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Announcing the 17th Annual

Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School

Princess Royale Hotel and Conference Center, Ocean City, MD

November 15-17, 2011

About the School

The school offers a 2 ½-day format with a variety of breakout sessions. Individuals needing training in soil and water, nutrient, crop, and pest management can create their own schedule by choosing from 5 session options. Emphasis is placed on new and advanced information with group discussion and interaction encouraged.

be $255 and must be received by November 11. Payment of registration fee entitles you to participation in 2.5 days of sessions, handout materials, name badge, 3 continental breakfasts, 2 lunches, and refreshment breaks. Remember: Enrollment is limited to 250 people and is on a first-come, first-served basis. You are encouraged to register online and pay by credit card or check. To do so, please visit https://crayola.hcs.udel.edu/conf/registration/crop_man agement Alternatively, you can either download or use the registration form and sessions schedule in the brochure and fax to: 302-831-2998 or mail along with payment to: Conference Services Attn: Gail Knapp 104 John M. Clayton Hall Newark, DE 19716 You may pay by check (payable to University of Delaware) or by credit card. If paying by check, it must accompany your registration form and proposed class schedule. Purchase orders will not be accepted. You will be notified of receipt of your registration form, fee and session schedule. Cancellation Policy ­ If you register but cannot attend, you may send a substitute. Please notify University of Delaware Conference & Visitor Services about changes in your registration prior to the school. A refund less $25 processing fee will be issued only if your request is received in writing or via email. Send the refund request by mail to the address above or by email to WEB ADDRESS no later than November 11, 2011.

Who Should Attend

This school is designed for anyone interested in crop management issues, including: agronomists crop consultants extension educators farmers and farm managers pesticide dealers, distributors, and applicators seed and agrichemical company representatives soil conservationists state department of agriculture personnel Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis. Breakout sessions will be limited to 50 participants in each session.

Continuing Education Credits

The 2011 Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School has been approved by the Mid-Atlantic Crop Adviser Program and has been assigned CCA continuing education units (CEU's) in the following categories: Crop Management ­ 18 Nutrient Management ­ 11 Pest Management ­ 11.5 Soil and Water Management ­ 12 Professional Development ­ 0 Total CEU's earned will depend on course selection. This school also provides Pesticide Recertification Credits for DE, MD, NJ, PA, WV, and VA and continuing education for Nutrient Management Consultants in DE, MD, VA and WV.

Hotel Reservation Information

The Princess Royale Oceanfront Hotel and Conference Center is located at 91st Street in Ocean City, MD. Room rate per night is $65. You are responsible for making hotel reservations no later than October 18. Call 410 524-7777, ask for reservations and indicate you are with the Crop Management School.

Registration Information

The early-bird registration fee (recommended for a place in the sessions of your choice) is $230 if payment is received by October 21. After that date the fee will

Last Year's Presentations

You can access last year's presentations on-line at the following web address: http://midatlanticcropmanagementschool.pbworks.com

I.

Registration

General registration will begin 8:30 a.m. on November 15. Registration packets and information regarding CEU's and re-certification credits will be available at the registration desk. A continental breakfast will be available. There will be no general session and all breakout sessions begin at 10:00 a.m. on November 15.

What are the pitfalls and opportunities of OFR? What are some of the fundamental factors involved with OFR? What are the fundamental concepts involved with conducting OFR? How can you use precision ag technologies to minimize the logistical headaches of conduction OFR? These are some of the questions I will address in this session. Instructor: Dr. Bob Nielsen, Purdue University How Much Does that Hay Costs and What Should I Charge?--Popular press and other media outlets are saturated with simple and very complex strategies on how to price a product or service. Yet they all start with four basic concepts: 1) know your cost of production; 2) know the prevailing market price; 3) produce what your customer wants; and 4) sell quality products at reasonable prices and with quality service. This presentation will help hay producers and their advisors to address and understand these concepts. Instructor: Dr. Gordon Groover, Virginia Tech Deep Tillage for Corn Production: Yes, No, Maybe??-- Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can limit grain or silage yield on many mid-Atlantic soils. Corn plants growing on compacted areas are often stunted and have slower root penetration rates. They may exhibit uneven emergence, slow early-season growth, and premature drought stress when grown in these areas. Combating soil compaction in no-till fields presents a unique challenge because of the need to minimize soil disturbance. Positive and negative responses to tillage will be discussed within various corn production systems. Instructor: Dr. Wade Thomason, Va Tech Understanding Soybean Development II: The Reproductive Stages--Why is knowing the reproductive stages of soybean so important? What does R2, R5, or R7 mean and have to do with anything? First, it standardized the terminology. By standardizing the language, we facilitate communication and research throughout the world. By linking our understanding of soybean physiological functions and processes to development, stage-specific management strategies can be devised to increase yield. When someone states that soybean is in the R5 development stage, we know that new seed are just beginning to form in pods located in the top 4 nodes of the plant and that the plant has attained its maximum height, number of nodes, and leaf area. With a standardized system of staging, we can accurately determine the development stage, and then predict how actions at that time will affect yield and profits. Instructor: Dr. David Holshouser, Va Tech Understanding Adaptation Barriers and Response to Selection for Corn Improvement--Breeding-based solutions to increase the resiliency and sustainability of crop production require the ability to access and assess the value of genetic variation. Corn is a highly diverse crop species. Despite the availability of diverse germplasm for corn improvement in the U.S., `exotic' sources (i.e. germplasm from which U.S. elite corn was not founded) represent only about 3% of the total U.S. corn parentage, and these sources are themselves a very narrow sample; tropical sources comprise a meager 0.3% of the total U.S. parentage

II.

