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DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE Headquarters US Air Force Washington, DC 20330-1030

CFETP 4B0X1 Parts I and II 1 October 2009

AFSC 4B0X1 BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

CAREER FIELD EDUCATION AND TRAINING PLAN

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CAREER FIELD EDUCATION AND TRAINING PLAN BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SPECIALTY AFSC 4B0X1 Table of Contents PART I Preface ............................................................................................................................................. 4 Abbreviations/Terms Explained...................................................................................................... 5 SECTION A GENERAL INFORMATION.......................................................................................... 8 1. Purpose of the CFETP 2. Use of the CFETP 3. Coordination and Approval of the CFETP SECTION B CAREER PROGRESSION AND INFORMATION ............................................................ 9 4. Specialty Description 5. Skill/Career Progression Apprentice (3-skill level) Journeyman (5-skill level) Craftsman (7-skill level) Superintendent (9-skill level) 6. Training Decisions 7. Community College of the Air Force Occupational Instructor Certificate Trade Skill Certification Associates in Applied Sciences Degree Requirements 8. Career Field Path SECTION C SKILL-LEVEL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS ............................................................. 17 9. Purpose 10. Specialty Qualification Apprentice Level Training Journeyman Level Training Craftsman Level Training Superintendent Level Training SECTION D RESOURCE CONSTRAINTS ...................................................................................... 20 11. Purpose 12. Reporting Job Proficiency Training Constraints - Units/MAJCOMS SECTION E TRANSITIONAL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS....................................... 20 ______________________________________

OPR: USAFSAM/OED Certified by: USAFSAM/OE (CMSgt Kevin Reid) Supersedes: 4B0X1 CFETP, 1 May 2005 Pages: 39

PART II SECTION A SPECIALTY TRAINING STANDARD INFORMATION ................................................. 21 SECTION B COURSE OBJECTIVE LISTS ..................................................................................... 31 SECTION C SUPPORT MATERIALS............................................................................................. 31 SECTION D TRAINING COURSE INDEX AND CIVILIAN CERTIFICATIONS ................................ 31 SECTION E MAJCOM UNIQUE REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................... 34 SECTION F - DOCUMENTATION OF TRAINING (MEDICAL SPECIFIC) ......................................... 34

BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SPECIALTY AFSC 4B0X1 CAREER FIELD EDUCATION AND TRAINING PLAN PART I Preface 1. This Career Field Education and Training Plan (CFETP) was developed to address a career field which has grown in scope and complexity. It is designed to sustain the career field through improved education and training; it is a comprehensive core education and training document that identifies life-cycle education and training requirements, training support resources, and minimum core tasks for this specialty. The CFETP provides personnel with a defined career path and instills rigor in all aspects of career field training. NOTE: Civilians occupying Bioenvironmental Engineering positions will use Part 2 to support duty position qualification training. 2. The CFETP consists of two parts; supervisors use both parts to plan, manage, and control 4B0X1 training. 2.1. Part I provides information necessary for overall specialty management. Section A explains how everyone will use this plan. Section B identifies career field progression information, duties and responsibilities, training strategies, and defines the career field path. Section C associates each skill level with specialty qualifications (knowledge, education, training, experience, and other). Section D indicates resource constraints. Section E identifies transitional training for SSgt through MSgt (reserved). 2.2. Part II provides a comprehensive list of training courses and standards available to support career field training requirements. There are six sections to Part II: Specialty Training Standard (STS), Course Objective List, OJT Support Material, Training Course Index, MAJCOM unique requirements, and Competency Assessment Folder maintenance. Section A contains the most current version of the STS. This revised STS identifies 3-, 5-, and 7-skill level training requirements and indicates those tasks determined to be core tasks. The STS also includes duties, tasks, technical references, USAF School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM)-conducted training, Readiness Skills Verification (RSV) curriculum, wartime emergency surge training curriculum, and correspondence course requirements. Section B contains the Course Objective List. Supervisors use this list to determine the scope of training Airmen receive from these courses. Section C identifies available OJT support materials, e.g. Qualification Training Packages (QTPs) which are developed to support proficiency training. Section D contains the Training Course Index, listing mandatory courses, field training, and Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) courses used to support training within the 4B career field. Supervisors use this index to determine resources available to support training. Included here are both mandatory and optional courses. Section E identifies MAJCOM-unique training requirements, if any. Section F is specific to medical AFSCs. It describes the master training plan and training documentation. At unit level, supervisors and trainers will use Part II to identify, plan, and conduct training commensurate with the overall goals of this CFETP. 3. The guidance provided in this CFETP will ensure individuals in the BEE career field receive effective and efficient training at the appropriate points in their career. This plan will enable you to train today's work force for tomorrow's challenges. 4

Abbreviations/Terms Explained Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL). Distributed Learning is a general term used to describe a multimedia method of instructional delivery that includes a mix of web-based instruction, streaming video, conferencing, face-to-face classroom time, distance learning through television or video, or other combinations of electronic and traditional educational models. Although distributed learning can be executed in a variety of ways, it is consistent in that it always accommodates a separation of geographical locations for part (or all) of the instruction, and focuses on learner-to-learner as well as instructor-to-learner interaction. Advanced Training (AT). Formal course that provides individuals who are qualified in one or more positions of their Air Force Specialty (AFS) with additional skills/knowledge to enhance their expertise in the career field. Training is for selected career Airmen at the advanced level of the AFS. Air Force Job Qualification Standard/Command Job Qualification Standard (AFJQS/CJQS). A comprehensive task list that describes a particular job type or duty position. Supervisors documenting task qualifications use them. AFJQS/CJQS tasks are common to all persons serving in the described duty position. Air Force Specialty (AFS). A group of positions requiring common qualifications. Each AFS has a title and code. Career Field Education and Training Plan (CFETP). A CFETP is a comprehensive, multipurpose document that identifies the entire life-cycle education and training for a career field. It outlines a logical growth plan that includes training resources, minimum core task requirements for a specialty, and is designed to make career field training identifiable and eliminate duplication. Certification. A formal indication of an individual's ability to perform a task to required standards. Certification Official. A person designated by the commander to determine an individual's ability to perform a task to required standards. Continuation Training. Additional training exceeding basic upgrade requirements with emphasis on present or future duty assignments. Core Tasks. Tasks the AFCFM identify as minimum qualification requirements for everyone within an AFSC, regardless of duty position. Core tasks may be specified for a particular skill level, duty position, or in general across the AFSC. Guidance for using core tasks can be found in the applicable CFETP narrative. Course Objective List (COL). A publication, derived from course training standards, identifying the tasks and knowledge requirements, and respective standards to achieve a 3-, 5-, and 7-skill level in a career field. Supervisors use the COL to assist in conducting graduate evaluations in accordance with AFI 36-2201, Volume 1, Training Development, Delivery and Evaluation. Enlisted Specialty Training (EST). A mix of formal training (technical school) and informal training (on-the-job) to qualify and upgrade Airmen in each skill level of a specialty. 5

Exportable Training. Additional training via computer assisted, paper text, interactive video, or other necessary means to supplement training. External Evaluation. Acquisition and analysis of data from outside the training environment to evaluate the training product in the operating environment. Go/No Go. In OJT, the stage at which an individual has gained enough skill, knowledge, and experience to perform the tasks without supervision. Initial Skills Training. A formal resident course, which results in the award of the 3-skill (apprentice) level. Instructional System Design (ISD). A deliberate and orderly, but flexible process for planning, developing, implementing, and managing instructional systems. It ensures personnel are taught, in a cost-effective manner, the knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential for successful job performance. Job Knowledge. Job knowledge is satisfied through career development courses (CDCs) designed to provide basic knowledge across a wide spectrum of subjects pertaining to a career field. Occupational Survey Report (OSR). A detailed report showing the results of an occupational survey of tasks performed within a particular AFS. On-the-Job Training (OJT)--Hands-on, over-the-shoulder training conducted to certify personnel in both upgrade (skill level award) and qualification training (duty position certification). Position Qualification Training. Training designed to qualify Airmen in a specific position, which occurs after upgrade training. Qualification Training (QT). Actual hands-on task performance training designed to qualify an individual in a specific duty position. This portion of the dual channel OJT program occurs both during and after the upgrade training process. It is designed to provide the performance skills required to do the job. Qualification Training Package (QTP). An instructional package designed for use at the unit to qualify, or aid qualification, in a duty position, program, or on a piece of equipment. It may be printed, computer-based, or in other audiovisual media. Readiness Skills Verification Program (RSVP). A software program which identifies all skill requirements by AFSC and unit type code (unit readiness mission). Used as a management tool to ensure contingency skills are sustained. Resource Constraints. Resource deficiencies, such as funds, manpower, equipment, facilities that preclude desired training from being delivered. Skills Training. A formal course that results in the award of a skill level. Specialty Training Standard (STS)--An Air Force publication that describes the skills and knowledge that Airmen in a particular AFS need on the job. It further serves as a contract 6

between USAFSAM and the user to show the overall training requirements for an Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) delivered in formal schools and correspondence courses. Standard. An exact value, a physical entity, or an abstract concept, established and defined by authority, custom, or common consent to serve as a reference, model, or rule in measuring quantities or qualities, establishing practices or procedures, or evaluating results. A fixed quantity or quality. Sustainment Training. Regular and recurring training necessary to maintain skills of a fully qualified individual to adequately perform the mission and related duties required by their job, regardless of duty location. Task Certifier. See Certification Official. Trainer. A trained and qualified person who teaches Airmen to perform specific tasks through OJT methods. Also, equipment that the trainer uses to teach Airmen specified tasks. Training Requirements Analysis. A detailed analysis of tasks for a particular AFS to be included in the training decision process. Training Setting. The type of forum in which training is provided (formal resident school, on-the-job, field training, mobile training team, self-study, etc.). Upgrade Training (UGT). Mandatory training that leads to attainment of a higher level of proficiency. USAFSAM. The US Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine located at Brooks City-Base TX, to be relocated to Wright-Patterson AFB OH in 2011. Utilization and Training Pattern. A depiction of the training provided to, and the jobs performed by, personnel throughout their tenure within a career field or Air Force specialty. There are two types of patterns: 1) Current pattern, which is based on the training provided to incumbents and the jobs to which they have been and are assigned; and 2) Alternate pattern, which considers proposed changes in manpower, personnel, and training policies. Utilization and Training Workshop (U&TW). A forum of MAJCOM Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) functional managers, Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and USAFSAM personnel who determine career ladder training requirements. Wartime Tasks. Those tasks that must be taught when courses are accelerated in a wartime environment. In response to a wartime scenario, these tasks will be taught in the 3-level course in a streamlined training environment. These tasks are only for those career fields that still need them applied to their schoolhouse tasks. For the 4B0X1 AFSC, these tasks are aligned with RSVP.

