Read DISASTER RESPONSE PLAN text version

BAILEY LIBRARY DISASTER RESPONSE PLAN

Emergency Procedures: General

See University Disaster Plan for Additional Information and Additional Types of Disasters For ALL types of emergencies notify: Campus Police x3333, (724) 738-3333 Phil Tramdack x2630 on campus, 724-992-1043 off campus Your immediate supervisor

See Collection Emergency Contact Sheet, p. 7 See Collection Salvaging Priorities list, p. 16 Do not enter the affected area(s) until it is safe!

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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BAILEY LIBRARY DISASTER RESPONSE PLAN

Date of completion: Dec. 2007 Date of this version: Oct. 2009 Date of next update of this plan: Fall 2010 Person responsible for next update is: Disaster Preparedness Committee List all locations where this plan is on file (on and off premises): Academic Advisement new Academic Support new Archives Bibliographic Services Career Services new Circulation (2) Facilities--Custodial Services new IMC Main Office (2) Night Security Personnel Reference Resource Acquisitions Resource Sharing Services Offsite (committee members): Robert Krzanowski new Kathy Manning Jessica Marshall Barbara McGinnis new Kevin McLatchy new Judy Silva Phil Tramdack

Who on the staff has a copy of this plan and is familiar with its contents? Robert Krzanowski, Kathy Manning, Jessica Marshall, Barbara McGinnis, Kevin McLatchy, Judy Silva and Phil Tramdack. This Disaster Preparedness and Response Plan is intended to serve as a living guide to be used in responding to and recovering from an emergency situation at Bailey Library, Slippery Rock University. This plan pertains only to collection emergencies. In the event of an emergency, the safety and welfare of PEOPLE are primary over collections. Ensure the safety of all staff and patrons before attempting to recover and salvage collections. All staff should become familiar with building exit routes, locations of fire alarm pulls and fire extinguishers, and potential hazards of the building. Floor plans indicating these are included in the Appendices section. Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station. iii

Table of Contents

Library Emergency Evacuation Procedures Building Floor Plans Bailey Library Emergency Phone List (all employees) Emergency Contact Sheet Local Resources Response to a Threat by Phone Power Failure Theft/Vandalism Water Emergencies: Leak or Flood DISASTER RECOVERY Disaster Response & Recovery Checklist Disaster Rehabilitation Steps Bailey Library Collection Salvaging Priorities WATER EMERGENCY Water Damage: Salvaging Tips Books and Paper Salvaging Tips Photographic Materials Salvaging Tips Loose Papers and Maps Salvaging Tips Flowchart for Treatment of Water Damaged Books and Papers Packing Wet Books/Paper for Transfer Off-Site Audio and Video Tapes Salvaging Tips Computer Hardware and Equipment Salvaging Tips Leather, Vellum and Parchment Salvaging Tips Microfilm and Microfiche Salvaging Tips MOLD REMEDIATION NEDCC Technical Leaflet: Emergency Salvage of Moldy Books and Papers CCAHA Technical Series No. 1: Mold SERVICE PROVIDERS Disaster Recovery and Salvaging (for major cleanup) Audio and Video Tape Recovery and Salvaging Service Providers Books and Paper Salvaging Service Providers Computer Records Recovery and Salvaging Service Providers Film Restoration Service Providers Freeze-Dry Service Providers Microfilm Recovery and Salvaging Service Providers Photograph Salvaging Service Providers Locating Conservators APPENDICES Building is closed due to emergency signs Disaster Response Supplies and Vendors Suggested Emergency Supplies Suggested Emergency Equipment Further Reading Wallet Cards: Bailey Library Emergency Contacts iv 1 3 7 8 9 10 11 11 11 13 14 15 17 18 18 18 19 20 21 21 22 22 25 35 42 43 44 47 48 49 50 50 50 52 54 55 56 57 69

EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURES: BAILEY LIBRARY

Evacuate the building immediately whenever the fire alarm sounds. Use the nearest stairways and exits. Do not use the elevators. Assist the disabled in exiting the building. Leave personal items and library materials & equipment behind. Building employees should report to the person in charge, indicating whether or not their areas are clear. If the library director is not here, the library faculty chairperson or the reference librarian on duty will act as building manager. Do not re-enter the building until the "all clear" is given by University Police or the Director of Environmental Health and Safety. Meet at the rock in the middle of the quad.

NIGHTS & WEEKENDS

IF the situation allows:

Laptop students or security student: close laptop room doors; clear the ground floor hallway as you leave by the loading dock door or nearest available exit, closing all fire doors behind you. Circulation personnel (or Resource Sharing Services or security guard): remain at the desk to receive or place calls to University Police. Circulation personnel: clear patrons from the cafe´ and close the doors. IMC personnel: clear the second floor (stacks, cubicles, restrooms, rooms 210, 211, 212, 213). Reference personnel: clear the first floor (including Reading Room, Special Services room and restrooms). Computer Lab student or security student: clear the third floor. Everyone: Close fire doors.

WEEKDAYS

IF the situation allows:

Everyone: Close fire doors. GROUND FLOOR (BASEMENT) Librarians and Academic Services personnel Clear the floor as you leave by the loading dock door or nearest available exit. FIRST FLOOR Circulation and Resource Sharing Services personnel Stay by the phone to place/receive calls from University Police and relay information. Career Services personnel Check the service elevator for passengers. Reference personnel Clear the reference room and vending machine area; direct patrons to the 2 side exits. Check first floor restrooms, including the handicapped-accessible restroom. Resource Acquisitions personnel Clear the Reading Room and Special Services room; direct patrons to the back exit. SECOND FLOOR All personnel Divide up to clear the main office, stacks, IMC stacks, IMC cubicles, Special Collections, rooms 210-213 and restrooms. THIRD FLOOR All personnel Divide up to cover stacks, restrooms, and computer lab.

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GROUND FLOOR

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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FIRST FLOOR

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SECOND FLOOR

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station. 5

THIRD FLOOR

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~Bailey Library~ Emergency Phone List It is important to talk to employees with further calling responsibility IN PERSON. If you do not reach an individual directly, please call PJT. PJT WILL CALL PROVOST'S OFFICE. Phillip Tramdack 724-992-1043 (Cell) 724-658-9529 (Home) Barb McGinnis Kathy Manning Jessica Marshall Cathy Rudowsky Lynn Hoffmann Martina Malvasi Heather Love Brian Danielson Mark Campbell John Snyder Linda Quidone Kathy Manning Rita McClelland Karen Mason Rebecca Cunningham Kevin McLatchy Allan Nocera Jessica Marshall Aiping Chen-Gaffey Renee Tkacik Kathy Frampton Jane Smith Joe Drobney Barb McGinnis Judy Silva Dorothy Ann Negley Mary Purdy Robert Krzanowski 11/02/09 Ellen Pontius xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx (H) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (H) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (H) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (H) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (H) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx (H) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx (Cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx

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Emergency Contact Sheet

Activate the Bailey Library emergency phone list, and appropriate personnel below: Campus Police x3333 724 738-3333

