well-defined academic interests or students still exploring various educational options, alternatives, and opportunities.

Thus students have the responsibility to tailor their general-education to their personal goals, interests, and academic talents in four personally meaningful general­education sequences and two analytical composition courses. By the time of graduation, Muir students will be required to complete:

· · · ·

one social science sequence one mathematical (calculus) or natural science sequence two sequences selected from two of the following areas: fine arts, humanities, or foreign languages two expository writing courses

Overlaps: A maximum of three courses may be used to satisfy both a general education requirement and major requirements. A student majoring in Chemistry/Environmental Chemistry, Chemistry/Pharmacological, Chinese Studies, Cognitive Science, Economics, Human Development, Interdisciplinary Computing and the Arts, International Studies, Japanese Studies, Literature/English, Literature/Writing, and Management Science or the Joint Major in Mathematics and Economics--each of which requires lower-division courses that could also be used to fulfill two or more of Muir's general education areas--may have to take an additional sequence in order to meet the three-course overlap limit.

Muir General Education

Muir is popular because of its general education program which combines a variety of yearlong sequences in four major academic areas and two expository writing courses. A sequence is three courses, normally in a single subject or discipline (e.g., three courses of American History). An area is a broad area of study such as the humanities or the social sciences. Muir's requirements accommodate a wide range of interests and aptitudes and prepare you for a broad array of majors. The openness and flexibility of the curriculum make Muir College particularly attractive to exceptionally able and well-prepared students as well as to students with well-defined academic interests or students still exploring various educational options, alternatives, and opportunities. Thus students have the responsibility to tailor their general-education to their personal goals, interests, and academic talents in four personally meaningful general­education sequences and two analytical composition courses. By the time of graduation, Muir students will be required to complete:

· · · ·

one social science sequence one mathematical (calculus) or natural science sequence two sequences selected from two of the following areas: fine arts, humanities, or foreign languages two expository writing courses

Overlaps: A maximum of three courses may be used to satisfy both a general education requirement and major requirements. A student majoring in Chemistry/Environmental Chemistry, Chemistry/Pharmacological, Chinese Studies, Cognitive Science, Economics, Human Development, Interdisciplinary Computing and the Arts, International Studies, Japanese Studies, Literature/English, Literature/Writing, and Management Science or the Joint Major in Mathematics and Economics--each of which requires lower-division courses that could also be used to fulfill two or more of Muir's general education areas--may have to take an additional sequence in order to meet the three-course overlap limit.

Muir College General Education Courses Offered Fall 2007 * These classes also fulfill the one quarter Cultural Diversity requirement. SOCIAL SCIENCES ANTH 2 COGS 1 ECON 1, 2, 3 ETHN 1A* LIGN 7* POLI 10, 11, 12, 13 PSYC 1, 3 SOCL 1A USP 3* MATH/NATURAL SCIENCES MATH 10A MATH 20A-B-C BILD 10 CHEM 6A, 6C CHEM 11 CHEM 6A, BILD 1 SIO 30 (previously ERTH) PHYS 1A-B-C PHYS 2B-C PHYS 5, 11 FINE ARTS MUS 4, 15

TDDE 1, TDPW 1 TDHT 22 VIS 3 VIS 84 HUMANITIES HILD 2A HILD 7A* HILD 10 LTEN 21 LTWR 8B (Prerequisite=MCWP 40 & 50) PHIL 13 PHIL 31 TWS 26 FOREIGN LANGUAGE CHIN 11, 21 JAPN 10A JUDA 1 LIFR 1A/AX, 1B/BX, 1D/DX LIGM 1A/AX, 1D/DX LIIT 1A/AX LIPO 1A/AX, 1D/DX LISL 1A*/AX*, 1B*/BX*, 1D*/DX* LISP 1B/BX, 1D/DX LTFR 2A-B-C

LTGM 2A LTIT 2A LTSP 2A-B-C-D LTGK 1 LTKO 1B, 2A-B LTLA 1 LTRU 1A, 2A

ABRAMSON, IAN AGLER, JAMES ALLEN, ERIC ANTONOVICS, KATE BAKOVIC, ERIC BELLARE, MIHIR BELONGIE, SERGE BENDER, EDWARD BERMAN, RONALD BLANCO, JOHN BOATENG, AKOSUA BOATEMA BOULANGER, LISA BRINK, DAVID BRODY, STUART BRYSON, NORMAN BUCKLEY, STEVEN CALLENDER, CRAIG CARSON, RICHARD CHARLES, MARIA CHENG, CHUNG-KUAN CHILUKURI, LAKSHMI CHRISPEELS, MAARTEN J. CHUNG-GRAHAM, FAN CHURCHLAND, PATRICIA CLAFFY, KIMBERLY COHEN, ALAIN COLES, WILLIAM A. CONCHA, JAIME COX, GARY CRUZ, TEDDY CSORDAS, THOMAS CULLEN, JULIE DALY, ALAN DE CALLAFON, RAYMOND DEY, SUGIT DOLAN, JUDITH DUBIN, DANIEL DUBOIS, PAGE ELLIOTT, GRAHAM ELMAN, JEFFREY FANTINO, EDMUND FORBES, DOUGLASS FORD, JOSEPH GALTON, IAN GIBSON, CLARK GOODBLATT, DAVID GREENSTEIN, JACK GRINSTEIN, BENJAMIN HARKINS, EDWIN HARTOUNI, VALERIE HAVIS, ALLAN HENDRICKSON, DAVID HOLWAY, DAVID HOWDEN, WILLIAM HU, PING HUTCHINSON, TARA INTRILIGATOR, KENNETH JED, STEPHANIE JENKINS, ELIZABETH

MATHEMATICS MATHEMATICS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ECONOMICS LINGUISTICS COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS LITERATURE LITERATURE COMMUNICATION BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES PHILOSOPHY BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES VISUAL ARTS MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING PHILOSOPHY ECONOMICS SOCIOLOGY COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MATHEMATICS PHILOSOPHY COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING LITERATURE ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING LITERATURE POLITICAL SCIENCE VISUAL ARTS ANTHROPOLOGY ECONOMICS EDUCATION STUDIES MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING THEATRE PHYSICS LITERATURE ECONOMICS COGNITIVE SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING POLITICAL SCIENCE HISTORY VISUAL ARTS PHYSICS MUSIC COMMUNICATION THEATRE CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING HISTORY STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING PHYSICS LITERATURE PHYSICS

JENSEN, HENRIK JETZ, WALTER JOHNSON, MONTE JONES, BARBARA JONES, WALTON JULES-ROSETTE, BENNETTA KARTIK, NAVIN KEATING, BRIAN KIM, HYONNY KLATCH, REBECCA KOKOTOVIC, MILOS KONECNI, VLADIMIR KOUSSER, THADDEUS KRASHENINNIKOV, SERGEI KRSTIC, MIROSLAV KRYSL, PETR KUMMEL, ANDREW LAU, SILVANUS LEE, SING LIN, JAMES LINDEN, PAUL LOWE, LISA LUO, HUEY-LIN MACLEOD, DONALD MAGAGNA, VICTOR MARES, DAVID MASRY, ELIAS McCULLOCH, ANDREW MOORE, JOHN NEGYESY, JANOS NEWPORT, JOHN NICOLAOU, KYRIACOS NUNEZ, RAFAEL O'BRIEN, WILLIAM OESTERREICHER, HANS ONUCHIC, JOSE OPELLA, STANLEY PARK, LISA SUN-HEE PARRISH, MICHAEL PASHLER, HAROLD PELLOW, DAVID PHILLIPS, DAVID PICKOWICZ, PAUL PLANT, REBECCA POZRIKIDIS, CONSTANTINE PRATHER, KIMBERLY PRICE, PAUL PROPP, WILLIAM REID, RODDEY REMMEL, JEFFREY REYNOLDS, ROGER SAIER, MILTON SANCHEZ, LISA SCHMID-SCHOENBEIN, GEERT SEJNOWSKI, TERRENCE SHARMA, VIVEK SHEVELOW, KATHRYN SMITH, SUSAN SNAITH, YOLANDE

COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES PHILOSOPHY PHYSICS THEATRE SOCIOLOGY ECONOMICS PHYSICS STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING SOCIOLOGY LITERATURE PSYCHOLOGY POLITICAL SCIENCE MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING LITERATURE ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY POLITICAL SCIENCE POLITICAL SCIENCE ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING BIOENGINEERING LINGUISTICS MUSIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY COGNITIVE SCIENCE LITERATURE CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY PHYSICS CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ETHNIC STUDIES HISTORY PSYCHOLOGY ETHNIC STUDIES SOCIOLOGY HISTORY HISTORY MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES HISTORY LITERATURE MATHEMATICS MUSIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ETHNIC STUDIES BIOENGINEERING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES PHYSICS LITERATURE VISUAL ARTS THEATRE

SOLLBERGER, HARVEY SPITZER, NICHOLAS STARK, HAROLD STEINBACH, HAIM STILES, JOAN TALBOT, JAN TESLER, GLENN THEODORAKIS, EMMANUEL TIMMERMAN, ALLAN TODD, MICHAEL TONKOVICH, NICOLE TYNAN, GEORGE TYTLER, DAVID VARGHESE, GEORGE VOELKER, GEOFFREY WASTAL, CARRIE WATSON, JOEL WAVRIK, JOHN WAYNE, DON WELCHMAN, JOHN WESTMAN, ROBERT WILLIAMS, BEN WOOLARD, KATHRYN YIP, WAI-LIM ZILBERG, ELANA

MUSIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MATHEMATICS VISUAL ARTS COGNITIVE SCIENCE MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ECONOMICS STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING LITERATURE MECHANICAL & AEROSPACE ENGINEERING PHYSICS COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING MUIR WRITING ECONOMICS MATHEMATICS LITERATURE VISUAL ARTS HISTORY PSYCHOLOGY ANTHROPOLOGY LITERATURE COMMUNICATION

SPRING 2007 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES MUIR 40 SECT. ID SECT. DAYS 586100 586101 586102 586103 586105 548106 586107 586108 586109 596541 596542 604724 A00 B00 C00 D00 F00 G00 H00 I00 J00 K00 L00 M00 MW MW MW MW TTH TTH TTH TTH TTH MW MW TTH TIME 12:30-1:50 2:00-3:20 3:30-4:50 5:00-6:20 9:30-10:50 11:00-12:20 12:30-1:50 2:00-3:20 3:30-4:50 11:00-12:20 12:30-1:50 9:30-10:50 ROOM 1128B 1128B 2333A 2333A 2346A 2346A 2346A 1128B 1128B 2305B 2346A 1128B INSTRUCTOR Bruce Tindall Bruce Tindall Ted Gideonse Ted Gideonse Maggie Levantovskaya Maggie Levantovskaya Tere Ceseña Jon Perkins Kelly Pendergrast Kelly Pendergrast Karen Van Ness Jon Perkins

MUIR 41 SECT. ID 586110 586111 SECT. A00 B00 DAYS MW MW TIME 9:30-10:50 11-12:20 ROOM 2333A 2333A INSTRUCTOR Lauren Smith Lauren Smith

