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ADEKUNLE AJASIN UNIVERSITY AKUNGBA ­ AKOKO, ONDO STATE, NIGERIA.

FACULTY OF SCIENCE PROSPECTUS HANDBOOK

PUBLISHED BY THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN

CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS Dean's Office Faculty of Science Adekunle Ajasin University Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State Nigeria.

[email protected] www. adekunleajasinuniversity.edu.ng

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CONTENT

PAGE

Officers of the University---------------------------------------Faculty Administration 2009/2010-------------------------Past Deans and Sub-Deans------------------------------------Introduction to Faculty Prospectus 2009/2010 ----------General Entry requirements to the Faculty of Science---General Regulations and Guidelines Governing the Award of Bachelor's Degrees in the Faculty of Science-----------------Prizes in the Faculty--------------------------------------------Academic departments in the Faculty of Science----------Department of Biochemistry ----------------------------------Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry------Department of Computer Science----------------------------Department of Environmental Biology and Fisheries-----Department of Geology ---------------------------------------Department of Industrial Mathematics---------------------Department of Microbiology-----------------------------------Department of Physics & Electronics------------------------Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology------------

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OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

VISITOR His Excellency Dr. Olusegun Mimiko Governor, Ondo State CHANCELLOR H.R.M OBA GBADEBO BAJOWA The Rebuja of Osooro Land, Okitipupa ACTING PRO - CHANCELLOR Barrister Dan Nwayanwu VICE CHANCELLOR PROFESSOR N. Oluwafemi Mimiko B.Sc. (Hons), M.Sc., Ph.D (Ife). DEPUTY VICE CHANCELLOR PROFESSOR Isaac Rotimi Ajayi B.Sc. (Hons), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Ibadan) ACTING REGISTRAR MR. R. B. Olotu B.Sc., M.Ed. (Ibadan), FCAI, AMNIMI, ANIPR ACTING BURSAR MR. O. T. Akinterinwa B.Sc. (Hon) Ilorin, PGD Computer Science, MBA, FCA, MNIM UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN MR. W. A. AKINFOLARIN BL.S, Grad-Cert. Ed (ABU); MLS(Ib)

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FACULTY ADMINISTRATION

Dean

Dr. IGE, Olugbenga Ebenezer B.Sc. (Nigeria), Ph.D. (Lancaster)

Sub-Dean

Dr. O. M Akanbi B.Sc (Calabar), M.Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan)

Faculty officer

Mrs V. T. Afuye B.A. (Hons) Ife

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PAST DEANS AND SUB-DEANS

SESSION DEAN 2000/2001 Dr. C.O. Aboluwoye 2001/2002 Dr. C.O. Aboluwoye 2002/2003 Prof. S. Mabradu 2003/2004 Prof. C.O Aboluwoye 2004/2005 Prof. C.O Aboluwoye 2005/2006 Prof. C.O Aboluwoye 2006/2007 Prof. C.O. Aboluwoye 2007/2008 Prof. C.O Aboluwoye Current Dean and Sub-Dean 2008/2009 Prof. I.R. Ajayi 2009/2010 Prof. I. R. Ajayi SUB-DEAN Dr. S. A. Laleye Dr. S. A. Laleye Dr. S. A. Laleye Dr. S. A. Laleye Dr. Gbadamosi Dr. Gbadamosi Dr. O.F. Olotuah Dr. O.F. Olotuah Dr. O.F. Olotuah Dr. O. M. Akanbi Dr. O. M. Akanbi

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INTRODUCTION

The Faculty of Science is one of the foundation faculties in Adekunle Ajasin University and from its modest beginning in 1999 with just few students and staff, the faculty has now evolved into one of the largest faculties in the university with over 3,000 students, about 100 academic staff, and over 90 administrative, technical and support staff.

The Faculty shares the university's mission of producing self-reliant graduates who will be job creators and not job seekers. To this end the faculty since its inception has continued to praise quality training to all student to meet the increasingly complex needs of the future with great emphasis placed on developing and sharping the students' analytical, creative, thinking, and presentation skills. Computer literacy and industrial trainings which are part of our academic programme make our graduates relevant in today's ICT revolutionized world.

In addition, the faculty is also involved in the conduct of leading and cutting edge research in the key areas of science and technology relevant to Nigeria and the global community. Our community of staff and students continue to make strong contributions in the three important elements of a world class university namely research, learning and teaching and community service.

The faculty offers a broad range of disciplines in the following departments; Chemistry, Physics & Electronics, Geology,

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Chemistry and

Industrial and

Biochemistry,

Environmental

Biology

Fisheries, Plant Science and Biotechnology, Industrial Mathematics and Computer Science. In these disciplines, the faculty prepares scientist and professionals for the challenges of the future This prospectus has been published for the purpose of providing accurate and timely information on the academic programmes at the Faculty. The information is useful for guiding students on registration of courses, graduation requirements and for other purposes. Staff will also need the information to guide and counsel the students on a regular basis. Since information is dynamic, it is the hope of the faculty to review the publication from time to time if the need arises.

This publication is therefore recommended to both staff and students of the department I.R. Ajayi Professor and Dean

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FACULTY ADMINISTRATION 2009/2010

Prof. I. R. Ajayi, Ph.D Dr. O. M. Akanbi, Ph.D Mrs. V. T. Afuye, B.A Mrs. H. O. Fajilade, HND Mrs F. I. Adedeji, NABTEB O/L Cert. Mr. B. A. Tugbiyele, OND Mrs. O. M. Adamolekun, OND Miss. I. R. Akinsiku, Dip. Coop. Studies Miss A. J. Afolabi, OND Mr. O. O. Falusi, SSCE Mr. F Afere Mr. Benson Adewumi _ Ag. Dean Sub-Dean Faculty Officer Confidential secretary Chief Typist Executive Officer Clerical Officer Typist I Data Entry Clerk I Officer Assistant Driver III Driver II

Heads of Departments

Department Department Department Department Department Department Department Department Department of of of of of of of of of Biochemistry Dr. Igbakin, A. P. Chemistry and Industrial ChemistryDr. Adebayo, A.E. Computer Science Prof.. Aderibigbe F.M Environmental Biology and Fisheries - Dr Akinwumi F.O Geology Prof. O. Oyinloye Industrial Mathematics Dr. Adewale, T.A. Microbiology Dr. Adejumo, T.O. Physics & Electronics Dr. Abagingin D.D Plant Science and Biotechnology Dr. Gbadamosi, A.E

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REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE AWARD DEGREES IN THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE

OF

BACHELOR'S

a. Definition of Course Credit System This shall be understood to mean a system whereby subject areas are split into units that are taught and examined at the end of each semester in such a way that no course extends to the second semester. A 1-unit course shall be equated with 15 hours of teaching in one semester. A 1-unit of laboratory work should be specified with 3 hours of laboratory practice. Projects are, however, to be weighted with a maximum of 6 units that could be spread over two semesters, but credited in the second semester. b. Units of Taught Courses No course shall carry less than 1 unit or more than 3 units with the provision only that when the need arises to exceed the maximum of 3 units, the faculty shall seek and obtain Senate approval. Under no circumstances shall any course carry more than 4 units. c. Student workload for full-time Students Student's workload shall be a minimum of 15 credit units with the provision that a graduating student can take 12 units subject to Senate approval. The maximum workload of students shall be 28 units with the provision that for graduating students the approval of the Faculty Board must be sought to exceed the maximum by not more than 3 additional unit, and that no approval for extra units shall be granted to any student with less than a CGPA of 2.40. d. Duration of courses The normal duration of a Bachelor's degree programme shall be 8 Semesters for students admitted to 100 level and 6 Semesters for students admitted to 200 level . Certain degree programmes require longer periods of study as may be prescribed by Faculty regulations. The maximum period of study permissible for the Bachelor's degree programme shall be 10, 12, and 14 semesters for the 3-year, 4-year and 5year courses respectively. Leave of absence shall not count as part of the maximum period. e. Course Codes Each course shall be identified by a code made up of three letter designating the teaching unit and three-digit number, the first of which shall indicate the level of the Course. f. Status of Courses and Definitions i. Compulsory Courses These are departmental courses, which students must take and pass in order to graduate.

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ii.

iii.

iv.

Required courses These are University wide general courses which students must take and pass before they can graduate. Elective Courses These are courses within or outside the Faculty of the students which they should take to meet the minimum number of units. A pre-requisite Course This is one which a student must take and make at least 35% grade to be able to register for certain courses.

g. Administration and Withdrawal from courses i. Admission into courses closes at the end of the registration period of each semester. ii. A student can withdraw from a course without penalty only if he/she has been permitted by the Head of Department on completion of add/delete forms. Any student who withdraws without due permission will be deemed to have failed the course except in special cases approved by the Senate. h. Continuous assessment The progress of the students enrolled in each course shall continuously be assessed by means of tests, written assignments; report and/or such other means as may be considered with the objectives and conduct of the course as determined by the Department. i. Examinations i. Each course shall normally be examined at the end of the semester in which it is offered. ii. The length of an examination shall be a period of not less than one hour and not more than three hours. iii. There shall be no resist examination in any course. j. Final Marks i. Each course shall be graded on the basis of 100 total marks with proportions for continuous assessment and course examination as determined by the appropriate Faculty Board. In no case shall the proportion for continuous assessment be less than 20% or greater than 30% except in cases specified by the Faculty Board.

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ii.

Each course shall be graded out of a maximum of 100 marks and score for each course shall be assigned appropriate letter grades and grade points as follows: MARKS% LETTER GRADE GRADE POINTS 70-100 A 5 60-69 B 4 50-59 C 3 45-49 D 2 40-44 E 1 0-39 F 0

k. Academic Standing i. A student shall be deemed to be in good academic standing as long as his cumulative G.P.A is not below 1.0 ii. A student shall be given a warning if his C.G.P.A is below 1.0 for the first time. This shall be indicated by the marks `WN' against the name of such student on the result sheet. iii. A student shall be placed on 1st probation marked with `P1' if his C.G.P.A is below 1.0 for the second consecutive semester; if his C.G.P.A is below 1.0 for the 3rd consecutive semester he shall be placed on 2nd probation marked with `P2'. iv. A student with a C.G.P.A of less than 1.00 in his/her 4th consecutive semester shall be required to withdraw from the department. Such a student may be allowed to seek admission into a level not higher than 200 in any other department/faculty in the University. A student required to withdraw shall seek and obtain admission into any other faculty or department within 4 weeks of the notice of withdrawal after which the withdrawal notice shall stand. l. Graduation Requirement To be eligible for the award of a Bachelor's degree of the Adekunle Ajasin Univeristy Akungba-Akoko in the faculty of Science, a student must pass the following minimum total number of units, inclusive of the University course requirements:

UME candidates - 144 units of course work Direct entry student candidates - 108 The cumulative grade point average shall be obtained by

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i.

ii. iii.

Multiplying the grade point assigned to the letter grade obtained in each course by the number of units assigned to the course to arrive at the weighted score for each course. Adding together the weighted scores for all courses taken up to that time. Dividing the total weighted score by the total number of units

m. Classification of Degrees For the purpose of computation of results for graduation, all courses taken by a student shall count. Degree classification shall be based on the cumulative grade point average (CGPA) obtained by each student as follows: CGPA 4.5 ­ 5.00 3.50 - 4.49 2.40 - 3.49 1.50 ­ 2.39 1.00 ­ 1.49 Below 1.00 CLASS OF DEGREE 1st Class (Hons.) 2nd Class (Hons.) (Upper Division) 2nd Class(Hons.) (Lower Division) 3rd Class (Hons) Pass Fail

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REGISTRATION PROCEDURE IN THE FACULTY Students are expected to carefully study the Faculty information brochure before proceeding to register for the courses online at the university eduportal www.aauaeduportal.com.. The following information should be followed to the letter. i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. Register for all your outstanding courses first. Print out the registration form and get it endorsed by your Head of department and the Dean of the faculty. Copies of the endorsed Registration forms are to be submitted in the department and the faculty offices before registration is complete. Students are advised not to register courses in any level higher than their present level. Late registration attracts financial penalty. The amount will be determined by the University Authority. Registration forms must be submitted latest six weeks after the commencement of the Semester. Students are expected to collect Add/Delete form from the Faculty Officer if they need to add or delete courses after registration. The completed Add/Delete Form must be submitted within the stipulated period in each semester

PRIZES IN THE FACULTY

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1.

University / Vice Chancellor's Prize ­ Cash prize of N10,000.00 to the overall best graduating student. Chemistry Department Prize ­ Cash prize of N2,000.00 to the best graduating student with not less than CGPA of 4.00. Ondo State Governor's Prize ­ Cash prize of N35,000.00 each to: The best graduating student in the Faculty of Science The best graduating student in Geology

2.

3. (a) (b)

4(a) Dr. Olusegun Agagu Prize ­ Cash prize of N100,000.00 to the best graduating student in Geology (b) Dr. Olusegun Agagu Prize ­ Cash prize of N50,000.00 to the best student in each of the Geology undergraduate classes 200 and 300 levels (CGPA ­ 4.0 ­ 4.56).

DEPARTMENT

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OF

BIOCHEMSITRY

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ACADEMIC STAFF LIST

1

IGBAKIN, A.P. B.Sc (Ado-Ekiti), M.Sc.(Benin) Ph.D (Ilorin) OLAWOYE, T.L. B.Sc. M.Sc., Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer and Ag. Head (Clinical Biochemistry)

2)

Professor (Membrane Biochemistry)

3]

ADANLAWO, I.G. B.Sc. (Ado Ekiti), M.Sc.(Ibadan] Ph.D. (Ilorin) MAKANJU, O. O. B.Sc, M.Sc. (Ibadan) OMONKHUA, A.A. B.Sc, M.Sc (Benin) ADENIRAN, O.Y. B.Sc., M.Sc(Ibadan) OLOGUNDUDU, A B.Sc, M.Sc.(Benin) *LAWAL, A.O. B.Sc., M.Sc. (Ibadan) ELEKOFEHINTI O. O. B.Sc. M.Sc. OMOTUYI I. O. B.Sc. M.Sc. SALIU J. A. B.Sc. M.Sc.

Adjunct Reader

4]

Adjunct Lecturer Nutrition Lecturer I (Toxicology) Lecturer I (Nutrition) Lecturer II (Environmental Toxicology) Assistant Lecturer (Drug Metabolism & Toxicology) Assistant Lecturer

5)

6)

7)

8)

9]

10]

Assistant Lecturer

11]

Assistant Lecturer

LIST OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL STAFF 1) FESOBI M.E. Senior Technologist HND(NIST),ANIST PGD(Akure] 2) MRS. OROLE R. T. HND(Ibadan) PGD, ANIST AYODELE, F. M.

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Technologist ll

3)

Technologist II

HND (Ado ­ Ekiti) 4) MRS. EJELONU O.C HND (Ibadan) MRS. ADEBOMI, V.B RGPOL MRS. FEMI-OJO O.M. OND(Ado-Ekiti) MRS MUSA.M.O. OND(Akungba) RICHARD-ALO WAEC DARAMOLA .B.B. WAEC AYODELE O.M WAEC KAYODE S. I. WAEC Technologist II

5)

TYPIST I

6)

Data Entry Clerk III

7)

Clerical Officer

8)

Laboratory Assistant

9)

Laboratory Assistant

10)

Laboratory Attendant

11)

Laboratory Attendant

* On study leave 2. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND (INFORMATION)

The department started with less than forty (40) students in 1984 at Ado-Ekiti (the then Ondo State University Ado-Ekiti). The University was relocated to Akungba - Akoko in December 1999 after the creation of Ekiti State from Ondo State. The department is growing with resourceful and dedicated academic and nonacademic staff on ground. At present, we have about 500 students at various levels in the Department. The number of students sharply contrasts the very limited human resources. The department is committed to high standard of teaching and research. We equally expose our students to practical programmes through Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) and supervision of independent research project work. The Department has turned out graduates in different spheres of life; academic, food producing industries; Hospital, laboratory research institutes and private Parastatals in and outside the country.

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3.

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES

The undergraduate programme in Biochemistry is designed to provide a sound and all - round education in the basic science of biochemistry up to bachelor's degree level. It is intended to make students assimilate the relevance of biochemistry in various ways and areas in meeting the manpower needs of the country. The department will also provide appropriate courses for students within the faculty of science and various other faculties, - pharmacy, health sciences, agriculture and technology - who require a working knowledge of Biochemistry. We equally train students for the award of M.Sc and PhD in different areas of specializations Environmental in Biochemistry Toxicology, Food Clinical and Biochemistry, Technology,

Biochemistry,

Lipidology,

Science

Enzymology and Industrial Biochemistry. 3B EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Employment opportunities for Biochemists should be on the increase with the growth of the national economy. Biochemists may find employment in hospitals as hospital biochemists, in agriculture, food processing and pharmaceutical industries (as quality analysts), in the brewing industries as brewers, in beautification industries as experts in cosmetology, in the leather industry, and research scientists in such diverse areas as oncology, molecular biology, ecological (environmental) pollution, e.t.c. and, of course, in University teaching. So far, Biochemists have been under utilized in the national economy.

4.

PROGRAMME OFFERED B.Sc. Biochemistry

5. (i)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Candidates seeking admission into the department of Biochemistry must satisfy the UME and the University's admission requirement i.e. Credit passes in English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology in at least two sittings. Any candidate who has satisfied the Adekunle Ajasin University pre-degree science programme is also eligible for admission.

(ii)

Direct entry students should in addition to satisfying the University requirements as stated in (i) above, have principal passes at HSC/GCE 'A' level in three of the following subjects: Physics, Chemistry, Biology and

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Mathematics. Candidates with ND or HND certificate who passed at the upper credit level are also qualified for admission.

6. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AWARD OF DEGREE Before a student can be awarded B.Sc (Hons) Biochemistry of this University, the candidate must satisfactory register and pass the followings: (i) (ii) The University requirements of 13 units of GST courses. The faculty of science requirements of 21 units of foundation courses

(iii) The departmental requirements of 103 units of compulsory courses. (iv) 10 units of elective courses. Total minimum units of courses to be passed before the award of B.Sc (Hons) in Biochemistry is 147 units. (v) Direct entry students should pass 104 units

7. (i.)

REGISTRATION FOR COURSES: Candidates must register for appropriate compulsory, Required and Elective courses as indicated in the programme.

(ii)

Courses which may be designed as prerequisites to some other courses must be taken and a score of at least 35% is required to be able to offer the subsequent courses.

(iii)

The minimum work load is 15 and the maximum is 24 units per semester. Permission for waiver must be sought from the H.O.D subject to Senate approval.

(iv)

A student can withdraw from a course within the time stipulated by senate without penalty only with the approval of the HOD on completion of Add and Delete form. Any student who withdraws without permission will be deemed to have failed the course.

8.

COURSE OFFERED BY THE DEPARTMENT:

These are the courses stipulated by the department which students must take and Passed accordingly.

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They are outlined below: (a) Departmental Compulsory courses COURSES TITLE Introductory Genetics I Biological techniques Organic chemistry I Physical chemistry I Analytical chemistry Organic chemistry III Instrumental methods of analysis Computer programming I Computer programming II Biostatistics General Microbiology I General Microbiology II UNITS 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3

COURSE CODE BI0201 BIO 204 CHM211 CHM210 CHM213 CHM 309 CHM312 MAT 211 MAT 212 BIO 206 MCB201 MCB 202 MCB 302 BCH 201 BCH 202 BCH 301 BCH 302 BCH 303 BCH 304 BCH 305 BCH 309 BCH 307 BCH 308 BCH 310 BCH 311 BCH 312 BCH 399 BCH 401 BCH 403 BCH 411 BCH 405

Microbial Genetics/molecular biology Introductory Biochemistry I Introductory Biochemistry II Introductory Enzymology Metabolism of lipids Metabolism of carbohydrate Metabolism of nucleic acids 3 3 3 2 2 2

Metabolism of amino acids and proteins 2 Methods in Biochemistry Membrane biochemistry Food & Nutritional biochemistry Bioenergetics Experimental Biochemistry I Experimental Biochemistry II 3 2 3 2 2 2

Students Industrial work experience (SIWES) 3 Enzymology Tissue Biochemistry Bioinorganic chemistry 3 2 2 3

Genetic Engineering & MolecuIar Bio.

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BCH 406 BCH 407 BCH 408 BCH 499 BCH 410 BCH 409 BCH 400 BCH 404 BCH 413 BCH 414

Metabolic regulations Plant Biochemistry Biochemical reasoning Seminar/Special Topics Clinical Biochemistry Advanced biochemical methods I Research project Industrial Biochemistry Biochemical Pharmacology Clinical Biochemistry TOTAL

3 2 2 1 3 3 4 4 2 2 103

b. (i)

Required courses are listed below under (i) and (ii) UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS UNITS 2 2 2 2 2 2

COURSECODE COURSE TITLE GST111 GST112 GST113 GST114 GST212 GST214 GST311 Communication in English I Philosophy and Logic Use of library and study skill Nigerian Peoples and Culture Communication in English II Peace and Conflict Resolution

Information and Communication 2 technology

GST411

Introduction to Entrepreneurial skills TOTAL

2

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(ii) FACULTY REQUIRED COURSES MAT 101 PHY101 PHY102 PHY103 PHY104 CHM 101 Algebra & Trigonometry General physics I General physics II Experimental physics I General physics laboratory General chemistry I

20

3 2 2 1 1 3

CHM 102 BIO 101 BIO 102 BIO 103 Bio 104

General chemistry II General Biology I General Biology II Experimental Biology I Experimental Biology II TOTAL

3 2 2 1 1 21

C.

ELECTIVE OR OPTIONAL COURSES

For B.Sc Biochemistry - A minimum of ten (10) units out of the following courses are to be taken and passed. BCH 313 BCH 314 BCH 415 MCB 304 BIO 409 ZOO 307 CHM 307 BI0205 CSC213 CSC 309 BCH 402 Immunochemistry Metabolism of Foreign Compounds Hormones and vitamins Immunology and Immunochemistry Population ecology Animal behaviour Industrial chemistry Cell Biology Computer logic Computer Arithmetic Environmental Biochemistry TOTAL 2 2 2 4 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 28

d.

PRE-REQUISITE COURSES:

These are the courses that must be taken as Pre-requisites and passed with at least 35% Course BCH 301 BCH 303 BCH 305 BCH 307 BCH 302 BCH 304 BCH 401 BCH 405 Pre-requisite BCH 202 BCH 202 BCH 202 BCH 202 BCH 201 BCH 201 BCH 202 and 301 BCH 305

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BCH 415 BCH 417 BCH 406

BCH 306 and BCH 309 BCH201, BCH 202, BCH 302, BCH304, BCH 305 BCH 302, BCH 304, BCH 305

9) COURSE OFFERINGS:

100 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES CODE BIO 101 CHM 101 MAT 101 BIO 103 PHY101 PHY103 GST111 GST113 GST 103 TITLE General Biology I General Chemistry Algebra and Trigonometry Experimental biology I General Physics I Experimental Physics I Communication in English I Use of Library Philosophy & Logic TOTAL UNITS 2 3 3 1 2 1 2 2 2 16

SECOND SEMESTER COURSES CODE BIO 104 BIO 102 TITLE Experimental Biology II General Biology II UNITS 1 2 3 2 1 2 2

CHM 102 General Chemistry II PHY102 PHY104 GST112 GST114 General Physics II General Physics Lab Philosophy and Logic Nigerian People and Culture

MAT 104 Basic Mathematics for Bio.Sc 3 TOTAL 16

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200 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES CODE BCH 201 BIO 201 MCB201 CHM 211 CHM 213 GST 201 Elective TOTAL SECOND SEMESTER COURSES CODE BCH 202 BIO 204 MCB 202 CHM210 GST 202 BIO 206 Elective TOTAL TITLE Introductory Biochemistry II Biological techniques General Microbiology Physical Chemistry II Computer Application Statistics for Biologists II UNITS 3 2 3 3 2 3 2 18 TITLE Introductory Biochemistry Genetics I General Microbiology I Organic Chemistry II Analytical Chemistry Introduction to Computer UNITS 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 19

300 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES CODE BCH 301 BCH 303 BCH 305 BCH 307 BCH 311 CHM 309 BCH 309 BCH 313 TITLE Introduction to Enzymology Metabolism of carbohydrate Metabolism of amino acids and proteins Membrane Biochemistry Experimental Biochemical I Organic chemistry III Methods in Biochemistry I Immunochemistry TOTAL

23

UNITS 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 18

SECOND SEMETER COURSES CODE TITLE UNITS 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 TOTAL 22

BCH 302 Metabolism of lipids BCH 304 Metabolism of Nucleic acids BCH 308 Food and Nutritional Biochemistry

BCH 310 Bioenergetics BCH 312 Experimental Biochemistry II MCB 302 Microbial genetics/Molecular Biology CHM 312 Instrumental Methods of analysis BCH 314 Metabolism of Foreign Compounds

BCH 399 SIWES

400 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES CODE BCH 401 BCH 403 BCH 405 BCH 407 BCH 409 BCH 499 BCH 411 BCH 413 BCH 415 TITLE Enzymology Tissue Biochemistry Genetic Engineering & Molecule Biology Plant Biochemistry Advanced biochemical methods Seminar Bioinorganic Biochemistry Biochemical Pharmacology Hormones and Vitamins TOTAL UNITS 3 2 3 2 3 1 2 2 2 20

SECOND SEMESTER COURSES CODE BCH 410 BCH 404 BCH 406 TITLE Clinical Biochemistry Industrial Biochemistry Metabolic Regulations

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UNITS 3 4 3

BCH 400 BCH 402 BCH 408

Research Project Environmental Biochemistry Biochemical Reasoning TOTAL

4 2 2 18

10. COURSE DESCRIPTION

BCH 201: INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY 1 (3 UNITS) (L 30: P20: T10) Short history and definition of Biochemistry. Acidity and Alkalinity. pH and PKa values and their effects on cellular activities; Buffers. Structures and functions of major cell components; prokaryotic versus eukaryotic organisms; Chemistry of amino acids, proteins and their derivatives; methods of isolation and

identification. Primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins; determination and biochemical applications of the structures.

Chemistry/structure of carbohydrates.

BCH 202: INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) (L 30: P20: T10) Functions and properties of water. Chemistry/structures of lipids and nucleic acids. Nomenclature of nucleosides, and nucleotides; effects of acids and alkalis on hydrolysis of nucleic acids. A brief outline of biotransformation processes and detoxification strategies in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Comparative

biochemistry of the digestive system and enzymes, species differences in steroid metabolism in animals. BCH 301 - INTRODUCTORY ENZYMOLOGY: (3 UNITS) (L30: PO: T15) Vitamins and co-enzymes. Fat and water soluble vitamins. Structure and functions of vitamins and co-enzymes. Classification and nomenclature of enzymes. Kinetics of enzymes and inhibition. Mechanism of enzymes - catalyzed reactions. Effects of temperature, pH, ions and inhibitors on enzymes-catalyzed reactions. Michaelis-Menten Equation. Allosteric/Regulatory enzymes. Active sites of enzymes. Estimation of kinetic para-meters-enzymes activities, km, Vmax, Ki etc. Zymogen activation, digestive enzymes etc. Production, isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes. Recent advances in enzymology. BCH 302 - METABOLISM OF LIPIDS (2 UNITS) (L30: PO: TO)

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Classification of lipids - fatty acids, triglycerides, glycosylglyceros, phospholipids, waxes, prostaglandins. Lipid micelles, monolayers and bilayers liporotein system. Oxidation and synthesis of fatty acids; cholesterols lipid metabolism. Acetic acid as a central precusor for biosynthesis of lipids. lipoproteins. BCH 303 METABOLISM OF CARBOHYDRATES: (2 UNITS) (L30: PO: TO) Degradation and digestion of carbohydrates - sugars, storage polysaccharides, cell wall, reactions of sugar, glycolysis, tricaboxylic acid cycle, the Synthesis of complex lipids and

phosphogluconate pathway, the glyoxylate pathway; the cori cycle: the Calvin pathway. Gluconeogenesis and glycogenesis. Disorders of carbohydrate

metabolism. Mucopolysaccharides BCH 304 - METABOLISM OF NUCLEIC ACIDS: (2 UNITS) (30: PO: TO) Genome organization and biosynthesis of proteins. Metabolism of purines and pyrimidines, nucleosides and nucleotides; abnormalities in nucleic acid

metabolism, xeroderma pigmentosum and skin cancer synthesis of nucleic acids.

BCH 305 - METABOLISM OF AMINO ACIDS AND PROTEINS (2UNITS) (L30: PO: TO) Amino acids as building blocks of proteins, covalent backbone of protein, amino acid sequence of proteins: Isolation, fractionation, purification, and

characterization of proteins. Biological function of proteins, oxidative degradation of amino acids and metabolism of one carbon, unit biosynthesis of amino acids and some derivatives, the urea cycle; metabolism of inorganic nitrogen. Disorders of amino acid metabolism

BCH 307 - MEMBRANE BIOCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) (L15: P10:TO) Structure, composition and functions of biological membranes, Isolation, characterization and classification of membranes, chemistry and biosynthesis of membranes. Molecular organization of membrane components. Natural and artificial membrane bilayers. The unit membrane hypothesis. Membrane

transport system, active versus passive transport system. Transport of sugar and amino; ionophores. Glycoproteins, bacterial cell wall

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BCH 308- FOOD AND NUTRITION BIOCHEMISTRY (3 UNITS) (L15: PO: TO) An introduction to the theory and application of physical and chemical methods for determining the constituents of foodstuffs. Processing, preservation and storage of traditional foods-roots and stem tubers, fruit drinks, seeds and grain, green vegetables. Food poisoning and intoxication. Prevention and cure. Food nutrients; energy values of foods and expenditure by mammalians. Nutritive values of foods - carbohydrate, fats, proteins, vitamins. Mineral element and water. Nutritional disorders, prevention and therapy. Nutritional requirements.

Recommended dietary allowances. Assessment of nutritional status. Nutrient requirements in relation to physical activity and aging, diet and disease, obesity and under nutrition. BCH 309 - METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY I (3 UNITS) (L15: P10: TO) Principles of instrumentation: principles, methodologies and application of electrophoresis, chromatographic methods; thin layer chromatography, paper chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography. Column chromatography, gasliquid chromatography and polarimetric method. Principles, methodologies and applications of spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, centrifugation, isotopic

techniques, radio-immuno-assay and autoradiography. BCH 310 - BIOENERGETICS (2 UNITS) (L15: PO: TO)

High energy compounds. Chemical potentials, electrochemical potentials, election transport system and oxidative phosphorylation. Regulation of ATP production. Chemical thermodynamics; oxidation and reductions.

BCH 311 - EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY I (2 UNITS) (LO: P50: TO) Principles of instrumentation: principles, methodologies and application of electrophoresis, chromatographic methods; thin layer chromatography, paper chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography. Column chromatography, gasliquid chromatography and polar metric method BCH 312 - EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY II (2 UNITS) (LO: P50: TO) Practical laboratory exercise in areas of interest of academic staff to cut across a wide spectrum of general biochemistry. Laboratory practical may be arranged on the basis of 6 hours per week. BCH 313 - IMMUNOCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS)

27

Concepts and types of immunity (humoral and cell-mediated). Immunogens antigens and haptens. Requirements for immunogenicity. Antibody classes, their structure, synthesis and function. Antigen-antibody reactions. Hypersensitivity, allergy and causes. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and immunological tolerance, Autoimmunity and concept of autoantibodies. Complement system and pathways. Applications of immunochemistry in clinical practice and biological research. Production of specific antibody and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): Radio-immunoassay, Haemaglutination and blood group serology. A brief outline of immunodiffusion techniques. BCH 314 - METABOLISM OF FOREIGN COMPOUNDS (2 UNITS) (L15: PO: TO) Introduction to xenobiochemistry and components of the microsomal drug metabolizing system; Experimental techniques, regulation of drug metabolizing enzymes by induction and other means; Excretion of foreign compounds, species differences in the metabolism of foreign compounds. Nutrition and other metabolism of drugs. Drug-drug interaction, Drug-food interaction; genetic polymorphism. BCH 399 - STUDENTS INDUSTRIAL WORK EXPERIENCE (SIWES) (3 UNITS) Students will be attached to some industrial organizations for 3 months, the exact period being determined by the institution.

BCH 400 - RESEARCH PROJECTS (4 UNITS) Independent research findings into selected areas/topics of interest to the academic staff. Students will be required to carry out literature survey on the topics, perform experiments and produce short reports (preferably at the end of second semester). Students will be subjected to both seminar and oral examination on the projects undertaken.

BCH 401 ­ ENZYMOLOGY (3UNITS)(L15:PO:T15) Steady state enzyme kinetics. Transient kinetics methods. Chemistry of enzyme catalysis. Regulatory enzymes. Molecular models for allosterism. Multi enzyme complexes. Enzyme assays. Criteria for determining purity of enzymes. Enzyme reconstitution. Regulation of enzyme activity and synthesis. BCH 402 - ENVIRONMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) (L 30: P0: T15)

28

Principles of toxicology and ecotoxicology. Industrial toxicology. Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA), Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). Multiple approaches to EIA. Ecotoxicolgy in micro- organisms and animal life. Bioremediation in Zoology. Ecotoxicology in plant life, phytoremediation. Biochemical consequences of crude oil and Bitumen exploration in Nigeria. BCH 403 - TISSUE BIOCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) (L15: PO: TO) Biochemistry of muscles, kidney, liver and adipose tissues. General metabolism of the brain and neurons, biochemistry of reproductive tissues. Detoxification and excretion in tissues. Blood; components, metabolism, clotting etc. Tissue fluids and hormones. Biochemistry of vision. BCH 404 - INDUSTRIAL BIOCHEMISTRY (4 UNITS) (L30: PO: T15) A short review of microbial physiology and genetics. A review of general metabolic pathways, control and application in industrial processes. Continuous culture methods, principles and applications. The chemostat and its application in industrial fermentations. Fermentations - alcoholic, amino acids, antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. Primary and Secondary metabolism. Process evaluation and development. Over production of metabolites - amino acids, taste enhancers, vitamins, toxins etc. Methods for screening and selecting microorganisms of industrial importance. Induction mutation in micro-organisms and plants for the purpose of over production. Stain selection/development and enhancement. Gene dosage and its application in industrial processes. BCH 405 - GENETIC ENGINEERING AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3 UNITS) (L15: PO: TO) Replication, transcription and translation - a brief review. The genetic code and its relationship to cellular functions. DNA replication in a cell - free system. Genetic transformation, transduction and conjunction. Gene mutation,

mutagenic agents and thin applications to gene transfer. Gene mapping. Structure of eucaryotic genome. Recombinant DNA, its application. Hybrido-mas. BCH 406 - METABOLIC REGULATIONS (3 UNITS) (L30: PO: TO) The relationship of Krebs cycle to protein, carbohydrate, lipid and nucleic acids metabolism. Integration of metabolic pathways. Turn-over rates and metabolic

29

pools. Regulation of enzymes of metabolic pathways - feed back inhibition versus enzyme synthesis. Catabolite repression, end product repression, the lactose operon. Identification of different regulatory mechanisms in metabolic pathways. BCH 407 - PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) (L30: PO: TO) Organization of plant cells, photosynthesis, alkaloids and flavonoids, plant hormones. Biosynthesis of carotenoid pigments. Biochemistry of plant

development. The plant cell wall structure, formation and growth. Lignin formation. Free amino acids, pyrimidines, purines and nucleosides in plants. Metabolism of auxins, gibberellins and cytokinins, synthetic growth regulators and herbicides. Structure-function relationship of plant hormones. BCH 408 - BIOCHEMICAL REASONING (2 UNITS) (L15: PO:TO) Evaluation and design of experimental biochemistry from available information and data. Analysis interpretation and inference - drawing from biochemistry research data. BCH 409- ADVANCED BIOCHEMICAL METHODS (3 UNITS) (LO: P30:TO) The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the operation of latest biochemical equipment and with methods of research, assimilation and dissemination of information. Students will therefore interact with lecturers in the Department with the aim of exposing them to such equipment under the supervision of lecturers. Part of the course will also cover the effective use of the library, preparation of dissertations or theses papers for journal.

BCH 410 - CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY (3 UNITS) L15 P 15 TO) Genetics basis of diseases, Aberration/Mutation, causes and consequence, Molecular diseases affecting the Haemoglobins (Haeamoglobinopathies).

Thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia. Inborn errors of metabolism of proteins, carbohydrate, nucleic acids and lipids. Diabetes mellitus and Diabetes insipidus. Disease associated with carbohydrate, protein, nucleic acid and lipid metabolism. Biochemical investigation and Biochemistry of AIDS Virus. Enzymes in diagnosis. Cancer and cancer therapy. Publications and journal reviews. Special assignments and essays will be given to students. BCH 411 - BIOINORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) (L15: PO: TO)

30

Relationship between the physicochemical properties and biological functions of inorganic ions. Ligand complexes and their biochemical significance. Electrolyte metabolism. Nitrogen fixation and sulphur cycle. BCH 413 - BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY (2 UNITS) (L15: PO: T15) Cellular metabolism in infected cells. Biochemistry aspects of host-parasite relationships. Metabolic factors affecting chemo-therapeutic agents. Theories of the mechanism of drug action. Drug resistance and other factors affecting drug efficacy. The physiological and biochemical action of some selected drugs. Nigerian traditional medicinal plants in the management and therapy of common ailments in Nigeria- malaria, sickle cell anaemia, common cold, hepatitis etc. BCH 415HORMONES AND VITAMINS (2 UNITS) (L 30: P 0: T 15)

Hormones: Biochemistry and molecular action, CAMP. Hormone receptors, isolation and properties. Diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia; insulin, glucagons, and other hormones controlling carbohydrate metabolism, hormones of the hypo physics (pituitary) Biochemistry and functions. Adrenaline and nor- adrenaline. Biochemistry and functions. Thyroid hormones, biochemistry and functions. Biochemistry and functions of steroid hormones, mineralocorticoids and

glucocorticoids. Biochemistry of lipid soluble vitamins, A, D, E and K. Biochemistry of the water soluble vitamins, vitamins C and B series.

BCH 499 - SEMINAR/INDEPENDENT METHODS (1 UNITS) Hormones, immunochemistry, oncology, brain biochemistry, monoclonal

antibodies. These may be taught or seminar may be given by academic staff and students.

31

DEPARTMENT

OF

CHEMISTRY AND INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY

1.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY.

32

B.Sc. Degree Programme in Chemistry

ACADEMIC STAFF LIST

2

ADEBAYO E.A

B.Sc.(BUK) M.Sc.(BUK) Ph.D.(Ilorin)

Senior

Lecturer

&

Ag.

Head

(Organic Chemistry)

3.

AKINTAYO, E.T.

B.Sc, M.Sc. (Ibadan)Ph.D (Akure)

Professor

4

ABOLUWOYE C.O.

B.Sc(Ibadan) M.Sc. (Ibadan)Ph.D (Ibadan)

Professor

(Biophysical Chemistry)

5

OLADOJA N.A

B.Sc(UNILAG) M.Sc.(Benin)Ph.D(Benin)

Lecturer I

(Environmental Chemistry)

6

OLOLADE I.A

B.Sc (Ibadan) M.Sc. (Ibadan) Ph.D(FUTA)

Lecturer I

(Environmental Chemistry)

7

EJELONU B.C.

B.Sc (Benin) M.Sc (Ibadan), Ph. D (Ibadan)

Lecturer I

(Inorganic Chemistry)

8

OLADIMEJI Y.B.

B.Sc(Ibadan), M.Sc (Ibadan)

Lecturer II

(Industrial Chemistry)

9

ASHOGBON A. A.

B.Sc ( UNILAG), M.Sc ( UNILAG)

Lecturer II

(Industrial Chemistry)

10

OLASENI S.E

B.Sc ( Ado-Ekiti) M.Sc (O.A.U.)

Assistant lecturer

(Physical Chemistry)

11

ABAYOMI T. G.

Assistant Lecturer

B.Sc., M.Sc. 12 Olaremu A. G. B.Sc., M.Sc. TECHNICAL STAFF

NAME QUALIFICATION

33

Assistant Lecturer

13

MR. AKINTOMIDE A.V

HND, F. Diploma

Technologist I

14.

MRS.OGUNLEYE O.J.

WAEC. OND, DEGREE

Laboratory Assistant

15.

MR.JEGEDE O.O.

Diploma SLT

Laboratory Assistant

16.

MR. OMIYE BODE

W.A.E.C

Laboratory Attendant

17.

MRS. ADEDEJI KEMI

S.S.C.E

Laboratory Attendant

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

18.

MR. ATIBA MOSES W.A.E.C B.Edu MRS.OGUNMAKIN RONKE WAEC, Dipl. In Comp. Studies MR. AJIWOJU ADELAKUN NECO PHILOSOPHY:

Clerical Officer

19.

Data Entry Clerk

20.

Office Attendant

2.

The philosophy of the department is geared towards providing necessary expertise in basic chemical applications. It is envisaged that graduating students will be functional in the area of science and technology drug manufacturing, food processing and environmental analysis. 3. AIMS / OBJECTIVE

The major objective of the department is to provide its students with a broad based knowledge of modern theoretical and practical chemistry. The courses offered in the department fall under the broad headings of physical, inorganic, organic, analytical and industrial chemistry. 4. ADMISSION REQUIREMENT

Students intending to graduate in Chemistry must satisfy the general University and Faculty of Science entry requirements. In addition, students seeking

admission to study Chemistry must normally satisfy at least one of the following conditions:

34

(a) Obtain five credits in Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics and English Language and any other Science subject in SSCE / GCE-O level / NECO Examination. (b) Pass the Pre-degree University (c) Pass with satisfactory grades at `A' level in Chemistry and Physics and / or Mathematics. Such candidate may be exempted from equivalent courses of the Science Faculty, Adekunle Ajasin

courses in the programmme. (d) OND Biology / Chemistry or Biochemistry / Chemistry (Upper Grade) (e) UME subjects: Mathematics. English Language, Chemistry, Biology / Physics,

5.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The minimum requirement for the award of the B.Sc. degree in Chemistry UME and successful Pre-degree Science candidates is the satisfactory completion of not less than 144 units of course work consisting of: B.Sc. (Hons) Chemistry Compulsory courses GST courses Elective courses Units 108 11 25 Total 144units

Direct entry student candidates are required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 108 units of course work consisting of: B.Sc. (Hons) Chemistry Compulsory courses GST courses Elective courses Units 76 11 21 Total 108 units A student must register for a minimum of 15 units and a maximum of 24 units each.