DAYS

Philip Tramdack Barbara McGinnis Facilities (Work Order) x2630 x2734 x6666 724 738-2630 724 738-2734 724 738-6666

NIGHTS/ WEEKENDS

Philip Tramdack xxx-xxx-xxxx / xxx-xxx-xxxx cell Jessica Marshall xxx-xxx-xxxx Kathy Manning xxx-xxx-xxxx

Also call the person listed below for the area of the emergency: Archives (3 floor) Biblio. Services (3rd floor) Computers/Printers Government Docs (3rd floor) IMC (2nd floor) Public Relations (basement) Reference (1st floor) Resource Acq. (1st floor) RSS/Circulation (1st floor) Academic Services Career Services Students w/Disabilities

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Judy Silva Aiping Chen-Gaffey Martina Malvasi Jane Smith Ellen Pontius Cathy Rudowsky Lynn Hoffmann Heather Love Kathy Manning Mark Campbell John Snyder Linda Quidone

Home xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx

Cell xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx

xxx-xxx-xxxx xxx-xxx-xxxx

If additional assistance is needed, call the Disaster Response Team: Judy Silva Kathy Manning Robert Krzanowski xxx-xxx-xxxx (cell) xxx-xxx-xxxx (home) xxx-xxx-xxxx (cell)

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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Local Resources

Campus Police: x3333 off-campus (724) 738-3333 Fire Department: call 911 Ambulance: call 911; x3333 Provost's Office: x2350; off campus (724) 738-2350 Carpenter: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Electrician: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Exterminator: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Freezer/Ice House: AVI, John Vag, Dining Services Director x2840; Giant Eagle (724) 794-5040; freezer truck rental Fumigation Service: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Glass Company: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Heating/Cooling (HAVC) Company: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Information Technology: x4357; off-campus (724) 738-4357 Janitorial Service: Facilities x2073 Locksmith: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Photographer: Public Relations x2091; off campus (724) 738-2091 Plumber: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Public Relations: x2091; off campus (724) 738-2091 Utility Companies: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Electric: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Gas: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Telephone: Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 Water: call Facilities x2073; off campus (724) 738-2073 9 Police: call 911

Response to a Threat by Phone

To be posted at every phone If you receive a threat by telephone, call Campus Police x3333 immediately afterwards with as much detail as possible.

Extension call came in on: ______________________ Listen carefully to the message; pay careful attention to wording, inflection, indications of speaker's age and gender, background noise, and any other identifying characteristics. Exact words: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________ Speech characteristics:______________________ Gender: _____________ Age: ____________

Background noise: ____________________________

Other audible clues: _____________________________________________________ ASK as appropriate: When will the threatened event happen? ______________________________ What is being threatened? ______________________________________________ What kind of bomb/device is it? ________________________________ What does it look like? ______________________________________ What will cause it to explode? ________________________________ Where is the threat? ______________________________________________ Where is the caller? _______________________________________________ Who is responsible? _______________________________________________ Other information to record: Time of call _________________________ Date of call _________________________ Person & department who took the call ______________________________ 10

Power Failure

In addition to the University guidelines: Check neighboring buildings; if they are dark, blackout could be neighborhood-wide or regional. Listen to the radio for information and instructions. Emergency power generator should kick in within 30 seconds so there should be lights in major areas and for exit signals, fire system, etc. If near-by buildings have power, call the electric utility company to report your outage. Refer to the guidance of local police or security personnel to evacuate the building or to determine if precautionary steps should be taken to safeguard the building. Contact Library director or librarian on duty to determine if building will be closed. If in doubt, close the building if power off for 10 minutes; notify Academic Affairs.

Theft/Vandalism

In addition to the University guidelines: Note the time of the event, location, type of threat and the characteristics of the actor. Try to keep the vandal/thief within sight until police or security personnel arrive. Remain at the scene to direct assistance.

Water Emergencies: Leak or Flood

In addition to the University guidelines: Once safe, move collections from harm's way. Drape plastic sheeting over collections or shelving units to prevent further damage. Stay away from standing water until electricity has been cut-off. Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station. 11

Swap in tabbed divider: Disaster Recovery printed on card stock

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Disaster Response & Recovery Checklist

Assess the situation Alert campus police, Facilities, the library director, appropriate library personnel Assign a coordinator Set up a command post Review this Disaster Plan: contacts, services, suppliers, salvaging priorities, recovery and salvaging tips, etc. Eliminate hazards Assess damage to the collection Activate plans for acquiring services, supplies and staff Control the environment Organize the recovery phase Train staff/volunteers to stabilize and recover affected collections Supervise activities Communicate internally and externally Document all activities

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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Disaster Rehabilitation Steps

1. Design procedure to systematically examine and sort all dried materials. 2. Determine options available -- surface cleaning, in-house or outsourced repair, binding or rebinding, conservation and restoration, boxing, or discard. 3. Hire and train personnel. 4. Be on the alert for mold; treat if necessary (refer to Mold section) 5. Replace spine labels, pockets or security tags if necessary.

6. Stamp each item indicating that it was damaged; include date of damage. For example: Water damaged ­ November 2001

7. Return materials to shelf. Shift collection if necessary. 8. Keep records; document all activities.

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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Bailey Library Collection Salvaging Priorities

(Listed in priority order) 1. Archives. 318 and 319A. All materials. If standing water present the bottom drawers of file cabinets must be emptied. Material in room 319 is behind glass and much of it exists elsewhere in the collection, therefore less urgent. 2. Special Collections. 202. Since the various collections are not separated out, all the materials ranked equally. Otherwise the most important collections would be Pennsylvania history, Japan Collection, and SRU faculty publications. 3. IMC. 2nd floor, back. Listed in order of importance a. AV. All materials behind the IMC Desk (all the way back to the office and 213) b. Awards Collection. Shelved next to the IMC Desk. c. Reference Collection. Shelved next to the IMC Desk. d. Textbooks. Shelved on the far side of the 4th stack in IMC. e. Fiction, Nonfiction and Biography Collections. Fiction is shelved on the 1st one and a half stacks. Nonfiction is shelved on the far side of the 2nd stack, 3rd stack, and the near side of the 4th stack in IMC. 4. Serials. Listed in order of importance a. Abstracts and Indexes. Reference room walls and stacks next to the loose journals. b. Bound journals. 3rd floor stacks at the far end of the building. c. Loose current copies. 1st floor Periodicals area. d. Microforms 1st floor Periodicals area. 5. Reference. 1st floor Reference area. Book stacks A through Z and the Atlas Case. 6. Main stacks. Listed in order of importance a. History. Stacks on the 2nd floor with call numbers C, D, E, and F. b. Philosophy. Stacks on the 2nd floor with call number B except BF. c. Geology. Stacks on the 3rd floor with call number QE. d. Music scores. Stacks on the 2nd floor with call numbers M and MT e. All the rest. Stacks on the 2nd and 3rd floors. 7. Government Documents. 3rd floor, middle. Listed in order of importance a. All the FS reports (old education titles). FS 5.3 (multiple volumes). b. USGS Bulletin. I19.3 (multiple volumes) c. Agriculture titles. A1.9-A1.76. d. DOD reports. T27.1-T28.7 15

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Water Damage: Salvaging Tips

Damage from water is the most common type of emergency since it can occur naturally, as the result of leaking pipes and plumbing from air conditioning systems, and is the direct result of nearly all other disasters including fire, storms and earthquakes. The following is a guide to assist you in salvaging various materials formats.