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PART I, Section A - General Information 1. Purpose. This CFETP provides information necessary for the Bioenvironmental Engineering (BE) career field manager, BE MAJCOM Functional Managers (MFMs), commanders, training managers, supervisors, trainers and the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) to plan, develop, manage, and conduct an effective and efficient career field training program. This plan outlines the training that individuals in the 4B0X1 AFS will receive to develop and progress in the 4B career field. This plan identifies initial skills, upgrade, qualification, advanced and proficiency/continuation training: 1.1 Initial skills training, conducted at USAFSAM, is the AFS-specific training an individual receives upon entry into the 4B career field. Course graduates are awarded the 3-skill level. 1.2 Upgrade training identifies the mandatory courses, task qualification requirements, correspondence course completion, and minimum experience required to award the 5-, 7-, and 9-skill levels. 1.3 Qualification/job proficiency training (along with job experience) is actual hands-on task performance training designed to qualify an airman in a specific duty position. This training program occurs both during and after the upgrade training process. It is designed to provide the performance skills and knowledge training required to do the job. 1.4 Advanced Training is formal specialty training provided to select Airmen. 1.5 Proficiency/continuation training is additional training, either with in-residence training courses or exportable advanced training courses, or on-the-job training provided to personnel to increase their skills and knowledge beyond the minimum required for upgrade. 2. Uses. The plan will be used by BE MFMs, superintendents, and supervisors of all 4B Airmen at all levels to ensure comprehensive and cohesive training programs are available for each individual in the specialty. 2.1 USAFSAM training personnel develop and revise formal resident, nonresident, field and exportable training based on requirements established during U&TWs and documented in Part II of this CFETP. They also work with the BE CFM to develop acquisition strategies to obtain resources needed to provide the identified training. 2.2 BE MFMs will ensure their training programs complement the CFETP mandatory initial, upgrade, and proficiency requirements. OJT, resident training, contract training, or exportable courses can satisfy identified requirements. MAJCOM-developed training to support this AFSC must be identified for inclusion in this plan and must not duplicate available training resources. 2.3 Each individual will complete mandatory training requirements specified in this plan. The lists of courses in Part II will be used as a reference to support training. 3. Coordination and Approval. The 4B0X1 AFCFM is the approval authority for this CFETP and will initiate an annual review of this document to ensure currency and accuracy. MAJCOM representatives and USAFSAM training personnel will identify and coordinate on the career field training requirements. Using the list of courses in Part II, they will eliminate duplicate training.

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PART I, Section B - Career Progression and Information

4. Specialty Description. 4.1. Specialty Summary. Performs and manages occupational and environmental health (OEH)-related activities to support delivery of Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) and BE capabilities. Related DoD Occupational Subgroup: 132200. 4.2. Duties and Responsibilities. Ensures delivery of BE capabilities at the tactical level as outlined below: 4.2.1. Execute SG related vulnerability assessment. Coordinate with members of Force Protection Working Group (FPWG) to identify critical infrastructure and operational components of base/location. In conjunction with the Threat Working Group (TWG), use existing sources of information (intelligence, previous vulnerability studies, EPA reports, etc.) to identify potential threats to critical nodes. Assess overall vulnerability to critical nodes given threats, probability or occurrence, and consequence of effects. Provide recommendations through FPWG to reduce overall vulnerability/risk to mission. 4.2.2. Identify / Approve potable and non-potable water sources. Analyze surface, ground and/or local supplier sources to determine drinking water quality and health risks associated with non-potable water quality for garrison/deployed operations. Recommend feasible solutions to address health concerns to facilitate approval of use. Scope of analysis is determined by immediacy of need, duration of need and population demographics. 4.2.3. Execute Occupational & Environmental Health Site Assessment (OEHSA). The key operational health tool for producing data or information used for health risk assessments (HRA) and to satisfy OEH surveillance requirements. OEHSAs focus on collecting sitespecific data to identify potential or actual exposure pathways during bed down, employ, and sustainment of air and space forces. OEHSAs are also the mechanism for providing OEH inputs to the development of base support and expeditionary site plans and each service member's longitudinal exposure record (LER). Sub-capability: Identify potential operating locations. Coordinate with Plans communities and retrieved intelligence to address OEH threats associated with potential garrison/deployed operating locations. This capability is most appropriately executed during the planning phase, but if necessary can be executed at any time. 4.2.4. Conduct predictive exposure assessments. Use data, intelligence products and modeling information collected in garrison as a baseline for predicting potential OEH exposures across the range of military challenges and operations. 4.2.5. Respond to OEH health threats. Effectively/efficiently respond to both deliberate and crisis events which may result in actual/potential exposure to OEH health threats. Document information regarding actual/potential exposure from OEH incidents as part of the LER 4.2.6. Identify OEH health hazards. Effectively/efficiently anticipate and recognize actual/potential chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and physical (OEH) health threats. Sub-capability: Link weapons effects w/ health risk to potentially exposed personnel. Work with Emergency Management personnel, EOD, and other base personnel to identify OEH hazards associated with different weapons effects. Working through TWG, identify probable weapons and assist with planning phases for posturing efforts, incorporating potential health risk as a result of attack due to residual effects of weapons (OEH hazards versus direct blast 9

effects) . Proficiency in this capability will allow easy translation from defensive to offensive operations if asked to address collateral damage input in an air tasking order. 4.2.7. Analyze OEH health hazards. Effectively/efficiently evaluate actual/potential chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and physical (OEH) health threats. Sub-capability: Manage samples. Collecting, handling, preserving, packaging, shipping or transporting/escorting samples associated with deliberate and crisis responses at garrison/deployed locations. Sub-capability: Conduct exposure investigations. Evaluates post exposure investigations through interviews, re-creation, modeling, post-exposure medical exams and knowledge of processes of AF work centers, implemented controls implemented and resultant health affects to document human health threats. Uses results to reduce risks in future operations and other similar and concurrent operations through recommendations to commanders. Documents known operational impacts (maximizing positive impacts and minimizing negative impacts). 4.2.8. Control OEH health hazards. Provide control recommendations and advocate for their installation/use to eliminate/mitigate actual/potential chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and physical (OEH) health threat. Sub-capability: Provide protective postures in C-CBRNE operations. Using information from gathered intelligence, vulnerability assessments, OEHSAs and incident-specific data, provide relevant threat control recommendations to the commander with respect to real-time and future operations. Apply the OEH hazard control hierarchy, using engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment as the operations dictate. Sub-capability: Assist with shelter management. Determine adequacy of collective protection for controlling OEH health threats, as requested. Perform health risk assessment to determine ability to release personnel from collectively protected facilities. 4.2.9. Associate exposure with affected personnel. Document information regarding identification, evaluation and control of actual/potential OEH health hazards as part of the LER. Tie completed or potentially completed exposure pathways to individuals using spatial and temporal reference marks. 4.2.10. Assist with health risk management. Advise decision makers in a decision-making process to evaluate and select courses of action (COAs), minimize OEH risks, and maximize benefits for operations and missions. This is the health component of the ORM process and HRM recommendations and decisions are integrated into the commander's ORM decisionmaking. Sub-capability: Communicate OEH risk-based information & recommend COAs. Effectively communicate potential health effects, outcomes, and control measures. Provide information consistent with the HRA. Use knowledge of processes of AF work. 5. Skill/Career Progression. Adequate training and timely progression from the apprentice to the superintendent skill level play an important role in the Air Force's ability to accomplish its mission. It is essential that everyone involved in training do his/her part to plan, manage, and conduct an effective training program. The guidance provided in this part of the CFETP will ensure each individual receives viable training at appropriate points in their career. 5.1 Apprentice (3-Skill) Level. Initial skills training in this specialty consists of the tasks and knowledge training provided in the Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice (BEA) located at USAFSAM. Individuals must complete this initial skills course to be awarded 10

AFSC 4B031. The 4B0X1 Airman's immediate supervisor will manage the member's 5-skill level upgrade training curriculum to include Career Development Course (CDC) enrollment and fulfillment of OJT requirements. 5.2 Journeyman level (5). Upgrade training to the 5-skill level in this specialty starts immediately after assignment to the duty position as an apprentice (3-level). Airmen must complete a minimum of 12 months of OJT (9 months for those in retraining status). Upgrade training consists of task and knowledge training provided in career development course (CDC) 4B051 and the 5-skill level core task requirements identified in the STS. During this period the individual will also be receiving job proficiency training for their specific duty position. After receiving their 5-level, SrA are eligible for most of the advanced and continuation training courses that Bioenvironmental Engineering enlisted personnel can attend that are offered at USAFSAM. The Bioenvironmental Engineering Site Assessment (BESA) Course, Parts 1 (via ADL) and 2 (via in-residence) is offered to SrA (and above) 4B051s who have reenlisted. Six-year first-term Airmen are eligible if they are between 36 and 60 months of their enlistment. Most 4B051s will attend Airman Leadership School (ALS) (for specifics, see AFI 36-2301, Professional Military Education). Following completion of ALS, 5-skill levels will be considered for appointment as supervisors, and rank permitting, as element-level NCOIC. 4B051s should strive to complete Associate Degree in Bioenvironmental Engineering Technology requirements for award of their Community College of the Air Force Degree. 5.3 Craftsman level (7). Individuals must be Staff Sergeant (SSgt) selectees and are entered into UGT on the first day of the promotion cycle. They must complete: a minimum 12 months of OJT (6 months for those in retraining status); the 7-level core task requirements identified in the STS; BESA, Parts 1 and 2; and the BEE Craftsman Course in-residence. A 4B071 can expect to fill various supervisory and management positions such as NCOIC of a flight or element. They may also be assigned to special duty positions. Also, they can expect career broadening experiences beyond the 4B career field, e.g. first sergeant, recruiter, PME instructor, etc. Increasing 4B management experience, deployment service, and additional duty at squadron level are strongly recommended for senior NCO promotion. Prior to promotion to Master Sergeant (MSgt), craftsmen will be selected to attend the USAF NCO Academy. Continued education leading to award of a BE-related bachelor's degree is highly encouraged. 5.4 Superintendent level (9). AFSC 4B091 will be awarded upon promotion to SMSgt, and after satisfying the requirements of AFI 36-2101, Classifying Military Personnel (Officer and Enlisted). A 4B091 can be expected to fill positions such as Superintendent, Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight and may include additional duty as a squadron superintendent. Additional training in the areas of resource management, to include budget, manpower, and personnel management, should be pursued through continuing education. Higher education, greater responsibility within the medical treatment facility and in the host unit, base, or community, plus deployment experience are expectations of senior NCOs. 6. Training Decisions. The CFETP uses a building block approach (simple to complex) to encompass the entire spectrum of training requirements for the Bioenvironmental Engineering career field. The spectrum includes a strategy for when, where, and how to meet the training requirements. The strategy must be apparent and affordable to reduce duplication of training and eliminate a disjointed approach to training. Initial skills and upgrade training requirements were reviewed, updated, and expanded during the 4B0X1 Utilization and Training Workshop (U&TW) held 20-24 August 2007 at USAFSAM. The decision to train specific tasks and knowledge items in the initial skills course is based on occupational survey report (OSR) data (2006), training requirements analysis (TRA) data, and input from 4B0X1 subject matter 11

experts (SME). Task and knowledge training requirements are identified in the Specialty Training Standard (Part 2, Section A of this CFETP). The following training decisions were made during the U&TW. The entire STS was reviewed and updated. Multiple line items were eliminated to reduce redundancy and align with the career field strategic objective of garrison equals deployed. 6.1 Initial (3) Skills Training. Tasks and proficiency codes in the 3-level course column were changed to reflect the career field's desire to increase the amount of hands-on training received by the students. Additions, deletions, and modifications were made to the course using OSR as the guiding criteria. 6.2 5-level Upgrade Training Requirements. The 5-level OJT and CDC columns were revised to align and increase proficiency in the subjects and tasks introduced in initial skills training; mandated use of QTPs and third party certification of all 5-level core tasks. 6.3 7-level Upgrade Training Requirements. 6.3.1 The 7-level OJT column was revised; mandated use of QTPs and third party certification of all 7-level core tasks; 6.3.2 Replaced the Bioenvironmental Engineering (BE) Advanced Measurements courses with the Bioenvironmental Engineering Site Assessment (BESA) Part I (ADL) and Part II (Inresident) courses. Mandated completion of BESA Part I and II. Completion of BESA Part I is a prerequisite for enrolling in BESA Part II. These courses provide critical assessment training, applying the Occupational and Environmental Health Site Assessment (OEHSA) concept to both garrison and deployed operations and particularly focusing on health risk assessment skill sets. Only those described in paragraph 5.2 above are eligible to enroll in BESA Part II. 6.3.3 Mandated completion of the BE Craftsman course. Continue the primary focus of the course on managing bioenvironmental engineering resources with no technical skills training. Completion of all 7-level core tasks is a prerequisite for attending the BE Craftsman course. 6.4 Proficiency Training. Any additional knowledge and skills requirements, which were not taught through initial skills or upgrade training, are assigned as continuation training. The purpose of the continuation training program is to provide additional training exceeding minimum upgrade training requirements with emphasis on present and future duty positions. The Medical Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (MNBC) Operations course was replaced with the Bioenvironmental Engineering Emergency Management Response (BEEMR) Part I (ADL) and Part II (In-resident) courses. The BEEMR courses provide training on critical skills necessary to operate on both MNBC Unit Type Code and Home Station Medical Response. The BEEMR Part I and II courses have been identified as an advanced course on the Specialty Training Standard (Part 2, Section A of this CFETP). It is not required for upgrade training.