6.

REGISTRATION FOR COURSES

35

(a)

Candidates must register for appropriate compulsory, required and elective courses as indicated in the University Regulations.

(b)

Certain courses which are designed as pre-requisites to some others must be taken and passed before registering for courses in which they are pre-requisites.

( c)

The minimum and maximum work load per semester are 15 and 24 units respectively. Permission for waiver for graduating students

must be sought from the Head of Department subject to Senate approval. (d) A student5 is at liberty to withdraw from a course within the time frame stipulated by senate and on completion of the add/delete form. Any student who withdraws from a course without permission will be deemed to have failed the course.

COURSE OUTLINE 1ST SEMESTER 100 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 101 BIO 101 BIO 103 MAT 101 PHY 101 PHY 103 COURSE TITLE General Chemistry 1 General Biology 1 Experimental Biology 1 Basic Algebra General Physics 1 Practical Physics 1 UNITS 4 2 1 3 2 1

Required Courses GST 111 Communication in English GST 113 Use of Library and Study skills Total: 2ND SEMESTER 100LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 102 BIO 102 BIO 104 MAT 102 COURSE TITLE

2 2 17

UNITS 4 2 1 3

General Chemistry 11 General Biology 11 Experimental Biology 11 Introd.Calculus &Trigonometry

36

PHY 102 PHY 104 Required Courses GST 112 GST 114

General Physics 11 Practical Physics 11

2 1

Philosophy and Logic 2 Nigerian Peoples and culture 2 Total: 17

1ST SEMESTER 200 LEVEL Compulsory Courses

COURSE CODE CHM 211 CHM 213 MAT 201 MAT 203 ICH 201

COURSE TITLE Organic Chemistry 1 Analytical Chemistry Mathematically Methods 1 Algebra 1 Basic Principles of Chemical Processes

UNITS 3 3 3 3 2

Required Courses GST 211

History and Philosophy of Science

2 16

2ND SEMESTER 200LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 212 CHM 214 CHM 210 ICH 202 ICH 204 PHY 204 Required Courses GST 212 COURSE TITLE Inorganic Chemistry 1 Structure and bonding Physical Chemistry 1 Basic Principles of Chemical processes Chemical Raw Materials Modern Physics UNITS 3 2 3 2 3 3

Communication in English Total:

2 18

1ST SEMESTER 300 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 301 CHM 305 COURSE TITLE Physical Chemistry II Petrochemistry

37

UNITS 3 2

CHM 307 CHM 309 CHM 311 CHM 313 GST 311 Electives

Industrial Chemical Processes Organic Chemistry II Polymer Chemistry Carbon hydrate Chemistry Information and Communication Technology Total:

3 3 2 1 2 3 17

Electives : At least 3 units but not more than 4 units from: CHM 315 Colour Chemistry & Technology CHM 317 Chemical Physics CHM 319 Environmental Chemistry ICH 307 Industrial Chemicals from Inorganic Compounds

2 1 2 3

2ND SEMESTER 300 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 302 CHM 304 CHM 306 CHM 308 CHM 312 CHM 316 CHM 314 CHM310 COURSE TITLE UNITS Inorganic Chemistry II 3 Atomic and Molecular Structure And Symmentry 2 Applied Spectroscopy 2 Natural Product Chemistry 2 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 3 Organometalic Chemistry 1 Applied Surface and Colloids Chem. 2 Industrial Attachment 3 Total 18

1ST SEMESTER 400 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 499 CHM 403 CHM 405 CHM 407 CHM 409 CHM 411 CHM 413 GST 411 COURSE TITLE UNITS Seminar 1 Quantum Chemistry 2 Electrochemistry 2 Polymer Chemistry 2 Coordination Chemistry 2 Transition Metal Chemistry 2 Natural Product Chemistry 2 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skills 2

38

Electives Total: Electives : At least 5 units but no more than 6 units from: ICH 411 Fertilizers & Agrochemicals CHM 415 Nuclear Chemistry CHM 427 Photochemistry & Pericyclic

4 17 2 2 1

2ND SEMESTER 400 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 400 CHM 402 CHM 404 CHM 406 CHM 408 CHM 410 CHM 416 COURSE TITLE Resaerch Project Theory of Molecular Spectroscopy Group Theory and Symmetry Reaction Kinetics Organic synthesis Heterocyclic Chemistry Analytical Chemistry II Total: UNITS 4 2 2 2 2 2 3 18

COURSE DESCRIPTION CHM 101: GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4 UNITS) Atoms, molecules and chemical reactions: chemical equations and stoichimoetry, atomic structure and periodicity, modern electronic theory of atoms, radioactivity, chemical bonding, properties of gases, equilibria and thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, Electrochemistry, acids, bases and salts. CHM 102: GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (4 UNITS) Historical survey of the development and importance of organic chemistry; Nomenclature and classes of organic compounds; homologous series; functional groups, isolation and purification of organic compounds, qualitative and quantitative chemistry, determination of structure of organic compounds, electronic theory in organic chemistry saturated hydrocarbons, unsaturated hydrocarbons, periodic properties, valence force, structure of solids. The

chemistry of selected metals and non-metals, transition metals, properties. Group 1A ­ IVA. CHM 210: PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Kinetics theory of gases, behaviour as real gases, electrochemistry, heart work, first law of thermodynamics, internal energy, state functions and differentials,

39

heat in chemical change and varieties of heat, entropy and free energy, the second law of thermodynamics and applications, the Gibbs function. The third law of thermodynamics, entropies EMF and phase equilibrium, reaction rates, laws, mechanisms and theories of elementary processes, photochemical

reactions. Practical: Theoretical processing of experimental data. Thermal analysis,

measurement of pH and preparation of buffer solutions, chemical kinetics and electrochemistry.. Pre ­ requisite: CHM 101

CHM 211: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Review of chemical bonding in organic chemistry. Chemistry of functional

groups. Methods and mechanisms of inter-conversions of functional groups. The chemistry of alkayhalides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, carboxylic acids, amines and their derivatives. Introduction to stereochemistry, conformations of aliphatic compounds, geometric isomer, optical isomers and chirality. Practical: Sodium fusion test,organic synthesis Pre ­ requisite: CHM 102

CHM 212:

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II ( 3 UNITS) Hybridization and structure of Concepts of

Molecular orbital and valence bond theories. inorganic molecules.

Introduction to first row transition metals.

hard and soft acids and bases. Chemistry in aqueous and non-aqueous media. Oxidation and reduction reactions. Practical: Quantitative inorganic analysis and simple inorganic synthesis.

Pre-requisite: CHM 101

CHM 213: ANALYTYCAL CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Titrimetric Analysis: Acis/Base, redox, complexometric and precipitation Gravimetric analysis of precipitate/crystal formation, contamination and appropriate and handing of precipitate/crystal. Unit measurements. Separation methods, theory of errors, statistical treatment of data. Pre-requisite: CHM 101 and 102

40

CHM 214:STRUCTURE AND BONDING (2 UNITS) Idea of quantum states, orbital, shape and energy. electron repulsion theory, atomic spectra. shape, bond lengths and angle. Simple valence theory,

Methods of determining molecular

The structure and chemistry of some

representative main groups element compounds. Pre-requisite CHM 101 and 102

CHM 301: PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY III (3 UNITS) A review of Gibbs function, chemical thermodynamics, introduction to statistical thermodynamics, ideal solutions, non-ideal solutions, properties of electrolytes. The statisatical equivalents of temperature, entropy, free energy partition functions in statistical colligative properties. Properties : Mazwell ­ Doltzman statistics, calculation of thermodynamic

properties, use of spectroscopic data transition state theory and introduction to Fermi-durac and Dose-Einstein statistics. Pre-requisite: CHM 210

CHM 302: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY III(3 UNITS) Descriptive chemistry of transition metal serioes:2nd and 3rd row transition metals introduction to coordination chemistry. Nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Introduction to radiochemistry. Ligand and crystal field theories. Introduction to organic chemistry e.g. metal carbonyls. Role of metals in living systems Practical: A more advanced course in experimental inorganic chemistry designed to illustrate preparative methods and the use of physical methods such as chromatography, infra red and electronic spectroscopy and magneto chemistry for the characterization of inorganic compounds. Pre-requisites: CHM 212

CHM 304: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND SYMMETRY (2 UNITS)

41

Schrodinger equation, Helium atom ground and exited states, spin and Paulin's Exclusion principle. Hydrogen molecular, comparison of molecular orbital and

valence bond theory, concept of resonance and configuration interaction. CVoulusion Fidher functions. Molecular orbital of diatomic molecules. Simple Pie election theory, Huckel theory. Maish rules. Rotational, vibrational and

electronics spectra. Applications for determining bond lengths and angles. Brief mention of other methods. Atomic spectra. Russel saunders Coupling and spin angular momentum. Use of symmetry in chemistry. Pre-requisite: CHM 214

CHM 305:

PETROCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Nature, classification and

Petroleum in the contemporary energy scene.

composition of crude petroleum and natural gases. Processing and distribution of petroleum hydrocarbon and natural gas resource (the Nigerian situation). Petroleum technology survey of refinery products and process. Petrochemicals in industrial raw materials. Prospect for the petrochemical industry in Nigeria.

CHM306: APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY (2 UNITS) Principle and application of UV, IR, Proton NMR, Mass spectroscopy. The

determination and elucidation of structures of organic compounds using the above principle.

CHM 307: INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL PROCESS 1 (3 UNITS) Production of primary intermediates and synthesis of industrial organic chemical, polymers, adhesives, dyes, explosive insecticides, herbides, pestides, flavouring agents and pharmaceuticals, fermentation process.

CHM 308: NATURAL PRODUCT CHEMSITRY (2 UNITS) Terpenoids, carotenoids, steroids, alkaloids and lipids

CHM 309:

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (2+1+3) (3 UNITS)

Aromaticity ­ Huckel'slaw:

42

Nucleophilic and electrophilic aromatic substitution.

Substituent effect on

electrophilic aromatic substitution SN!, SN2, E1 and E2 reactions, amines and epoxides. Rearrangement reactions. Carbanions, Aldol condensation and related reactions, Michel, Witting, Diels-Alder, Mannich reaction carbonins synthesis with maolonic ester, acetoacetic ester synthesis of ketones. Practical: A more advanced course on experimental organic chemistry designed to provide experience in single and multi-step synthesis. Procedures of chemical tests.

CHM 310: INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY (1 UNIT) Heat transfer and mass transfer processes. Unit operation. Chemical technology equipment design.

CHM 311: POLYMER CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) The nature of polymer nomenclature. Outline the sources of raw materials for polymer: polymerizatrion process, condensation of polymerization in details. Solubility and solution properties of polymers. polymers. Fibre forming polymers. Structures and properties of

CHM 312: INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Spectroscopic techniques. techniques; UV-visible flame and absorption, atomic emission and fluorescence

absorption

sapectrophotometry.

Chromatography and separation methods. Pre-requisite: CHM 213

CHM 313: CARBONHYDRATE CHEMISTRY (1 UNIT) Classification, structures and nomenclature, sugars, General reaction

preparations and reaction mechanism. Configurations, Epimerization. CHM 314: APPLIED SURFACE AND COLLOID CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Some general principles relating to surfaces. Electrical potentials. Attractive

forces. Solids-gas interface and solid-liquid interface. Absorption equations and their applications. Wetting and floatation, corrosion, and colloidal chemistry. CHM 315: COLOUR CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY (2 UNITS)

43

Colour

and

constituents,

chemical

properties

of

dyes

and

pigments.

Classification of dyes and fibers. Dyeing mechanisms. Preparation and dyeing of natural and synthetic fibers. Colour fastness properties. Qualities. Control

procedure and the colouration industry.

CHM 316: ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMSITRY (2 UNITS) Classification of oganometallic Compounds, preparation, tructure and reactions including abnormal behaviour of organometallic compounds. Synthetic utility of organometallics and borane chemistry.

CHM 317: CHEMICAL PHYSICS (1 UNIT) Theory of bonding H2 and H2+ Rotation and vibration of molecules. Heat capacity of crystals.

CHM 318: INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIAL RESOURCES INVENTORY (1 UNIT) Survey of Nigeria's industries and their raw materials requirements. Mineral chemistry. Fossils and their uses. Plant and animal products. Nuclear solar and hydrodynamics sources of energy. Potentials and applications of locally available raw material feedstock.

CHM 319:ENVIRONMENTALCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Sources, types and effect of environmental pollution. analyses. Water analysis and air

CHM 402: THEORY OF MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY (2 UNITS) Quantum theory of rotation and vibration. Theory of microwave, IR, Raman UV, visible and NMR spectroscopy. General introduction to electron spin resonance. Mossbauer effect, nuclear quantum resonance and other modern techniques. Pre-requisites: CHM 304

CHM 403: QUANTUM CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Wave mechanics and application of boundary conditions. Bohr,s theory of atomic spectra and its limitation. The uncertainty principle. Operators and postulates

44

of quantum mechanics.

Term symbols.

Schrodinger equations for atoms,

Hydrogen ion and hydrogen molecule and application in the interpretation of spectra. Introductory molecular orbital theories for chemical bonding. Pre-requisite: CHM 304

CHM 404: GROUP THEORY AND SYMMETRY (2 UNITS) The basic theory of groups; symmetry elements and symmetry operations; molecular symmetry and symmetry groups; representation of groups; symmetry consideration in quantum mechanical calculations application of symmetry in a crystal calculation; application of symmetry in a crystal structure; crystal from both inside and outside.

CHM 405: ELECTROCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Ionic and Electronic, ionic deals with the transport and thermodynamic properties of tonic solutions. Other electronic topics will include measurement of cell potential, standard cells and their construction, the nature of

electrode/solution interface. technique.

Introduction to electrode kinetics and volume

45

CHM 406: REACTION KINETICS (2 UNITS) Review first, second and third order rate equations, rate and equilibrium constants. Collision theory, thansition state theory reaction coordinates.

Unimolecular reaction theory, bimolecular reaction mechanisms, chain reaction mechanism, catalysis and heterogeneous reaction. mechanisms. Pre-requisite: CHM 301 CHM407: POLYMER CHEMISTRY II (2 UNITS) Polymerization mechanisms, detailed treatment of addition polymerization, sterrospecific polymerization: industrially important thermoplastic and Photochemical reaction

thermosetting polymers: polyurethane's rubber elasticity. Mechanical properties of polymers. Analysis and testing of polymers. Degradation of polymers. Pre-requisite: CHM 311

CHM 408: ORGANIC SYNTHESIS (2 UNITS) Review of some organic reagents for synthesis. Rearrangement reaction. Reaction of carbenes, Nitrenes, Benzynes and Ylides application of reactive intermediates.

CHM 409: COORDINATION CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Definition, recognition and application of coordination compounds,

nomenclature, coordination formula stereochemistry of complex molecules, theories of structures of bonding. Physical methods of structural investigation, magnetic properties. series. Absorption and vibrational spectra. The spectrochemical distortion stability of

The nephelauxetic series and the Jahn-Teller

unusual oxidation states by complex formation, thermodynamic stability of complex compounds, the stability constant, the chelate effect. Preparation and reactions of complexes. Kinetics and mechanisms. Pre-requisite: CHM 302 CHM 410: HETEROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) The chemistry of pyrroles, furan thiophene, pyridines. systems quinoline, Fused heterocyclic

isoquinolines, benzofurans, benzothiuophene, indoles, Application of heterococyclic systems in drug

cumarines and chromones. synthesis. Pre-requisite: CHM 309

46

CHM 411: TRANSITION METAL CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Properties of electronic configuration of the d-block series oxidation state; ligand field,splitting crystal field stabilization energy, Magneto chemistry, comparative treatments of the 3d, 4dand 5dseries. Selected characteristic features of 4d

series elements and technological uses of 4d and 5d metals and complexes. Chemistry of Lanthanides and Actinides. Pre-requisite: CHM 302

CHM 412: PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Experimental methods of investigation reaction mechanisms; stereochemistry and conformational analysis; structure activity relationship. effects. Solution and medium effect on organic reactions. Pre-requisite: CHM 309 Kinetics and isotopes

CHM 413: NATURAL PRODUCT CHEMISTRY II ( 2 UNITS) Chemistry of terpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, antibiotics, prostaglandins and chlorophils. Other natural products of pharmaceutical importance. General

methods of isolation, separation, purification and structural determination of the natural products. Classification. Pre-requisite: CHM 308

CHM 414: RADIOCHEMISTRY AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Natural radiation, fusion, decay processes, nature of radiation. Nuclear models energies of nuclear reaction. Radiation hazards. Principle and measurement of radioactivity.

CHM 418: PHTOCHEMISTRY PERICYCLIC REACTION(2 UNITS) Interaction of radiation with matte, electronic excitation selection rules, deactivation routes, sensitization, guarding, photogragmentation oxidation

reduction, re-arrangement, pericyclic re4actions and molecular orbit symmetry.

CHM 416: ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS)

47

Theory of errors, statistical treatment of data, electro analytic methods. Analysis of food samples (proteins, fat, moisture, starch element, vitamins constants (etc) 1. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY. B.Sc. Degree Programme in Industrial Chemistry

2.

PHILOSOPHY:

The philosophy of the department is geared towards providing necessary expertise in basic chemical applications. It is envisaged that graduating students will be functional in the area of science and technology drug manufacturing, food processing and environmental analysis. 3. AIMS / OBJECTIVE

The major objective of the department is to provide its students with a broad based knowledge of modern theoretical and practical chemistry. The courses

offered in the department fall under the broad headings of physical, inorganic, organic, analytical and industrial chemistry. 4. ADMISSION REQUIREMENT

Students intending to graduate in Industrial Chemistry must satisfy the general University and Faculty of Science entry requirements. In addition, students

seeking admission to study Industrial Chemistry must normally satisfy at least one of the following conditions: (a) Obtain five credits in Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics and English Language and any other Science subject in SSCE / GCE-O level / NECO Examination. (b) Pass the Pre-degree courses of the Science Faculty, Adekunle Ajasin University ( c) Pass with satisfactory grades at `A' level in Chemistry and Physics and / or Mathematics. Such candidate may be exempted from equivalent

courses in the programmme. (d) (e) OND Biology / Chemistry or Biochemistry / Chemistry (Upper UME subjects: English Language, Chemistry, Biology / Physics, Mathematics. 5. GRADUATION REQUIREMENT Grade)

48

The minimum requirement for the award of the B.Sc. degree in Industrial Chemistry UME and successful Pre-degree Science candidates is the satisfactory completion of not less than 144 units of course work consisting of B.Sc. (Hons) Industrial Chemistry Units 108 11 25 Total 144units

Compulsory courses GST courses Elective courses

Direct entry student candidates are required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 108 units of course work consisting of B.Sc. (Hons) Industrial Chemistry Units Compulsory courses GST courses Elective courses Total 76 11 21 108units

A student must register for a minimum of 15 units and a maximum of 24 units each.

6.

REGISTRATION FOR COURSES (a) Candidates must register for appropriate compulsory, required and elective courses as indicated in the University Regulations. (b) Certain courses which are designed as pre-requisites to some others must be taken and passed before registering for courses in which they are pre-requisites. ( c) The minimum and maximum work load per semester are 15 and 24 units respectively. Permission for waiver for graduating students

must be sought from the Head of Department subject to Senate approval. (d) A student is at liberty to withdraw from a course within the time frame stipulated by senate and on completion of the add/delete form. Any student who withdraws from a course without permission will be deemed to have failed the course.

49

COURSE OUTLINE 1ST SEMESTER 100 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 101 BIO 101 BIO 103 MAT 101 PHY 101 PHY 103 COURSE TITLE General Chemistry 1 General Biology 1 Experimental Biology 1 Basic Algebra General Physics 1 Practical Physics 1 UNITS 4 3 1 3 3 1

Required Courses GST 111 Communication in English GST 113 Use of Library and Study skills Total: 2ND SEMESTER 100LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 102 BIO 102 BIO 104 MAT 102 PHY 102 PHY 104 Required Courses GST 112 GST 114 COURSE TITLE

2 2 19

UNITS

General Chemistry II 4 General Biology II 3 Experimental Biology II 1 Introd.Calculus &Trigonometry 3 General Physics II 3 Practical Physics II 1

Philosophy and Logic Nigerian Peoples and culture Total:

2 2 19

1ST SEMESTER 200 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE ICH 201 CHM 211 CHM 213 MAT 201 MAT 203 MAT 102 COURSE TITLE UNITS

Basic Principles of Chemical 2 Processes Organic Chemistry I 3 Analytical Chemistry I 3 Mathematically Methods 1 3 Linear Algebra 1 3 Intro. Calculus &Trigonometry 3

50

MCB 201 Required Courses GST 211

General Microbiology

3 2

History and Philosophy of Science 22

2ND SEMESTER 200LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 212 CHM 214 CHM 210 ICH 202 ICH 204 PHY 204 Required Courses GST 212 COURSE TITLE UNITS

Inorganic Chemistry 1 3 Structure and bonding 2 Physical Chemistry 1 3 Basic Principles of Chemical processes 2 Chemical Raw Materials 3 Modern Physics 3 Communication in English Total: 1ST SEMESTER 300 LEVEL 2 18

Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE CHM 301 CHM 305 CHM 307 CHM 309 CHM 311 ICH 301 ICH 303 GST 311 Electives COURSE TITLE UNITS Physical Chemistry II Industrial chemical Laboratory Industrial Chemical Processes I Organic Chemistry II Polymer Chemistry Unit Operation I Industrial chemistry fro Inorganic compounds 2 Information and communication Technology 2 3 Total: 20 ND SEMESTER 300 LEVEL 2 3 2 3 3 2 2

Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE ICH 310 CHM 302 CHM 306 CHM 308 CHM 312 ICH 306 COURSE TITLE UNITS Industrial Attachement 3 Inorganic Chemistry II 3 Applied Spectroscopy 2 Natural Product Chemistry 2 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 3 Introduction to Catalysis 2

51

ICH 308 ICH 302

Basic concept of drugs Unit Operation II Total

2 2 18

1ST SEMESTER 400 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE ICH 499 ICH 407 ICH 409 ICH 411 CHM 403 CHM 407 CHM 409 CHM 411 CHM 413 GST 411 Electives COURSE TITLE UNITS Seminar 1 Industrial management 3 Management Accounting 3 Fertilizer an Agrochemicals 2 Quantum Chemistry 2 Polymer Chemistry 2 Coordination Chemistry 2 Transition Metal Chemistry 2 Natural Product Chemistry 2 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skills 4 Total: 19

2

52

2ND SEMESTER 400 LEVEL Compulsory Courses COURSE CODE ICH 400 ICH 402 ICH 406 CHM 406 CHM 408 CHM 410 CHM 416 COURSE TITLE Research Project UNITS 4 Industrial Methodology and Quality control 2 Nigerian Chemical Industries 2 Reaction Kinetics 2 Organic synthesis 2 Heterocyclic Chemistry 2 Analytical Chemistry II 3 Total: 17

9.

COURSE DESCRIPTION CHM 101: GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4 UNITS) Atoms, molecules and chemical reactions: chemical equations and stoichimoetry, atomic structure and periodicity, modern electronic theory of atoms, radioactivity, chemical bonding, properties of gases, equilibria and thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, Electrochemistry, acids, bases and salts.

CHM 102: GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (4 UNITS) Historical survey of the development and importance of organic chemistry; Nomenclature and classes of organic compounds; homologous series; functional groups, isolation and purification of organic compounds, qualitative and quantitative chemistry, determination of structure of organic compounds, electronic theory in organic chemistry saturated hydrocarbons, unsaturated hydrocarbons, periodic properties, valence force, structure of solids. The

chemistry of selected metals and non-metals, transition metals, properties. Group 1A ­ IVA. CHM 210: PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Kinetics theory of gases, behaviour as real gases, electrochemistry, heart work, first law of thermodynamics, internal energy, state functions and differentials, heat in chemical change and varieties of heat, entropy and free energy, the second law of thermodynamics and applications, the Gibbs function. The third law of thermodynamics, entropies EMF and phase equilibrium, reaction rates, laws, mechanisms and theories of elementary processes, photochemical

reactions.

53

Practical: Theoretical processing of experimental data.

Thermal analysis,

measurement of pH and preparation of buffer solutions, chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. Pre ­ requisite: CHM 101

CHM 211: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Review of chemical bonding in organic chemistry. Chemistry of functional

groups. Methods and mechanisms of inter-conversions of functional groups. The chemistry of alkayhalides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, carboxylic acids, amines and their derivatives. Introduction to stereochemistry, conformations of aliphatic compounds, geometric isomer, optical isomers and chirality. Practical: Sodium fusion test,organic synthesis Pre ­ requisite: CHM 102

CHM 212:

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II ( 3 UNITS) Hybridization and structure of Concepts of

Molecular orbital and valence bond theories. inorganic molecules.

Introduction to first row transition metals.

hard and soft acids and bases. Chemistry in aqueous and non-aqueous media. Oxidation and reduction reactions. Practical: Quantitative inorganic analysis and simple inorganic synthesis.

Pre-requisite: CHM 101

CHM 213: ANALYTYCAL CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Titrimetric Analysis: Acis/Base, redox, complexometric and precipitation Gravimetric analysis of precipitate/crystal formation, contamination and appropriate and handing of precipitate/crystal. Unit measurements. Separation methods, theory of errors, statistical treatment of data. Pre-requisite: CHM 101 and 102

CHM 214:STRUCTURE AND BONDING (2 UNITS) Idea of quantum states, orbital, shape and energy. electron repulsion theory, atomic spectra. shape, bond lengths and angle. Simple valence theory,

Methods of determining molecular

The structure and chemistry of some

representative main groups' element compounds.

54

Pre-requisite CHM 101 and 102

CHM 301: PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY III (3 UNITS) A review of Gibbs function, chemical thermodynamics, introduction to statistical thermodynamics, ideal solutions, non-ideal solutions, properties of electrolytes. The statisatical equivalents of temperature, entropy, free energy partition functions in statistical colligative properties. Properties: Mazwell ­ Doltzman statistics, calculation of thermodynamic

properties, use of spectroscopic data transition state theory and introduction to Fermi-durac and Dose-Einstein statistics. Pre-requisite: CHM 210

CHM 302: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY III(3 UNITS) Descriptive chemistry of transition metal serioes:2nd and 3rd row transition metals introduction to coordination chemistry. Nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Introduction to radiochemistry. Ligand and crystal field theories. Introduction to organic chemistry e.g. metal carbonyls. Role of metals in living systems Practical: A more advanced course in experimental inorganic chemistry designed to illustrate preparative methods and the use of physical methods such as chromatography, infra red and electronic spectroscopy and magneto chemistry for the characterization of inorganic compounds. Pre-requisites: CHM 212

55

CHM 304: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND SYMMETRY (2 UNITS) Schrodinger equation, Helium atom ground and exited states, spin and Paulin's Exclusion principle. Hydrogen molecular, comparison of molecular orbital and

valence bond theory, concept of resonance and configuration interaction. CVoulusion Fidher functions. Molecular orbital of diatomic molecules. Simple Pie election theory, Huckel theory. Maish rules. Rotational, vibrational and

electronics spectra. Applications for determining bond lengths and angles. Brief mention of other methods. Atomic spectra. Russel Saunders Coupling and spin angular momentum. Use of symmetry in chemistry. Pre-requisite: CHM 214

CHM 305:

PETROCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Nature, classification and

Petroleum in the contemporary energy scene.

composition of crude petroleum and natural gases. Processing and distribution of petroleum hydrocarbon and natural gas resource (the Nigerian situation). Petroleum technology survey of refinery products and process. Petrochemicals in industrial raw materials. Prospect for the petrochemical industry in Nigeria.

CHM306: APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY (2 UNITS) Principle and application of UV, IR, Proton NMR, Mass spectroscopy. The

determination and elucidation of structures of organic compounds using the above principle.

CHM 307: INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY PROCESS 1 (3 UNITS) Production of primary intermediates and synthesis of industrial organic chemical, polymers, adhesives, dyes, explosive insecticides, herbides, pestides, flavouring agents and pharmaceuticals, fermentation process.

CHM 308: NATURAL PRODUCT CHEMSITRY I (2 UNITS) Terpenoids, carotenoids, steroids, alkaloids and lipids

CHM 309:

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III (2+1+3) (3 UNITS)

Aromaticity ­ Huckel'slaw:

56

Nucleophilic and electrophilic aromatic substitution.

Substituent effect on

electrophilic aromatic substitution SN!, SN2, E1 and E2 reactions, amines and epoxides. Rearrangement reactions. Carbanions, Aldol condensation and related reactions, Michel, Witting, Diels-Alder, Mannich reaction carbonins synthesis with maolonic ester, acetoacetic ester synthesis of ketones.

Practical: A more advanced course on experimental organic chemistry designed to provide experience in single and multi-step synthesis. Procedures of chemical tests.

CHM 310: INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY (1 UNIT) Heat transfer and mass transfer processes. Unit operation. Chemical technology equipment design.

CHM 311: POLYMER CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) The nature of polymer nomenclature. Outline the sources of raw materials for polymer: polymerizatrion process, condensation of polymerization in details. Solubility and solution properties of polymers. polymers. Fibre forming polymers. Structures and properties of

CHM 312: INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Spectroscopic techniques. techniques; UV-visible flame and absorption, atomic emission and fluorescence

absorption

sapectrophotometry.

Chromatography and separation methods. Pre-requisite: CHM 213

57

CHM 313: CARBONHYDRATE CHEMISTRY (1 UNIT) Classification, structures and nomenclature, sugars, General reaction

preparations and reaction mechanism. Configurations, Epimerization.

CHM 314: APPLIED SURFACE AND COLLOID CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Some general principles relating to surfaces. Electrical potentials. Attractive

forces. Solids-gas interface and solid-liquid interface. Absorption equations and their applications. Wetting and floatation, corrosion, and colloidal chemistry.

CHM 315: COLOUR CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY (2 UNITS) Colour and constituents, chemical properties of dyes and pigments.

Classification of dyes and fibers. Dyeing mechanisms. Preparation and dyeing of natural and synthetic fibers. Colour fastness properties. Qualities. Control

procedure and the colouration industry.

CHM 316: ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Classification of oganometallic Compounds, preparation, tructure and reactions including abnormal behaviour of organometallic compounds. Synthetic utility of organometallics and borane chemistry.

CHM 317: CHEMICAL PHYSICS (1 UNIT) Theory of bonding H2 and H2+ Rotation and vibration of molecules. Heat capacity of crystals.

CHM 318: INDUSTRIAL RAW MATERIAL RESOURCES INVENTORY (1 UNIT) Survey of Nigeria's industries and their raw materials requirements. Mineral chemistry. Fossils and their uses. Plant and animal products. Nuclear solar and hydrodynamics sources of energy. Potentials and applications of locally available raw material feedstock.

58

CHM 319:ENVIRONMENTALCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Sources, types and effect of environmental pollution. analyses. Water analysis and air

CHM 402: THEORY OF MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY (2 UNITS) Quantum theory of rotation and vibration. Theory of microwave, IR, Raman UV, visible and NMR spectroscopy. General introduction to electron spin resonance. Mossbauer effect, nuclear quantum resonance and other modern techniques. Pre-requisites: CHM 304

CHM 403: QUANTUM CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Wave mechanics and application of boundary conditions. Bohr,s theory of atomic spectra and its limitation. The uncertainty principle. Operators and postulates of quantum mechanics. Term symbols. Schrodinger equations for atoms,

Hydrogen ion and hydrogen molecule and application in the interpretation of spectra. Introductory molecular orbital theories for chemical bonding. Pre-requisite: CHM 304

CHM 404: GROUP THEORY AND SYMMETRY (2 UNITS) The basic theory of groups; symmetry elements and symmetry operations; molecular symmetry and symmetry groups; representation of groups; symmetry consideration in quantum mechanical calculations application of symmetry in a crystal calculation; application of symmetry in a crystal structure; crystal from both inside and outside.

CHM 405: ELECTROCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Ionic and Electronic, ionic deals with the transport and thermodynamic properties of tonic solutions. Other electronic topics will include measurement of cell potential, standard cells and their construction, the nature of

electrode/solution interface. technique.

Introduction to electrode kinetics and volume

CHM 406: RE4ACTION KINETICS (2 UNITS)

59

Review first, second and third order rate equations, rate and equilibrium constants. Collision theory, transition state theory reaction coordinates. Unimolecular

reaction theory, bimolecular reaction mechanisms, chain reaction mechanism, catalysis and heterogeneous reaction. Photochemical reaction mechanisms. Pre-requisite: CHM 301

CHM407: POLYMER CHEMISTRY II (2 UNITS) Polymerization mechanisms, detailed treatment of addition polymerization, sterrospecific polymerization: industrially important thermoplastic and

thermosetting polymers: polyurethane's rubber elasticity. Mechanical properties of polymers. Analysis and testing of polymers. Degradation of polymers. Pre-requisite: CHM 311

CHM 408: ORGANIC SYNTHESIS (2 UNITS) Review of some organic reagents for synthesis. Rearrangement reaction. Reaction of carbenes, Nitrenes, Benzynes and Ylides application of reactive intermediates.

CHM 409: COORDINATION CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Definition, recognition and application of coordination compounds,

nomenclature, coordination formula stereochemistry of complex molecules, theories of structures of bonding. Physical methods of structural investigation, magnetic properties. series. Absorption and vibrational spectra. The spectrochemical distortion stability of

The nephelauxetic series and the Jahn-Teller

unusual oxidation states by complex formation, thermodynamic stability of complex compounds, the stability constant, the chelate effect. Preparation and reactions of complexes. Kinetics and mechanisms. Pre-requisite: CHM 302

CHM 410: HETEROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) The chemistry of pyrroles, furan thiophene, pyridines. systems quinoline, Fused heterocyclic

isoquinolines, benzofurans, benzothiuophene, indoles,

60

cumarines and chromones. synthesis. Pre-requisite: CHM 309

Application of heterococyclic systems in drug

CHM 411: TRANSITION METAL CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Properties of electronic configuration of the d-block series oxidation state; ligand field,splitting crystal field stabilization energy, Magneto chemistry, comparative treatments of the 3d, 4dand 5dseries. Selected characteristic features of 4d

series elements and technological uses of 4d and 5d metals and complexes. Chemistry of Lanthanides and Actinides. Pre-requisite: CHM 302

CHM 412: PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Experimental methods of investigation reaction mechanisms; stereochemistry and conformational analysis; structure activity relationship. effects. Solution and medium effect on organic reactions. Pre-requisite: CHM 309 Kinetics and isotopes

CHM 413: NATURAL PRODUCT CHEMISTRY II ( 2 UNITS) Chemistry of terpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, antibiotics, prostaglandins and chlorophils. Other natural products of pharmaceutical importance. General

methods of isolation, separation, purification and structural determination of the natural products. Classification. Pre-requisite: CHM 308

CHM 414: RADIOCHEMISTRY AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Natural radiation, fusion, decay processes, nature of radiation. Nuclear models energies of nuclear reaction. Radiation hazards. Principle and measurement of radioactivity.

CHM 416: ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY II (3 UNITS) Theory of errors, statistical treatment of data, electro analytic methods. Analysis of food samples (proteins, fat, moisture, starch element, vitamins constants (etc) Pre-requisite: CHM 312

61

CHM 418: PHTOCHEMISTRY PERICYCLIC REACTION(2 UNITS) Interaction of radiation with matte, electronic excitation selection rules, deactivation routes, sensitization, guarding, photogragmentation oxidation

reduction, re-arrangement, pericyclic re4actions and molecular orbit symmetry.

ICH 201; BASIC PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICALS PROCESSES I (2 UNITS) Processes variable data presentation and analysis, metals; and energy balances. Application in Chemistry and allied product processes. users survey of chemistry raw material in Nigeria. Steam generation and

ICH202: BASIC PRINCIPLE OF CHEMICAL PROCESS II (2UNITS) Flowchart for industrial processes, large scale processes. Types of industrial operations. Fluid flow, simultaneous heat and transfer process combustion process. Unit operation equipment.

ICH 204: CHEMICAL RAW MATERIALS (2 UNITS) Inventory state convertibility of Nigeria's natural resources. Environmental

effects of Nigeria's chemical industries. Ore processing for selected metals. The uses and reactivates. purification and uses. The chloro/alkali processin details, industrial gases:

62

CHM 301: UNIT OPERATIONS I (2 UNITS) Introductory heat transfer principles and applications in chemical industries. Heat transfer by condition, convention and radiation at steady state. Boiling and condensation. equipment. Boiler, heart exchangers. Heat transfer in some typical unit

Momentum transfer, flows processes and related measurements,

Bernoulli's equation and its applications. Pumps, compression; and expansion. Energy particle size reduction.

ICH 302: UNIT OPERATION II (2 UNITS) Physicochemical industrial processes, filtration, distillation, extraction processes (solid/solvent, solvent/solvent), crystallization,evaporation,drying rectors types design and optimization, waste treatment and utilization. ICH 303: INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS FROM INORGANIC COMPOUNDS (2 UNITS) Chemical of metals, occurrence extraction and general properties and

importance.

Industrial gases (N2O2, H2 ) and their industrial importance.

Chemistry of inorganic compounds (Sulphate, Carbonat, Chloride) and complexes of industrial interest phosphate phosphorous, urea, potash, glass, cement e.t.c.

ICH 305: INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1 UNIT) An integrated laboratory course covering polymer, petroleum chemistry and allied products, food catalysts, drug, agricultural and environmental Chemistry.

ICH 306: INTRODUCTION OF CATALYSIS (2 UNITS) General principles of catalysis processes. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and

enzymes catalysis. Kinetics and mechanism of catalysis processes. Preparation and characterization of catalysts, Chemistry and structure of commercial catalysis, industrial application of catalysis.

ICH 308: BASIC CONCEPT OF DRUG (2 UNITS) Design and production, classification of the various types of drugs. The

chemistry and properties of each class of drugs. Synthesis activity relationship

63

and medicinal use.

Sulfonamides, typonocides, antihemoinitics, anticoplastic

and antiviral agents, alkaloids, glycoside,liquids and volatile oral.

ICH 310: INDUSTRIAL ATTACHEMENT (3 UNITS) Students will be attached to various chemical and allied industries for 12 weeks during the long vacation.

ICH 400: RESEARCH PROJECT (4 UNITS) Research work on an approved applied chemistry problems.

ICH 499: SEMINAR (1 UNITS) Literature research, presentation of seminar on comprehensive literature review of selected topic of current research interest.

ICH 402: INDUSTRIAL METHODOLOGY AND QUALITY CONTROL (2 UNITS) Chemical and technical quality control of chemical and allied industries (breweries, detergents,. Fertilizer and foods, drugs, plastics, soft drinks, etc) statistical analysis of quality control data (upper and lower limits) and their significance. Reliability. Theory and quality control, production and inventory control, Research allocation.

ICH 406: NIGERIA CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES (2 UNITS) This involves treating at least 10 Nigerian chemical industries such as sugar, detergent and soaps, breweries, glass and its products etc. It will cover the

chemistry, equipment, pollution and other important factors that affect the operation of the chemical industries.

ICH 407: INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT (2 UNITS) Industrial group and organization behaviour, motivation industrial law.

Legislation in wags, trade marks and patents. An introduction to the concept and procedures of decision making in the management of business operation.

ICH 409: MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING (2 UNITS)

64

Finacial relationship-statements, revenue depreciation, taxes capitals, cash receipt and disbursements. Operation planning and control cost concepts,

estimating and controlling costs, material and labour, production cost (fixed, variable) cost-volume-profit relationships. capital investment decision. Budgets-analysis and production

ICH 411: FERTILIZERS AND AGROCHEMICALS (2 UNITS) Chemistry and applications of physically mixed and complex NPK fertilizer, organic chloride and organic phosphoruss insecticides, fungi herbicides and growth regulators. Technology for the production of fertilizers and agrochemical. The effects of fertilizers and pesticides on the environment.

65

DEPARTMENT

OF

COMPUTER SCIENCE

66

ACADEMIC STAFF LIST NAME 1. F.M. Aderibigbe B.Sc, M.Sc (Ibadan) Ph.D(Ilorin) 2. A.O. AKINGBESOTE B.Sc. (Ago-Iwoye) M.Tech, (Akure) 3. S.O. OLATUNJI B.Sc. (Ado-Ekiti), M.Sc (Ibadan) 4. R.Z FISUSI B.Sc, M.Sc. (Ife) 5. O.OLABODE B.Tech, M.Tech, Ph.D.0. 6. OLATUNBOSUN B.Sc, M.Tech 7. 8. 9. F. ALAO B.Sc, M.Tech, Ph.D Bello O.A. OJEYINKA T. O. B.Sc., M.Sc. Professor & Head Lecturer II [Expert System] Assistant Lecturer [Fusil Logic] Adjunct Lecturer [Database] (Adjunct Lecturer) [Database] Asst. Lecturer [Software Engineering] Senior Lecturer[Adjt.Lect] [Theoretical & Computational] Lecturer II Lecturer II STATUS

10.

AJAYI O.O. B.Sc., M.Sc.

Assistant Lecturer

11.

OGUNNIYE G. B. B.Sc., M.Sc.

Graduate Fellow

TECHNICAL STAFF

NAME 8. B.R. FADIPE HND, PGDCS Computer

67

STATUS

9.

D.A. AKINWUMI B.Sc, (Ado-Ekiti) Programmer 1

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 10. F.M. OLORUNMOLA SSCE, Diploma in Computer Literacy 11. OLAGBAYE SSCE, ND 12. H.A. ADEKUNLE SSCE 13. ILEKURA M. SSCE Office Attendant Office Assistant Clerical Officer Data Entry Clerk

UNDERGRADUATE COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAMME 2.0 INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL BACKGROUND

The Department of Computer Science offers a degree programme of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc) Computer Science The Department of Computer Science was an arm of the then Mathematical Sciences Department right from Ado ­ Ekiti. At the relocation of the university to Akungba-Akoko on 1st December, 1999. The Department of Mathematical Sciences consisted of two options, namely: Mathematics, and Computer Science. In 2003/2004 session, the Department of Computer Science evolved to become a unique academic division in the production of highly trained graduates in Computer Science.

3.0

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES

The programme is designed to give students the opportunity to obtain a broad knowledge of Computer Science and allow the students to tailor the programme to meet their interest and individual needs. It is envisaged that students will be able to take relevant course in Mathematics and Electrical/Electronics Engineering. Computer Science graduates should be sufficiently exposed to be able to work in the public and industrial sectors of the

68

economy. The very promising students should be able to proceed to higher degrees and take up jobs in institutions of higher learning.