Points to keep in mind when recovering and salvaging materials

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TIME IS CRITICAL ­ you have 48-72 hours to stabilize wet materials.

Try to get assistance from an experienced preservation professional or conservator as soon as possible after the disaster occurred. See Collection Emergency Contact Sheet. Lower temperature and humidity to avoid mold and mildew outbreaks. The cooler and dryer the environment the better -- below 70 degrees Fahrenheit, below 50% Rh. Install fans to circulate the air to prevent stagnant air that promotes mold growth. Protect materials that were not affected by the disaster to prevent additional damage. Avoid damaging materials in the recovery phase. Wet materials are extremely fragile and vulnerable to tears from simple handling. Select the recovery method(s) best suited to the collection and to the kind of damage it received. Keep an inventory of all materials removed from the site. Number each box and record the number of books in each box. Or, scan barcode of each book prior to packing out. Document all salvaging activities ­ written notes, photographs, or video recording. Save high priority materials. Refer to the Collection Priorities list (page 20). Do not waste time on unimportant or unsalvageable materials. Materials of highest need of immediate recovery: Clay-coated paper, e.g. art books Water soluble inks (manuscripts) Film-based media

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10.

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Books & Paper Salvaging Tips

Wet books need to be stabilized--air-dried or frozen--within 48 hours to minimize damage. Damp books and papers can be air-dried unless there are too many of them. Rule of thumb: more than 100 books freeze; less than 100 air-dry. Wetter books will need to be frozen. Do not squeeze wet books or try to straighten them or open them. Just handle each book carefully and pack for freezing. Pack books spine down only one layer deep in boxes or plastic crates; try to loosely wrap (create a sling) around each book with waxed or freezer paper so that they do not stick together or allow inks or dyes to transfer to each other. Get the books to a freezer immediately. Clay-coated paper: Freeze immediately or interleave every page with absorbent paper towels.

Photographic Materials Salvaging Tips

(prints, negatives, transparencies)

Do not freeze photographs unless you have no other alternative. Freezing may damage the surface of the photo. Keep immersed in cold water. Air-dry flat or hang on clothes line within 48 hours; 72 hours for negatives and transparencies. If they cannot be air-dried within 48 hours, freeze them.

Loose Papers & Maps Salvaging Tips

Do not try to separate wet single sheets by hand as pages will tear easily. If sheets are just damp, separate each by lifting each one using a piece of Mylar or polyester film, and lay out to dry. If wet, interleave groups of papers with waxed or freezer paper and freeze as soon as possible. When you are ready to air dry, thaw the papers and then separate the sheets using Mylar or polyester film. Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station. 18

Judith Fortson, Disaster planning and recovery: a how-to-do-it manual for librarians and archivists. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 1992, p. 61. Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station. 19

Packing Wet Books/Paper for Transfer Off-Site

Freezing most paper-based materials stabilizes materials physically and chemically to prevent further damage. Once frozen, materials can remain in this state indefinitely. Training staff in recovery methods is essential to avoid ruining materials. The condition and shape of materials after freezing will be the same as before freezing. However, because wet materials are extremely fragile, trying to straighten pages and text blocks may result in greater damage. Most materials will need to be placed in boxes or plastic crates for transport to the freezer. Use standard size record or book boxes. Loosely wrap each book with waxed or freezer paper to prevent transfer of binding designs or cloth dyes Pack bound volumes spine down in each box, one layer deep. Pack loosely Keep records of box contents. Code boxes to identify location of materials requiring special treatments. Stack boxes on pallets, no more than three cartons high to avoid collapse of the boxes. Use shrink-wrap to secure stacks of boxes on wooden pallets.

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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Salvaging Tips: Non-Books/Paper

Audio & Video

Very labor-intensive to save if wet, so have BACK-UP copies of irreplaceable tapes. If there is water inside the cassette box, open the box and air dry. If the tape is wet, contact a professional restoration vendor immediately. See Disaster Response Services and Resources listing. Do not use heat to dry. Once the tape is dry, make a new copy. See page __ for audio and video tape recovery services

Computer Hardware & Equipment

Computers should be set up off the floor. Move to cool, dry, clean location. Rinse off debris if necessary. Open covers to drain Let dry ­ dry in cool room with temperature between 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit and Rh of 40-50% Or, contact a disaster recovery company for drying and cleaning. See U.S. Disaster Response Services and Resources listing.

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Leather, Vellum & Parchment

Handle with care. Wet leather is extremely fragile. Air-dry slowly and gently blot saturated areas. Freeze large quantities ­ loosely wrap each item with waxed or freezer paper.

Microfilm & Microfiche

If only a few microfilm reels or fiche are wet, gently dry with a clean, nonabrasive cloth, and place on a flat surface, or hang on a line to dry. Do not expose to heat. Use a fan to dry them. If there are many, immerse the film and fiche in a trashcan (or bucket or garbage bag) filled with cold water. Contact a microfilming processing vendor immediately. See Disaster Response Services and Resources listing. Once wet, film and fiche need to be rewashed by a vendor and dried within 72 hours.

Emergency supplies are located in room 227: IMC librarian's back office. Flashlights are available at each work station.

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Handling Moldy Books: Moldy books must be separated from the collection immediately, preferably by placing in a plastic bag. Do not carry unwrapped moldy books around the library; this spreads mold spores. The books that were next to the moldy ones on the shelf may also need to be removed and cleaned. Shelving must be cleaned with a biocide (not Lysol).

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Disaster Response Services Providers

Disaster Recovery & Salvaging (for major cleanup)

Munters Moisture Control Services (verified 02/2009) 31387 Lorain Road North Olmstead, OH 44070 Phone: (800)686-8377 Fax: (440) 716-9974 Email: [email protected] http://www.muntersamerica.com/ Services: (1) Water pumping and vacuuming. (2) Drying of floors, walls, insulation, and furnishings. (3) Document and media restoration. Cost estimates are provided after an evaluation of the damage. BMS CAT (Blackmon-Mooring-Steamatic Catastrophe, Inc.) (verified

02/2009)

303 Arthur Street Fort Worth, TX 76107 (800) 433-2940 (817) 332-2770 Fax: (817) 332-6728 Email: [email protected] http://www.bmscat.com V.P. Dean McKinney recommended contact per Iron Mountain Services: microbial remediation, sewage remediation, dehumidification, fire & water damage recovery, data, magnetic media & microforms recovery, document, books & vital records restoration. DiCaprio Cleaning (verified 08/2009) 1021 Huey Street New Castle, PA (724) 652-7330 (recommended by Del Hamilton) http://dicapriocleaning.com/ Specializing in fire, water, & smoke clean-up; anti-bacterial treatment; carpet, furniture, & upholstery; janitorial service; sewage back-up, 24 hour emergency service.