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7. Community College of the Air Force. Enrollment in CCAF occurs after completion of Basic Military training. CCAF provides the opportunity to obtain an Associate of Applied Sciences Degree. In addition to its associate degree program, CCAF offers the following: 7.1 Occupational Instructor Certification. Upon completion of instructor qualification training, consisting of the instructor methods course and supervised practice teaching, CCAF instructors who possess an associate's degree or higher may be nominated by their school commander or commandant for certification as an Occupational Instructor. 7.2 Trade Skill Certification. When a CCAF student separates or retires, a trade skill certification is awarded for the primary occupational specialty. The College uses a competency based assessment process for trade skill certification at one of four proficiency levels: Apprentice, Journeyman, Craftsman (Supervisor), or Master Craftsman (Manager). All are transcribed on the CCAF transcript. 7.3 Degree Requirements. All Airmen are automatically entered into the CCAF program. The journeyman 5-level must be held at the time of program completion and the following requirements must be met. As of the publication date of this CFETP, CCAF awards 24 semester-hours for completion of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice course. Airmen can access multiple CCAF self-service options via the Air Force Virtual Education Center application through the Air Force Portal or via the Air University CCAF site at http://www.au.af.mil/au/ccaf/catalog/2008cat/deg_req_two.htm

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Degree Requirements Occupational Specialty 4B0X1 Technical Education (24 semester hours) A minimum of 12 SHs of technical core subjects or courses must be applied and the remaining semester hours applied from technical core or technical elective subjects or courses. Requests to substitute comparable courses or to exceed specified semester hour values in any subject or course must be approved in advance. See Technical Education Requirement. Technical Core Subjects/Courses Bioenvironmental Protection CCAF Internship Disaster Medicine Introduction to Bioenvironmental Sciences Occupational Environment Occupational Health & Safety Technologist Certification Radiation Health Physics Waste Management Technical Electives Computer Science General Biology General Chemistry Hearing Conservation Industrial Hygiene Measurements Microbiology Principles of Ecology Radiological Hazards Statistics Survey of Nuclear Medicine Safety and Procedures Max Sem Hours Max Sem Hours 8 18 9 9 6 12 4 8 Max Sem Hours 6 8 8 4 6 8 3 4 3 6

Leadership, Management & Military Studies (6 semester hours) Professional military education, civilian management courses accepted in transfer and/or by testing credit. Physical Education (4 Semester Hours) 14

General Education (15 semester hours) Applicable courses must meet the criteria for application of courses to the general education requirement and agree with the definitions of applicable courses starting on Subject/Courses Oral Communication Speech Written Communication English Composition Mathematics Intermediate algebra or a college-level mathematics course satisfying delivering institution's mathematics graduation requirement-if an acceptable mathematics course applies as technical or program elective, you may substitute a natural science course for mathematics. Social Science Anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, government, history, political science, psychology, sociology Humanities Fine arts (criticism, appreciation, historical significance), foreign language, literature, philosophy, religion Sem Hours 3 3 3

3

3

Program Elective (15 semester hours) Courses applying to technical education, LMMS or General education requirements; natural science courses meeting general education requirement application criteria; foreign language credit earned at Defense Language Institute or through the Defense Language Proficiency Test; maximum 6 SHs of CCAF degreeapplicable technical course credit otherwise not applicable to program of enrollment. 7.3.1. See Licensure and Certification section in CCAF catalog for certification information. 7.3.2. Additional off-duty education is a personal choice that is encouraged for all. Individuals desiring to become an USAFSAM Instructor must possess as a minimum an associate degree or should be actively pursuing an associate degree. This special duty assignment requires a USAFSAM instructor candidate to have a CCAF degree or be within one year (12 semester hours) of completion. A degreed faculty is necessary to maintain accreditation through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 8. Career Field Path. Figure 1 depicts Bioenvironmental Engineering career paths. The chart outlines possible jobs and when training is required for each skill level and function within this specialty.

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4B0X1 CAREER PATH

Education and Training Requirements Rank Basic Military Training School Apprentice Technical School (3-Skill Level) (6 months) N/A (Average 4B0X1 Sew-on) Special Duty Complete CDCs Grade Requirements College Degree Encouraged

(10 months) Upgrade To Journeyman (5-Skill Level) Complete 4B051 CDCs Certified in all STS Core Tasks Minimum 12 months OJT Retrainees 9 months OJT USAF Honor Guard USAF Academy USAFSAM Associate Degree in Bioenvironmenta l Engineering Technology

(3 years TIS or 28 months TIG) Trainer

Airman Leadership School (ALS) SRA with 48 months TIS or SSgt select Resident graduation is a prerequisite for SSgt sewon (active duty only) Upgrade To Craftsman (7-Skill Level) Minimum rank of SSgt with 12 months OJT (6 months for retrainees who currently or previously possessed a 7-skill level) Complete BESA course Parts 1 and 2 Complete BEC course Desirable: College level courses in: Algebra, Physics, Biology, Chemistry Professional certifications and licenses Noncommissioned Officer Academy (NCOA) Must be a TSgt or TSgt select Completion is required before assuming MSgt

Certified to perform the task to be trained Must have attended the Air Force Training Course Certifier At least a SSgt with a 5-skill level (or civilian equivalent) capable of evaluating the task A person who is certified to perform the task to be trained and is not the trainer Must have attended the Air Force Training Course USAFSAM or AETC Instructor Duty Recruiter Duty GSU staff USAFSAM AETC Instructor (11.5 years) Bachelors Degree in Engineering, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Health Physics or other degree with heavy concentration in engineering

(4.4 years)

USAF Senior NCO Academy (SNCOA) Must be a MSgt, SMSgt select, or SMSgt Completion is required before assuming CMSgt (17.2 years)

USAF Academy First Sergeant Squadron Superintendent MAJCOM USAFSAM or AETC Instructor

Masters Degree in Industrial Hygiene or Environmental Engineering and Science

Upgrade To Superintendent (9 Skill Level) Must be a SMSgt Complete all required duty position training Desirable: formal or recurring advanced training in management, occupational health, environmental sciences, radiological health, and medical readiness. Chief Enlisted Manager (CEM) (4E000) CMSgt's Leadership Course

Squadron Superintendent USAFSAM MAJCOM (21.2years) MAJCOM Career Field Manager

(24.4 years)

Figure 1.- Bioenvironmental Engineering Career Path

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8.1 Manpower Table. CMSgt SMSgt MSgt TSgt SSgt SrA Amn Grand Totals 980 908 92.7

Authorizations 6 32 88 166 281 246 211 Assigned 3 18 89 165 256 147 172 % 50 56.3 101.1 99.4 91.1 59.8 81.5 NOTE: Manpower table figures reflect end of fiscal year 2008 authorizations.

PART I, Section C - Skill-Level Training Requirements

9. Purpose. Skill-level training requirements in this career field are defined in terms of tasks and knowledge requirements. This section outlines the specialty qualification requirements for each skill level in broad, general terms and establishes the mandatory requirements for entry, award and retention of each skill level. The specific task and knowledge training requirements are identified in the STS at Part II, Section A of this CFETP. 10. Specialty Qualification. 10.1 Apprentice Level Training Requirements (4B031) 10.1.1 Specialty Qualification. 10.1.1.1 Knowledge. Mandatory understanding of basic and applied mathematics, basic chemistry, physics and computer usage, and occupational and environmental health risk assessment. 10.1.1.2 Education. 10.1.1.2.1 Completion of an Algebra I course in high school is mandatory for entry into this AFSC. 10.1.1.2.2 Completion of high school courses in Algebra II, Physics, Biology, English Composition, Chemistry, Typing/Keyboarding, and Basic Computer Skills is highly desirable. 10.1.1.3 Training. Completion of the basic Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice course is mandatory for award of the 3-skill level AFSC. 10.1.1.4 Experience. None. 10.1.1.5 Other: The following are mandatory for entry into this specialty: 10.1.1.5.1 Normal color vision as defined in AFMAN 48-123, Medical Examination and Standards. 10.1.1.5.2 Valid state driver's license and qualification to operate government vehicles in accordance with guidance found in AFI 24-309, Vehicle Operations. 10.1.1.5.3. A minimum age of 18 years. 10.1.2 Training Sources and Resources. Formal training is accomplished through the Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice (BEA) Course (B3AZY4B031-002) at USAFSAM satisfies the knowledge and training requirements specified in the specialty qualification section (above) for award of the 3-skill level. The STS identifies the tasks and knowledge taught in this course and the proficiency level to which students are trained.