69

4.0

PROGRAMME OFFERED

B.Sc. DEGREE PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE DURATION: Candidates who enter through the University Matriculation

Examination (UME): normally, will spend 4 years (Minimum), while the Direct Entry candidates will spend 3 years (Minimum).

5.0

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Minimum Entry Requirements

5.1

UME Entry Requirements (a) Five O'Level credit passes at the SSCE/NECO/GCE `O' level of its equivalent in at most two sittings, must include English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology. (b) (c) UME subjects must include Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. Must have passed the Pre-degree Science courses of the Faculty of Science, Adekunle Ajasin University, Nigeria. At least a B (60-69%) score in Mathematics and Physics and a C (50-59%) score in Chemistry, and English Language, provided 1 (a) is satisfied.

5.2

Direct Entry Requirements Students coming into 200 level of the Computer Science degree programme must satisfy one of the following: (a) Passes in two A' level subjects which must include Mathematics, provided 1(a) is satisfied. (b) At least Upper Credit pass in ND Computer Science, Statistics or Electronics/Electrical Engineering, provided 1(a) is satisfied. (c) NCE with at least credit pass in Mathematics, Computer Science and any other Science or Social Science subject, provided 1(a) is satisfied.

6.0

REQUIREMENTS FOR AWARD OF DEGREE To be eligible for the award of B.Sc Honours degree in Computer Science, a candidate must offer and pass a total of 148 credit units, made up of: FOUNDATION COURSES

70

=

24 UNITS

COMPULSORY COURSES ELECTIVE COURSES GST COURSES

= = =

104 UNITS 13 UNITS 7 UNITS

Direct entry candidates are required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 120 units. A student must register for a minimum of 15 credit units and a maximum of 24 credit units each semester.

7.0

REGISTRATION FOR COURSES (i) Candidates must register for the appropriate compulsory, required and elective courses as indicated in the programme. (ii) Courses, which may be designed as prerequisites to some other courses, must be taken and a score of at least 30% is required to be able to offer the subsequent courses. (iii) The minimum workload is 15 units and the maximum is 24 units for each semester. Permission for waiver must be sought from the HOD subject to Senate approval. (iv) A student can withdraw from the time stipulated by Senate without penalty only with the approval of the HOD on completion of add/delete form. Any student who withdraws without permission will be deemed to have failed the course.

8.0

COURSE OFFERINGS

100 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSES COURSE CODE CSC 101 MAT 101 CHM 101 BIO 101 BIO 103 PHY 101 PHY 107 GST 101 GST 107 COURSE TITLE UNITS 2 3 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 17

71

Introductory to Computer Science Basic Algebra General Chemistry 1 General Biology 1 Experimental Biology 1 General Physics 1 General Physics Lab 1 Use of English 1 Use of Library Total

SECOND SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSES COURSE CODE CSC 102 MAT 102 CHM 102 BIO 102 BIO 104 PHY 102 PHY 108 GST 102 GST 104 COURSE TITLE Programming Languages

Introductory Calculus and Trigonometry

UNITS 2 3 3 2 1 2 1 2 2 18

General Chemistry II General Biology II Experimental Biology II General Physics II General Physics Lab II Use of English II Nigerian Peoples and Culture

200 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSE COURSE CODE CSC 201 CSC 211 CSC 213 CSC 215 MAT 201 MAT 203 MAT 207 COURSE TITLE Algorithms and Data Structure UNITS 2

Computer Programming I (FORTRAN)3 Computer Logic Assembly Language Programming Mathematical Methods I Linear Algebra I Real Analysis I 3 3 3 2 3 19

SECOND SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSE COURSE CODE CSC 212 COURSE TITLE Computer Programming II (PASCAL, OR C++) CSC 214 CSC 216 MAT 202 MAT 204 MAT 206 Digital Electronics 3 2 UNITS

File Organisation and Data Processing3 Elementary Differential Equations I 3 Linear Algebra I 2

Introduction to Numerical Analysis 3 Elective Courses Total 3 18

300 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSE

72

COURSE CODE CSC 301 CSC 303 CSC 305 CSC 309 CSC 311 CSC 313

COURSE TITLE Computer Architecture I Database Systems Object-Oriented Programming Digital Electronics II Linear Programming Automata Theory and Formal Language

UNITS 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 19

CSC 319

Discrete Mathematics Total

SECOND SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSE COURSE CODE CSC 302 CSC 304 CSC 306 CSC 310 CSC 314 CSC 316 COURSE TITLE Operating Systems Design Compiler Construction I Introduction to Operations Research Software Engineering UNITS 3 3 3 3

Computer Organisation and Architecture 3 Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems 3 Elective Courses Total 2 18

300 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSE COURSE CODE CSC 400 CSC 413 CSC 415 CSC 419 CSC 490 COURSE TITLE Seminar Structured Programming

Computer systems Installation Management Computer Systems Performance Evaluation

UNITS 1 3 3 3 2 6 19

Students Industrial Experience (SIWES) Elective Courses Total

SECOND SEMESTER COMPULSORY COURSE COURSE CODE CSC 410 CSC 412 CSC 414 COURSE TITLE Project Computer Networks Computer Systems Modelling and

73

UNITS 6 3

Simulation CSC 416 Management Science Elective Courses Total ELECTIVE COURSES

3 3 3 18

A minimum of 8 units of elective course will be chosen out of the following courses subject to the availability of relevant staff. COURSE CODE CSC 303 CSC 309 CSC 314 CSC 418 CSC 421 CSC 422 CSC 423 CSC 424 CSC 425 COURSE TITLE Introduction to Formal Language Introduction to Computer Arithemetic Compiler Architecture II Computer Graphic Systems Programming Compiler Construction II NON-VON Nueman Computers Application Packages Advanced Design and Analysis of Algorithms CSC 411 CSC 417 PHY 202 PHY 203 3 UNITS 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3

Programming with Java/Java Script/Html 3 Special Topics in Computer Science Solid State Physics Electric Circuit and Electronics 3 3 3

Students can choose elective courses from the 200, 300 and 400 level courses in the Faculty of Science. These courses should not include any GST courses. No student will be allowed to take more than 8 units of elective courses outside the Faculty of Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the Head of Department of Computer Science.

ANALYSIS OF COURSE UNITS FOR B.SC. (HONS) COMPUTER SCIENCE UME STUDENTS

LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER TOTAL

100

(Electives)

14 UNITS 3 UNITS 19 UNITS

14 UNITS 4 UNITS 16 UNITS

74

17 UNITS 35 UNITS 2 UNITS

100 (GST) 200

(Electives) 300 (Electives) 400 (Electives) TOTAL

20 UNITS 12 UNITS 6 UNITS 74 UNITS

2 UNITS 18 UNITS 2UNITS 15 UNITS 3 UNITS 74 UNITS

38 UNITS 2 UNITS 27 UNITS 9UNITS 28 UNITS 148 UNITS

DIRECT ENTRY STUDENTS In addition to all 200 level Compulsory courses, students are expected to register for the following GST course at the 200 level.

FIRST SEMESTER GST 101 GST 107 TOTAL 2 UNITS 1 UNIT 3 UNITS

SECOND SEMESTER GST 102 GST 104 TOTAL 2 UNITS 2 UNITS 4 UNITS

75

LEVEL

FIRST SEMESTER

SECOND SEMESTER 16 UNITS 4 UNITS 2 UNITS 18 UNITS 2 UNITS 15 UNITS 3 UNITS 74 UNITS

TOTAL

200 ...(GST) ...(Electives) 300 ...(Electives) 400 ...(Electives) TOTAL

19 UNITS 3 UNITS 20 UNITS 12 UNITS 6 UNITS 74 UNITS

35 UNITS 7 UNITS 2 UNITS 38 UNITS 2 UNITS 27 UNITS 9 UNITS 148 UNITS

SUMMARY Foundation Courses Compulsory Courses Elective Courses GST Studies Total 24 104/100* 13/13* 7/7* 148/120* Units Units Units Units Units

* FOR DIRECT ENTRY STUDENTS ONLY 9. DESCRIPTION OF COURSES CSC 101 UNITS) What is Information Technology? Storing and retrieval of information. Brief review of advantages of IT. Evolution of computers. Benefit of using computers. Input/Output hardware devices, the processor, motherboard and disk memory. Random access memory, read only memory, operating systems, software packages, peripherals (Monitor, keyboard, mouse, scanner) expansion slots. Linking of system components, how computer works, how programs are executed. Secondary storage medial, magnetic tape streamers, diskette, harddisk, accessing secondary storage. INTRODUCTION OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS (2

76

What is an Operating System? Components of an operating system. Types of Operating Systems, Operating System capabilities/functions, micro-computer operating systems: DOS, WINDOWsS, etc. Word Processing: how does word processing software work? Advantages of word processing. Introduction to application of spreadsheet software package.

Introduction to database. Brief review of advantages of IT.

CSC 102

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

(2 UNITS)

Fundamentals of BASIC Programming. Constants, Variables Operations. Data types and expressions, assignment statements, arrays, subscripts, expressions and control statements. Decision steps; Conditional ­ if statements, repetition and loops. Function and Subroutine sub-programs. Format and Files. String manipulations. Plotting functions.

CSC 201

ALGORITHMS AND DATA STRUCTURE

(2 UNITS

Basic structures for data representation. Graphics and Network flows. Data definition languages. Sequential and linked storage allocation (for linear, multi linked structures and string process techniques). Tree implementation, Tree traversal and the mathematical properties. Dynamic storage allocation (Sorting, Searching). Algorithms analysis.

CSC 211

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 1 (FORTRAN)

(3 UNITS)

Declaration, Data types, Precisions, Operations, built-in functions. Conditional ­ if statements, repetition and loops . arrays, Function and Subroutine subprograms. Format and Files. String manipulations pre-requisite CSC102

CSC 212

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II (PASCAL OR C/C ++) (3 UNITS)

Structured programming in PASCAL or C/C+ + language: variables, Data types and arithmetic expressions. Program looping. Making Decisions, Arrays,

Functions and Structures, Character Strings pointers. Operations on Bits. The preprocessor. Input and Output. Dynamic memory allocations. Pre-requisite CSC 102.

77

CSC 213

COMPUTER LOGIC

(3 UNITS)

Introduction to the internal structure of Digital Computers. Central Processing Units (CPU), Memory Devices, Input and Output channels. Storage primitives. Design of gates. Pre-requisite CSC 102

CSC 214

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS I

(2 UNITS)

Introduction to the internal structure of digital computers. Number Systems, Binary Codes, Multiplexers, arithmetic operation using half adder and full adder, Two compliment addition, one compliment addition, division and multiplication of numbers: logic circuit Design of gates, Function of single and two binary variables OR, AND,NOT,NOR and NAND operations and symbols. The exclusive OR gate logical variables. The truth table. The 0.1 notation Boolean theorems and demorgan's theorems. The standard sum of product and the standard product of sums, minimum term and maximum term specification of logic, functions truth table of Karnaugh maps, circuit minimization using k-map representation of two, three and four variables. Overlapping groups, rolling the map, eliminating redundant four, don't care conditions, k-map for five and six variables. Basic logic design; Data representation, instruction formats; computer

architecture. Case study of the architecture of a simple microcomputer.

CSC 215

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING

(3 UNITS)

Introduction to machine level programming. Distinction between high level language and assembly language. Organization and use of memory, central processor, input/output devices. Program writing in Microsoft Assembly

Language on microcomputers. Structures and modularity of programs and data at the machine level. macro definition and overview of one other Assembly language. Introduction to systems software. Instruction formats. Pseudo-code, instruction sets, and programmer's models of 8086/M68000 microprocessors. Assemblers, Exercises. Pre-requisite: CSC 101

CSC 216

FILE ORGANISATION & DATA PROCESSING

78

Basic physical characteristics of I/O and auxiliary storage device, types of memory access, concept of data, physical and logical records, inter-record gaps, record structuring, fields, files type of files, hierarchical files, files on certain I/O devices, operation on files, label, buggering, blocking and deblocking, director structures, opening and closing files, files access control and access methods, crating and deleting files, backup procedures, searching and sorting technique, merging, high level programming language such as C+ +, BASIC e.t.c.

CSC 301 Basic

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE I design. Data representation instruction

(3 UNITS) formats; Computer

logic

architecture. Case study of the architecture of a simple microcomputers. Pre-requisite: CSC 213 CSC 302 OPERATING SYSTEMS TECHNIQUES (3 UNITS)

An overview of operating systems; Structures and functions of operating systems, multiprogramming, multitasking/multi-user, timesharing process state models and scheduling algorithms, memory management, interrupt processing, resource protection and deadlock. Sequential processes, Concurrent processes and Realtime processes, Processor management, Design strategies and study of several operating systems. Pre-requisite: CSC 215

CSC 303

DATABASE SYSTEMS

(3 UNITS)

Introduction to the concepts, approaches, tools and methodology of database design. The entity-relationship model, the model relational algebra, relational calculus and commercial languages such as SQL, functional dependencies, normal forms, design theory and optimization. Other topics may include concurrency control, distributed systems security, knowledge base and concept of object-oriented database systems.

CSC 304

COMPILER CONSTRUCTION I

(3 UNITS)

Meaning of alphabet, string, concatenation; language, levels of language, grammars, parsing. Compiler structure, lexical analysis, syntax analysis, grammar, description of programming language, automatically constructed recognizers and error recovery and semantic analysis, semantic language,

79

semantic

processes,

intermediate

language,

optimization

techniques

and

extendable compilers. Pre-requisite: CSC 215

CSC 305

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

(3 UNITS) programming paradigms;

Object-oriented programming vs. procedure oriented

OOP features; OOP languages. Programming in C++, OOP-PASCAL;SMALTALK. Object oriented analysis and design. Pre-requisite: CSC 212

CSC 306 Pure,

INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3UNITS) and Binary Integer Programming Problem; Transportation,

Mixed

Transshipment and Assignment models; Quadratic Programming; Unconstrained and Constrained Minimization; Problems, Kuhn Tucker, Inventory, Decision and Reliability Theories, Project Planning and Control with Program Evaluation and Review Techniques (PERT) and Critical Path Method (CPM). Pre-requisite: CSC 311 (Alternative to and will not be counted with MAT 316 and MAT 425) CSC 309 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS II (3UNITS)

Logic Families, Flip Flops, Registers and Counters, Semiconductors Memories, Analogue Switches and Timing Circuit. Pre-requisite: CSC 214

CSC 310

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

(3UNITS)

Software life cycle from requirements specification and design phase through the construction of actual software. Management of programming teams,

programming methodologies, debugging aids, documentation, evaluation and measurement of software, verification and testing techniques and the problems of maintenance, modification and portability.

CSC 311

LINEAR PROGRAMMING

(3UNITS)

Historical perspective and major phases of Operations Research, Systems of linear inequalities, Review of Vector analysis, Hyperplane, Convex and Concave

80

functions, Standard and Canonical general linear programming problems: Primal Simplex, Dual Simplex, Two-Phase, and revised Simplex Algorithms, Sensitivity Analysis, Network theory and Dynamic Programming. Network theory; and Dynamic Programming. Pre-requisite: MAT 203 (Alternative to and will not be counted with MAT 311)

CSC 313

AUTOMATA THEORY AND FORMAL LANGUAGES (3UNITS)

Formal grammars and automata. Meaning of alphabet, string, concatenation, language, level of language. Regular languages, context-free languages,

Deterministic parsing of context free languages. Recursive languages. The finite state automata. Turing machine, syntactic pattern recognition and applications. Pre-requisite: CSC 212

CSC 314

COMPUTER ORGANISATION AND ARCHITECTURE II

(3UNITS) Memory system; general characteristics of memory operation, (technology of magnetic recording, semi-conductor memory, charged couple devices, magnetic bubble); Memory addressing, memory hierarchy, virtual memory control systems, hardwired control, microprogrammed control, asynchronous control, I/O control. Introduction to the methodology of fault tolerant computing. Pre-requisite: CSC 213

CSC 315

INTRODUCTION TO DATA COMMUNICATIONS (2UNITS)

Introduction, waves, Fourier analysis, measure of communication, channel characteristics, transmission media, noise and distortion, modulation and demodulation; multiplexing TDM, FDM and FCM, error detecting and correcting codes, parallel and serial transmission loop systems, data switching principles; broadcast techniques; network structures for packet switching. Pre-requisite: CSC 301

CSC 316

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND EXPERT SYSTEM

(3UNITS)

81

Introduction to artificial intelligence; search methods, search space, natural languages, knowledge representation; expert systems; definition and basic concepts, principles of expert systems. Architecture of expert systems. Knowledge engineering; acquisition, representations, uncertainty handling; fuzzy systems, inference engine; backward and forward chaining; control strategies. Expert system, shells/tools, languages. Evaluations and applications, PROLOG/LISP programming. Pattern recognition. Pre-requisite: CSC 213

CSC 318

INTRODUCITON TO FORMAL LANGUAGE

(3UNITS)

Meaning of alphabet, string, concatenation; language, levels of language. Grammars, parsing. The finite state automata turning machine. Syntactic pattern, recognition and application. Pre-requisite: CSC 211

CSC 319

DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

(3UNITS)

SETS AND Binary Relations, Combinatories, Introduction to Mathematical Logic, Trees and Graphs, Analysis of Algorithms, Complexity Theory.

CSC 400

SEMINAR

(1UNIT)

Seminar topics chosen from a variety of computer science fields including applications in various fields, computer installation, staffing and administration, computer maintenance, software engineering etc.

CSC 410

PROJECT

(6UNITS)

A project to be chosen and approved by the Department and under the direction and supervision of a lecturer.

CSC 411

PROGRAMMING WITH JAVA/JAVA SCRIPT/HTML (3UNITS)

Problem solving using JAVA/JAVA SCRIPT/HTML programming language; Treatment of the following topics under the language chosen; data type and declaration statements, constants, variables, expressions and assignments, transfer of data (input and output), control structures. String manipulations,

82

procedures and functions e.t.c Emphasis is on programming exercises with implementation.

CSC 412

COMPUTER NETWORKS

(3UNITS)

Basics of networking; network considerations, network components, network models (centralized computing, distributed computing, etc), network classification (geographical coverage, topologies, and mode of connection-like peer-to-peer etc.), network services (file services, message services, etc.) comparing LANs, MANs AND WANs. The OSI model. Network media; bounded media, unbounded media, data transmission. Network designs; ARKNET, Ethernet, Token, Ring, FDDI. Network protocol. Connecting networks; LAN connectivity devices (Repeaters, Bridges, etc), Internet working devices (Modems, Reuters, etc), Website design. Pre-requisite: CSC 301

CSC 413

STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING

(3UNITS)

Principle of good programming style, expression; structured programming concepts; control flow, invariant relation of a loop; stepwise refinement of both statement and data; program modulation (Bottom up approach, top-down approach, nested virtual machine approach); Languages for structured

programming, debugging, testing, verifying, code inspection; semantic analysis. Test construction. Program verification; test generation and running. Pre-requisite: CSC 310

CSC 414

MODELLING AND SIMULATION

(3UNITS)

The concepts and techniques used in modeling and simulation methodology and a suitable simulation language; modeling; generation of random variables, transformation of random design numbers, parameter estimation design, experiment, factorial Design optimization. Pre-requisite: CSC 306

CSC 415

COMPUTER SYSTEMS INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT

(3UNITS)

83

The role of the computer centre; general operating procedure; data preparation; magnetic tape library; operations procedure; job processing procedure; security procedure; performance statistics. Pre-requisites: CSC 310

CSC 416

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE

(3UNITS)

Project planning and control economics, evaluation of investment decisions. Management information systems. Work study, organization and methods (O&M). Principles of design and use of packages in the areas covered in operation research. Selected areas in management science techniques. Network theory and applications. Pre-requisites: CSC 310

CSC 417

SPEICAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

(3UNITS)

Performance evaluation of computer systems, concurrent programming, parallel computing, partner recognition, distributed databases, procedure databases, programming environments, high level language and data flow architecture, computer vision, planning, natural and spoken language, temporal logics,

supercomputing, VLSI design, Human computer interaction.

CSC 418

COMPUTER GRAPHICS

(2UNITS)

Hardwares aspects; plotters microfilm, plotters displays, graphics tablets, light pens, other graphical input aids. Facsimile and its problems. Refresh huggers, changing images, light pen interaction. Two and three-dimensional

transformations, perspective. Clipping algorithms, hidden live removal, bolden surface removal; Warnock's method, shading data reduction for graphical input, introduction to hard writing and character recognition. Curve synthesis and fitting. Contouring, Ring structures versus doubly linked list. Hierarchical structures; data structure; organization for interactive graphics. Introduction to fractals and chaos. Pre-requisite: CSC 301 or CSC 313.

CSC 419

COMPUTER SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

(3UNITS)

84

Measurement techniques; simulation techniques; analytical techniques; workload characterization; performance evaluation in selection problems; performance

evaluation in design problems; evaluation of programme performance. Pre-requisites: CSC 306

CSC 420

SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING

(3UNITS)

Advanced programming techniques in assembler macro language and higher level languages. Systems software such as loaders, linkers, assemblers, interpreter and compiler. Pre-requisite: CSC 308

CSC 421

COMPILER CONSTRUCTION II

(2UNITS)

Grammar languages; recognizers, Top-down and bottom-up, Run time storage organization. The use of display in run-time storage allocation; LR grammars and analyzers; construction of LR table. Organization of symbol tables. Allocation of storage to run-time variables. Code generation. Optimization Translator writing systems. Pre-requisites: 304

CSC 422

NON-VON NUEMAN COMPUTERS

(2UNITS)

Flynn's taxonomy, system examples of SISD, SIMD, MISD, MIMD. Architectures; Havard, pipeline, vector, systolic, parallel, computers. Parallel computing languages: OCCAM, ADA. Pre-requisites: CSC 309

CSC 424

ADVANCED DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

(3UNITS) Efficient Algorithms: Strassan, FFT Complexity times space NP Complete Problems. Pre-requisite: CSC 314

CSC 490

STUDENTS

INDUSTRIAL

WORKSHOP

EXPERIENCE

(SIWES)

(2UNITS)

85

Each student is attached to a computer installation. A report of the student's project is submitted for grading in the department. Supervision will be jointly done by an academic staff of the department and a supervisor at the computer installations.

86

DEPARTMENT

OF

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY AND FISHERIES

87

LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF AND AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 1. F. O. AKINWUMI B.Sc (Calabar),M. Sc (Ibadan), Ph.D (Akure) Senior Lecturer (Post harvest fisheries management)

2.

G. A. O. ARAWOMO B.Sc(Zoology), M.Phil, Ph. D (Stirling) I. A. AYODELE B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan)

Professor (Fisheries and Hydrobiology)

3.

Adjunct Professor (Wildlife utilization)

4.

C.O. ADEDIRE B.Sc.; M.Sc.; Ph.D (Akure) A. I. ADEYEMO B.Sc.; M.Sc.; Ph.D (Ibadan) J. A. BADAKI B.Sc. (Yola), M.Sc.; Ph.D. (Jos) O. M. AKANBI B. Sc (Calabar), M. Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan) O. OGINNI M. Tech. (Akure), Ph. D (Akure), 2004

Adjunct Professor (Entomology) Reader (Wild Life Nutrition) Senior Lecturer (Parasitology) Lecturer I (Parasitology/Immunology) Lecturer I (Fisheries Management and Aquaculture Lecturer I (Animal physiology and Reproduction) Lecturer I (Fisheries Biology and Aquaculture) Lecturer II Fisheries Management

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

F. A. GBORE B. Agric, (Makurdi); M.Sc.; Ph.D (Ibadan)

10.

D. O. ODEDEYI B. Sc (Ilorin), M. Tech (Akure)

11.

A. M. ADEWOLE B.Sc., M. Sc., M. Phil. (Ibadan)

88

TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE (NON-TEACHING) STAFF 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. MR. A. ADEJUYIGBE HND MR. A. ENIADE HND, PGD MRS. ORIMOGUNJE B. C Dip. in Computer MR A. K. ABOLOYE WASC, MR. Z. A. JAYEOLA WASC, MRS. ADEAGBO C. O. Grade II, RSA, Comp. Cert MRS. A. BAKARE Pry Six Certificate MRS. L. AJISAFE Pry Six Cert. Technologist I Technologist II Data entry Clerk III Laboratory Assistant Laboratory Attendant Typist III Laboratory Attendant Office Attendant

CURRICULUM FOR B. SC. (HONS) DEGREE IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY AND FISHERIES 1. INTRODUCTION

The programme of the Department of Environmental Biology and Fisheries reflects the wide applicability of the "traditional zoology" discipline especially in the socio-economic, scientific and technological development of the country. The programme, which is in response to community,

national and international expectation and need, is a shift from the basic zoology teaching and research activities to the growth and diversification of the faunistic components of the environment in the following areas: Animal Physiology, Entomology, Environmental Biology, Fisheries and

Hydrobiology, Genetics and Parasitology. 2. PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVE

The overall objective is to provide a sound, broad-based knowledge in both basic and applied aspects of the faunal science, as they are relevant to the

89

understanding of the relationships of man, animals, plants and other components of the ecosystems and the application of such training to the development of the human intellect and management of our natural resources. The major objective therefore is to train scientists for a wide range of employment opportunities and services in the private and public sectors, and as well develop their skills for self-employment. 3. PROGRAMME OFFERED

B.Sc. (Hons) Environmental Biology and Fisheries Duration: The duration for the award of B.Sc. (Hons) degree in

Environmental Biology and Fisheries shall be four (4) years (Eight Semesters) for U.M.E. /Successful Pre-degree students and three (3) years (Six semesters) for Direct Entry Students.

4. (i)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 5 credits in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics and English

Language at the ordinary level of GCE/SSCE/NECO obtained at not more than two sittings. (ii) Successful completion of the pre-degree programme of this

University. In addition to (i) above Direct Entry candidates must posses satisfactory grades in Biology and one other science subject at GCE level. Candidates with National Diploma Certificates (Upper Credit) in Fisheries, Marine Biology, Microbiology or related areas are also qualified for direct entry admission. 5. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AWARD OF THE DEGREE `A'

To be eligible for the award of B.Sc. Honours degree in Environmental Biology and Fisheries, a candidate must offer and pass a total of 144 credit units, made up of: GST COURSES COMPULSORY COURSES = 11units = 123 units

90

ELECTIVE COURSES

= 10 units

Direct entry candidates are required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 108 units. A student must register for a minimum of 15 credit units and a maximum of 24 credit units each semester. 7. (a) REGISTRATION FOR COURSES Candidates must register for the appropriate compulsory, required

and elective courses as indicated in the University Regulations. (b) Certain courses, which are designed as prerequisites to some others, taken and passed before registering for courses to which they are

must be

prerequisites. (c) The minimum and maximum work loads per semester are 15 and 24

units respectively. Permission for waiver for graduating students must be sought from the Head of Department subject to Senate approval. (d) A student is at liberty to withdraw from a course within the time

frame stipulated by Senate and on completion of the add/delete form. Any student who withdraws from a course without permission will be deemed to have failed the course. 8. COURSE OFFERINGS FIRST SEMESTER: 100 LEVEL COURSE CODE BIO 101 BIO 103 CHM 101 MAT 101 PHY 101 PHY 103 GST 111 GST 113 COURSE TITLE General Biology I Experimental Biology I General Chemistry I Algebra and Trigonometry General Physics I (Mechanics) General Physics Laboratory I Communication in English Use of the Library and Study skills Total UNITS 3 1 3 3 3 1 2 2 18

91

SECOND SEMESTER: 100 LEVEL COURSE CODE BIO 102 BIO 104 CHM 102 PHY 102 PHY 104 MAT 104 GST 112 GST 114 COURSE TITLE General Biology II Experimental Biology II Introductory Chemistry II General Physics II General Physics Laboratory II Basic Mathematics Philosophy and Logic Nigerian Peoples and Culture Total FIRST SEMESTER: COURSE CODE BIO 201 BIO 205 EBF 201 MCB 201 CHM 211 PSB 203 GST 211 BCH 201 200 LEVEL COURSE TITLE Introductory Genetics Introductory Development/ Cell Biology Lower Invertebrates General Microbiology I Organic Chemistry I Seedless Plants History and Philosophy of Science General Biochemistry I Total SECOND SEMESTER: COURSE CODE BIO 202 BIO 204 MCB 202 BIO 206 200 LEVEL COURSE TITLE Introductory Ecology Biological Techniques General Microbiology II Statistics for Agricultural and Biological Students EBF 202 EBF 204 GST 202 BCH 202 GST 212 Coelomate Invertebrates Chordates Computer Applications General Biochemistry II Communication in English II

92

UNITS 3 1 3 3 1 3 2 2

18

UNITS 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 23

UNITS 3 2 3

3 3 3 2 3 2

GST 214

Introduction to Peace and Conflict Resolution Total 2 23

FIRST SEMESTER: COURSE CODE BIO 301 EBF 301 EBF 303 EBF 305 EBF 307 EBF 309 EBF 311 EBF 313

300 LEVEL COURSE TITLE General Genetics Ichthyolgy and Hydrobiology Animal Physiology Basic Entomology Animal Ecology and Behaviour Introductory Parasitology Principles of Animal Systematics Ecological Entomology and Ecotoxicology 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 UNITS

GST 311

Information and Communication Technology Total 2 23

SECOND SEMESTER: COURSE CODE EBF 300 EBF 302 EBF 304

300 LEVEL COURSE TITLE Histology and Histochemistry Limnology Environmental and Conservation Science 3 3 UNITS 3 3

EBF 306 EBF 308 EBF 310 EBF 312 MCB 308

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Environmental Impact Assessment 2 Industrial Experience Introductory Immunology Agricultural Microbiology Total 3 2 3 22

FIRST SEMESTER: COURSE CODE

400 LEVEL COURSE TITLE

93

UNITS

EBF 401 EBF 403 EBF 405 EBF 407 EBF 409 EBF 411 EBF 413 EBF 415 GST 411

Advanced Developmental Biology Applied Entomology Land and Park Life Management Aquaculture Epidemiology and Public Health Field Course Environmental Biotechnology Applied Immunology Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skills Total

2 3 2 3 2 1 2 2 2 19

SECOND SEMESTER: 400 LEVEL COURSE CODE EBF 400 EBF 402 COURSE TITLE Research Project Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering EBF 404 EBF 406 Applied Parasitology Fishing Methods and Fisheries Management EBF 408 EBF 410 Fish Diseases and Parasites Seminar Total 3 3 1 16 2 3 UNITS 4

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9.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 2 UNITS

BIO101 (C): GENERAL BIOLOGY I

Cell structure and Organization. Function of cellular organelles. Cell division. Diversity, characteristics and classification of living things. General reproduction. Interrelationship of organisms. Heredity and

evolution. Elements of ecology and types of habitat. Introduction to plant and animal identification and the use of keys. BIO102 (C): GENERAL BIOLOGY II 2 UNITS

A generalized survey of the plant and animal kingdoms based mainly on the study of the similarities and differences in the external features and, ecological adaptation of these forms. BIO103 (C): EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY I 1 UNIT

Introduction to Microscopy, care of the microscope. Laboratory procedures. Examination of living cells of human cheek, epithelium, epidermal, blood and plant cells, etc. Reproductive structures in plants and animals. BIO104 (C): EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY II 1 UNIT

Practical classes on Evolutionary trends in organism. Viruses, Bacteria, Fungi, Bryophyta, Mollusca, Pteridophyta, Vertebrate Gymnospermae, Anatomy: Angiospermae, Respiratory,

Arthropoda,

Digestive,

Circulatory and Reproductive systems. BIO201 (C): INTRODUCTORY GENETICS 3 UNITS

Historical perspectives, Life cycles and Reproduction . Mendel's laws. Probability and tests of goodness of Fits. Introduction to Microbial genetics. Quantitative inheritance. Variation in genome structure. Variation in natural populations. Introduction to population genetics. Darwin and natural selection. Pre-requisite: BIO 101.

95

EBF 201 (C):

LOWER INVERTEBRATES

3 UNITS

Comparative study of the protozoa- Anatomy and biology of sarcodina. Sporozoa, Flagellata, Cilliata, Porifera, Cnidaria, Acoelomate,

Pseudocoelomate animals. BIO 202 (C): INTRODUCTORY ECOLOGY 3 UNITS

Aims and scope of ecology. Autecology and Synecology. Population Community. Ecosystem. The concept of measurement and effects on organisms and populations. Sampling and collection methods in the study of communities and ecosystem. Estimation of abundance density, field cover and frequency of organisms. Statistical methods in ecology. Parametric and non-parametric tests. Vegetation zones of West Africa, their climatic and edaphic features, floral and fauna composition, Co-existence and resource shift. EBF 202 (C): Organization COELOMATE INVERTEBRATE and biology of 3 UNITS ­ Nematenea,

Coelomate invertebrates

Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda and Echinodermata. BIO 204 (C): Basic research BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES in Biology 2 UNITS including manometry,

techniques

spectrophotometry, Chromatography, advanced microscopy. Staining and preparation of permanent slides including the use of microtomes. Identification and preservation of insects. Animal Care­ housing, feeding, etc. Handling Laboratory animals. Animal preparation for dissection. Ethics in animal experiments. Basic microbiological sterile techniques.

Presentation and interpretation of biological data. EBF 204 (C): CHORDATES 3 UNITS

Classification, Biology, Habitat/habits, Features, External features, skin, skeleton, Locomotion, Nutrition, Respiration, Excretion, Blood system, Sense organs (C.N.S) Reproduction and Phylogenetic relation of the following representative Chordates ­ Balanoglossus, Ciona, Branchiostoma, Petromyzon, Scoliodon, Tilapia, Bufo, Agama, Columba and Rattus to illustrate the evolution, organization and diversity of the chordates.

96

BIO 205 (C): INTRODUCTORY DEVELOPMENTAL/CELL BIOLOGY UNITS

3

History and present trends in cell biology. Reproduction, cell division, cell differentiation and growth of cells. A brief study of the molecular basis for cell structure and development. Organelles. Protein and nucleic acids. BIO 206 (C): STATISTIC FOR AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL STUDENTS 3 UNITS Use of statistical methods in biology and agriculture. Frequency

distributions. Laws of probability. Binomial, Poisson and normal probability distributions. Estimation and tests of hypotheses. Design of simple agricultural and biological experiments. Analysis of variance and

covariance, simple regression and correlation. Contingency tables. Some non-parametric tests. BIO 300 (C): HISTOLOGY AND HISTOCHEMISTRY 3 UNITS

Introduction to histology. Types of tissues ­ Epithelia, Glands, Blood and lymph. Blood cell formation. Connective, Cartilage, Bone and its formation development. Muscular and Nervous tissues, Spleen. Hypothalamus. Histology of the GIT. Stains and staining techniques. Composition of stains, preservatives. Interaction of preservatives with tissues. Interaction of stains with cellular components. BIO 301 (C): GENERAL GENETICS 3 UNITS

Human genetics­ pedigree analysis, human karyotype, blood grouping in humans, Chromosome mapping. Genetic Engineering. Chromosomes and genes. Sex chromosome. Sex­linkage. Extrachromosomal and epigenetic systems. Physical and chemical nature of the genetic material. Protein synthesis. Mutation. EBF 301 (C): ICHTHYOLOGY AND HYDROBIOLOGY 3 UNITS

The gross external and internal anatomy of a typical bony and cartilaginous fish. Embryology and life history of a fish with special reference to commercially important species e.g. Tilapia and Clarias. Taxonomy and detailed study of principal commercial species of Nigerian freshwater fish, estuary and ocean. Identification of

97

fish species

using

keys

and

monographs. Ecology of fish with special reference to distribution, natural history and application of this knowledge for fisheries management. Food and feeding habits. Food chain. Reproductive behaviour. Age and growth studies. Biological attributes of fish populations. Processing and

preservation of fish. EBF 302 (C): LIMNOLOGY 3 UNITS

Classification of water bodies, their origin and diversity with special reference to lakes, running waters, ponds and swamps. Physical and chemical properties of inland waters. Properties of natural and man­made lakes. Thermal properties and stratification. Light and optical properties of water. Plankton composition, distribution and their role in inland waters. Benthos and benthic organisms. EBF 303 (C): ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 3 UNITS

Regulation of salt and water in animal inhabiting freshwater, brackish, marine, estuarine and terrestrial environments. Excretion­ ammonotelic, ureotelic and uricotelic animals. Respiratory and circulatory systems. Feeding and digestion. Nutrition and intermediary metabolism. Endocrine mechanisms. Muscle and nerve physiology. Bioluminescence,

chromophores and colour change in animals. EBF 304 (C): UNITS Natural resources policies, planning effective use of them, Nigerian laws as applicable to natural resources management and administration. ENVIRONMENTAL AND CONSERVATION SCIENCE 3

Conservation of critical ecosystem such as water sheds, hilly areas, grazing lands, open pit mining areas, areas of broken topography and marginal environment. Preservation of endangered species. EBF 305 (C): BASIC ENTOMOLOGY 3 UNITS

Insect morphology, Life cycles, growth and development of insects. Nutrition, physiology of digestion and absorption, metabolism of fat, carbohydrate, proteins. Excretion, salt and water balance. Respiration­ terrestrial, aquatic and endoparasitic insects. Chemistry of insects' cuticle, Haemolymph. Nervous and sensory systems. Neural control of skeletal

98

muscles, Endocrine control of reproduction, development and diapause. Mechanisms of insect behaviour. Insect pheromones. Orientation and coordinated behaviour. General insect control including elements of chemical and biological control. Economic importance of insects. EBF 306 (C): COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 3 UNITS

Vertebrate plan, phylogeny, adaptation of evolution. General and integrated principles of vertebrate structure and morphology. Skeletal adaptation to life in water, land and air. Transition from water to land. Evolution of pentadactyl limb. Comparative anatomy and physiology of respiratory structure, gaseous exchange, circulatory system. Urinogenital system. Osmoregulation (in water and land), salt and water balance.

Thermoregulation. Endocrine control of physiological system. EBF 307 (C): ANIMAL ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR 2 UNITS

Animal population and communities and the regulation of numbers. The ecology of local terrestrial and aquatic animals. Reflexes and complex

behaviours. The development of behaviour. External structure and sense organs. Motivation. Conflicts. Hormones and behaviour instincts and learning. Behaviour and evolution. Behaviour and genetic social life among animals. EBF 308 (C): ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT 2 UNITS

Basic concepts and history of environmental impact assessment (EIA) relationship between environmental impact assessment (EIA) and

environmental impact statement (EIS) Essentials in an EIA. Potential problems of EIA and their solutions. Cost­benefit analysis as a tool for environmental decision-making. EBF 309 (C): INTRODUCTORY PARASITOLOGY 3 UNITS

Animal associations: symbiosis, commensalisms, parasitism, predator/prey associations. The host as an environment. Host/parasites interaction. Types of parasites. General characteristics of parasites. Classification, morphology and biology of protozoan, helminth, nematode and arthropod parasites. Socioeconomic effects of parasites. Effects of human factors and vectors on the prevalence of parasitic infection.

99

EBF 310 (C): Supervised

INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE industrial attachment with written

3 UNITS reports in

agricultural/fisheries/medical/public health/industrial establishment for a period of 6 months. EBF 311 (C): Zoological PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL SYSTEMATICS Rules and interpretation. 2 UNITS Principles of

nomenclature.

classification. Biological classifications and history. Hierarchy of categories and their taxa. Methods of animal classification. Taxonomic characters, procedure of classification and taxonomic publication. Introduction of major taxa of Nigeria with special reference to local examples. EBF 312 (E): INTRODUCTORY IMMUNOLOGY 2 UNITS

The nature of immunity­ immune response, antigens and antibodies and their interactions, cell­mediated immunity. The immune systems B- and TLymphocytes, T- cell/B-cell interactions. Immunoglobulins. Effectors of immunity. EBF 313 (E): ECOLOGICAL ENTOMOLOGY AND ECOTOXICOLOGY 2 UNITS Definitions. Basic biological and ecological adaptation, properties,

behaviour and processes. Natural control of insect populations. Roles or effects of insect in ecosystems. Application of ecology of insect population management. Classification of insecticides. Mode of action. Metabolism of insecticides by animals. Resistance and evaluation of toxicity. Effects on population and communities. EBF 400 (C): RESEARCH PROJECT 4 UNITS

Each student is required to choose and execute a special project in his/her area of option under a supervisor. EBF 401 (C): The concept ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY of growth in animalsprocesses, 2 UNITS and

measyrement

interpretation of growth patterns, factors affecting it; the concept of development in animals- cleavage, gastrulation, organogeny. Anatomy, functions and regulation of male and female reproductive structures and

100

processes. Fertilization and development of the zygotes. Reproduction and management for improved reproduction. Biology of the neonates. Twining. EBF 402 (C): MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETIC ENGINEERING 2 UNITS Chemical and physical concepts of the cell­ structure, function and synthesis of cell organelles including genetic code. Macromolecular basis of life: protein synthesis, organelles synthesis and structure of building units. Properties of cell surface complex. Biochemical basis of development and differentiation. Cell and tissue culture. Genetic in gene expression. Methods of creating recombinant DNA. Isolation of clone genes. In­vitro muta­ genesis. Experimental induction of DNA into cell. Recombinant DNA and genetic disease. Synthesis of human insulin. EBF 403(C): APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY 3 UNITS

Insects, arachnids and other arthropods of medical importance (orders, families, species of major and minor importance). Biology, behaviour, mode of action, etc of these arthropods that act as direct agents of diseases or discomfort (e.g. dermatosis, myiasis, sclerociasis, allergies) and vectors or intermediate hosts of diseases pathogens (e.g. malaria, onchocerciasis, filariasis, allergies), enemies of control. Biology, behaviour, etc of Acarines, insects and other arthropods of veterinary importance either as direct agents of disease or discomfort (e.g. tick parasites, etc) or as vectors or intermediate hosts of disease pathogens (e.g. protozoans, viral,

spirochaetal, bacterial, etc ) in animal health. EBF 404 (C): APPLIED PARASITOLOGY 3 UNITS

Principles of applied parasitology, the impact of social and economic consideration on parasitism, infection, parasitic diseases and their transmission patterns. The study of diseases of protozoan such as trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, babesiosis, coccidiosis and

amoebiasis. The study of helminth parasites of medical importance. The study should include: diagnosis, pathology, epidemiology, clinical

manifestation, treatment and control.