Crop Management Sessions

Each Session is Worth 1 CEU in Crop Management.

Wheat Management (especially nutrients) in Fall and Spring - Approximately 0.5 million acres of wheat are produced annually in the Mid-Atlantic. This region's states have tributaries draining into the Chesapeake Bay. Recent federal emphasis on improving Bay water quality has established Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL's) for nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment and resulted in the development of Watershed Implementation Plans (WIP's) to attain those TMDL goals. Throughout the watershed, the WIP's will require a fresh look at recommendations for managing N, P, and sediment. This session will emphasize wheat nitrogen management from fall through spring introducing decision-making tools to help with fall and green-up stage nitrogen applications. Instructor: Dr. Bob Kratochvil, University of Maryland Growin' Good Corn: Rocket Science or Common Sense? - World population continues to increase. Global demand for food continues to increase. Grain yields of major agronomic crops need to increase to meet this demand. Some believe that "biotech" hybrid traits have already helped us begin to "turn the corner" on increasing grain yield. Consequently, some predict the average U.S. national corn yield will be 300 bu/acre by the year 2030. Does history offer any guidance on the likelihood of achieving this? What does it require to significantly "raise the bar" for corn yields? Join us for a lively discussion. Instructor: Dr. Bob Nielsen, Purdue University Understanding Soybean Development I: The Vegetative Stages--Why do you need to know how to stage a soybean crop? What do all of these stages have to do with anything? Why was this so important? First, it standardized the terminology. It put us on the same page. Today, when someone states that soybean is in the V2 development stage, we know that the plant has two fully developed trifoliate leaf nodes. By standardizing the language, we facilitate communication and research on soybean throughout the world. Next, by linking our understanding of soybean physiological functions and processes to development, stage-specific management strategies could be devised to increase yield. For instance, at V2, we know that soybean roots are normally being infected with Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteria. With this standardized system of staging, we can accurately determine the development stage, and then predict how management actions at that time will affect yield and profits. Instructor: Dr. David Holshouser, Va Tech Thoughts About On-Farm Research - Why conduct field research? Why be involved with on-farm research (OFR)?

(Goodman 1998). A major barrier to accessing and assessing the high level of diversity harbored by exotic sources is the response of flowering time to differences in daylength and temperature across latitudes. We have begun a project to characterize the barriers to adapting 'exotic' corn to new environments. The latest results from this project will be presented. (Goodman, M.M. 1998. Research Policies Thwart Potential Payoff of Exotic Germplasm. Diversity 14:30-35). Instructor: Dr. Randall Wisser, Univ. of Delaware Management of Crops and Pests with Plasticulture-- The production system known as plasticulture involves covering the soil surface with a thin layer of polyethylene mulch. This system is most often used in combination with drip irrigation. Though these tactics add to input costs, they also provide tremendous benefits such as crop earliness, improved irrigation and fertilizer efficiency, reduced fertilizer loss, improved quality, and improved pest control. Different types of mulch can be used to modify the soil environment as well as provide improved pest control. Plasticulture is a system that can improve crop quality and productivity as well as reduce the impact of cropping systems on the surrounding environment. Instructor: Dr. Josh Freeman, Va Tech Palmer Amaranth: It's Here and It Will Change How We Look at Crop Management--Palmer amaranth has been described as a "pigweed on steroids" and "a game changer". Palmer amaranth has the potential to impact how we approach crop management. Why this species is so competitive will be reviewed, and we will discuss how other regions have altered their crop management to help manage this species. Instructor: Dr. Mark VanGessel Global Warming and Turfgrass Management--I will discuss the impact of climate change on the world of turfgrass management within the Mid Atlantic region and beyond, the weather data over the past thirty years, and the new cold tolerant bermudagrass varieties that have become increasingly popular and have been implemented throughout the region. Following this there will be a discussion of the turf management challenges in using these warm season grasses and the management programs and necessary tools to be successful moving forward. Instructor: Mr. Mark DelSantro, Longwood Gardens