17

10.1.3 Implementation. Entry into training is accomplished by initial classification or by approved retraining. The 3-skill level is awarded upon completion of the BEA course. 10.1.3.1 After graduation, upgrade and job proficiency training starts when an individual is assigned to their first duty position. Thereafter, it is initiated anytime an individual is assigned duties they are not qualified to perform. 10.2 Journeyman Level Training Requirements (4B051) 10.2.1 Specialty Qualification. All 4B031 qualifications in addition to the following: 10.2.1.1 Knowledge. Knowledge is mandatory of occupational and environmental health risk assessment, basic and applied mathematics, and radiological health principles. 10.2.1.1.2 Knowledge is desirable of: basic chemistry, physics, and computer hardware/software operations. 10.2.1.2 Education. Requirements are the same as for the 3-skill level (listed above). 10.2.1.3 Training. Completion of the 4B051 Bioenvironmental Engineering Journeyman Career Development Course and all 5-skill level core tasks trained and certified using 4B051 Qualification Training Package, is mandatory. Completion of training in computer operations, occupational and environmental health risk assessment, and regulating directives is desirable. 10.2.1.4 Experience. Qualification in and possession of AFSC 4B031. Also, experience in conducting bioenvironmental engineering assessments. 10.2.2 Other. See Part II, Section D, paragraph 9.1 for desired certifications and licenses. 10.2.3 Training Sources and Resources. Completion of the 4B051 CDCs, Bioenvironmental Engineering Journeyman, satisfies the knowledge requirements specified in the specialty qualification section (above) for award of the 5-skill level AFSC. Completion of all 5-skill level core tasks identified in the STS regardless of present duty position; in addition to, all other tasks associated with that duty position as identified by the trainer. Upgrade and position qualification training are provided by qualified trainers and certifiers. If qualified trainers and certifiers are not available, requests should be directed to your unit training manager. 10.2.4 Implementation. Entry into 5-skill level upgrade training is accomplished after graduation from the Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice course, and upon initial assignment. Job proficiency training is initiated anytime an individual is assigned duties that they are not qualified to perform. 10.3 Craftsman Level Training Requirements (4B071) 10.3.1 Specialty Qualification. All 4B051 qualifications in addition to the following: 10.3.1.1 Knowledge. 10.3.1.1.1 Knowledge is mandatory of occupational and environmental health risk assessment, Bioenvironmental Engineering administration, health physics, and radiological health principles. 10.3.1.1.2 Knowledge is desirable of statistics, microbiology, and elementary anatomy and physiology. 10.3.1.2 Education. Completion of college level courses in Algebra, Physics, Biology, and/or Chemistry is desirable Completion of CCAF degree in Bioenvironmental Engineering Technology is also desirable. 10.3.1.3 Training. 18

10.3.1.3.1 Completion of all 7-skill level core tasks trained and certified using 4B071 Qualification Training Package is mandatory. 10.3.1.3.2 Completion of BESA Parts I and II are mandatory prerequisites (for those entering upgrade training as of the publication date of this CFETP) to upgrade to the 7-skill level. 10.3.1.3.3 Completion of the in-resident 7-skill level (Bioenvironmental Engineering Craftsman) is a mandatory prerequisite for upgrade to the 7-skill level. 10.3.1.3.4 Completion of the Nuclear Emergency Team Operations Course delivered at the Defense Nuclear Agency Interservice Nuclear Weapons School, Kirtland AFB, is highly desirable. 10.3.1.4 Experience. Qualification in and possession of AFSC 4B051. Also, experience in performing and supervising health risk assessments, occupational and environmental health site assessments, and medical readiness to include the preparation of all correspondence, reports, and charts. 10.3.1.5 Other. See Part II, Section D, paragraph 9.1 for desired certifications and licenses. 10.3.2 Training Sources and Resources. The STS (Part 2, Section A of this CFETP) identifies all the core tasks required for skill level upgrade qualification and other duty position tasks identified by supervisor. Completion of all 7-skill level core tasks identified in the STS regardless of present duty position; in addition to, all other tasks associated with that duty position as identified by the trainer. Upgrade and position qualification training are provided by qualified trainers and certifiers. If qualified trainers and certifiers are not available, requests should be directed to your unit training manager. 10.3.3 Implementation. Entry into 7-skill level upgrade training is initiated when an individual has obtained the necessary rank and skill level. Job proficiency training is initiated anytime an individual is assigned duties that they are not qualified to perform. 10.4 Superintendent Level Training Requirements (4B091) 10.4.1 Specialty Qualification. All 4B071 qualifications in addition to the following: 10.4.1.1. Knowledge. 10.4.1.1.1 Knowledge is mandatory of occupational and environmental health risk assessment, health physics, and radiology health principles. 10.4.1.1.2 Knowledge is desirable of statistics, microbiology, and anatomy and physiology. Additionally, knowledge of the AF Medical Service, wing and medical service organizations, management and leadership, and planning, programming and budgeting is highly recommended. 10.4.1.2 Education. Completion of college level courses in Algebra, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics is desirable. Completion of CCAF degree requirements in Bioenvironmental Engineering Technology is desirable. 10.4.1.3 Training. Completion of formal or recurring advanced training in management, quality improvement, radiological health practices, industrial hygiene, environmental protection and medical readiness is desirable. 10.4.1.4 Experience. Qualification in and possession of AFSC 4B071. Also, experience managing industrial hygiene, community environmental surveillance, and radiological health programs. 10.4.1.5 Other. See Part II, Section D, paragraph 9.1 for desired certifications and licenses. 19

10.4.2 Training Sources/Resources. N/A 10.4.3 Implementation. The 9-skill level is awarded upon sew-on of SMSgt. Position qualification training is initiated anytime an individual is assigned duties that they are not qualified to perform.

Part I, Section D - Resource Constraints

11. Purpose. This section identifies known resource constraints that preclude optimal/desired training from being developed or conducted, including information such as cost and manpower. Narrative explanations of each resource constraint and an impact statement describing what effect each constraint has on training are included. Also included in this section are actions required, office of primary responsibility, and target completion dates. Resource constraints will be, as a minimum, reviewed and updated annually. There are currently no resource constraints. 12. Reporting Job Proficiency Training Constraints - Units/MAJCOMS. 12.1 Supervisors should report known resource constraints, which prevent personnel from completing the mandatory training requirements specified in this plan, to their unit enlisted specialty training (EST) manager. The authority for requesting waivers is AFI 36-2101, Military Personnel Classification Policy. 12.2 In the report, provide a brief description of the resource constraints which adversely affect your training program and include the impact this constraint has or will have on training. Identify the specific STS task code(s) affected. Also, provide a brief description of what you need to resolve the problem, including expenses, the corrective actions taken or to be taken, and the estimated completion date. 12.3 If the constraint can be resolved at the local level the report will be coordinated with the senior 4B0X1, and if the impact affects unit war skill requirements, the group commander. If the constraint needs MAJCOM support, forward the report through your group commander to the MAJCOM 4B0X1 Functional Manager. Constraints that cannot be resolved at the unit or MAJCOM level, or have a long term estimated completion date, must be forwarded to the 4B0X1 AFCFM as a request for waiver or deferment of CFETP requirements.

Part I, Section E - Transitional Training Guide - There are currently no transition

training requirements. This area is reserved. BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE

OFFICIAL

CHARLES B. GREEN Lieutenant General, USAF, MC, CFS Surgeon General

Attachment: CFETP Part II

20

Part II

Part II, Section A - Specialty Training Standard

1. Implementation. Implementation of the revised STS included in this CFETP will be as follows: 1.1 Initial (3) Skills Training. Implemented in the first BE Apprentice (BEA) course of CY10, class start date January 2010. 1.2 5-Level CDC and QTP. Implementation projected for February 2010 for those completing BEA course in 6.4.1, above. 1.3 7-Level QTP. Implementation projected for February 2010. 1.4 BESA Part I and II. Implementation projected for December 2009. 1.5 BE Craftsman began in February 2009. 1.6 BEEMR Part I and II. Implementation projected for March 2010. 2. Purpose. As prescribed in AFI 36-2201, this STS accomplishes the following: 2.1. Lists Career Field Tasks - Column 2 lists the most common tasks, knowledge, and technical references (TRs) necessary for Airmen to perform duties in the Bioenvironmental Engineering Education and Training Career ladder These are based on the specialty descriptions in AFI 36-2108 for the 4B031, 4B051, and 4B071 skill levels. 2.2. Lists Core Tasks - Column 3 identifies those tasks determined to be Core Tasks for the 5- and 7- skill levels. Personnel in UGT to the 5-skill level must be trained and certified on all tasks annotated with a 5. Personnel in UGT to the 7-skill level must be trained and certified on all tasks annotated with a 7. Third party certification is required for upgrade of any core tasks. 2.3 Lists Wartime Tasks. Column 4 identifies deployment task requirements. Tasks annotated with a W are those tasks identified as minimum required skills for functioning in a deployment situation. These tasks are directly related to the BE Readiness Skills Verification Program (RSVP). Additionally, deployment tasks serve as an outline for the BE Apprentice course, should the need ever arise to condense this course to support a surge student load potentially needed to support a large-scale deployment effort. 2.4 Provides Certification for OJT. Columns 5 through 9 provide space for documenting the initiation and completion of UGT. 2.5 Shows Formal Training and Correspondence Course Requirements. Qualitative requirements are described on page 24 which provides an area for trainee identification and a description of the Air Force Proficiency Code Key. 2.5.1 3-Level Course Requirements. Column 10 shows the tasks and knowledge attendees of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice Course will be trained in and to what proficiency level it will be trained. Graduates of the course can be expected to perform the tasks and have the subject knowledge to the proficiency listed in the STS. 2.5.2 5-Level OJT Requirements. Column 11 shows the tasks and knowledge individuals in 5-level OJT are expected to perform and achieve the listed proficiency level. 21

2.5.3 5-Level CDC Requirements. Column 12 shows the tasks and knowledge graduates of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Journeyman CDC (4B051 CDC) will be trained in and to what proficiency level it will be trained. Graduates of the course can be expected to have the subject and task knowledge to the proficiency listed in the STS. 2.5.4 7-Level OJT Requirements. Column 13 shows the tasks and knowledge individuals in 7-level OJT are expected to perform and achieve the listed proficiency level. 2.5.5 7-Level Course Requirements. Column 14 shows the tasks and knowledge attendees of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Site Assessment (BESA) Course and Bioenvironmental Engineering Craftsman Course will be trained in and to what proficiency level it will be trained. Graduates of these courses can be expected to perform the tasks and have the subject knowledge to the proficiency listed in the STS. 2.5.6 Advanced Course Requirements. Column 15 shows the tasks and knowledge proficiency codes to be used in the Bioenvironmental Engineering Emergency Management Response (BEEMR) Course. 2.6 Becomes a Job Qualification Standard (JQS). Used for on-the-job training when placed in the Enlisted Training and Competency Folder, and used according to AFI 36-2201. When used as a JQS, the following requirements apply: 2.6.1 Documentation. Document and certify completion of training. Identify duty position requirements by circling the subparagraph number next to the task statement. As a minimum, complete the following columns in Part II of the CFETP: Start Date, Complete Date, Trainee's Initials, and Trainer's Initials. An AFJQS may be used in lieu of Part II of the CFETP only upon approval of the 4B0X1 AFCFM. NOTE: The 4B0X1 AFCFM may supplement these minimum documentation procedures as needed or deemed necessary for their Career Field. 2.7 Weighted Airman Promotion System (WAPS) Test Development Guide. Specialty Knowledge Tests (SKT) are developed at the USAF Occupational Measurement Center by Senior NCOs with extensive practical experience in their career fields. The tests sample knowledge of the STS subject matter areas judged by test development team members to be most appropriate for promotion to higher grades. Individual responsibilities can be found in AFI 36-2605. Test questions are based on references listed in the WAPS catalog which is published every August. Questions are also derived from materials identified within AFI 36-2605. 3. Proficiency Code Key. The proficiency code key on page 24 contains the information used to indicate the level of training and knowledge provided by resident training and career development courses. 4. Recommendations. Identify inadequacies and provide suggested changes of this STS to USAFSAM/OED, 2602 Louis Bauer Drive, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235-5252. Reference specific STS paragraphs.