101

EBF 405 (C):

LAND AND PARKLIFE

MANAGEMENT

2 UNITS

Wildlife in relation to their environments. Factors affecting the distribution and abundance of wildlife. Interrelationship between climate, soils, vegetation, history and wildlife populations. Movement, behaviour, life cycles, reproduction, food and food habits of wildlife. Nature and efficiency usage of rangelands in West Africa. Methods of range assessment and management. EBF 406 (C): UNITS Traditional and modern fishing gears. Types of fishing gear and fishing crafts, properties of the material used in the construction of fishing gear. Construction of fish gears, passive and active gears, hooks, traps, nets, etc.. Efficiency of gears. Fisheries policies and laws of Nigeria. International laws of the sea. Conservation strategies. Fisheries institution. EBF 407 (C): AQUACULTURE 3 UNITS FISHING METHODS AND FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 3

Aims, history, organization and state of aquaculture in Nigeria. Types of aquaculture project and management. Site selection, construction, pond design, species selection, liming, fertilization, stocking, feeding, harvesting­ materials, methods and efficiency processing and preservation. Economic consideration of aquaculture. Maintenance of public health. Breeding of finfish. Production of fries and fingerlings. Management of breeders, growers. Building and equipment needed in fish farms. Procurement of feed, and systems of feeding. Harvesting and marketing. Culture of shrimps, oysters, crabs, crayfish, periwinkles, lobsters, etc. Control of aquatic weeds in ponds­ chemical, mechanical and biological. EBF 408 (E): FISH DISEASES AND PARASITES 3 UNITS

Identification, morphology, taxanomy, life history of fish parasites. The ecological and pathological effects of parasites and disease of fish. Epidemiology of parasite populations in water body. Common bacterial, protozoan, fungal and viral diseases and their control. Other enemies of fish. International restriction of the transportation of fish across country boundaries. Fish pond and public health.

102

EBF 409(E): EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH

3 UNITS

Scope of application of epidemiology. Epidemiology methods­ counting diseases, populations and samples. Epidemiological variables­ field work techniques analysis and presentation of findings, investigation of epidemics and application of epidemiological techniques. The concepts of community diagnosis (CD) ­ Demography, vital statistics, socio-economic status, nutritional status, family health, use of health services, tests and community diagnosis, use of CD in health care planning and training programmes, drugs abuse, accidents. EBF 410 (C): SEMINAR 1UNIT

Each student is expected to write and make an oral presentation on a topic in his/her area of option and participate in all department seminars. EBF 411 (C): FIELD COURSE 1 UNIT

Visits with report by each student to various aquatic and terrestrial habitats and places- entomological, parasitological, fisheries, aquacultural, environmental and animal health interest. For example, NIOMR (Lagos), NVRI (Vom), IITA (Ibadan), Freshwater Institute (Kainji), Fisheries terminal (Igbokoda), Yankari National Park, Sandy and Rocky beaches, public commercial fish farms and companies, etc. EBF 413 (E): ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY 2 UNITS

The basic and principles involved in the operation of microbial processes on an industrial scale, which include the selection, maintenance and improvement of microorganisms. Influence of physical and chemical factors on the microbial environment; control of environmental factors; effects of operational patterns on batch and continuous flow cultivation; aeration and agitation; microbial waste treatment and environment control. EBF4 15(E): APPLIED IMMUNOLOGY 2 UNITS

Effectors of immunity. Control of immunity. Immunological tolerance. Immunity and infection disease. Immuno­diagnosis of parasitic infection. Principles of immunopathology­ anaphylaxix, cytotoxicity. Immune complex

103

disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions. Allergies. Immunodeficiency disease. Auto-immune disorders.

104

DEPARTMENT

OF

GEOLOGY

105

ACADEMIC STAFF LIST 1. O. OYINLOYE B.Sc, M.Sc (Ibadan) Ph.D (Cardiff, U.K) M.O. OLORUNFEMI B.Sc. (Ife), M.Sc. (Birmingham), PhD (Birmingham) MNMGS

Professor & Head (Economic Geology) Adjunct Professor (Applied Geophysics)

2.

3.

M.I. OGUNBAJO B.Sc, MSc. Ph.D (Germany) MNG

Adjunct Professor (Geochemistry)

4.

*I. R. AJAYI B.Sc. M.Sc., Ph D (Ibadan) S. O. OPELOYE B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph D (Bauchi) MNMGS, COMEG M. T. OLOWOKERE B. Tech., M. Tech., Ph.D (Akure). MNMGS O.O. OCAN B.Sc. Ph.D(Ife)MNMGS

Professor (Radiation Physics) Adjunct Reader (Sedimentology/ Petroleum Geology) Adjunct Reader (Applied/Expl. Geophysics)

5.

6.

7.

Adjunct Senior Lecturer (Petrology, Precambrian Rocks) Adjunct Senior Lecturer {Applied Geophysics)

8.

A. A. ADEPELUMI B. Tech., M.Sc., Ph.D. (Brazil) MNMGS A.Y. K. ANIFOWOSE B.Sc., M.Sc., PGD-RS (Sweden) Ph D (Akure), MNMGS

9.

Adjunct Senior Lecturer (Eng. Geology/ Hydrogeology/ Remote Sensing) Lecturer I (Applied/Expl. Geophysics)

10.

M. Z. MOHAMMED B. Tech., M. Tech., Ph.D (Ife) MNMGS

11.

*O. M. AFOLABI

106

Lecturer I

B. Sc., M. Sc., (Ife),M. Sc.(Ife), Ph.D. (Ife) 12. P. S. OLA B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph D (Akure), MNMGS

(Applied Geophysics)

Adjunct Lecturer I (Sedimentology/ Petroleum Geology/ Micropaleontology) Lecturer (Geochemistry)

13.

O. ADEGBUYI B.Sc., M.Sc., Dip., Dip. In Computer, MNMGS, MAGID, MSSN, MASCMIL, MIAGC. S. O. OLABODE B. Tech. M. Tech. (Akure), MNMGS A. V. OYESHOMO B.Sc.(Ife), M.Sc.(Ibadan), MNMGS,MNAPE. O. A. ADEMESO B.Sc., M.Sc. (Ibadan), MNMGS, COMEG T. H. T. OGUNRIBIDO B. Tech, M. Tech, (Akure), MNMGS M. B. AMINU B.Sc., M.Sc. (Ife), MNMGS B. O. TAIWO B.Sc. (Akungba) B. A. OMONIYI B.Sc. (Akungba)

14.

Adjunct Lecturer I (Sedimentary/ Petroleum Geology) Lecturer II (Mineral Exploration Geochemistry) Lecturer II (Mineral Exploration)

15.

16.

17.

Asst Lecturer (Hydrogeology/ Engineering Geology) Asst Lecturer (Applied Geophysics)

18.

19.

Graduate Fellow

20.

Graduate Fellow

TECHNICAL AND LABORATORY STAFF

107

21.

MR. L. A. AKINOLA MNLA, MNIST MRS. A.M. ODUBANJO

HND Geology,(FUTA), PGD Geology, (FUTA)

Principal cartography

22.

Technologist II

23.

MR TOYIN OJO

HND Mining Eng.(Ado-Ekiti).

Technologist II

24.

MRS. M.O. ADULOJU

OND, HND (Akure)

Technologist II

25.

Mr. M. J. MOHAMMED Diploma (Akungba) MISS L.N. OLANIPEKUN SSCE MR. K.J. OLOTIN SSCE, WAEC MRS O.M. OYEBO

Technical Officer

26.

Lab Assistant

27.

Lab Attendant

28.

lab Attendant

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. MRS F. M. OWABORIAYE MRS. J. K. FANIRAN MRS. O. OYEBO MR. O ADEIFA MR. ADELUSI YINUSA Senior Typist II Data Entry Clerk Office Attendant Driver II Driver II

108

1.0

NAME OF DEPARTMENT AND PROGRAMME(S)

Department of Geology, BSc. Degree Programme in Geology & BSc. Degree Programme in Applied Geophysics 2.0 INTRODUCTION

The Department of Geology was established in 1982 at the Ondo State University Ado-Ekiti. The department was relocated to Akungba-Akoko in December 1999, following the creation of Ekiti State from the old Ondo State. The Department had to continue with very few students and staff in the new location. Within a spate of five years of relocation, the Department stayed with remarkable achievements in areas of staffing, office accommodation and items of both office and Laboratory and teaching equipment. It was on this note that the Department through the University Senate floated two degree programmes with options in Geology and Applied Geophysics. The Department of Geology is committed to providing the best education in geosciences and indeed is poised to meet world standards. The Geology and Applied Geophysics Options have been visited by the National Universities Commission (NUC) as meeting their minimum standards for geoscience education in Nigeria. Also, the two programmes have been visited and certified by the Council for the Regulation of Mining and Geosciences in Nigeria (COMEG) which is the professional regulatory body for geoscience education in Nigeria. 2.1 Philosophy and Objectives

The undergraduate programmes in Geology and Applied Geophysics are designed to equip the students with the basic requirements for serving in a professional capacity in most of the fields in which well qualified Geologist and Geophysicists are needed in Nigeria and other countries of the world. It is planned that this will be achieved through the provision of effective, practical oriented and academically sound programmes (in teaching and supervised independent field work) in specialized areas such as geological mapping, hydrogeology, engineering geology, petroleum geology, geochemistry, economic geology, sedimentology, micropaleontology, Palynology, mineral exploration, groundwater investigation and development, foundation-engineering (dam-site, road, and building),

109

geothermal resources exploration, earth movements and earthquake engineering, nuclear waste-storage site evaluation and environmental pollution. In addition to requiring students to take the compulsory foundation and departmental courses, the programme broadens students' knowledge by making them to select appropriate elective courses from other departments within and outside the Faculty of Science. The department is also intended to provide a mission-oriented consultancy service whose immediate focus will be in Ondo state (as in case of oil, bitumen and tar sand), its environs and Nigeria in general. 2.2. Programmes Offered (i) (ii) B.Sc. (Hons.) Geology B.Sc. (Hons.) Applied Geophysics

Duration: The normal duration for the award of a B.Sc. (Hons.) Geology and Applied Geophysics degree shall be four (4) Years (Eight Semesters) for U.M.E/ Successful Pre-degree students and 3 years (6 semesters) for Direct Entry Students. 2.3 Admission Requirements

(a) Option A: BSc. (Hons.) Geology (i) Students intending to major in Geology must satisfy the University admission requirements i.e credit passes in English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology at not more than two sittings of SSCE/NECO/GCE `O' Level. They are required to sit for English Language, Chemistry, Biology, and Physics or Mathematics as UME subjects. Any candidate who has satisfied the Adekunle-Ajasin University Pre-Degree Science programme is also eligible for admission. Direct Entry students, in addition to satisfying the University requirement must have principal passes at HSC/GCE `A' level in at least two of the following subjects: Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology and Physics. Students with the ND certificates in relevant Geosciences courses, who have passed at the Upper Credit level, also qualify for admission.

(ii)

(b) Option B: BSc. (Hons.) Applied Geophysics (i) Students intending to major in Applied Geophysics must satisfy the University admission requirements i.e credit passes in English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology at not more

110

than two sittings in SSCE/NECO/GCE `O' L. In addition, they are required to sit for English Language, Physics, and Chemistry Mathematics or Biology, as UME subjects. Any candidate who has satisfied the Adekunle-Ajasin University Pre-Degree Science programme is also eligible for admission into the 100 Level. (ii) Admission to 200 Level is possible for candidates who, in addition to satisfying the University and Faculty of Science requirements, have principal passes at Advanced Level of GCE (or equivalent) in Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. Students with ND (Upper Credit) or HND (Upper Credit) certificates in Civil, Geological, or Electrical and Electronic Engineering and other science or engineering courses adjudged relevant by the department also qualify for admission.

2.4 Requirements for Award of Degrees (a) Option A: B. Sc. (Hons.) Geology)

In order to be eligible for the award of a degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology, the candidate must have satisfactorily completed the following: (i) The normal University requirements, i.e. 16 units of GST and 8 units of ENT courses. (ii) The Faculty of Science requirements i.e. normal 46 units of foundation courses. (iii) The Departmental requirements of 88 units. (iv) Electives (10 units). A minimum total of 168 units are required of four (4) years U.M.E./Predegree Students and 136 units of Direct Entry Students for the award of B.Sc. (Hons.) degree in Geology, from course work consisting of: Compulsory Courses 134 units Elective Courses 15 units GST Courses 16 units ENT Courses 8 units 173 units (b) Option A: B. Sc (Hons.) Applied Geophysics

In order to be eligible for the award of a degree of Bachelor of Science in Applied Geophysics, the candidate must have satisfactorily completed the following: (i) The normal University requirements, i.e. 16 units of GST and 8 units of ENT courses. (ii) The Faculty of Science requirements i.e. 46 units of foundation courses. (iii) The Departmental requirements of 88 units.

111

(iv)

Electives (10 units). A minimum total of 166 units are required of four (4) years U.M.E./Predegree Students and 134 units of Direct Entry Students for the award of B.Sc. (Hons.) degree in Applied Geophysics, from course work consisting of: Compulsory Courses 133 units Elective Courses 25 units GST Courses 16 units ENT Courses 8 units 182 units Registration for Courses

2.5

Courses required for registration in the Department fall under these headings: Compulsory course: A required course which a student must take and pass before graduation. Elective course: A Departmental prescribed or self chosen course which a student must take before graduation. Pre-requisite: A course which must be taken and passed before a particular course is registered. (a) (b) Candidates must register for the appropriate compulsory, required and elective courses as indicated in the University regulations. Certain courses which are designed as prerequisites to some other courses must be taken before registering for courses to which they are prerequisites; a student must score at least a minimum of 35% before he/she can be permitted to register for the course to which it is a prerequisite. The minimum workload is 15 units per semester and the maximum is 24 units per semester or 28 units with the introduction of Entrepreneurship courses. Permission for waiver for graduating students must be sought from the Head of Department, subject to Senate approval. A student can withdraw from a course within the time stipulated by Senate (within the first four weeks of the semester) without penalty only with the approval of the Head of Department, on completion of add/delete form. Any student who withdraws without permission will be deemed to have failed the course. Any student who takes an examination in a course he/she has not registered for will have the result of such examination declared cancelled.

(c)

(d)

(e)

112

2.6 (i)

Examinations and Grading System Every course shall normally be examined at the end of the semester in which it is offered. There is a provision for continuous assessment constituting 30%, which shall be by way of tests, practical, written assignments and other assessment methods during the semester. The totality of every grade shall be based on a maximum of 100 marks (including continuous assessment).

(ii)

(iii)

(iv) The score for each course is assigned appropriate grade as follows: MARKS 70-100 60-69 50-59 45-49 40-44 00-39 LETTER GRADE A B C D E F GRADE POINT 5 4 3 2 1 0

2.7

Graduation Requirements

(i) To be eligible for the award of B.Sc. (Hons.) Geology and Applied Geophysics, a student must have successfully completed all prescribed courses listed in item 6a and 6b respectively. (ii) The final award and class of degree shall be based on the cumulative grade point average (CGPA) as follows:

CGPA 4.50-5.00

CLASS OF DEGREE FIRST CLASS (HONS)

113

3.50-4.49 2.40-3.49 1.50-2.39 1.00-1.49

SECOND CLASS (HONS) UPPER DIVISION SECOND CLASS (HONS) LOWER DIVISION THIRD CLASS (HONS) PASS

114

3.0 COURSES OFFERED

3.1 Course Outlines- Option A: BSc. (Hons.) Geology

1st Course Code Course Title

100LEVEL SEMESTER Contact Hours L T P 2 2 0 0 0 0

Units 0 0 2 2 2

(a) General Studies/ Required Courses GST 111 Communication in English GST 113 Use of Library and Study skills ENT 111 Introd. To Enterpreneurship I (b) Compulsory/Core Courses GEY 101 (C) Introductory Geology I BIO 101 (C) General Biology I BIO 103 (C) Experimental Biology I CHM 101 (C) General Chemistry I PHY 101 (C) General Physics I PHY 103 (C) Practical Physics I MAT 101 (C) General Mathematics I TOTAL

2

0

2 3 0 2 3 0 3

0 0 0 1 1 3 0

0 0 3 3 0 1 0

2 3 1 3 3 3 22

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title L (a) General Studies/ Required Courses GST 112 (C) Philosophy and Logic GST 114 (C) Nigerian People and Cultures (b) Compulsory/ GEY 102 (C) BIO 102 (C) BIO 104 (C) Core Courses Introductory Geology II General Biology II Experimental Biology II

115

Contact Hours T P Units 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2

3

2 0 0

0 0 0

0 3 3

2 1

CHM PHY PHY MAT

102 102 104 102

(C) (C) (C) (C)

General Chemistry II General Physics II Physics Practical II General Mathematics II TOTAL

3

2 1 0 3

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 0

3 1 3 20

1st Course Code Course Title

200 LEVEL SEMESTER Contact Hours L T P 2 0 2 0 0 2 0

Units

(a) General Studies/ Required Courses GST 211 (C) History and Philosophy of Science ENT 211 (C) Introd. To Enterpreneurship II

2

(b) Compulsory Courses GEY 201 (C) Intro. Map Interpretation & Field Geology 1 GEY 203 (C) Crystallography and Mineralogy 2 0 GPS 203 (C) Elementary Surveying 2 0 CSC 101 (C) Computer Programming I 2 0 CHM 211 (C) Organic Chemistry I 2 0 CHM 213 (C) Analytical Chemistry 2 0 TOTAL (c) Elective Courses GEY 205 (E) Mineral Resources PHY 203 (C) Thermodynamics

0 3 3 0 3 3

3 3 3 2 3 3 20

2

1

0 2

0 1

2 0

3

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Units Course Title L (a) General Studies/Required Courses GST 212 Communications in English GST 214 Peace and Conflict Resolution (b) Compulsory Courses GEY 202 (C) Optical Mineralogy

116

Contact Hours T 2 0 P 0 0 0 2 2

2

1

0

3

2

GEY GEY CHM CHM CSC MAT

204 (C) 206 (C) 210 (C) 212 (C) 102 (C) 106 (C)

Invertebrate Paleontology Introductory Petrology Basic Physical Chemistry I Basic Inorganic Chemistry I Programming Languages I Introductory Statistics TOTAL

2 1 2 2 2 2

0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 0 0

3 2 3 3 2 2 21

117

300 LEVEL 1st SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours Units L T P 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2

(a) General Studies/Required Courses GST 311 Information and Communication Tech ENT 311 Introd. To Enterpreneurship III (b) Compulsory Courses GEY 301 (C) Adv. Map Interpretation & Field Mapping GEY 303 (C) Introductory Geochemistry 2 GEY 305 (C) Structural Geology 2 GEY 307 (C) Igneous Petrology 2 0 GEY 309 (C) Sedimentology 2 GEY 313 (C) Environmental Geology 2 GEP 301 (C) Introductory Exploration Geophysics TOTAL (c) Elective Courses: GEY 311 (E) Sedimentary Basins of Africa

1 0 0 3 0 0 2

0 0 3 3 3 0 0

3 2 2 3 2 3 21

2

3

2

0

0

2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P

U

(a) General Studies/ Required Courses (b) Compulsory Courses GEY 302 (C) Geostatistics 1 GEY 304 (C) Principles of Stratigraphy 2 GEY 306 (C) Metamorphic Petrology 2 GEY 308 (C) Photogeology & Remote Sensing 0 GEY 310 (C) Long Vacation Geological Mapping GEY 312 (C) Geology of Ore Deposits & Fossil Fuels GEY 314 (C) Marine Geology 2 TOTAL (c) Elective Courses: GEY 316 Energy Resources

118

0 0 0 0 2 0

3 0 3 6 0 0

2 2 3 2 3 0 2 16

2

2

0

0

2

119

400 LEVEL 1st SEMESTER Course Code Units Course Title L (a) Required Courses ENT 411 Introduction to Entrepreneural Skills (b) Compulsory Courses GEY 401 (C) Engineering Geology GEY 403 (C) Economic Geology GEY 405 (C) Micropaleontology GEY 407 (C) Exploration Geochemistry GEY 409 (C) Geology of Nigeria GEY 411 (C) Basin Analysis GEY 413 (C) Palynology GEY 499 (C) Seminar in Geology TOTAL (c) Elective Courses: GEY 415 Mining Geology Contact Hours T 2 P 0 0 2

1

1 1 2 2 0 2 2 0

0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 2 3 0 3

2 2 3 3 2 3 1 20

1

0

0

2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Units Course Title L (a) General Studies/ Required Courses (b) Compulsory Courses GEY 400 (C) Research Project GEY 402 (C) Quaternary Geology GEY 404 (C) Petroleum Geology GEY 406 (C) Hydrogeology GEY 408 (C) Precambrian Geology of Africa 1 GEY 410 (C) Geotectonic s TOTAL

120

Contact Hours T P

2 2 2 0 2

0 0 0 0 0

0 3 3 1 0

6 2 3 3 2 17

(c) Elective Courses: GEP 408 Geothermal Exploration GEY 412 Geochronology

1 1

0 0

0 0

2 2

121

3.2 Course Outlines- Option B:

BSc. (Hons.) Applied Geophysics

100 LEVEL 1ST SEMESTER Course Code (a) General GST 111 GST 113 ENT 111 Course Title L Studies /Required Courses Communication in English Use of Library and Study skills Introd. To Enterpreneurship I Contact Hours T P Units 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2

2

(b) Core/Compulsory Courses CHM 101 General Chemistry I CSC 101 Introduction to Computer GEY 101 Introductory Geology I MAT 101 General Mathematics I MAT 103 Vector and Geometry PHY 101 General Physics I PHY 103 Practical Physics I Total (c) Electives/Optional Courses

2 3 2 3 0

3 2 0 1 0 1 0

1 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 2 3 2 3 1 22

3 2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P 0 0 0 0

Units 2 2

(a) General Studies/Required Courses GST 112 Philosophy and Logic 2 GST 114 Nigerian Peoples and Cultures 2 (b) Compulsory CHM 102 CSC 102 GEY 102 MAT 102 Courses General Chemistry II Programming Languages Introductory Geology II General Mathematics II

122

3 2 3

1 2 0 1

0 0 0 0

3 0 2 3

2

MAT 106 PHY 102 PHY 104

Introductory Statistics General Physics II Practical Physics II Total

2 3

0 1 0

0 0 0

2 3 3 20

1

(c) Electives/Optional Courses -

123

200 LEVEL 1ST SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P 2 2 0 0 0 0

Units 2 2

(a) General Studies/Required Courses GST 211 Philosophy of Science ENT 211 Introd. To Enterpreneurship II

(b) Compulsory Courses CSC 211 Computer Programming I 3 0 GEY 201 Introductory Map Interpretation and Field Geology 3 GSP 205 Elementary Surveying 3 0 0 MAT 201 Mathematical Methods I 3 1 0 PHY 203 Thermodynamics 3 1 0 Total (c) Electives/Optional Courses GEY 203 Crystallography and Mineralogy GEY 205 Mineral Resources

0 1 3 3 3 19

3 0

3

2 1

0 0

3 3

3 2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P 2 0 0 0 Units

(a) General Studies/Required Courses GST 212 Communications in English GST 214 Peace and Conflict Resolution (b) Compulsory Courses GEP 202 Physics of the Earth GEY 206 Introductory Petrology PHY 204 Modern Physics MAT 202 Mathematical Methods II MAT 206 Introductory Numerical Analysis Total

2

0 2

2

2 3

3 0 1 3 3

1 3 0 1 0

0 2 3 0 0 18

3

3 3

(c) Electives/Optional Courses GEY 202 Optical Mineralogy

124

2

0

0

2

1ST Course Code Course Title

300 LEVEL SEMESTER Contact Hours Units L T P 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2

(a) General Studies/Required Courses GST 311 Information and Communication Tech ENT 311 Introd. To Enterpreneurship III

(b) Compulsory Courses GEP 301 Introd. Exploration Geophysics 2 0 GEP 303 Gravity Methods in Prospecting 2 0 GEP 305 Magnetic Methods in Prospecting 2 0 GEY 301 Advanced Map Interpretation and Field Mapping 2 GEY 305 Structural Geology 1 0 GEY 309 Sedimentology 2 0 3 Total (c) Electives (Restricted) MAT 305 Vector and Tensor Analysis PHY 303 Electromagnetic Theory I

3 3 3 0 3 3 21

3 3 3 3 2

3

3 2

0 1

0 0

3 3

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P Units

(a) General Studies/Reqiured Courses (b) Compulsory Courses GEP 302 Electrical Methods in Prospecting

125

2

0

3

3

GEP 304 GEY 302 GEP 310 3 GEY 304 GEY 308

Electromagnetic Methods in Prospecting 2 0 Geostatistics 2 0 Long Vacation Mapping/Geophysical Field Practice Principles of Stratigraphy Photogeology and Remote Sensing Total 2 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 2 15

3 2 0 2

9

2

(c) Electives (Restricted) PHY 216 Wave, Vibration and Optics PHY 302 Electromagnetic Theory II

3 3

0 1

0 0

3 3

126

400 LEVEL 1ST SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours Units L T P 2 0 0 2

(a) Required Courses ENT 411 Introduction to Entrepreneural Skills

(b) Compulsory Courses GEP 401 Seismic Methods in Prospecting GEP 403 Geophysical Well Logging GEP 405 Radiometric Methods in Prospecting GEP 407 Geophysical Time Series Analysis GEP 499 Geophysics Seminar GEY 401 Engineering Geology GEY 403 Economic Geology GEY 409 Geology of Nigeria Total (c) Electives GEY 415 Mining Geology

1

1 2 2

3 1 0 2 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0

3 3 2 0 0 2 3 2 20 2

4 2 2 1

1

0

0

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours Units L T P

(a) General Studies/Required Courses (b) Compulsory Courses GEP 400 Research Project GEP 402 Engineering Geophysics GEP 404 Groundwater Geophysics GEP 406 Environmental Geophysics GEP 408 Geothermal Exploration GEY 404 Petroleum Geology GEY 406 Hydrogeology GEY 410 Geotectonics Total (c) Electives

127

2

2 2

0 2 2 0 2 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 3 0

6 2 0 0 2 3 3 3 20

2 2 3 2

GEY 412 GEP 410

Geochronology Special Topics: Case Studies

1 2

0 0

0 0

2 2

128

4.0 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Option A - BSc. (Hons.) Geology Courses

GEY 101: INTRODUCTORY GEOLOGY I (2 UNITS) Definition of Geology and its branches. The study of the earth and solar systems; Earth early history - formation of the crust, hydrosphere, atmosphere, the earth today; internal structure of the earth ­ the core, mantle and crust, origin and abundance of elements and their classification; Geomorphic processes and products. Definition, types and names of mineral; physical properties and chemical characteristics of minerals, identification of minerals using their physical properties. Introduction to Sedimentary, Igneous and Metamorphic rocks. GEY 102: INTRODUCTORY GEOLOGY II (2 UNITS) The Geologic time scale. The Paleozoic Mesozoic; and Cenozoic eras. Brief treatment of the different Systems with examples drawn from Africa and Nigeria. Succession of Life. Basic principles of stratigraphy, Fossils and Fossilization. Historical development of the geologic time scale. GEY 201: INTRODUCTORY MAP INTERPRETATION AND FIELD GEOLOGY (2 UNITS) Study and interpretation of geologic and topographic maps, dip and strike of strata, three point problems, distribution of rock units in different ages, folds, unconformities, apparent and true thickness of rock units, dip of rock strata, upthrown and downthrown blocks of faults. Drawing of elementary geologic sections. Geologic mapping exercise and general field geology in the immediate environments. Pre-requisite: GEY 101. GEY 202: OPTICAL MINERALOGY (2 UNITS) Mineral preparation for microscopic study; describing and identifying the parts of the petrological microscopes; study of the optical properties of minerals, nature of light, Refractive index and double refraction; uniaxial minerals and their interference figures, optically biaxial minerals and their interference figures, the nicol prism, minerals between crossed nicols, vibration- direction and optic orientation, pleochroism and absorption; synopsis, of petrological microscopes; identification and study of mineral groups- oxides and hydroxides, carbonates, borates, sulphates, phosphates, silicates. Pre-requisite: GEY 101 and PHY 101

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GEY 203: CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND MINERALOGY (3 UNITS) Principles of crystal chemistry, physical and determinative properties of minerals; systematics of mineralogy; silicate structures; description of common rock forming minerals. Formation of crystals; crystalline state; law of crystallography, space lattices and the unit cell; symmetry elements, crystal geometry and stereographic projection; crystallographic notation, seven crystal systems and 32 classes of symmetry; crystal defects; twining and twin law. Pre-requisite: CHM 101. GEY 204: INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY (3 UNITS) General morphology, classification and geologic history of the phyla, protozoa, foraminifera, Coelenterata, Brachiopoda, Mollusca, Arthropoda and Echinodermata their applications in biostratigraphy and paleoecology. Pre- requisite: GEY 102 GEY 205: MINERAL RESOURCES (2 Units) Elementary geology, formation, distribution and utilization of economic minerals and energies with special reference to Nigeria (Suitable for students of industrial Chemistry and other faculties) GEY 206: INTRODUCTORY PETROLOGY (2 Units) Introduction to the common rocks in the earth's crust. Definition of rocks; sedimentary rocks weathering, transportation and sedimentation; lithification and digenesis, texture, structure and classification. Igneous rocks magma series and igneous association, volcanic activity, pyroclastic rocks, igneous intrusion, grain size, texture, structure and classification, Metamorphic rocks, metamorphism, metamorphic texture, contact and classification, Metamorphic facies and migmatite. Pre- requisite: GEY 101 GEY 301: ADVANCED MAP INTERPRETATION AND FIELD MAPPING TECHNIQUES (2 Units) Advanced study and interpretation of geologic maps, identification of relevant structures, distribution and ages of various rock types. Drawing of geologic sections and discussion of the geologic history. Field geology mapping exercises including igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary terrains. Pre- requisite; GEY 201 GEY 302: GEOSTATISTICS (2 Units) Map analysis, Geologic maps, distribution points, contouring, trendsurfacing, comparing maps, Fourier series, series of events. Analysis of multivariate data, multivariate extension of elementary statistics. Discriminate functions; factor analysis. Sampling and estimation ­ The population- sampling; estimation and confidence. Area sampling schemes. Analysis of Dispersion, Homogeneity of

130

dispersion Maholanobis distance. Geometric representation of Maholanobis distance. Canovical variables. Pre- requisite: MAT 106

131

GEY 303: INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY (2 UNITS) Fundamental Principles of Geochemistry, Geochemical cycles, partition of elements in metal, sulphide and silicate phases; lithophiles, atmophile, chalcophile and siderophile elements, chemical basis of geochemical classification, composition of the earth methods of geochemical sampling, meteorites, Equilibrum reactions in solid gas systems. Limestone metamorphism, rate of chemical reactions, solid state equilibria, solution equilibria, precipitation reactions. Principles of trace element analysis, preparation and analytical procedure, melt equilibria. GEY 304: PRINCIPLES OF STRATIGRAPHY (2 Units) Development of stratigraphy and stratigraphic principles, geologic time and geochronology. Methods of stratigraphy, sedimentary environment. Stratigraphic record in time and space. Stratigraphic units: Lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic units. Stratigraphic code and nomenclature, principles and practice of stratigraphic correlation. Practical methods of stratigraphy. Unconformities, facies and facies changes with examples drawn from Nigerian sedimentary basins. GEY 305: STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (3 UNITS) Primary and secondary structures in rocks. Unconformity, criteria for their recognition. Physics and mechanics of rock deformation, effects of pressure, temperature and time. Stress-train relationships in fractures, classification of faults and joints. Salt domes. Stereographic projection, rosette, block and isopach diagrams. GEY 306: METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY (3 Units) Definition of metamorphic rocks and metamorphism; types of metamorphism. Physical conditions of metamorphism, physicochemical processes involved in metamorphism, control of metamorphism, experimental appraisal of metamorphic reactions. Metamorphic differentiation, metamorphic facies and migmatites. Textures of metamorphic rocks. Classification of metamorphic rocks; broad survey of Grubenmann- Becke depth zones; progressive zones of Barrow, Eskola facies concept, facies of metamorphic minerals and their stability field. Migmatities, charnockite-metamorphic and magmatic. Eclogites; Anatexis and Granitization, discussion of some typical metamorphic areas of the world, with emphasis on Nigeria. GEY 307: IGNEOUS PETROLOGY (3 UNITS) Definition of igneous rock, magma series and igneous association, volcanic activity, pyroclastic rocks, igneous intrusion, grain size, texture, structure and classification. Origin of magmatic crystallization, magmatic differentiation of crystal fractionation, classification of igneous rocks, plutonic and volcanic

132

associations. Granitic rocks, their classification and petrogenesis, older and younger granites in Nigeria. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, layered complexes, Basalts, variations with structural environments, petrogenesis, serpentinites, peridotites, Kimberlite, carbonatites. Alkalic volcanic rocks. GEY 308: PHOTOGEOLOGY AND REMOTE SENSING (2 UNITS) Aerial photography - types, stereoscopy, measuring and plotting instruments in photogeology and the procedures. The principles of interpretation, types of photogeologic studies, geomorphological and geological. Their identification and interpretation. Study of typical examples. The use of photogeology in reconnaissance mapping, economic geology and water resources. GEY 309: SEDIMENTOLOGY (3 UNITS) Definition of sedimentary rocks, weathering, transportation and sedimentation, lithification, texture and structure. Sedimentary processes, concept of size grade scales, methods of size analysis, grain size distributions and interpretations, qualitative and statistical study of texture, structure and composition of sedimentary rocks. Description and classification of sedimentary rocks, study of diagenetic processes, recognition of sedimentary environments from rock records. Heavy mineral analysis. Petrographic studies of sedimentary rocks. GEY 310: LONG VACATION MAPPING (3 UNITS) Two weeks of intensive training in geologic mapping exercises followed by three weeks of supervised independent student mapping exercise at approved locations. Pre-requisite: GEY 301, GEY 305. GEY 311: SEDIMENTARY BASINS OF AFRICA (2 UNITS) Regional phanerozoic Stratigraphy of Africa with special reference to coastal and other sedimentary basins, and their economic potentials. GEY 312: GEOLOGY OF ORE DEPOSITS AND FOSSIL FUELS (2 UNITS) Ore-bearing fluids and their migration. Deposition of ores. Wall rock alteration. Mineral paragenesis and zoning. Classification of ore deposits, magmatic segregation deposits, pegmatites, hydrothermal deposits; volcanogenic deposits, sedimentary deposits, supergene sulfide enrichment. Nature of fossil fuels (coal and oil shales), origin, occurrence, and classification. Fossil fuel fluids. The nature and properties of oil and gas. Reservoir, caprock and seal, seal properties, porosity, permeability, capillary and displacement pressure phenomena, properties and classification of traps, anticlinal, flowage, stratigraphic and combination traps, origin, and migration of petroleum. Petroleum occurrence in Nigeria. GEY 313: ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY (2 UNITS)

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Fundamental concepts in environmental geology, Earth materials and processes. Hazardous Earth processes and their remedies. Flooding, landslides, earthquakes, volcanic activities, coastal hazards, solid mineral resources and environmental impacts and waste disposal systems. Geologic aspects of environmental health.

GEY 314: MARINE GEOLOGY (2 UNITS) Characteristics of oceans, continental margins and oceanic floor, shoreline processes. The origin, classification and distribution of marine sediments and resources. Marine eco-system. Pollution hazard and control. Coastal management. GEY 316: ENERGY RESOURCES (2 UNITS) Historical development of energy usage and industrialization ­ case studies of Nigeria. Classification of conventional, non-conventional and exotic energy resources. Occurrence, exploitation, application and associated environment problems of the various energy sources. Future alternative energy sources, Bitumen occurrence in Nigeria with case study of Ondo State. GEY 400: RESEARCH PROJECT (6 UNITS) Individual research project selected by the student from any of the various fields of Applied Geology/Geophysics and to be carried out under the supervision of one or more academic staff of the department. The project involves literature survey, field investigation, experimental and statistical data acquisition, analysis and interpretation. The project report must be submitted at least four weeks before the final degree examination. GEY 401: ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (2 UNITS) The Geologist and Civil Engineer. Classification of soils and rocks for engineering purposes. Index and engineering properties of soils and rocks. Factors affecting rock durability. Effects of discontinuities on rock mass characteristics. Rock properties related to drilling and blasting. Excavation in soil and rock. Geotechnical methods in stabilization of soils. Stability of slopes. Foundation problems - buildings, bridges and dams, Geology of reservoirs in tunneling. Drainage problems in low-lying areas. Practical: Index and engineering properties of soils and rocks. Aggregate tests. Site investigation. GEY 402: QUATERNARY GEOLOGY (2 UNITS) Worldwide geological events in Quaternary Time, Glacial and interglacial periods; marine transgressions and regressions. Shifting climatic belts in the tropics.

134

Mineral deposits in Quaternary environments. Origin of man and the earliest uses of rocks and minerals. Quaternary geology of West Africa - with special emphasis on Nigeria. GEY 403: ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (3 UNITS) Concept of ore genesis, factors controlling deposition of metallic ores, metallogenic provinces and epochs. Physical and chemical properties, mode of formation and industrial uses of clay, limestone, evaporates, coal and tar sands. Mineral deposits in Nigeria and other parts of the world, exploration techniques, extraction and evaluation of reserves.

GEY 404: PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (3 UNITS) Composition, origin, migration and accumulation of petroleum. Source, reservoir and cap rocks; type of petroleum traps; drilling, logging and production: reservoir and reserve estimation, recovery methods, geological and geographical distribution of petroleum; Petroleum geology of Nigeria. GEY 405: MICROPALEONTOLOGY (2 UNITS) Morphology, classification, and geological history of major microfossil groups, particularly foraminifera, ostracoda and conodonts. Biostratigraphy and paleontology of microfossils. Sample collection and preparation techniques. GEY 406: HYDROGEOLOGY (3 UNITS) Groundwater utilization. Hydrologic cycle. Groundwater occurrence and factors influencing groundwater distribution in different rock types. Hydrogeological units. Stream gauging. Assessment of groundwater resources. Groundwater movement. Groundwater resources evaluation. Response of different aquifers to pumping. Water chemistry, quality and radioactive pollution. The GhybenHerzberg formula. Groundwater exploration techniques. Groundwater distribution in Nigeria. Practical: Theis curve, pumping test analysis. Discharge measurement ­ use of current meter. Water level measurements. Hydrogeological maps. GEY 407: EXPLORATION GEOCHEMISTRY (3 UNITS) Introduction to the application of Geochemistry in mineral exploration. Principles of geochemical dispersion and re-concentration in rocks and ore systems. Primary dispersion patterns. Weathering and soil formation. The migration of economic and pathfinder of elements in the secondary environments. Geochemical soil and drainage surveys. Biogeochemical, geobotanical and atmogeochemical surveys. Lithogeochemical survey. Plotting, statistical analysis

135

and interpretation of geochemical data. Geochemical surveys in integrated minerals exploration programmes. Practicals will include field and laboratory analysis of geochemical samples. Pre-requisite: GEY 303. GEY 408: PRE-CAMBRIAN GEOLOGY OF AFRICA (2 UNITS) Principles of Precambrian stratigraphy and application to major shield areas of the world. Pre-Cambrian Geology of Nigeria. Pre-Cambrian Geology of Africa and other continents of the world. GEY 409: GEOLOGY OF NIGERIA (2 UNITS) An overview of the basement complex and sedimentary basins of Nigeria. Geology of Nigerian minerals and economic deposits. Fieldwork/ training visits to areas of geologic interest in Nigeria.

GEY 410: GEOTECTONICS (2 UNITS) Concept of plate tectonics and types of boundaries; causes and evidences of continental drift, ocean floor spreading, associated structures and resources. Earthquakes and tremors. GEY 411: BASIN ANALYSIS (2 UNITS) Classical stratigraphy. Basin evolution and analysis of some selected West African basins. Concepts and methods of subsurface facies analysis- grain size distribution and textures, mineralogy, geochemical, fauna/flora, stratigraphy and wireline logs. Interpretation based on construction of subsurface maps. Range (distribution) charts. Economic biostratigraphy, application of principles of stratigraphic correlation. Preparation and interpretation of structure contour, isopach, and facies maps. Construction of stratigraphic, structural, paleostructural profiles and their use in paleogeological analysis. GEY 412: GEOCHRONOLOGY (2 UNITS) Principles of geochronology, Rb/Sr and K/Ar, U/Pb and carbon dating methods. Stable isotopes. Data analysis and interpretation. GEY 413: PALYNOLOGY (2 UNITS) Introduction to Plant Kingdom. Sources of palynomorphs. Transportation and description. Palynomorph groups. Sample collection and preparation techniques. Palynostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental studies, particularly of

136

Nigerian Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments. Qualitative and quantitative analysis.

GEY 415: MINING GEOLOGY (2 UNITS) Mining and Mining methods, choice of mining methods, open-pit and underground mining. Mineral laws and legislation in Nigeria. GEY 499: SEMINAR (1 UNIT) Each student is expected to write and present a seminar paper in the broad areas of Geology/ Applied Geophysics/ Science and Society.

137

Option B: B.Sc. (Hons.) Applied Geophysics Courses GEP 202: PHYSICS OF THE EARTH (3 UNITS) The Earth in space. Geochronology and the age of the Earth. Gravity and the shape of the Earth. Earth's magnetic field - its morphology, temporal variations (micropulsations to reversals), history and origin. Earthquakes - their distribution, focal mechanism, and prediction. Seismology and the planetary interior. Geothermic and the planetary. Pre-requisites: GEY 101 and MAT 201, GEP 301: INTRODUCTORY EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS (3 UNITS) The nature and scope of Geophysics and the role of Geophysics in geological prospecting and exploration. Principles, techniques (data acquisition, presentation and interpretation) and principal applications of Gravity, Electrical, Seismic and Electromagnetic prospecting methods. Geophysical well logging; principle, types, data acquisition and interpretation. Hydrocarbon, Mineral and Groundwater exploration using Geophysical prospecting methods. Applications of geophysics in solving engineering and environmental problems. Pre-requisites-GEY 101, GEY 102 and MAT 201 *Compulsory course for B.Sc. (Hons.) Geology Students. Elective Course for other Science Students.