What Goes Up Must Come Down...But When?--Long term agronomic management of animal manures has resulted in elevated soil P levels on many Mid-Atlantic farms. Soil test P levels may increase rapidly or gradually over time, depending on manure application rates and field management practices. It is much easier to increase soil P levels than it is to decrease soil P. How long will it take for different crop rotations to reduce excessive soil P levels down to agronomically optimum levels? Instructor: Dr. Frank Coale, University of Maryland Maryland Soil Fertility Update--An update on soil fertility and nutrient management research being conducted at the University of Maryland and beyond will be presented. Potential topics include sulfur fertility in corn, use of streamer nozzles for nitrogen applications in wheat, and variable rate nitrogen in corn and wheat. Instructor: Dr. Josh McGrath, University of Maryland Soil Acidity and Liming--One of the most important soil properties and management considerations for good crop production is soil acidity and pH management. Soil acidity affects almost every other crop cultural practice from nutrient availability to root growth, to pesticide effectiveness and many more. However, soil acidity management is not very exciting and often gets overlooked. In this presentation, the basic causes, impacts and management of soil acidity will be covered. Also, special topics such as pH management in no-till and alternatives to traditional liming materials will be discussed. Instructor: Dr. Douglas Beegle, Penn State University Volatilization Losses from Urea Fertilizers--The course will cover the chemical mechanism of urea hydrolysis in agricultural ecosystems. Why this is important to crop production worldwide and what urea nitrogen sources are currently used. Topics covered will include conditions that influence urea hydrolysis such as residues, temperatures (air and soil), soil texture, moisture, and soil pH. A brief literature review of potential losses of ammonia in various cropping systems and measures to reduced ammonia volatilization such as urease inhibitors and placement of urea based fertilizers. Instructor: Mr. Hunter Frame, Virginia Tech Precision Agriculture Technologies for Enhanced Nutrient Stewardship--4R Nutrient Stewardship is a management strategy focused on applying the right fertilizer source at the right rate, right time, and in the right place. Determining what is "right", however, depends on site-specific factors including soil, climate, crop, management system, and logistics. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the application of precision agriculture technologies within the 4R framework to suit local conditions at the practical level while remaining focused on economic, social, and environmental sustainability goals. Instructor: Dr. Steve Phillips, International Plant Nutrition Institute Nutrient management for vegetable crops in the MidAtlantic--Proper nutrient management for vegetable crops is becoming more important as fertilizer prices continue to escalate and farmers are under increasing pressures to improve their overall fertilizer nutrient use efficiencies.

III. Nutrient Management Sessions

Each Session is Worth 1 CEU in Nutrient Management

Manganese Deficiency--Manganese (Mn) deficiency can limit yield of soybean, wheat, and corn. Deficiency arises from both a limited quantity in the soil and low crop availability of the Mn present. The primary factors affecting Mn availability are high pH and microbial oxidation of available forms of Mn to unavailable forms. Soil- and foliar-applied Mn are utilized to alleviate Mn deficiency. Interaction of Mn and glyphosate complicate the use of foliar-applied Mn. In my presentation I will discuss the best ways to overcome Mn deficiency in common cropping systems in use today. Instructor: Dr. James Camberato, Purdue University

Proper nutrient management practices will be discussed for the major vegetable crops grown in the Mid-Atlantic region. Nutrients of focus will include nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in both bareground and polyethylene mulch production systems. Instructor: Dr. Mark Reiter, Virginia Tech Silicon in Soil Fertility and Crop Nutrition--Silicon, a beneficial nutrient for soils and crops, has been shown to increase mechanical strength of plant tissue, suppress diseases such as powdery mildew, and increase yield and growth of pumpkin, wheat, and Kentucky bluegrass in New Jersey. Harvest of wheat straw may remove about 70 lbs of silicon per acre. Calcium silicate, when used as a liming material, supplies silicon for plant nutrition. Instructor: Dr. J. Heckman, Rutgers University What to Consider when Looking at Experimental Results--This presentation will discuss how to interpret experimental results. Producers/consultants are constantly bombarded with research information, but rarely are they provided much in the way of statistical information to understand the real value of the experimental data. I will talk a little about experimental design (why it is necessary) and how to interpret research data to find the meaningful information. Instructor: Dr. Robert Mullen, Potash Corporation

Hands-On Plant Disease Identification and Management--During this session participants will get a chance to look at actual disease plant specimens that are commonly seen on field crops in the region. This presentation will mostly be a hands-on experience and upclose-and personal time with your favorite plant diseases that can be provided at this time of the year. We will try to emphasize fungal structures that you can see with the unaided eye or using a 10X hand lens. Instructor: Bob Mulrooney, University of Delaware Herbicide Carryover to Vegetables: Causes and Consequences: Many herbicides provide residual weed control, an advantage provided it does not affect the following crops. We often consider herbicides used in agronomic crops being the culprit, but many vegetable herbicides can limit rotations as well. This talk will discuss the factors that influence herbicide carryover and illustrate the effects of herbicide carryover to sensitive vegetables. Herbicides prone to carryover will be highlighted. Instructor: Dr. Mark VanGessel, University of Delaware Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Field Crops: Experiences from 2011--The brown marmorated stink bug is an exotic species that has the potential to become a significant pest of field crops in the Mid-Atlantic. Since its accidental introduction in Allentown, PA in 1996, it has been confirmed in 27 states including Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and New Jersey. In 2010, economic losses were documented on soybeans in this region; however, more research needs to be done. This talk will focus on 2011 survey results and research trials aimed at better understanding the impact of this pest on field crops in the Mid-Atlantic. Instructors: Bill Cissel and Joanne Whalen, University of Delaware Managing Weeds in Organic Spring Cereals: Weeds can lower yields up to 80% in spring cereals and can also cause reductions in quality. Managing weeds without herbicides can be challenging. This presentation will provide some guidance on how to control weeds in organic cereals through manipulations of planting date, seeding rate, and encouraging vigorous crop growth, as well as incorporating more selective weed control with inter-row cultivation. The talk will also discuss the economics of incorporating these various weed management techniques. Instructor: Dr. Lauren Kolb, University of Maryland Emerging and Re-Emerging Pests in Vegetables and Fruit Crops in the Mid-Atlantic: In recent years, crops in the Mid-Atlantic region have been attacked by a number new insect pest such as the Brown Marmorated stink bugs (BMSB) and threatened by others such as the Spotted Winged Drosophila and Western Bean Cutworm. In addition, each season there is always an "old nemesis" that seems to attack without warning. This presentation will focus on sampling, biology and management strategies for potential new insect pests as well as difficult to control pests attacking both vegetables and fruit in the Mid-Atlantic region. Instructor: Joanne Whalen, University of Delaware

IV. Pest Management Sessions

Each Session is Worth 1 CEU in Pest Management.