22

This Block Is For Identification Purposes Only

Name Of Trainee Printed Name (Last, First, Middle Initial) Initials (Written) Printed Name Of Certifying Official And Written Initials N/I N/I N/I N/I N/I N/I Last 4 SSAN

N/I N/I N/I N/I N/I N/I

N/I N/I

N/I N/I

QUALITATIVE REQUIREMENTS

Scale Value Proficiency Code Key Definition: The individual Can do simple parts of the task. Needs to be told or shown how to do most of the task. (Extremely Limited) Can do most parts of the task. Needs only help on hardest parts. (Partially Proficient) Can do all parts of the task. Needs only a spot check of completed work. (Competent) Can do the complete task quickly and accurately. Can tell or show others how to do the task. (Highly Proficient) Can name parts, tools, and simple facts about the task. (Nomenclature) Can determine step-by-step procedures for doing the task. (Procedures) Can identify why and when the task must be done and why each step is needed. (Operating Principles) Can predict, isolate, and resolve problems about the task. (Advanced Theory) Can identify basic facts and terms about the subject. (Facts) Can identify relationship of basic facts and state general principles about the subject. (Principles) Can analyze facts and principles and draw conclusions about the subject. (Analysis) Can evaluate conditions and make proper decisions about the subject. (Evaluation)

1 Task Performance Levels Task Knowledge Levels Subject Knowledge Levels 2 3 4 a b c d A B C D

Explanations 1. A task knowledge scale value may be used alone or with a task performance scale value to define a level of knowledge for a specific task. (Example: b and 1b) 2. A subject knowledge scale value is used alone to define a level of knowledge for a subject not directly related to any specific task, or for a subject common to several tasks. 3. - This mark is used alone instead of a scale value to show that no proficiency training is provided in the course or CDC. 4. STS notes for column 14 (7-lvl courses) ­ Proficiency codes marked with an * are provided in the BE Craftsman Course only. All others are provided in the BESA course.

23

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

C* -

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Mission and Organization of the USAF Medical Service 1 Medical Service 1.1 (HQ USAF/SG Ltr, Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) Strategic Plan, 26 Mar 07; AFPD 48-1, Aerospace Medicine Program; HQ USAF/SG1/SG8, Flight Path Implementation Guide For The Combat Wing Organization-Medical, 14 Feb 08) Purpose and organization 1.1.1 B Aerospace Medical Program 1.1.2 B Bioenvironmental Engineering 1.2

(AFMOA/SG3PB, Bioenvironmental Engineering Operational Execution Plan 2008; Concept Of Operations for UTCs) 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 2 2.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.2 2.2.1 2.2.2 2.3

Mission and organization of BE Roles and interactions of BE with other agencies (state, local, federal and base) BE UTC General Administration and Office Management General Administrative Duties Develop trend analyses from results (OEH samples, questionnaires, etc.) Determine and maintain publications or reference libraries Equipment and Supply Management Maintain BE equipment Maintain BE supplies Resource Management Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution System Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution Draft budget requirements Develop Fin Plans Budget execution Contracting USAF contracting process Write a statement of work (SOW) Manpower Resources BE manning Develop and evaluate work schedules Program Management Internal and external inspections / assessments (ESOHCAMP, HSI, ORI, OSHA, EPA, NRC, etc) BE requirements of support agreements Construction plan review Review local work order requests Fundamental Skills Communication

A A A

-

B B B

-

7

W

1a -

-

b -

-

2b *

(The Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution (PPBE) System & The Air Force Corporate Structure (AFCS) Primer, 2003; AFI 41-120, Medical Resource Operations, 18 Oct 01; AFI 65-601V1, Budget Guidance and Procedures, 3 Mar 05; Local Cost Center Management Guide, if available) 2.3.1 2.3.1.1 2.3.1.2 2.3.1.3 2.3.1.4 2.3.2 2.3.2.1 2.3.2.2 2.3.3 2.3.3.1 2.3.3.2 2.4

7 7 7 7 -

-

-

-

B * 2b * 2b * B* B* 2b * B* 2b *

(AFI 90-201, Inspector General Activities, IC 3, 19 Jul 07; AFI 25-201, Support Agreements Procedures, 1 May 05) 2.4.1 2.4.2 2.4.3 2.4.4 3 3.1 2b A B a B* -

5

3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 3.1.4 3.1.5 3.1.6 3.1.7 3.1.8

(AFH 33-337, Tongue and Quill, 1 Aug 04; AFMAN 33-326, Preparing Official Communications, 15 Oct 07; AFMOA Ltr, Interim Guidance Letter - Bioenvironmental Industrial (BE) Occupational Health Program, 9 Apr 03; AFI 48-145, Occupational Health Program, 5 Mar 08; RISK COMMUNICATION PRIMER: A Guide for Communicating with Any Stakeholder on Any Issue that Impacts Your Mission; USACHPPM TG 248, Guide for Deployed Preventive Medicine Personnel on Health Risk Management, Aug 01) Fundamentals of written correspondence A -

Fundamentals of public speaking Fundamentals of risk communication Prepare and conduct oral and written communication Brief CBRN (and physical) hazards / risks to personnel (shop personnel, commanders, incident commander, etc) Prepare health risk assessment reports Develop training and lesson plans, programs, procedures, or training aids Use field communication systems

A A 2b 5 W W 2b 1a 1a

2b -

a a a

-

B* 2c c* 2b

W

24

Advanced Course

B 3c -

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

B c B B* C C -

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Basic Mathematics 3.2 Solve calculations using basic arithmetic functions (add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers, fractions, and decimals) 3.2.1 Perform conversion of units using dimensional analysis (formula manipulation), metric conversions 3.2.2 Solve calculations using exponential powers 3.2.3 Solve calculations using scientific notation 3.2.4 Calculate areas and volumes 3.2.5 Use basic statistics 3.2.6 Chemistry 3.3 (Basic Chemistry, 7th Ed.) Composition of matter 3.3.1 Physical characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases 3.3.2 Periodic Table of the Elements 3.3.3 Compounds 3.3.4 Acids and bases 3.3.5 Calculate solution strengths 3.3.6 Calculate gas laws 3.3.7 Anatomy and Physiology 3.4 (Anatomy and Physiology, 7th Ed.) Basic structure and functions of the cell 3.4.1 Basic structure and functions of tissues 3.4.2 Basic structure and functions of organ systems 3.4.3 Toxicology 3.5

(Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons, 7th Ed.; The Dose Makes the Poison) 3.5.1 3.5.2 3.5.3 3.5.4 3.5.5 3.5.6 3.5.7 3.5.8 3.5.9 3.6

2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 1a

-

-

-

A A A A A 1a 1a

-

B B B B B b b

-

A A A

-

B B B

-

Dose response relationships Basic toxicological terms Biological response factors and variables Biological effects of toxic substances Exposure routes Classification of toxic materials Physiological effects Physical forms of toxic agents Chemical forms of toxic agents Ecology and Environmental Toxicology The Biosphere Ecological life forms Toxic substances in the environment Effects of pollution on humans

A A A A A A A A A

-

B B B B B B B B B

-

(Environmental Science: The Way the World Works, 7 th Ed.; Toxic Substances in the Environment; Toxic Air Pollution Handbook; Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment, 2nd Ed.) A A A A B B B B -

3.6.1 3.6.2 3.6.3 3.6.4 4 4.1

Occupational and Environmental Health (OEH) Program

OEH Program Overview

(AFI 48-145, Occupational and Environmental Health Program, 5 Mar 08; AFMOA Ltr, Interim Guidance - Bioenvironmental Industrial (BE) Occupational Health Program, 9 Apr 03; AFMAN 48-153, Health Risk Assessment, 28 Mar 07; AFMAN 48-154, Occupational and Environmental Health Site Assessment, 28 Mar 07; AFMAN 48-155, Occupational and Environmental Health Exposure Controls, 1 Oct 08; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5 th Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2nd Ed.; Bioenvironmental Engineering Field Manual, 2008; AFIOH Environmental Health Site Assessment Guide (IERA-RS-BR-TR-2003-002); AFIOH Assessment Methodology for Toxic Industrial Chemicals/Toxic Industrial Materials (TICs/TIMs), 2006; ACGIH TLVs and BEIs; NIOSH Pocket Guide; AFOSH Std 91-501, Air Force Consolidated Occupational Safety Standard, 7 Jul 04, DOEHRS Student Guide/User Manual) OEH Program A B -

4.1.1 4.1.2 4.1.3 4.1.4 4.1.5 4.1.6 4.1.7 4.1.8 4.1.9 4.1.10 4.1.11 4.1.12

Occupational and Environmental Health Site Assessment Toxic industrial chemical/toxic industrial material (TIC/TIM) vulnerability assessments Perform TIC/TIM vulnerability assessment Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Site selection Federal, DOD, AF directives and technical orders Occupational and Environmental Health Management Information System (OEHMIS ) Utilize the OEHMIS Health risk assessment Total exposure health risk (additive, synergistic, multiple routes, etc.) OEH exposure controls

A A 5,7 W A A A A 5,7 W 2b A A A

2b 3c -

B B a B B B B B B B

3c 3c -

25

Advanced Course

B -

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

c C c 2c 2c c b 2c 2c

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Roles and interaction in personal protective equipment (PPE) guidance 4.1.13 Verify correct use, selection and limitations of PPE 4.1.14 Sample result interpretation 4.1.15 OEH Process Assessment 4.2 Workplace categorization Perform routine assessments Prioritize special assessments Investigate occupational illness/injury Conduct pregnancy profile evaluations Hazard Abatement Program Assign occupational health risk assessment codes (RACs) Hazard Communication Program overview Key player(s) responsibilities Evaluate shop hazard communication (HAZCOM) programs Laboratory chemical hygiene programs Sampling

A W 1b A

-

B b B

-

(AFI 48-145, Occupational and Environmental Health Program, 5 Mar 08; AFMOA Ltr, Interim Guidance - Bioenvironmental Industrial (BE) Occupational Health Program, 9 Apr 03) 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.3 5,7 7 5 W W W A b a a a 2b 2b B b b b b 3c 3c -

(AFI 91-301, Air Force Occupational and Environmental Safety, Fire Protection, and Health (AFOSH) Program, 1 Jun 96) 4.3.1 4.4 4.4.1 4.4.2 4.4.3 4.4.4 4.5 7 a b 3c -

(AFI 90-821, Hazard Communication, 30 Mar 05; AFOSH Std 48-22, Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, 1 Mar 94) A A 5 a 2b B B a A -

(Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater; AFMAN 48-155, Occupational and Environmental Health Exposure Controls, 1 Oct 08; Industrial Ventilation A Manual of Recommended Practice, 26th Ed.; ACGIH TLVs and BEIs; 29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards; Emergency Response Planning Guidelines (ERPG) & Workplace Environmental Exposure Levels (WEEL) Handbook; 40 CFR 141, National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Technical Guide 230, Chemical Exposure Guidelines for Deployed Military Personnel, published by USACHPPM) 4.5.1 4.5.1.1 4.5.1.2 4.5.1.3 4.5.1.4 4.5.2

Sampling Overview Sampling methodology (solid, liquid, gas) Prepare and/or preserve samples for shipment Decontaminate equipment Select appropriate occupational and environmental exposure limit (OEEL) (TLV, MCL, SPEGL, etc) Air / Gas Sampling

5

W

A a a

2b -

B a b b

-

W

1a

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 nd Ed.; NIOSH Publication 77-173, Occupational Exposure Sampling Strategy Manual; NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods, Chp D; Equipment User's Manuals)

4.5.2.1 4.5.2.2 4.5.2.3 4.5.2.4 4.5.2.5 4.5.2.6 4.5.2.7 4.5.2.8 4.5.2.9 4.5.2.10 4.5.2.11 4.5.2.12 4.5.2.13 4.5.2.14 4.5.2.15 4.5.3

Types of air samples (integrated and grab) Air sampling devices (direct reading instruments, pumps, passive dosimeters, etc.) Air sampling media Determine or establish air sampling strategies Calculate sampling rates and volumes Calibrate/Operate direct reading instruments (DRIs) Calibrate air sampling pumps Collect area air samples Collect breathing zone air samples Calculate equivalent OEELs Convert raw concentrations (i.e. grams to mg/m3) Calculate time weighted averages (TWA) Calculate upper and lower confidence limits Calculate compliance factors (unity) Correct results for atmospheric conditions Soil / Solid Sampling

