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Nominations for Fiscal Years 2012-2013

Director, International Cooperation Office of the Under Secretary of Defense Acquisition, Technology and Logistics

Web: www.acq.osd.mil/ic/cwp.html Email: [email protected]

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I N T R O D U C T I O N .........................................................................................................................3

B U I L D I N G P A R T N E R S H I P S ...................................................................................... 4 N E E D ................................................................................................................................. 4

C O A L I T I O N W A R F A R E P R O G R A M ......................................................................................5

B A C K G R O U N D ............................................................................................................... 5 M I S S I O N .......................................................................................................................... 5 CWP REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................................................... 6

L E V E R A G I N G R E S O U R C E S .....................................................................................................7

FUNDING ............................................................................................................................. 7 M U L T I - A N D B I L A T E R A L F O R U M S ....................................................................... 7 U . S . - O N L Y A C Q U I S I T I O N P R O G R A M S ................................................................ 8

M A N A G E M E N T A P P R O A C H ....................................................................................................8

R O L E S ............................................................................................................................... 9

P R O J E C T S U B M I T T A L / S E L E C T I O N S C H E D U L E ..............................................................9

S T E P 1 : C A L L F O R N O M I N A T I O N S ..................................................................... 10 S T E P 2 : P R O J E C T P L A N N I N G ............................................................................... 10 S T E P 3 : O U T R E A C H .................................................................................................. 11 S T E P 4 : P R O J E C T N O M I N A T I O N S C H E D U L E S ............................................... 12 S T E P 5 : I N I T I A L N O M I N A T I O N S ......................................................................... 12 S T E P 6 : E V A L U A T I O N A N D F E E D B A C K ............................................................ 13 S T E P 7 : F I N A L N O M I N A T I O N ............................................................................... 13 S T E P 8 : F I N A L E V A L U A T I O N : R E V I E W B O A R D A N D S E L E C T I O N ......... 14 S T E P 9 : P R O J E C T I N I T I A T I O N A N D F U N D I N G R E L E A S E .......................... 14 S T E P 1 0 : P R O J E C T E X E C U T I O N ........................................................................... 15

C W P P O I N T S O F C O N T A C T ..................................................................................................16 A N N E X E S ....................................................................................................................................16 A C R O N Y M S ................................................................................................................................17

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INTRODUCTION Current U.S. military strategy and the global security environment make coalition warfare and multinational operations fundamental features of the U.S. national security strategy. Traditional U.S. military operations (from peacekeeping to major conflicts) almost always involve multinational coalitions. The DoD is also taking on more "soft power" roles, which includes an expanded role in humanitarian activities, requiring broader international, interagency, civilian and non-governmental coordination. Coalitions provide a broad base of operational and logistical support for military operations. As NATO forces and other coalition partners continue to lead and support missions worldwide, there are many lessons learned relating to interoperability. Coalition operations have shown a lack of partner coordination in Command, Control, Communications and Computers (C4) and Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), Battlespace Awareness and Logistics. These shortcomings not only reveal the complexities and challenges associated with multinational air, land and sea campaigns, but also encumber U.S. warfighters' abilities to efficiently and safely complete specific missions and coalition operations. Coalitions also serve as a means to ease the U.S. financial and manpower burdens associated with military goals and objectives. This is growing in importance to the U.S. and partner nations as national defense budgets decline, while defense missions continue to grow. DoD leadership realizes that the U.S. must embrace coalition interoperability as a key to the development of capable forces in the future. Coalition strategies, doctrine and tactics continue to be developed and analyzed within the DoD to support engagements with regional and operational partners. As a result of combat operations, U.S. Government and DoD strategy and policy all point to the criticality of early and continuous planning for more effective coalition operations. The Obama Administration has outlined a set of defense priorities that includes engaging our allies in meeting our common security challenges and organizing to help partners and allies in need. The emphasis on renewing our alliances is based on the White House's priorities to transform and strengthen alliances--such as NATO--on common security concerns like Afghanistan, homeland security, and counterterrorism, as well as ensuring our allies contribute their fair share to mutual security.