MUIR 50 SECT. ID 586112 A00 MW 8-9:20 2333A Isa Hinrichs SECT. DAYS TIME ROOM INSTRUCTOR

586113

B00

MW

9:30-10:50

2346A

Chris Wisniewski Chris Wisniewski

586114

C00

MW

11:00-12:20

2346A

586115

D00

MW

12:30-1:50

2305A

David Najar

586116

E00

MW

2:00-3:20

2305A

Karen Stuart

586117

F00

MW

3:30-4:50

2346A

Renee St. Louis Yumi Pak

586118

G00

MW

5:00-6:20

2346A

586119

H00

MW

9:30-10:50

2333B

Erick Ramirez

586120

I00

MW

2:00-3:20

2333B

Karen Van Ness

586121

J00

MW

3:30-4:50

1228B

Karen Van Ness

586122

K00

MW

5:00-6:20

2305A

Renee St. Louis

586123

L00

TTH

9:30-10:50

2333A

Michael Tiboris

586124

M00

TTH

11:00-12:20

2333A

Chris Guzaitis

586125

N00

TTH

12:30-1:50

1128B

Chris Guzaitis

586126

O00

TTH

2:00-3:20

2346A

Patrick Gleason

586127

P00

TTH

3:30-4:50

2333A

Patrick Gleason

586129

R00

TTH

9:30-10:50

2333B

Dixa Ramirez

586130

S00

TTH

11:0-12:20

2333B

Melissa Hidalgo

586131

T00

TTH

12:30-1:50

2333B

Ray Salcedo

586132

U00

TTH

2:00-3:20

2333B

Brad Kreit

586133

V00

TTH

3:30-4:50

2333B

Brad Kreit

MUIR 125 SECT. ID SECT. DAYS TIME ROOM INSTRUCTOR

586134 586135 586136 586137 595841

A00 B00 C00 D00 E00

TTH TTH MW MW TTH

9:30-10:50 11:00-12:20 12:30-1:50 2:00-3:20 8:00-9:20

1106A 1106A 2305B 2346A 1106B

Ramie Tateishi Carrie Wastal Sara Safdie Sara Safdie Ramie Tateishi

http://provost.ucsd.edu/muir/muir-writing/

MCWP COURSES 40. Critical Writing (4) First course of sequence in university reading and writing which satisfies the Muir College graduation requirement in writing. Required of all Muir College first-year students and of transfer students who have not completed a comparable course elsewhere. MCWP 40 introduces students to the basic elements of argument and analysis. Students engage in close reading of texts, weekly writing and revision, and individual conferences. Course must be taken for a letter grade. Those who need additional work to prepare for MCWP 50 will be given a grade of IP and will be required to take MCWP 41. Prerequisite: satisfaction of the Subject A requirement. 50. Critical Writing (4) Second course of sequence in reading and writing which satisfies the Muir College graduation requirement in writing. Required of all Muir College first-year students and of transfer students. MCWP 50 focuses on advanced skills of argument and analysis. Students engage in close reading of texts, weekly writing and revision, and individual conferences. Course must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisite: satisfaction of MCWP 40 requirement or completion of TAG or IGETC agreement. 125. Argument and Analysis (4) An advanced course in argumentation and analysis, with particular attention both to constructing arguments and analyzing the logic and rhetoric of others' arguments. Students will engage in close reading of texts, weekly writing and revision, and individual conferences. A course specially designed for and required of transfer students who enter Muir College under the aegis of TAG or IGETC. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

MCWP 50 or MCWP 125? How are these courses similar to each other? The writing courses developed and taught by the Muir College Writing Program are designed to help you with the process of reading critically and writing analytically. We believe this process is integral to a great number of the courses offered at UCSD. Many of our former students have said that although MCWP 50 or MCWP 25 are among the most demanding courses they have taken at UCSD, we hope that they are also among the most helpful and widely applicable. Both courses are led by experienced and dedicated instructors. And in both courses you will write papers that ask you to research and analyze arguments in a particular field like the sciences, the social and behavioral sciences, or the humanities. The courses focus on the process of writing, including revision strategies, workshops, and one-on-one conferences. Your instructor will provide detailed responses to your written work throughout the quarter. Course descriptions are available online and in the MCWP main office at HSS 2346. The office is open Monday through Friday, from 9am-noon and 1-4pm.

How are these courses different from each other? There are three main differences between MCWP 50 and 125--class size, division credits, and course design. 1) In MCWP 50, class enrollment is held to fifteen students but in MCWP 125, class enrollment is held to twenty students. 2) Students who complete MCWP 125 receive four units of the upper division credits needed to graduate. 3) MCWP 50 assumes that many of the students enrolled have already completed MCWP 40. In contrast, MCWP 125 was created with transfer students in mind so instructors work to catch everyone up to speed on the program's expectations for writing.

MCWP 40

MCWP 50

- SPRING 2007 -

Keeping Score: Sports in Contemporary U.S. Culture

SEC . ID

SECTION

DAY /TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

S00 586130

TTH 11:00-12:20 HSS333B

Melissa Hidalgo

From Monday Night Football to Friday Night Lights, from Billie Jean King to Lisa Leslie, professional sports and the athletes who shine permeate life and living in the U.S. This writing course will examine the role that sports, particularly professional and big-time college sports, plays in the U.S. In the humanities and social sciences, academics and scholars have studied sports and their intimate ties to national culture, looking at the many ways in which sports impact our daily lives. Upon closer examination, we will find that sports offers a way to think critically and analytically about how issues of class, race, gender, sexuality, consumerism, international politics, and nationalism play out on the courts (and courtrooms), fields, and in the arenas across the country and the world. The required reading for this course includes Dave Zirin's What's My Name, Fool? and an anthology of academic essays about sports. Students will be expected to produce a final research paper, from sources preselected by the instructor, which engages an academic discussion about sports and its role in U.S. culture.

Texts: What's My Name, Fool?: Sports and Resistance in the United Statesby David Zirin; and Race Matters: Race, Recreation, and Culture edited by John Bloom and Michael Nevin Willard.

The Afro German Experience "Between Continents": New Perspectives on Cultural Expression and Political Activism

SEC. ID 586116

SECTION E00

DAY/TIME MW 2:00-3:20

ROOM HSS 2333A

INSTRUCTOR Karen Stuart

Why take a course on "Afro Germans"? In 1986, fourteen black and biracial German women came together to discuss their ethnic ambiguity, something generally unacknowledged before in Germanyand the U.S. African-American feminist Audre Lorde saw the global importance of these women who lived "between continents," and convinced feminist editors to record their dialogues in the book, Showing Our Colors. In its foreword, Lorde refers to them as "Afro Germans," a name which they then adopted. Scholars have since explored how this movement influenced new political expressions in areas of culture and activism. One such expression has been Afro German Hip Hop. In addition, Afro German experiences offer us new understandings of the globally accepted and contested categories of race, gender, sexuality, and class. If you want to learn more about the political relevance of such issues, then this course is for you. As a primary text, we will read Ika Hügel-Marshall's memoir of her life as a biracial woman in post-World War II Germany. In addition, we will examine other primary sources and scholarly articles that represent differing perspectives on Afro German experience, looking closely at issues related to feminism, community, and the "African Diaspora." These writings will provide the basis for your research into a specific variation on the course's overall set of themes. You will be expected to write a paper that presents and supports an informed perspective within this discourse in the humanities. Texts: Invisible Woman: Growing up Black in Germanyby Ika Hügel-Marshall; and a photocopied reader. Do You Suffer from Monsteritis?

SEC. ID 586120 586121

SECTION DAY/TIME I00 J00 MW 2-3:20 MW 3:30-4:50

ROOM HSS 2333B HSS 1128B

INSTRUCTOR Karen Van Ness Karen Van Ness

What makes a monster a monster? Why do we sometimes fear them and sometimes love them? The construction of monstrosity in a particular culture frequently associates abnormality with terror so as to uphold a particular cultural definition of normality; however, monsters have also been used as metaphors for positive alternatives to a social order. Using Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as an anchoring text, you will investigate ongoing academic conversations considering how monsters in literature have been constructed in response to and/or as expressions of a culture's anxieties. After researching primary and secondary sources, you will

develop a paper which advances your own perspective on the academic discussion of the construction of monstrosity.

Texts: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley; and a photocopied reader. From Indiana Jones to Professor X: Imagining Academia in Popular Culture and Popular Culture in Academia

SEC. ID 586124 586125

SECTION DAY/TIME M00 N00 TTH 11:00-12:20 TTH 12:30-1:50

ROOM HSS 2333A HSS 2346A

INSTRUCTOR Chris Guzaitis Chris Guzaitis

When you think of your archaeology professor, do you imagine Indiana Jones, who when not teaching is off excavating the Temple of Doom? Or when your professor of religious symbology is on sabbatical, do you envision The DaVinci Code's Professor Langdon battling murderous monks in an attempt to reveal a religious cover-up? Probably not; so, then what do these popular cultural representations of academia communicate about higher education to the general public? What exactly does the U.S. public imagine happens within the ivory tower or in the hallowed halls of universities and colleges across the country? In this course we will examine the various representations of professors, universities, and college students in popular culture and explore what such representations convey about issues of accessibility to higher education. In addressing the theme of access, we will examine issues of race, gender, and class inequalities within higher education and how these inequalities get negotiated in the public sphere. We will also consider the role of popular culture within the academy and whether or not the incorporation of popular culture as an area of study has made academia any more accessible. We will read a variety of sources that present multiple perspectives and approaches to the topic of higher education in popular culture, and we will engage popular cultural texts. Writing will include a research paper that enters the larger academic dialogue about issues of higher education and its relationship to popular culture. Texts: Popular Culture: A Primer by John A. Weaver; and a photocopied reader.

Who Wrote the Book of Love?: The Social Construction of Romantic Love

SEC. ID 586119

SECTION DAY/TIME H00 MW 9:30-10:50

ROOM HSS 2333B

INSTRUCTOR Erick Ramirez

When you think of romantic love, what do you think about? One of the primary questions we will be asking ourselves in this course is where our conception of romantic love comes from. What components are necessary for romantic love to form? Is love a democratic ideal? Has romantic love, as we now know it, always existed? Has it always been viewed as something valuable? How does love affect our social and political institutions? What about our identities as husbands,

wives, men, women, and lovers? We will be reading responses ranging across the social sciences and the humanities both ancient and modern. One answer that we will focus on in this course claims that romantic love is not a stable concept at all, but that relationships and the rules surrounding their formation are governed by the needs and values of human societies and are influenced by pre-existing gender and political norms. Texts: The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera; and a photocopied reader.

Eating Culture: Making Social Meaning of Food

SEC. ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

586117 586122

F00 K00

MW 3:30-4:50 HSS 2346A MW 5:00-6:20 HSS 2305A

Renee St. Louis Renee St. Louis

Everybody has to eat to live, which means that every person has an inescapable relationship to food preparation, service, and consumption. However, textual representations of cooking-- both popular and academic, and everything in between--disagree as to what this relationship indicates, how it is structured, what effects it has on the individual and society, and even what should be considered part of that relationship. As a result, texts which address food and people represent that relationship in a variety of ways. In this class, we will examine academic analyses drawn from the social sciences which relate food and people's relationship to it. In examining these texts, we strive to understand how social science arguments about people and food are made, supported, and reproduced, and how analysis of similar texts yields different results depending on a variety of factors. Finally, students will use these academic models to produce a research-based analysis of the primary text on the subject of food. Texts: How We Eat: Appetite, Culture, and the Psychology of Food by Leon Rappoport; and a photocopied reader.

Personal and Public Tensions in America Medicine

SEC. ID 586132 586133

SECTION DAY/TIME U00 V00 TTH 2:00-3:20 TTH 3:30-4:50

ROOM HSS 2333B HSS 2333B

INSTRUCTOR Brad Kreit Brad Kreit

In 2005, a media circus erupted around the life and death of a Florida woman named Terri Schiavo who had spent the previous 15 years in a persistent vegetative state. The hoopla surrounding Schiavo obscured several debates that have swirled in the medical community regarding the obligations of physicians, the rights of patients, and the role of the public and policy makers in making decisions about the concept and meaning of death. Tensions between

these three constituencies extend into a variety of health care arenas such as health insurance policy and access to care. This class will offer a brief introduction to how these stakeholders factor into decisions on end-of-life care, insurance, and research into new medical treatments such as stem cell-based treatments. Texts: Uninsured in America: Life and Death in the Land of Opportunity by Susan Sered and Rushika Fernandopulle; and a photocopied reader.

Virgins, Vamps, Criminals, and Flappers

SEC. ID 586112 586129

SECTION DAY/TIME A00 R00 MW 8:00-9:20 TTH 9:30-10:50

ROOM HSS 2346A HSS 2333B

INSTRUCTOR Isa Hinrichs Dixa Ramirez

The 1920s and 1930s have frequently been associated with progressive modernization. While continuous economic and industrial developments indicated a transformation at the social level, cinema, as a relatively modern art form, reflected and initiated the construction of a "modern woman." This new female identity represented, on the one hand, an abrupt break from the constraints of Victorian corsets, while simultaneously reproducing a distinctly gendered subjectivity. Shaping the representation of the female body in film and the gestures of these cinematic bodies, other modernist art forms played a significant role in the construction of "new" femininity. The cinematic woman of the 1920s and 1930s was, however, not a uniform and easily apprehensible character, but consisted of a conglomeration of different types of femininity. This course will examine the current discourse that surround how film, as a cultural product, reinforced gender roles and social stereotypes, while simultaneously giving rise to a new kind of femininity. We will also examine essays that address the role women, as spectators and as movie stars, played as participants in the production of their own subjectivity. We will, in addition, look at scholarly dialogues that examine how early cinema and women in general transformed the female look and dress in relation to other modernist movements, such as Cubism and Art Deco. This class will survey a number of critical essays which analyze the role and the representation of the feminine in early film, as well as a longer text, leading to the development of a research paper that contributes to the academic discussion. Texts: The Awakening by Kate Chopin; and a photocopied reader.