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Audio and Videotape Recovery & Salvaging

VidiPax (verified 02/2009) 30-00 47th Ave. Long Island City, NY 11101 Toll-Free: (800) 653-8434 Phone: (718) 482-7111 Fax: (718) 482-1370 email: [email protected] http://www.vidipax.com Services: Videotape, audiotape restoration, consulting, videotape supplies, and forensic video services. Restoration Technologies Inc. (verified 8/2009) 3695 Prairie Lake Court Aurora, IL 60504 Phone: (800) 421-9290 Fax: (630) 851-1774 Email: [email protected] http://www.restorationechnologies.net/ Services: Recovery of electronic data processing, radio & TV, magnetic tapes, and floppy discs. Mobile laboratory brought to site. Safe Sound Archive (verified 02/2009) (recommended by Judy Silva) c/o George Blood 21 West Highland Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19118 Phone (215) 248-2100 Fax: (215) 242-2177 Email: [email protected] http://www.safesoundarchive.com What's Happenin' Productions (verified 02/2009) 2571 Western Ave. Altamont, NY 12009 Phone: (518) 355-5888 or (518) 355-5305 Fax: (518) 355-6109 Email: [email protected] http://whpvideo.com/ (Contact: Tom Quaglieri) Services: (1) Copying of damaged videotapes. (2) Drying of 16mm, 8mm, and Super 8 film.

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Books and Paper Salvaging

Library of Congress National Preservation Program Office LM-G07 Washington, DC 20540 Phone: (202) 707-5213 Fax: (202) 707-3434 Email: [email protected] (emailed 3/1/2007 for verification) http://lcweb.loc.gov/preserv/ (verified 02/2009) Expertise: Information on salvage, restoration, and reformatting of books and paper. American Freeze-Dry, Inc. (verified 8/14/2009) 441 White Horse Pike Audubon, NJ 08106 Phone: (856) 939-8160 or (866) 939-8160 Emergency: (609) 458-0510 [email protected] http://www.americanfreezedry.com/emergency.htm Services: Vacuum freeze drying; -20 deg. F. storage. This company deals primarily with books and paper. They can provide crates, pick-up and delivery, cleaning of materials, smoke odor removal, and mold and fire recovery. Works closely with conservators and with artifacts. Northeast Document Conservation Center (verified 02/2009) 100 Brickstone Square Andover, MA 01810-1494 Phone: (978) 470-1010 Disaster Assistance: (978) 470-1010 day or night, seven days a week. Fax: (978) 475-6021 Email: see http://nedcc.org/about/staff.php email list by department http://nedcc.org/services/disaster.php Expertise: Regional conservation center, which specializes in the salvage, restoration, and reformatting of books, paper materials, and photographs.

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Books and Paper Salvaging, cont.

Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (verified 02/2009) 264 South 23rd Street Philadelphia, PA 19103 Phone: (215) 545-0613 Fax: (215) 733-9313 Email: [email protected] http://www.ccaha.org/ Expertise: Regional conservation center, which specializes in the salvage, restoration, and reformatting of books, paper materials, and art. Etherington Conservation Center (verified 02/2009) 7609 Business Park Drive Greensboro, NC 27409 Phone: (800) 444-7534 or (336) 665-1317 http://www.thehfgroup.com/ecsover.htm Expertise: Salvage, restoration, and reformatting of paper and books, photographic media, and works of art on paper. Sue Kellerman (verified 02/2009) Judith O. Sieg Chair for Preservation, Head, Digitization & Preservation Department 402 Pattee Library The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA 16802-1804 Office Phone: (814) 863-4696 (verified 3/1/2007) Home phone: (814) 466-3156 Fax: (814) 865-8769 (verified 3/1/2007) email: [email protected] (verified 3/1/2007) http://www.libraries.psu.edu/preservation/ (verified 3/1/2007) Expertise: Disaster response and recovery.

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Books and Paper Salvaging, cont.

Intermuseum Conservation Association 2915 Detroit Avenue Cleveland, OH 44113 Phone: (216) 658-8700 Fax: (216) 658-8709 http://www.ica-artconservation.org/

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Computer Records Recovery & Salvaging

BMS CAT (Blackmon-Mooring-Steamatic Catastrophe, Inc.) (verified

02/2009)

303 Arthur Street Fort Worth, TX 76107 (800) 433-2940 (817) 332-2770 Fax: (817) 332-6728 Email: [email protected] http://www.bmscat.com V.P. Dean McKinney recommended contact per Iron Mountain Services: microbial remediation, sewage remediation, dehumidification, fire & water damage recovery, data, magnetic media & microforms recovery, document, books & vital records restoration. Restoration Technologies Inc. (verified 8/2009) 3695 Prairie Lake Court Aurora, IL 60504 Phone: (800) 421-9290 Fax: (630) 851-1774 Email: [email protected] http://www.restorationechnologies.net/ Services: Recovery of electronic data processing, radio & TV, magnetic tapes, and floppy discs. Mobile laboratory brought to site. Document Reprocessors (verified 02/2009) 5611 Water Street Middlesex, NY 14507 Phone: (800) 437-9464 (emergency, 24 hrs) (585) 554-4500 (daytime, EST) Fax: (585) 554-4114 http://www.documentreprocessors.com/ Services: Salvage of computers. They will come to the site to inventory and help pack materials to be taken to their facility.

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Film Restoration

Scene Savers (Silva recommends. They did a reformatting project for Archives) 424 Scott Street Covington, KY 41011 ph: 859-292-1104| fax 859-292-1105 [email protected] Cineric, Inc. 321 West 44th Street New York, NY 10021 (212) 586-4822 John E. Allen, Inc. 116 North Avenue Park Ridge, NJ 07656 (201) 391-3299 Colorlab Corp. 5708 Arundel Ave Rockville, MD 20853 tel: 301-770-2128 fax: 301-876-0798 e-mail: [email protected] Summit Film Lab & Media Services 1020 Napor Blvd Pittsburgh, PA 15205 phone: 412-937-9333 www.summitfilmlab.com

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Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Freeze-Dry Service

Document Reprocessors (verified 02/2009) 5611 Water Street Middlesex, NY 14507 Phone: (800) 437-9464 (emergency, 24 hrs) (585) 554-4500 (daytime, EST) Fax: (585) 554-4114 http://www.documentreprocessors.com/ (Contact: Eric Lundquist or Quentin Schwartz) Services: (1) Vacuum Freeze Drying. (2) Salvage of computers. They will come to the site to inventory and help pack materials to be taken to their facility. They also have a mobile freeze-drying unit and provide various other combinations of services, including barcoding and reshelving. They will service all types of micrographics, electronic media, and large formats such as maps. American Freeze-Dry, Inc. (verified 8/2009) 441 White Horse Pike Audubon, NJ 08106 Phone: (856) 939-8160 or (866) 939-8160 Emergency: (609) 458-0510 [email protected] http://www.americanfreezedry.com/emergency.htm Services: Vacuum freeze drying; -20 deg. F. storage. This company deals primarily with books and paper. They can provide crates, pick-up and delivery, cleaning of materials, smoke odor removal, and mold and fire recovery. Works closely with conservators and with artifacts.