New Insights on Wheat Scab: How Much are Mycotoxin Levels Reduced by Cultural Practices--Conventional wisdom says that planting wheat directly into corn or wheat stubble is the biggest risk factor for scab development and mycotoxin contamination in grain. Recent epidemiology findings are causing experts to re-examine earlier conclusions about the predominant source of Fusarium spores that infect wheat heads. Due to the ability of Fusarium spores to become airborne and to be transported considerable distances by air currents, even wheat grown in fields that are devoid of cereal residues is found to develop scab epidemics and accumulate high levels of mycotoxin. In this session, you will learn about the results of coordinated experiments in seven U.S. states and two Canadian provinces conducted to determine the quantitative effects of crop sequence and debris management on mycotoxin reduction in wheat grain. These findings are discussed in the context of integrated disease management. Instructor: Dr. Gary Bergstrom, Cornell University Nematode Management in Field Crops and Vegetables with Seed Treatments--In the last few years, a number of seed applied treatments have become available for nematode management in field corn and soybeans. These same materials are also being evaluated in research trials in vegetable crops; however, we are still uncertain if they will be marketed in vegetables. This presentation will provide an overview of what is commercially available and research and demonstration results from 2010. Potential management programs using these products will also be discussed. Instructor: Dr. Steve Rideout, Virginia Tech

V. Soil and Water Sessions

Sessions Earn 1 CEU in Soil and Water Management Unless Noted.

The Wind Erosion Prediction System: A New Tool for Wind Erosion Prediction--In the fall of 2010, the Natural Resource Conservation Service implemented a new computer tool to evaluate soil erosion from wind. The old Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ) did not show any erosion on the eastern coastal plains because the climate factor was too low. The Wind Erosion Prediction System computer program has corrected that. Many areas in the coastal states with sandy soils now have measureable wind erosion. The new model will show new information about wind erosion. Saltation, creep, and suspension are shown. Soil leaving the edge of the field is now quantified. Crop damage to seedlings is now predicted. A video and short demonstration of the software will be presented. Instructor: Mr. Michael Sporcic, USDA, NRCS Eliminating "Nonpoint" from Nonpoint Source Pollution--We will focus on fundamental understanding of process impacting water quality, specifically how to delineating environmentally sensitive areas of agricultural landscapes. We first explain the basic science behind runoff generation and how it has been conceptualized in many of the commonly used tools. Next we explore how we can reconceptualize these processes to better delineate areas needing added protection. Finally we demonstrate some new tools that managers can use to protect water quality. Instructor: Mr. Zachary Easton, Va Tech Residue Management - No-Till and Rolling Vertical Tillage Systems--Organic residues from crops and cover crops are crucial for erosion protection, infiltration improvement, soil organic matter maintenance and crop water stress reduction. But crop residue can be a challenge too, especially at planting time. In this session we will consider management of crop residue. We will take a look at the role rolling vertical tillage tools can play to manage residue. Instructor: Dr. Sjoerd Duiker, Penn State Potential Climate Change During the Next 30 to 50 Years--Atmospheric CO2 concentration is increasing by about 2 ppm per year, due mainly to the burning of fossil fuels. This is expected to continue or even accelerate well into the foreseeable future. The increase in CO2 will be accompanied by significant climate changes, including increased temperature and altered rainfall amounts and seasonal patterns. These changes will significantly affect crop and forage production and nutritional quality. This presentation will describe expected changes in temperature and precipitation over the next 30 to 50 years and present an overview of plant responses to future carbon dioxide, temperature, and precipitation levels. Instructor: Dr. Howard Skinner, USDA-ARS, University Park, PA Pasture Management Strategies to Minimize Losses in Surface Runoff and Subsurface Flow--Three general grazing systems have been studied for over 30 years to evaluate their impacts on erosion and water quality, both surface runoff and subsurface flow. The systems include continuous, unimproved pasture; "medium-fertility", weekly rotational pasture; and "high-fertility", weekly rotational pasture. Different rates of mineral N fertilizer,