The Construction of Masculinities

SEC. ID SECTION DAY/TIME 586131 T00 TTH 12:30-1:50

ROOM HSS 2333B

INSTRUCTOR Raymond Salcedo

This course will focus on the performance and construction of masculinity as it intersects with issues of race/ethnicity, class, nationality, and sexuality. We will read and analyze a fictional

novel, as well as critical essays by writers and intellectuals who offer multiple perspectives and approaches as they treat these concepts. As we consider how terms such as "butch," "macho," and "sissy" are socially constructed and give meanings to our gendered bodies, we will map out histories of these categories to understand them as fluid concepts that change over time and reflect certain anxieties and maintain (or challenge) social power structures. Writing assignments will include a 13-15 page research paper demonstrating each student's ability to enter the academic dialogue/discussion surrounding the discourse of masculinity. Texts: Jarhead by Anthony Swofford; and a photocopied reader.

Who Owns the Water?: The Theory and Politics of California's Water Scarcity

SEC. ID 586123

SECTION L00

DAY/TIME TTH 9:30-10:50

ROOM HSS 2333A

INSTRUCTOR Michael Tiboris

Southern California should be impossible. Annual rainfall here is similar to Iraq, and the main sources of water are an extensive and expensive system of aqueducts (some of which are 1,400 miles long, drawing water from the Colorado River basin). Nevertheless, California is one of the most successful desert civilizations in the history of the planet, so much so that the steadily increasing population threatens to outpace the water supply. In other parts of the world - for example, India and Bolivia - similar crises have degenerated into violent conflict over scarce fresh water. Why does this seem unlikely to happen here, or is it just a matter of time? Students in this class will examine different answers to the question: Who, if anyone, has a right to the important and scarce natural resource of water? While considering this philosophical issue in environmentalism, we will also learn about the surprisingly epic, sometimes even violent, history of water policy and distribution in California since the mid-19th century. Using their newly informed perspectives on these issues, students will learn how to develop an academic research project on a narrow topic within this broad area of environmental history and theory. Texts: Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner; and a photocopied reader.

The Politics of the Rainbow: Queer Issues, Civil Rights, & Pop Culture

SEC. ID 586118

SECTION G00

DAY/TIME MW 5:00-6:20

ROOM HSS 2346A

INSTRUCTOR Yumi Pak

In this class we will examine the various ideologies that surround the issue of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) studies, as well as queer studies, in the United States. By engaging in academic analyses of argument structure, we will look at how these issues have surfaced in discipline-specific debates in the humanities, with particular attention paid to philosophy, feminist studies, and literature. We will also examine what effect these academic

discussions have in developing the relationship between media and society by looking into how images of queer populations have surfaced in the mainstream media, and examine just what these images are arguing about both queer populations and "straight" society. Intersections between sexuality, race, class, and nationality will also be an integral part of our discussions. Students will produce a final research paper for the class. No previous knowledge of or research in the subject of queer studies is required for the course. Texts: Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg; and a photocopied reader.

Rage and Reason: Investigating Constructions of Islam

SEC. ID 586115

SECTION D00

DAY/TIME MW 12:30-1:50

ROOM HSS 2333A

INSTRUCTOR David Najar

In her 2004 book titled The Force of Reason, Italian journalist and best-selling author Oriana Fallaci castigates Europeans for allowing a Muslim invasion that is morphing the continent into "Eurabia." In the same text, she says, "Islam is a pond. And a pond is a trough of stagnant water...it is never purified...it is easily polluted, like a watering hole for livestock of little value. The pond does not love life: It loves death." Fallaci is not alone in her view of Islam; in fact, respected academics such as Bernard Lewis and popular films such as Chuck Norris's actionadventure vehicle Delta Force construct Muslims as raging, dangerous threats to the American way of life. However, this view is being contested in academics by scholars such as Iranian American Reza Aslan and by filmmakers such as Egyptian-American Jehane Noujaim. The West is not only involved in a military conflict with the Middle East but also a war of stories, images, and meanings. In this course, we will interrogate cultural texts that have worked to create Muslims as unworthy of self-determination and prone to wild acts of violence. Additionally, we look to dissonant stories and analyses that contradict this dominant narrative. In doing so, we will consider questions such as: Are we currently in a clash of civilizations? Is this a clash of monotheisms? Do we need new ideas and language to define the conflict between the West and the Middle East? Three and half years into a war that has killed thousands, it is crucial to consider why we are fighting. Texts: No god but God by Reza Aslan; and a photocopied reader.

Love and Hate: Religion and Religious Fundamentalism

SEC. ID SECTION 586113 586114 B00 C00

DAY/TIME MW 9:30-10:50 MW 11:00-12:20

ROOM HSS 2346A HSS 2346A

INSTRUCTOR Chris Wisniewski Chris Wisniewski

There's a thin line between love and hate / Wider divide that you can see between good and bad / There's a grey place between black and white

· Iron Maiden, from their album Brave New World

Relying on post-911 perspectives, many observers argue that religious fundamentalism is on the rise, especially Islamic fundamentalism. More often than not, the observation signals a concern that is based on the assumption and animated by the fear that religious fundamentalism brings with it inevitable, irrational, violent, and even lethal confrontation with modern, peaceful, and "secularized" cultures--among which the United States and Western Europe are usually included--and in so doing characterizes religious fundamentalism as intrinsically anti-modern and non-Western. But any proposition that inordinately focuses on a particular religious tradition (such as Islam) obscures that fact that every significant religious tradition has a welldocumented history of responding at some point to other faiths with lethal force, to say nothing of the great amount of violence that `religious fundamentalists' direct at members of their own, larger faith communities; it also ignores the fact that religious fundamentalism occurs in all kinds of otherwise very modern societies. This class explores fundamentalism (in itself, a sometimes highly contested term) in a variety of monotheistic (Islamic, Jewish, and Christian) and non-monotheistic (Hindu, Buddhist, etc.) faith contexts, and takes as its starting point the call to love and tolerance that is present in the sacred texts and core teachings of each of these religions. Put this way, then, a better question might be to ask how or why some disciples of these different faiths--who are dedicated believers in a tradition that goes to great lengths to preach love and tolerance--nevertheless resort to hatred and intolerance? Texts: Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith by Jon Krakauer; and a photocopied reader.

From Jack Tarr to Jack Sparrow: Piracy in the Atlantic World

SEC. ID 586126 586127

SECTION DAY/TIME O00 P00 TTH 2:00-3:20 TTH 3:30-4:50

ROOM HSS 2346A HSS 2333A

INSTRUCTOR Patrick Gleason Patrick Gleason

So you think you know pirates, eh? You've been on the ride at Disneyland, seen both Pirates of the Caribbean movies, and can shout "Avast, me hearties!" with the best of them. Well, do you know the difference between privateers, buccaneers, and pirates? Did you know that some of the most successful pirates were women? That "walking the plank" and burying treasure were the inventions of novels and movies? That pirate ships were often multi-national communities governed by democratic consent of the crew rather than by a dictatorial captain? If you want to do research on the real history of piracy in the Atlantic, learn about the role of piracy in American history and in popular culture, and learn how to put together an academic research project, then this may be the class for you. No previous knowledge of maritime history is required, although students may develop an uncontrollable urge to shout "Aaargh!" and walk about with parrots on their shoulders.

Texts: Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age by Marcus Rediker; and a photocopied reader.

MCWP 50 INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHIES

Patrick Gleason A former Muir College student, Patrick Gleason's research lies in Gothic studies, particularly nineteenth and early twentieth-century American literature. He has also taught Muir 50 courses on monstrosity and prison literatures. Chris Guzaitis Chris Guzaitis is from the Cultural Studies section of the Literature department. She is currently finishing her dissertation, "The Imperial Logic of Sexuality." Melissa Hidalgo Melissa Hidalgo is from the Literature department. Her emphasis is in Cultural Studies. She has taught English and writing courses at the high school, community college, and university levels. Her current research interests include education, pedagogy, U.S. imperialism, and the British literary canon. Isa Hinrichs Isa Hinrichs is from the Literature department and her research interests lie in Comparative Literature, with a focus on film. Recently, she taught a Muir 50 class on the filmic works of David Cronenberg. Brad Kreit Bradley Kreit is a graduate student in the Anthropology department and is currently writing about the role of employers and government in health care. Prior to coming to UCSD, he engaged in volunteer work with a Costa Rican radio station. David Najar David Najar is from the Literature department. He studies U.S. and Middle East political, military, and cultural encounters. His work focuses on how the United States has constructed Islam, Arabs, and the Middle East through popular culture, media, and policy statements. David has also worked as a filmmaker and film editor. Yumi Pak Yumi Pak is from the Literature department. She is interested in the intersections of queer, feminist and literary theories within 20th-century Korean American /Asian American literatures and 18th-century British Restoration literature. Erick Ramirez Erick Ramirez is from the Philosophy department. In his work, he explores human morality and its internal motivations. Ray Salcedo Ray Salcedo is from the Literature department. His research focuses on identity practices such as passing in Queer Chicano fiction and drama.

Renee St. Louis Renee St. Louis's research background is in domesticity, violence, gender, sexuality and U.S. American literatures. A poet, she has taught a variety of MCWP courses on such topics as insanity, paranoia and folklore. Karen Stuart Karen Stuart is from the Literature department. Her research interests include problematic relationships between discourses on psychology and colonial power structures or stereotypes connected to Africa. Michael Tiboris Michael Tiboris is from the Philosophy department. His research is on theories of distributive justice, in particular how the values of equality and moral responsibility interact. His scholarly interests also extend to the topic of environmental ethics. Karen Van Ness Karen Van Ness works on Trans-Atlantic Modernist poetry. She received her undergraduate degree from Brown University in Rhode Island and received her M.A. from UCSD. Carrie Wastal Carrie Wastal is the Director of the Muir Writing Program. She holds a doctorate in Composition and Rhetoric from the Literature Department at UCSD. Her research interests include public policies for higher education, writing instruction, and nontraditional students. Chris Wisniewski Chris Wisniewski is from the History department and specializes in Latin American History. His current research focuses on the experiences of the Franciscans in New Spain-Mexico during 1760-1860.

MCWP 125

-Spring 2007-

Between Technology and the Arts SEC . ID 586134 A00 TTH 9:30-10:50 HSS 1106A Ramie Tateishi SECTION DAY /TIME ROOM INSTRUCTOR

595841

E00

TTH 8:00-9:20

HSS 1106B

Ramie Tateishi

Advancements in technology have given rise to new forms of creativity such as computer music and computer-generated art, expanding the boundaries and definitions of artistic expression. While some embrace the possibilities offered by these new art forms, others Still others argue that we should believe that they rob us of our humanity by subsuming the uniquely "human" activity of artistic expression into forms which are precisely inhuman. not be quick to make so rigid a distinction between "humanity" and "technology," especially in this modern age where much of everyday life is intimately connected with technology, from cell phones to the Internet. In this course we will examine articles and essays that

support, critique, and engage with these various standpoints in order to better understand the rhetorical techniques used to shape this discussion, leading to a 13-15-page final paper focusing on an original argument about the status and value of human aesthetics in the face of technology. Text: A photocopied reader.

SEC . ID 586136 586137

SECTION C00 D00

DAY /TIME MW 12:30-1:50 MW 2:00-3:20

ROOM HSS 2305B 2346A

INSTRUCTOR Sara Safdie Sara Safdie

Texts: Saving Place: An Ecocomposition Reader by Sidney Dobrin.

Human Actions and the "Wilderness" SEC . ID 586135 SECTION B00 DAY /TIME TTH 11:00-12:20 ROOM HSS 1106A INSTRUCTOR Carrie Wastal

In this course, we will examine current and long-standing issues about the effects of humans on the wilderness and of the wilderness on humans. From the Modern Wilderness Movement of the 1900s to current discussions about wilderness management and wildlife resources, biologists, naturalists, and scientists have expressed varying perspectives about the need to regulate the interactions of humans, wildlife, and the American wilderness. In order to address this topic, we will focus, in addition to other issues, on the recent intensification of discussions regarding human attempts to live among wildlife and the commodification of the wilderness. Questions we will investigate include: Is our interaction with animals more dangerous for us or for wildlife and their habitats? What do we lose and what do we gain by such interactions? How has the commodification of the wilderness informed our views of these areas and of local wildlife? While some natural scientists may argue that we enrich our lives by communing with the wilderness, others argue that we do not enrich the wilderness, that in fact, we destroy sensitive wilderness areas. We will address these arguments and others in this course which culminates in a research paper that asks students to add their informed perspective to this discussion. Texts: Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer; and a photocopied reader.

Math/Natural Sciences Choose ONE year-long sequence. Courses marked # must be taken in sequential order.