49

Disaster Response Services Providers, cont.

Microfilm Recovery & Salvaging

BMS CAT (Blackmon-Mooring-Steamatic Catastrophe, Inc.) (verified

02/2009)

303 Arthur Street Fort Worth, TX 76107 (800) 433-2940 (817) 332-2770 Fax: (817) 332-6728 Email: [email protected] http://www.bmscat.com V.P. Dean McKinney recommended contact per Iron Mountain Services: microbial remediation, sewage remediation, dehumidification, fire & water damage recovery, data, magnetic media & microforms recovery, document, books & vital records restoration.

Photograph Salvaging

Image Permanence Institute Rochester Institute of Technology/IPI 70 Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester, NY 14623-5604 (verified 3/1/2007) Phone: (585) 475-5199 (verified 3/1/2007) Fax: (585) 475-7230 (verified 3/1/2007) Email: [email protected] (verified 3/1/2007) http://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/ (verified 3/1/2007) Expertise: Salvage and restoration of photographs.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Locating Conservators

American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) 1717 K Street, Suite 200 Washington, D.C. 20006 Phone: (202) 452-9545 Fax: (202) 452-9328 Email: [email protected] http://aic.stanford.edu/faic/refer.html Services: AIC provides free referral to conservators (in your area) and informational publications on collection care. 50

Swap in tabbed divider: appendices

51

Building is Closed due to Emergency

52

Building is Closed due to Emergency

53

Disaster Response Supplies & Vendors

Quantity 20 20-21 rolls 1 6 1 bdl & 4 sm rolls 9'x9'x33' 1 2 1 box (50) 2 pkg 30 2 2 1 1 pkg (10) 1 box (100) 20 3 5 6 6/2 2 1 2 rolls 1 1 2 2 ctn (40) 1 ctn (100) 1 pkg 1 1 1 2 2 1 Vendor Demco Direct Safety Gaylord Lab Safety Supply Servistar Uline Supplies Boxes Paper towels Tape guns Tape Waxed paper Plastic sheeting Plastic bucket Sponges - Cellulose Garbage bags Mylar (Melinex) Cotton rags Fans-20" Extension cords-16 gauge 50' Multi-plug electrical strip Lightsticks (8 hours each) Gloves (for use with chemicals) Boots - Grips on bottom Waterproof markers Clipboards Tablets Pens/Pens Scissors First-Aid kit Caution tape Emergency Salvage wheel Platform truck Handsanitizer Dust mask Disposable aprons - polyethelyne Blotting paper Duct tape Disposable camera Clothesline & pins Door wedges Trouble lights Dehumidifier Address PO Box 7488 Madison,WI 53707-7488 PO Box 44995 Madison,WI 53744-4995 PO Box 4901 Syracuse,NY 13221-4901 PO Box 1368 Janesville,WI 53547-1368 239 Grove City Rd. Slippery Rock,PA 16057 2200 S. Lakeside Dr. Waukegan,IL 60085 54 Vendor Gaylord Servistar In house In house Uline Servistar Servistar Servistar In house Gaylord Servistar Servistar Servistar Servistar Lab Safety Servistar Direct Safety In house In house In house In house In house In house Servistar In house Demco Direct Safety Uline Uline Gaylord Servistar Servistar Servistar Servistar Servistar Servistar Phone# (800) 356-1200 (800) 528-7405 (800) 448-6160 (800) 356-0783 (724) 794-6615 (800) 295-5510

Suggested Emergency Supplies

Aprons, Rubber and/or plastic Boots Boxes ­ all sizes; or plastic crates Brooms and dustpans Camera and film Clipboard(s), Pens and Magic Markers Clothesline and Clothes Pins Crates, plastic Extension cord, 50 ft., heavy duty, (grounded) and/or a multi-plug electrical strip First-Aid kit, Band-aids Flashlight(s) Freezer or waxed paper Garbage bags, plastic Gloves, rubber and plastic Marking pens, waterproof Mops, buckets, sponges Mylar or Polyester film for handling wet unbound papers/maps Paper towels: many packs, you'll need lots if you have to interleaf clay-coated paper Plastic bucket(s) and trash cans Plastic sheeting ­many rolls, so you can drape it over collections that are in harm's way Protective masks/glasses Rags, cotton Rubber boots Scissors Tape gun(s) ­ plus tape, to seal boxes Sponges Tablets ­ to record inventory lists Waxed paper ­ many rolls; buy large economy size Also: Emergency funds, purchase orders, institutional credit cards 55

Suggested Emergency Equipment

Construction materials (wood, screws, nails) Dehumidifiers, portable Extension cords (50ft., grounded) Fans, portable Fire suppression Type: Wood, paper, combustible (Type A) ­ 10 water extinguishers All routine types of fire (Type ABC)- 15 dry chemical extinguishers Generator, portable Hard hats Ladders Lighting, portable Metal book trucks Phone, nearest off-site location: Portable toilets Pump, portable Refrigerator trucks Tables, portable Wet vacuum

56

Further Reading

Internet Sources

Preservation Directorate at the Library of Congress, Emergency Preparedness and Response http://lcweb.loc.gov/preserv/pubsemer.html Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Emergency Salvage Steps http://www.fema.gov/r-n-r/salvage.htm National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) http://www.nfpa.org/Home/index.asp Salvage Operations for Water-Damaged Collections, by Betty Walsh http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/waac/wn/wn10/wn10-2/wn10-202.html National Task Force on Emergency Response, Heritage Preservation http://www.heritagepreservation.org/PROGRAMS/taskfer.htm American Library Association, Association for Library Collections & Technical Services division, Disaster Preparedness Clearinghouse http://www.ala.org/alcts/publications/disaster.html Conservation On-Line, disaster planning and recovery information with additional links http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/ Tips for Water Damage to Family Heirlooms and Other Valuables, prepared by the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) and the National Institute for Conservation (NIC) http://aic.stanford.edu/disaster/tentip.html Northeast Document Conservation Center, Disaster Assistance http://www.nedcc.org/disaster.htm Northeast Document Conservation Center, Preservation of Library and Archival Materials: A Manual http://www.nedcc.org/plam3/index3.htm Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) Preservation Service, Disaster Service http://www.solinet.net/presvtn/disaster/disastsv.htm Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, Disaster Service http://www.ccaha.org/ Illinois Cooperative Extension Service Disaster Resources Home Page http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~disaster/prep.html