"In an increasingly interdependent world, challenges to common interests are best addressed in concert with likeminded allies and partners who share responsibility for fostering peace and security. America's national security and defense strategies depend on strong foreign ties, including a vibrant network of defense alliances and partnerships adapted to this challenging era. " "Thoughtful engagement, communication, and collaboration with allies and partners who share our interest in fostering peace and security remain essential." - Quadrennial Defense Review, February 2010

Implementation of the Guidance of Employment of Forces (GEF) requires an enduring role for AT&L to promulgate international armaments cooperation strategies that support the GEF and help guide security cooperation, building partnership, and capacity building plans of OUSD(P), COCOMs, Services and Defense Agencies. 3

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS The 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review highlights "Building Partnership Capacity" as a key objective for the Department. Building Partnerships initiatives focus on U.S.-partner capacities and capabilities for long term security cooperation improvement, as lessons learned in the Global War on Terror stress the need to build stronger political and technological relationships with a larger set of partners across the globe. These projects support a wide range of activities to include: information sharing, infectious disease mapping and control, humanitarian assistance, and disaster relief. NEED Despite the recognized needs, there is not a consistent approach to attract international participation and focus on the warfighters' coalition needs. Without the proper assessments for program strategies that identify cooperative opportunities or potential coalition interoperability implications on new programs, blanket requirements for coalition interoperability are funded or put into the initial phases of formal programs of record. Thus, many of the planned materiel solutions hinder or complicate interoperability, as they emerge slowly within existing DoD acquisition programs without emphasis on use with and by coalition partners. The United States must address international interoperability earlier in the acquisition process. Working sequentially meets neither the tenets of the U.S. Government's strategic security goals nor the goals for acquisition reform; it exacerbates the gaps between U.S. and coalition partners by adding time and significant cost to the U.S. and partner nations' programs and operations.

"Engagement begins with our closest friends and allies--from Europe to Asia; from North America to the Middle East. These nations share a common history of struggle on behalf of security, prosperity, and democracy. They share common values and a common commitment to international norms that recognize both the rights and responsibilities of all sovereign nations. America's national security depends on these vibrant alliances, and we must engage them as active partners in addressing global and regional security priorities and harnessing new opportunities to advance common interests." -National Security Strategy, May 2010

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COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM (CWP) BACKGROUND To address the need for coalition interoperability and further support the 21st Century warfighter, the Department established the CWP Program Element (0603923D8Z) in 2000 under the authority of the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology & Logistics) (OUSD(AT&L)). The CWP is the only Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) program dedicated to initiating cooperative research and development (R&D) projects with allies and coalition partners. The Program, which was originally authorized and appropriated for Fiscal Year 2001, provides funding for international cooperative development projects. In the ten-year period in which Congress has funded CWP, the program has leveraged U.S. contributions at a ratio of $1:$4.5 and foreign contributions at a ratio of $1:$6 for projects that either have delivered or will deliver coalition warfare-enhancing solutions in key capability areas. MISSION The CWP is a defense-wide effort to assist the Combatant Commanders, DoD R&D Community, PEOs and PMs to use cooperative research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) as a tool to integrate coalition-enabled solutions into existing and planned U.S. programs. CWP projects can be focused on any technology area at different stages along the RDT&E spectrum to support not only on near-term, interoperability-enhancing solutions that support U.S. and coalition forces in current operations, but also on early identification of coalition solutions to long-term or persistent interoperability issues (architectures, coalition requirements, major system acquisition). By leveraging support from CWP for a one to two-year time frame, project teams can meet their stated objectives and move their technology into the next stage of development or prepare for transition to the operational forces.

The Coalition Warfare Program supports international cooperative development of technological solutions that enable U.S. and friendly armed forces to: ­ Accelerate the delivery of high-quality solutions to warfighter problems ­ Improve U.S. interoperability with its coalition partners ­ Strengthen global partnerships

The Coalition Warfare Program enables OUSD(AT&L) to support the DoD in providing and improving interoperable coalition capabilities. The CWP addresses the various challenges that encumber the DoD acquisition process. There are serious risks to joint/coalition operations and significant cost increases when combined operations are not planned for early in the programs' development cycles. The Combatant Commanders, charged with employing the Combined Joint Task Force (CJTF), have little discretionary funding to "fix" systems related to Joint and/or coalition interoperability. They are reliant upon the Services to provide them with the technical solutions, and in many cases develop "work 5