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#MATH 10A-B-C #MATH 20A-B-C (effective Fall 2003) Biology (BILD) 10 plus any two courses from 7, 12, 14, 20, 22, 24, 26, 30, 32, 36 (Although this sequence is for non-science majors, Biology 10 contains a significant amount of chemistry) #Chemistry (CHEM) 6A-B-C #Chemistry (CHEM) 6A, 6B; Biology (BILD) 1 Chemistry (CHEM) 11-12-13 (non-science major sequence) Earth Science (ERTH) 1, 10, 20, 30 (choose three) #Physics (PHYS) 1A-B-C #Physics (PHYS) 2A-B-C #Physics (PHYS) 4A*-B-C (* 4A commences winter quarter) Physics (PHYS) 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (choose three)

Mathematics (MATH) 10A-B-C Calculus Each of the three parts of the course is offered each quarter by various professors. Mathematics 10A-B-C is a general introduction to the subject, with emphasis on word problems, conceptual exercises, and graphical exercises. Applied examples show how mathematicians and physicists describe the world. The sequence is suitable for majors in the liberal arts, economics, and most biology majors except for molecular biology, which requires the 20 series, and ecology, behavior, and evolution, which strongly recommend the 20 series. MATH 10A Differentiation and integration of algebraic functions. Fundamental theorems of calculus; applications. Three lectures; two recitations. (Credit not given if Math 20A previously completed.) Prerequisite: appropriate score on UCSD placement exam. MATH 10B Further applications of the definite integral. Calculus of trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions; complex numbers. (Credit not given if Math 20B previously taken.) Prerequisite: Math 10A. MATH 10C Vector geometry, velocity, and acceleration vectors; partial derivatives, multiple integrals; exact differentials. (Credit not given if Math 20C previously completed.) Prerequisite: Math 10B. [top]

Mathematics (MATH) 20A-B, 20C Calculus for Science and Engineering A more advanced introductory course than Mathematics 10A-B-C, 20A-B-C presumes four years of high school mathematics. Mathematics 20A-B-C is required for certain majors, such as mathematics, management science and decision science, physics, chemistry, engineering, and some of the majors in biology. It fulfills the same Muir College general education requirement as Mathematics 10A-B-C. Each of the three parts of the sequence is offered each quarter by various professors. MATH 20A. Calculus for Science and Engineering Foundations of differential and integral calculus of one variable. Functions, graphs, continuity, limits, derivative, tangent line. Applications with algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Introduction to the integral. Prerequisite: Passing score on placement examination or completion of Math 4C with a grade of B or better.

MATH 20B. Calculus for Science and Engineering Integral calculus of one variable and its applications, with exponential, logarithmic, hyperbolic and trigonometric functions. Methods of integration. Polar coordinates in the plane. Prerequisite: Math 20A or equivalent / Score of 4 or better on AB calculus AP test.

MATH 20C. Calculus for Science and Engineering Vector geometry, vector functions, and their derivatives. Partial differentiation. Maxima and minima. Double integration. Prerequisite: Math 20B or equivalent / Score of 4 or better on BC calculus AP test. [top]

Biology (BILD) 10 plus any two courses from 7, 12, 14, 22, 24, 26, 30, 32, 36 The following biology courses are designed for non-biology students and do not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology majors. BILD 10 is required for all other courses in the sequence. BILD 7: The Beginning of Life An introduction to the basic principles of plant and animal development, emphasizing the similar strategies by which diverse organisms develop. Practical applications of developmental principles as well as ethical considerations arising from these technologies will be discussed. BILD 10: Fundamental Concepts of Modern Biology An introduction to the biochemistry and genetics of cells and organisms; illustrations are drawn from microbiology and human biology. Some chemistry is included in this course.

Students may learn whatever chemistry is introduced if they had no chemistry in high school. Choose any two of the following courses: BILD 12: Neurobiology and Behavior An introduction to the organization and functions of the nervous system; topics include molecular, cellular, developmental systems and behavioral neurobiology. Prerequisites: Bio 10 or equivalent. Bio 1, 2, 3. BILD 14: Plant Biology An introduction to plant biology for non-majors. Topics will include plant growth and development, plants and the environment, agriculture, plant diseases, medicinal plants, and plant biotechnology. BILD 20: Human Genetics in Modern Society Fundamentals of human genetics and introduction to modern genetic technology such as gene cloning and DNA finger printing. Applications of these techniques, such as forensic genetics, genetic screening, and genetic engineering. Social impact and ethical implications of these applications. BILD 22: Human Nutrition A survey of our understanding of the basic chemistry and biology of human nutrition; discussions of all aspects of food; nutritional value, production, distribution, cultural aspects. Discussion of human health, public health and public policy. Prerequisite: Bio 10. BILD 24: Biology of Human Reproduction A survey and analysis of sexual reproduction in various organisms, with special emphasis on humans. Discussions of inheritance, genetic diseases, and public policy issues relating to humans. Prerequisite: Bio 10. BILD 26: Human Physiology Introduction to the elements of human physiology and the functioning of the various organ systems. A survey of human evolution, nutrition, disease, and environmental adaptation. Prerequisite: Bio 10. BILD 30: Biomedicine/Microbes General principles of microbiology with emphasis on the cell biology of microorganisms and of the cells with which they interact in causing diseases of man and animals. A discussion of infection by bacteria, fungi and viruses, and host responses to infection. Prerequisite: Bio 10. BILD 32: Biomedicine/Cancer An introduction to molecular, cellular, and immunological aspects of cancer and a consideration of the sociological and psychological impact of cancer on the individual and general society. Prerequisite: Bio 10. BILD 36: AIDS Science and Society An introduction to all aspects of the AIDS epidemic. Topics include the epidemiology, biology

and clinical aspects of HIV infections; HIV testing; education and approaches to therapy and the social, political and legal impacts of AIDS on the individual and society. [top]

Chemistry (CHEM) 6A-B-C The Chemistry 6 sequence is a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. The sequence provides an in-depth and detailed coverage of both conceptual (qualitative) and calculational (quantitative) aspects of chemistry. CHEM 6A: General Chemistry Topics include stoichiometry; gases, liquids, and solids; solutions and colligative properties; equilibrium constants; and ionic equilibria. Prerequisites: proficiency in high school chemistry or physics and in high school math; Math 10A may be taken concurrently. CHEM 6B: General Chemistry Topics include thermodynamics; oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry; kinetics; quantum theory and atomic structure. Prerequisites: Chem. 6A; Math 20A or Math 10A. CHEM 6C: General Chemistry Topics include more about atoms; chemical bonding and molecular structure; detailed descriptive chemistry of the elements; coordination chemistry; nuclear chemistry; organic chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisite: Chem. 6B. [top]

Chemistry (CHEM) 6A, 6B, and Biology (BIO) 1 CHEM 6A: General Chemistry Topics include stoichiometry; gases, liquids, and solids; solutions and colligative properties; equilibrium constants; and ionic equilibria. Prerequisites: proficiency in high school chemistry or physics and in high school math; Math 4C or equivalent. CHEM 6B: General Chemistry Topics include thermodynamics; oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry; kinetics; quantum theory and atomic structure. Prerequisites: Chem. 6A and Math 20A or Math 10A. BIO 1: Cell Biology This course is an introduction to the basic unit of life (the cell), life-sustaining processes (photosynthesis and respiration), perpetuation of life, and patterns of inheritance (Mendelian genetics and molecular biology). Prerequisites: two quarters of general chemistry (the second

quarter may be taken concurrently). Please note: Biology 1 is a prerequisite for biology majors and therefore quite rigorous. [top]

Chemistry (CHEM) 11, 12, 13 The Chemistry 11, 12, 13 sequence in general chemistry is designed for non-science majors. Its objective is to provide students not continuing in science a broad overview of the fundamental concepts of chemistry and a working knowledge of the application of these principles to the solution of chemical problems. CHEM 11: The Periodic Table May not be taken for credit if any AP credit is claimed for chemistry, or after any general chemistry course. CHEM 12: Molecules and Reactions Prerequisites: Chemistry 11 or a good high school chemistry course. CHEM 13: Chemistry of Life Prerequisite: Chemistry 12. [top]

Earth Science (ERTH) 1, 10, 20, 30 (choose three) ERTH 1: The Planets Space exploration has revealed an incredible diversity among the planets and moons in our solar system. The planets and their histories will be compared to gain insight and a new perspective on planet Earth. ERTH 10: The Earth A basic introduction to geology for student with little science background. ERTH 20: The Atmosphere Descriptive introduction to meteorology and climate studies. Prerequisites: some high school physics and chemistry recommended. ERTH 30: The Oceans Modern ideas and description of the physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of oceanography. Prerequisites: some high school physics and chemistry recommended. [top]

Physics (PHYS) 1A-B-C The science of physics involves the observation of natural phenomena and events. From these observations comes the mathematical formulation of general principles which may be tested further or applied to specific problems. Because physics is so basic to other sciences, its study provides a background with broad flexibility for later activities. For most of the biology and chemistry majors, the 1 series is sufficient; however, if students have special interests in physical aspects of biology or chemistry they are urged to opt for the 2 or 4 series. Computer Science & Engineering, Electricial & Computer Engineering, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Physics, or Structural Engineering majors must select either the 2 or 4 series. Simple calculus, trigonometry, and vectors are used extensively in lectures, problem sets, and exams. Students with insufficient background in physics are advised to take Physics 11. PHYS 1A-B-C is a lecture course covering mechanics in A, electricity, magnetism, and thermodynamics in B, and modern physics in C. PHYS 1A: Mechanics o First quarter of a three quarter calculus-based lecture introductory physics course geared toward life-science majors. Equilibrium and motion of particles in Newtonian mechanics, examples from astronomy, biology and sports, oscillations and waves, vibrating strings and sound. Prerequisites: Math 10A or 20A and concurrent enrollment in Math 10B or 20B.

PHYS 1B: Electricity, Magnetism, and Thermodynamics o Second quarter of a three-quarter calculus-based lecture introductory physics course geared toward life-science majors. Electric fields, magnetic fields, DC and AC circuitry, and thermal physics. Prerequisites: Physics 1A and concurrent enrollment in Math 10C or Math 20C. PHYS 1C: Diffusion, Radiation, and Modern Physics o Third quarter of a three-quarter calculus-based lecture introductory physics course geared toward life science majors. Behavior of systems under combined thermal and electric forces, the interaction of light with matter as illustrated through optics and quantum mechanics. Examples from biology and instrumentation. Prerequisite: Physics 1B and Math 10C or 20C. [top]

Physics (PHYS) 2A-B-C PHYS 2A: Mechanics Treats vectors, motion in one and two dimensions, Newton's first and second laws, work and

energy, conservation of energy, linear momentum, collisions, rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics, gravitation. Prerequisites: Math 20A and concurrent enrollment in Math 20B. PHYS 2B: Electricity and Magnetism Deals with charge and matter, the electric field, Gauss's law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, electromotive force and circuit, the magnetic field, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, inductance and magnetic properties of matter, and Maxwell's theory. Prerequisites: Physics 2A, Math 20B, and concurrent enrollment in Math 20C. PHYS 2C: Fluids, Waves, Thermodynamics, and Optics Continuation of Physics 2B covering fluid mechanics, waves in elastic media, sound waves, temperature, heat and the first law of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, geometric optics, interference and diffraction. Prerequisites: Physics 2B, Math 20C, and concurrent enrollment in Math 21D. [top]

Physics (PHYS) 4A-B-C The Physics 4 sequence is intended for physics majors in general. The five quarters allow for a slower, more careful treatment of essentially the same topics covered in the Physics 2 sequence. This sequence commences winter quarter. PHYS 4A: Mechanics Covers vectors, particle kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, collisions, rotational kinematics and dynamics, and equilibrium of rigid bodies. Prerequisites: Math 20A or AH and concurrent enrollment in Math 20B. PHYS 4B: Mechanics, Fluids, Waves, and Heat Treats oscillations, gravity, fluid statics and dynamics, waves in elastic media, sound waves, heat and the first law of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, second law of thermodynamics, gaseous mixtures and chemical reactions. Prerequisites: Physics 4A, Math 20B, and concurrent enrollment in Math 20C. PHYS 4C: Electricity and Magnetism Concerns charge and Coulomb's law, electric field, Gauss's law, electric potential capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, magnetic field, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, inductance, magnetic properties of matter, LRC circuits, Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: Physics 4B, Math 21C, and concurrent enrollment in Math 20C. [top]

Physics (PHYS) 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (choose three) The following Physics sequence is designed for non-science majors. PHYS 5: The Universe Introduction to astronomy. Topics include the earth's place in the universe; the atom and light; the birth of life and death of stars; the Milky Way galaxy; normal and active galaxies; and cosmology. Students may not receive credit for both Physics 5 and Physics 7. Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. PHYS 6: Physics of Space Science and Exploration Descriptive introduction to basic physics concepts relevant to space science and exploration. Topics include gravity; orbits, weightlessness, and Kepler's laws; the Earth's physical environment (including its atmosphere, its magnetic field, and radiation from the sun); and light as an electromagnetic wave. These topics form the basis for an introduction to the space program and discussion of the scientific reasons for performing experiments or observations in space. Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. PHYS 7: Introduction to Astronomy Introduction to astronomy and astrophysics. Topics same as Physics 5. This course uses basic pre-calculus level mathematics (algebra, proportions, logs, similar triangles). Students may not receive credit for both Physics 5 and Physics 7. PHYS 8: Physics of Everyday Life Examines phenomena and technology encountered in daily life from a physics perspective. Topics include waves, musical instruments, telecommunication, sports, appliances, transportation, computers, and energy sources. Physics concepts will be introduced and discussed as needed employing some algebra. No prior physics knowledge is required. Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. PHYS 9: The Solar System A non-mathematical exploration of our Solar System and other planetary systems for nonscience majors. The Sun, terrestrial and giant planets, satellites, asteroids, comets, and meteors. The formation of planetary systems, space exploration, the development and search for life. PHYS 10: Concepts in Physics A general physics course for non-science majors. Topics covered are motion, energy, heat, waves, electric current, radiation, light, atoms and molecules, and nuclear fission and fusion. This course emphasizes concepts with minimal mathematical formulation. Prerequisite: college algebra or equivalent. Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. PHYS 11: Survey of Physics This course is a survey of physics for non-science majors with strong mathematical background, including calculus. Physics 11 describes the laws of motion, gravity, energy, momentum and relativity. A laboratory component consists of 2 experiments with gravity and conservation principles.