and different formulations of N fertilizer were studied as well as grass-legume mixtures. Losses of nutrients in surface runoff and subsurface flow were determined. Instructor: Mr. Lloyd Owens, USDA-ARS State Nutrient Management Regulations: Do They Work?--Dr. Michelle Perez will share highlights from her dissertation about the successes and shortcomings of three state laws enacted in the 1990's to improve farmer nutrient management behavior. Perez interviewed 60 farmers on the Delmarva Peninsula and over 60 policy stakeholders, including crop consultants and fertilizer dealers. Among the many challenges associated with nutrient management plan regulations, Perez observed the important yet, in some cases, problematic role the agribusiness sector played in implementing the state laws. Perez is a Senior Analyst at the World Resources Institute and serves as President-Elect of the Soil Water Conservation Society's National Capital Chapter. Instructor: Dr. Michelle Perez, World Resources Institute Climate Change and Food Security--Documented and projected changes in atmospheric CO2 are likely to alter agricultural productivity in two ways: directly, by supplying additional carbon for photosynthesis and growth; and, indirectly by altering climate, specifically surface temperatures and precipitation. In this overview on the impact of CO2 and climate change on food security, I will present data from a number of sources that document the likely negative impacts, specifically high temperature induced pollen sterility; the vulnerability of irrigation infrastructure and water supply; potential changes in nutrition; as well as a overview of how agro-ecosystems could be adversely affected by invasive pathogens, disease and weeds. Conversely, I will also address potential opportunities associated with climate change, particularly the work on intra-specific variability in regard to adaptation of crop lines to rising CO2 and temperature. I will discuss potential cultural or agronomic adaptation strategies that could be used to minimize climate change impacts on production. Instructor: Dr. Lewis Ziska, USDA-ARS Soil Microbes: Where Do They Fit in Soil Fertility?-- Soil microbes continue to remain a subject of fascination and frustration to the agricultural community. There is an abundance of misinformation regarding the roles of soil microbes in soil fertility and our abilities to apply and/or manipulate soil microbes to our advantage. I will try to present up-to-date information on what we are learning about soil microbial communities and the state of knowledge regarding applications of microbial inoculants in agricultural systems. Instructor: Dr. David Zuberer, Texas A&M University Chesapeake Bay TMDL - What it Means for Agriculture--Kelly Shenk will provide an overview of the Chesapeake Bay restoration effort (TMDL) and discuss the role of agriculture. She'll highlight topics such as the goals of the Bay restoration, the role that all sectors play in the restoration, the state Watershed Implementation Plans commitments, Agricultural Certainty, and local engagement. Instructor: Ms. Kelly Shenk, Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office

Time 8:30 -10:00 10:00 - 10:50 Pest Mgmt. Palmetto 1 New Insights on Wheat Scab--Mycotoxin Reduction by Cultural Practices--G. Bergstrom New Insights on Wheat Scab--Mycotoxin Reduction by Cultural Practices--G. Bergstrom Nematode Mgt in Field Crops and Vegs. w/Seed Treatments--S. Rideout Nematode Mgt in Field Crops and Vegs. w/Seed Treatments--S. Rideout Hands-On Plant Disease ID and Management--B. Mulrooney Hands-On Plant Disease ID and Management--B. Mulrooney

Day 1: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 Registration Crop Mgmt. Nutrient Mgmt. Soil & Water Mgmt Palmetto 2 Palmetto 3 Palmetto 4 Wheat Management Manganese The Wind Erosion Prediction (especially nutrients) in Fall Deficiency--J. System: A new tool for Wind and Spring--B. Kratochvil Camberato Erosion Prediction--M. Sporcic Wheat Management (especially nutrients) in Fall and Spring--B. Kratochvil Growing Good Corn: Rocket Sci. or Common Sense--B. Nielsen Growing Good Corn: Rocket Sci. or Common Sense--B. Nielsen Understanding Soybean Development I: Vegetative Stages--D. Holshouser Understanding Soybean Development I: Vegetative Stages--D. Holshouser Manganese Deficiency--J. Camberato

Lunch

Fifth Session Palmetto 5 Disease Diagnostics for Vegetables and Fruits--N. Gregory Disease Diagnostics for Vegetables and Fruits--N. Gregory Consulting for the Green Industries--Greenhouse, Nursery, Landscape, and Turf--C. Schuster & Rojas Note: This will be a 2 hour block Consulting for the Green Industries--Greenhouse, Nursery, Landscape, and Turf--C. Schuster & Rojas Note: This will be a 2 hour block

11:00 ­ 11:50

The Wind Erosion Prediction System: A new tool for Wind Erosion Prediction--M. Sporcic Eliminating "Nonpoint" from Nonpoint Source Pollution--Z. Easton Eliminating "Nonpoint" from Nonpoint Source Pollution--Z. Easton Residue Management - No-Till and Rolling Vertical Tillage Systems--S. Duiker Residue Management - No-Till and Rolling Vertical Tillage Systems--S. Duiker

11:50 ­ 1:00 1:00 ­ 1:50 2:00 ­ 2:50 2:50 ­ 3:10 3:10 ­ 4:00 4:10 ­ 5:00

What Goes Up Must Come Down.. But When?--F. Coale What Goes Up Must Come Down.. But When?--F. Coale

Break

Maryland Soil Fertility Update--J. McGrath Maryland Soil Fertility Update--J. McGrath

Time 8:00 ­ 8:50 9:00 ­ 9:50 9:50 ­ 10:10 10:10 ­ 11:00

11:10 ­ 12:00

Day 2: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 NOTE: CMS on Wheels Is an Additional Option for Wednesday Schedule Nutrient Mgmt. Crop Mgmt. Crop Mgmt. Soil & Water Mgmt. Fifth Session Palmetto 1 Palmetto 2 Palmetto 3 Palmetto 4 Palmetto 5 Soil Acidity and Liming-- Thoughts About On-Farm How Much Does Hay Potential Climate Change Tomato Production in the D. Beegle Research--B Nielsen Cost and What Should I During the Next 30-50 Years-- Mid-Atlantic--J. Freeman Charge?--G. Groover H. Skinner Soil Acidity and Liming-- Thoughts About On-Farm How Much Does Hay Potential Climate Change Tomato Production in the D. Beegle Research--B Nielsen Cost and What Should I During the Next 30-50 Years-- Mid-Atlantic--J. Freeman Charge?--G. Groover H. Skinner Break Managing Ammonia Deep Tillage for Corn Understanding Soybean Pasture Mgt Strategies to Deficiencies and Disorders Volatilization Losses from Production: Yes, No, Development II: The Minimize Nutr. Losses in of Vegetables and Fruits-- Urea Fertilizers--H. Frame Maybe??--W. Thomason Reproductive Stages-- Surface Runoff and Subsurface G. Johnson D. Holshouser Flow--L. Owens Managing Ammonia Deep Tillage for Corn Understanding Soybean Pasture Mgt Strategies to Deficiencies and Disorders Volatilization Losses from Production: Yes, No, Development II: The Minimize Nutr. Losses in of Vegetables and Fruits-- Urea Fertilizers--H. Frame Maybe??--W. Thomason Reproductive Stages-- Surface Runoff and Subsurface G. Johnson D. Holshouser Flow--L. Owens