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

arounds" to current systems that serve only as a temporary fix, compromising the safety and security of our forces. CWP REQUIREMENTS The approach in which CWP projects are selected is outlined below. OUSD(AT&L) employs top level guidance and pursues collaborative projects nominated by the DoD community to fill the coalition capability gaps. Projects selected for CWP funding must adhere generally to the following criteria: Strong sponsorship: CWP only accepts project nominations from DoD organizations. An organization's commitment to a project can be weighed by the financial and/or non-financial contributions as well as commitments it makes to ensure a project's successful transition. Sound foreign partnership: CWP projects are collaborative efforts with foreign partners' defense organizations. The foreign partner(s) must have a demonstrable interest in the project's outcomes. The legal vehicles and requirements (i.e., required international agreements, export control, technology transfers, etc) must be well understood and in place for the project to receive the CWP funding. Substantive RDT&E content: CWP, as an RDT&E Program Element, mandates that funding requested is to execute a research, development, test and evaluation project. The projects must ensure that the plan falls within the restrictions on usage for RDT&E funding (for example, cannot fund training or exercises). Warfighter emphasis: CWP chooses projects that have the support of the combatant commanders and offer coalition capabilities they demand in order to be successful in their missions and operations. Projects may support the full range of DoD operations, including building partnerships, warfighting, humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, information sharing, and shaping and stability operations. Leveraged funds: To maximize the benefit to the U.S. Government, CWP is leveraged against the financial contributions, man-hours, technology, infrastructure and prior investment of both foreign partners and the other DoD partners. CWP should be utilized to enhance or make a project executable, not as the primary source of funding. Near-term delivery: CWP develops and demonstrates solutions that reach warfighters quickly. A key goal is to have the project provide tangible and demonstrated results to transition into the next phase of development, testing or into fielding by the end of the CWP project. Portability: CWP pursues projects that develop solutions that are applicable to the needs of multiple Combatant Commands. 6

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

Promoting cooperative relationships: CWP pursues projects that provide springboards for greater coalition capabilities, either in support of technological or political objectives. CWP projects may form the basis for future cooperation with additional partners to meet a larger need. Addressing technology transfer, export control and disclosure issues early: CWP projects include engagement with not only foreign governments but also foreign and U.S. industry. Project leads need to understand the security requirements early in the process to execute successful projects. Drawing upon available expertise. CWP encourages project teams to utilize the expertise of the armaments cooperation community of AT&L, the Service International Program Offices, and requirements organizations. These organizations can assist the project team with the various matters related to executing an international project, to include appropriate international agreements, requirements harmonization, and resolving disclosure issues. Judicious Management: CWP emphasizes the need for the project team to properly execute, manage and report on the selected CWP projects, mitigating risks and seizing opportunities as they are available. Successful projects have achievable goals, execute according to their project plan, and accurately report their progress. LEVERAGING RESOURCES FUNDING Project nominations are selected for one to two years of funding, to a maximum of $1 million per year. The value of the CWP contribution is reflective of the financial need to fully fund the stated objective of each proposal, considering the contributions from the other U.S. and foreign participants. Projects should have equitable cost sharing between the U.S. and each of the foreign partners. As a general rule, CWP funding requests are for U.S. activities within a project, and should not exceed the amount of other U.S. contributions or that of the foreign partner. However, exceptions can be made by the CWP Team in extreme cases (political considerations, magnitude of non-financial foreign contributions and the overall urgency/need of the project). MULTI- AND BILATERAL FORUMS The DoD Science and Technology (S&T) and Research and Defense (R&D) communities have a wealth of knowledge with respect to activities in their counterparts' programs, and well established relationships with many of their direct counterparts in partner nations. CWP seeks to leverage, promote, and increase

"Achieving the Department's strategic objectives requires close collaboration with counterparts at home and with key allies and partners abroad. Through its foreign defense relationships, the United States not only helps avert crises but also improves its effectiveness in responding to them. Quadrennial Defense Review, 7 February 2010