GEP 302: ELECTRICAL METHODS IN PROSPECTING (3 UNITS) Electric conduction and the electrical properties of Earth materials. Electrical resistivity prospecting - electrode arrays, and apparent resistivity formulae; profiling and soundings, interpretation of resistivity data, geological problems amenable to resistivity investigations, some case histories, the self potential (sp) method - origin, measurement, interpretation and examples. The induced polarization (IP) method - the phenomenon of IP in ore bearing rocks and sediments; time and frequency domain measurements, pseudo-sections, geological applications and some case histories. Pre-requisites- PHY 303, GEP 202 and MAT 206. GEP 303: GRAVITY METHODS IN PROSPECTING ­ (3 UNITS) Basic definitions and units. Variation of Earth's gravity field with latitude and elevation. Mineral and rock densities. Gravity prospecting instrument, field operations and reduction. Gravity anomalies of some idealized sources and their geologic equivalents. Simplified methods of rapid gravity interpretation, regional, residual derivatives and continuations. Ground, marine and airborne gravity surveys and some case histories of gravity surveys. Pre-requisites- GEP 202 and MAT 305.

138

139

GEP 304: ELECTROMAGNETIC METHODS IN PROSPECTING (3 UNITS) Elementary theory ­ description of Electromagnetic fields, combination of EM field, amplitude and phase relation. Ground electromagnetic methods (Principles, field practice and data interpretation). Tilt angle, Turam, Horizontal loop systems, VLF, AFMAG, Telluric and magnetotelluric methods. Airborne electromagnetic methods, principles and practices. Rotary-field, AFMAG, VLF, transient (INPUT) methods, Quadrature, long wire systems. Application of electromagnetic methods in mineral prospecting, geological mapping, and groundwater investigation. Case histories. Pre-requisites: PHY 303 and 302. GEP 305: MAGNETIC METHODS IN PROSPECTING (3 UNITS) Basic concepts, definitions and units. Elements of Geomagnetism and rocks. Magnetic prospecting instruments and magnetic survey procedures, including the correction of magnetic data. Magnetic anomalies of some idealized sources and their geologic equivalents. Magnetic interpretation by characteristic points half slopes, nomograms, and polynomials. Regional, residual, derivatives and continuation. Airborne-, ground- and marine- magnetic surveys and their applications. Pre-requisites: GEP 202, MAT 201 and MAT 202

GEP 310: LONG VACATION MAPPING/ GEOPHYSICAL FIELD PRACTICE (3 UNITS) An independent geological and geophysical field studies exercise lasting 4-6 weeks during the long vacation at the end of the third year. A report of this exercise must be written and submitted at the beginning of the second semester of the fourth year. GEP 400: RESEARCH PROJECT (6 UNITS) An independent research project chosen according to the interest of the student and supervised by staff during the final year. The subject matter must be related to any aspect of applied geophysics - petroleum, groundwater, mineral exploration, environmental or engineering site-investigation. Pre- requisites: Final-year standing.

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GEP 401: SEISMIC METHODS IN PROSPECTING (4 UNITS) Seismic wave propagation in an elastic medium, Elastic properties of rocks, principles of refraction and reflection seismics in horizontal and inclined single and multiple interfaces. Seismic prospecting instrumentation and field procedures. Simple methods of interval velocity determinations. Variable velocities, wave fronts and ray paths. Elements of seismic data processing migration, and seismic stratigraphy. Some direct seismic signals hydrocarbon search (e.g velocity sag, Vs/Vp ration, bright and flat spots) Use of seismic methods in geological prospecting and exploration and solving simple engineering problems. Pre-requisite- PHY 216. GEP 402: ENGINEERING GEOPHYSICS (2 UNITS) Geophysical methods in Engineering site investigation: Foundation studies, highway routes, oil pipeline routes, Dam site investigation. Determination of soil/bedrock engineering characteristics-nature of soil bedrock, soil corrosivity, depth to bedrock (or overburden thickness), formation parameters (porosity, permeability), dynamic elastic constants, Rock quality designation and fracture frequency (FF), bedrock structural disposition . Pre-requisites: GEY 401 and 302. GEP 403: GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOGGING (2 UNITS) Types of geophysical well logs and information obtainable from them. Archie's Law. A general survey of the electrical logs (S.P., resistivity- conventional and focused); induction, radiation, density, and sonic methods of borehole geophysics, their applicability, advantages and limitations. Pre- requisites: GEP 302, GEY 101, GEY 102, MAT 201, MAT 202 and PHY 204. GEP 404: GROUNDWATER GEOPHYSICS (2 UNITS) Application of geophysical methods in groundwater exploration. Direct and indirect investigation techniques. Aquifer identification and delineation in typical basement complex and sedimentary areas. Mapping of geological structure useful to groundwater investigation. Determination of aquifer characteristics. Relevant geophysical techniques and field procedures. Borehole location strategy. Case Histories. Pre-requisites: Consent of the departmental. GEP 405: RADIOMETRIC PROSPECTING (1 UNIT) Fundamental principles of radioactivity, nuclear radioactive decay processes, radioactivity of rocks and minerals. Instrumentation and data interpretation. Case histories. GEP 406: ENVIRONMENTAL GEOPHYSICS (2 UNITS)

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Applications of geophysical techniques in environmental pollution studies, saline water intrusion and mapping, determination of groundwater quality, chemical pollution at industrial site and delineation of chemical plumes, oil spillage, pollution and its mapping. GEP 407: GEOPHYSICAL TIME SERIES ANALYSIS (2 UNITS) Review of Fourier transforms, convolution, autocorrelation, impulses response; Z- transform, sampling theory, filter design, particular attention to geophysical application for each topic. Extensive use of the computer. Pre-requisites: MAT 206, 305 and CSC 211. GEP 408: GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION (2 UNITS) Origin and nature of heat flow from the earth. Factors that control economic aspects of geothermal energy. Descriptions of known fields. Application of heat flow measurement. Electrical surveys, seismicity studies and other exploration tools for the search and evaluation of geothermal energy Field trips. Pre-requisites: GEP 302 and PHY 203. GEP 410: SPECIAL TOPICS: CASE STUDIES (1 UNIT) This course is designed for students who have scored a minimum of B+ in a particular course and are willing to have advanced knowledge of that particular course beyond what is normally taught at the undergraduate level. Pre-requisite: Concurrent consent of the Course Instructor and the Head of Department. GEP 499: GEOPHYSICAL SEMINAR (1 UNIT) Presentation by class members of material drawn from personal investigation or material selected from geological/ applied geophysical and scientific literature.

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DEPARTMENT

OF

MATHEMATICS AND INDUSTRIAL MATHEMATICS

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LIST AND QUALIFICATIONS OF STAFF AND THEIR AREA OF SPECIALISATION 1. T.A ADEWALE B.Sc. (Hons) Lagos; M.Sc., Ilorin; Ph.D (Ado) Senior Lecturer & Ag Head (Computational methods in

2.

ONI S.T B.Sc (Hons) M.Sc, Ph.D

Adjunct Professor (Fluid Dynamics & optimization}

3.

T.A KORIKO B.Sc. (Hons) Nsukka; PGD (England]; M.Sc, (Ibadan); Ph.D (Akure)

Adjunct lecturer mathematical modelling of combustion problems

4.

J.A. OLOFINSAO B.Sc.(Benin); M.Sc (Ibadan); PGD(Ado)

Lecturer (Numerical Analysis)

5.

S.O. IMONI B.Sc. (Hons) (Abraka) M.Sc (Benin)

Lecturer (Numerical Analysis)

6.

O.S. OLUSA B.Sc. (Hons); M.Sc. (Ibadan)

Lecturer (Algebraic Topology)

7.

S.O. OGUNLEYE B.Sc. (Hons); M.Sc. (Ife)

Lecturer (Statistics)

8.

ADEDOWOLE A. B.Sc., M.Sc.(Akure)

Assistant Lecturer

9.

JAYEOLA D. B.Sc., M.Sc. (Minna)

Assistant Lecturer

10.

AWONUSIKA R. O. B.Sc.,(Akungba)

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Graduate Fellow

11.

OKE A. S. B.Sc.,(Akungba)

Graduate Fellow

TECHNICAL STAFF 12. Ajayi R. I. B .Sc (Ado-Ekiti) Technologist II

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF LIST 13. OJOMU OPEYEMI S.S.C.E Senior Clerical Officer

14.

FANIBUYAN FOLUSO S.S.C.E

Data Entry Clerk

SECTION 3: PHILOSOPHY The undergraduate programme is designed to produce graduates that can be more readily absorbed into the various areas of the rapidly developing fields of Physics and Electronics. Students are exposed to both basic and applied courses as well as Laboratories and Industrial Training to enable them to satisfy the manpower needs of the public and industrial sectors of any economy. SECTION 4: AIMS / OBJECTIVES The objectives of the programme are: (1) To give students basic knowledge in experimental; theoretical Physics as well as in basic Electronics (2)

and

To allow a students who so desires to pursue deeply a course in Mathematics and/or Industrial Mathematics that will be useful in the Industry or any other area in the society.

SECTION 5: RATIONALE/ JUSTIFICATION Please include: (i) Compatibility of programme with institutional mission: The programme is in agreement with the university's mission of producing high level manpower needs for the nations to address the issues of shortage of manpower in the area of applications of mathematics to the society, science and technology.

145

(i)

Relevance to national needs (evidence of relevance form National Manpower Board to be attached): Our graduates fit in properly into the Nigerian and International labour markets and for self employment/job creation.

(iii)

Source and availability of staff for the programme; provide evidence, permanent if any: Members of staff of staff are obtained qualified from and

members

and

highly

experienced sabbatical and senior adjunct staff. SECTION 6: ADMISSION REQUIREMENT The minimum requirements for admission to courses leading to B.Sc degree in the Department of Mathematics and Industrial Mathematics are those for entry in the Faculty of Science. Admission to the 100 level or the first year is through the Joint Matriculation Board (JMB) examination or such other concessional examinations as the University system may approve. In addition, candidates are required to have credits in five subjects at the SSC and GCE "0" level or NECO including Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry/Economics and English language. Admission to the 200 level is possible for candidates who, in addition to meeting the Faculty General Admission Requirements have good passes at the Advanced level of the GCE (or equivalent) in Physics, Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics; or approved equivalent qualifications such as the ND and HND. Consideration may also be given to such other qualifications as the Departments and/or Faculty may evaluate and approve. Candidates who have passed through the Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko Pre-degree Programme are also eligible for admission. SECTION 7: COURSE CONTENT

These are the courses stipulated by the Department which students must take and pass. They are outlined below: 1st Semester: 100 Level (a) Compulsory Courses Course Code Course Title

146

Unit

MAT 101 MAT 103 PHY 101 PHY 107 CHM 101 BIO 101 BIO 103 (b)

-

Basic Algebra Introductory Statistics General Physics I General Physics Lab I General Chemistry I General Biology I Experimental Bio I

-

3 3 2 1 3 2 1 2 2 21 2

CSC 101 Introduction to Computer Required Courses GST 111 GST 113 Communication in English

Uses of Library and Study Skills Total 2nd Semester: 100 Level -

(a)

Compulsory Courses Course Code Course Title

Units MAT 102 MAT 106 PHY 102 PHY 108 CHM 102 BIO 102 BIO 104 CSC 102 (b) Introduction Calculus & Trigonometry Vectors & Geometry General Physics II General Physics Lab II general chemistry II General Biology II Experimental Biology II 3 3 2 1 3 2 1 2

Introduction to Computer Science II -

Required Courses GST 112 Philosophy and Logic Total 2 19

1st Semester: 200 Level (a) Compulsory Courses Course Code Units MAT 201 Mathematical Methods I

147

Course Title

-

3

MAT 203 MAT 205 MAT 207 MAT 209 (b)

-

Introduction to Algebra Logic, Set & Real Number Systems Introduction to Real Analysis Introduction to Mechanics I

-

3 3 3 3 3 2

CSC 211 Computer Programming I (FORTRAN)Required Courses GST 211 History and Philosophy of Science -

(c)

Free elective (2 units) ECO 201 MAT 211 Principle of Economics History of Mathematics Total 2nd Semester: 200 Level 2 2

20/22

(a)

Compulsory Courses Course Code Course Title

Units MAT 202 MAT 204 MAT 206 MAT 208 MAT 210 CSC 212 (b) Mathematical Methods II Linear Algebra 3 3 3 3 3 3

Introduction to Numerical Analysis Probability Distribution I Introduction to Mechanics II Computer Programming II -

Required Courses GST 212 Communication in English Total 1st Semester: 300 Level 2

18/20

(a)

Compulsory Courses Course Code MAT 301 MAT 303 MAT 305 MAT 307 MAT 309 MAT 311 Course Title Abstract Algebra Introduction to Topology Tensor Analysis Complex Analysis Real Analysis Operations Research

148

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

(b)

Required Courses GST 311 Information and Communication Technology -

2 20

Total 2nd Semester: 300 Level (a) Compulsory Courses Course Code MAT 304 MAT 306 MAT 308 MAT 310 MAT 300 MAT 312 Course Title

-

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3

Introduction to Mathematical Modeling -

Elementary Differential Equation Complex Analysis II Numerical Analysis SIWES Statistical Inference

-

Six unit free electives MAT 320 MAT 314 CSC 310 CSC 316 Waves theory Vectorial Mechanics Software Engineering Computer Networks Total 1st Semester: 400L (a) Compulsory Courses Course Code MAT 499 MAT 401 MAT 403 MAT 409 MAT 425 Course Title Seminar Ordinary Differential Equations

Introductory Applied Functional Analysis

-

3 3 3 3 24

Units 1 3 3 3 3

Advanced Numerical Analysis I Optimization theory

(b)

Free Electives

Any two (2) elective courses from the following on the students' speciality MAT 405 MAT 407 General Topology Quantum Mechanics I

149

-

3 3

MAT 415 MAT 417 MAT 419 MAT 421 MAT 423 CSC 413 (c)

-

Differential Geometry I Fluid Dynamics I Elasticity I Probability Distribution I Information Theory Structured Programming

-

3 3 3 3 3 3

Required Course GST 411 Total 2nd Semester: 400 Level

Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skills

21

2

-

(a)

Compulsory Courses Course Code MAT 400 MAT 402 MAT 422 MAT 426 Course Title Project Work Units 6 3 3 3

Partial Differential Equations Design of Experiments Mathematical Modeling I -

(b)

Free Elective

Any two (2) elective courses from the following on the student's speciality Course Code MAT 404 MAT 408 MAT 410 MAT 416 MAT 418 MAT 420 MAT 424 MAT 428 Course Title Measure Theory & Integration Quantum Mechanics II Numerical Analysis II Differential Geometry II Fluid Dynamics II Elasticity II Coding Theory Stochastic Processing Total 12. COURSES DESCRIPTION MAT 101: BASIC ALGEBRA (3 UNITS) Set Theory:

150

Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

-

Definition, examples and description of sets, Types of sets ­ empty, universal singleton, subsets, equal, equivalent, power set, finite and infinite sets. Venn diagrams. Operations on sets ­ Union, intersection, difference, complement, product. De ­ Morgan's law. Terminating and non ­ terminating decimal numbers. Binary operations and the real number system. Complex number systems, Geometrical representations Polynomials and Rational Functions: Polynomials, the Remainder and Factor Theorems. Polynomial Equations and Inequalities ­ especially linear, quadratic and cubic. Domain and zeroes of Rational Functions, Partial Fractions. Curve sketching of Polynomial and Rational Function, Surds, indices and logarithms. Matrices: Definition of m x n matrices 1 m, n 3; addition, multiplication and inverse operations on matrices and applications to solutions of linear equations. Elementary properties of determinants of at most 3 x 3 matrices. Application to simple linear equations. Sequences and Series: Arithmetical, Geometrical and Harmonic sequences and series. Limits and sums to infinity. Binomial Theorem: Elementary concept of mathematical induction. Permutations and

Combinations and their applications. The Binomial Theorem for any index and its applications. MAT 102: INTRODUCTORY CALCULUS & TRIGONOMETRY (3 UNITS) Trigonometry: Circular measure, small angles. Definition and properties of sine, cosine, tangent etc. Formulae for sin(A + B), cos(A + B), tan(A + B), sin ½ A, etc sine and cosine formulae, factor formulae. Inverse trigonometric functions. General solution of trigonometric equations such as acos bsin c etc.

Calculus: Functions of a real variable, graphs, limits and idea of continuity. The derivative as limit of rate of change. Differentiation of algebraic, exponential, logarithms,

151

trigonometric, product and quotient functions. Application of differentiation to curve sketching. Maxima and minima. Definite and indefinite integrals with applications to areas and volumes. Integration by parts and other simple techniques of integration. Simple first order ordinary differential equations.

MAT 103: INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (3 UNITS) Finite sample spaces. Definition of probability of finite sample spaces and examples. Probability as proportion areas. Conditional probability of events. Independence of events, tree diagrams, variables and cumulative frequency distribution. Mean, median, mode, variance and covariance. Conditional expectation and linear correlation using scatter diagram.

MAT 104: BASIC MATHEMATICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (3 UNITS) Trigonometry Circular measure, small angles. Definition and properties of sine, cosine, tangent etc. formulae for sine(A+B), cos(A+B), tan(A+B), sin ½A, cos ½A, tan ½A, etc sine and cosine formulae. Inverse trigonometric functions. General solution of trigonometric equations such as acos bsin c etc. Calculus: Functions of a real variable, graphs, limits and idea of continuity. The derivative as limit of rate of change. Differentiation of algebraic, exponential, logarithms, trigonometric, product and quotient functions. Application of differentiation to curve sketching. Maxima and minima. Definite and indefinite integrals with applications to areas and volumes. Integration by parts and other simple techniques of integration. Simple first ordinary differential. Coordinate Geometry: Equations of lines, circles, ellipse, hyperbola and parabola. Tangents and normal.

MAT 201: MATHEMATICAL METHODS I (3 UNITS) Sequences and series: Limits, continuity, differentiability, implicit functions, sequences, series, test for convergences, sequences and series of functions Calculus:

152

Partial differentiation, total derivatives, implicit differentiation, change of variable. Taylor's theorem and extremum of functions of two variables, Langragian multiplier. Differential equations: Introduction, equation of first order and first degree, separable equations, homogeneous equations, exact equations, linear equations, Bernoulli's and Riccati equations. Applications to mechanics and electricity. Orthogonal and oblique trajectories. Second order equations with coefficients. Elementary treatment of Laplace transform. MAT 202: MATHEMATICAL METHODS II (3 UNITS) Vector Calculus: Element of vector operations. Differential vector operators, gradient and potential field, directional derivative, divergence, solenoid, Laplacian; properties of operations involving curl. Transformation of coordinates system; polar,

cylindrical, spherical, parabolic coordinates. Elemental length and volume element, scale factors. Differential invariants, noble, rotor or curl, divergence and Laplacian: Elementary Differential Equations: First order ordinary differential equations. Existence and uniqueness. Second order ordinary differentials equations with constant co-efficient. General theory of n- the order liner equations. Laplace transforms solution of initial ­ value problems by partial differential equations in two independent variables. Application of O.D.E. and P.D.E.'s to physical life and social sciences. Pre ­ requisite ­ MAT 102. MAT 203: INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA (3 UNITS) Sets: Vector spaces over the real field. Subspaces, linear independence, basis and dimension. Linear transformations and their representation by matrices. Range, null spaces, rank. Singular and non-singular transformation and matrices. Algebra of matrices.

153

Integers: Fundamental theorem of arithmetic congruence, linear congruence equations. Euler's function o(n). Rings: Definition and examples of rings. Commutative rings. Integral domain. Order, well ­ ordering principle. Mathematical induction. Zn, division ring, field construction of field of fractions of an integral domain and the embedding theorem. Prerequisite: MAT 101. MAT 204: LINEAR ALGEBRA (3 UNITS) Description, representation and definition of a vector space, subspace, sum and direct sum of spaces, linear independence, basis, change of basis and dimension. Linear equations. Linear transformation and their representation by matrices, kernel, images, rank, nullity of linear transformations. Linear equations and matrices. Types of matrices; triangular, diagonal, orthogonal, nilpotent,

idempotent. Positive definiteness of a matric, normal matrix. Determinant, minor, cofactor, rank of a matrix, inverse matrix. Eigenvalue and Eigenvectors. Minimum characteristic polynomials. Caley-Hamilton Theorem. Bilinear and Quadratic forms and diagonalization of matrices, canonical forms. Prerequisite: MAT 101 & MAT 102

MAT 205: LOGIC, SETS AND REAL NUMBER SYSTEM (3 UNITS) Logic: Statements, symbols for the three simplest connectives ( ( ,, ); truth tables, tautology and equivalence. Laws of the algebra of statements, viz commutative, associate, distributive, idempotent, identity, the complement and De-Morgan's laws. Sets and Functions: Cartesian products of sets, family of sets. A function as a triple (F,X,Y). Direct and inverse images, subjective functions. Injective functions and one-one correspondence Unipotent sets. Finite sets. Countable sets. Existence of uncountable sets. The Real Number Sytem R = (R,+,. )

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R is an ordered filed Axioms for addition and Axioms of multiplication (the distributive laws). Mathematics Induction. Definition of the natural numbers, the rational numbers. Upper bounds, lower bounds, suprema and infima. The completeness axiom, open intervals, open sets. Density of rationals in the real number system. Every open set is a countable union of disjoint open interval. Prerequisite: MAT 101 & MAT 102. MAT 206: INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Solutions of Equations: Graphical method, simple iterative methods, Graeffe's method, Bernoullli's method, Bairostow's method. Iterative methods for systems of linear equations. Gauss elimination method, Gauss-Jordan method. Jacobi iterative method. Gauss-field iterative method. Numerical Methods: Introduction to iterative methods, Newton's method applied to finding roots. Trapezium and Simpson's rules of integration. Interpolation: Lagrange's and Hermite interpolation formulae, divided differences and difference schemes. Interpolation formulae by use of divided differences. Approximation: Least square polynomials approximations. Chebyshev's polynomials, continued fraction and rational fraction. Orthogonal polynomials. Numerical Integration: Newton-Cote's formulae, Gaussian quadrature.

Matrices and Related Topics: Eigenvalue and eigenvector, Algebraic eigenvalue problems. Power method and Jacobin method. Prerequisite: MAT 201 MAT 207: INTRODUCTION TO REAL ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Sequences and Series:

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Functions and sequences. Elementary properties of limits, convergence of sequences, Cauchy convergence principle, convergence of series. Test of convergence, absolute convergence, conditional convergence, uniform

convergence. Power series. Continuity and Differentiability Real value functions, periodic functions, bounded functions, continuity of functions using neighbourhood. Elementary properties of continuous functions. Differentiability of functions, partial differentiation, total derivatives, implicit functions, change of variables. Derivatives of higher orders, Rolle's Theorem, Mean value theorem, Taylor's theorem and maxima and minima of functions of two variables, Lagrange multiplier method. Prerequisite: MAT 201 & MAT 202

MAT 208: PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION I (3 UNITS) Discrete Sample Space: Algebra and probability of events. Combinational analysis. Sampling with and without replacement. Conditional probability, Baye's theorem and Stochastic independence, Discrete distributions; binomial, Poisson, negative binomial, hypergeometric and multinomial. Normal approximation to binomial and Poisson approximation to binomial. Random variables and expectations: means, variance, covariance. Probability generating function and moment generating function. Cheybychev's inequality. Continuous joint distributions: marginal and

conditional density; stochastic independence. Expectations: moments, moment generating functions. Uniform, normal, gamma, beta, Cauchy and log ­ normal distributions. Prerequisite: MAT 103. MAT 209: INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS I (3 UNITS) Static: Moments and couples. Equilibrium of a particle and a rigid body under the action of a system of coplanar forces. Centre of mass of simple bodies. Moment of inertia of simple bodies. Dynamics:

156

Newton's laws. Forces, work, power, energy and momentum Rectilinear Motion Constant acceleration, Force as a function of time, distance and velocity. Impulsive Motion Elastic and inelastic collisions. Prerequisite: MAT 106

MAT 210: INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS II (3 UNITS) Statistics: System of line vectors. Couple and wrenches. Principle of virtual work. Stability of equilibrium. Centre of mass of simple bodies. Moments of inertia of simple bodies. Dynamics of System of Particles: Elastic strings. Hooke's law. Motion in resisting media. Changing mass. Motion along a curve. Frenet's formulae. Coplanar Motion: Energy equation. Motion in a vertical circle, simple pendulum. The cycloid and cycloidal motion. orbital motion ­ disturbed orbits and stability. Prerequisite: MAT 209 MAT 211: HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS (2 UNITS) The Origin of Mathematics: Egyptian and Babylonian Mathematics. Greek mathematics: Pythagoras school, the golden age, the decline of Greek Mathematics. Mathematics in other culture: Hindu and Arabian Mathematics.

The European renaissance: Solutions of cubic and quadratic equations. Modern Mathematics: The origin and development of analytic geometry, number theory, projective geometry and calculus. MAT 212: STATISTICS FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE (2 UNITS)

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Nature and scope of statistics. Populations, samples and inductive processes. Tabular and diagrammatic representations of data. Combinatorial analysis. Dicrete and continuous distributions; Measures of location and dispersion. Inference about population means, proportions and variance. Correlation and regression. Time series, demographic measures and index numbers. Prerequisite: MAT 103 MAT 301: ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I Groups: Definition and examples of groups. Sub-groups, coset decomposition, Lagrange's theorem. Cyclic groups, homomorphism, isomorphism, odd and even ( 3 UNITS)

permutations, Cayley's theorem. Definition, examples including permutation groups. Subgroups, cosets.

Lagrange's theorem and applications. Euclidean algorithm for polynomials, Polynomial rings, factorization, H.C.F. and L.C.M. of polynomials. Prerequisite: MAT205

MAT 302: ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II

(3 UNITS)

Normal subgroups and quotient groups. Monomorphic and isomorphic theorems. Symmetric groups, automorhisms, conjugate classes, normalizers. The sylow theorems. Normal and composition series. The Jordan ­ holder theorem. Direct product. Solvable groups. Rings: Isomorphism theorems for rings, Ideals and quotient rings. Euclidean domain. Irreducibility. Field extensions, degree of extension, minimum

polynomials. Algebraic and transcendental extensions. Straight edge and compass constructions. Principal Ideal Domain and Unique factorization Domain. Prerequisite: MAT 203.

MAT 303: INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY (3 UNITS) Definition and example of open sphere (or balls), open sets, closed sets, Interior, exterior, limit points, closure of set, dense subsets and separable spaces. Convergence, Completeness and Continuity mapping of metric spaces. Spaces of continuous function (X,R) as a Banach space. Euclidean and unitary spaces,

158

Cauchy's

inequality,

Minkowshi's

inequality.

Compactness,

Boundedness,

Connectedness and Ascolis theorem. Prerequisite: MAT 205. MAT 304: INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL MODELING (3 UNITS) Introduction: Definition and scope Methodology: Identification, formulation, investigation, validation, updating/optimization of models, cause-effect diagrams. Types of models: Verbal and mechanical analogies, finite (graph), fuzzy subset, statistical and stochastic models. Equation types involved: Algebraic, ordinary differential, partial differential, difference, integral and functional equations. Application of mathematical model to physical, biological, social and behavioural sciences. Computer simulation of some of the applications. Prerequisite: MAT 201

159

MAT 305: TENSOR ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Introduction: Manifold of points and definition of a tensor. Summation Convention.

Contravariant and covariant vestors. Scalar, vectors and other tensors of higher ranks (e.g. strain, stress and Hooke's tensor, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and moment of inertia). Kronecker delta. Operations, including contraction, on tensors and properties. Algebra of tensor. Quotient law. Basis. Metric tensor, signature of tensors. of metric and Christofell symbols. Covariant

differentiation

Geodesics.

Isotropic

tensors,

pseudoscalrs,

pseudovectors, speusdotensors, Riemann tensor, Ricci tensor, Einstein tensor, Compatibility tensor, Line element, exterior form, Exterior algerbra, Integrals and tensor densities. Physical applications of tensors. Prerequisite: MAT 210.

MAT 306: ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3 UNITS) The concept of existence and uniqueness of solutions. Operational methods of solution of Linear equations. Sturm-: Liouville theory. Green's functions and some of their elementary properties. Series solutions of second order linear equations, Bessel, Legendre, Gamma, Beta functions. Expansions in orthogonal functions. Fourier series. Prerequisite: MAT 201 MAT 307: COMPLEX ANALYSIS I (3 UNITS) Functions of complex variable. Limits and continuity of functions of a complex variable. Derivatives. The Cauchy ­ Riemann equations. Analytical functions. Bilinear transformations, conformal mappings. Integration of the complex plane. Contour integrals. Cauchy's theorems and its main consequences. Liouville's theorem, Morere's theorem. Convergence of sequences and series of functions of a complex variable. Power series. Taylor series and Laurent's series. Maximum modulus principle. Argument principle, Rouches's theorem. The Singularities and zeros. The Residue theorem and the evaluation of integrals. Prerequisite: MAT 207

MAT 308: COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (3 UNITS)

160

Topological Index and Properties: Some topological properties of the index. Chains and cycles. Simple connectivity Local and conformal mapping theory; the argument principle, maximum modulus theorem. Schwartx lemma. Normal families. Riemann ­ mapping theorem. Analytical Continuation: General theory of singularities. Reimann ­ surfaces. Functions defined by integrals. The Gamma ­ function. The Zeta-function. The principle of reflection. Function with natural boundaries. Power series: uniform convergence. Prerequisite: MAT 202 and MAT 307 MAT 309: REAL ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Integration: The integral as the area of the ordinate set of a function. Definitions of the Riemann integral of bounded functions, condition for integrability. Properties of the integral. Relations between the integrals and their derivations. Approximation to integrals by sums. Functions of bounded variation. Riemann ­ Stielfjes integral. Integration with respect to functions of bounded variation. Rectifiable curves. Sequence and series of functions: Convergence of sequence and series of functions. Uniform convergence. Test of convergence and uniform convergence. Continuity of sum and of uniform convergent series of continuous functions. Terms by term integration and differentiation of a series of continuous functions. Application to power series. Prerequisite: MAT 207 MAT 310: NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Nonlinear problem ­ Constrained and unconstrained optimization

problems, nonlinear methods. The development and analysis of algorithms for polynomial and spline interpolator and Gaussian quadrature; solution of systems of nonlinear equations; and the initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT 206

161

MAT 311: OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3 UNITS) Programming: Linear programming: formulation and graphical solution. The simplex method, Duality. Integer programming: transportation problem. Two ­ person zero ­ sum games. Non ­ linear programming: quadratic programming, Kuhn ­ Tucker methods. Optimality criteria. Simple variable Gradient methods. Dynamic programming: Operations research: Phase and classifications of operations research models. Decision Theory. Inventory models, Critical path. Analysis and project controls. Prerequisite: MAT 201. MAT 312: Statistical Inference (3 Units) Point estimation; Properties of point estimates; unbiasedness, sufficiency, consistency, efficiency and completeness. Maximum likelihood methods and the method of moments. Large sample properties of Least Square Estimator (L.S.E), Bates estimates. Confidence intervals, regions for mean variance of binomial and normal distributions. Tests of Hypotheses. Neymann-Pearson Theory. Composite hypotheses. Most powerful tests and UMP tests. Generalized likelihood ration tests. Tests of mean and variance of a normal distribution. Tests of goodness of fit and independence in contingency tables. Elements of sequential analysis. Non ­ parametric tests. Prerequisite: MAT 103. optimization. Multivariable technique.

MAT 313: DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY (3 UNITS) Definitions and examples of basic projective Geometry, Affine and Euclidean Geometries. Vector function of a real variable. Boundedness. Limits. Continuity and differentiability. Functions of Class Cm, Taylor's formulae. Analytical functions. Curves: regular, differentiable and smooth. Curvature and torsion. Tangent line and normal planes, Vectors: Functions of Vectors variable; Linear continuity and

162

limits. Directional functions of Class Cm. Taylor's theorem and inverse function theorem. Concept of a surface; parametric representation, tangent plane and normal lines. Topological properties of simple surface. Prerequisite: MAT 201

MAT 314: VECTORIAL MECHANICS (3 UNITS) Rotating Axes: Motion relative to the earth. Foucault's pendulum. Rigid Body Dynamics: Moments and products of inertia. Principal axes ­ momental ellipsoid. Energy and angular momentum. Two dimensional problems. Three dimensional

problems Euler's equations. Polode cone. Eulerian angles processional motion Analytical Mechanics: Lagrange's equation for holomonic and non ­ holonomic systems. Ignoragle coordinate, impulse, small oscillations, expressions for Kinetic and potential energies. Normal coordinate. Principal modes of oscillation. Prerequisite: MAT 209. MAT 320: WAVES THEORY ( 3 UNITS) Nature of waves, Equations of wave motion. Waves on strings, Finite and infinite strings. Waves in membrane, Longitudinal waves, Sound waves, Water waves, Tidal waves, Surface waves.

MAT 400: PROJECT IN INDUSTRIAL MATHEMATICS (6 UNITS) The Honours project in Industrial Mathematics will consist of a type written (double space on A4 paper) report on some approved and supervised topic(s) in the field of mathematics with applications. The student is expected to be examined orally on the approved report. MAT 401: ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3 UNITS) Existence of Solution. Uniqueness of solutions. Method

of

successive

approximations, Continuation of solution. Systems of differential equations. The nth order equation. Extension of the idea of a solution, maximum and minimum solutions. Elementary differential inequalities. Dependence of solutions on initial

163

conditions and parameters Variation of solutions with respect to initial conditions and parameters. Prerequisite: MAT 306 & MAT 309 MAT 402: PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3 UNITS) First order partial differential equations. Classifications and functional solutions. Second order partial differential equations. Classifications, solutions of heat, wave and Laplace equations by the method of characteristics, separation of variables, Lablace transform, Fourier transform. Prerequisite: MAT 306 MAT 403: INTRODUCTORY APPLIED FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Concepts of linear functional and operators, normed space, metric space, Benach space, Hilbert space, Sobolev space, Simple examples on application in mechanics (fluid and solid mechanics) and optimization problems. Prerequisite: MAT 309 MAT 404: MEASURE THEORY AND INTEGRATION (3 UNITS) Measure Theory Measure of open, closed sets. Outer and inner measure. Measurable sets. Properties of measure, non ­ measurable sets, measurable functions. Simple function algebra. The Lebesgue Integral Lebesgue Measure. Integral of nonnegative functions, Integral as measure of ordinate set, as a limit of approximate sums. Integral of an unbounded function. Integral over an infinite range. Simple properties of the integral. Sequences of integral (positive functions; functions with positive and negative values). Lebesgue monotone convergence theorem. Fatou's Lemma. Dominated convergence. Bepo's lemma. Bounded convergence. Sets of measure zero. Integration by parts. Fubini's theorem and applications to multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MAT 309 MAT 405: GENERAL TOPOLOGY (3 UNITS) Definition and examples. Open bases, open sub-bases. Topologizing of sets. G.F. sets. Continuous maps, open maps and closed maps. Homeomorphisms. Weak

164

topologies, Function algebras C(X,R), C(X,C). Compact spaces. Product of spaces. Tychonoff's theorem. Locally compact spaces. The separation axioms,

connectedness. The Weierstrass's approximation theorem. Prerequisite: MAT 303 MAT 406: ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY (3 UNITS) Fundamental Groups: Definition of the fundamental groups of space. Continuous mapping and fundamental groups. The fundamental group of a circle is infinite cyclic. Applications, The Brower fixed point theorem in 2-dimensions. The fundamental group of a product space. Covering Spaces: Definitions and example; Lifting of paths to a covering space. The fundamental group of a covering space. Homomorphism and automorphism of covering spaces. Prerequisite: MAT 405. MAT 407: QUANTUM MECHANICS I (3 UNITS) Classical Dynamics in Hamiltonian form and its application to atomic problems. The Bohr Theory. The ideal of Heisenberg and Schrödinger. Dynamical variables as oertors and the states of a system. Examples of energy eigen-functions. The representation of states in function space. Prerequisite: MAT 306

MAT 408: QUANTUM MECHANICS II (3 UNITS) Transformation of representations. Elements of linear operator theory. The Heisenberg and Schrödinger representations. The motion of a particle in three dimensions. Angular momentum relations. The hydrogen atom. The elements of perturbation theory. Ritz variation method of bounded states. Prerequisite: MAT 407 MAT 409: NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) The Approximation of the solution of ordinary differential equations: Solutions of first order differential equations ­ Taylor's expansion approach, Euler's Methods, Runge Kutta methods, predictor-corrector methods, other

165

integration formulas. Boundary value problems. Eigenvalue and Eigenvectors, Cayley-Hamilton Theorem. Characteristic equations. Krylor's methods.

Fundamental properties of equations. Calculations of eigenvalues and eigenvector. Matrix iteration method. Method of finding largest and smallest eigenvalues. The von Mises theorem. The Rayleigh Quotient. Matrix deflation, similarity and equivalence of matrices. Interpretation: General problem of the finite interpretation, systems possessing the interpolation property. General remainder theorems for interpolation in linear spaces. Best real error estimates. Convergence theorems. Prerequisite: MAT 310 MAT 410: NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II (3 UNITS) Difference Equations: Notations and definitions. Formation of difference equations. The solution concept of a difference equation. Linear homogeneous difference equations. Formation of difference equations. Bernoulli's method. Partial difference equations. The Approximation of the solution of partial differential equations: Classification of partial differential equations. The approximation of derivatives by finite difference. Simple parabolic differential equations. The explicit form of the difference equations and its convergence. The implicit form of the difference equation and its convergence. Stability and consistency. The Crank-Nicolson method. Introduction to finite elements method: Variational formulations, engineers point of view of finite element methods. Boundary conditions. Weighted residual methods. The Gelerkin methods. Prerequisite: MAT 409.

MAT 412: ADNVANCED COMPLEX ANALYSIS (3 UNITS) Integral Functions: Factorization of integral functions. Construction of different kinds of integral function. Factorization of integral function. The order of an integral function. Integral function of finite orders. Canonical products. Borel's theorems of canonical

166

products. The Phragmen-Lindel of principle. The proximate order of integral functions. Elliptic Functions: Definitions. The irreducible poles and zeros of an elliptic function. Weistrass's elliptical function p(z). Meromorphic functions. Prerequisite: MAT 411 MAT 413: HOMOLOGY THEORY (3 UNITS) Basic definition of homology, equivalence ideas of category theory and functions. Axiomatic approach to cohomology & homology theory. Chain complexes and singular homology applications to (1) Euclidean spaces (2) degree of a map (3) local homology. Filtration and C.W complexes. Complexes. Calculation of the homolog groups. Simplicial homology. Singular homology and cohomology with general coefficients. Prerequisite: MAT 202 and MAT 306 and enrolment in MAT 405 MAT 414: HOMOTOPY THEORY (3 UNITS) Homotopy and Homotopy equivalence; construction of the fundamental group ­ role of base point. Calculation of higher Homotopy group;- the exact sequence of the pair and the vibration sequence. Application to cell complexes ­ killing Homotopy classes, construction of space with given homotopy group, etc. Prerequisite: MAT 413 MAT 415: DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY I (3 UNITS) Curves in Frenet-Serret formulae; manifolds. Vector fields and I-Forms, Tensor algebra, Grassmann algebra, Exterior differenctiation. Interpolation of the Jacobian, Transformation of vector fields. Effect on differential forms. Affine connections, parallelism, the exponential mapping, covariant differentiation, structural equations, Riemannian connection. Prerequisite: MAT 415

MAT 417: FLUID DYNAMICS I (3 UNITS) Stresses and strains. Navier stokes Equation. Flow past a circular cylinder. Circle and Blasius's Theorems. Conformal

167

mapping,

Schwatz-christoffel

Theory.

Joukowski theory and aerofoils. Theory: D'Alembert's paradox.Boundary Layer introduction. Hele-Shaw cell. Energy equation Simple exact solutions. Dynamics similarity. Slow flows: Stoke's and Green's Lubrication theory. Laminar boundary layer, thickness, skin friction and heat transfer. Blasius solution for the flat plate and similar solutions. Laminar boundary layer separation. Prerequisite: MAT 314 MAT 418: FLUID DYNAMICS II (3 UNITS) Thermodynamics, compressibility effects. Equations of continuity and motion. Energy equation. One dimensional unsteady flow. Small disturbance theory. Normal and obliques shock waves. Flow produced in a tube by moving piston. Differential equations satisfied by velocity potential in steady irrotational motion. Linearised form of the equation in subsonic and supersonic flows (Small disturbance treatment for 2 ­ dimensional flows). Prerequisite: MAT 417. MAT 419: ELASTICITY I (3 UNITS) Tensors: Strain, stress, finite deformation of an elastic solid. Infinitesimal theory. Isotropic and non-isotropic elastic media. Solution of simple problems. Elementary concepts of heterogeneous media. Two dimensional problems of elasticity. Plane strain, plan stress, generalized plane problems. Theory of membranes and torsion problems; bending of prismatic bodies. The Airy's stress ­ functions and displacement functions. The complex stress-function and complex stress potentials. Simple solution for a circular boundary's Prerequisite: MAT 307 and MAT 314 MAT 420: ELASTICITY II ( 3 UNITS) 3 ­ D Problems of Electrostatics: Kelvin's solution, Boussinesq solution, Hertz's contact problem. Variational Principles:

168

Principle

of

minimum

potential

energy,

minimum

complementary

work

(Castiglian's principle). Rayleigh ­ Ritz method, Resissner's principle. Theory of wave propagation; p-wave, s-way, Rayleigh wave, Love wave. Theory of thin plates. Prerequisite: MAT 419 MAT 421: PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION (3 UNITS) Distribution of functions of random variables. Sampling distributions (including the distributions of sample means and variance from the normal population); distribution function technique, moment generating function technique and change of variable technique. Derivations and properties of t and F distributions. Distributions of order statistics and their functions. Laws of large numbers. Central limit theorem. Bivariate and multivariate normal distributions. Prerequisite: MAT 208.

MAT 422: DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT (3 UNITS) Basic Principle of Experimentation: Randomization, Replication and Control. Uniformity trials. Completely randomized, randomized block and latin square designs. Missing plot techniques. Factorial experiments, confounding and partial confounding the experiments with factors at two levels each. Split plot designs. Balanced incomplete block designs and lattice designs. Concepts of efficiency, application to Agriculture, Biology and Industry. Prerequisite: MAT 208 MAT 423: INFORMATION THEORY (3 UNITS) A measure of information technology: Axioms of uncertainty, properties of the uncertainty function; joint and conditional uncertainty; the measure of information. The discrete memory-less channels: Models for communication channels, channel capacity; classification of channels; decoding schemes; the fundamental theory; The weak converse to the fundamental theorem. Channel with memory; finite-state channels. The capacity of a general discrete channel. Continuous channels; The time discrete ­ Gaussian channels; uncertainty in the continuous case; the time-continuous Gaussian channel. Optional:

169

Comparison of the weak and strong converses for channels with memory. The converse of the coding theorem for the time discrete Gaussian channel. Bandlimited channels. Prerequisite: MAT 307. MAT 424: CODING THEORY (3 UNITS) The problem of unique decipherability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of Instantaneous codes. Extension of the

condition.

