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SEATTLE ACADEMY OF FINE ART CLASSICAL ATELIER

THE

TEACHING IN

THE

CLASSICAL TRADITION

The Seattle Academy of Fine Art atelier offers students the opportunity to study classical drawing and painting with a master artist. Based on the 19th century methods for training painters, this program is designed to provide students with the fundamental language of realistic drawing. Work is done from the model, casts, and still life. The atelier equips students with the necessary skills to create well designed and accurately executed drawings and paintings.

Seattle Academy of Fine Art

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206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

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www.seattlefineart.org

CLASSICAL ATELIER

Welcome

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he Seattle Academy of Fine Art (SAFA) is guided by the conviction that artists are made, not born. The desire to pursue art is inborn, while the skills necessary to translate that desire into reality is acquired though dedicated labor. The Academy is dedicated to helping artists of all ages and levels of proficiency meet the challenges of creating art with insight, skill and sound technique.

the sculptures being unearthed in their own day dating back to the time of ancient Rome. They sought to learn from the ancients through emulating the simplicity and design of their work. The Romans in turn shamelessly emulated the Ancient Greeks. We do not have access to many secrets dating back to the ancient Greeks, however we do have a direct line to 19th century France through the lineage of the Americans who studied abroad during that time.

19TH CENTURY FRENCH ATELIERS

The term "Atelier" (French for "artist's studio") is taken from the 19th century French academies. Art students from that time would study under the keen eye of an established master to learn how to paint, while also attending the Ecole des Beaux Arts where they learned how to draw. The foundation of these programs rested on both an intense study of nature and the emulation of their masters. Students became adept at observation, theory and craft. The 19th century French schools considered the Italian Renaissance to be the pinnacle of artistic endeavor and sought to closely reconstruct the education artists would have received in that time, even sending their finest students off to study in Rome. The artists of the Italian Renaissance were astonished by the beauty of

THE SAFA CLASSICAL ATELIER

The SAFA Classical Atelier program is based on the teaching methods of the 19th century Academic tradition. Intended for long-term students, the curriculum is designed to provide fundamental drawing and painting skills with a strong emphasis placed on accurate observation of proportion, shape, tonal value, and color. Students work through the atelier's curriculum in a step-by-step progression. As each new skill is acquired, new and more challenging projects are assigned. Atelier students take additional classes in perspective, anatomy, composition, painting techniques, and color theory, then, with the help of their instructor, put it all together achieving a high degree of skill in observation, theory and craft.

"Constancy. Not he who begins, but he who perseveres."

­Leonardo DaVinci

Seattle Academy of Fine Art

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206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

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www.seattlefineart.org

Methodology

CLASSICAL ATELIER

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he SAFA Classical Atelier Program offers students the opportunity to study classical drawing and painting techniques with a master artist. Information is presented in a variety of formats intended to enable students of all levels the ability to easily grasp even the most difficult concepts.

· Students are expected to attend on a daily basis, three hours a day, five days a week. Your instructor, Juliette Aristides, will attend twice a week to carefully monitor your progress by providing individual critiques, facilitating peer critiques, leading group discussions, and demonstrating concepts. · First time atelier students can expect to draw for the first year unless special plans have been made. Please contact your instructor with any questions or requests. · New students are strongly encouraged to enroll in the Analytical Drawing class (see the SAFA catalog for dates/times). Analytical Drawing introduces you to all of the design systems that are employed in the Atelier Program. · Every student will be expected to complete one cast drawing and cast painting before moving on to still life work. · In addition to classroom work, there will be reading assignments and occasional take home projects. During the course of the year in addition to the atelier instruction, students are encouraged to attend lectures at the Academy in art history, anatomy, historic methods and materials and technical demonstrations. Atelier students should address requests for additional areas of study to their instructor.

THE ACADEMIC METHOD

During the first year of the atelier, students are immersed in the academic method of drawing. They are taught how to sight and measure the subject in order to reproduce it accurately. Exercises are designed to improve the students drawing skills, with an emphasis on contour, proportion, gesture, anatomy, modeling, and the shape of light and shadow. Once a student has acquired the requisite drawing skills, they begin to learn the art and science of painting. Painting projects are designed for the first-time painting student. The emphasis is on drawing accuracy, handling of paint, and the careful observation of light and shadow. Students go on to use a limited and then full palette while completing increasingly complex projects in cast and still life painting. · The Atelier runs from mid-September through mid June each year and is a self-directed environment meant for the serious student.

"A talent is formed in stillness; a character in the worlds' torrent."

­Goethe

Seattle Academy of Fine Art

·

206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

·

www.seattlefineart.org

Instructor

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uliette Aristides is a gifted, passionate, intellectually stimulating artist who seeks to understand and convey the human spirit through art. Ms. Aristides has spent the past ten years acquiring a rigorous education on the principles of classical realism. She began her studies in 1988 under Myron Barnstone in Design Systems. She continued to study drawing and painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, then at The Atelier in Minneapolis in the tradition of Richard Lack. This work was followed by two years of instruction at the National Academy in New York with Jacob Collins, while also receiving instruction from Carlos Madrid. Juliette spent a year working with a small group of students at Jacob Collins' studio prior to becoming a founding member of the Water Street Studio in Brooklyn, New York. Juliette received both the Wilder Prize for Drawing and the Albert Hallgarten Traveling Scholarship while studying at the National Academy of Design. For fur-

ther information regarding Ms. Aristides, visit her web site at aristidesarts.com. Her work can also be seen online at gandygallery.com and artrenewal.com. "I have a simple belief that the goal of learning to draw and paint is attainable by anyone who is willing to pursue it. It is as accessible as learning to write or play a musical instrument. There is more then one path a person can follow to be a well-trained artist. What is necessary, however, is a passion for excellence, discipline, and an unflinching desire to pursue truth. Traditional skills are necessary for developing a foundational base for the artist to work from. It is craftsmanship that opens the door to effective selfexpression. I am excited about teaching the methods from our artistic inheritance. I know that once this knowledge becomes commonplace again, it can only enrich our cultural life." --Juliette Aristides, August 1, 2002