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

cooperative activities within these communities and to initiate RDT&E projects that provide interoperable solutions for identified capability gaps. The DoD has international dialogues with numerous partners to address deficiencies in U.S. coalition warfare capabilities. Key target areas are identified multilaterally as well as bilaterally, and CWP can provide the budgetary support (through funds and monitoring capability) to facilitate true interoperability by leveraging counterpart participation, funding, and investment in multinational acquisition projects. U.S.-ONLY ACQUISITION PRO GRAMS CWP seeks to convert U.S.-only projects into coalition solutions for the U.S. warfighter, with the expenses and benefits shared by the U.S. and international partners. The CWP office also seeks to influence coalition interoperability in major programs that will have far reaching use by the U.S. forces. CWP may also help expand the scope of Joint Capability Technology Demonstrations (JCTDs). Briefly, JCTDs are joint efforts by the acquisition and operational communities within the DoD. Typically, JCTDs identify significant military requirements and then match these needs with technology programs ready to focus on potential solutions. The emphasis is on near-term responses to validated Joint requirements. JCTDs identify solutions to the highest priority needs of a Combatant Commander. CWP can play a crucial role by helping to meet the coalition portion of that need by adding specific objectives supporting allied participation in the larger JCTD projects. MANAGEMENT APPROACH The Coalition Warfare program is administered by the Office of the Director of International Cooperation (IC) in OUSD (AT&L). The Director of IC is the approval authority for selection and funding of CWP projects. The Deputy Director for Coalition Warfare serves as the senior OSD point of contact for CWP. The CWP team oversees the entire proposal-to-project cycle, maintains the budget, and monitors the use of CWP funds by the project teams. Once proposals are submitted, the Deputy Director for CWP and the CWP team go through several stages of review and nomination refinement before selecting the top candidates for the Subject Matter Experts (SME) Review Panel and Embassy Reviews. The CWP team utilizes a broad range of experts in DoD and in our foreign partners' embassies to select projects that best enable coalition solutions and meet the broader needs of the Department and our partners. Projects selected to receive CWP funding are executed by the nominating project team from the DoD R&D Community.

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ROLES COCOM Science Advisor staffs: The technology experts supporting the regional and functional Combatant Commanders, these offices are the advocates for Service and Agency run projects that are designed to meet needs in line with their Commanders' objectives. They are also a key part of the SME Review Panel. CWP Team: The Deputy Director for CWP and OUSD(AT&L)/IC CWP staff. The CWP team seeks out potential projects, analyzes proposals, works with U.S. and partner nation teams to improve the viability of worthwhile initiatives and oversees the execution of the CWP program and the selected projects. DoD R&D Community: The government labs and program offices within the Service Departments and Agencies that have the Title 10 Authorities to execute RDT&E activities. The R&D Community includes the project leads and managers (once selected) of CWP projects, and the transition managers of the products. Experts within this community participate in CWP reviews to help identify project synergies and duplications. Embassy Representatives: Members from the Defense and S&T Attaché staffs within the partners' Washington DC Embassies. The CWP Team holds discussions with Embassy representatives to evaluate partner support and execution plans of proposals. SME Panel: The Review Panel includes the Services' International Program Offices (IPOs), Service and COCOM requirements communities, DoD Agencies, the Joint Staff, and OSD staff who review the final CWP candidates and evaluate them against the Department's warfighting priorities and the CWP project criteria. These recommendations help the CWP team make determinations on the candidates, to include the final selections. PROJECT SUBMITTAL/SELECTION SCHEDULE

FY12-13 call memo released CWP SME Kickoff Conference CWP Open House (San Diego) CWP Open House (DC) CWP Outreach

Service Due Dates

SME Review Panel

Final submissions due to OSD* Final selections made

Start FY13-14 cycle

Initial submissions due to OSD*

A u g 2010

Sep 2010

Oct 2010

7 13-15

Nov 2010

Dec 2010

Jan 2011

14

Feb 2011

Mar 2011

11

Apr 2011

28

May 2011

Jun 2011

Jul 2011

Aug 2011

Sep 2011

Oct 2011

The following six steps outline the basic project schedule. Additional guidance and details are provided in the referenced Annexes. 9