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Books and Articles

"Planning for the Unthinkable." Library Personnel News 15, no. 4 (2002). "Flood Recovery Health Concerns." The Unabashed Librarian no. 104 (1997): 17-18. "Quick Thinking in Library Prevents Flood and Fire." Library Association Record 97, (1995). "The Disaster Preparedness Checklist." Library Mosaics 3 (1992). Akussah, Harry, and Venatus K. Fosu. "Disaster Management in Academic Libraries in Ghana." African Journal of Library, Archives & Information Science 11, no. 1 (2001): 1-16. Alexander, Harriet Semmes. "Disaster Planning: A Bibliography." Tennessee Librarian 48 (1996): 19-21. Alire, Camila, ed. Library Disaster Planning and Recovery Handbook. New York: NealSchuman Pubs., 2000. Alire, Camila A. "The Silver Lining: Recovering from the Shambles of a Disaster." Journal of Library Administration 38, no. 1 (2003): 101-7. Alley, Brian. "Sonny and Rico to the Rescue; Or, it Wasn't a Complete Disaster." Technicalities 14, (1994). Armond, David. "Preventative Conservation and Disaster Recovery." Conservation Administration News no. 53 (1993): 18-19. Armour, Annie. "Learning from Experience: A Trial-and-Error Approach to Disaster Planning." The Southeastern Librarian 44 (1994): 62-6. Austin, Kristi. "Courting Disaster: Libraries, Water Damage, & the Need for a Plan [Computer File]." Idaho Librarian (Online) 55, no. 3 (2004). Baker, Aidan. "Disaster and After." Library Management 20, no. 1 (1999): 54-5. Baker, Whitney. "Preservation Perspectives: Preparing for the Imminent: Protecting Your Collections from a Disaster." Kentucky Libraries 66, no. 2 (2002): 18-19. Barlak, Karen. "Emotional Coping Mechanisms in Times of Disaster." New Jersey Libraries 28 (1995).

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Barnes, Melvyn P. "The Threshold of Opportunity--Or the Brink of Disaster?" Library Association Record 97 (1995): 594-5. Barton, John P., and Johanna G. Wellheiser, eds. An Ounce of Prevention: A Handbook on Disaster Contingency Planning for Archives, Libraries and Record Centres. Toronto: Toronto Area Archivists Group Education Foundation, 1985. Benefiel, Candace R., and Pixey Anne Mosley. "Coping with the Unexpected: A Rapid Response Group in an Academic Library." Technical Services Quarterly 17, no. 2 (1999): 25-35. Bolger, Laurie. "Scared Or Prepared? Disaster Planning Makes the Difference." Information Outlook 7, no. 7 (2003): 26-30. Brooks, Constance. Disaster Preparedness. Washington, DC: Association for Research Libraries, 1993. Brown, Doris R. "Collection Disaster: Mold in the Stacks." College & Research Libraries News 64, no. 5 (2003): 304-6. Buchanan, Sally. "Preservation Management: Emergency Preparedness." In Preservation. American Lib. Assn, 159-65. Building an Emergency Plan: A Guide for Museums and Other Cultural Institutions. Compiled by Valerie Dorse and Sharon Jones. Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute, 1999. Butler, Randall, and Sheryl J. Davis. "IELDRN [Inland Empire Libraries Disaster Response Network] Stages Disaster Recovery Workshop." Conservation Administration News no. 40 (1990): 1-3. Cannata, Arleen. "Telecommunications in Disaster Management; International Organizations are Putting Telecommunications to Work in Natural Disaster Recovery." Computers in Libraries 11 (1991): 44-5. Carpenter, Kathryn Hammell. "Dealing with Disaster: An Interview with Camila Alire." Library Administration & Management 14, no. 4 (2000): 188-90. Chadbourne, Robert D. "A Post-Disaster Primer: Elba on the Rebound." Wilson Library Bulletin 68 (1994): 24-5. Chadwell, Faye A. "Planning for the Worst: When Disaster Strikes." OLA Quarterly 6, no. 3 (2000): 16-17.

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Childress, Schelley H. "Planning for the Worst: Disaster Planning in the Library." The Southeastern Librarian 44 (1994): 51-6. Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts. Disaster Recovery: Salvaging Art on Paper. Philadelphia: CCAHA, 2000. Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts. Managing a Mold Invasion: Guidelines for Disaster Response. Philadelphia: CCAHA, 1994. Courtois, Martin P., and Claire B. Rubin. "Crisis, Disaster, and Emergency Management." College & Research Libraries News 63, no. 10 (2002): 723-6. Crane, Marilyn, and Sheryl J. Davis. "The Practice of Disaster Response." Conservation Administration News no. 55 (1993): 8-9. Cunha, George Daniel Martin. "Disaster Planning and a Guide to Recovery Resources." Library Technology Reports 28 (1992): 533-624. Curzon, Susan Carol. "When Disaster Strikes: The Fall and Rise of a Library." American Libraries 31, no. 4 (2000): 64-9. Cuthbert, Sheena S., and Judith Doig. "Disaster Plans: Who Needs them?" Australian Academic & Research Libraries 25 (1994): 13-18. Daines, Guy. "'Disasters' to Come from Unitary Plans." Library Association Record 95, (1993). D'Angelo, Kathleen T. Mass Treatment Options for the Recovery of Water-Damaged Library Materials, with Attention to Disasters and Disaster Planning : A Review of the Literature. Davies, Miriam. "Disaster Management." The Law Librarian 26 (1995): 406-9. Davis, Marlys Cresap. "Be Prepared! Planning for Disaster." Show-Me Libraries 42, (1991): 32-6. Davis, Mary B., Susan Fraser, and Judith Reed. "Preparing for Library Emergencies; a Cooperative Approach." Wilson Library Bulletin 66 (1991): 42-4. DeCandido, GraceAnne Andreassi. "Digital Disaster Planning: When Bad Things Happen to Good Systems." Public Libraries 39, no. 5 (2000): 258-9. Donnelly, Helene M. "Disaster Planning: A Wider Approach." Conservation Administration News no. 53 (1993): 8-9. 60

Donnelly, Helene M. "Fighting Floods and Fire." Library Association Record 94, (1992): 5245. Dorge, Valerie and Sharon L. Jones. Building an Emergency Plan: A Guide for Museums and Other Cultural Institutions. Los Angeles: Getty Conservation Institute, 1999. Drewes, Jeanne. "Computers: Planning for Disaster." Law Library Journal 81 (Winter 1989): 103-116. Dyer, Victor. ""After the Deluge: What Next?" A Disaster Planning Workshop." Public Libraries 26, (1987): 13-15. Eden, Paul, and Graham Matthews. "Disaster Management in Libraries." Library Management 17, no. 3 (1996): 5-12. Eng, Sidney. "How Technology and Planning Saved My Library at Ground Zero." Computers in Libraries 22, no. 4 (2002): 28-35. Ennis, Lisa A. "Saving a Collection from the Brink of Disaster: Or, Life as a Chihuahua in a Rottweiler World." DttP 31, no. 3 (2003): 36-7. Ezennia, Steve E. "Flood, Earthquake, Libraries and Library Materials." Library & Archival Security 13, no. 1 (1995): 21-7. Ferguson, Anthony W. "Back Talk -- does Your Library Disaster Preparedness Plan have a Section on Epidemics?" Against the Grain 15, no. 3 (2003): 110-109. Fisher, Steven P., and Thomas K. Fry. "Security and Emergency Preparedness in a University Library: Planning Works." Colorado Libraries 23 (1997): 9-11. Fortson, Judith. Disaster Planning and Recovery: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians and Archivists. How-To-Do-It Manuals for Libraries, No. 21. New York: Neal-Schuman, 1992. Fortson, Judith. "Disaster Planning: Managing the Financial Risk." The Bottom Line 6, (1992): 26-33. George, Susan C. "Library Disasters: Are You Prepared?" College & Research Libraries News no. 2 (1995). Gillespie, Karen. "Elements in Developing a Library Emergency Plan." Kentucky Libraries 58 (1994): 10-11.

