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Managing Stress

PRESENTATION NOTES

PURPOSE

The purpose of the American Red Cross Managing Stress presentation is to give individuals an introduction to the knowledge necessary to recognize and manage stress.

PREREQUISITES

There are no prerequisites for enrolling in the Managing Stress presentation.

LENGTH

The Managing Stress presentation is designed to be taught in approximately 1 hour. The presentation can be presented as an add-on presentation to any course, or it can be presented as a stand-alone session. The estimate of 1 hour is based on up to 25 participants per leader.

MATERIALS

For the Leader American Red Cross Injury Control Presentations Leader's Guide American Red Cross Managing Stress Booklet (StayWell Stock No. 656714) Managing Stress PowerPoint Presentation slides (optional) For the Participant American Red Cross Managing Stress Booklet (StayWell Stock No. 656714) (one per participant)

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

This presentation has no knowledge or skill assessments; therefore, there are no requirements for successful completion. Awarding Course Certificates Participants may be issued certificates using the Has Completed Universal Certificates indicating Managing Stress. There is no validity period for the certificate.

PREPARATION FOR PARTICIPANTS' QUESTIONS

Before beginning this lesson, be sure you are prepared to answer possible questions from participants. You may want to review the material on the topic at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Stress Management for the Health of It website: www.cdc.gov/niosh/nasd/docs4/sc98011.html (URL was correct at the time of publication). The information in this presentation is general in nature, serves only as an introduction to the topic, and is not intended for compliance purposes. Participant questions related to employer

American Red Cross Injury Control Presentations Copyright © 2009 The American National Red Cross Duplication permitted for use in American Red Cross presentations.

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responsibilities, worker's compensation, and other topics should be directed to participants' workplace health and safety office, supervisor, safety officer, wellness office, employee assistance program (EAP) professional, or personal physician.

MANAGING STRESS PRESENTATION OUTLINE

Topic Introduction Stress and the Workplace Work-related Stress General Strategies for Managing Stress Stress First Aid Closing Approximate Time 5 minutes 5 minutes 20 minutes 10 minutes 10 minutes 5 minutes 1 hour

Approximate Total Time

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LESSON: MANAGING STRESS

Lesson Length 60 minutes Lesson Objectives After completing this lesson, participants should know how to-- Recognize the causes and signals of stress. Identify ways to manage stress. Develop personal strategies for managing stress. Materials, Equipment, and Supplies Managing Stress Booklet (one for each participant) Managing Stress PowerPoint Presentation slides (optional) Universal Certificate indicating Managing Stress (one for each participant) Course Record Course Record Addendum American Red Cross identification Name tags or name tents (one for each participant) Pens or pencils 3" x 5" index cards* Laptop and LCD projector (optional) Newsprint and markers *Leader Note: Prepare 3" x 5" index cards for facilitating and conducting the activities, "Work-related Stress" and "Strategies for Managing Stress." The number of 3" x 5" cards needed will depend on the specific activity and the number of participants in the presentation.

TOPIC: INTRODUCTION

Length: 5 minutes

ACTIVITY:

Welcome participants, briefly introduce yourself, and give your background. Identify yourself as an American Red Cross leader. Have participants briefly introduce themselves. Ask them to write their names on name tags or name tents and display them where they can be seen. Review any facility policies and procedures, including emergency procedures; location of restrooms, water fountains, and break areas; and smoking policies. Ask participants to print their full names and addresses on the Course Record Addendum. Distribute Managing Stress booklets before participants arrive. o Inform participants that these booklets are theirs to keep. o Briefly review the booklet. Explain that participants will use this booklet for various activities during the presentation.

American Red Cross Injury Control Presentations Copyright © 2009 The American National Red Cross Duplication permitted for use in American Red Cross presentations.

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Leader Note: Use optional PPT slide 2 or write the information on newsprint.

KEY POINTS:

The purpose of the American Red Cross Managing Stress presentation is to give individuals in the workplace an introduction to the knowledge necessary to recognize and manage stress. An American Red Cross Universal Certificate indicating that the participant has completed Managing Stress will be issued at the end of this presentation. It has no expiration date. The Managing Stress presentation contains awareness information and is not intended to substitute for worksite health and safety training, policies, or procedures. Participants should consult with their worksite health and safety office, supervisor, safety officer, wellness office, EAP professional, or personal physician for specific advice or recommendations for individual situations. Leader Note: Participants may ask you for medical advice, such as telling them they have chronic stress. Participants may also ask you to assess their condition or recommend specific strategies for managing stress. Such questions are beyond the purpose of this presentation, which focuses on awareness. Participants should consult with their worksite health and safety office, supervisor, safety officer, wellness office, EAP professional, or personal physician for specific advice or recommendations for individual situations.

TOPIC: STRESS AND THE WORKPLACE

Length: 5 minutes Leader Note: Use optional PPT slide 3 or write the information on newsprint.

KEY POINTS:

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) defines job stress as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. According to the American Psychological Association (APA), 43 percent of all adults suffer adverse effects from stress. Both job and personal stress, however, are not always unpleasant or harmful, and the amount of stress experienced varies from person to person. Recognizing the causes and signals of stress will help you understand and manage stressful situations.

ACTIVITY:

Ask participants to identify job and personal/family stressors. Encourage open exchange of positive and negative stressors, and write examples on newsprint. After a list has been compiled, refer participants to page 3 in the booklet so that they can review some examples of job and personal/family stressors that may not have been listed on newsprint.

American Red Cross Injury Control Presentations Copyright © 2009 The American National Red Cross Duplication permitted for use in American Red Cross presentations.