B B 5 5 5,7 5 5,7 5,7 5 5 5 5 5 5 W W W W W W W W W W W W B a 2b 1a 2b 1a 1a 1a 1a 2b 1a 2b 1a

2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 3c 2b 3c 2b

B B B a c a c a c b c c c c c

3c 3c 3c -

(EPA Manual SW-846, Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods; ASTM D 1452, Standard Practice for Soil Investigation and Sampling by Auger Borings; ASTM D 4700, Standard Guide for Soil Sampling from the Vadose Zone; ASTM D 5633, Standard Practice for Sampling with a Scoop; ASTM D 5743, EPA SOP 2009, Drum Sampling; EPA SOP 2012, Soil Sampling; Equipment User's Manuals) 4.5.3.1 4.5.3.2 4.5.3.3 4.5.3.4 4.5.3.5 4.6

Sampling methods for soil and solids Determine or establish soil / solid sampling strategies Collect soil / solid samples Soil / Solid sampling devices (DRI, lead test kit, etc.) Field analyze soil / solid samples Chemical Health Hazards

th

5 5,7 5,7

W W W

nd

A a 1a B 1a

2b 2b 2b

B a a B a

3c 3c

4.6.1

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5 Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 Ed.; AFOSH Std 91-501, Air Force Consolidated Occupational Safety Standard, 16 Sep 02; Quick Selection Guide to Chemical Protective Clothing; NIOSH Recommendations for Chemical Protective Clothing; AFI 32-7086, Hazardous Materials Management, 1 Nov 04) Chemical hazards (industrial, WMD, etc) A B C

26

Advanced Course

C 2c 2c 2c

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

c c C C c C c c B B B B B B B B 2c 2c 2c 2c 2b C 2c B -

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Substance specific standards 4.6.2 Identify / Analyze chemical hazards based on routes of entry (inhalation, injection, ingestion, absorption, contact) 4.6.3 Determine or establish regulated areas for chemical hazards 4.6.4 Chemical hazard controls 4.6.5 Protective clothing concepts (permeation, breakthrough, etc.) 4.6.6 Evaluate HAZMAT request (AF Form 3952 or equivalent) 4.6.7 Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) 4.6.8 HAZMAT reports and inventories 4.6.9 Biological Health Hazards 4.7

4.7.1 4.7.2 4.7.3 4.7.4 4.8 4.8.1 4.8.2 4.8.3 4.8.4 4.8.5 4.8.6 4.8.7 4.9 4.9.1

A 5 5 W b a A A A A

2b 2b -

B b a B B a B B

-

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 nd Ed.)

Biological hazards (industrial, WMD, etc) Identify / Analyze biological health hazards Biological hazard controls Indoor air quality Confined Spaces Roles and interactions in Confined Space Program Identify confined space Classify confined spaces (permit / non permit) Analyze confined space hazards Confined space hazard control Confined space health hazards and monitoring equipment training Confined space permit review Radiation Radiation Overview

5

W

A b A A

2b -

B b B B

-

(AFOSH Std 91-25, Confined Spaces, 1 Feb 98; Lewis Publishers, Complete Confined Spaces Handbook; Equipment User Manuals) A 5 5 5 b b b A 2b 2b 2b B b b b B B -

(Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 5th Ed.; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2nd Ed.)

4.9.1.1 4.9.1.2 4.9.1.3 4.9.1.4 4.9.2

Roles and interactions in Radiation Safety Program Management Fundamental concepts of energy and mass Electromagnetic spectrum Types of radiation Ionizing Radiation

A A A A

-

B B B B

-

(Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 5th Ed.; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2nd Ed.; AFIOH Report IOH-SD-BR-SR-2005-0004, Bioenvironmental Engineer's Guide to Ionizing Radiation; AFI 48-148, Ionizing Radiation Protection, 12 Oct 01; Radioanalytical Sampling Guide; T.O. 33B-1-1, Nondestructive Inspection Methods; Equipment User's Manual)

4.9.2.1 4.9.2.2 4.9.2.3 4.9.2.4 4.9.2.5 4.9.2.6 4.9.2.7 4.9.2.8 4.9.2.9 4.9.2.10 4.9.2.11 4.9.2.12 4.9.2.13 4.9.2.14 4.9.2.15 4.9.2.16

4.9.2.17 4.9.3

Radioactive decay Radiation and radioisotopes (quantities and units) Interactions with matter Biological effects of ionizing radiation Sources, use and production of X-rays Identify radiological/nuclear hazards Radioisotope permit programs Perform RAM storage and use surveys Perform medical and industrial diagnostic X-ray scatter surveys Perform swipe tests of radiological sources Calibrate / Operate radiation detection equipment Investigate suspected ionizing radiation overexposures/abnormal exposures Perform ionizing radiation calculations (dose, dose rate, stay time, protection factors, decay, etc.) Ionizing radiation hazard controls As-low-as-reasonably achievable (ALARA) training Survey radioactive materials for shipment or transport Disposal methods for radioactive material with Air Force Radiation and Radioactive Recycling and Disposal (AFRRAD) office USAF Personnel Dosimetry Program Roles and interaction in the USAF Personnel Dosimetry Program

A A A A A a 1a 1a 1a 5,7 W 1a A A 5 W a

2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b

A B B B B B a a a a b b B B a

3c 3c -

5 5 5 5,7

W W W W

-

-

A

-

(AFMAN 48-125, USAF Personnel Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry, 7 Aug 06) 4.9.3.1 A B -

27

Advanced Course

3c C 3c 3c 2c 3c -

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

B B 2c 2c 2c 2c C c B B c B B B 2b C C C 2c C -

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Types of personal dosimeters 4.9.3.2 Enroll/Disenroll personnel and exchange/ship dosimeters 4.9.3.3 TLD results and histories of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation 4.9.3.4 Non-ionizing Radiation 4.9.4

A 5 W 2b A

3c -

B b B

-

4.9.4.1 4.9.4.2 4.9.4.3 4.9.4.4 4.9.4.5 4.9.4.6 4.9.4.7 4.9.4.8 4.9.4.9 4.9.5

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 nd Ed.; AFOSH Std 48-9, Radio Frequency Radiation (RFR) Safety Program, 1 Aug 97; AFOEHL Rpt 89-023RC011DRA, Base Level Management of Radio Frequency Radiation Protection Program; Equipment User Manuals) Principles of RFR A B B

Health risks of RFR exposure Types of RFR emitters Perform RFR risk assessment Determine radio frequency radiation (RFR) permissible exposure limits (PELs) Calculate RFR hazard distances Perform RFR measurement surveys RFR controls Investigate potential RFR overexposures or accidents Lasers

th

A A 7 5 5 5 W W W W a 1a 1a 1a A nd

2b 2b 2b -

B B b b b a B b

3c -

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5 Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 Protection Program, 10 Dec 99; AL-TR-1991-0112, Base Level Management of Laser Radiation Protection Program) 4.9.5.1 4.9.5.2 4.9.5.3 4.9.5.4 4.9.5.5 4.9.5.6 4.9.5.7 4.9.5.8 4.9.6 4.9.6.1 4.1

Ed.; AFOSH Std 48-139, Laser Radiation A A a A A A A A B b B B B B -

Laser fundamentals Biological effects of lasers Identify and analyze laser sources / hazards Maximum permissible exposures Nominal hazard zone Nominal ocular hazard distance Perform theoretical laser hazard (LHAZ) evaluations Laser controls Other non-ionizing radiation hazards and controls: UV and IR

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5h Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 nd Ed.)

UV/IR sources, hazards and controls Noise

th

A

nd

-

B

-

(Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5 Ed.; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 Ed.; The Noise Manual, AFOSH Std 48-20, Occupational Noise and Hearing Conservation Program, 30 Jun 06; DoDI 6055.12, Hearing Conservation Program, 5 Mar 04; ANSI S3.1-1999 (R2003), Maximum Permissible Ambient Noise Levels for Audiometric Test Rooms; AFRL Attenuation Performance of Auditory Protection Devices, Helmets, and Communication Equipment; Equipment User Manuals) 4.10.1 4.10.2 4.10.3 4.10.4 4.10.5 4.10.6 4.10.7 4.10.8 4.10.9 4.10.10 4.10.11 4.11 4.11.1 4.11.2 4.11.3 4.12

Roles and interactions in the Occupational Noise and Hearing Conservation Program Physical properties of sound Quantities and units of sound Effects of noise exposure Perform noise calculations Hazardous noise sources and areas Perform noise source surveys (dBA, impact, impulse, speech interference) Perform worker exposure surveys (dosimetry) Perform octave band noise surveys including audiometric booths Noise controls (source, path, receiver) Verify adequacy of hearing protection devices (calculate attenuation factor) Ergonomics Ergonomic Hazards Identify and analyze ergonomic hazards (screening or calculation) Ergonomic controls Thermal Stress

A A A A 5 W 1a A 2b 1b 2b A W 1b

2b 3c 3c 3c 3c

B B B B b B b b b B c

-

5 5 5

W

5

(AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 nd Ed.; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.) A a A B b B -

(AFPAM 48-151, Thermal Injury, 18 Nov 02; ACGIH TLVs and BEIs; AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2nd Ed.; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; TB MED 507, Heat Stress Control and Heat Casualty Management, 7 Mar 03; TB MED 508, Prevention and Management of Cold-Weather Injuries, Apr 05)

4.12.1 4.12.2 4.12.3 4.12.4

Roles and interactions in the Thermal Stress Program Thermal stress hazards Analyze thermal stress hazards Thermal stress controls

5

W

A A 2b A

3c -

B B b B

-

28

Advanced Course

-

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

B B C 2c C b c b -

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Health/medical effects of extended IPE/GCE wear 4.12.5 Mechanical Ventilation Systems 4.13

(AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 Recommended Practice, 26th Ed.; Equipment User Manuals) 4.13.1 4.13.2 4.13.3 4.13.4 4.13.5 4.13.6 4.13.7 4.13.8 4.13.9 4.13.10 4.13.11 4.13.12 4.13.13 4.13.14 4.13.15 4.13.16 4.14

A

nd th

-

B

-

Ed.; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5 Ed.; ACGIH Industrial Ventilation A Manual of A A A A A A A A 3c 3c 3c 3c 3c B B B B B B B B B B b b b b b B -

Types of pressure Pressure losses Velocity Mass flow Ventilation system design reviews Principles of dilution ventilation Principles of local exhaust ventilation Types of hoods System advantages and disadvantages Ventilation survey requirements (initial, baseline, routine) Perform ventilation calculations Perform face velocity ventilation survey Perform capture velocity survey Perform pitot traverse ventilation survey Perform static pressure checks Follow up actions for deficient ventilation systems Respiratory Protection

5 5 5 5 5

A 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b A

(AIHA, The Occupational Environment: It's Evaluation, Control and Management, 2 nd Ed.; Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, 5th Ed.; NIOSH Pub No. 2005-100, NIOSH Respirator Selection Process 2004; AFOSH Std 48-137, Respiratory Protection Program, Feb 05 w/ IC 1, 2007; 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection; Equipment User's Manual)

4.14.1 4.14.2 4.14.3 4.14.4 4.14.5 4.14.6 4.14.7 4.14.8 4.14.9 4.15 4.15.1

Roles and interactions in the Respiratory Protection (RP) Program Types and classes of respirators Operating principles of respirators Work area RP program evaluation Select or approve RP equipment Perform qualitative fit tests Perform quantitative fit tests Conduct RP training Use, care and maintenance of respirators Environmental Health Programs Potable Water Program