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Goldsborough, Reid. "New Media and Disasters." Teacher Librarian 29, no. 4 (2002). Green, Deidre. "After the Flood: Disaster Response and Recovery Planning." Bulletin of the Medical Library Association 78 (1990): 303-6. Greene, Harlan. "Build it and they Will Come: Libraries and Disaster Preparedness." North Carolina Libraries 52 (1994): 6-7. Guerin, Lyn. "Canadian Emergency Preparedness Initiatives." Library & Archival Security 18, no. 2 (2003). Gulik, Susan H. "Your Disaster Plan: Does it Cover Everything?" New Jersey Libraries 28, (1995): 6-7. Hackbart-Dean, Pamela. "Shelter from the Storm: Disaster Prevention and Planning." North Carolina Libraries 58, no. 3 (2000): 48-53. Haines, Michael. "Physical Hazards and Post-Trauma Problems." New Jersey Libraries 28., (1995): 11-12. Haislip, Ron. "Knee Deep in North Carolina: A Disaster Planning Manual." North Carolina Libraries 58, no. 3 (2000): 54-6. Hendriks, Klaus B. and Brian Lesser. "Disaster Preparedness and Recovery: Photographic Materials." American Archivist 46 (Winter 1983): 52-68. Higginbotham, Barbra Buckner. ""it Ain't Over 'Til it's Over": The Process of Disaster Recovery." Technicalities 16 (1996): 12-13. Higginbotham, Barbra Buckner. "Managing Emergencies: Small Construction Projects." Technicalities 16 (1996). Higginbotham, Barbra Buckner. "Before Disaster Strikes; be Prepared." Technicalities 15 (1995): 4-5. Higgs, Jessica. "The EL Buying Guide: Power of Nature." Emergency Librarian 21 (1994): 48-9. Hitchcock, Leonard. "Making a Claim: Disaster Follow-Up at the Oboler Library [Computer File]." Idaho Librarian (Online) 55, no. 3 (2004). Hobbs, Lenora. "Chaos Limitation: Emergency Response Plans." Public Libraries 38, no. 5 (1999). 62

James, Robert M. "Disaster Resources on the Web." North Carolina Libraries 58, no. 3 (2000): 70-2. Johnson, Steven D. "Library Disaster Recovery: The Fine Art of Gift Raising." Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services 23, no. 1 (1999): 133-4. Kahn, Miriam B. "Disaster Prevention, Response and Recovery." Conservation Administration News no. 53 (1993). Kahn, Miriam. Disaster Response and Planning for Libraries. 2nd ed. Chicago: American Library Association, 2003. Kahn, Miriam B. "Fires, Earthquakes and Floods: How to Prepare Your Library and Staff." Online (Weston, Conn.) 18 (1994): 18-24. Kahn, Miriam B. First Steps for Handling and Drying Water Damaged Materials. Columbus, Ohio: MBK Consulting, 1994. Kahn, Miriam B. "Mastering Disaster: Emergency Planning for Libraries." Library Journal (1976) 118 (1993): 73-5. Kahn, Miriam and Barbra Higginbotham. Disaster Prevention and Response for Computers and Data. Columbus, Ohio: MBK Consulting, 1994. Kane, Kim. "You Too can do a Disaster Plan." Library Mosaics 12, no. 2 (2001): 12-13. Kleiman, Allan M. "A Blueprint for Disaster." Public Libraries 38, no. 6 (1999): 357-8. Kulczak, Deborah E., and Lora L. Lennertz. "A Decade of Disaster: A Selected Bibliography of Disaster Literature, 1985-1995." Library & Archival Security 15, no. 1 (1999): 7-66. Labuik, Karen. "Well, You can't Plan for Every Disaster!" PNLA Quarterly 60, (1996): 1314. Lederer, Naomi, and Douglas J. Ernest. "Managing the Media during a Library Crisis." American Libraries 33, no. 11 (2002): 32-3. Leita, Carole. ""Disasters Happen"--Part 1--Natural." The Unabashed Librarian no. 118 (2001): 7-9. Leita, Carole. ""Disasters Happen"--Part Two--Man-made." The Unabashed Librarian no. 119 (2001): 9-10. 63

Line, Maurice B. "Management Musings 9: Extracting Pearls from Rotten Oysters." Library Management 23, no. 8 (2002): 435-6. Lunde, Diane B. "When Disaster Strikes: A Case Study; Colorado State University Libraries, July 28, 1997." The Serials Librarian 36, no. 3-4 (1999): 363-82. Lunde, Diane B. "Aftermath of a Disaster: Establishing a Rebinding Program." New Library Scene 17, no. 2 (1998): 10-13. Matthews, Graham, and Paul Eden. "Disaster Management Training in Libraries." Library Review (Glasgow, Scotland) 45, no. 1 (1996): 30-8. Matthews, Graham, and Paul Eden. "Heading Off Disaster." Library Association Record 97 (1995). McClure, Frances D. "Emergency Preparedness." In Managing Preservation. State Lib. of Ohio, 21-51. McCracken, Peter H. The Crucial Inadequacy: Disaster Planning in Libraries and Museums. Miller, R. Bruce (Robert Bruce). "Contingency Planning Resources." Information Technology and Libraries 9 (1990): 179-80. Morgan, G. Gillian, and J. Gretchen Smith. "Disaster Management in Libraries: The Role of a Disaster Plan." South African Journal of Library and Information Science 65 (1997): 6271. Morris, John. Managing the Library Fire Risk. 2nd ed. Berkeley: Univ. of California, 1979. Muir, Adrienne, and Sarah Shenton. "If the Worst Happens: The use and Effectiveness of Disaster Plans in Libraries and Archives." Library Management 23, no. 3 (2002): 115-23. Mullin, Christopher G. "Planning for Disaster: Some Ideas about Where to Begin." PNLA Quarterly 60 (1996): 11-12. Musser, Linda R. "Internet Information on Hazards and Disasters: Resources for Researchers." Science & Technology Libraries 16, no. 1 (1996): 11-18. Musser, Linda R., and Lisa A. Recupero. "Internet Resources on Disasters." College & Research Libraries News no. 6 (1997): 403-7. Norris, Debra Hess. Disaster Recovery: Salvaging Photograph Collections. Philadelphia: Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, 1998. 64