Fine Arts Choose a year-long sequence. Courses marked # must be taken in sequential order.

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#Music (MUS) 1A-B-C (Music Literacy) Music (MUS) 4 plus any two from 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13AF, 13AM, 13AS, 14, or 15 Music (MUS) 5, 7, 14 Theatre/General Intro(TDGE) 1 plus two courses from Theatre/Acting (TDAC) 1, Theatre/Design (TDDE) 1, Theatre/General Film(TDGE) 10 or Theatre/Playwriting (TDPW 1) Theater/History (TDHT) 10, 21, 22, 23(choose three) Visual Arts (VIS) 1, 2, or 3 (choose two) plus 111 Visual Arts (VIS) 20, 21, 22, 111 (choose three) Visual Arts (VIS) 22, 84, 154 (VIS 84 is a prerequisite to VIS 154)

Music (MUS) 1A-B-C Musical Literacy The intent of this year-long course is to develop listening abilities through a conceptual understanding of the structure of music, together with listening exercises and techniques. Topics include musical notation, melodic transcription, scales, chords, intervals, keys, rhythm, meter, and elements of musical form. The sequence is primarily intended for non-majors. [top]

Music (MUS) 4 plus two courses from 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13AF, 13AM, 13AS, 14, or 1b5 MUS 4: Introduction to Western Music A brief survey of the history of Western music from the Middle Ages to the present. Much attention will be paid to the direct experience of listening to music and attendance of concerts. Class consists of lectures, listening labs, and live performances. MUS 8: American Music Music 8 is designed to study the development of music in America. The focus will be both on the vernacular traditions including hymn singing, country music, jazz, blues, big band, rock, etc., as well as the cultivated traditions of various composers from William Billings to John Cage. MUS 9: Symphony Music 9 will consist of lectures and listening sessions devoted to a detailed discussion of a small number of recognized masterworks (e.g., Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, etc.).

MUS 10: Chamber Music Music 10 will consist of lectures and listening sessions devoted to a detailed discussion of recognized Chamber masterworks (e.g., Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Bartok, etc.). MUS 11: Folk and Popular Music A course on folk and popular musics of the world, all geographic regions. Folk and/or popular music will be covered through lectures, films, and listening sessions devoted to detailed discussion of music indigenous to varying cultures/areas of the world. MUS 12: Opera Music 12 will consist of lectures, listening labs, and films. An in-depth discussion of five operas written between 1642-1925 by Monteverdi, Mozart, Verdi, Bizet, and Berg is included. Assigned readings and listening to materials on reserve in the Central Library prepares students for class presentations. Attendance at a selection of concerts and related events is required. Critiques on specific subjects are written, corrected, and discussed. MUS 13AF: World Music/Africa A course that focuses on the music of Africa and on African ways of music-making in the Diaspora to the Caribbean and South America. No prior technical knowledge of music is necessary. MUS 13AM: World Music/Multicultural America A study of music cultures in the United States, particularly Native American, Hispanic American, European American, and Asian American, and Pacific Islanders from the perspective of ethnicity, origin, interaction, and the contribution of various ethnic groups to American musical life. No prior technical knowledge of music is necessary. MUS 13AS: World Music/Asia and Oceania Introduction to selected performance traditions of Asia and Oceania with links to local and visiting musicians from these cultures. No prior technical knowledge of music is necessary. MUS 14: Contemporary Music This course offers opportunities to prepare oneself for experiences in new music (through preview lectures), to hear performances (by visiting or faculty artists), and to discuss each event informally with a faculty panel in an effort to foster informed listening to the new in music. MUS 15: Popular Music A course on popular music from different time periods, covered through lectures, films, and listening sessions. Topics vary from year to year. [top]

Music (MUS) 5, 7, 14

MUS 5: Introduction to Music Making This course is designed to discover musical potential and expand musical experience. No knowledge of music, notation, or instrumental skill is necessary. Small lab sessions present music through composing, improvising, and performing. Results take the form of works for tapes, theatre, voices, or instruments. MUS 7: Music, Science, and Computers An exploration of the interactions among music, science, and technology, including the development and history of science and technology from the perspective of music and the modern resynthesis of these disciplines occurring around computers. MUS 14: Contemporary Music This course is described in the preceding sequence. [top]

Theatre/General (TDGE) 1 plus two courses from Theatre/Acting (TDAC) 1, Theatre/Design (TDDE) 1, Theatre/General (TDGE) 10 or Theatre/Playwriting (TDPW 1) TDGE 1: Introduction to Theatre An introduction to fundamental concepts in drama and performance. Students will attend performances and learn about how the theatre functions as an art and as an industry in today's world. TDAC 1: Introduction to Acting A beginning course in the fundamentals of acting: establishing a working vocabulary and acquiring the basic skills of the acting process. Through exercises, compositions and improvisations, the student actor explores the imagination as the actor's primary resource, and the basic approach to text through action. TDDE 1: Introduction to Design for the Theatre A survey of contemporary and historical concepts and practices in the visual arts of the theatre; studies in text analysis, studio processes, and technical production; elementary work in design criticism. A course serving non-majors as an introduction to theatre and majors as the first step in the design and production course sequence. TDGE 10: Theatre and Film Theatre and Film analyzes the essential differences between theatrical and cinematic approaches to drams. Through selected play/film combinations, the course looks at how the director uses actors and the visual languages of the stage and screen to guide and stimulate the audience's response. TDPW: Introduction to Playwriting A workshop designed to liberate the dramatic imagination. Students develop character and

action through a variety of individual and group exercises that involve activities such as realworld observation, acting improvisations, or written work. [top]

Theatre/History (TDHT) 10, 21, 22, 23 (choose three) Survey of Dramatic Literature TDHT 10: Introduction to Play Analysis An introduction to the fundamental techniques of analyzing dramatic texts. Focus is on the student's ability to describe textual elements and their relationships to each other as well as on strategies for writing critically about drama. Prerequisites: none. TDHT 21 Performance Dynamics: Spaces, Performers, and Audiences This course introduces the basic parameters of performance dynamics by exploring varieties of performance space, of acting methods, and of actor-audience relations, comparing examples drawn from different historical periods and world cultures. TDHT 22 One actor, Two or More: How Theatre Peoples the World: This course explores how theatre uses one, two, or many actors to project personal and social identities and relationships, comparing examples from different cultures and historical periods. TDHT 23 Social Contexts of Performance The functions and meaning of theatre depend in part on the social contexts of performance. This quarter looks at performance modes associated with court spectacles, commercial venues, and popular theatre, comparing examples from different cultures and historical periods. [top]

Visual Arts (VIS) 1, 2, or 3 (choose two) plus 111 Introduction to Art Making VIS 1: Introduction to Art Making: Two-Dimensional Practices An introduction to concepts and techniques of art-making with specific reference to the artists and issues of the 20th century. Lectures and studio classes will examine the nature of images in relation to various themes. Drawing, painting, found objects and texts will be employed to construct a series of projects generated from visual and narrative sources. Prerequisite: none required. VIS 2: Introduction to Art Making: Motion and Time-Based Art An introduction to the process of art-making utilizing transactions between people, objects,

and situations. Includes both critical reflection on relevant aspects of avant-garde art of the last two decades (Duchamp, Cage, Rauschenberg, Gertrude Stein, conceptual art, happenings, etc.) and practical experience in a variety of artistic exercises. Prerequisite: none required. VIS 3: Introduction to Art Making: Three-Dimensional Practices An introduction to art-making that uses as ts base the idea of the "conceptual." The lecture exists as a bank of knowledge about various art world and non-art world conceptual plays: mapping, ear`1thworks, special concepts, conceptual art, decoration, taste. The studio section attempts to incorporate these ideas into individual and group projects using any "material." Prerequisite: none required. VIS 111: The Structure of Art The course is based on the assumption that if an art work "means something" we should be able to articulate the way or the ways in which it manages to mean it. The course begins with an analysis of drawings by a wide variety of artists, including Durer, Rembrandt, Flaxman, Ingres, Delacroix, Manet, and Hokusai. Photography is the next mode considered and covers a wide range of historical and contemporary photographs from Adamson and Hill to Friedlander and Robert Cumming. Discussion of the central issue of "framing" generalized as an idea of synecdoche or metonymy, in which a single framed "scene" is used to stand for some state of affairs or some event of which it is a part. Painted and photographic portraits are examined, some sculpture portraits as well if time permits. [top]

Visual Arts (VIS) 20, 21, 22, 111 (choose three) Art History and Criticism Through the study of art history, students learn to treat works of art as manifestations of human belief, thought, and experience in Western and non-Western societies from pre-history to the present day. Courses in criticism review the theoretical approaches which are used to understand artistic achievement. By combining art historical and critical study, the program promotes in the student an awareness of the cultural traditions which have shaped his or her intellectual outlook and provides a framework for informed judgment on the crucial issues of meaning and expression in contemporary society. VIS 20: Introduction to Art History Works of art are tools through which humanity has struggled to understand and deal with the world, with society, and with the self. This course provides an overview of the development of Western art and architecture through such defining issues as the respective roles of tradition and innovation in the production and appreciation of art, the relation of art to its broader

intellectual and historical contexts, and the changing concepts of the monument, the artist, meaning, style, and 'art' itself. Representative examples will be selected from different periods ranging from Antiquity to Modern. VIS 21: Introduction to Non-Western Art Non-Western societies have created modes of art and expression profoundly different from those developed by Western societies. By examining the arts, symbolism, and traditions of these societies, alternative models emerge for the formal language of the work of art and for its broader social functions. This course offers a comparative and thematic approach to examining the artistic achievements and cultural productions of societies from widely divergent structures and political organizations. Traditional art forms from the ancient kingdoms and empires or Central America and Asia to the tribes of Africa and the chiefdoms of native American and Oceanic peoples will be considered. VIS 22: Formations of Modern Art In later eighteenth century Europe, the cultural and political upheavals of the American, French, and early Industrial Revolutions provoked such artists as Goya, Blake, and David to produce daring works which broke with academic painting. From then on, the world and the arts changed rapidly, and along with them the nature of the art audience and art market: a new middle-class art public emerged as did the new structures of museums, galleries,and criticism. Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionismrepresented by such artists as Ingres, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Bonheur, Degas, Cassatt, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin, and Cezanne-developed under these new economic, political, and artistic circumstances. During the twentieth century, bold experiments with new techniques of representation such as Fauvism (Matisse) and Cubism (Picasso, Braque, Robert, and Sonia Delaunay), with abstraction (Kandinsky, Mondrian, Malevich), and in Dada and Surrealism (Duchamp, Miro, Fini, Dali) with the energies of the irrational and the unconscious succeeded and interacted upon one another, posing new questions about the nature of art and the role of the artist in society. Architectural practice and theory was transformed by the coming of the International Style and the teachings of the Bauhaus. The course will end with a study of art since World War II, including American Abstract Expressionism (Pollock, Krasner, de Kooning), the subsequent international movements of Pop, Minimal, Conceptual, Performance and New Image Art, and the recent questioning of the established history and institutions of art by the Third World and Women's Art Movements. VIS 111: The Structure of Art The course is based on the assumption that if an art work "means something" we should be able to articulate the way or the ways in which it manages to mean it. The course begins with an analysis of drawings by a wide variety of artists, including Durer, Rembrandt, Flaxman, Ingres, Delacroix, Manet, and Hokusai. Photography is the next mode considered and covers a wide range of historical and contemporary photographs from Adamson and Hill to Friedlander and Robert Cumming.