"Originality is more concerned with sincerity than peculiarity"

­Harold Speed

Seattle Academy of Fine Art

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206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

·

www.seattlefineart.org

Curriculum Progression

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t was common practice in the 19th century academies to prove ones ability to draw in general before being allowed into the life drawing room. First the student would copy lithographs or engravings to learn technique and aesthetics. When found competent in copying, the student would graduate to drawing from the antique. Drawing these plaster casts, the student could learn directly from great works of sculpture, the aesthetic translation necessary to transform life into a work of art. Only then would the novice be allowed to join the life drawing room where all the experience gained in copying masters would pay-off in tackling the complexity of real life. Everyone in the class would have had a similar experience so there would be a common language, and a high level of competency from the very beginning of the artists' training.

bined with a thorough knowledge of design. We are not simply copying nature, rather in the spirit of the Greeks, we seek to understand nature so thoroughly that we can reconstruct it to convey the power of life. The average pose is two weeks. Throughout the year we will focus on creating a strong block-in, understand the gesture, separate the shadow from the light, then concentrate on understanding and rendering form.

Readings: The Practice and Science of Drawing by Harold Speed; The Nude by Kenneth Clark; The Artist's Complete Guide to Figure Drawing by Anthony Ryder; Artistic Anatomy by Dr. Paul Richer translated by Robert Beverly Hale

FIGURE AND PORTRAIT PAINTING

CAST DRAWING

Cast drawing is a way of teaching through emulation, the design systems found in the art of the ancient world. Students work from classical statuary under unchanging light conditions. The light and cast set-up is designed to enhance form and clarify value relationships. Rendering skills and a command of materials are the goals of this exercise.

Readings: The Practice and Science of Drawing by Harold Speed

Figure painting explores mass and form, unlike figure drawing which focuses on linear relationships. The goal is to become comfortable handling paint and to understand the procedures necessary to begin and finish a painting. Students will complete a drawing and transfer it to a panel or canvas, then create poster studies and an under painting in either monochromatic tones, or full color. The process ends with the final layers of paint to complete an intelligent painting.

Readings: Secrets of the old Masters by Albert Abendschein

STILL LIFE PAINTING

CAST PAINTING

A monochrome oil painting which carries the lessons of the cast into the medium of paint. The student learns to address all the problems of painting: dividing light and shade, blocking-in, handling the materials and finishing without the complication of color.

Readings: Oil Painting Techniques and Materials by Harold Speed

FIGURE AND PORTRAIT DRAWING

The focus of still life painting will be one of composition (design) and color. This module of the atelier begins with discovering the methods for creating thoughtful, interesting arrangements, and continues with the examination of the relationships between masses of value, color, and intensity. Paintings will progress from poster studies to highly finished areas of turning form. Students will be introduced to color through studying several limited palettes, which includes how to mix neutrals and the concept of color keying.

Readings: The Power of the Center by Rudolf Arnheim

Drawing the human form is the benchmark of a classical education and forms the focal point of our atelier program. The goal is unflinching accuracy com-

Seattle Academy of Fine Art

·

206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

·

www.seattlefineart.org

Materials

BASIC DRAWING SUPPLIES

Drawing Board: 19-1/2" x 25-1/2" piece of 1/2" foam core or equivalent Newsprint (25 sheets) Eberhard-Faber kneaded eraser(s) Glassine for protecting drawings Portfolio to transport paper and drawings 3/4" masking tape Small diameter knitting needle or skewer (for sighting) Bulldog clips

CLASSICAL ATELIER

BASIC PAINTING SUPPLIES

Small painting panels or canvas for studies (5x7) Pre-stretched, portrait grade canvas (11x14 - 14x17) Brushes - synthetic, nylon, round in the following sizes: Small: 0, 1, 2 Medium: 4, 6, 8 Large: 10 or 12 Turpenoid (1pt.) or odorless mineral spirits Wooden pallet (paper palettes are not recommended) Paint rags (cut up t-shirts work great) Paper towels Palette knife Small jar with lid or Silicoil brush cleaner

FOR STUDENTS WORKING IN VINE CHARCOAL

Ingres Fabriano, 65# charcoal paper, 19 x 25" / white or off-white Grumbacher or Windsor & Newton vine charcoal: hard, medium, soft Sand paper, 120 grit (for sharpening charcoal) Chamois

For transferring drawings to canvas:

Tracing paper (the size of your drawing) Carbon or transfer paper 1 bottle permanent India ink

FOR STUDENTS WORKING IN GRAPHITE

Strathmore 400, 80# drawing paper, 18 x 24" (white or off-white) Graphite pencils: HB, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 6B, 8B Pencil sharpener Staedtler Mars plastic eraser Soft brush Exact-o knife and blades

OIL COLORS

Cadmium Red Deep Cadmium Orange Cadmium Yellow Light Windsor or Thalo Green Thalo or Prussian Blue Ultramarine Deep Yellow Ocher Burnt Umber Raw Umber Burnt Sienna or English Red Alizarin Crimson Manganese Violet Ivory Black Titanium or Flake White (additional colors to be discussed in class)

Seattle Academy of Fine Art

·

206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

·

www.seattlefineart.org

Seattle Academy of Fine Art CLASSICAL ATELIER

·

206-526-ARTS or 800-880-3898

·

www.seattlefineart.org

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