D

i

1

1, i 1 to n to decipherable codes.

Error codes: minimum distance principle; relation between distance and error; correcting properties of codes; the Hamming bound; Parity check coding. Application of group theory to parity check coding upper and lower bounds on the error correcting ability of parity checked codes; the strong converse for the binary symmetric channels. Prerequisite: MAT 301 MAT 425: OPTIMIZATION THEORY (3 UNITS) Stochastic System: The functions of a model; problem of optimization, analytic and summation models; the role of the Markov Chain concept. Validation. Models for social land occupational mobility. Manpower systems. Replacement systems. Inventory and storage systems. Queuing system: single and multiple channels, finite capacity systems. Queue networks, machine interference problems, priority disciplines, applications and queuing theory. Prerequisite: MAT 311 MAT 426: MATHEMATICAL MODELLING (3 UNITS) Simulation Modelling, Example from life, physical and social sciences. Examples of the consequences of crude approximations of models. Criticism of some known models in Genetics, Species interaction and Disease control. Case studies. Prerequisite: MAT 208 MAT 499: SEMINAR (1 UNIT) The Honours Seminar in Industrial Mathematics will be delivered by the students. The candidate will be examined orally.

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171

DEPARTMENT

OF

MICROBIOLOGY

172

ACADEMIC STAFF LIST

1. T.O. ADEJUMO B. Sc, M. Sc (Ilorin), Ph.D. (Ibadan) J.A. AKINYANJU B. Sc (Nsukka), Ph.D. (Lancaster) A.O. EKUNDAYO. B.Sc, M.Sc., Ph.D. S. A. LALEYE B. Sc (Ado), M. Sc, (Lagos) Ph.D.(Ado) A. O. AJAYI, B. Sc, M. Sc (Ife), Ph.D. (Ibadan) S.A. BALOGUN, B.Sc, M. Sc (Ibadan) R.A.O. GABRIEL-AJOBIEWE, B. Sc (Ilorin), M. Tech. (Akure) K.T. ADEGBEHINGBE, B. Tech. (Akure), M. Sc (Ibadan) G.A. ADESOJI B. Sc, M. Sc (Ife) A.O.O. ADESEMOYE, B. Tech. (Akure), M.Sc (LASU) M.O. BABALOLA

Senior Lecturer & Ag. Head

(Agric Microbiology and mycology) Professor (Microbial Physiology) Visiting Professor (Environmental Microbiology) Senior lecturer (Food/industrial microbiology] Lecturer I [Environmental Microbiology] Lecturer II [Environmental Microbiology] Lecturer I [Food/Industrial Microbiology] Lecturer II [Food/Industrial Microbiology] Lecturer II [Medical Microbiology] Assistant Lecturer

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

Assistant Lecturer

B.Sc., M.Sc. TECHNICAL STAFF

12. A. ADEMOKOYA, H.N.D. (Akure) O. AKELE, H.N.D. (Ado- Ekiti) V.T. TENIOLA H.N.D (Ado-Ekiti) ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 15. Y. BOWAJE Grade II, WASC(SSCE) A.A. STEPHEN Dip. computer M.D. ASEMOLOYE D. S BADEJO primary six Office Attendant

173

Technologist I

13.

Technologist I

14.

Technologist II

Clerical Officer

16.

Data Entry Clerk III

17. 18.

19. 20.

A.A. Olasehinde S. Fagorola

2.

INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL BACKGROUND

The Department of Microbiology was established in 1999 after the relocation of the University to Akungba­Akoko in December 1999. It combines theoretical and practical principles with a realistic approach to the problems and needs of a developing country. 3. PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES. The Department of Microbiology trains students in various aspects of microbiology such as agricultural microbiology, environmental microbiology, food and industrial microbiology, medical microbiology, microbial biotechnology, microbial genetics, microbial ecology and physiology. The programme is designed to equip graduates to undertake work in medical, agricultural, industrial, food and dairy industries, sanitary and other scientific fields. These trainings will enable the students to be employed in various fields of research in the university system, hospital, biotechnology and or allied setup. 4. PROGRAMME OFFERED

B. Sc (Hons) Microbiology Duration: The duration for the award of a B.Sc. (Hons) Microbiology degree shall be four (4) Years (Eight Semesters) for U.M.E / Successful Pre-degree students and 3 years (6 semesters) for Direct Entry Students. 5. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS (i) Candidates seeking admission into the Department of Microbiology must satisfy the University admission requirement (i.e.) credit passes in English Language, Mathematics, Biology/Agricultural Science, Chemistry and Physics at not more than two sittings of SSCE/NECO/GCE O/L/. Any candidate who has satisfied the Adekuinle-Ajasin University Pre-Degree Science programme is also eligible for admission. (ii) Direct Entry candidates: In addition to satisfying the University admission requirement, students must have passes in Biology and Chemistry at the Advanced level of the General Certificate of Education. Candidates with National Diploma (ND, Upper credit) or Higher National Diploma (HND) in Microbiology and Virology or related subjects may be considered for admission. 6. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AWARD OF DEGREE

To be eligible for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Microbiology in this University, the candidate must have satisfactorily completed the following:

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(i) The normal University requirements, i.e. 11 units of GST courses. (ii)The Faculty of Science requirements i.e. normal 24 units of foundation courses. (iii) The departmental requirements of 99 units (iv) Electives (10 units). A minimum total of 144 units are required of four (4) years U.M.E./Pre-degree students and 108 units of Direct Entry Students for the award of B. Sc (Hons.) degree in Microbiology. 7. REGISTRATION FOR COURSES

(a) Candidates must register for the appropriate compulsory, required and elective courses as indicated in the University regulations (b) Certain courses which are designed as prerequisites to some other courses must be taken before registering for courses to which they are prerequisites; a student must score at least a minimum of 35% before he/she can be permitted to register for the course to which it is a prerequisite. (c) The minimum workload is 15 and the maximum is 24 units per semester. Permission for waiver for graduating students must be sought from the HOD subject to Senate approval. (d) A student can withdraw from a course within the time stipulated by Senate without penalty only with the approval of the HOD on completion of add/delete form. Any student who withdraws without permission will be deemed to have failed the course. 8. COURSE OFFERINGS 100 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses CODE TITLE UNIT

BIO 101 General Biology I 2 BIO 103 Experimental Biology I 1 CHM 101 General Chemistry I 3 MAT 101 Basic Algebra 3 PHY 101 General Physics I 3 PHY 103 Practical Physics I 1 (b) Required Courses GST 111 Communication in English 2 GST 113 Use of the Library & Study Skill 2 17

SECOND SEMESTER COURSES

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(a) Compulsory Courses CODE TITLE BIO 102 General Biology II BIO 104 Experimental Biology II CHM 102 General Chemistry II MAT 104 Basic Mathematics PHY 102 General Physics II PHY 104 Practical Physics II (b) Required Courses GST 112 Philosopshy & Logic GST 114 Nigerian Peoples & Cultures 200 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses CODE TITLE UNIT UNIT 3 1 3 3 3 1 2 2 18

MCB 201 General Microbiology I 3 MCB203 Microbiological Techniques 2 BCH 201 Introductory Biochemistry I 3 BIO 201 Introductory Genetics 3 BIO 205 Introductory Cell Biology 3 CHM 211 Organic Chemistry I 3 (b) Required Courses GST 211 History & Philosophy of Science2 Electives (3units) EBF 201 PSB 203 Lower Invertebrates (3 units) Seedless Plants (3 units) 22 SECOND SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses CODE TITLE UNIT

MCB 202 General Microbiology II 3 BCH 202 Introductory Biochemistry II 3 BIO 202 Introductory Ecology 3 BIO 206 Biostatistics for Agric & Biological Sciences CHM 212 Inorganic Chemistry I 3 (b) Required Courses GST 212 Communication in English 2 GST 214 Introduction to Peace & Conflict Resolution Electives (2units)

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3

2

PSB 204

Introductory Plant Biotechnology

2 21

300 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses CODE TITLE UNIT

MCB 301 Virology 3 MCB 303 Bacteriology 3 MCB 305 Mycology 3 MCB 307 Microbial Physiology and Metabolism 3 (b) Required Courses GST 311 Information & Communication Technology 2 Elective Courses (5/6 units) BCH 301 Enzymology 3 BCH 311 EBF 305 EBF 309 Experimental Biochemistry 1 Basic Entomology Introductory Parasitology 2 3 3 19/20 SECOND SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses CODE MCB MCB MCB MCB MCB MCB 302 304 306 308 310 312 TITLE UNIT

Microbial Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 Immunology and Immunochemistry 3 Microbial Ecology 3 Agricultural Microbiology 3 Students Industrial Work Experience (SIWES) Analytical Microbiology and Quality Control 3

3

MCB 314 Aquatic Microbiology 3 (b) Electives (2/3 units) EBF 308 Environmental Impact Assessment (2units) BCH 308 Food and Nutrition Biochemistry (3 units) 23/24

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400 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses MCB 401 CODE TITLE Principles of Epidemiology and Public Health UNIT 3 3 3 3 3 2 2

MCB 403 Microbial Biotechnology MCB 405 Industrial Microbiology MCB 407 Environmental Microbiology MCB 409 Soil Microbiology MCB 499 Seminar (b) Required Courses GST 411 Introduction to Enterpreneurial Skills Elective courses (3 Units) BCH 405 Genetic Engineering (3 Units)

22 SECOND SEMESTER COURSES (a) Compulsory Courses CODE TITLE MCB 400 Research Project MCB 402 Microbial Diseases of Economic Crops MCB 404 Medical Microbiology MCB 406 Pharmaceutical Microbiology MCB 410 Food Microbiology (b) Elective course (2 units) MCB 408 Petroleum Microbiology UNIT 6 3 3 3 3 2 20

11. COURSE DESCRIPTION MCB 201: GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY I (3 UNITS) Historical aspect: Scope of Microbiology, forms and functions of microbial groups­ algae bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. General characteristics of

microorganisms, growth and reproduction. Economic importance of major groups of microorganism.

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MCB 202: GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY II (3 UNITS) Basic principles of isolation, identification and classification of microbes, ecological distribution. Relationships and succession between microorganisms in nature. Microbial variation and heredity, cycles of elements in nature and

nitrogen fixation. Pre-requisite MCB 201. MCB 203: MICROBIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (2 UNITS) Students are expected to undergo both field and Laboratory studies for successful completion of this course. Field techniques and sample collection, analysis of samples. Operation of specialized equipment employed in Microbiology:

microscopy, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis and photography. Aseptic and pure culture techniques, Pasteurization, sterilization and disinfection. Media preparation, isolation and identification of microorganisms, maintenance and preservation of cultures.

MCB 301: VIROLOGY (3 UNITS) Classification, structure, pathogenesis, host response and replication strategies of viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals, molecular biological techniques. Regulation of lytic development and maintenance of the lysogenic state in bacteriophage lambda P2, T4 single stranded DNA and RNA phages. Methods for purification of viruses. Cytopathology of animal viruses of local ecological interest. Interferon, tumors viruses. Pre-requisite MCB 201,203. MCB 302: MICROBIAL GENETICS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3 UNITS) A survey of the current status of microbial genetics (bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi) including discussion of methods and findings in the areas of mutagenesis inductions, isolation and biochemical characteristics of mutants: adaptation, transformation, transduction, conversion and conjugation. DNA replication, regulation, recombination and repair. General and specialized methods and techniques in microbial genetics. Experiments with virulent

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phages, temperate phages and lysogenic bacteria. Fungal and other lower eucaryotic genetics. Application of genetic engineering. Pre-requisite: MCB 201,203

MCB 303: BACTERIOLOGY (3 UNITS) The morphology, life cycle and biochemical characteristics of bacteria. Growth and nutrition of bacteria. The problems and methods involved in the systematic study of bacteria and other prokaryotes, their nature, characteristics,

identification and isolation. Chemotherapeutic agents. Genetic recombination. Role of these organisms in nutritional diseases of animals and plants. requisite MCB 201,203 MCB 304: IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOCHEMISTRY (3 UNITS) Basic concepts of immunology, structure of antigens, antigenic determinants, cellular response to antigenic stimulation. immunolglobulins and antibodies. formation. thymus in Structure and classification of Pre-

Mechanism and theories of antibodies Role of lymphoid tissues and immuno-pathology,

Antigen and antibody interactions. immune responses.

Hypersensitivity,

autopathology, auto-immunology, tumour and transplantation immunology. Immuno-prophylaxis and serotheraphy. The practicals will include laboratory

exercises in modern techniques in immunology and immunochemistry. MCB 305: MYCOLOGY (3 UNITS) Mycological techniques, structure, form and function, reproduction and life cycle of higher and lower fungi. Fungal interactions with other organisms, Ecological distribution and economic importance of representative groups of fungi. Field and laboratory study of fungi used by man. Plant and animal pathogens and roles in ecosystems. Pre-requisite MCB 201,203. MCB 306: MICROBIAL ECOLOGY (3 UNITS) Geographical distribution of some selected groups of microorganisms of water, soil and air of industrial and medical importance. Their phylogeny and paleontology, autecology and synecology, population, nutritional and habitat groups. Applications in the areas of deterioration of products and disposal of

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wastes.

Biogeochemical

cycles,

Interaction

between

organisms,

Natural

microbiota. MCB 307: MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY AND METABOLISM (3 UNITS) Microbial growth: Changes in cell population and macromolecular composition during growth process. The role of enzymes in the physiology of microorganisms. Growth under nutrient limiting and morphology of microorganisms. Growth

under nutrient limiting and non-limiting condition, nutrition and metabolism of yeast, molds and bacteria. Carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Chemical anatomy of the cell. Oxygen relations. Aerobic and anaerobic assimilation.

General aspect of energy yielding processes. Factors influencing microbial growth. The biotic environment. Beneficial association, antagonist association and

synergism. Microbial biosynthesis. Regulatory mechanisms. Pre-requisite MCB 201/203. MCB 308: AGRICULTURAL MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) Utilization of micro-organisms in agriculture, Microbial inoculants as

biofertilizers, phytostimulators and biological control agents, Plant diseases and control, Aflatoxin and grain storage, Use of agricultural and industrial wastes for the production of compost and single cell protein, Mushroom cultivation. Prerequisite MCB 303,305. MCB 310: INDUSTRIAL ATTACHMENT (3 UNITS) (Student industrial work experience) Industrial attachment in Medical/public health, Agricultural research institutes or University during the long vacation (i.e. over a three-month period). MCB 312: ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND QUALITY CONTROL (3 UNITS) Microorganisms as reagents in quantitative analysis. Selection of test organism for assays (antibiotics, amino acids, vitamins etc.) Responses of microorganisms used in assays. Preparation of assay sample and methods of assay, Interpretation of results. Aspect of quality control. Plastic and equipment sanitation.

Microbiological standards and specification. Pre-requisite MCB 201/203.

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MCB 314: AQUATIC MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) Microorganisms in natural waters, physical and chemical factors affecting them. The role of microorganisms in biogeochemical cycles in water and sediment. Microorganisms and origin of mineral resources. The role of microbes in selfpurification of water. Oligotrophic and eutrophic lakes. Economic importance of aquatic microorganisms. MCB 400: RESEARCH PROJECT IN MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (6 UNITS) A student will be expected to carry out a detailed laboratory research investigation under supervision of a staff in any special area of microbiology and biotechnology, write it up as a project report and be examined for his/her knowledge of the work before a panel of external and/or internal examiners in an oral examination. MCB 401: PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH (3 UNITS) A short history of epidemiology. Natural origin and spread of infectious disease. Methods used in epidemiological investigations. Herd immunity. Latency of

infectious, multinational system in epidemics, zoonoses, antigenic drifts, prevention and control of infection diseases, Biological products for

immunization, international control of infections diseases. Emphasis should be laid on infectious diseases of local relevance. Pre-requisite MCB 201/203. MCB 402: MICROBIAL DISEASES OF ECONOMIC CROPS (3 UNITS) Major microbial diseases of some economic crops e.g. cocoa, oil palm, cashew, coffee, rubber, kolanut, maize, cassava, cowpea, groundnut and sorghum. Symptoms, etiology, transmission and control. Methods and techniques of plant protection. Cultural practices, use of chemicals and biological control. Prerequisite: MCB 308. MCB 403: MICROBIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY (3 UNITS)

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Recombinant DNA techniques in biotechnology: the polymerase chain reaction, preparation of recombinant DNA, cloning vectors, inserting genes into eukaryotic cells, application of genetic engineering. Microbial products: bioinsecticides, biopolymers, biosurfactants; biodegradation: control and stimulation; biosensors. Analysis and manipulation of genes. Pre-requisite MCB 302. MCB 404: MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (4 UNITS) Source of transmission of infections, Etiological agents of microbial diseases (bacteria fungi and viruses). Collection and examination of clinical specimensdiagnosis, epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention and control; Determinants of pathogenicity; Treatment and control. Host-parasite relationship.. Pre-requisite MCB 201, 202. MCB 405: INDUSTRIAL MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) The use of microorganisms in industrial fermentation. Industrial exploitation of microorganisms. Media for industrial fermentation, Types of fermentation of foods, bread, alcoholic and non alcoholic beverages, fermented vegetables and dairy products, soy sauce, tempeh, miso, garri, ogi. Antibiotics production e.g. penicillin, griseofulvin and tetracycline antibiotics. Industrial uses of

microorganisms in single cell proteins. Bacteria, actinomycetes, yeast and moulds of industrial importance, microbial deterioration of pulpwood, paper and plant. The course will include an industrial visit. Pre-requisite MCB 306 MCB 406: PHARMACEUTICAL MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) Introduction to antimicrobial agents; Chemistry of chemotherapeutic agents and antibiotics; Production and synthesis of antimicrobial agents and antibiotics; Antimicrobial products of plant origin. Mode of action and assay of antimicrobial agents; Antibiotic sensitivity and resistance; Quality control of pharmaceutical agents; Assessment methods of antimicrobial agents and parameters determining their usefulness. Pre-requisite: MCB 201. MCB 407: ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) The microbial environment and microorganisms in their natural environments. The Microbiology of sanitation sanitary practice as related to everyday living

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where contamination of air, water, food and soil result in deterioration of the environment and mankind. Methods of water and sea treatment processes and activities of specific and the contamination of an environment or a product will be explored. The role of microbes in prospecting, recovery and degradation of

petroleum products. Pre-requisite MCB 201. MCB 408: PETROLEUM MICROBIOLOGY (2 UNITS) History of petroleum microbiology. Microbes in prospecting for oil. Genesis of fossil fuel and microorganisms. Acid and mine drainage. Thermophiles oil

spillage, pollution and biodegradation of petroleum. Pre-requisite MCB 201,202. MCB 409: SOIL MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) The characteristics of soil environment; Microbial flora and fauna of soil; Microbial activities of soil; Nitrogen cycle, carbon cycle and mineral transformation by microorganisms. Ecological relationship among the soil pathogens; Effects of pesticides on soil microorganisms. Biodegradation, enhanced biodegradation and biofuels generation. Pre-requisite: MCB 201.

MCB 410: FOOD MICROBIOLOGY (3 UNITS) Food and microorganisms, factors affecting microbial growth in foods. Food spoilage, condition of storage, consequences of microbial growth in foods. General view of poisoning in foods, poisoning by microorganisms and their products, seafood toxicants, chemical poisoning. Investigation of food-borne disease outbreaks. Food fermentation, Food preservation, food sanitation. MCB 499: SEMINAR IN MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (2 UNITS) Under the supervision of staff, the student is expected to select a seminar topic for detailed study, using library methods. The course phases should be on

current advances in the chosen field. The course is expected to give the student the opportunity for independent thought and expression. The study will result in seminars and symposia.

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185

DEPARTMENT

OF

PHYSICS AND ELECTRONICS

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1. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ELECTRONICS

B.Sc Degree Programme in Physics and Electronics ACADEMIC STAFF 1. D. D. ABAJINGIN Senior Lecturer & Ag. HOD B.Sc. (Benin), M.Sc. (Ibadan), Ph.D (Benin) (Theoretical Physics) I. R. AJAYI B. Sc., M.Sc. Ph.D (Ibadan) V. S.A. ADELOYE M.Sc. (Brunel), Ph.D (Ilorin) O.S. AJAYI B. Sc., M.Sc. (Ibadan) Ph.D (Akure) Professor (Radiation and Health Physics) Visiting Reader (Communication)

2.

3.

4.

Visiting Reader (Radiation and Health Physics) Adjunct Reader (Theoretical Physics)

5.

F. OJELABI

B.Sc.,(Ado-Ekiti),M.Sc.,(Ibadan), Ph.D. (Benin)

6.

A. B. RABIU B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D O. M. AFOLABI B. Sc., M.SC (Ibadan), Ph.D. (Ife) R. S. FAYOSE B.Sc. (Ife), M. Tech (Akure) O. OLUBOSEDE B. Tech (Akure) M.Sc. (Benin) E. O. ONIYA B. Sc (Ado-Ekiti), M.Sc. (Ibadan) J. AGBI B. Sc.(Ado-Ekiti), M.Sc.(Benin) TOMIWA A. C. B. Sc., M.Sc. (Ilorin) AYODEJI KUNLE B. Sc., M.Sc.(Lagos) SUNDAY A.G.

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Adjunct Reader (Atmospheric Physics) Lecturer I (Geophysical/ Solid State) Lecturer II (Electronic Instrumentation) Lecturer II (Theoretical Physics) Lecturer II (Radiation and Health Physics) Assistant Lecturer (Theoretical Physics) Assistant Lecturer (Atmospheric Physics) Assistant Lecturer (Geophysics) Graduate Fellow

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13. 14.

B. Sc.(Akungba) SENIOR TECHNICAL STAFF 15. S.A. ADEYEMI HND (Ado-Ekiti) 16. F.S. OLUYEMI FTC, MSET (London) S. A. GIWA HND (Owo), PGD (Ado-Ekiti) J. O. IBUKUN HND (Akure), PGD (Akure) J. O.FAGBEMI B.Sc. (Akungba) O. A. ADEYERI OND (Kaduna)

Chief Technologist

[Electronics and Telecommunication)

Chief Technologist Mechanical Assistant Chief Technologist Electrical Senior Technologist Electronic Technologist II

17.

18.

19.

20.

Higher Technical officer

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

21.

OSAKUADE A. OND(Owo) ADEWOLE O.F SSCE OLUKAYODE K. OND AKINSIKU O. SSCE OGBERA A. A. SSCE ADULOJU O. SSCE DAODU J.O.

Data Entry Clerk II

22.

Laboratory Assistant

23.

Typist

24.

Clerical Officer

25.

Office Assistant

26.

Laboratory Attendant

27.

2.

Laboratory Assistant

Introduction and Background Information:

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The Department was one of the Department of Ondo State University when the University was relocated to Akungba-Akoko in 1999. The department has

reviewed its course curriculum and substantially modified it, thus making it more responsive and adaptable to the scientific and technological advances of modern time. The department has continues to play its own role in the task of training competent physicists and related experts for national man power needs and technological development of the country.

3. Philosophy and Objectives of the Programme: i. The undergraduate programme is designed to produce graduates that can be more readily absorbed into the various areas of the rapidly developing fields of Physics and Electronics. Students are exposed to both basic and applied

courses as well as Laboratories and Industrial Training to enable them to satisfy the manpower needs of the public and industrial sectors of any economy. ii. The objectives of the programme are: (1) To give students basic knowledge in experimental; and theoretical Physics as well as in basic Electronics (2) To allow a students who so desires to pursue deeply a course in Pure and/or Applied Physics (Option A) such as is found within any other regular Physics department elsewhere so that he can if he chooses to obtain minor specialization ins any of the following areas: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) Condensed Matter Physics Environmental Physics Electronic Materials and Devices Technology (Microelectronics) Electronic Instrumentation Techniques Radiation and Health Physics Geophysics Theoretical Physics

3. To allow other students who so desire to pursue our Electronics Option (Option B) (especially after the common first two years) with exposure to courses in Digital electronics, Power Electronics, Vacuum Physics and Thin Film Technology, Information an Communication technology , Material Science, Software Engineering etc. Students in this

189

category would have the necessary foundations to pursue career objectives in manufacturing or processing industries or help in high tech laboratories. Given the appreciable dose of Physics, they are already

exposed to they could even go further to specialize in the following areas, among others: (i) (ii) (iii) Electronics Material and Devices Technology (Micro electronics) Electronic Instrumentation Techniques Information in Communication technology

4. The Programme Offered:B.Sc (Hons) in Physics and Electronics Duration: 4 years - for candidates admitted through UME

3 years - for Direct Entry candidates 5. Admission Requirements The minimum requirements for admission to courses leading to B.Sc degree in the Department of Physics and Electronics are those for entry in the Faculty of Science. Admission to the 100 level or the first year is through the Joint Matriculation Board (JMB) examination or such other concessional examinations as the University system may approve. In addition,

candidates are required to have credits in five subjects at the SSC and GCE "0" level or NECO including Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and English language. Admission to the 200 level is possible for candidates who, in addition to meeting the Faculty General Admission Requirements have good passes at the Advanced level of the GCE (or equivalent) in Physics, Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics; or approved equivalent qualifications such as the ND (Upper Credit) and HND. Consideration may also be given to such other qualifications as the Departments and/or Faculty may evaluate and approve. Candidates who have passed through the Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba-Akoko Pre-degree Programme are also eligible for admission. 6. Registration for Courses Courses for registration in the Department are characterized as follows:

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Compulsory course: is a course which a student must take and pass before graduation. Elective Course: A departmentally prescribed or self chosen course which a student must take before graduation. Pre-requisite: A course which must be taken before a particular course. Any alteration in the number or content of course for which a student is formally registered can only be effected with the consent of his/her Head of Department. Such alteration (either by way of addition, dropping or

substitution of a course) must be carried out on specially prescribed Add/Delete form and within the first four weeks of the semester. Any student who takes an examination in a course he/she has not registered for will have the result of such an examination declared cancelled. 7. The minimum requirement for the award of the B.Sc degree in Physics and Electronics for UME candidates is the satisfactory completion of not less than 144 units of course work consisting of: Compulsory courses Electives 116 units 16 units

GST courses 12 units Total 144 units Direct entry student candidates are required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 118 units. A student must register for a minimum of 15 credit units and maximum of 24 credit units each semester. Course Outline 100 LEVEL 1ST SEMESTER Course Code

Course Title L

Contact Hours Units T P 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 1 3 3 3

Compulsory Courses PHY 101 General Physics I PHY 103 Practical Physics I CHM 101 General Chemistry I MAT 101 General Mathematics I BIO 101 General Biology Required Courses GST 111 Communication in English

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3 0 3 3 3

2

0

0

2

GST 113 Use of Library and Study skills

2

0

0

2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 Units

Compulsory Courses PHY 102 General Physics II 3 PHY 104 Practical Physics II 0 CHM 102 General Chemistry II 3 MAT 102 General Mathematics II 3 BIO 102 General Biology II 3 Required Courses GST 112 Philosophy and Logic 2 GST 114 Nigerian Peoples and Cultures 2 200 LEVEL SEMESTER

3 1 3 3 3 2 2

1ST Course Code Course Title

Contact Hours Units L T P 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 3 0 3 3 3 1 1 3

Compulsory Courses PHY 201 Theoretical Mechanics 3 PHY 203 Thermodynamics 3 PHY 205 Applied Electricity I 3 PHY 207 Practical Physics III 0 PHY 209 Electricity and Instrumentation Lab I 0 MAT 201 Math Methods I 3

Required Courses PHY 211 PHY 213 GST 211 Workshop Practice Introd. to Astrophysics History and Philosophy of Science 0 2 2 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 2 2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours L T P 3 1 0 Units

Compulsory Courses PHY 202 Wave, Vibrations & Optics

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3

PHY PHY PHY PHY

204 206 208 210

MAT 202

Modern Physics 3 Applied Electricity II 3 Practical Physics IV 0 Electricity and Instrumentation Laboratory II 0 Math. Methods II 3

1 1 0 0 1

0 0 3 3 0

3 3 1 1 3

Required Courses PHY 212 CSC 102 GST 212 Introduction to Material Science Programming Languages Communication in English 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 2

200 Level Long vacation Students are to be on a twelve-week industrial training (SIWES) programme. 300 LEVEL 1ST SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours Units L T P 1 0 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 2

Compulsory Courses PHY 301 Electromagnetic Theory I 3 PHY 307 Electronics Lab I 0 PHY 315 Mathematical Physics I 3 PHY 319 Measurement & Instrumentation GST 311 Information & Communication Technology 2 PHY 303 Quantum Mechanics I 2 PHY 305 Circuit Theory I 2 PHY 309 Analog Electronics I 2 PHY 313 Digital Electronics I 2 Electives PHY 317 Analytical Mechanics 3 CSC 205 Algorithm & Data Structure 2 2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title

3

Contact Hours L T P 1 1 0 1 0 0 3 0

Units

Compulsory Courses PHY 302 Electromagnetic Theory II 3 PHY 304 Thermal and Statistical Physics3 PHY 308 Electronics Lab II 0 PHY 320 Communication Principles 3

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3 3 1 3

PHY 322 PHY 318 PHY 306 Electives PHY 310 PHY 314 CSC 314

Solid State Physics Computational Physics Circuit Theory II

3 3 2

1 1 1

0 0 0

3 3 2

Analog Electronics II 2 Digital Electronics II 2 Computer Organisation & Arch.2

1 1 1

0 0 0

2 2 2

1ST Course Code Course Title

400 LEVEL SEMESTER Contact Hours L T P 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 2 Units

Compulsory Courses PHY 499 Seminar 0 PHY 403 Mathematical Physics II 3 PHY 431 Power Electronics I 3 PHY 409 Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme 0 0 GST 411 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Skills 2 Option A For students interested in Physics career PHY 405 Quantum Mechanics II 3 PHY 411 Nuclear and Particle Physics I 3 And five (3) units of any of the following: PHY 413 Solid State Devices I 3 PHY 415 Control System Techniques I 3 PHY 417 Introd. to Telecommunication and Broadcasting 3 PHY 419 Atmospheric Physics 3 PHY 421 Applied Geophysics I 3 Option B For students allowed into Electronics option PHY 415 Control System Techniques I 3 PHY 417 Introd. to Telecommunication and Broadcasting 3 And five (3) units of any of the following: PHY 407 Microprocessors & Applications2 PHY 413 Solid State Devices I 3 PHY 421 Applied Geophysics I 3

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1 3 3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0

3 3 2 3 3

PHY 419 PHY 423 PHY 427

Atmospheric Physics Microwave and Antennas Software Engineering I

3 2 2

1 1 1

0 0 0

3 2 2

2ND SEMESTER Course Code Course Title Contact Hours Units T P Compulsory Courses PHY 400 Project 0 0 4 PHY 406 Energy Conversion and Environment 2 1 0 PHY 448 Electrical Engineering Installation 2 1 0 Option A Electives For students interested in Physics career Twelve (9) units of any of the following: PHY 404 Atomic and Molecular Physics PHY 412 Nuclear and Particle Physics II PHY 414 Solid State Devices II PHY 420 Vacuum Physics & Thin Film Technology PHY 424 Applied Geophysics II PHY 426 Reactor and Health Physics PHY 430 Optical Fibre Communication PHY 438 Electronics System & Installation Option B Electives For students allowed into Electronics option Nine (9) units of any of the following: PHY 404 Atomic and Molecular Physics PHY 408 Digital Signal Processing PHY 410 Semiconductor Technology PHY 414 Solid State Devices II PHY 416 Electronic Instrumentation PHY 418 Control System Technique II PHY 422 Material Science PHY 426 Reactors and Health Physics PHY 428 Acoustics PHY 430 Optical Fibre Communication PHY 432 Power Electronics II PHY 434 Reliability and Maintainability Electr. and Electronic Systems PHY 436 Data Communication PHY 438 Electronic System & Installation

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4 2 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

PHY PHY PHY PHY

440 442 444 446

Software Engineering II Computer Hardware System St. Satellite Communication Computer Networks and Services COURSE DESCRIPTION

2 2 3 3

1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0

2 2 3 3

PHY 101: GENERAL PHYSICS I (3,1,0)

3 units

Units of Measurement and order of magnitude Scalars and vectors, vector product Motion along a straight line, motion in two dimensions. Newton's Laws of motion and their applications. Gravitation and Newton's Law with its applications. Force and Motion, Work and Kinetic Energy. Conservation of Energy. Impulse, linear Momentum conservation. Collision, Rotational Dynamics angular momentum and its conservation Statics. Equilibrium of particles and bodies. Circular motion, Harmonic Motion, Oscillation. Waves, and Wave motion in a stretched string and in a pipe, sound waves. Temperature and Expansion. Heat and heat measurements, transfer of heat. Hydrostatics, pressure gauges, Archimedes Principle. Surface Tension, Contact angle and capillarity, Elasticity and Plasticity. PHY 102 GENERAL PHYSICS II (3,1,0) 3 units Electric charges and forces, Coulomb's law, Electric potential, Capacitance, Dielectrics. Electric current and resistance, circuits, Electromotive force, Kirchoff's laws. The magnetic field, Ampere's law and its applications. Faradays laws of induction, Magnetic properties of matter. Electromagnetic Oscillations. Magnetic forces and power generation. Simple A.C. circuits. Electromagnetic waves. Geometrical Optics. Reflection and Refraction at Plane and Curved Surfaces. Lenses and Optical instruments. Interference, Diffraction. Photons, Electrons and Atoms. Emission and Absorption of light in quanta. Photoelectric effect. De Broglie hypothesis. The Bohr atom and Line Spectra. Elementary Semiconductor Physics. Prerequisite PHY 101 PHY 103: PRACTICAL PHYSICS (LABORATORY) I (0,0,3) 1 unit

The use of Graphical Methods, the Errors and Accuracy in Experimental Physics. Simple measuring instruments e.g. Micrometer Screw Gauge, Callipers, Spherometer, etc. Measurement of Time, Pendulum, Inertia. Motion under Uniform Acceleration, Including Inclined Plane and Friction experiments. Elasticity, Surface Tension Simple Calorimetry Experiments.

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PHY 104 PRACTICAL PHYSICS (LABORATORY) II (0,0,3) Experiments with Simple Plane and Spherical mirrors Thin Lenses Experiments Refraction of Light at Plane Surfaces, Prisms The Spectrometer and Dispersion Introduction to Electrical Circuits, Ohm's Law Wheatstone Bridge Measurements The Potentiometer Comparison of EMF's of cells Determination of AC Mains Frequency PHY 201: THEORETICAL MECHANICS (3,1,0) 3 units

1 unit

Newtonian Mechanics: motion of a particle in one, two and three dimensions; systems of particles and collision theory; Newtonian gravitation, conservative force and potentials, oscillations, central force problems; accelerated frames of reference; rigid body dynamics, generalised motion, mechanics of continuous bodies. Prerequisite MAT 104 PHY 202: WAVES, VIBRATIONS AND OPTICS (3,1,0,) 3 units Waves phenomena; acoustic waves; the harmonic oscillator waves on a string; energy in waves motion; longitudinal waves; standing waves; group and phase velocity; Doppler effect; Optics; Spherical waves; interference and diffraction, interferometers and difractometers; holography, dispersion and scattered geometrical optics; waves and rays; reflection at a spherical face, thin lenses optical lenses, mirrors and prisms. PHY 203: THERMODYNAMICS (3,1,0) 3 units

The structure of Matter Atoms, Molecules, Phases of Matter; Solid, Liquid, gas and plasma. Elastic and Plastic properties of solids. The kinetic Theory of Gases; Heat transfer-conduction, convection and radiation Liquids at rest (Hydrostatics); Liquids in motion (hydrodynamics) Surface phenomena - Surface tension, evaporation, boiling phase changes condensation, sublimation, solidification. Thermal expansion of solids, Expansion of Liquids, gases, ideal gas laws and the behaviour of real gases. Thermodynamics, Isothermal and Adiabatic changes. The second law, Carnot engine. Bonding of matter covalent, ionic, metallic, Van der Waals Hydrogen bond. Prerequisite PHY 102

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PHY 204: MODERN PHYSICS (3,1,0)

3 units

Atoms, Electrons, and Nuclei: Atomic nature of matter, Discovery of the electron, Millikan and the electronic charge Special Relativity: Einstein's postulates, Time dilation, Doppler effect, length contraction, Lorentz transformations, Velocity transformation, Relativistic momentum and energy Particle Properties of Waves: Blackbody radiation, Planck's formula, energy quantization, Photolelectric Effect, X-rays, X-ray diffraction, and the Compton effect pair production Wave Properties of Particles: DeBroglie Waves, matter waves; diffraction, particle in a box; energy quantization, uncertainty principle, wave-particle duality Atomic Structure: Rutherford's nuclear atom, Atomic spectra, Bohr's model of the atom, Correspondence principle, The laser Quantum Mechanics: Schrödinger's wave equation, Expectation values, Conditions on the wave function, Stationary states, Eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, Uncertainties particle in a box (revisited), Finite square well, Simple harmonic oscillator, Scattering by potential steps, Barrier potentials, Tunnelling, Applications Radioactivity: Discovery of radioactivity, Types of radioactivity, Radioactive decay law, half-life, activity Prerequisite PHY 102 PHY 205: APPLIED ELECTRICITY I (3,1,0) 3 units Introduction to electrostatics, Gauss's theorem and application of electrostatic potential and equipotential surface capacitances, energy of a charged conductor. Foundation of electric circuit theory: Circuit elements: resistors, capacitors and inductors; Network theorems: Norton theorem and superposition theorem; transient response of RC, RL and RLC circuits. Elementary discussion on semiconductor devices:

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pn junction diode, npn and pnp transistors and applications. Full wave and halfwave rectification circuits, and smoothing circuits. Electric lamps and illumination. Prerequisite: PHY 102 PHY 206: APPLIED ELECTRICITY II (3,1,0) 3 units Magnetic field of currents in space: Magnetic flux and flux density, corkscrew rule, solenoid and magnetomotive force, periodic wave forms their average and effective values. Characteristics and use of non-linear elements in simple circuits. Single phase alternating current circuits: Complex impedances and admittances. Series and parallel resonant circuits. Magnetic circuits, mutual inductance, transformers. Introduction to electrical generators and motors. Power factor correction. Prerequisite: PHY 102 and PHY 205 PHY 207: PRACTICAL PHYSICS III 1 unit (0,0,3) Pre- requisite. PHY 107 Illustration of errors, Determination of Young's modulus of different materials, Frictional damping of simple pendulum, Compound pendulum, Hysteresis of materials, Vibration strings, Calorimetry and specific heat capacity of thermal materials, Determination of refractive indices, Application of spherometers and spectrometers in light, Conductivity measurements in electrolytic solution. PHY 208: PRACTICAL PHYSICS IV 1 unit (0,0,3) Pre- requisite. PHY 108 Practical illustration on the application of photometers in illumination of light measurements, voltage measurement in LR and LC circuits, Capacitance and loss factor measurements, Impedance and reactance determination in a.c circuits, Frequency measurement using oscilloscope, Characteristic of diode and transistors.

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PHY 209: ELECTRICITY AND INSTRUMENTATION LAB. I (0,0,3) 1unit Laboratory 1: Familiarization with Electronic Measuring Equipment and Techniques Use of Power Sources and Meters: Identify safety hazards common in the electronics laboratory. Measurement of body resistance under dry and wet conditions, using an ohmmeter. Familiarisation with the safety precautions required when working with electronic circuits. Proper operating procedure when using a power supply. Use of ohmmeter to measure resistance. Proper connection of voltmeters and ammeters for circuit measurement. Component Symbols and Abbreviations, Voltage Measurement: Identify and label component symbols used in electronic schematic diagrams. Express and interpret electrical terms in abbreviated form. Measure various voltages with a multimeter. Compare the loading effect of a panel meter with that of the multimeter. Measure the output of a solar cell under varying light conditions. Measure the output of dry cells connected in series and parallel. Power Supply and Switches: Measurement of output of a power supply under varying dc load conditions using a multimeter. Study of the effect of load variation (resistance added in parallel), on load current and power. Percent load regulation calculation of a dc power supply. Identification of switches: using an ohmmeter, power source and miniature lamps. Control of various combinations of lamp circuits, using SPDT, DPST and DPDT switches. Operation of a three-way switching circuit, using two SPDT switches and lamp. The Ohmmeter, DC Voltmeter and Ammeter: Measure the internal resistance of basic 0-1mA dc (100mV) meter movement, using a dc voltmeter and multimeter. Conversion of milliammeter (0-1mAdc) to a 25Vdc voltmeter, calculation of multiplier resistance. Comparison of converted voltmeter with a standard Voltmeter. Extending the range of basic 0.mAdc meter movement of 5mAdc full-scale. Comparison of extended range milliammeter with a standard milliammeter. Internal resistance of an ohmmeter and calibration of a series of ohmmeter using standard Electronic VOM.

200

The Oscilloscope and the Audio Frequency Generator: Familiarisation with the controls of a triggered single trace and double trace oscilloscope. Measurement of ac waveforms (sine-square and triangular-wave) using the oscilloscope and an Electronic VOM. Measurement of dc voltages with the oscilloscope and Electronic VOM. Frequency measurements of ac signals using the calibrated time base of the oscilloscope. Direct and Alternating Currents: Relationship between the effective or rms alternating current and direct current energy relationship. Use the oscilloscope to measure peak-to-peak voltage. Calculate the peak and the rms values of a known peak-to-peak signal, using the conversion formula. Laboratory 2: Ohm's Law: Determination of ohmic value and tolerance of resistors using the colour code. Measure the value of resistors, using an ohmmeter. Calculate and measure the current flow through resistors, using Ohm's law and the multimeter. Calculate and measure the power dissipated in resistance as the voltage is varied. Determine the resistance of a lamp filament varies with temperature. Laboratory 3: Series and Parallel Resistive Circuits Calculate and measure resistance in series and parallel. Measure the current flow in series and parallel circuits. Measure the voltage drops in series and parallel circuits. Locate open and shorts in a series circuit using the multimeter. Determine that a parallel circuit has more than one path of current flow. Laboratory 4: Kirchoff's Law Calculate and measure unknown voltages and resistances in a series circuit using Ohm's and Kirchoff's laws and multimeter. Verify Kirchoff's voltage law. Calculate and measure unknown currents and resistances in a parallel circuit using Ohm's and Kirchoff's laws and multimeter. Verify Kirchoff's current law. Calculate and measure individual, branch and total circuit values in a seires0parallel circuit. Determine the single equivalent resistance of a series-parallel circuit using Kirchoff's and Ohm's laws and multimeter.