Discussion of the central issue of "framing" generalized as an idea of synecdoche or metonymy, in which a single framed "scene" is used to stand for some state of affairs or some event of which it is a part. Painted and photographic portraits are examined, some sculpture portraits as well if time permits. [top]

Visual Arts (VIS) 22, 84, 154 Film Sequence Visual Arts 84 must be taken before Visual Arts 154. VIS 22: Formaions of Modern Art This course is described in the Visual Arts 20, 21, 22, 111 sequence. VIS 84: History of Film A survey of the history and the art of the cinema. The course will stress the origin of cinema and the contributions of the earliest filmmakers, including those of Europe, Russia, and the United States. Materials fee required. VIS 154: Hard Look at the Movies Examines a choice of films, selected along different lines of analysis coherent within the particular premise of the course. Films are selected from different periods and genres among Hollywood, European, and Third World countries. Prerequisite: Visual Art 84 Humanities Choose a year-long sequence.

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History (HILD) 2A-B-C History (HILD) 7A-B-C History (HILD) 10, 11, 12 Lit/English (LTEN) 21,22, 23 25,26 (choose three) Lit/English (LTEN) 27, 28, 29 Lit/World (LTWL) 4A-B-C-D-F-M (choose three) Lit/World (LTWL) 19A-B-C Lit/Writing (LTWR) 8A-B-C (MCWP 40 + 50 are prerequisites) Philosophy (PHIL) 13, 14, 15 Philosophy (PHIL) 31, 32, 33 Third World Studies (TWS) 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 (choose three)

History (HILD) 2A-B-C

U.S. History This year-long course examines the social, economic, and political transformation of America from the colonial era to the present. In addition to providing explanations about why and how these developments took place, History 2 attempts to introduce students to the different methodologies employed by historians in their quest to understand the past and the process by which historical studies provide a foundation for deciphering the events of the present day. Lectures, discussions, and readings trace the evolution of the American people from colonial dependency in the seventeenth century to the status of superpower in the 1990s. HILD 2A: American History from c. 1607 to c. 1800 The Puritan establishment, the New England town, the autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, and the American Revolution are some of the topics in the first quarter of the course. HILD 2B: American History in the Nineteenth Century The emphasis is on the social changes and conflicts brought about by industrialization and the national unification of sections. Topics include the tensions between preindustrial and industrial cultures, emergence of the factory system, the rise of antebellum reform movements, slavery and the conflict of sections, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and popular radicalism during the Gilded Age. HILD 2C: The United States in the Twentieth Century The history of the United States from the times of Theodore Roosevelt to the present day. Special attention is given to the rise and fall of reform movements, the expansion and decline of the American empire abroad, the crisis in racial and social relations since c. 1960. [top]

History (HILD) 7A-B-C Race and Ethnicity in the United States HILD 7A: Race and Ethnicity in the United States A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be slavery, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America. HILD 7B: Race and Ethnicity in the United States A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be the Asian-American and white ethnic groups, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America. HILD 7C: Race and Ethnicity in the United States A lecture-discussion course on the comparative ethnic history of the United States. Of central concern will be the Mexican-American, race, oppression, mass migrations, ethnicity, city life in industrial America, and power and protest in modern America.

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History (HILD) 10, 11, 12 - East Asia HILD 10: East Asia: The Great Tradition Examines the evolving characteristics of East Asian culture and civilization before 1600. Contrasts the rise of Imperial Confucian governance in China to the development of feudal society in Japan. HILD 11: East Asia and the West Compares Chinese and Japanese responses to Western imperialism after 1600, focusing on popular protest and dynastic decline in China and the rise of the modernizing nation state in Japan. HILD 12: Twentieth-Century East Asia Deals with the rise of East Asia in the Pacific Century. This course stresses the emergence of a regionally dominant Japan before and after World War II and examines the process of revolution and state-building in China during the Nationalist and Communist eras. [top]

Literature/English (LTEN) 21, 22, 23, 25, 26 (choose three) The English and American Literary Imagination LTEN 21 - Introduction to the Literature of the British Isles: Pre-1600 An introduction to literatures written in English in Britain before 1660, with a focus on the interaction of text and history. LTEN 22 - Introduction to the Literature of the British Isles: 1660-1832 An introduction to literatures written English in Britain and Ireland between 1660 and 1832, with a focus on the interaction of text and history. LTEN 23 - Introduction to the Literature of the British Isles: 1823-present An introduction to literatures written in English in Britain, Ireland, and the British Empire (and the former British Empire) from 1832 to the present, with a focus on the interaction of text and history. LTEN 25 - Introduction to the Literature of the United States: beginning to 1865 An introduction to literature written in English in the United States from the beginnings to 1865, with a focus on the interaction of text and history.

LTEN 26 - Introduction to the Literature of the United States: 1865-present An introduction to the literatures written in English in the United States from 1865 to the present, with a focus on the interaction of text and history. [top]

Literature/English (LTEN) 27, 28, 29 LTEN 27: Introduction to Afro-American Literature A lecture discussion course that examines a major topic or theme in Afro-American literature as it is developed over time and across the literary genres of fiction, poetry, and belle lettres. A particular emphasis of the course is how Afro-American writers have adhered to or departed from conventional definitions of genre. LTEN 28: Introduction to Asian-American Literature Same approach as 27. LTEN 29: Introduction to Chicano Literature Same approach as 27. [top]

Literature/World (LTWL) 4A-B-C-D-F-M (choose three) Fiction and Film in Twentieth-Century Societies A study of modern culture and of the way it is understood and expressed in novels, stories, and films. The sequence airms at an undestanding of relationships between the narrative arts and society in the twentieth century, with the individual quarters treating fiction and film of the following language grtoups: LTWL LTWL LTWL LTWL LTWL LTWL [top] 4A: French 4B: German 4C: Asian 4D: Italian 4F: Spanish 4M: Multiple national literatures and films

Literature/World (LTWL) 19A-B-C Introduction to Greeks and Romans

LTWL 19 A-B-C will expose students to the fundamental works of Western culture: Homer's Iliad, Greek Tragedy, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Vergil, and more. These works and authors are important because later authors have copied or imitated them right up until today and because they raise fundamental questions about human existence with which we must all struggle. If God is good, where does evil come from? Is the best human life based only on reason, or should our emotions also guide us? Are we really responsible for everything we do, or are there some things we do which are out of our control? These problems, and others, are all raised in nearly every work to be read in Literature/World 19. In addition, there will be one "event" per quarter. One year the students viewed Public Television's In Search of the Trojan War, an absorbing quest for the historical reality behind the myth of the Trojan War. Another time, students planned a Euripides Festival, with several films by the modern Greek director Michael Cacoyiannis of plays by Euripides, and several speakers. A third example was the time students saw the movie A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, which not only is a very funny movie, but also is taken entirely from ancient Latin comedies. Students read original works in translation rather than as excerpts. Art is incorporated into appropriate lectures. [top]

Literature/Writing (LTWR) 8A-B-C The Craft of Writing A study of major literary genres from the standpoint of craft and formal structure. Students will learn basic techniques of literary composition (prosody, metrics, narration, personification, rhetoric, argument, dialogue) by studying traditional and modern examples of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. An important component will be application of this information through practical exercises, imitations, and parodies. These courses are prerequisite to any upperdivision writing workshop in a given genre. The department plans to offer 8A all quarters, 8B winter quarter, and 8C spring quarter. (MCWP 40 and 50 are prerequisites). LTWR 8A The Craft of Writing: Fiction LTWR 8B The Craft of Writing: Poetry LTWR 8C The Craft of Writing: Non-Fictional Prose [top]

Philosophy (PHIL) 13, 14, 15 Ethics, Metaphysics, and Theory of Knowledge Introduction to Philosophy A year-long introduction to philosophy organized according to perpetual topics and problems: ethics (fall), metaphysics (winter), theory of knowledge (spring). The specific content of the course varies from year to year among such emphases as the moral problems of sexism and health care (ethics), and theories of space and time: can a person survive her own death? (what survives?), is the universe caused? by what? (metaphysics), what is scientific knowledge? is it true? what does true mean (theory of knowledge)? Philosophic responses to such topics and questions are shown to be sufficiently various, but the topics and questions are shown to be perdurable from the early Greek philosophers to the present. PHIL 13: Ethics An inquiry into the nature of morality and its role in personal and social life. PHIL 14: Metaphysics This course offers a sample of a coherent group of metaphysical problems to acquaint the student with the method philosophers employ in dealing with them. The views considered range from the ancient philosophers to contemporary writers. Some topics selected in past years: mind and body; human freedom; space and time; essence and necessity. PHIL 15: Theory of Knowledge This is a course in the theory of knowledge. The aim of the course is to raise and to try to answer a series of questions about the nature of knowledge-what sort of knowledge we have of the world, what justifies our believing that such knowledge exists, how one can describe and meet skeptical challenges, etc. In particular, the issue of whether there is a kind of knowledge that is scientific will be raised. This course will raise a number of issues which will contribute to the student's understanding of the character and methods of philosophy. Is there a special way of approaching the problems described above that is uniquely philosophical? What kinds of results do such approaches achieve? Is philosophy an activity rather than a theory-i.e., something resulting in specific propositions? Is the method one that is inherently non-objective? There will be strong emphasis on argumentation. What counts as valid, cogent reasoning? Are such techniques universal and thus transfer to any intellectual discipline? Students who are successful in this course will learn how to analyze a question, how to distinguish sound from unsound reasoning, what counts as genuine evidence for a proposition, and so forth. [top]

Philosophy (PHIL) 31, 32, 33 History of Philosophy

This is a traditional year course in the history of philosophy and serves as a prerequisite for philosophy majors. PHIL 31: Ancient Philosophy It is both a truism and an astonishing fact that most of what we associate with Western culture, including its science, art, drama, political theory, and philosophy, had a historical beginning in the classical age of Greece. Within a few centuries a group of some of the most powerful and inventive artists, poets, and philosophers in history formulated the set of problems which we are still, to a great extent, struggling to resolve. Perhaps the most interesting (and mysterious) of these origins is the beginning of the philosophic tradition around the sixth century, B.C. Readings will be taken from the "Pre-Socratics" (the earliest philosophers), the greatest dialogue by Plato, The Republic, and some selections from the ethical writings of Plato's pupil, Aristotle. The course's goal will be not only to understand what these philosophers said, and why they said it, but also to try to see whether their claims can be defended in a contemporary context. The format of the course will be lecture/discussions. PHIL 32: The Origins of Modern Philosophy The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries are often known as the Age of the Scientific Revolution. This description is accurate, for this period sees the emergence of a recognizably modern scientific world-picture. In this course students see how the greatest philosophers of the age responded to the challenge of the new science and of other major developments. Students will study the writings of Machiavelli, Descartes, Hobbes, and Leibniz. PHIL 33: Philosophy in the Age of Enlightenment This course will provide an introduction to the thought of the two greatest philosophers of the eighteenth century: David Hume and Immanuel Kant. A unique feature of the course will be the attention paid to their respective ethical theories. The aim will be not only to develop an understanding of the basic issues on which these two thinkers differ, but also to study the connections between the epistemological-metaphysical and moral theories of each. [top]

Third World Studies Literature (TWS) 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 (choose three) TWS 21: African Literature This course will use the writing of African artists to view, through the eyes of residents, some of the problems, achievements, and continuing concerns of various areas of the continent. Novels, poetry, and drama will provide perspectives on the journey from colonization to independence and beyond. Because Africa is not well known to most students, readings and lectures on history and culture will augment the literary discussions. The goal of the course is first of all to dispel inaccurate information concerning the continent and its people, then to examine and evaluate the various artistic visions of African realities provided by these renowned authors.

TWS 22: Latin America This course studies Latin American short stories and novels from a socio-historical perspective. Students will read a short story collection, a series of short stories by Cortazar, and two novels by Garcia Marquez. TWS 23: Modern China Chinese literature shall be studied in this course as a series of mechanisms employed throughout the centuries by writers to constitute a reality in which they could exercise different forms of control over forces which are otherwise indifferent, or even hostile to them. TWS 24: Caribbean Literature TWS 25: Middle Eastern Literature TWS 26: Literatures of the Indian Subcontinent

Foreign Languages Choose a year-long sequence. Courses marked # must be taken in sequential order. More advanced courses in any of the foreign language sequences may be applied toward this generaleducation sequence.