A A A 5,7 5 W W A 1b 1a 2b 2b A

2b 3c -

B B B B b b b b B

3c -

4.15.1.1 4.15.1.2

(Uniform Plumbing Code; TB MED 577, Sanitary Control and Surveillance of Field Water Supplies, Nov 05 published by the US Army; AFI 48-144, Safe Drinking Water Surveillance Program, 19 Mar 03; 40 CFR 141, National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; AFI 10-246, Food and Water Protection Program, 4 Dec 04; AFI 32-1066, Backflow Prevention Program, 17 Oct 07; ANSI/AWWA C651-05, Disinfecting Water Mains, 1 Jun 05; USAFSAM IERA-RS-BR-TR-1999-005, Guidance for Conducting Potable Water System Sanitary Surveys and Water Vulnerability Assessments; USAFSAM IOH-RS-BR-TR-2003-0001, Water Vulnerability Assessment Guide) Water Systems A B -

Regulatory requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and Air Force Sources and characteristics of potable water Hydrologic cycle Groundwater hydrology Drinking water treatment Disinfection of new water mains, water main breaks, or repairs Maintain certification of water laboratories Compliance and noncompliance reporting requirements Consumer confidence reports (CCRs) Health risk ratings for backflow or cross connection areas Base sanitary surveys Perform base sanitary surveys Water vulnerability assessment Perform water vulnerability assessments Perform aircraft watering point surveys Non-potable Water Program Preseason or postseason inspections of swimming pools, hot tubs, or spas Natural bathing area sanitary survey

A A A A A A A A A 5,7 5,7 W W A a

2b 2b -

B B B B B B B B A B a B a b

3c 3c -

4.15.1.3 4.15.1.4 4.15.1.5 4.15.1.6 4.15.1.7 4.15.1.8 4.15.1.9 4.15.1.10 4.15.1.11 4.15.1.12 4.15.1.13 4.15.1.14 4.15.1.15 4.15.1.16 4.15.2

(AFOSH Std 48-14, Swimming Pools, Spas And Hot Tubs, and Bathing Areas, 1 Apr 96) 4.15.2.1 4.15.2.2 A A B B -

29

Advanced Course

-

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Certification for OJT Core War Training Complete

Proficiency Codes indicate required training level (refer to PC key on pg 24) 7-lvl Courses

b 2c C* -

3-lvl Course

Tasks, Knowledge, and Technical References Water / Liquid Sampling 4.15.3

4.15.3.1 4.15.3.2 4.15.3.3 4.15.3.4 4.15.3.5 4.15.3.6 4.15.3.7 4.15.3.8 4.15.3.9 4.15.3.10 4.15.3.11 4.15.3.12 5

(AFI 48-144, Safe Drinking Water Surveillance Program, 19 Mar 03; Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater; Equipment User Manuals)

Sampling Analysis and Monitoring Plan Develop a water/liquid sampling strategy Collect water samples from swimming pools, hot tubs, spas, natural bathing areas or other non-potable sources Perform heterotrophic plate count Water sampling devices (DRI, HACH, DPD, etc.) Calibrate / operate water sampling equipment Water sample collection equipment / containers Perform chlorine analyses Perform pH analyses Perform fluoride analyses Collect potable water samples Perform presence-absence method (bacteriological / E.coli) Response Operations

5 5

W W

A a 1a 1a A

2b 2b 2b 3c 3c 3c 3c

B a b b B a B b b b b

3c -

5,7 5 5 5 5

W W W W W

1a A 2b 2b 1a 2b 2b

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 5.1 6 6.1 6.2 6.2.1 6.2.2 6.2.3 6.3 6.4 6.4.1 6.4.2 6.4.3 6.4.4 6.4.5 6.4.6 6.5 6.5.1 6.5.2 6.5.3 6.5.4 6.5.5 6.6 6.7

(AFI 10-2501, Air Force Emergency Management (EM) Program Planning and Operations, 24 Jan 07; AFMAN 10-2602, Nuclear, Biological, Chemical, and Conventional (NBCC) Defense Operations and Standards, 29 May 03; AFMAN 32-4005, Personnel Protection And Attack Actions, 30 Oct 01) Air Force Emergency Management Program A B Roles and interactions in response operations A B -

Response material and sources (publications, intel, modeling programs, etc.) Emergency management response plans and checklist Shelter operations Pre-incident protective measures CBRN detector deployment plan support Operate CBRN equipment--FFGL7 & 886H Evaluate CBRN hazard model outputs Post-incident protective measures Hazardous Waste Operations Regulatory requirements Hazard Recognition Chemical, fire, and explosion hazards Physical hazards Radiation hazards Toxicology Air Monitoring Principles Occupational and environmental exposure limits Use combustible gas indicator Use detector tubes Use photoionization/flame ionization detectors Use radiation meters Personal protective equipment Respiratory protection Levels of protection Perform level A and B dress-out Conduct fit-testing and communication Perform decontamination Review safety and health program Conduct indoor/outdoor waste site exercise

5,7 W

A A A A A A A A A A A A 1a 1a 1a 1a A A 1a 1a 1a 1a 1a

2b -

B B B B A B -

3c -

30

Advanced Course

2c C C B C C 2c 3c C -

5-lvl CDC

5-lvl OJT

7-lvl OJT

Training Start

Certifier Initials

Trainee Initials

Trainer Initials

Section B - Course Objective Lists

5. Purpose. Knowledge of course objectives can aid the supervisor in assessing graduates of apprentice level training, determine knowledge levels of graduates from advanced courses provided by the USAFSAM, and aid in developing OJT materials. 6. Availability. USAFSAM sponsors more than 80 different entry level and advanced courses. Listing individual course objectives and samples of behavior in this document would be cumbersome. Anyone wishing copies of objectives for a particular course or block of instruction may request them via one of the following channels, attention to the Department Superintendent. Address: USAFSAM/OE 2602 Louis Bauer Drive Brooks City-Base, TX 78235 DSN 240-2059 DSN 240-2017

Phone: Fax:

Section C - Support Materials

7. OJT Support Materials. These materials enhance the base-level OJT Program and help standardize the program across the Air Force. Supervisors may check with USAFSAM/AT at DSN 240-2059 regarding the availability of QTPs and other OJT support materials. 7.1 Qualification Training Packages (QTPs) - Established to provide standardized OJT Program; mandatory for use during UGT. A set of guides providing standardized instructions and guidance in the performance, training, and certification of core tasks. These guides are available on the AF e-publishing and on the USAFSAM Bioenvironmental Engineering web page.

Section D - Training Course Index and Civilian Certifications

NOTE: Refer to Air Force Education and Training Course Announcements (ETCA) located at the following URL: https://etca.randolph.af.mil, for information on courses listed in this index. Not all courses are listed--if unable to locate in ETCA, contact your supervisor. 8. Training Course Index. Bioenvironmental Engineering personnel are very privileged. Because of the broad and varied responsibilities of the career field, there are many training courses they can attend. Courses at the USAFSAM, the AFIT School of Civil Engineering and several tri-service schools are available. Courses for which bioenvironmental engineering personnel may qualify for are listed below. Those course titles that are asterisked (*) award the graduate a certification, manufacturer's certification, or fulfill regulatory requirements to hold certain titles or positions.

31

8.1 USAFSAM COURSES Course Number B3ABY4B031 003 B3ACY4B071 0A1A B6RSOM B6ERBM B3OZY0000E 020 B3OZY0000E 002 B3OZY4XXX 0B1B Course Title Bioenvironmental Engineering Apprentice Bioenvironmental Engineering Craftsman Radiation Safety Officer* USAF Ergonomics Course Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response* 8-Hour Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency. Response Contingency Preventive Medicine Bioenvironmental Engineering Site Assessment, Part I Bioenvironmental Engineering Site Assessment, Part II Bioenvironmental Engineering Emergency Management Response, Part I Bioenvironmental Engineering Emergency Management Response, Part II Location USAFSAM USAFSAM ADL ADL USAFSAM ADL USAFSAM ADL USAFSAM ADL USAFSAM

8.2 AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (AFIT) SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING AND SERVICES COURSES Course Number

WENV222

Course Title Hazardous Material Management Program

Location Wright-Patterson AFB

8.3 DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY INTERSERVICE NUCLEAR WEAPONS SCHOOL (DOE) Note: These courses must be unit funded Course Number G3OZP9124-000 G3OZP1916-001 G3OZP1944-000 G3OZP4054-000 Course Title Nuclear Hazards Training Course Senior Officers Nuclear Accident Course Nuclear Emergency Team Operations Nuclear Weapons Orientation Advanced Location Kirtland AFB Kirtland AFB Kirtland AFB Kirtland AFB

8.4 DEFENSE SPECIAL WEAPONS AGENCY ARMED FORCES RADIOBIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE Note: These courses are part unit funded, part Air Force funded Course Number J5OZN4400-022 Course Title Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation (formerly Medical Effects of Nuclear Weapons), Regional Short Course 32 Location Varies Varies

J5OZD32E1D 05DA Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation

8.5 ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL DEFENSE Note: This course must be unit funded. Course Number

J5OZA44XX 00BA

Course Title Medical Management of Chemical Casualties

Location Aberdeen PG, MD

8.6 Other Courses. There are many courses taught by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that are applicable to bioenvironmental engineering personnel. These courses are often tuition free for government employees but your unit must pay travel and per diem. Sometimes funding for EPA courses is available through the Center of Environmental Restoration Education at AFIT. 9. Civilian Certifications. Bioenvironmental engineering personnel are eligible to apply for a variety of civilian certifications and registrations. Members are encouraged to pursue any that interest them, as it will increase the member's professional standing. Most certifications require a combination of education and experience along with an examination. In many cases the exam fee can be reimbursed through DANTES, see your base education office. Listed below are most of the certifications BEE personnel have been interested in and the name of the certifying body. 9.1 List of Certifications. Refer to the AFMS Knowledge Exchange USAFSAM BEE webpage for the most current list of certifications. 9.1.1 Occupational Health and Safety Technologist (OHST) - American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH)/Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP). This is the most common certification for enlisted BEE personnel. 9.1.2 Industrial Hygienist in Training (IHIT) - ABIH. 9.1.3 Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) - ABIH. While the IHIT and the CIH are mainly for engineers there have been senior 4B0X1s who have held these certifications. 9.1.4 Engineering Technician (ET) - National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technology (NICET). One of the oldest certification programs. 9.1.5 Radiation Protection Technologist - National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists. 9.1.6 Environmental Technician (ET)- National Registry of Environmental Professionals (NREP). An entry level program. 9.1.7 Associate Environmental Professional (AEP) - NREP. Requires two years of college and an exam. 9.1.8 Registered Environmental Manager (REM) - NREP. Many senior 4B0X1s have this.

33

9.1.10 Registered Environmental Laboratory Technologist (RELT) - NREP. Recommended for personnel assigned to the USAF Institute for Operational Health (AFIOH) 9.1.12 Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM) - Institute of Hazardous Materials Management (IHMM). 9.1.13 Registered Hazardous Substances Professional (RHSP) - National Environmental Health Association (NEHA). 9.1.14 Construction Health and Safety Technologist (CHST) - American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH)/ Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP). 9.2 Fees. Be aware that besides the exam fee there may be a yearly fee to the affiliating organization to keep your certification current. The Air Force will not pay the yearly fees, they are your responsibility. In most cases there are also continuing education requirements to maintain your certification. 9.3 Other Certifications. A variety of State level certifications exist in areas such as asbestos, lead based paint and drinking water analysis.