201

Laboratory 5: Thevenin's and Norton's Theorems Determine the equivalent voltage/current source and series/parallel resistance of a series-parallel circuit using Thevenin's/Norton's theorem. Measure the voltage and resistance of a series-parallel circuits using a multimeter. Measure the load current and voltage of a series-parallel circuit using a multimeter. Determine the effects of potentiometers and rheostats in a circuit using a multimeter. Calculate and measure voltage distribution and power dissipated in loaded and unloaded variable voltage dividers. PHY 210: ELECTRICITY AND INSTRUMENTATION LABORATORY II (0,0,3) 1unit Laboratory 1: Power Transfer and Relay Action Measure and calculate the power dissipated in an adjustable load. Construct a power transfer curve and determine the condition for maximum power transfer. Measure `pull-in' and `drop-out' properties of typical dc relay using a multimeter. Identify the `control' circuits and the `controlled' circuit using lamps and multimeter. Demonstrate the various operations of various relay circuits using lamps and multimeter. Laboratory 2: Capacitance, Inductance and Time Constant Demonstrate that capacitors pass ac current but block dc currents. 21 Demonstrate that a capacitor always charges to the voltage connected across it. Demonstrate that it always retains charge after disconnection from the circuit and thus becoming a voltage source capable of electric shock. Calculate and measure the effect of series RL circuit on dc and ac voltage and current. Determine the effect of circuit current when inductance is added in series and parallel. Demonstrate voltage-current phase (lead-lag) relationships in inductive and capacitive circuits. Calculate and measure RC and L/R time constants. Laboratory 3: Transformers, Inductive and Capacitive Reactance Identification of transformer windings and test for open and short circuits. Calculate and measure voltage and current-turns ratio, determine the offset of secondary loan on primary current. Measure the effect of inductive and capacitive reactance on current flow. Measure the effect of change in frequency on circuits current.

202

Demonstrate the phase (lead-lag) relationship between current and applied voltage in a series RC and RL circuit. Laboratory 4: Series and Parallel Resonance Calculate and measure the resonant frequency of series RLC and parallel LC circuits. Determine the impedances of parallel LC circuit at resonance using tank circuit voltage and line current measurement. Demonstrate that series resonance occurs when inductive and capacitive reactances are equal. Determine the bandwidth of series RLC and parallel LC tank circuits by plotting the response curves. Pre- requisite. PHY 209

PHY 211: WORKSHOP PRACTICE (0,0,3) 1 units Workshop safety measure. Introduction to Workshop hand and powered tools emphasizing safety measures to be taken during operation. Workshop materials, various gauges, comparators, measuring devices. Tolerance of products. Marking off on face place. General description of the function and capabilities of grinding machines. Practice in grinding machine tools and drills. Functions and capabilities of drilling machines, lathe machines, milling machine, and shaping machine. Jigs, fixtures, practice in the use of machines. PHY 212: INTRODUCTION TO MATERIAL SCIENCE (2,1,0) 2 units Mechanical Properties: Tensile testing; impact testing; hardness tests; brinell, Vickers and Rockwell tests; plastic deformation; fracture toughness; creep; fatigue; cold work; recovery. Equilibrium Diagrams: Phase rule; binary alloy systems; solid solutions; eutectic; peritectic; meritectic; entectoid systems; the lever rule; micro structural development during slow cooling; elementary metallography. Structural Material: Iron; carbon diagram; ferrous alloys; carbon and low alloy steels; high alloy steels; cast irons; non-ferrous alloys; copper aluminium; nickel; base alloys; bearing metals; composites. Phase Transformations: Diffusion in solids; fick's law; solutions to fick's second law; applications based on second law solutions; kirkendal effect; other diffusion processes; pearlite, bainite and martensite transformations in steels; austempering and martempering; annealing, normalising and hardening methods for ferrous and non-ferrous alloys; precipitation hardening. Magnetic and Dielectric Materials:

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Ferro magnetism and related phenomena; domain structure; hysteresis loop; soft and hard magnetic materials; dielectric materials; polarisation; temperature and frequency effects; electric breakdown; ferro-electric materials. Semiconductors: Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors; different semi conducting materials; band shaper of real semiconductors; direct and indirect band gap materials; Fermi energy level and p-n junction diode; homojunction and heterojunction; transistor action. Basic Metal Shaping Processes: Sand casting; die casting; forging processes; soldering and brazing; spot welding; arc welding; gas welding processes; powder metallurgy processes. Prerequisite PHY 203 PHY 213: INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS (2,1,0) 2units Instruments, devices and methods used for space and planetary exploration. Satellite hosting, Remote sensing of earth and other solar system bodies, GIS. Solar wind, comets, asteroids and meteoroids. Geodesic and field equations; Test of general theory of relativity; Black holes, cosmology, models of the universe, remnant blackbody radiation. Interplanetary disturbances produced by solar activity and their terrestrial effects. PHY 301 ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I (3,1,0) 3 units A. C. Circuits, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations. Electrostatics and magentostatics. Laplace's equation and boundary value problems; Multiple expansion, dielectric and magnetic materials, Lorentz covariance and special relativity. Electromagnetic potentials and Fields. Prerequisite PHY 202 & PHY 203 PHY 302: ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II (3,1,0) 3 units Maxwell's equations, The wave equation; Propagation of plane waves. Reflection and Refraction; Interference and Diffraction of waves. Transmission lines, wave guides and resonant cavities. Fibre optics and applications. Electromagnetic radiation. Prerequisite PHY 301 PHY 303: QUANTUM MECHANICS I (3,1,0) 3units Review of elementary wave mechanics: Schrödinger's equation, wave packets. Probability current density. Expectation values. Operators. Energy quantization. Time-independent potentials. One-dimensional problems: Review of steps, barriers and square wells. Linear harmonic oscillator. Quantum mechanical formalism: States and operators. Dirac notation. Compatible observables. Generalized uncertainty relation. Unitary transformations. Evolution of states. Schrödinger and Heisenberg pictures. Symmetry principles and conservation laws. Angular momentum:

204

Rotational invariance and angular momentum conservation. General angular momentum operators, eigenvalues, and eigenstates. Addition of angular momenta. Prerequisite PHY 204 PHY 304: THERMAL AND STATISTICAL PHYSICS (3,1,0) 3 units Basic concept of statistical mechanics, microscopic basis of thermodynamics and applications to macroscopic systems, condensed state, phase transformations, quantum distributions; Elementary kinetic theory of transport process, Fluctuation phenomena. Applications. Prerequisite: PHY 203 PHY 305: CIRCUIT THEORY I (2,1,0) 2 units Overview of Network - theorems: Superposition, Thevenin's, Norton's, Millman's, reciprocity and maximum power transfer theorems. Responses of Simple Networks: Transient and steady state sinusoidal responses. Network graphs and their application to network analysis General Definitions of Two Port Parameters: Insertion loss or gain. Image iterative and characteristic impedances. Basic principles of one and two port circuits. Z, Y, h, ABCD parameters and circuit models: input and output impedance, current and voltage gain for each circuit model. Analysis of frequency response of circuits. Application of Laplace Transformation: Laplace transforms. Application to steady state and steady state analysis of circuits. Pole-zero analysis frequency response of circuits. Fourier Methods in Waveform and Circuit Analysis: Real and complex forms of Fourier series. Fourier analysis of complex waveforms. Parselves theorem. Line spectra representation of periodic signals. Impulse signals. Impulse response. Duhamel superposition integral. Fourier transform and convolution concepts. Transmission Line Theory: Partial Differential Equations of transmission lines, ac steady-state equations, Characteristic impedance and propagation constant. Circuit Analysis using a Computer Simulation Package (e.g. HSPICE): Application to networks, amplifiers and filters. Prerequisite PHY 206 PHY 306: CIRCUIT THEORY II (2,1,0) 2 units Review of network analysis. Two-port Networks, Synthesis: Foster and Cauer's methods of synthesis. Active filters. Analysis of n-port network. Network functions. Analogy between transmission lines and two-port network equations. Introduction to network synthesis; polynomial approximate methods; Darlington methods; filters characteristic equations. Realizability. Butterworth Chebyahev and Elliptic filters and their syntheses. Frequency transformation; low-pass to band-pass; low-pass to high-pass filters; band elimination filters. Design of filters.

205

Prerequisite

PHY 307

PHY 307: ELECTRONIC LABORATORY I (0,0,3) 1 unit BASIC PRACTICAL PHYSICS LAB Experiments on errors and statistical analysis, The cathode ray oscilloscope, electronic measuring instruments, Colour code in resistors, capacitors, Photography, Vibration and waves, Vibrating rod and LCR passive network, Thick lens-focal length and model points, Fresnel Briprism and Zone plates, Experiments on d.c circuits using Heathkit apparatus. Laboratory 1: Semiconductor Diode Characteristic and Application Identification of diode terminals and testing. Study of diode characteristics. Application: Half wave and full wave rectification, clipping and clamping circuits. Laboratory 2: Zener Diode Characteristics and Application Study forward and reverse characteristics of a zener diode. Application: use as a regulator in power supply. Laboratory 3: Bipolar Transistor Characteristics and Biasing Identification of terminals in NPN and PNP transistors. Study the characteristics and operating parameters of a transistor. Study various biasing modes of a bipolar transistor and measure circuit operating parameters. Determine the values of biasing resistors of a common-emitter circuit. Study factors affecting bias variation. Laboratory 4: Bipolar Transistor Amplifier Circuit Construct a single stage common-emitter amplifier. Calculate and measure the DC operating voltages. Measure voltage gain with a or without load Measure phase shift between input and output signal. Construct a 2-stage R-C coupled amplifier circuit using the single stage commonemitter amplifier circuit constructed above. Laboratory 5: Switch Logic Series, parallel, series/parallel connection of switches. Repeat the experiment using diode. Transistor application as a switch: inverter, NOR and NAND. Laboratory 6: Study of Digital Logic Gates (TTL & COMS) Input and output characteristics of gates. Truth of variation gates: NOT, OR, AND, NOR, wired AND. Circuit characteristics. Comparison of TTL and CMOS characteristics. Pre-requisite - PHY 207

206

PHY 308 ELECTRONIC LABORATORY II ( 0,0,3) 1 unit BASIC PRACTICAL PHYSICS LAB Experiments on impedance measurements, Schering bridge, Oweris bridge, a.c potentometers, Moving coil galvanometer, current sensitivity, galvanometer resistance, period and log decrement charge sensitivity, constants of suspension of galvanometer and critical resistance, Experiments in Electronics I, Diode characteristics and transistor characteristics, Experiments in Electronics II, wiring up the amplifier circuit, testing the amplifier circuit, Hall effect experiment, More experiment using the Heathkit apparatus. Laboratory 1: Simulation of Simple Combinational Circuits Characteristics of EX-OR & EX-NOR circuits. Half and full adder circuits. Encoder and decoder circuit. Binary magnitude comparator, code converter & parity bit generator. Serial and parallel adders. Laboratory 2: Further Combinational Circuits Study of multiplexer and demultiplexer. Study of tristatic logic circuits, characteristics, 2:1 multiplexer using tristate logic, tristate bi-directional switch. 7-segment decoder/driver/display. Laboratory 3: Flip Flops and Binary Counters Study of flip flops: SR latch using NAND/NOR. Clocked SR, D and JK types. Binary counters: 2 bit and 4 bit. Laboratory 4: sequential Circuits BCD counters. Design of synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. Laboratory 5: Introduction to computer Simulation Use of HSPICE to simulate and analyze a simple common-emitter amplifier. Use of ANALYSER to simulate a simple NAND gate. Pre-requisite - PHY 208 PHY 309: ANALOGUE ELECTRONICS I (2,1,0) 2 units Transistor biasing: Need for biasing of transistor, fixed biased circuits. The operating point: static and dynamic load lines. Q-point and maximum undistorted output. Other bias circuits: voltage divider bias, base bias and collector feedback, emitter bias by two sources. Bias stabilization against variation in Ico, Vbe and B. bias stability. Bias compensation. Biasing techniques for linear integrated circuits. Thermistor and sensistor compensation. Thermal runaway. Thermal stability. DC & AC Equivalent Circuit of CB, CE & CC Amplifier: Effect of source resistance Rs. Small signal low-frequency model. T-model. Input impedance of a two-port network. Voltage gain of a two-port network. The hparameter notation for transistors. Conversion of h-parameters, h-parameter analysis of CI and CC amplifier circuits. Field Effect Transistors (FETs):

207

The function FET. Pinch-off voltage, JFET I-V characteristics. FET small-signal model. MOSFET. Lowi frequency CS and CD amplifiers. Biasing the FET. FET as a voltage-variable resistor (WR) CS amplifier at high frequency. DC amplifiers at high frequencies. Transistor at High Frequencies: Hybrid- model hybrid- circuit parameters. Variation of Hybrid - circuit parameter. The CE short circuits current gain. Current gain with resistive load. Single-stage CE transistor amplifier response. The gain-bandwidth product. Emitter follower at high frequencies. Multistage Amplifiers: Frequency response of an amplifier: low, mid- and high frequency responses. Bandwidth effect of an emitter bypass capacitor on low frequency response: cascading gain, gain bandwidth, product, bandwidth. RC-coupled amplifier: low, frequency response. Multistage CE amplifier cascade at high frequencies noise in amplifier circuit. Prerequisite PHY 206 PHY 310: ANALOGUE ELECTRONICS II (2,1,0) 2 units Power Amplifiers: Classification. Class A large-signal amplifier. Second Harmonic distortion, higherorder harmonic generation. The transformer-coupled Audio power amplifier. Efficiency. Class B amplifiers. Push-pull amplifier crossover distribution. Class AB operation. Complementary symmetry push-pull class B amplifier. Class C amplifier tuned amplifier. Distortion in amplifiers (linear and non-linear). Feedback Amplifiers: Classification. Feedback concept. Feedback-amplifier topologies characteristics of negative-feedback amplifiers. Characteristics of positive feedback amplifiers. Analysis of feedback amplifier: voltage and current-series, voltage - and - current - shunt. Effect of feedback on bandwidth. Frequency response. Gain and phase margins compensation. Oscillator circuits. Operational Amplifiers (Op. Amp.): The differential amplifiers concept. The ideal op. amp. (characteristics). Basic op. amp. Packages and identification. The non-ideal properties (specifications) of practical op. amp.: dc and ac. Linear & Non-linear Application of Op. Amps: Breadboarding. Inverting and non-inverting amplifiers. Differential amplifiers. Instrumentation amplifiers. Voltage to current emitter. Sample and hold. Integrated and differentiator. Comparator. Oscillator circuits (sine wave, voltage controlled, timers and function generator circuits). Multiples. Active filters. Further Applications:

208

Phase locked loop (PLL). High speed comparator. Limiters. Bilateral analogue switches. Different types of Op. Amps. Computer Aided Design: Use of computer for simulation of analysis of transistor circuits. Prerequisite PHY 309 PHY 313: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS I (2,1,0) 2 units Number Systems: Decimal system and counting binary system and counting representation of binary digits by switches, punched paper tape and voltage levels parallel and serial transmission of bits. Binary addition - to - decimal and decimal - to binary conversion, binary subtraction, ones - complement and twos complement, two - complement subtraction, ones - complement subtraction. The 9's and 10's complements. Binary multiplication and division. Octal number system, octal - to decimal and decimal - to - octal conversions, octal - to - binary and binary - to - octal conversions, hexadecimal - to binary and binary - to hexadecimal conversions, hexadecimal - to - decimal and decimal - hexadecimal conversions. Binary Codes: The 8421 code BCD codes other four bit BCD codes. The excess - 3 codes. The parity bit even and odd parity, double parity, parity generator, parity checker 5 bit codes code with more than five bits. The grey code, binary - to - grey and grey - to - binary conversions, the SC II code alphanumeric displays. Decoders. NAND gate decoder, 3 - 8 line decoder, decimal decoders, seven segment decoders, dot matrix decoding. Multiplexers: 4:1 multiplexers: Date representation: fixed point representation, integer representation over flow, floating point representation. Arithmetic operations: half - adder, full - adder, an 8421 adder, a serial adder, parallel adder, addition of more than two numbers. A high - speed adder, twos complement addition, ones - complement addition sealing, multiplication, and division of binary numbers, the ALU Logic Circuits: Function of single binary variable and two binary variables OR, AND, NOT, NOR and NAND operations and symbols. The exclusive - OR gate logical variables. The 0.1 notation Boolean theorems and demorgan's theorems. The standard sum of products , the standard product of sums, minimum term and maximum term specifications of logic functions truth table of karnaugh maps. Plotting ones and zeros, the k - map representation of two, three and four variables, pairs, quads and octets k - map simplifications. Overlapping groups, rolling the map, eliminating redundant fours, don't care conditions, k - maps for five and six variables, synthesis using NAND - OR - NOR gates. Prerequisite PHY 206

209

PHY 314: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS II (2,1,0) 2 units Logic Families: TRL, DCTL, ITL, DTL, HTL, TTL, ECL gates and their input - output characteristics, fan-outs, transfer characteristics and propagation delay times. Logic versatility of ECL gates, the MOS and CMOS inverters and their transfer characteristics, rise and fall times in MOS and CMOS gates. Flip Flops: The flip - flop as a memory element, flip - flop using NAND gates, the characterless switch, clocked flip - flop, the master - slave flip - flop. The ac coupled edge - triggered flip - flop, the clocked ac - coupled flip - flop, propagation delay flip - flops,28 the JK flip - flops, the type - D flip - flop, T - flip - flop, capacitance storage, flip flop manufacture specifications. Registers and Counters: The shift register, clocking serial parallel data transfer shift - right, shift - left register, ripple counters, mod - 3 and mod - 5 counters. Lock out combinations of modulo counters, the up - down ripple counter, the up - down synchronous ring counter and sequence generator. Semiconductor memories: Types of memories, shift - register, sequential memories, MOS register states, two - phase ratio less shift register. Four phase ratio less register stage CMOS register stages, static shift register stage, a three - phase static register stage, the RCM programmable and erasable ROMS, TCM multiplier. The ROM as look - up table BJT - RAM calls, MOS, RAMS, organization of a RAM, paralleling of memory IC chips. Analogue Switches: Switch configurations, basic operating principles of switches, diode transmission gates, high speed S/H circuit BJT and FET gates, sample and hold circuit, CMOS gates. Multiplexing introduction to comparators, various types of A/D and D/A converters with relevant theory specification s of D/A and A/D converters. Timing Circuits: ACMOS NOR - gate monostable multivibrator and astable multivibrator, monostable multivibrator using ECL NOR - gates, multivibrators for short time intervals, a TC 77L monostable multivibrator, IC timer 555 and its functional diagram, the 555 timer connected as a monostable multivibrator and as an astable multivibrator. Prerequisite PHY 313 PHY 315: MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS I (3,1,0) 3units Function of Complex variable - The Cauchy-Riemann equations. Analytic functions, Integration in complex plane. Cauchy's theorem and integral formula,

210

Liouville's and Taylor's theorems. Laurent's series. Theory of residues and its application including evaluation of real integral conformal transformation. The Dirac Delta function. Integral transforms, fourier series and fourier transforms; laplace transforms. Application of transform methods to the solution of elementary differential equations of interest in Physics and Engineering. Partial differential equations; solution of boundary value problems of partial differential equation by various method which include; separation of variables the method of integral transforms. Prerequisite MAT 202 PHY 317 : ANALYTICAL MECHANICS (3,1,0) 3 units Degrees of freedom; generalised co-ordinates, Lagrange's formula of mechanics and its applications. The Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics, Application of Invariance and Conservation laws. Oscillatory systems, including damped forced and coupled oscillations; Normal modes. Prerequisite MAT 201 and PHY 201 PHY 318: COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS: (3,1,0) (3 Units) Calculus of errors, errors of observation and their treatment, formulation of Physics problems. Numerical methods in Physics; numerical differentiation, integration and iteration. Calculation of electric and magnetic field of charge and current distribution, curve fitting, approximation of function. Prerequisite PHY 315 PHY 319: MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION (3,1,0) 3 units Basic Concepts of Measurement: System configuration. Problems analysis. Basis characteristics of measuring devices. Calibration: units, theory and errors. Measurement of Circuit Parameters: DC and AC signals. Resistance, inductance, capacitance and impedance. Bridge measurement. Sallen-key. Maxwell etc. Transducers (Electrical and Non-Electrical: Classification. Basic requirement of a transducer. Transducer principles of nnelectrical qualities (displacement, strain, temperature pressure, etc.)

Basic Electronic Measuring Instrument: The oscilloscope, signal generator, multimeters - their characteristics, operation and application. Performance Characteristics of an Instrumentation System: Generalised measurement - zero, first, second-order systems based on transfer function representation. Measurement f Time and Frequency:

211

Spectrum analysis. Use of modulation in measurements. Measurement of electrical signals using cathode ray oscilloscope. Indicating Instruments: Principles of operation. Essentials of indicating instruments. Deflecting torque. Damping torque. Types of indicating instruments: moving iron, moving coil, induction, etc. Treatment of various types of ammeters, voltmeters, ohmmeters and their calibration. Measurement of Electrical Power and Energy: Wattmeter, dynamometer and induction type. Error measurement. Instrumentation amplifiers: Basic characteristics, dc amplifiers. Operational amplifiers. Instrumentation amplifiers. Signal conditioning. Electrometric amplifiers. Overview of Complex Based Measurement and Data Acquisition System: Hardware and software comments. The interface. The data acquisition cards and instruments. IEEE regulation n interfacing measuring equipment to computer. The Use of Computer: Control of Instruments, analyses and processing and post processing of results. Presentation and management of measured data. LABORATORY EXERCISES The Use of Meters and Oscilloscope: DC and AC voltmeters and ammeters, ohmmeter, digital multimeter. The Oscilloscope: obtaining traces in double beam oscilloscope, study of synchronisation, mode operations, triggering. Digital Instruments: 1 Operation of frequency counter, digital voltmeter, logic analyser. 2 Converting a 2-channel oscilloscope to display four signals. Construction of an Instrument Amplifier using Operational Amplifier. Capacitance and Inductance Measurements: 3 Using bridge method 4 Using 555 timer A/D and D/A Conversions: Introduction to Virtual Instrumentation (Software Lab.) Wiring and connecting. Measurement and reading. Building up a VI system. Processing measured data. Data acquisition. Prerequisite: PHY 206 PHY 320: COMMUNICATION PRINCIPLES (3,1,0) 3 units Overview of Telecommunication Systems: The transmission media. Radio frequency spectrum. Decimetric to millimetric wave bands. The optical spectrum. Information content signals. Voice. Data, video. Cables: coaxial, optical, etc. Satellite Communication System. Transmission Lines and Cables:

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Primary line constants. Phase velocity and line wavelength. Characteristic impedance. Propagation coefficient. Reflection. Travelling and standing waves. Impedance matching. Modes. Wave packets. Pulses, phases and group velocities. Dispersion. Smith chart as an analytical tool. Telephone lines and cables. R.F. lines. Microstrip lines. Transmission of Signal Waves and Associated Problems: Wave motion. Electromagnetic waves. Propagation in the Ionosphere. Free space wave attenuation propagation in the ionosphere. Sun-spot activity and day/night prediction. Thermal Noise. Distortion Noise. Rain, water vapour mist and oxygen absorption. Radio frequency interference. Electromagnetic interference. Amplitude Modulation Signals: Amplitude modulation principle, single-side-band (SSB), double-side-band (DSB), vestigial-side-band (VSB). AM transceivers, balanced modulator. AMN signal detection. Independent-side-band (ISB). Signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Carrier suppression. Applications in practical transmission systems. Angle Modulation Signals: Frequency modulation (FM). 2-level, 4-level and 8-level with discriminator detection. Phase Modulation (PM): 2-level, 4-level and 8-level with coherent detection; with differential coherent detection. Necessary bandwidth. Tolerance to distortion. Comparison of FM and PM modulation variants. Noise in FM systems. FM detection threshold, FM improvement factor. FM improvement threshold. Applications in practical transmission systems. Pulse Code Modulation: Band limited analogue signals. Sampling theorem. Principle of Quantization. Uniform and non-uniform quantization. PAM waves. Coding, Compounding (or compression). The A-law and -law. Development of the 24-channel and 32channel PCM systems. The DI (North American) framing structure. The EI (CEPT) framing structure. Quantizing distortion. Idle channel noise. Modulation for Digital Transmission on Analogue Channels: Amplitude-shift-keying (ASK). Frequency-shift-keying (FSK). Phase-shift-keying (PSK). Quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM). Application in modem interfaces. Digital Coding of Signals: Introduction to Binary Coding techniques. Sources, entropy. Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem. The converse to the coding theorem. Coding gain. Forward-errorcorrection (FEC) coding. Channel block-coding techniques. Convolutional coding. Industry applications. The ASCII. The ITU-T No. 5 code, the EBCDIC. Channel coding communication satellites. Prerequisite PHY 313 and PHY 309

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PHY 322: SOLID STATE PHYSICS (3,1,0) 3 units Lattice Translation Vectors, Basis and Crystal Structure, Lattice Types, Indexing planes, simple crystal structures, Imaging of atomic structures Bragg Law, Scattered wave amplitude, Brillioun Zones, structure factor, atomic form factor Crystals of Inert Gases, Ionic Crystals Phonons and Crystal Vibrations vibration of crystals with monatomic basis, vibration of crystals with two atoms per primitive cell, quantization of elastic waves, phonon momentum, inelastic scattering by phonons Plank's distribution, Phonon Heat Capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal resistivity of phonon gas, umklapp processes, imperfections Free electron gas, energy levels in 1D, fermi Dirac distribution, free electron gas in 3D, heat capacity, hall effect, thermal conductivity of metals Energy bands, origin of energy band, magnitude of energy band, Bloch Functions and Kronig-Penny Model, Wave Equation of electron in periodic potential Semiconducting crystals, band gap, equation of motion for holes, electrons, effective mass, carrier concentration, impurity conductivity (donor states, acceptor states), thermoelectric effects Fermi Surfaces ( reduced zone scheme, periodic zone scheme), construction of fermi surfaces (nearly free electrons) Plasmons,Polaritons,Polarons, excitons Superconductivity Dielectric , Ferroelectrics, diamagnetism,paramagnetism, Ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism Prerequisite PHY 204 and PHY 301 PHY 400 PROJECT (0,0,4) 4units This course is a continuation of PHY 401. It also offers students the opportunity to do research in Modern Physics and Electronics, under the supervision of academic staff. Detailed report on the research is presented by the student when the project is completed. PHY 403: MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS II (3,1,0,) 3 units Linear algebra and functional analysis; Transformation in linear vector spaces and matrix theory. Hilbert space and complete sets of orthogonal functions. Special functions of Mathematical Physics. The gamma functions; hypergeometric functions; Legendre function; Bessel functions. Hermite and Languere function. Sturm-Liouville theory; uniqueness of solutions. Calculus of residues and applications to evaluation of integrals and summation of series. Applications to various physical situations which may include electromagnetic theory, diffusion Phenomena, atmospheric Physics or quantum theory. Prerequisite PHY 315

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PHY 404: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS (3,1,0) 3 units The Hydrogen atom: Relativistic effects and spin. Identical particles and symmetry. Many electron atoms. Coupling schemes and vector model. Zeeman effect, Hyperfine structure. The diatomic molecule; Frank-Condon principle, X-ray diffraction. Microwave methods. Resonance phenomena, ESR, NMR, Optical pumping and Mossbauer. Prerequisite: PHY 301 PHY 405: QUATUM MECHANICS II (3,1,0,) 3 units Three-dimensional problems: Review of separation of variables. Motion of a free particle in three dimensions. Three-dimensional square well. Hydrogen atom problem. Isotropic harmonic oscillator. Approximation methods, time-independent problems: Stationary perturbation theory for non-degenerate and degenerate energy levels. Variational method. Approximation methods, time-dependent problems: Time-dependent perturbation method. The sudden approximation. Constant perturbation. Radiation theory. Scattering theory: Cross sections. Potential scattering. Partial wave analysis. Green's functions. Born approximation. Scattering of identical particles. Prerequisite PHY 303 PHY 406: ENERGY CONVERSIONS AND ENVIRONMENT (2,1,0) 2 units Theory of modern energy conversion, transmission and storage methods; windmills; heat engines, classical engines, ocean thermal energy converters, thermoelectric thermionic, fuel cells, production of hydrogen, electrolytic, chemical thermolytic, photolytic conversion, hydrogen storage for energy, environmental heat energy sources, photoelectron converters, photovoltaic and thermovoltaic cells, biomass, photosynthesis, production of methanol and ethanol from vegetable matter. Nuclear energy, geothermal, wind and solar energy. Hydrogen energy and conversion mechanisms. Environmental pollution: air, land and water pollution. Baseline Environmental Studies. Environmental Impact Assessment (E.I.A). energy policy and legislation. PHY 407: MICROPROCESSORS AND APPLICATIONS (2,1,0) 2 units Microprocessors: introduction; evolution; architecture and microcomputer systems; 8080/8085 based microcomputer systems; 8085 CPU; block diagram instruction set; addressing modes; writing assembly language programs; software development systems and assemblers; programming 8085 microprocessors; looping; counting; indexing; stacks; subroutines; code conversions.

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Memory interfacing and I/O interfacing of 8085; address decoding; interfacing RAMS & EPROMS. I/O interfacing concepts; interfacing keyboards and output displays; direct I/O and memory mapped I/O. I/O techniques; simple, polled and interrupt driven I/O; interrupts of 8085. interfacing data converters; A/D converter interface, D/A converter interface; stepper motor interface. Programmable peripheral devices; 8255PPI, 8253 programmable interval timer, 8259 programmable interrupt controller and 8279 keyboard / display device. Serial I/O and data communication techniques; software controlled asynchronous; serial I/O lines; hardware controlled serial I/O using programmable devices, 8251 USART. Microprocessor application; a smart scale design; up based temperature and level measuring systems. Overview of industrial process control system, an 8085 based industrial process control system; block diagram; comparison of contemporary 8 bit microprocessors; zilog Z80, Motorola 6800, etc. Prerequisite PHY 314 PHY 408: DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (3,1,0) 3units (elective) Introduction to Digital Signals and Signal Processing: Continuous; Time and discrete; time signals, discrete; time signal and their characteristics, discrete; time signals from continuous time signals, linearity, shift invariance and convolution sum, stability ad causality, linear constant coefficient difference equations, frequency response of discrete - time system; transfer function relationship. Z - Transform: Introduction, linearity, causality and shift invariance, frequency response of sampler sampling theorem Z - transform; some useful discrete-time functions. Convergence of Z-transform; properties of Z-transform, inverse Z-transform responses corresponding to different pole locations in the Z-plane, two sided Ztransforms. Discrete Fourier Transform: Introduction, properties of DFT, comparison of circular convolution with linear convolution, relation between DFT and Z-transform. Sampling the Z-transform; linear convolution using DFT; pitfalls in using DFT. Computation of DFT using Fast Fourier Transform decimation - in - time (DIT) algorithm, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) , decimation - in - frequency (DIF) algorithm, binary equivalent description of FFT (DIF). Theory and design of infinite impulse response (IIR) digital filter. Prerequisite: PHY 315 PHY 409: STUDENTS INDUSTRIAL WORK EXPERIENCE SCHEME (SIWES) 1 unit (0,0,1) Students are expected to observe a minimum of 3 months industrial training (SIWES) in a relevant industry/establishment where they can acquire practical

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skills related to their field of study. The report of the skills and experienced gained is to be submitted to the department and assessed by a panel of examiners. PHY 410: SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY (3,1,0) 3units (elective) Crystal Growth and Epitaxy: Crystal growth from the melt, float zone process, wafer shaping and material characterisation, vapour-phase epitaxy, liquid-phase epitaxy, molecular-beam epitaxy. Oxidation and Film Deposition: Thermal oxidation, dielectric deposition, polysilicon, deposition, metallization. Diffusion and Ion-implantation: Basic diffusion theory and practice, extrinsic diffusion, diffusion related processes, distribution and range of implanted ions, disorder and annealing, implantation related processes. Lithography and Etching: Optical lithography, electron beam, x-ray and ion beam lithographies, wet chemical etching, dry etching. Integrated Devices: Passive components, bipolar technology, MOSFET technology, MESFET technology, fundamental limits of integrated devices. Prerequisite PHY 405 PHY 411: NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE PHYSICS I (3,1,0) 3 units Nuclear structure: Nuclear models, Nuclear properties, Nuclear size, Nuclear masses; Nuclear forces, Nuclear-nucleon scattering; the Deuteron. Radioactive decay; alpha, beta, gamma decays. Nuclear reactions, Properties of characteristic radiations, interactions of radiation with matter. Detection of radiation; Counters, Monitors and Radiation alerts. Application of radiation in medicine and industry. Prerequisite PHY 301 PHY 412: NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE PHYSICS II (3,1,0) 3 units Nuclear Instrumentations and radiation detection techniques; Nuclear spectroscopy. Neutron Physics; Production, detection of neutrons. Fission and fusion. Nuclear reactor and nuclear energy and application. Elementary particles. Conservation laws, particle classification. Strong, electromagnetic and weak interaction. Resonances. Prerequisite PHY 411 PHY 413: SOLID STATE DEVICES I (3,1,0) 3 units (elective) Energy Bands and Carrier Concentration: Semiconductor materials, crystal structure, valence bands, energy bands, density of states, intrinsic carrier concentration, donors and acceptors. Carrier Transport Phenomena:

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Carrier drift, carrier diffusion, carrier injection, generation and recombination processes, continuity equation, high field effects. p-n Junction: thermal equilibrium condition, depletion region, depletion capacitance, current voltage characteristics, charge storage and transient behaviour, junction breakdown. Bipolar devices: The transistor action, static characteristics of bipolar transistors, frequency response and switching of bipolar transistors, heterojunction bipolar transistors, thyristors. Unipolar Devices: Metal semiconductor contacts, JFET, MESFET, MOS diode, MOSFET: basic characteristics, threshold voltage and device scaling. Microwave Devices: Tunnel diode, IMPATT diode, BARITT diode, transferred electron device. Photonic Devices: Radiative transitions and optical absorption, light-emitting diode, semiconductor laser, photodetector, solar cell. Circuit Aspects of Physical Electronics: Model, A, Y, H, g, A, a chain matrices, two-port networks. Physics of Electron Beams: Beam confinement, velocity modulation, resonant cavities, klystron amplifier, reflex klystron, plasma oscillations. Modern Amplifiers: Travelling wave tube, travelling wave magnetron, noise, parametric amplifiers, masers and lasers Prerequisite PHY 306 PHY 414: SOLID STATE DEVICES II (3,1,0) 3 units Gas discharges: Kinetic theory of gases, distribution functions, collision, I-V characteristic Townsend discharge, glow discharge, positive column, plasma wave, punch effect, gaseous devices. Electron Emission: Photoemission, thermionic emission, secondary emission and field emission. Charged Particle Dynamics: Uniform electric fields, electrostatic defection in a CRT, uniform magnetic fields, magnetic deflection in a cathode-ray tube, general motion of a charged particle in uniform fields, crossed electric and magnetic fields, electron optics. Classical Vacuum Devices: I-V characteristics of a diode, multielectrode devices, triodes, tetrodes, pentodes, phototubes and photomultiplier tubes, image orthicons, electrometer tubes.

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Prerequisite

PHY 413 (3,1,0) 3 UNITS (ELECTIVE)

PHY 415: CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNIQUES I

The control system, closed loop control, open loop control, servomechanisms. Differential equations of physical systems, transfer functions, procedure for deriving transfer function. Block diagram algebra, signal flow graphs, Mason's gain formula, application of signal flow graph to control system. The concept of stability, necessary conditions for stability, Hurwitz stability criterion, Routh stability criterion, application of routh stability criterion to linear feedback systems. The root locus concept, construction of root loci, construction rules, determination of roots from root locus. Relation between time and frequency response, polar plots, Bode plots. Nyquist stability criterion, gain margin and phase margin, closed loop frequency response, Nichols chart. Prerequisite PHY 409

PHY 416: ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION (3,1,0) 3 units (elective) Analogue Instrumentation: Electronic voltmeters: VTVN, TVM, FETVM voltmeters, electronic milliammeters; differential voltmeters. Cathode Ray Oscilloscope: Block diagrams; vertical and horizontal amplifiers; sweep circuits; delay time; dual trace oscilloscope; measurement of frequency, phase angle, special purpose oscilloscopes. Q-meters, vector impedance and vector voltmeters, instruments for generating and analysing wave forms: square-wave, pulse, standard-signal; random noise and function generators; wave analysers; spectrum analysers wavemeters. Digital Instruments: Digital voltmeters, digital frequency meters, digital display method and units digital read out oscilloscopes, data acquisition system. Prerequisite PHY 314 and 319 PHY 417: INTRODUCTION TO TELECOMMUNICATION AND BROADCASTING (3,1,0) 3 units (elective) Review of the Principles of Analogue and Digital Transmission Telephone Systems: Wire telephoning: telephone circuits. Transmission bridges. 4 wire terminating set. 2 wire repeaters. 4 wire transmission. Public telephoning network: The systems step-by-step switching. Cross-bar switching. Electronic switching. Trunk, circuits. Private telephone network (PSTN). Facsimile and TV:

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Introduction. Facsimile transmission sender. Receiver. Telegraph signals. Television: Camera, circuits interlacing and picture scan repetition rate, picture definition, horizontal television signal, television receiver, television transmitter. B/W TV, coloured TV. Switching Techniques: Circuits switching. Message switching. Packer switching. Comparison of switched communication techniques. Data Communication System: A data link. Data formats. Multi-terminal system. Packet switching protocols. WAN services. LANs. Data network interconnections. ISDN. Satellite communications, international standards. Tropospheric propagation: Special features of VHF and UHF propagation. Propagation characteristics at microwave frequencies. Design of microwave links system. Radio transmitters and receivers, mono and stereo broadcasting. Practical antenna systems: L.F. M.F VHF and UHF antenna Prerequisite PHY 320

PHY 418: CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNIQUE II (3,1,0) 3units (elective) Introduction to complex control systems, state variable analysis of dynamical systems, canonical forms, stability, controllability and observability. Continuous and discrete systems, linear system design by state variable feedback. Introduction to optimal control quadratic performance index and regular problems. Non-linear elements and systems - phase plane and describing function methods. Stability analysis and liapunov's method. Prerequisite PHY 415 PHY 419: ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS (3,1,0) 3units (elective) The structure of the earth's atmosphere, Ozone depletion, the green house gases and effects. Atmospheric Electricity, solar and earth radiation, air quality, standard and measurement, air pollution. Thunder storms and Tornadoes; fluid turbulence near thunderstorms at high altitudes. Significance of climatic factors and atmospheric monitoring for civil and military aviation. Prerequisite PHY 320 PHY 420: VACUUM PHYSICS AND THIN FILM TECHNOLOGY (3,1,0) 3 units (elective) Vacuum Physics. Design and characterisation of vacuum systems. Tyupes of vacuum pumps and their uses, measurement of low pressure, different types of gauges. Uses of valves and other vacuum materials. Industrial uses of vacuum

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systems. Vacuum heating, furnaces, induction heating, electron bombardment heating. Thin film technology: Vacuum evaporation by means, evaporation sources and techniques, substrate and surface preparation for thin film deposition in vacuum. Epitaxial growth processes. Heat treatment of thin films, compatibility of film and substrates. Sputtering techniques. Deposition of thin insulating films by R.F. sputtering, preparation and use of masks for thin films deposition. Characterisation and application of thin films. Prerequisite PHY 413 PHY 421 - APPLIED GEOPHYSICS I: (3,1,0) 3 Units Gravity Method Introduction to the Gravity method, the Physical basis of gravity surveying, the Earth's gravitational field, gravity corrections, principles and use of gravimeters in prospecting, simple interpretation of anomalies. Magnetic Methods: Magnetic properties of minerals and rocks, the Earth's magnetic field, field variations design of measuring instruments, field magnetometers, surveying procedures, magnetic anomalies, airborne magnetic prospecting. Electrical Methods: Introduction to the Electrical methods, Conductivity of minerals and rocks, the D. C. conduction (resistivity) methods and interpretation: Four electrode arrays (Wenner, Schlumberger and Dipole): General equation for the Electrical potential. Seismology: Introduction to the Seismic methods: Physical basis of the Seismic method: Elasticity and wave motion: Observation wave types: Factors influencing Seismic velocity in rocks, major structure of the Earth; Crystal structure; earthquakes and Seismicity of the Earth. Prerequisite PHY 212 PHY 422: MATERIAL SCIENCE (3,1,0) 3 units Introduction to engineering plasticity. Yielding and related phenomena. Work hardening theory in single crystal and crystalline solids. Texture. Strengthening mechanics. Fracture, creep and fatigue. Heat treatment of metals and polymers: recovery, recrystallization, grain growth, annealing, twinning and recrystallization texture. Deterioration of materials: Oxidation, Corrosion and Wear. Steel: production, treatment and engineering application. magnetic materials and application, introduction to solidification theory, rapid solidification, amorphous solids and liquid semiconductors. Plastics and other polymes, insulating glasses, structure and electronics, properties of metallic glasses. Electrical, mechanical and nuclear engineering materials and properties. Prerequisite PHY 209 PHY 423: MICROWAVE AND ANTENNAS

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(2,1,0)

2 units

Fundamentals of Antennas: Radiation from a short current filament. Some basic antenna parameters: radiation pattern, radiation resistance, directivity, efficiency, power gain of an antenna, effective area of an antenna, effective length of an antenna, radiation from a small current loop, antenna impedance. Antenna Arrays: End fix and broad side types: the Hertzzian dipole, half wave dipole, vertical antennas, folded dipole antenna. Loo antenna, ferrite-rod antenna. Long wire antenna Rhombic antenna, VHF-UHF antennas. Microwave antennas. Introduction to Microwave: Microwave frequency range. Correspondence between field and circuit concepts. Overview of applications of microwave. Transmission Line Theory as Applied to Microwave Circuit: Review of transmission lines analysis. Uniform Transmission lines. Allocations of uniform transmission line theory of microwave circuit. Impedance matching by transmission line section. Graphical solution of transmission line equations. Transmission lnes with losses. Rectangular impedance diagram for lossy transmission lines. Smith chart or polar impedance diagram for lossy transmission. Resonator: Fundamental principles of resonant circuit. Transmission-line resonant circuit. Microwave cavity resonators. Rectangular cavity, cylindrical cavity, equivalent circuits for cavities. Spherical cavity resonator fabtry-perot resonators. Microwave Passive Components: General consideration, waveguide components: filter, circulators, splitters, loads and attenuators. Phase changer microwave hybrid junction (magic Tee or TwinTee). Directional couplers Connect of Non reciprocity. Microwave properties of ferrites. Microwave propagation in ferrites. Permeability and Susceptibility. Tensors inferrite medium. Lane wave propagation in unbounded ferrite. Medium Faraday rotation. Applications of microwave ferrite devices. Ferrite four-port and three-port circulators. Periodic Structures, Delay Lines: General properties of delay-lines or slow-wave structures used in Travelling-wave tubes (TWT). Classification of delay lines. Comparison between delay lines and ordinary waveguides. Sheath Helix Parallel-late delay lines. Inhomogeneous delay lines or periodic structures. Equivalent circuits of inhomogeneous delay lines or periodic structures. Wave propagation in lines of periodic structure space harmonics. General method of analysing periodic delay lines. Analysis of planeperiodic delay line. Tape helix as periodic delay lines. Closed-ring periodic delay lines: general properties. Analysis of closed-ring delay line. Dispersion curves and modes of travelling-wave magnetron. Microwave Electron Tubes:

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High frequency limitation of convection tubes. Classification of transit-time tubes. Drift-space tubes. Growing-wave tubes. Klystron: types, analysis and operation. Magnetrons: types, operations, different modes of oscillation, equivalent circuits and analysis. Travelling wave amplifier tube: slow circuit and small-signal analysis. Solid state sources. Prerequisite PHY 320 PHY 424: APPLIED GEOPHYSICS II (3,1,0) 3 units (elective) Theories of radiometric, electrical and electromagnetic methods, instrumentations and their applications in mineral, groundwater and pollution or environmental explorations. Use of seismic reflection and refraction methods in structural evaluation and in exploration. Borehole operations, borehole logs and telemetry. Application of gravity and magnetics methods in mineral, structural and oil explorations. Gravity and magnetics instrumentation. Airborne and ground gravity and magnetics explorations. Magnetics gradiometers, magnetics corrections, modelling and interpretation. Corrections and reductions of gravity data. Bouguer corrections and anomaly. Density evaluations. Parasnis and Nettleton's methods, gravity mapping and interpretations. Prerequisite PHY 421 PHY 426: REACTORS AND HEALTH PHYSICS ( 3,1,0,) 3 units Separation of Isotopes, X-section of interaction of neutrons, fast and thermal diffusion length, Neutron diffusion theory, homogenous reactors Fermi Age equation. Types of reactors and their start-up and operation. Effects of Radiation on livi8ng cells somatic and genetic damage. Acute whole body does syndromes. Uses of Radiation - Industrial uses and Medical uses. Radiation protection, Principles and Methods, Personnel Monitoring using TLD and film. Prerequisite PHY 411 PHY 427: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING I (2,1,0) 2 units Introduction to Compiler Techniques: Editors, linkers, interpreters, code generators, debuggers management tools. Introduction to Software Engineering: A preview software development. Relationship of software engineering to programming languages, operating systems and databases. R39 Software Requirement Specification: Operational specification. Data flow diagrams. Control flow. Descriptive specification: entity-relationship diagrams. Logic specification and algebraic specifications, specification languages.