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#Chinese Studies (CHIN) 11, 12, 13 or 21, 22, 23 #Japanese Studies (JAPN) 10A-B-C or 20A-B-C #Judaic Studies/Hebrew (JUDA) 1, 2, 3 #Linguistics Courses in Arabic (LIAB) 1A-B-C (Beginning Arabic or Portuguese) (effective Fall 2003) #Linguistics courses in American Sign Language (LISL), French (LIFR), German (LIGM), Italian (LIIT), Spanish (LISP) 1A/AX, 1B/BX, 1C/CX, 1D/DX #Literature--Any three literature courses, numbered 2 or higher, in one of the following languages: French (LTFR), German (LTGM), Italian (LTIT), Russian (LTRU), Spanish (LTSP) (Combination of foreign language and literature in the same foreign language may be taken.) #Literature/Greek (LTGK) 1, 2, 3 #Literature/Italian (LTIT) 1A-B-C #Korean Literature (LTKO) 1A-B-C or 2A-B-C (effective Fall 2003) #Literature/Latin (LTLA) 1,2, 3 #Literature/Russian (LTRU) 1A-B-C, 1AB and 1BC, or 2A-B-C

Chinese Studies (CHIN) Sequence CHIN 11, 12, and 13 are first-year Chinese language courses CHIN 21, 22, and 23 are second-year Chinese language courses Chinese language courses focus on the basic grammar and usage, with initial emphasis on the spoken language. The written language is progressively incorporated. Advanced classes feature a general introduction to history and culture through reading and writing in Chinese. Students in the first and second years must attend weekly three lectures and two tutorials, which include in-class drill sessions. In addition to the lectures, first-year students spend three hours in the language lab every week; second-year students spend one hour in a conversation class and two hours in the language lab. [top]

Japanese Studies (JAPN) Sequence

JAPN 10A, B, and C are first-year Japanese language courses JAPN 20A, B, and C are second-year Japanese language courses Japanese language courses focus on the basic grammar and usage, with initial emphasis on the spoken language. The written language is progressively incorporated. Advanced classes feature a general introduction to history and culture through reading and writing in Japanese. Students in the first and second years must attend weekly three lectures and two tutorials, which include in-class drill sessions. In addition to the lectures, first-year students spend three hours in the language lab every week; second-year students spend one hour in a conversation class and two hours in the language lab. [top]

Judaic Studies/Hebrew (JUDA) 1, 2, 3 Fundamentals of Hebrew grammar; exercises in vocabulary, accidence, and reading. [top]

Linguistics Courses: American Sign Language (LISL), French (LIFR), German (LIGM), Italian (LIIT) and Spanish (LISP) French, German, and Spanish instruction at UCSD is divided between courses taught in the Department of Linguistics which are designed to give students conversational and reading ability in those languages, and courses taught in the Department of Literature that use those abilities to study and write about literature. The linguistics department courses are further divided to reflect two related but different aspects of basic language study; learning a language partly means learning to converse in it-to understand others when they talk and to talk oneself-but it also means gaining academic, analytic insights into language in general and into the particular language under study. Language courses in the sequence numbered 1A,1B,1C,1D are designed to satisfy the conversational teaching function; they consist of small "tutorial" meetings held three times a week with a native speaker of the language, plus laboratory assignments. Language courses in the sequence numbered 1AX,1BX,1CX,1DX are designed to guide the students' reading of the language and to increase their sophistication about language and language learning; they consist of group conferences conducted once a week by a linguistic scientist, plus reading and assigned laboratory work. Unlike some conventional courses, those in the linguistics department discourage students from memorizing paradigms, learning lists of isolated vocabulary items, doing laborious but meaningless grammar and pronunciation drills. Instead, students are thrown immediately into using the language:

listening to someone actually saying something that is meaningful to the listener or reading real stories or articles. Of course, given this way of teaching, students aren't expected to understand every word they hear or read; in time the important words will come around again-as they do in real life-and students will get plenty of chances to understand them. There is strong inducement, in the form of grades and tests, to come to class and do all the homework-the total course really requires twelve hours a week of a student's time. Students are encouraged, but not forced, to join in the conversations about what they are reading or doing outside of class. By the end of the second quarter of the sequence, students will be reading major works of literature and talking about them, as well as talking about everyday things in an everyday way. In tutorials the emphasis is on fluency in speaking and reading, rather than on accurate, but painful, coding and decoding of messages from one language to another. In analysis conferences, the language is examined carefully and in detail, and the analysis is expected to be as rigorous as in any other scientific inquiry. Since the language courses in the 1A/AX-1D/DX sequences are actually unitary courses divided into two parts only for purposes of keeping separate track of student grades in the two aspects of language study, each course in the 1A-1D series must be taken concurrently with the corresponding course in the 1AX-1DX series.Before you enroll in language courses, carefully note that: Courses numbered 1A/AX are for students who are just beginning their study. Students with previous exposure (formal or informal) to the language may not take 1A/1AX. Instead they must take the UCSD Language Placement Exam to be placed at the correct level. Linguistics Courses in Arabic (LIAB) or Portuguese (LIPO) These courses are designed to teach basic vocabulary and grammatical structures needed for oral and written communication in the language. Courses meet 3 days a week and do not have corresponding AX-BX-CX courses. [top]

Literature/French (LTFR) 2A-B-C In order to prepare students coming from Ling 1A/AX-1D/DX for work in the upper division and/or for the Education Abroad Program, a full year of study is necessary. Since each of the four language skills requires significantly more time to develop than can be provided by a one-quarter course of ten weeks, this sequence will integrate all of the skills at each level of proficiency. The students will progress from a study-review of the basic elements of the French language to problems of sentence structure and, finally, to aspects of French stylistics. In terms of the literary texts to be read and discussed, the sequence will begin with fairly simple, short texts and will introduce the students to the most elementary techniques of literary analysis, progressing to longer, more difficult works calling for more sophisticated approaches. Correspondingly, the compositions to be written about these texts will initially be approximately one page in length, increasing to three-five pages by the final quarter. The three-quarter sequence will be taught entirely in French and should be completed in the course of one

academic year. These courses may not be repeated for credit. The prerequisite for the first quarter of the sequence is Ling. 1C/CX. LTRF 2A-B French 2A-B, taught entirely in French, emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. The courses also introduce students to basic techniques of literary analysis. LTFR 2C: Composition, Conversation, Culture French 2C is designed to improve writing and conversational skills. Aims to develop written expression in terms of organization of ideas, structure, vocabulary. Includes a review of grammar. Discussions of a contemporary novel and film. May be taken in lieu of 50 as a prerequisite for upper-division courses. [top]

Literature/German (LTGM) 2A-B-C LTGM 2A German 2A is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening comprehension, and conversational and writing skills. Thus all aspects of language mastery are stressed in detailed and close study of a wide variety of texts, half of which are selected from modern and classical authors and half from non-literary disciplines. Prerequisite: LIGM 1C/1CX or equivalent. LTGM 2B German 2B is a continuation of 2A for students who intend to practice their reading abilities, listening comprehension, and writing skills on a more advanced level. LTGM 2C Designed for students who wish to improve their conversational and writing skills. [top]

Literature/Italian (LTIT) 2A-B, 50 LTIT 2A, 2B, and 50 are second-year Italian courses. [top]

Literature/Russian (LTRU) Sequence

LTRU 1A-B-C: First-year language course. LTRU 1AB and 1BC: A two quarter intensive beginning Russian. Covers material of first year Russian. Winter and Spring quarters. (7.5 units each) LTRU 2A-B-C: Second-year language course. [top]

Literature/Spanish (LTSP) 2A-B-C LTSP 2A: Readings and Composition This course is taught entirely in Spanish and emphasizes the development of reading ability, listening, comprehension, and writing skills. It includes intensive grammar review, weekly compositions, and class discussions. Prerequisite: Ling 1C/CX, 1D/DX or equivalent. LTSP 2B: Readings and Interpretations This course further reviews major points of grammar and emphasizes critical reading and interpretation of Spanish texts through class discussion, vocabulary development, and written compositions. Prerequisite: LISP 2A or equivalent. LTSP 2C: Cultural Readings and Composition In this course students work on problems in writing and translation. The course includes class discussion of cultural topics as well as grammar review and composition. The course will further develop the ability to read articles, essays, and longer pieces of fictional/nonfictional texts. Prerequisite: LTSP 2B or equivalent. LTSP 2D: Advanced Readings and Composition for Native Speakers Designed for bilingual students seeking to become biliterate. Reading and writing skills stressed with special emphasis on improvement of written expression and problems of grammar and orthography. Prepares native speakers with little or no formal training in Spanish for more advanced courses. Prerequisite: Native speaking ability and/or recommendation of instructor. [top]

Literature/Greek (LTGK) 1, 2, 3 LTGK 1, 2, and 3 form a unified and coherent series of courses in ancient Greek. Greek 1 and 2 are devoted to the intensive study of Greek grammar; Greek 3 continues this study of the language as students read a selected work of Greek literature. Questions of grammar and vocabulary are stressed. In Greek 1 and 2 students are assigned a grammar such as Chase and Philips' A New Introduction to Greek; in the third quarter of the sequence they read one book of Homer or a short Platonic dialogue. [top]

Literature/Italian (LTIT) 1A-B-C LTIT 1A The Language of the Italian Theater An introduction to the study of the Italian language. Exercises in grammar, syntax, conversation, and writing are generated from the texts of Italian plays (Goldoni, Pirandello, Campanile, Fo). No prior study of Italian required. LTIT 1B The Language of the Italian Opera A continuation of the study of the Italian language. Exercises in grammar, syntax, conversation, and writing are generated from the texts of opera libretti. LTIT 1C The Language of the Italian Theater Further study of Italian language. Exercises in grammar, syntax, conversation, and writing are generated from the texts of Italian screenplays and novels. Prepares students for enrollment in Literature/Italian 2A. [top]

Korean/Language (LTKO) Sequence LTKO 1A-B-C: First year Korean. LTKO 2A-B-C: Second year Intermediate Korean. [top]

Literature/Latin (LTLA) 1, 2, 3 LTLA 1, 2, and 3 form a coherent and unified series of courses in the Latin language. Students begin, in Latin 1, with an intensive study of Latin grammar and continue this elementary study in Latin 2. In Latin 3, they apply their knowledge of grammar to a work of Latin literature. In Latin 1 and 2, students are assigned a work of Latin grammar like Wheelock's Latin; in Latin 3 they frequently read one book of Virgil's Aeneid. [top]

Literature/Russian (LTRU) Sequence LTRU 1A-B-C: First-year language course.

LTRU 1AB and 1BC: A two quarter intensive beginning Russian. Covers material of first year Russian. Winter and Spring quarters. (7.5 units each) LTRU 2A-B-C: Second-year language course.

Social Sciences Choose ONE year-long sequence. Courses marked # must be taken in sequential order.

· · · · · · · · · ·

Anthropology (ANLD) 1, 2, 3 Cognitive Science (COGS) 1, 11 plus one course from COGS 10 or 17 Critical Gender Studies (CGS) 2A-B, 100 # Economics (ECON) 1-2-3 Ethnic Studies (ETHN) 1A-B-C Linguistics, General (LIGN) 3, 4, 7, 8 (choose three) Political Science (POLI) 10, 11, 12, 13 (choose three) Psychology (PSYC) 1, 2, 3, 4 (choose three) Sociology (SOCL) 1A-B, plus 10 or 20 (majors must take 20) Urban Studies and Planning (USP) 1, 2, 3

Anthropology (ANLD) 1, 2, 3 ANLD 1-Cultural Anthropology-Introduction An introduction to the anthropological approach to understanding human behavior, with an examination of data from a selection of societies and cultures. ANLD 2-Human Origins: Human Evolution An introduction to human evolution from the perspective of physical anthropology, including evolutionary theory and the evolution of the primates, hominids, and modern man. Emphasis is placed on evidence from fossil remains and behavioral studies of living primates. ANLD 3-Human Origins: World Prehistory This course examines theories and methods used by archaeologists to investigate the origin of human culture. [top]

Cognitive Science (COGS) 1, 11 plus one course from COGS 10 or 17 The sequence explores classical and fundamental questions of mind and intelligence, including relations among minds, brains, and computers. COGS 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science: Cognitive Science or ("CogSci") is the study of thought. It is a broad field which includes researchers from areas such as Psychology, Neuroscience, Linguistics. Philosophy and Computer Science. CogSci 1 is a Cognitive Science "sampler" course. Over the course of the quarter, there will be lectures on such topics as artificial intelligence, addiction, false memories, and the difficult task of communicating clearly.