12:00 ­ 1:00 1:00 ­ 1:50

2:00 ­ 2:50

Precision Ag Tech for Enhanced Nutrient Stewardship--S. Phillips Precision Ag Tech for Enhanced Nutrient Stewardship--S. Phillips Nutrient Mgt for Veg. Crops in the MidAtlantic--M. Reiter Nutrient Mgt for Veg. Crops in the MidAtlantic--M. Reiter

Understanding Adaptation Barriers and Response to Selection for Corn Improvement--R. Wisser Understanding Adaptation Barriers and Response to Selection for Corn Improvement--R. Wisser Palmer Amaranth: It's here and Will Change Crop Mgt--M. VanGessel Palmer Amaranth: It's here and Will Change Crop Mgt--M. VanGessel

Lunch Management of Crops and Pests with Plasticulture--J. Freeman Management of Crops and Pests with Plasticulture--J. Freeman Break Global Warming and Turfgrass Management-- M. DelSantro Global Warming and Turfgrass Management-- M. DelSantro

Regulating Farmers: A 3 State Study of NM Laws on the Delmarva Peninsula--M. Perez Regulating Farmers: A 3 State Study of NM Laws on the Delmarva Peninsula--M. Perez Climate Change and Food Security--L. Ziska Climate Change and Food Security--L. Ziska

Understanding and Managing Bean Crops-- Snap Beans and Lima Beans--E. Ernest Understanding and Managing Bean Crops-- Snap Beans and Lima Beans--E. Ernest Key to Growing Quality Potatoes in the MidAtlantic--S. Mathew Key to Growing Quality Potatoes in the MidAtlantic--S. Mathew

2:50 ­ 3:10 3:10 ­ 4:00 4:10 ­ 5:00

Time 8:00 ­ 8:50

Pest Mgmt. Palmetto 1

Herbicide Carryover to Vegs.: Causes and Consequences--M. VanGessel Herbicide Carryover to Vegs.: Causes and Consequences--M. VanGessel Managing Weeds in Organic Spring Cereals-- L. Kolb Managing Weeds in Organic Spring Cereals-- L. Kolb

Day 3: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Pest Mgmt. Nutrient Mgmt. Palmetto 2 Palmetto 3

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Field Crops: 2011 Experiences--B. Cissel and J. Whalen Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Field Crops: 2011 Experiences--B. Cissel and J. Whalen Emerging and Re-Emerging Pests in Vegs. and Fruit Crops in Mid-Atl.--J. Whalen Emerging and Re-Emerging Pests in Vegs. and Fruit Crops in Mid-Atl.--J. Whalen

Soil & Water Mgmt. Palmetto 4 Soil Microbes: Where do They Fit in Soil Fertility--D. Zuberer Soil Microbes: Where do They Fit in Soil Fertility--D. Zuberer Chesapeake Bay TMDL-- What This Means for Ag--K. Shenk Chesapeake Bay TMDL-- What This Means for Ag--K. Shenk

Fifth Session Palmetto 5 Basics of Strawberry Crop Mgt with Emphasis on Annual Plasticulture Systems--K. Demchak Basics of Strawberry Crop Mgt with Emphasis on Annual Plasticulture Systems--K. Demchak IPM for Greenhouses, Nurseries, and Landscapes--B. Kunkel IPM for Greenhouses, Nurseries, and Landscapes--B. Kunkel

Silicon in Soil Fertility and Crop Nutrition--J. Heckman Silicon in Soil Fertility and Crop Nutrition--J. Heckman Break What to Consider when Looking at Experimental Results--R. Mullen What to Consider when Looking at Experimental Results--R. Mullen Adjourn

9:00 ­ 9:50

9:50 ­ 10:10 10:10 ­ 11:00 11:10 ­ 12:00 12:00

VI. Fifth Sessions

Horticulture Track

Each session's CEU category is designated at end of abstract.

low internal and external defects, acceptable fry color, and managing high temperatures during tuber bulking.(CM=1.0) Instructor: Sudeep A. Mathew, University of Maryland Basics of Strawberry Crop Management with Emphasis on Annual Plasticulture Systems--This talk will provide crop consultants with basic information on strawberry crop establishment, nutrition, and irrigation with an emphasis on the annual plasiculture production system that is growing in the region. Common disease, insect, and weed problems will be discussed including cultural and chemical options for their management. Instructor ­ Ms. Kathy Demchak, Pennsylvania State University (CM=1.0) Integrated Pest Management for Greenhouses, Nurseries, and Landscapes--Insects are found throughout the landscape and not all of these cause problems for you or your plants. Many arthropods help manage pest populations throughout the year and this presentation will discuss products available that have reduced impacts on beneficials. Techniques such as banker plants and trap cropping will be described for greenhouse operations and examples of beneficial arthropods in action will be illustrated. (PM=1.0) Instructor: Dr. Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware

Disease Diagnostics for Vegetables and Fruits-- Implementation of successful control measures for diseases of vegetables and fruits often hinges on timely detection and accurate diagnosis, and many chemical control options are mostly preventative. Hands on techniques and tips will be demonstrated for samples with signs and symptoms of problems caused by various fungi and bacteria. Use of a hand lens, quick tests and examinations that can be done in the field will be emphasized. Instructor - Ms. Nancy Gregory, University of Delaware (PM=1.0) Consulting for the Green Industries - Greenhouse, Nursery, Landscape, and Turf--Expand your scouting to include more of the horticultural industry. Operations are diversifying and need qualified IPM scouts. Learn scouting techniques that can be used in the nursery and landscape, what is causing havoc in your turf (sod and lawns) and how to be ahead of the curve. Instructors: Chuck Schuster, University of Maryland, Marie Rojas, Independent IPM Consultant (PM 2.0) Tomato Production in the Mid-Atlantic--Tomato production will be covered from pre-season decision making to harvest. Specific topics will include transplant production, plasticulture, cultural practices, variety selection, and soilborne pest management. Current research on methyl bromide alternatives will also be discussed. Instructor ­ Dr. Josh Freeman, Virginia Tech (CM=1.0) Deficiencies and Disorders of Vegetables and Fruits-- Many problems encountered in the field with vegetables and fruits are physiological in nature and not due to pathogens or other pests. In this session, participants will learn how to diagnose common deficiencies and disorders of vegetables and fruits by symptoms and how to confirm deficiencies with tissue analysis and soil testing. Causes of these deficiencies and disorders will be detailed and corrective and preventative measures will be discussed. Instructor ­ Dr. Gordon Johnson, University of Delaware (NM=1.0) Understanding and Managing Bean Crops ­ Snap Beans and Lima Beans Split sets, delayed set, diseases, dropped pods and flowers ­ does getting a good yield from lima and snap beans perplex and frustrate you? Learn how environmental factors affect lima bean and snap bean yield, how you can mitigate the effects of heat and drought, and what bean breeders are doing to develop more stress and disease tolerant varieties. Instructor ­ Ms. Emmalea Ernest, University of Delaware (CM=1.0) What do markets want? Key to growing quality potatoes in the Mid-Atlantic--Potatoes have long held the prominent position of being America's favorite vegetable. The potato is also a significant portion of the diversified vegetable industries in many Eastern States. Cash farm receipts for Eastern potatoes are approximately $600 million. Closeness to the high population consumer centers makes eastern potato acres an attractive option for growers. This session will discuss aspects to achieve quality that includes managing pests, uniform tuber shape, high specific gravity,

VIII. Crop School on Wheels Wednesday, November 16

Wednesday's tour will leave the Princess Royale at 7:45 AM and return by approximately 5:30 PM. Please arrive at the bus at 7:35 AM. Tour hosts: Dr. Cory Whaley, Dr. Bill McGowan, and Mr. Bill Brown, University of Delaware. Refreshments and box lunch are included. (3 CEU SW, 1 CEU NM, 3 CEU CM, ½ CEU PM). Stops Delaware Center for the Inland Bays (CIB), Rehoboth, DE--At this location, representatives from the CIB will discuss water quality monitoring, vegetative buffers, aquatic research, restoration and demonstration projects, and their on-going involvement with agriculture issues within the Inland Bays watershed. Delaware Crop Production and BMP's--Between tour stops, there will be an overview of the DE agricultural industry and local crop production and BMP's. Perdue AgriRecycle, Seaford, DE--Participants will receive a guided tour of the plant observing how raw poultry litter is processed into fertilizer pellets that can be used in the agricultural, turf, and horticultural industries. Redden State Forest, Georgetown, DE--Participants will get a firsthand look at timber production, specifically loblolly pine, from site preparation to harvest and can see demonstrations on seeding, pest management, thinning, prescribed burns, and timber harvest. Forestry BMP's to protect water quality will be discussed. Isaacs Poultry Farm, Milton, DE--The Isaacs family will give participants a look into their process of introducing solar energy into a large-scale poultry operation as well as discuss the benefits and challenges associated with solar PV. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, Milton, DE--Participants will get a guided tour of the brewery where they will hear about the barley and hops selection process, the brewing, bottling, and packaging and processes, and how DogFish Head handles and recycles distillers grain and water.

Registration Form Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School Princess Royale Oceanfront Hotel and Conference Center Ocean City, Maryland November 15-17, 2011

EITHER Register ON-LINE at https://crayola.hcs.udel.edu/conf/registration/crop_management OR Complete this and the following page and mail or fax to the University of Delaware Conference Services {contact information below}.

Name ______________________________________________________ Company or Affiliation _______________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ City __________________________ State ____________ Zip __________ Telephone _______________________ FAX ________________________ e-mail ________________________________________________________

CCA Certification Number ______________________________________ Nutrient Management Certification Number __________________ State______ Pesticide Certification Number ___________________________ Registration fee on or before October 21 is $230.00. State______

Registration fee after October 21 is $255.00.