Section E - MAJCOM Unique Requirements - There are currently no MAJCOM

unique requirements. This area is reserved.

Section F - Documentation of Training (Medical Specific)

10. Development of a Work Center Training Plan and the Enlisted Training and Competency Folder. 10.1 The Focus. This training guidance is to bring all training documentation back into one OJT record. Over the years, training documentation has taken on many forms. The following training information provides specific guidance along with recommended documentation, consistent with current Air Force instruction/directives. This training guidance has focused on two main areas: 1) Developing a Master Training Plan and 2) Documentation of the Training in the Enlisted Training and Competency Folder. 10.2 Developing a Master Training Plan (MTP). 10.2.1. What Is It? A Master Training Plan is a reference guide developed for each section that includes all facets of training for individuals assigned. It is to be used as a reference source for the type of training and training documentation that occurs with each assigned member. The MTP is used to standardize training and to give trainers, trainees, supervisors, NCOICs, and OICs an overview of the training process for the duty section. The MTP is also used as a means to reduce the amount of paperwork previously required during the training process. 10.2.2 What's In It? Keep in mind that the Master Training Plan is an overview of training for the duty section; it should include all documents involved in the training process for the duty section. Training will vary from section to section and person to person, but there are certain documents that will be a standard requirement for all MTPs. They are listed below. 34

10.2.2.1 Unit Specific Orientation Checklist: Locally developed. 10.2.2.2 Job description for each duty position within the duty section 10.2.2.3. Dual Channel OJT Concept Documents 10.2.2.3.1. Career knowledge requirements 10.2.2.3.2. Job qualification requirements CFETP Part II, Section A (STS) 10.2.2.4 Testing procedures for CDCs 10.2.2.5. Performance standards/position job proficiency training for each duty position: Locally developed OIs, and individual supervisor standards and expectations. 10.2.2.6 Master Career Field Education Training Plan (CFETP): 10.2.2.6.1 Identifies all tasks required for the duty section: Locally developed master STS. 10.2.2.6.2 Standardized reference source for initiating individual training 10.2.2.6.3 Impact of training on career progression: CFETP Part I, Section B. 10.2.2.7. Milestones for Qualification Training Packages (QTPs) use for task completion and CDC completion (identify the projected timeframe the trainee will complete all required tasks, home station training, deployment/UTC tasks, and each set of CDCs/QTPs as required). 10.3 Documentation of Training. 10.3.1. The purpose of this section is to provide guidelines and examples of proper documentation for the many forms used in training all medical personnel. Training documentation helps us to assess readiness capability, individual strengths and weaknesses, and resources needed to support quality patient care. It also helps us meet all JCAHO and regulatory requirements. Enlisted Specialty Training documentation is migrating from the hard copy Enlisted Training and Competency Folder to the electronic Air Force Training Record (AFTR). Effective 1 Sep 08, all existing 4B0X1 training documentation (except for 623a entries and various training certificates) should be transcribed to AFTR. AFTR will also be upgraded to allow scanned document storage. Once this capability is activated, all existing hard copy 623a forms and training certificates must be scanned and added to each Airman's AFTR. AFTR is accessible from the Advanced Distributed Learning System via the Air Force Portal. Refer to your unit training manager for the most current policies and guidance on training documentation.

35

ON - THE - JOB TRAINING RECORD CONTINUATION SHEET

14 Feb 1995 SrA B`Tech is assigned to the Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight (BEF), Industrial Hygiene Element on this date. SSgt Sir Veigh has been assigned as a trainer for SrA B`Tech. SSgt Sir Veigh will orient SrA B`Tech to the shop using the BEF orientation checklist located in the Master Training Plan dated 17 March 94. An initial interview was accomplished on this date. SrA B`Tech attended his hospital orientation and is looking forward to the BEF orientation. He expressed his concern on meeting previously scheduled appointments while under the BEF orientation. I informed SrA B`Tech that time to attend his appointments would be scheduled as needed. SrA B`Tech stated that his goals during the orientation process were to learn as much as possible and to question the trainer when he was not clear as to the training provided. SrA B`Tech seems very enthusiastic about working in the shops and has expressed his desire to take on any challenges that the trainer has to offer.

SrA B`Tech

SSgt Sir Veigh BEF IH

27 Feb 1995 A mid-orientation progress check was accomplished on this date. SrA B`Tech has progressed throughout the BEF orientation checklist dated 17 Mar 94, with little to no difficulty. He completed his review of the BEF specific OIs and has begun required reading of applicable hospital OIs. SrA B`Tech will complete the remainder of his orientation on beginning 28 Feb 95.

SrA B`Tech

SSgt Sir Veigh BEF IH

12 Mar 95 SrA B`Tech has completed all training on the BEF orientation checklist dated 17 Mar 94. A review of the checklist with SrA B`Tech indicates that he was knowledgeable of all items discussed. SrA B`Tech stated that he feels comfortable with the training provided and believes that he is ready to be released from orientation. I recommend SrA B`Tech be released from orientation on this date

SrA B`Tech

SSgt Sir Veigh BEF IH

Concur

Concur

MSgt Road, NCOIC Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight

Capt Done, OIC Bioenvironmental Engineer

SAMPLE ORIENTATION DOCUMENTATION

AF FORM 623a, Mar 79 PREVIOUS EDITION WILL BE USED

Figure 1 - Sample Initial Upgrade Training Briefing (4B0X1 Model)

36

ON - THE - JOB TRAINING RECORD CONTINUATION SHEET INITIAL BRIEFING (Trainee Orientation)

______________________________ has been briefed on the On-The-Job Training (OJT) Program and how he/she fits into the program while in upgrade training (UGT). Upgrade training was explained as a dual-channel process designed to qualify an Airman for skill level upgrade. Dual-channel OJT is a systematic reportable application of self-study and the craftsman/apprentice principle. Trainees acquire job qualification while performing on the job under supervision. This combination, knowledge and job position qualification constitutes the dual-channel concept. Requirements from AFI 36-2101, 36-2108, and 36-2201 were covered. AF Forms 623, 623a, 797, 2096, and the CFETP, STS/JQS or automated JQS, which serves to make up the individual training record, was explained. Responsibilities of the commander, base training, BEF education and training manager (ETM), immediate supervisor, trainer, and trainee were discussed. The career development course (CDC) was briefly discussed and will be explained in detail when the CDC arrives, if applicable. Requirements for upgrade in your AFSC ____________ are: (1) Satisfactory completion of CDC ___________; (2) Supervisor certify job qualifications with adequate hands on training; (3) Meet typing proficiency of ______ WPM per AFI 36-2108, if applicable; (4) Completion of 7-level school, if applicable; and (5) Supervisor recommendation for upgrade. Each Airman in grades E1 through E6 (and SNCO's in retraining status) has an AF Form 623 that must contain a CFETP or JQS. The CFETP or JQS may contain 150 or more separate tasks but it should be annotated to show only those tasks the Airman is required to perform in his/her current duty position, all AFI 36-2108 mandatory requirements for upgrade, and core task requirements. In the JQS there is a space for both the supervisor and the trainee to initial to certify training is complete. In the CFETP, the trainer, trainee, and certifier have a space to initial when training is completed. After upgrade the CFETP or JQS will continue to be used to document further job proficiency training.

______________________________ SUPERVISOR'S SIGNATURE

______________________________ TRAINEE'S SIGNATURE

________ DATE

________________________________________________________________________________ LAST NAME FIRST NAME MIDDLE INITIAL

AF FORM 623a, Mar 79 PREVIOUS EDITION WILL BE USED

Figure 2 - Sample Initial Upgrade Training Briefing

37

ON - THE - JOB TRAINING RECORD CONTINUATION SHEET

TRAINEE'S RESPONSIBILITIES DURING UPGRADE TRAINING (UGT) 1. Read and understand your Air Force Specialty (AFS) description, training requirements, objectives, and training record (AF Form 623). 2. Budget time (on and off-duty) for timely completion of CDCs and keep all CDC materials for future reference and study. 3. Attain and maintain qualification in your assigned AFS. 4. After CDC briefing trainee will do the following: (Read and initial) ______ a. Read "Your Key to a Successful Course." ______ b. Make all required course corrections and return entire package to your supervisor. ______ c. When you are issued your first volume you will read and study the volume, chapter, and answer chapter review exercise (CRE) and the volume review exercise (VRE) or the self-test questions and the unit review exercises (URE). Questions are to be answered in the space provided when possible. Highlight/reference where answers are found in the most effective manner determined by the supervisor. ______ d. Supervisor will check CRE and self-test questions for accuracy and completeness. You will correct all incorrect responses. ______ e. Supervisor issues the ECI Form 34 (Field Scoring Sheet) for you to transcribe your answers from the URE/VRE. The URE/VREs are teaching devices and must be administered as open book exercises. All scores less than 100 percent require review training. ______ f. Minimum acceptable training consists of correcting incorrect responses, reading the appropriate area from which the question was taken, and a verbal question and answer session. ______ g. Your next volume is issued by your supervisor. You must work it in the same manner as above for the entire course. ______ h. Upon completion of your last volume you and your supervisor will immediately start a comprehensive review of the entire CDC to prepare for your course examination. 5. Review and discuss training requirements with supervisor regularly. Provide input on your training and ask questions. 6. Upon satisfactory completion of your career knowledge training, position qualification, and mandatory requirements listed in AFI 36-2108, your supervisor will initiate upgrade action on you.

___________________________ UTM'S SIGNATURE

______________________________ TRAINEE'S SIGNATURE

___________ DATE

______________________________________________________________________________________ LAST NAME FIRST NAME MIDDLE INITIAL

AF FORM 623a, Mar 79 PREVIOUS EDITION WILL BE USED

Figure 3 - Sample Upgrade Documentation (4B0X1 Model)

38

ON - THE - JOB TRAINING RECORD CONTINUATION SHEET

23 July 1995 I KNOW WHERE TO FIND A CURRENT COPY OF MY JOB DESCRIPTION/PERFORMANCE STANDARDS. I HAVE READ, DISCUSSED WITH MY SUPERVISOR, AND UNDERSTAND MY JOB DESCRIPTION AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS. I UNDERSTAND MY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THE POSITION THAT I AM CURRENTLY WORKING IN. IF I HAVE QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS ABOUT MY JOB DESCRIPTION/PERFORMANCE STANDARDS I WILL SEEK ASSISTANCE FROM MY SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL IN MY CHAIN OF COMMAND. IT IS MY RESPONSIBILITY TO REVIEW MY JOB DESCRIPTION/PERFORMANCE STANDARDS WITH MY SUPERVISOR DURING EACH FEEDBACK SESSION AND WITH EACH CHANGE IN SUPERVISOR/DUTY POSITION.

William G. B`Tech, SrA BEF, Industrial Hygiene 23 Jul 95 SrA Jones has completed his review of his Job Description/Performance Standards on this date. I am confident that he is thoroughly familiar with standards and expectations. At this Time SrA B`Tech has no questions or concerns.

Sir Veigh, TSgt, USAF OJT Trainer BEF TRAINEE NAME SrA William G. B`Tech

AF FORM 623a, Mar 79 PREVIOUS EDITION WILL BE USED

Figure 4 - Sample Job Description/Performance Stds Review (4B0X1 Model)

39

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