Obokoh, Nathaniel P. "Coping with Flood Disaster: The Experience of a University Library." Library Review (Glasgow, Scotland) 40, no. 6 (1991): 22-9. Ogden, Sherelyn. "Security from Loss: Water and Fire Damage, Biological Agents, Theft, and Vandalism." Rare Books & Manuscripts Librarianship 11, no. 1 (1996): 43-7. Owens, Brian M., and Christopher Brown-Syed. "Not in our Stars: The University of Windsor Archives and Library Disaster Plan." Library & Archival Security 14, no. 2 (1998): 61-6. Page, Julie. "'Exercising' Your Disaster Plans." PNLA Quarterly 66, no. 1 (2001). Page, Julie A. "Exercising Your Disaster Plans: A Tabletop Drill." Conservation Administration News no. 54 (1993): 8-9. Page, Julie A. "When Disaster Strikes: First Steps in Disaster Preparedness." The Serials Librarian 36, no. 3-4 (1999): 347-61. Parker, Susan E., and Don Jaeger. "What to do when Disaster Strikes: The California State University, Northridge, Experience." The Serials Librarian 44, no. 3 (2003): 237-42. Pelser, Janeen C., and Penny Culpepper. "What if--." Florida Media Quarterly 27, no. 2 (2002): 33-5. Pilston, Anna. "{Disaster Management for Libraries and Archives}." Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services 28, no. 3 (2004): 347-8. Polloni, Diana. "Picking Up the Pieces." The Law Librarian 26, (1995): 409-11. Polloni, Diana, and Barney Harkins. "Picking Up the Pieces: An Organizational Profile of the Library Disaster Centre." Library Management 17, no. 1 (1996): 37-40. Reinsch, Mary. "Library Disasters and Effective Staff Management." Conservation Administration News no. 55 (1993): 4-5. Riffel, Jean. "Disaster Planning for Libraries: Safeguards for Software." OCLC Micro 6, (1990). Rightmyer, Sandra P. "Disaster Planning; Or, the "what Next" Attitude." New Jersey Libraries 28, (1995): 3-18.

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Riley, Cheryl A. "In an Emergency: Salvaging Library Collections." The Serials Librarian 40, no. 1 (2001): 19-30. Riley, Julie, and A. J. (Arthur Jack) Meadows. "The Role of Information in Disaster Planning: A Case Study Approach." Library Management 16, no. 4 (1995): 18-24. Robertson, Guy. "A Van and a Plan: How Consortium Offices can Contribute to Disaster Recovery." Feliciter 49, no. 6 (2003): 302-4. Robertson, Guy. "Investigating Risk: Assessing and Analyzing Trouble before it Strikes." Feliciter 48, no. 1 (2002): 30-2. Robertson, Guy. "Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst: A Disaster Planner's Experience." Feliciter 41, (1995): 20-5. Rutherford, Christine. "Disaster: Planning, Preparation, Prevention." Public Libraries 29, (1990): 271-6. Ruyle, Carol J., and Elizabeth M. Schobernd. "Disaster Recovery without the Disaster." Technical Services Quarterly 14, no. 4 (1997): 13-26. Schaefer, Jo Ann Jecklin. "An Ounce of Prevention: The Importance of a Written Disaster Plan." Texas Library Journal 71, (1995): 158-61. Schink, Michael Lee. "Selecting Disaster Recovery Software." Colorado Libraries 25, no. 1 (1999): 38-9. Schneider, Joanne A. "Mold: Recovery from a Potential Collection Disaster and Environmental Hazard." Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply 14, no. 4 (2004). Scott, Ralph Lee. "Wired to the World: FEMA and NHC Web Sites." North Carolina Libraries 57, no. 3 (1999). Shapkina, Larissa B., Adolph A. Leonovich, and Michael K. Nikitin. "Restoring Book Paper and Drying Books After a Disaster." Restaurator 13, no. 2 (1992): 47-57. Shorley, Deborah. "Disaster Planning: 'in the End You just Cope." Library & Information Update 2, no. 3 (2003): 46-7. Smith, Richard D. "Disaster Recovery: Problems and Procedures." IFLA Journal 18, no. 1 (1992): 13-24. 66

SOLINET Preservation Services. The Invasion of the Giant Spore. SOLINET Preservation Leaflet #5. Atlanta: SOLINET, January 1997. Steal This Handbook: A Template for Creating a Museum's Emergency Response Plan. Columbia, S.C.: Southeastern Registrar's Association, 1994. Stoker, David. "Planning Disasters for the Twenty-First Century." Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (Folkestone, England) 28, (1996): 129-31. Tennant, Roy. "Coping with Disasters." Library Journal (1976) 126, no. 19 (2001): 26-8. Thorburn, Karen J. "Disaster Manual: Save the Horses!" New Jersey Libraries 28, (1995): 16-18. Todaro, Julie Beth. "Managing through Tragedy." Library Administration & Management 16, no. 1 (2002): 40-3. Trinkley, Michael. Can You Stand the Heat? A Fire Safety Primer for Libraries, Archives and Museums. Atlanta, GA: Southeastern Library Network, 1993. Trinkley, Michael. "Disaster Planning; an Outline of an IAMSLIC Pre-Conference, Washington, D.C., October 11, 1993." In Preserving the Past, Looking to the Future. Edited by International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers. Conference (19th :1993 :Bethesda, Md.). IAMSLIC, 1-9. Ury, Connie Jo. "Heading Off Disaster." School Library Journal 43 (1997). Van Sickle, Anne. "Building Woes and Potential Disaster." PNLA Quarterly 60 (1996). Vriend, Anita. "Creating Guidelines for Disaster Planning." Art Libraries Journal 27, no. 1 (2002): 27-30. Wand, Patricia A. "Library Life in the Shadow of the Pentagon; Reflections on what we Experienced and what we Learned." OLA Quarterly 8, no. 4 (2002): 10-12. Watkins, Christine. "Chapter Report: Disaster Planning Makes (Dollars and) Sense." American Libraries 27, (1996). Watt, Marcia A. "2200 Gallons of Water." The Southeastern Librarian 44 (1994): 67-8. Welch, John T. "The Fire Next Time: Disaster Planning & Recovery." North Carolina Libraries 58, no. 3 (2000): 48-73.

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Wellheiser, Johanna G., Jude Scott, and Canadian Archives Foundation. An Ounce of Prevention : Integrated Disaster Planning for Archives, Libraries, and Record Centres. 2nd ed. Lanham, Md.; Toronto, Ont.: Scarecrow Press; Canadian Archives Foundation, 2002. Wettlaufer, Brian. "Preparing a Library Disaster Plan." Library Mosaics 6 (1995): 8-10. Winston, Iris. "RATs Meet Disaster with Equanimity." Feliciter 43 (1997). Wood, Larry. "1000 Easy Steps Toward Developing a Disaster Recovery Plan; Or, the Boss must Like Me because He Gave Me the Job of Writing the Disaster Plan." Conservation Administration News no. 58-59 (1994): 16-20. Wright, Gordon H. "A Management Perspective on Disaster Planning." In Disaster Management for Libraries. Edited by Claire England. Canadian Lib. Assn, 13-21. Wynen, Nancy. "The Big One: Staff Survival After a Disaster." Library Administration & Management 7 (1993): 103-5.

Videos

Culture Shock: Fire Protection for Historic and Cultural Property. Boston University, Preservation Studies Program, 1995. VHS video. The Inside Track to Disaster Recovery. Prairie Village, KS: Association. of Records Managers and Administrators, 1986. VHS video. Library and Archival Disaster ­ Preparedness and Recovery. Oakton, Va.: BiblioPrep, 1986. (21 minutes). VHS video.

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