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Leader Note: Responses may include-- Job Stressors Starting a new job Speaking to a large group Working with a demanding boss Personal/Family Stressors Getting married/having a child Death or loss of a loved one Lack of communication

Briefly review the signals of stress on page 3 of the booklet. Examples include headache, fatigue, anxiety, irritability, and changes in sleeping and eating patterns. Next, ask participants to complete the activity "Is Your Stress Under Control?" on page 5 of the booklet. Tell them that they may refer back to this information later in the presentation if they choose to complete the optional plan for managing stress.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION

Q. How many potential warning signals for stress do I need to observe before I reach out for help? A. If you discover that your stress becomes unmanageable or causes concern, contact your worksite health and safety office, safety officer, EAP professional, wellness office, or personal physician for assistance with your specific situation.

TOPIC: WORK-RELATED STRESS

Length: 20 minutes Leader Note: Use optional PPT slide 4 or write the information on newsprint.

KEY POINTS:

All employees, including those in managerial and supervisory roles, experience some degree of job stress. Your stress profile information from the activity "Is Your Stress Under Control?" may be directly associated with any of the following categories of work-related stress: o Change in the Workplace--may involve mergers, takeovers, and management changes o Unclear Job Responsibilities--lead to frustration and lack of motivation o Heavy Workload--long hours, poor job fit, and deadlines o Role Conflicts--being caught between customer and organizational demands o Slow Career Progress--feeling trapped or frustrated in your job o Limiting Management Styles--having little or no decision-making responsibility o Poor Working Conditions--may include excessive noise, overcrowding, and poor air quality o Family Problems--problems at home that carry over into the workplace Leader Note: To help facilitate the following activity, divide newsprint into headers with the types of work-related stress. Also, if you have not already done so, prepare 3" x 5" cards with a type of work-related stress listed at the top of each card.

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ACTIVITY:

Divide participants into small groups, and ask each group to designate a spokesperson. Assign each group one type of work-related stress on a 3"x 5" card. Have participants brainstorm ideas about what strategies they might use to reduce the assigned type of work-related stress. Ask them to write these ideas on their 3" x 5" card. After 8 minutes, ask each group spokesperson to present the type of work-related stress and possible strategies for reducing that stress. Facilitate the discussion by posing questions and allowing participants to answer. Record the list of ideas on newsprint. Leader Note: Emphasize the importance of achieving a proper balance between work and family or personal life, a support network of friends and co-workers, and a relaxed and positive outlook as broad-reaching strategies.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION

Q. Should I leave or quit my job due to chronic stress? A. If you feel you are exposed to chronic stress, consider exhausting the resources available to you, such as your personal physician, workplace health and safety office, wellness office, or EAP professional.

TOPIC: GENERAL STRATEGIES FOR MANAGING STRESS

Length: 10 minutes

KEY POINTS:

Managing stress in the workplace involves planning and persistence. Basic steps you can use to begin addressing your stress level include-- o Identify your current stressors, focusing on what you can change. o Think about ways to fix the problem. o Prioritize solutions you can use right away. o Communicate your intentions to co-workers and supervisors before taking any action. o Repeat these steps until you reach your goal. Leader Note: Distribute 3" x 5" cards with a work-related scenario listed at the top of each card. Possible scenarios include-- o Constant distractions coming from a co-worker in an adjacent cubicle. o Your boss wants you to complete a last-minute report by lunchtime. o Your co-worker has called in sick and now you have 1 hour to prepare to conduct a meeting for him or her. o Your customer (a major account) wants you to change policy or else by day's end. o You have been passed over for promotion in the last reorganization.

ACTIVITY:

Divide participants into small groups, and ask each group to designate a spokesperson. Assign each group one workplace scenario on a 3" x 5" card.

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Have participants brainstorm possible strategies to address each scenario on the 3" x 5" card. After 5 minutes, ask each group spokesperson to present the possible strategies for each assigned scenario. Record the list of ideas on newsprint.

TOPIC: STRESS FIRST AID

Length: 10 minutes Leader Note: Use optional PPT slide 5 or write the information on newsprint.

ACTIVITY:

Refer participants to pages 9-10 in the booklet. Ask participants to raise their hands as to which two stress buster activities (choices #1­#6) they would like to complete. After tallying the number of raised hands for each of the activities, pick the top two and lead the participants through the activities. After the activity is complete, ask participants for feedback on what stress busters worked best for them and why.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION

Q. Where can I get additional training or find out more information about managing stress? A. Contact your worksite health and safety office, safety officer, EAP professional, wellness office, or personal physician for additional information.

TOPIC: CLOSING

Length: 5 minutes

KEY POINTS:

Encourage participants to work closely with co-workers and supervisors to minimize stress in their workplace. Remind participants to use available resources, such as their health and safety officer or EAP professional, to assist them in managing stress levels.

ACTIVITY:

Thank participants for attending. Remind participants that the Managing Stress presentation is an introduction to the knowledge necessary to recognize and manage stress and contains awareness information and is not intended to substitute for worksite health and safety training, policies, or procedures. Participants should consult with the worksite health and safety office, supervisor, safety officer, wellness office, EAP professional, or their personal physician for specific advice or recommendations for their individual situations. Suggest your local American Red Cross for additional awareness training on workplace safety, such as Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls; Ergonomics; Preventing Back Injuries; Workplace Violence Awareness; Your Heart Matters; and other health and safety programs and courses.

American Red Cross Injury Control Presentations Copyright © 2009 The American National Red Cross Duplication permitted for use in American Red Cross presentations.

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If possible, give participants a workplace contact name and phone number for additional information on stress and employee assistance programs. They can write this information in the back of their booklets in the space provided. Issue an American Red Cross Universal Certificate indicating Managing Stress to each participant who has successfully completed the presentation. Answer any questions participants have.

American Red Cross Injury Control Presentations Copyright © 2009 The American National Red Cross Duplication permitted for use in American Red Cross presentations.

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