COGS 10: Introduction to Cognitive Science: Cognitive Consequences of Technology In this course we explore the interrelationships of cognition and technology from a new perspective offered by cognitive science. We address questions of crucial importance for our increasingly technological society: (1) How does technology shape our minds? (2) How should what we know about our minds shape technology? Example topics include the cognitive and cultural factors involved with the web, cell phones, social networks, computer viruses, privacy, interruptions, ubiquitous computing, augmented reality and cyborgs. COGS 11: Introduction to Cognitive Science: Minds and Brain. Brain damage and cognitive deficits: What clinical studies tell us about the brain and the mind. Neurological and physical constraints on human cognition. COGS 17: Neurobiology of Cognition Introduction to the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics include molecular, cellular, developmental, systems, and behavioral neurobiology. Specifically, structure and function of neurons, peripheral and central nervous systems, sensory, motor, and control systems, learning and memory mechanisms. [top]

Critical Gender Studies (CGS)2A, 2B, 100 (formerly Women's Studies) CGS 2A: Introduction to Women's Studies: Feminist Theories and Methods This course surveys varieties of feminist critiques and examines them as emerging from distinct historical and cultural conditions. It analyzes intersections of gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and colonialism. Texts include case studies, ethnographies, literary and historiographic narratives and documents. CGS 2B: Introduction to Women's Studies: Contests and Controversies in Feminist Analysis Students analyze topics (varying yearly) relevant to current feminist debate, possibly including pornography, abortion, occupational segregation, the feminization of poverty, women and the media, and women and social movements. Particular attention is given to the construction of gender identity within individual academic disciplines. CGS 100: Feminism in a Global Frame: Politics, Positions, Practices An interdisciplinary course, focusing on non-western feminism and the historical, cultural, economic, and colonial struggles that shape and are shaped by them. Possible topics include comparative international feminism, women,m resistance, and revolution, gender and colonialism, the constructions of sexuality and gender in the context o global movements and migrations (of people, capital, and culture). [top]

Economics (ECON) 1, 2, 3 Introductory Economics Economics is the study of how individuals, organizations, and societies deal with scarcity-the problem that available resources are not sufficient to satisfy everyone's wants. ECON 1, 2, 3: Elements of Economics Basic methods of economic analysis and their application to public policy and current events. Courses must be taken in 1-2-3 order. ECON 1 concerns microeconomics: supply and demand, markets, income distribution, perfect and imperfect competition, the role of government. ECON 2 concerns standard tools of economic analysis: mathematical foundations of marginal analysis, basis of graphical, algebraic and statistical modeling, policy analysis, discounting, and strategic interaction. ECON 3 concerns macroeconomics: unemployment, inflation, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy. [top]

Ethnic Studies (ETHN)1A-B-C Ethnic Studies is the study of the social, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped the development of America's diverse ethnic peoples over the last five hundred years and which continue to shape our future. ETHN 1A: Population Histories of the U.S. This course examines the comparative historical demography of what is today the United States, focusing on the arrival, growth, distribution, and redistribution of immigrants from Asia, Europe, Africa, and Latin America. ETHN 1B: Immigration and Assimilation in American Life A history of immigration to the United States from colonial times to the present, with emphasis on the roles of ethnic and racial groups in economics, power relations between dominant and subordinate groups, and contemporary ethnic and racial consciousness. ETHN 1C: Race and Ethnic Realities in the U.S. This course explores the theoretical literature on race and ethnicity, focusing on issues of domination and subordination and the historical emergence of racism and ethnic conflict. Attention is given to class and gender differences within racial and ethnic groups. [top]

Linguistics (LIGN) 3, 4, 7, 8 (choose three) LIGN 3: Language as a Social and Cultural Phenomenon Introduction to the study of language: language variation, change, and loss, multilingualism, pidginization, and creolization; language planning, standardization, and prescriptivisim; writing systems; the role of language in thought, myth, ritual, advertising, politics and the law. LIGN 4: Language as a Cognitive System Introduction to the study of language: differences between animal communication, sign systems, and human language; origins and evolution of language; neural basis of language; language acquisition in children and adults; fundamental issues in language and cognition. LIGN 7: Sign Language and Its Culture Deaf history since the eighteenth century. The structure of American Sign Language and comparison with oral languages, ASL poetry and narrative and Deaf people's system of cultural knowledge. Basic questions concerning the nature of language and its relation to culture. LIGN 8: Languages and Cultures in America The linguistic and cultural diversity of the United States in historical and comparative perspective. The languages surveyed in the course include: English (standard and nonstandard); African-American Vernacular English; pidgins and Creoles (Gullah, Louisiana French, Mitchif, etc.); Native American languages; Spanish and Spanish-English continuum, with particular emphasis on Southern California; immigrant languages from Asia, Africa, and Europe; sign languages. The main topics surrounding these languages are as follows: the linguistic history of North America; language and ethnicity; the politics of linguistic pluralism vs. societal monolingualism, and the "English Only" movement; language and education; language loss, renewal, and preservation; code-switching, perscriptivism, and social uses of language; comparison with other multilingual societies. [top]

Political Science (POLI)10,11,12, 13 (choose three) POLI 10: An Introduction to American Politics This course surveys the processes and institutions of American politics. Among the topics discussed are individual political attitudes and values, political participation, voting, parties, interest groups, Congress, the presidency, the Supreme Court, the federal bureaucracy and domestic and foreign policy-making. POLI 11: Introduction to Comparative Politics The underlying purpose of this course is to identify and to explain differences in political life among a set of diverse states. Attention will be focused on the United Kingdom, France, Japan, the CIS, and India. Although these countries differ on a number of dimensions, special attention is paid to differences on three dimensions: (1) the basis of authority and the

concentration of power, (2) the incorporation of national minorities; and (3) the nature of foreign economic policy. POLI 12: Introduction to International Relations This course explores alternative explanations about various central features of international relations: the explanation of war and peace, the ways in which the likelihood of war has been mitigated, the nuclear arms race, economic interdependence, and north-south relations. The course will mix theoretical and historical analyses which concentrate on the internal structure of states and the international system within which they interact. POLI 13: Power and Justice An exploration of the relationship between power and justice in modern society. Materials include classic and contemporary texts, films and literature. [top]

Psychology (PSYC) 1, 2,3,4 (choose three) Biological, Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology This sequence will provide a general overview of the field, with emphasis on empirical and scientific rather than clinical issues. PSYC 1 PSYC 2: Biological Foundations One way to understand the origins of behavior and experience is to identify their physiological substrates. This course will consider the functions of the sensory systems (with emphasis on the visual system) and the brain from both neuropsychological and behavioral standpoints. Topics included are cerebral localization of function; hormones, drugs, and behavior; the control of eating and drinking; the physiological basis of memory; and visual and auditory perception. PSYC 3: Cognitive Foundations The goal of this course is to give students an initial understanding of the perspectives and factual basis of cognitive psychology, including cognitive development, and cognitive science in general. Emphasis will be given to aquatinting the student with the experimental, observational, and theoretical methods of science applied to human cognition. The course also deals with the empirical data base and fund of theoretical ideas developed by cognitive scientists. PSYC 4: General Psychology: Behavioral Foundations This course will provide a general introduction to the methods and principles of behavioral psychology. Topics covered include instincts, classical and operant conditioning, principles of learning and motivation. Emphasis will be on the laboratory study of these applications to realworld situations. [top]

Sociology (SOCL) 1A-B, and 10 or 20 American Society Sociology studies the life of human groups: their composition, organization, culture, and development. It combines scientific and humanistic perspectives and methods to investigate a subject matter that is both broad and relevant. SOCL 1A: The Study of Society This course is an introduction to the major ideas, concepts, and methods in the study of societies, social structure, and culture; the construction and acquisition of social roles and organizations; major institutions and processes of change. The first quarter will focus on classical approaches to the study of societies. SOCL 1B: The Study of Society This course is an introduction to the major ideas, concepts, and methods in the study of societies, with an emphasis on modern approaches in sociological theory and analysis. SOCL 10: American Society-Social Structure and Culture in the United States The basic "text" for this course is Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America. Although this book was written almost 150 years ago by a scholar who was not even American, some contemporary commentators have called it the wisest book ever written about America. Writing in the early nineteenth century, Tocqueville was concerned to understand the nature of the democratic society that he saw coming into existence everywhere in the West, but most fully exemplified in the United States. He attempted to analyze the interplay between American social structure, political institutions, and culture in order to assess whether modern democratic societies would be able to maintain free political institutions or whether they might slip into some new kind of despotism. The questions Tocqueville asked are still vitally important, and many of his insights are still valid. SOCL 20: Social Change in the Modern World A survey of the major economic, political, and social forces that have shaped the contemporary world, this course will provide an introduction to theories of social change as well as prepare the student for upper-division work in comparative-historical sociology. Topics may include origins and growth of the world economic system, the formation of the nationstate and political modernization, industrialization and urbanization and their social consequences, the population explosion and the demographic transition, modern revolutions and nationalism, and prospects of social change in rich and poor nations. [top]

Urban Studies and Planning (USP) 1, 2, 3 The sequence provides students with a variety of perspectives for understanding the development, growth, and cultures of cities and the communities within them.

USP 1: History of U.S. Urban Communities This course charts the development of urban communities across the United States both temporally and geographically. It examines the patterns of cleavage, conflict, convergence of interest, and consensus that have structured urban life. Social, cultural, and economic forces will be analyzed for the roles they hve played in shaping the diverse communities of America's cities. USP 2: Urban World System Examines the contemporary division of labor among cities and the effects of the creation of a world system on social groups, classes, and individuals. USP 3: The City and Social Theory An introduction to the sociological study of cities, focusing on urban society in the United States, including ethnic communities.

U.S. Cultural Diversity Requirements, 2007-2008 (effective Fall 2007) Muir students must complete by graduation one four-unit course that explores some aspect of the diversity of the culture of the United States. There are several ways to meet this requirement from alternatives listed below. One course, as appropriate, may be one of the courses in the humanities, fine arts, foreign language or social sciences general eduation sequences OR may be one of the courses for the major or optional minor OR may be an elective OR may be one of the eighteen upperdivision four-unit courses required for graduation. The U.S. Cultural Diversity course may be selected from the following courses. It is our expectation that this course will be completed by the end of the fresman or sophomore year. Effective Fall 1993 for freshman students and Fall 1995 for transfer students, one four-unit course exploring American diversity is required for graduation from Muir College. The course you choose may be a part of a general education sequence and possibly applicable to the major or minor. Courses cross-listed between two departments are indicated by italics. Please consult the UCSD General Catalog for descriptions and more information. You may choose one of the following courses to fulfill the cultural diversity requirement. SOCIAL SCIENCES : ANLD 23; CGS 2A, CGS 2B; COCU 164, COCU 168; COMT 115; ETHN 1A, ETHN 1B, ETHN 1C, ETHN 101, ETHN 110, ETHN 112A, ETHN 112B, ETHN 121, ETHN 122, ETHN 130, ETHN 131, ETHN 132, ETHN 133, ETHN 134, ETHN 135A, ETHN 135B, ETHN 138, ETHN 141, ETHN 151, ETHN 152, ETHN 161, ETHN 170B, ETHN 172, ETHN 173, ETHN 174, ETHN 175, ETHN 176; LIGN 7, LIGN 8; POLI 100H, POLI 100J, POLI 102E, POLI 102J, POLI 102K, POLI 104B, POLI 104C, POLI 104M, POLI 116A, POLI 150A; SOCC 129, SOCC 151M, SOCC 152, SOCC 154; SOCD 151, SOCD 188K; USP 3, USP 107, USP 129, USP 133 FINE ARTS : MUS 8, MUS 13AM, MUS 126, MUS 127A, MUS 127B, MUS 154; VIS 126CN HUMANITIES : HILD 7A, HILD 7B, HILD 7C; HIUS 108A, HIUS 108B, HIUS 115, HIUS 129, HIUS 135B, HIUS 138, HIUS 139, HIUS 155A, HIUS 155B, HIUS 156, HIUS 157, HIUS 158, HIUS 159, HIUS 164, HIUS 165, HIUS 167, HIUS 176, HIUS 180, HIUS 183; LTAM 100, LTAM 101, LTAM 102, LTAM 105, LTAM 106, LTAM 107; LTCS 130; LTEA 144; LTEN 27, LTEN 28, LTEN 29, LTEN 178, LTEN 180, LTEN 181, LTEN 183, LTEN 184, LTEN 185, LTEN 186, LTEN 187; LTSP 150A, LTSP 150B, LTSP 151, LTSP 153 LTSP 154; LTWL 155; PHIL 169, PHIL 170, PHIL 185 FOREIGN LANGUAGE : LISL 1A/AX, LISL 1B/1BX, LISL 1C/1CX, LISL 1D/DX, LISL 1E

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