Total amount enclosed $____________ Check, money order or credit card information must accompany the registration form and class choices. Make check or Money Order payable to: University of Delaware Credit Card (circle one) VISA MasterCard Discover Credit Card No: ____________________________________________________ Expiration Date: ___________ Name on Card: ___________________________

Mail completed form, class choices, and payment (no purchase orders) to: Conference Services Attn: Gail Knapp 104 John M. Clayton Hall Newark, DE 19716 Phone: 302-831-2214 FAX: 302-831-2998

Questions? - Please call ­ Dr. Richard Taylor (302-545-2395)

Sponsored by the University of Delaware, University of Maryland, and West Virginia University Cooperative Extension Systems in conjunction with the Mid-Atlantic CCA Board, and the USDA/NRCS..

Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School - Session Schedule

Note: There will be no general session. Registration will begin 8:30 am on November 15. Breakout sessions will begin at 10:00 am on November 15 and at 8:00 am on November 16 and 17. Please examine the following schedule of course offerings. Course availability is on first-come, first served basis. Each session runs for fifty minutes and provides 1 CEU in the assigned category unless otherwise noted. You can mix and match across topic areas ­ crop production, pest management, nutrient management, and soil and water. Please read across each time frame and rank (1-5) by your preference (1 for first choice and 5 for last choice). If your choices 1 and 2 are unavailable, you will be assigned to another session. You will receive a schedule noting your assigned sessions. Day 1 ­ Tuesday, November 15, 2011 . Pest Crop Time Management Management Room Palmetto I Palmetto II

10:00 - 11:50 (2 sessions) 1:00 - 2:50 (2 sessions) 3:10 ­ 5:00 (2 sessions)

Nutrient Management Palmetto III

DeficiencyCamberato

Soil & Water Management Palmetto IV

Fifth Session Palmetto V

New Insights

on Wheat ScabBergstrom Nematode Mgt F. & Veg. Crops w/ Seed Tmts-Rideout

Wheat Mgt (esp Manganese

Nutrients) in Fall & Spring-Kratochvil Growing Good Corn Rocket Sci. or Com. Sense-Nielsen

Wind Erosion

Prediction System, New Tool-Sporcic Eliminating `NonPoint' from NonPoint Source Pollution-Easton Till/Rolling Vertical Till Sys-Duiker

Disease Diagnostics

for Vegs. and FruitsGregory

What Goes Up

Must Come Down but When-Coale Fertility UpdateMcGrath

Consulting for the

Green Industry (2 hour session)-Schuster/Rojas Green Industry (2 hour session)-Schuster/Rojas

Hands-On

Plant Disease ID & Mgt-Mulrooney

Understanding Maryland Soil

Soy Develop. Veg Stages-Holshouser

Residue Mgt: No- Consulting for the

Day 2 ­ Wednesday, November 16, 2011

For the "School on Wheels" Bus tour, enter a 1 in the box on the left. In case the tour is full, please rank the

classroom sessions below with a 2 through 6 in each box for your alternative choices for each time slot. Time Nutrient Crop Fifth Crop Soil & Water Management Management Session Management Management

8:00 ­ 9:50 (2 sessions) 10:10 ­ noon (2 sessions)

Soil Acidity

and Liming-Beegle

Thoughts about On-Farm ResearchNielsen

How Much Does Potential Climate Tomato Production

Hay Cost/What Should I Charge-Groover Change during Next 30-50 Yrs-Skinner in Mid-Atl.-Freeman

Managing

NH3 Volatilization Losses in Urea Fertilizers-Frame Precision Ag Tech for Enhanced Nutr StewardshipPhillips

Deep Tillage for

Corn Production: Yes, No, Maybe?Thomason

Understanding

Soy Develop. II: Reproductive StagesHolshouser Mgt of Crops and Pests with Plasticulture-Freeman

Pasture Mgt

Strategies to Minimize Nutr Losses-Owens Regulating Farmers: A 3 State Study of NM Laws on Delmarva-Perez

Deficiencies and

Disorders of Vegs. and Fruits-Johnson Understanding and Managing Bean Crops-- Snaps and Limas-Ernest

1:00 ­ 2:50 (2 sessions)

Understanding

Adapt Barriers and Response to Selection for Corn Imprv-Wisser It's here and Will Change Crop MgtVanGessel

3:10 ­ 5:00 (2 sessions)

Nutrient Mgt

for Vegs. in MidAtlantic-Reiter

Palmer Amaranth: Global Warming

and Turfgrass MgtDelSantro

Climate Change

and Food SecurityZiska

Key to Growing

Quality Potatoes in the Mid-Atlantic-Mathew

Day 3 ­ Thursday, November 17, 2011 Time Pest Pest Management Management

8:00 ­ 9:50 (2 sessions)

Herbicide Carryover in Vegs.VanGessel

Nutrient Management

Silicon in Soil Fertility and Crop Nutrition-Heckman

Soil & Water Management

Soil Microbes: Where do They Fit in Soil Fertility-Zuberer

Fifth Session

Basics of Strawberry Crop Mgt/Annual Plasticulture Sys-Demchak

Brown

Marmorated Stink Bug Field Crops-Cissel & Whalen

10:10 ­ noon (2 sessions)

Managing

Weeds in Org Spr Cereals-Kolb

Emerging and

Re-Emerging Pests in Veg. & Field CropsWhalen

What to

Consider when Looking at Exp Results-Mullen

Chesapeake Bay

TMDL: What's it Mean for Ag-Shenk

IPM for

Greenhouses, Nurseries, and Landscapes-Kunkel

Information

Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School

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Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School