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410 Blackwell St., Suite 200 Durham, NC 27701 Toll-Free: 888.245.9593 | Local: 919.317.3050 www.artinstitutes.edu/durham

Catalog 2010

Catalog 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION

Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Accreditation and Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Statement of Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Catalog Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Transfer of Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Readmissions Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Academic Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Educational Policies & Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Student Affairs & Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Accounting Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Student School Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

TUITION AND FEES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Culinary Arts Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Culinary Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Fashion Marketing & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Fashion Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Web Design & Interactive Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

STAFF AND FACULTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 SCHOOL CALENDAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Culinary Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Fashion Marketing & Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Web Design & Interactive Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Developmental Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 General Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Related Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 1

GENERAL INFORMATION

Mission

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is committed to the training and education of individuals for careers in the applied arts. Our graduates are capable of contributing fully within a diverse workforce and a global environment. To effectively live our mission in all we do, we are dedicated to the following specific goals: · Deliver learner-centered instruction by faculty who exhibit excellence in teaching, possess appropriate academic credentials, and have industry-related experience. · Ensure market-focused, competency-based education and curriculum by ongoing communication with students, graduates, employers, and industry professionals. · Strive for continued improvement in education quality, operational efficiency, institutional effectiveness, and overall teamwork and communication among all constituents. · Promote life-long learning by encouraging continuous personal and professional development of students, alumni, and employees.

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham building includes classrooms, computer and art labs, studios, resource rooms, culinary kitchens, and office space for an educational institution. In addition, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham has a student lounge, a library, supply store, and an exhibition gallery in its main building. All educational programs and student services are offered from this location. The Admissions Department is located at 318 Blackwell Street, Suite 120M, Durham, NC, in a nearby building within walking distance to the main building.

Parking

Parking is conveniently located near the school in the historic downtown district. The North Deck parking lot is located at the corner of Carr & Pettigrew Streets and is available for student use. There is a quarterly fee charged for parking in the deck. An access card to the parking deck is required for all students. There is ample visitor parking available for guests on the first level of the deck.

Values

The value system of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is the foundation of our educational institution. Learner-Centered Education: We believe in an educational environment that places the learner at the center of our efforts. Quality of Life: We believe in the commitment, dedication, and loyalty of our employees and in the involvement of the entire community in decision-making processes. We believe in supporting employees' efforts to balance professional and personal lives. Ethical Principles: We believe that the ultimate governing philosophy of our institution must be predicated upon strong ethical principles.

History

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham opened in August 2008. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is one of The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu), a system of over 40 education institutions located throughout North America, providing an important source of design, media arts, fashion, and culinary arts professionals. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham offers five Bachelor of Arts degree programs in the following areas: · · · · · Culinary Arts Management Fashion Marketing & Management Graphic Design Interior Design Web Design & Interactive Media

Vision Statement

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham strives to create a student-focused learning environment rich in creativity and collaboration where students, faculty, and staff encourage a culture of excellence. Through serving our college community, we will make a difference in individuals' lives and provide our employers with resourceful and innovative graduates, capable of solving the creative challenges of today and tomorrow. Through this vision our campus will grow and prosper as the preeminent applied arts college in the region.

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham offers four Associate of Applied Science degree programs in the following areas: · · · · Culinary Arts Fashion Marketing Graphic Design Web Design & Interactive Media

The Art Institute of Charlotte Board of Trustees The oversight of this board for The Art Institute of Charlotte extends to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham as its branch campus. Mr. Tim Newman, Chair CEO, Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority Mrs. Claire Oakley Boone Oakley Advertising Agency Mr. Ron Puntil Senior Consultant, Grubb & Ellis Company Dr. Dennis Fantaski, Ph.D. Education Management Corporation Mr. Hal Griffith Vice President, Education Services, Education Management Corporation Mr. Brad L. Janis, Ex-Officio President, The Art Institute of Charlotte Ex Officio (non-voting) Brad Janis President The Art Institute of Charlotte The Art Institutes International LLC Board of Directors John R. McKernan, Jr. Edward H. West John M. Mazzoni

Accreditation and Licensure

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is a branch of The Art Institute of Charlotte. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools to award associate's and bachelor's degrees. The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools is listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States Department of Education and is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. ACICS can be contacted at 750 First Street, NE, Suite 980, Washington, D.C. 20002-4241; telephone number 202-336-6780. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is licensed by The Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina (Post Office Box 2688, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688; telephone number: 919-962-4559) to confer Associate of Applied Science and Bachelor of Art degrees.

Student Body

The student body includes individuals who have enrolled directly after completing high school, those transferring from other colleges and universities, and adults who have decided either to enter the job market or to change careers after having been in the job market.

Facility

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is located at 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, in the heart of the downtown Durham historical and entertainment district, at the American Tobacco Campus. The American Tobacco Campus is a 1 million square foot registered historic site with roots as the American Tobacco Factory established in the 1800s. The entire complex has been converted into retail, residential, restaurant and office space, providing an exciting, creative campus atmosphere. The school is located next to the Triple-A Durham Bulls baseball park, is adjacent to a 2,800-seat performing arts center and is easily accessible from the I-40. The complex regularly hosts art exhibits, shows, film festivals, and other entertainment events.