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STEP 1: CALL FOR NOMINATIONS OUSD(AT&L) will issue an annual memo to Combatant Commands, Services, and DoD agencies in late August requesting CWP project proposals. Along with the request memo, this management plan and the new document templates will be distributed and posted on the CWP website: http://www.acq.osd.mil/ic/cwp.html. STEP 2: PROJECT PLANNING Financial Planning: Project managers must implement sound financial management practices. In order to do this, you will need a good relationship with your organization's budget office. Sound financial management includes obligating funds as soon as possible, forwarding obligation documents to the CWP Team, executing funds per the defined expenditure plans in the Monthly Financial Report (Annex E), and alerting the CWP Team to any financial issues that arise (including changes to the obligation and expenditure plans). Project managers should start identifying which internal resources will be available for the project early in the project nomination process. CWP requires that a project team contribute resources to a project. Projects that can show equitable contributions from other U.S. funding sources are most competitive. Financial and contracting offices should be a part of the project team. YEAR ONE: In general, project leads should plan to start execution in January and plan to expend through the following December. This means that all international agreements and contracts should be in place in time for a January start. If contracts are able to accept obligations before January, please let the CWP Team know. CWP will distribute funding in December or January subject to Congressional completion of the DoD Appropriation Bill. YEAR TWO: Project leads receiving second year funds should start their obligation and expenditure plans in November of the new fiscal year and execute through the remainder of the project. Management Planning: Successful cooperative projects with foreign counterparts require broad engagements across the DoD to assure compliance with plans, processes and regulations. Project Team: should consist of people responsible for the technical, financial, and contractual aspects of the project. The project team will have a team lead and could have multiple U.S. partners participating in the effort. More complex projects might need to include technology transfer and foreign disclosure specialists on the project team. Other projects will include these specialists on the supporting teams. 10

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Support Team: Support elements to a project include the offices assisting with the processes and project development, but not necessarily involved in day to day activities. Examples of support elements include: Attachés in the foreign embassies, Offices of Defense Cooperation, and Service and AT&L desk officers or other organizations that support information sharing and coordination with counterparts, foreign disclosure, technology transfer, and international agreements. Advocates: Advocates are the supportive user-community representatives of the end-user of the products. Advocates will typically come from the COCOMs, but could also come from Services or Agencies, depending on the nature of the project. A project team should seek support of an advocate for a project idea early in the proposal development process to make the nomination competitive. The user-community, through the COCOM Science Advisors, is part of the CWP Subject Matter Expert (SME) panel that participates in the reviews of the CWP nominations. Endorsers: Organizations that are solicited and have stated support of the project are project endorsers. These may be at any level, from program offices interested in transitioning the technology, other COCOMs, senior level DoD support, other Agencies or foreign partners. Test and Demonstration Planning: Project leads should identify early in their planning what demonstration or exercise venues (e.g., CWID, COCOM exercises, etc) they plan to participate in during the CWP project. Many of these venues require early application and test plans. International Agreements: The project team should have at least made initial contact and received confirmed interest with potential international partners before initiating a CWP proposal. Most, but not all, CWP projects require international agreements to be negotiated and signed to facilitate the projects. The appropriate Service international program offices can assist the project team with understanding what agreements, if any, are needed to conduct the project. An agreement need not be in place or in negotiations at the time a proposal is submitted to OSD for consideration, but will need to be in place before a selected project can begin execution. Project teams may also consult the International Armaments Cooperation Handbook at http://www.acq.osd.mil/ic/handbook.pdf for general guidance on the development and conduct of international research and development agreements. STEP 3: OUTREACH Project leads/teams are highly encouraged to engage the CWP Team early in the nomination process with proposal ideas and to receive assistance with nomination development. As well as possibilities for outreach to specific DoD locations, the CWP Team will be holding two "Open House" events in early October (planned for 7 October at SPAWAR San Diego and 13-15 October in the Pentagon)

Please let the CWP Team know if you are interested in more information or would like to participate in one of11 the Open House events or would like help with your nomination.