Validation:

223

Construction of scenarios, cross-referencing and prototyping. Building and using specification in practice. Software Engineering Principles: Formality. Modularity. Abstraction. Refinement instrumentality. Planning a Software Project: Cost estimate. Project scheduling. Personal planning. Quality assurance planning. Project monitoring planning. System Design: Design principles. Concept. Structure design methodology. Object-oriented approach. Design specifications. Coding: Programming practice. Verification. Metrics. Monitoring and control. Testing: Testing fundamentals. Functional testing. Structural testing. Process testing. Detailed Design. Prerequisite CSC 205 PHY 428- ACOUSTICS: (3 Units) (3,1,0) Basic principles of acoustics, electroacoustic transducers. Noise measurement and control, Architectural and building acoustics, underwater acoustics, Vibrational concepts of acoustics, Natural frequencies and modes, Acoustic wave phenomena: propagation, transmission, reflection, interference, and energy. Plane and spherical wave propagation in stationary and moving fluids; acoustic radiation and scattering; standing waves in ducts and cavities. Measurement techniques and practices for quality data collection using electroacoustic transducers: calibration techniques, measurement of transducer response and model parameters, interface electronics. Prerequisite PHY 202 PHY 430: OPTICAL FIBRE COMMUNICATION ( 3,1,0,) 3 units The optical Spectrum Optical fibre as a transmission medium. Optical wavelength range. Frequency/wavelength formula. Definitions and terminology bandwidth in nanometers, refractive index of optical ray, incident angle, critical angle. Comparison of optical fibre cable with other communication media: immunity to EMI and RFI, power requirement, signal regeneration, bandwidth, size and weight. Laser Principles ( Optical Sources) Spontaneous emission. Stimulated emission and absorption, optical gain. Spectrum range. Bandwidth coherent. Lasing threshold. LED and ILD ( Injection Laser Diode) characteristics: component life-time, power requirements, spectra loss, efficiency, input-signal tracking, noise and distortion, biasing. Component costs. Analogue modulation. Digital modulation. Optical Receivers or Detectors

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PIN diode. Avalanche Photo-Diode (APD). Photon energy (E) equation. Efficiency of optical-to-electrical power conversion (quantum efficiency). Responsivity or Sensitivity versus wavelength. Noise III the frequency domain. Dark current. Signal-to-Noise ration and its equation Noise in the optical domain ( i.e. quantum noise). Bit error rate versus bandwidth. Opto-electronics. Photonics. Comparison between PIN and APD: costs, electronic circuitry, gain, response time, temperature stability, biasing, sensitivity. Optical Fibre Transmission Technology Snell's law. Step Index and Graded Index. Glass fibre construction. Fibre normalise frequency equation. Control of propagation modes by refractive index and cladding diameter. Single-mode or Mono-mode. Multimode. Normal dispersion. Delay distortion. Dispersion distortion. Distance-Bandwidth product. Power loss. High level PCM/DM modulation configurations. Optical Fibre Cable Fabrication & Application Armoured cable for directly buried installation. PVC sheathed underground and aerial cables. Polyurethane inner jackets. Coated Aluminium polythene outer jacket. Filling material. Bending radius. Fibre strengths: pulling tension and compression load. Go and Return configuration. Multiple glass fibres cable. Fibre ribbons for computer installation. Installation Tools and Measuring Equipment Fusion splicer. Termination and Distribution optical fibre signal cross-connect. Precision supper. Mechanical cable guide for manhole and ducway laying. Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR). Chromatic Dispersion Tester. Optical fibre talk-set. Prerequisite PHY 417 PHY 431: POWER ELECTRONICS I (3,1,0) 3 units Power Electronics Components: The owner diode. The transistor (power MSFET, IGBT, Cascade switch). The thyristor (constructions). Special Thyristor structures (Diacs, Triacs, GTO). Switching Devices in Power Electronics: Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) as a switch. IGBT as a switch. Switching Actions of Thyristors, Triacs and GT: Structure. Models, Characteristics, Turn-on and turn-off, power dissipation ratings. Protection. Thermal considerations. Thyristors in series and parallel. GTO applications (AC-AC and AC-DC conversions). Other Switches and the MCT: Static Induction Transistors (SIT): Structure, I-V characteristics, turn-on, turnoff, protection, rating and applications. Static Induction Thyristors (SITH): structures, I-V characteristics, turn-on, turn-off, protection, rating and applications. Thyristors (Asymmetric SCR, ASCR). Gate-Assisted Turn-ff Thyristor (GATT), TCT (Reverse Conducting Thyristor). MOS-controlled Thyristor (MCT): structure, I-V characteristics, turn-on, turn-off, protection, rating and applications.

225

Uncontrolled Converter Circuits: Single-hase half-wave rectifier circuit. Single phase bridge rectification. Multiphase half-wave and full wave rectifier circuit. LABORATORY EXERCISES Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR): Test an SCR using an ohmmeter. Demonstrate the operation of an SCR and measure the holding current. Perform an in-circuit operational test f an SCR. Effect of negative gate current on the gate. Effect of excess capacitance in the gate circuit of an SCR. SCR DC & Power Control: Verification of an SCR as a semiconductor switch. Half-wave controlled rectifier. Fu..-wave controlled rectification. Half-wave variable resistor control. Half-wave RC-diode phase control circuit. Power determination in a half-wave phase control circuit. Unijunction Transistor (UJT): Unijunction transistor characteristics. Intrinsic stand-off ratio determination. Peak emitter firing voltage oof UJT. UJT relaxation oscillator. Frequency variation with the timing comments. UJT as a square wave generator. UJT-SCR time delay circuit. Calculate and measure the period f a UJT-SCR time delay circuit. TRIAC and DIAC: Study of the bi-directional conduction of a TRIAC and gated DIAC. The triggering modes (four) of a TRIAC, DIAC-TRIAC phase control, and hysteresis reduction method. The hysteresis-free phase control circuit. Prerequisite PHY 431 PHY 432: POWER ELECTRONICS II (3,1,0) 3 units Naturally Communicating Converters: Single-phase half controlled converter circuits. Single phase full-controlled converter circuits. Multiphase controlled converter circuits. Regulators: Single-phase regulator. Three-phase AC regulators. Integral cycle control. 1 phase transformer tap chargers. Cycloconverter, load efficiency, and supply current power factor. Thyristors Forced Commutated DC Choppers: Reverse impressed voltage Commutated dc choppers. Current impulse displacement commutated dc choppers. Static Power Converters: Voltage-fed inverter bridge topologies. Controlled current-sourced inverters reversible converters, standby inverters and uninterrupted power suly (UPS), power filter, comparison f inverter techniques. Switch mode power supplies: The forward converter. The flyback converter, comparison of basic converters, multiple-switch, balanced isolated converter.

226

Passive Components as Applicable to Power Electronics Circuits: Type of resistors and capacitors and circuits, properties of resistor, repetitive pulse power resistor behaviour, stability and endurance f resistors, special function power resistor, power ferric transfer design. Application for AC and DC Drive Control. Prerequisite PHY 431 PHY 434: RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS (3,1,0) 3 units Introduction to maintenance principles: Definition of maintenance, type of maintenance, M and breakdown M causes of faults (breakdown in systems, symbiosis between system design and reliability factor, MTBF, etc. merit and demerit of PM. Faults diagnosis: Discrete electrical/electronic circuits on PCBs and their problems. Inspection of faults, repair of cards CB. Use of test equipment. Troubleshooting Techniques for Electrical/Electronic System (Hardware Approach): Logic steps in system troubleshooting: system level device level and component level fault diagnosis: intermittent failure, partial failure and catastrophic failure, their causes, operating stress, environmental stress etc. Logical steps in fault diagnosis, inputs to output, output to input random and half split method. Computer based maintenance approach: Fault modelling and diagnosis using computer systems: interfacing between the system under test and the computer. Development of fault determination, location and clearing algorithms. Automatic test equipment development. Advantages and disadvantages Of computer based maintenance system. Build in test, self test in systems. Maintenance and Documentation Information: System manuals and operation of system. Reading of circuit diagrams. Its aids in location of faults. Fault Correction: Problem of soldering and de-soldering and their solution comment, device and card replacement. Software Maintenance. Prerequisite PHY 310 & 407 PHY 436: DATA COMMUNICATION (3,1,0) 3 units Introduction: Information element in binary system. Conversion of continuous wave signals to binary data. Bits and Binary convention. The dc nature of data transmission. Neutral and Polar modes f transmission. Bits and Baud. Definition of Bit-rate. Definition of bandwidth.

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Binary Coding Techniques: Base band system. Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK). Frequency Shift Keying (FSK). Phase Shift Keying (PSK). Matched filter detection. Quadrature detection. Sources, entry and the noiseless coding theorem. Mutual information and channel capacity. The converse to the coding theorem. Binary Data Transmission and Concept of Time: Asynchronous Transmission: Protocol frame structure, error correction and detection throughput and overheads. Synchronous Transmission:: protocols frame structure, error-correction and detection, clock timing cyclic redundancy check (CRC). Throughput and overheads, flow control. Binary Data Transmissions Errors: Nature of Errors. Forward-error-correction (FEC). Error correction with feedback channel, Hamming code. Hamming distance. Cyclic codes. Automatic repeat request (ARQ). Bit-error-rate (BER). Distortion. Data Communication Channel and Communication Modes: Analogue media support for binary data. Digital data transmission media. Circuit-switched and Virtual-switched data transmission channels. Channel bandwidth considerations: capacity, noise distortion, Memory-less channel. Simplex, Half-duplex transmission modes. Equaliser conditions for leased line operation. Prerequisite PHY 417 PHY 438: ELECTRONIC SYSTEM AND INSTALLATIONS (3,1,0) 3 units Building, Siting and Site: Electronic instrumentation and computer building considerations: design and siting. Site preparation: controlled environment, telecoms facility, wiring, conduits, cable, ducts, plugs, underground cabling, etc. Power Supply System: Storage Batteries: The principles of lead acid cell. Cadmium - Acid storage battery. Wet and dry-charged batteries, initial charge, maintenance charge, equalisation charge. Discharge voltage characteristics. Ampere-hour operating characteristics. Electrolyte and specific gravity. Alternating Current Rectifiers: Input/output voltage and current characteristics. Single-phase and threephase balanced and unbalanced rectifiers. Other configurations of rectifiers. Voltage rectifiers. Power rectifiers. Filtering of rectifier outputs. Passive filters. Active filters. Output regulation. Charge circuit. Uninterrupted Power Supplies (UPS): Off-time or standby UPS configuration. On-line UPS single input configuration. On-line UPS dual input configuration with head staticswitch. Hybrid topology (no Poreale). Hybrid topology (bi-directional) Hybrid topology (load sharing). The principle of solar cells. Solar cell power supply.

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Solar cell arrays. Energy conversion efficiency. Installation practice. Computation of standby, operating capacity. Safety Consideration and Site Protection: Electrical power stabilisation: lightening arreters, mains filter, grounding, fire protection, radiation monitoring, access control. Installation Organisation and Management: Organisation Structure (organogram). Task scheduling and report, stores and requisition procedures: data and report keeping analysis - library: backup procedure, standard operating practice - budgeting and planning. Personnel: Computer personnel selection, deployment and development and tracing the signal at all the nodes in the circuit. Laboratory 1: The Supervisor introduces a fault and multi-fault. The students are to trace the signal and find where the fault occurs and what type of fault and clear the fault using (1) an oscilloscope, and then (2) the multimeter. Laboratory 2: Fault in Digital Circuit Each student or group of students is provided a sequential circuit using flip-flops and gates. (a) With a given signal to the circuit, trace and draw the output at Q of each flip-flop as shown on the double beam oscilloscope and study the timing sequence. (b) The supervisor introduces a fault. Using an oscilloscope, trace the fault and clear it.

Laboratory 3: Equipment Study Each student or group of students is to open an electronic equipment like a multi-range radio, a TV, an oscilloscope and identify all the components with the aid of a circuit diagram. Laboratory 4: Computer Study System Study Open and identify various devices and circuits in a PC. Comparison of cards in 386, 486 and 586 PCs. Laboratory 5: Computer Fault Detection and Location Use digital system D3000 for the simulation of fault through a computer connected to the system by following instruction in the manual. Prerequisite PHY 310 and 313 PHY 440: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING II Software Design Tool and Environment Classification Re-usability:

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(2,1,0)

2 units

UNIX. Interslip. ADA. Tools in an object-oriented environment. Program construction. Data flow-oriented design: Information flow. Process considerations. Transform analysis. Transaction analysis. Object-Oriented Design: Concepts. Method. Refinement. Implementation. Data Oriented Design: Data structure. Process considerations. User-Interface Design: Human factor (perception, skill, behaviour) Human-computer interface design. Real-time Design: Real-time system. Intercept. Databases. Operating systems and languages. Analysis and simulation of real-time systems. Programming Languages and Codes: Languages' characteristics. Fundamentals. Class. Coding style: data declaration, statement construction. Software Maintenance: Maintenance characteristics. Tasks. PHY 442: COMPUTER HARDWARE SYSTEM STUDIES (2,1,0) 2 units System Review of the Computer: Input, CPU, Storage and Output. Computer Availability: Maintenance, MTTR, Upgrading, Spare provision, Record-Keeping. Peripherals: Keyboard, VDU, printers, Scanners, (OCR, MICR, etc.) Interface and Interconnections of Computer System: Bus structure, Daisy chain, DMA, Interrupt Techniques. Memory Modes: Requirements (Read head, Write head, Address reflection mechanism, storage Medium). Characteristics: Access time, capacity, data transfer rate, etc. Types: magnetic (drum, disk, diskette, tape films, etc.) Semiconductor memory (RAM, ROM, Programmable): optical storage (CD RM). Memory Hierarchy (Primary/ Main: secondary/mass/back-up, virtual memory, cache: buffer). Computer Modes: Batch processing, Interactive Real Time. Time sharing, Process Control. Computer Viability: Computer performance measurement and reliability (MTBF, MTTD, MTTR), graceful degradation and methods (fault tolerance, over design, redundancy, partition). Prerequisite PHY 407 PHY 444: SATELLITE COMMUNICATION (3,1,0) 3 units

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Historical Development of Satellite Communication: Arthur C. Clarke's concept of global telecommunication system. The 3-satellte Geostationary global communication system. The basic orbits: circular polar orbit, circular equatorial orbit and elliptical inclined orbit. Sky temperature versus frequency-bands curve. The SYNCOM elliptical inclined orbits satellites. The EARLY BIRD (North Atlantic) circular equatorial orbit satellite. Geographic advantages of the circular equatorial orbit. The geostationary or geo-synchronous orbit. INTELSAT satellites (ownership, locations, regulations for utilisation, transponder leasing) INMARSAT satellites. High orbit, medium orbit and low orbit satellites. Earth-to-Space and Space-to-Earth: Geostationary satellite orbit distance above earth. Transmitted and Received signal power flux density. Time delay. Polarization Isolation versus Frequency characteristics. Space segment architecture. Ground station architecture. Earth Station Antennas: Parabolic Reflector (r Dish Antenna). Geometry and equation for a paraboloid. The point source of energy, (r feed). The on-axis antenna power gain equation. Effective projected area of the aperture. Bandwidth. Beam width equation. Surface inaccuracy equation. Radiation patter for the paraboloid antenna. The Cassegrain antenna geometry with hyperboloids sub-reflector. The Cassegrain antenna with a 4-reflectr beam waveguide feed. The off-set Cassegrain antenna geometry. The off-set Trus antenna. Antenna Mounts: X-Y mount AZ-EL mount (i.e. Azimuth/Elevation mount), poplar mount. Main reflectors. Sug-reflectors. Wheel and Track pedestal system. Comparison f antenna configurations. Gain versus frequency response. Gain-to-Noise temperature ratio equation. The gain loss equation. The 3dB beam width formula. Gain Roll-off. Waveguides and Feeds: Basic Waveguides theory. Maxwell's boundary conditions. Function of the antenna feed in satellite earth station. The Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) propagation modes in Waveguides. Velocity of propagation phase velocity. Rectangular Waveguides propagation. Circular Waveguides propagation. Waveguides beam shaping. The communication feed. Corrugated Feed Horn. Beam Waveguides feed. The orthomode coupler (or Diplexer). Sense of feed polarizations: right-hand clockwise, left-hand anticlockwise. Linear polarization. Circular polarization. Orthogonal polarization (fr frequency re-use). Frequency re-use technique. Elasticity (or Axial ratio) infrequency re-use. Axial ratio equation. Polarization Isolation versus Antenna Axial ration. Dual-frequency band operation. Frequency Selective Reflecting (FSR) surface in dual-frequency band operation. Earth Station Antenna Tracking: Introduction. Satellite station keeping. Monopulse Tracking. Step track Autotracking and system configuration. Non-tracking antenna. Introduction to Earth Station Equipment (HPA):

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High Power Amplifier (HA). Brief introduction to Klystron Power Amplifier. Travelling

Wave Tube (TWT) amplifier. HA output combining techniques: hybrid multiplexing, circulatory multiplexing, diplexer multiplexing, HA testing. Introduction to Earth Station Equipment (LNA): Low Noise Amplifier (LNA). Principle of operation of Parametric Amplifiers. The Varactor diode and its equivalent circuit. Equivalent circuit of parametric amplifier. Junction Gate FET, low-noise amplifier. GASFET low noise amplifier. Thermo-electric cooling (peltir effect). Gain bandwidth low noise amplifier. LNA receive and test switching. VSAT Earth Station Equipment: Principle of Very Small Aperture Terminal. Gain-over-Temperature ratio. Compact HPA and LNA equipment. Introduction to Earth Station Equipment (Frequency Converters): Up/Down converters:: RF filters, single frequency conversion, double frequency conversion IF amplifiers AGC. IF filters, group delay-equalizers. Performance characteristics of Up/Down converters:: RF bandwidth. IF bandwidth, frequency agility, equalization, carrier frequency tolerance linearity. Earth Station Equipment (Ground Communication): Transmit/Receive channelling and telecommunication microwave equipment. Monitoring and Control. Auxiliary, equipment. Telecommunications power supplies. Noise: Figure of merit. System Noise Temperature. Noise power equation. Aerial noise temer4ature equation. Noise temperature of LNA. Cosmic and Atmospheric noise. Waveguide comment losses. Equivalent noise temperature (in Kelvin) and equivalent factor equations. Carrier-to-Noise ratio and Carrier-to-Noise power ratio equations. Signal-to-Noise ratio equation. Calculation f system noise budget. Station margin. Satellite Network Access Techniques: FDM/FM Technique. Compounded FDM (CFDM) technique. TDM technique. TDMJTDMA technique. CDMA technique. SCPC and MCPC. DAMA (Demand Assignment Multiple Access). Prerequisite PHY 417 PHY 446: COMPUTER NETWORKS AND SERVICES (3,1,0) 2 units Review of Switching Techniques and Networks: Communication Networks. Circuit Switching. Message switching. Packet switching. Comparison of switched communication techniques. Broadcast Networks. Classification of Networks, Topology and Transmission Media:

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Classification of network: broad and base-band. LAN, WAN, MAN and others. Implementation of network topologies. ISO-OSI Reference Models: Protocol: The layered approach: OSI model. TCP/IP Protocol suite. Transport protocols; ISO, DOD and other protocols. Network architecture: SNA and others. Interfacing and Internetworking: Data interface standards and MODEMS. Principles of internetworking. The bridge. Routing with bridge. Access servers. Gateways devices. Connection-oriented Internet working. Connectionless internetworking. Connectionless internet work protocol standards. Router-level protocols. Local Area Networks (LANs): Local network technology. The Bus/star topology. The ring topology. Access Method: CSMA-Collision Detection (CD), CSMA-Collision Avoidance. Token assign media: Cable, wireless, LAN protocol performance standards. Network Operating Systems: Administration. Applications: Virtual terminal protocols. File transfer protocols. Electronic mail. The integrated digital network. Overview f ISDN. Transmission structure. User access. ISCN protocols. Signalling system number 7. broadband ISDN (multimedia). Frame lay. ATM. Internets: Service. Tools. Service providers. Prerequisite PHY 417 PHY 448: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING INSTALLATION (3,1,0) 3 unit Requirement for Safety: NEPA and IEE regulations. Legal requirements. Labels and notices. National Supply of Electricity: Thermal and hydro generating plants. The national supply grid. Ring and radial supply network. Voltage and frequency values and regulations. Distribution of Electrical Supply: Overhead open-wire installations practice. Armoured and non-armoured underground installation practice. Types of cables and conductors. Substations. Distribution Transformer and Sub-Stations: Installation and Maintenance practice Cooling, Overhead and Ambient operating conditions. Excess load current and fault current protection practice. System earthing. Drop-out devices. Instrumentation:

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Ammeters. Voltmeters. Kilowatt meters. Kilowatt-hour meters. Kilo Var meters and power factor indicators. Sychroscopes and frequency meters. Single-phase load. Three-phase loads, power factors. Diversity loads. Phase load balancing and power factor correction at supply switchgears. Final Sub-Circuits: Wiring installation practice (conduits, surface, trays and raceways, rings and radicals, etc.). voltage drops due to conductors, ambient temperature and circuitgrouping. Earth-leakage protection installation practice. Fuses and circuitbreakers. Additions to Existing Installation: Electric range. Demand factors. Calculation of feeder loads and protection switchgear capacities. Motor leads. Lighting System: Brief introduction to office., industrial and computer room lighting. Schematic and Connection Diagrams: Single line diagram for AC and DC systems. Connections to meters and other instruments. Use of graphic symbols: physical size, shapes, location. Connection and installation of parts and devices of the systems. Internal and external connection. Component Labelling Format: Circuit arrangement. Connectors. Interrupted paths. Mechanical linkages. Symbols covered by national international codes (e.g. ANSI Y 32.2). Standard circuit components: resistors, capacitors, inductors, semiconductors and transistors. Switches and transformers etc. separation of parts. Reference designations: use of standard abbreviation. Standard form or presenting the values of resistance, capacitance, inductance and voltage. Functional identification of parts. Prerequisite PHY 206 PHY 499 SEMINAR (0,0,3) 1 unit The course offers students the opportunity to do research in Modern Physics and Electronics, under the supervision of academic staff. Detailed report on the research is presented by the student when the project is completed.

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DEPARTMENT

OF

PLANT SCIENCE AND BIOTECHNOLOGY

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S/NO NAME 1. A.E. GBADAMOSI

AREA OF SPECIALIZATION Senior Lecturer & Ag. Head (Silviculture & Tree Improvement)

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan)

2.

I .O. FASIDI B.Sc. Ph. D. (Ibadan) Professor

Professor (Plant Physiology & Biotechnology)

3.

O.Osonubi B.Sc. Ph.D

Professor

4.

J. KAYODE B.Sc. (Ado-Ekiti) M.Sc (Ife)

Professor (Plant Ecology)

5.

O. E. IGE.

Senior Lecturer

B.Sc.(Benin), M.Sc., Ph.D (Ibadan) (Palynology & Palaeoecology)

6.

O. F. OLOTUAH

B.Sc.(Ado-Ekiti) M.Tech(Akure), Ph.D(Akure)

Lecturer I (Plant Pathology/Pest Managt.)

7.

O. A. OBEMBE B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D (Benin)

Lecturer I (Genetics& Plant taxonomy) Lecturer II (Plant Pathology) Lecturer II (Plant Ecology) Assistant Lecturer (Phytochemistry & Economic Botany)

8.

S. A. OLATOKUNBO B.Sc (Ado-Ekiti) M.Sc. (Ibadan)

9.

O. KEKERE. B.Sc., M.Sc. (Benin)

10.

C. M. OGUNYEMI B. Sc. (Ilorin) M.Sc.(Ife)

ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL STAFF 11. MR. AGUDE, M.C. Technologist II HND, AISLT 12. MRS. SANNI, C.I. B.Tech. (Microbiology) Technologist II

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13.

MRS. SALEMCITY, O.B. Diploma in Accounting MRS. TUGBIYELE, Diploma in Computer M.A. MR. AKINSIKU OLADAPO R. WAEC MRS. POPOOLA, O. T SSCE MRS. OLAMUYIWA KEHINDE WASC MR. OLOGUNORISA, O.B. WASC Grade II

Data Entry Clerk

14.

Lab. Assistant

15.

Clerical officer

16.

Lab. Assistant

17.

Office Assistant

18.

Lab. Assistant

1.

INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL BACKGROUND The Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology was one of the departments in the Faculty of Science that relocated to Akungba from the former Ondo State University, Ado Ekiti in 1999 as Department of Botany. The Department provides basic foundation Biology courses to students in Education, Environmental Biology and Fisheries, Computer Science, Biochemistry, Mathematics, Chemistry, Microbiology, Geology and Physics. PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES. The objectives of the Plant Science and Biotechnology programme is the provision of the intending graduates with a thorough knowledge in modern theoretical and practical Botany and related disciplines, together with further work in several areas of general and applied Botany. The B.Sc. Graduate in Botany thus suited for specialized Postgraduate training or for general work in related areas of endeavour. Each student is assigned to a departmental adviser who will counsel and guide the student in the selection of courses best suited to his capabilities and interests and most related to form a coherent career pattern. PROGRAMME OFFERED: B.Sc. (Hons) Plant Science and Biotechnology ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS A candidate for admission to the Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology must have at least five credits at the S.S.C.E/G.C.E. `O' level, NECO, or its equivalent at not more than two sittings in the following subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, English and any other subject. The Joint Matriculation Examination (JME) subjects are Biology, Chemistry and any other science subject. Direct Entry requirements are two "A" level

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2.

3. 4.

passes in Biology/Botany/Zoology and Chemistry or Physics while ND with at least upper credit in relevant areas in addition to UME requirements may also be admitted. Candidates who have satisfied Adekunle Ajasin University, pre-degree Science programme are also eligible for admission. 5. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AWARD OF DEGREE The minimum requirement for the award of the B.Sc degree in Plant Science and Biotechnology for JME candidates is satisfactory completion of not less than 144 units of course work consisting of: GST courses Elective courses Compulsory courses ­ 11 units 10 units 123 units 144 units Direct entry candidates are required to satisfactorily complete a minimum of 108 units. A student must register for a minimum of 15 credit units and a maximum of 24 credit units each semester. 6. REGISTRATION FOR COURSES The following terminologies approved by Senate shall apply to the different categories of courses. (a) Compulsory Courses: Specified Departmental courses which students must take and pass in order to graduate (b) Required Courses: University or Faculty courses, which students must take and pass before they can graduate (c) Elective Courses: These are courses within or outside the Faculty of the students which they should take to meet the minimum number of units. (d) Pre-requisite Course: This is one which students must take and make at least 35% to be able to register for certain courses. ADMISSION REQUIREMENT A candidate for admission to the Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology must have at least five credits at the S.S.C.E/G.C.E. `O' level, NECO, or its equivalent at not more than two sittings in the following subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, English and any other subject. The Joint Matriculation Examination (JME) subjects are Biology, Chemistry and any other

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science subject. Direct Entry requirements are two "A" level passes in Biology/Botany/Zoology and Chemistry or Physics while ND with at least upper credit in relevant areas in addition to UME requirements may also be admitted. Candidates who have satisfied Adekunle Ajasin University, Pre-degree Science programme are also eligible for admission.

COURSE CONTENT 100 LEVEL BIO 101: GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 (3 UNITS) Cell structure and organization, functions of cellular organelles; diversity, characteristics and classification of living things; general reproduction, interrelationship of organisms, heredity and evolution. Elements of Ecology and types of habitat. Introduction to plant and animal identification and the use of keys. (Compulsory) BIO 102: GENERAL BIOLOGY II (3 UNITS) A general survey of the plant and animal kingdoms based mainly on similarities and differences in the external features: ecological adaptation of these forms. (Compulsory) BIO 103: EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY I (1 UNIT) Introduction to Microscopy, care of the microscope, parts and uses of the microscope. Laboratory procedures. Living cells e.g. human cheek epithelium, epidermal cells, blood cells, plant cells etc. Reproductive structures in plants and animals. (Compulsory). BIO 104: EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY II (1 UNIT) Practical classes on Evolutionary trends in organisms. Viruses, Bacteria, Fungi, Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Gymnospermae, Angiospermae, Arthropoda, Mollusca, Vertebrate anatomy--Digestive, Respiratory, Circulatory and Reproductive Systems. (Compulsory). 200 LEVEL BIO 201: INTRODUCTORY GENETICS (3 UNITS) Historical perspective, life cycle and reproduction, Mendel laws, probability and tests of goodness of fit: Quantitative inheritance. Variation in genome structure, variation and natural population genetics, Darwin and Natural selection. (Compulsory) BIO 202: INTRODUCTORY ECOLOGY (3 UNITS) Aims and scopes of ecology, autecology and synecology. Units of ecology: population, community, ecosystem. The concept of measurement and effects on

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organisms and populations. Sampling and collection methods in the study of communities and ecosystems. Estimation of abundance. Density, yield, cover and frequency of organisms. (Compulsory) BIO 204: BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES (2 UNITS) Microscope, preparatory slides, photometry, colorimetry, chromatography, conductometry. Experimental design. Sterilization techniques, interpretation of biological reports. (Compulsory) BIO 205: INTRODUCTORY CELL BIOLOGY (3UNITS) History and present trends in cell Biology. Reproduction, cell division, cell differentiation and growth of cells. Brief study of the molecular basis of cell structure and development. Organelles, protein and nucleic acids. (Compulsory) BIO 206: BIOSTATISTICS FOR AGRIC AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (3 UNITS) Use of statistical methods in biology and agriculture. Frequency distributions, Laws of Probabiity. The binomial, Poisson and normal probability distributions. Estimation and tests of hypothesis. Design of simple agricultural and biological experiments. Analysis of Variance and Covariance, Simple regression and correlation, Contigency tables. Some non-parametric tests. (Compulsory) PSB 202: SEED PLANTS (3UNITS) General organization of the angiosperms, variation in the structure of the roots, stems, leaves, Inflorescence, flower. Fruits and seeds. (Compulsory) PSB 203: SEEDLESS PLANTS (3 UNITS) Historical survey of the development of ideas and methods. Morphology and reproduction of algae, bryophytes and pteridophytes including fossils. Use of morphological, physiological and chemical characteristics and their limitations. (Compulsory) PSB 204: INTRODUCTORY PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY (2 UNITS) Meaning of biotechnology and other terminologies. Biotechnology ­ ancient and modern; DNA and gene expression; The exploitation of microorganisms; Plant cell, tissue and organ culture; Biotechnology and plant improvement; Legal, social and ethical aspects of biotechnology. (Compulsory) 300 LEVEL BIO 301: GENERAL GENETICS (3UNITS) Human genetics: pedigree analysis, human karyotype, blood grouping in humans, genetic counseling. Chromosome and genes. Chromosome mapping, Sex chromosome and sex linkage, extra-chromosomal and epigenetic introduction to microbial genetics. The physical and chemical nature of the genetic materials, protein synthesis, mutation. (Compulsory). Pre-requisite: BIO 201.

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BIO 308: EVOLUTION (2 UNITS). Current concept in evolution. Geological periods and epochs. Genetic variation and speciation. Evolution of selected organisms. (Compulsory). Pre-requisite BIO 201. PSB 301: PLANT TAXONOMY (3 UNITS) History of taxonomy. Taxonomy and its significance: principles and concepts in plant taxonomy with special emphasis on cytotaxonomy and chemotaxonomy, phylogenetic considerations, treatment of selected orders and families. (Compulsory). Pre-requisite PSB 202. PSB 302: COMPARATIVE PLANT ANATOMY (3 UNITS) Characteristics and classification of tissue and systems: Organisation of meristems, Characteristic evolution of issues, evolution of vascular tissues comparative wood anatomy. Anatomical adaptations to specialized habitats. Applied aspects of plant anatomy. (Compulsory). PSB 303: PLANT PHYSIOLOGY I (3 UNITS). Cell structure and function. Water relationship of cells, imbibitions Vacuolation, Osmotic pressure, water potential and tension in cell wall, permeability. Division and elongation. Mechanism of cell elongation, water relation. Plant-water relation cell wall synthesis, uptake and utilization of minerals. Stomatal movement, translocation of solutes within plants. (Compulsory) PSB 304: PLANT ECOLOGY (3 UNITS) Study of various plant communities and their ecological frame-work, modern concepts in ecology, succession, community interaction, species and indices of diversity, ecosytem description, evaluation and management problems. Statistical methods in ecology parametric and non-parametric tests. Vegetation zones of West Africa, their climatic and edaphic features. Their floral and faunal composition, co-existence, resource shift. Pre-requisite: BIO 202 (Compulsory) PSB 305: MYCOLOGY (3 UNITS) Structures, life cycles, physiology and classification of fungi. Fungi of economic importance. (Compulsory). PSB 306: CYTOGENETICS (3 UNITS) Aspects of cell and nuclear divisions. Morphology and behaviour of chromosomes. Chromosomal aberration and polyploidy. Apomixis and parthenogenesis. (Compulsory). Pre-requisite: BIO 205. PSB 308: HORTICULTURE (2 UNITS)

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Floriculture and landscaping. Principles underlying basic horticultural practices. Methods of plant propagation. Cultivation and management of ornamental plants. (Compulsory). PSB 309: PALEOBOTANY (3 UNITS): Fossil plants, their origin and techniques of studies. Early plant life ­ Silurian to late Devontan. (Elective). PSB 311: PRINCIPLES AND RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN BIOTECHNOLOGY (3 UNITS) Basic definitions in Biotechnology; Techniques for gene transfer; the technology of molecular markers, the technology of monoclonal antibodies; Tissue culture techniques, cytological techniques, plant breeding techniques ­ alloploidy, polyploidy and hybridization. (Compulsory) Pre-requisite: PSB 204. PSB 313: ALGOLOGY (3 UNITS) Primary algal classification. Structure and reproduction of algae. Ecology of terrestrial and fresh water algae. Economic importance of algae. (Elective). Prerequisite: PBS 203 PSB 314: PLANT PHYSIOLOGY II (3 UNITS) Hormones and plant growth regulators, auxins, gibberellin, Cytokinins, ethylene and synthetic plant growth regulators. Roles of auxins and plant growth regulators in germination, reproduction. Practical application in agriculture/horticulture. Seed dormancy and Germination. Flowering, enzymes, photosynthesis and respiration in plants. (Compulsory). Pre-requisite: PSB 303. PSB 399: INDUSTRIAL FIELD WORK (3 UNITS): Supervised industrial field study in all areas of Plant Science and Biotechnology. (Compulsory). 400 LEVEL PSB 401: PLANT BREEDING (3 UNITS) The objectives of plant breeding, Breeding systems in plants, origin and domestication as basis of breeding, self pollinated and cross pollinated crops. Breeding methods, pure line breeding and mass selection, pedigree method. Bulk population, back cross breeding. Recurrent selection, heterosis, chromosome manipulation. (Compulsory). Pre-requisite: PSB 306. PSB 402: ECONOMIC BOTANY (3 UNITS) Study of the botany and cultivation of plant species with particular reference to Nigerian plants of economic values. (Compulsory) PSB 403: NIGERIAN VEGETATION (3 UNITS)

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Classification of Nigerian Vegetation. A study of Nigerian Forests and Savanna. The tropical, mangrove, and freshwater rainforests. Forest Stratification/Physiognomy. Field work in Southern Forest, derived savanna, northern guinea and sahel savanna. (Elective). PSB 404: POPULATION GENETICS (3 UNITS) The Mendelian population. Mendelian and quantitative genetics Gene and genotype frequencies and Hardweinberg equlibrium. Factors influencing allele frequency. An introductory consideration of mathematical models for the analysis of gene frequencies and genetic variation in population growth and limitation: selection on population breeding systems. (Elective). PSB 406: PLANT PATHOLOGY (3 UNITS) Principles and concepts in plant pathology. Some pathogens of plants, especially those prevalent in Nigeria. The geographical distribution of the pathogens, their distribution ,isolation, identification, morphology, life-cycles, source of isolation, transmission and clinical manifestations of specific bacterial, viral and fungal pathogens of plants. Control of plant diseases Pre ­ requisite PSB 305. (Compulsory). PSB 407: PLANT REPRODUCTION (3 UNITS) Developmental trends of sexual and asexual reproductions in plants. (Elective)

PSB 408: ADVANCES IN PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY (2 UNITS) Cell and Tissue Culture, Cell fusion (hybridization), recombinant (rDNA). Technology or genetic engineering. Traditional technologies e.g. microbial fermentation, beer brewing, rapid plant propagation, Biological control of pests, vaccine production. (Compulsory) PSB 409: PLANT VIROLOGY (3 UNITS) General characteristics of plant bacteria and viruses. Viral multiplication. Selected viral diseases in plants. (Compulsory) PSB 411: SEMINAR (1 UNIT) Each student in the graduating year is to make an oral presentation of a review of literature on a research topic, or of the progress report on his/her research project. (Compulsory). PSB 412: RESEARCH PROJECT (4 UNITS) Each student in the graduating year will undertake a research project or critical literature review in a current area of Botany under the direction of a member of academic staff. (Compulsory)

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PSB 413: PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY (3 UNITS) Enzyme classification and nomenclature. Characterisation of main enzyme groups. Inhibition of enzymes, regulation of enzymes. Structure and types of plastics and chlorophyll, photosynthesis, respiration and techniques in plant Biochemistry. (Compulsory). PBS 414: PALYNOLOGY (3 UNITS). Form, morphogenesis and functions of pollen and spores. Evolutionary trends, palynological techniques and application. Pollen morphology and taxonomy. (Elective). Pre-requisite PSB 309. PSB 416: ENVIRONMENTAL PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (3 UNITS) Physical, chemical and Biological stress conditions and the effects on plants. Principles of pollution control. Plant Productivity and controlling factors. Physiological basis of crop yield. (Elective). PSB 417: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (2 UNITS) Cell theory, chemistry of life, mechanist view of life, nucleic acids, nucleotides and nucleosides, molecular basis of heredity, DNA and RNA replication, protein synthesis, gene manipulation (Compulsory)

PSB 421: BRYOLOGY (3 UNITS) Structure and reproduction of the bryophytes; spore dispersal mechanism. Bryophyte life history; the protonemal, gametophytic and sporophytic phases. Evolutionary significance of the bryophytes. Taxonomic considerations: Family, genus, species, subspecies, variety and form concepts. Taxonomic characters and bryophyte identification. Treatment of selected families and genera. (Elective) PSB 425: CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES (3 UNITS) Conservation of natural resources, Including soil, vegetation, water, marine and wild life. Land use management. Environmental pollution, environmental impact assessment of soil, water and air pollution in relation to the determination of the environment, soil fertility, air and water pollution. Biotoxicity, phytotoxicity, pollution legislation, use of plants for pollution monitoring and control: - algae, lichen, aquatic macrophytes and higher plants. Merits and demerits of various taxonomic groups as indicators of pollutants. (Compulsory). Pre-Requisite: BIO 202. BIO 403: SOIL ECOLOGY (3 UNITS)

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Physical and Chemical nature of soil. Detritus organisms. Cycling of minerals and nutrient pools. (Elective)

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Microsoft Word - Faculty of Science brochure 2010

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