COALITION WARFARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PLAN FY2012-2013

to talk to project nominators about their ideas for FY12 submissions. These Open Houses are opportunities for project managers to ask the CWP Team questions about the process and to discuss their proposal ideas. The CWP Team can also provide advice on the necessary coordination and project planning that will help make a nomination successful. The CWP Team and SMEs may recommend, for example, that particular countries be targeted as international partners for cooperative development or organize meetings that bring together relevant subject-matter-experts (e.g., based on technology, international partners involved and international agreements) to investigate the viability of a particular proposal. Project leads wishing to re-submit a proposal from a prior year should review the nomination templates and provide revised submissions of their CWP project nominations in a timely manner. STEP 4: PROJECT NOMINATION SCHEDULES Projects require different degrees of staffing prior to submission, depending on the organizations and international agreements involved. The Service representatives from the IPOs have earlier due dates to review and coordinate on planned CWP submissions, as listed below. Please contact them to understand any and all Service specific deadlines and requirements. Initial Nominations Army: DASA(DE&C) Navy: NIPO 01C Air Force: SAF/IAPQ CWP Team in AT&L 17 December 2010 15 December 2010 14 December 2010 14 January 2011 Mid-Process Review 15 February 2011 16 February 2011 TBD ongoing Final Nominations

4 March 2011 4 March 2011 4 March 2011 11 March 2011

STEP 5: INITIAL NOMINATIONS Initial nominations for FY12-13 funding must be submitted to the CWP Team no later than 14

January 2011 for FY12-13 nominations.

includes the following documentation:

Early submissions are appreciated. A complete nomination

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CWP Questionnaire (Annex A) Nomination Form (Annex B) Quad Chart (Annex C) Project leads should submit completed proposals by e-mail to [email protected], and to the CWP Team. Please answer the questions posed in the templates as completely as possible. Inquiries may be directed to the CWP Team concerning answering these questions. The CWP Team will review the initial nominations and provide feedback on all proposals. Nominations that are competitive will be asked to continue refinement and submit a final package on or before 11 March 2011. STEP 6: EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK The CWP staff will analyze each incoming proposal and determine what, if any, critical data is missing. Projects need to have sound project plans as part of their nomination package. Please make sure to fully engage your financial management and contracting offices in the development of the proposal to understand their timelines and processes to execute. Normally, the submission of a proposal initiates a dialogue between the project lead's organization and the CWP Team. The CWP Team will assist project teams in getting their proposals to the point that they are as competitive as possible. This will include either face-to-face, video teleconferences, or teleconferences with the larger project team and necessary coordinating offices, as well as email and phone calls with the technical and support leads. Project teams will have the time between the initial and final due dates to update their proposals based on feedback received. The CWP staff requests timely responses to questions to better coordinate updated submissions with SME reviewers. STEP 7: FINAL NOMINATION Final nominations are due to the CWP Team no later than 11 March 2011. Early submissions are appreciated. A complete nomination includes the following documentation: Updated Nomination Form (Annex B) Updated Quad Chart (Annex C) Proposals will be rejected as a candidate if not completed by the deadline. 13

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STEP 8: FINAL EVALUATION: REVIEW BOARD AND SELECTION The CWP Team will convene the SME Review Panel at the end of April to evaluate the proposals that qualify for CWP candidacy. Each proposal will be evaluated against the Department's warfighting priorities and the CWP project criteria (see CWP Requirements). Separately, several meetings with respective Embassy representatives will be held to evaluate partner commitment and execution plans of proposed projects. The Director, International Cooperation, OUSD(AT&L) is the final approval authority on funding of CWP proposals. Following the formal evaluation process, project leads will be notified with respect to whether or not their candidate proposals were selected for CWP in the late May/ early June timeframe. STEP 9: PROJECT INITIATION AND FUNDING RELEASE Upon notification, the project teams will be assigned an oversight manager from the CWP Team and are required to sign and return the CWP Agreement Form (Annex D) by 15 June 2011. In signing the form, Project Offices agree to comply with CWP reporting requirements. CWP funding is dependent upon congressional approval of the CWP budget and successful completion of the required steps to initiate the project. These steps include completing the necessary international agreements, developing valid project plans, and securing partner nation and U.S. partner funding and resources. Initial reporting to the CWP Team is due on or before 15 July 2011. This documentation is required to prepare the outlays of funds to the project offices and to complete budget plans for the upcoming fiscal year. These documents are critical reporting elements for the CWP Team, which has reporting requirements within AT&L and OSD Comptroller. Documents required to be completed by 15 July 2011: Revised Nomination Package (Annexes B and C) that incorporates any changes to the project plan or contributions as a result of follow-on discussions Monthly Financial Report (Annex E) Quarterly Status Report (Annex F)

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Don't wait until the Due Date! The financial reporting is the most time consuming of the initial documents; it requires a thorough understanding of the project plan and engagement by project leads' financial and contracting offices. Guidance from the CWP Team will also be provided to project managers and their teams.

CWP project managers should not anticipate their first year's funding until January. Funding for the second year of the project will typically be available in November or December depending on whether or not Congress has completed the DoD Appropriations bill by that time. The Director, IC will initiate the transfer of funds to the project team in accordance with the project's funding plan. CWP funds are only authorized for the specific project and fiscal year designated. (See Project Documentation section for additional details.) STEP 10: PROJECT EXECUTION Projects are executed by the project manager that submitted the proposal. Project managers' performance is measured against their project schedule and spend plan provided to the CWP Team. The CWP Team may also contact you with requests for information to support CWP execution rates. The CWP Team has a minimal set of required documentation to keep abreast of the project's status and assist as required. The reporting requirements are as follows. 15th of each month - Monthly Report (Annex E). Required for the updated obligation and expenditure information for the previous month, as provided by the project manager's financial officers. In addition, copies of obligation documents (contracts, outlays, etc) are required as they are available. The CWP Team's obligation and expenditure benchmarks are provided. 15th of October, January, April and July ­ Monthly Report (Annex E), Quarterly Report (Annex F) and Updated Quad Chart (Annex C) - This provides an update on the project by describing progress toward goals, identifying issues impeding progress, and updating funding chart with project team and partner leveraged funds.

Project leads are required to submit quarterly reports to AT&L/IC, regardless of the level of activity in any given month or quarter. Monthly reports are required as soon as funds are provided to the project and as requested before that time.

Year Two Updates. Project managers must update their obligation and expenditure plan for the Year Two funds as part of their 15 July 2012 monthly report.

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Project Reports. Project managers are encouraged to invite the CWP staff to demonstrations as well as send the CWP Team reports from demonstrations and trials through the life of the project. Occasional reports on the transition status of the project after CWP support has ended are welcomed. Final Report. The Final Report should be forwarded within 60 days of the project's completion. At a minimum, it should include the final update to the nomination, a three-to-five page narrative outlining how well the project met originally stated goals and objectives, reports from demonstrations and trials, a description of the project challenges that may have impacted final outcome, likely follow-up activities (i.e., further testing, acquisition, etc.), and a comprehensive picture of all spending that transpired (OSD, other DoD and foreign partner). All other reports are required until the CWP Team receives the project's final report. CWP POINTS OF CONTACT Website: http://www.acq.osd.mil/ic/cwp.html Email: [email protected] ANNEXES A: Questionnaire B: Nomination Form C: Quad Chart D: Acceptance Form E: Monthly Report F: Quarterly Report

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ACRONYMS COCOM C4ISR CJTF CWID CWP DAU FMR DASA/DE&C DoD FPOC IC IPO GEF JCTD MIPR NIPO OSD OUSD(AT&L) OUSD (P) PE PEO PM NATO QDR R&D RDT&E S&T SAF IAPQ SME SPAWAR USC Combatant Command Command, Control, Communications and Computers and Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Combined Task Force Coalition Warrior Interoperability Demonstration Coalition Warfare Program Defense Acquisition University DoD's Financial Management Regulation Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Defense Exports and Cooperation Department of Defense Financial Point of Contact International Cooperation International Program Office Guidance for the Employment of Forces Joint Capability Technology Demonstrations Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request Navy International Programs Office Office of the Secretary of Defense Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Program Element Program Executive Office Program Manager North Atlantic Treaty Organization Quadrennial Defense Review Research and Development Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Science and Technology Secretary of the Air Force for International Affairs Subject Matter Expert Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command United States Code

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