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Office Address: Main Campus The Art Institute of Charlotte Three LakePointe Plaza 2110 Water Ridge Parkway Charlotte, NC 28217-4536 800-872-4417 www.artinstitutes.edu/charlotte Branch Campus The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200 Durham, NC 27701 888-245-9593 www.artinstitutes.edu/durham

Members of the Education Management Corporation Board of Directors are: Mick J. Beekhuizen Samuel C. Cowley Adrian M. Jones Jeffrey T. Leeds John R. McKernan, Jr. (Chairman of the Board) Leo F. Mullin Todd S. Nelson Michael K. Powell Paul J. Salem Peter O. Wilde

Catalog Preparation

This catalog was prepared by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The information contained herein was published in and effective January, 2010. For more information, write to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701. The telephone number is 919-317-3050 or 888-245-9593. The web site address is www.artinstitutes.edu/durham. All information in this catalog is subject to change without notice at the discretion of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham including but not limited to program offerings, admissions requirements, tuition and fees, and graduation requirements. It is the policy of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham not to discriminate on the basis of age, disability, color, creed, ancestry, national origin, religion, race, gender, sexual orientation, genetic marker, or any other characteristic protected by state, local or federal law in student recruitment and admissions, in financial aid programs, in student and employee services, in educational programs and activities, or in employment practices. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200 Durham, NC 27701 Phone: 919-317-3050 or 888-245-9593 Web: www.artinstitutes.edu/durham

Statement of Ownership

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is owned by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, Inc. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, Inc. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Art Institutes International LLC. The Art Institutes International LLC, through two intermediary limited liability companies, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Education Management Corporation. Education Management Corporation 210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd floor Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Phone: 412-562-0900/Fax: 412-562-0598 The Executive Officers of Education Management Corporation are: Todd S. Nelson Chief Executive Officer Edward H. West President and Chief Financial Officer Robert A. Carroll Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer Joseph A. Charlson Senior Vice President of Strategic Operations Tony Digiovanni Senior Vice President ­ Marketing and Admissions Danny Finuf President of Brown Mackie Colleges Anthony J. Guida, Jr. Senior Vice President ­ Regulatory Affairs and Strategic Development John Kline President, EDMC Online Higher Education J. Devitt Kramer Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary John M. Mazzoni President of The Art Institutes Stacey R. Sauchuk, PhD Senior Vice President of Academic Programs and Student Affairs John T. South, III Chancellor of South University Craig D. Swenson, PhD President of Argosy University Roberta L. Troike Senior Vice President of Human Resources

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ADMISSIONS Admissions Policy

In order to matriculate at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, a student must provide proof of graduation from high school that is approved by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Proof of graduation can be in one of the following forms: a. an official high-school transcript from a high school whose accreditation is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education; b. General Educational Development (GED) test scores; c. an official transcript from a postsecondary school whose accreditation is recognized by the U. S. Department of Education --that demonstrates completion of a bachelor's, master's, or higher degree; Other admissions requirements follow. Please note that a certificate of attendance or completion, or a diploma based on the passing of a series of tests other than the GED is not acceptable. Under certain conditions, a student may begin classes on a conditional basis with a less formal proof of graduation, and have a defined period of time to produce the documentation noted above. Students who are not granted final acceptance within 30 days of matriculation will have their enrollment cancelled. In the case of a fully-documented extenuating circumstance, the Senior Director of Admissions or the Dean of Academic Affairs may approve an extension to the 30-day limit; however, that will not extend beyond the student's first quarter of study. Students requiring F-1 non-immigrant status do not qualify for conditional admission. High school seniors who apply prior to graduation and who meet all other admission requirements will be accepted conditionally pending submission of a final official transcript following graduation. Each individual who seeks admission to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is interviewed, either in person or by telephone, by an Assistant Director of Admissions. The purpose of this interview is to: · Explore the prospective student's background and interests as they relate to the program offerings at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. · Assist prospective students in identifying the appropriate area of study consistent with their background and interests. · Provide information concerning curricular offerings and support services available at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Additionally, all applicants to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham must submit the following: · · · · · A signed application or online application submission $50 application fee 150-word written essay Signed enrollment agreement $100 enrollment fee (due within 10 days of application)

Students found to need assistance in English and math may be required to enroll in appropriate Developmental Studies courses offered at The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham. Although not applicable to any degree, each course is equivalent to (4) four-quarter credits, and credits are charged at the current per-credit charge. Students enrolled in Developmental Studies may be required to take from (4) four to (8) eight credits as part of their normal program of study requirements. Developmental Studies course credits do not count toward the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA); however, they do count in determining the maximum time frame and the Increment Completion Rate (ICR). Developmental Studies courses may be attempted no more than (3) three times and require a grade of C or better to pass the course. Developmental Studies are in addition to the required curriculum; thus, enrollment in these courses may affect the student's graduation date.

Appeal Process

All applicants have the right to appeal an academic denial. A written appeal may be submitted to the Admissions Appeal Committee through the Dean of Academic Affairs at 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701. The Admissions Appeal Committee is comprised of the Admissions Committee Chairperson, Admissions Committee CoChairperson and the Dean of Academic Affairs. All appeals are to be reviewed by at least two members of the committee and two must be in agreement for a decision to be reached. The written appeal must provide documentation to support the appeal. Examples of documentation might include: · · · · Additional standardized test scores Certificates of merit Diplomas from workshops or special academic programs Proof of work experience in the desired field of study

Applicants must submit all written appeals and supporting documentation and must have taken the placement tests within 15 days of being notified of the Admissions Committee's original decision. Upon receipt of the appeal, the Admissions Appeal Committee may overturn or uphold the decision of the Admissions Committee. The committee's options are one of the following: · Acceptance in the BA Program at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · Acceptance in the AAS Program at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · Deny There is no opportunity for a second appeal to the Admissions Appeal Committee. An appeal of their decision should be directed to the President.

A financial plan must be completed and signed by the student and by a parent or guardian if the applicant is a minor. The application and essay must be submitted to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The student and parent or guardian must sign an enrollment agreement if the applicant is a minor. Prospective students are encouraged to visit The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham, although a visit is not a condition for submitting the application for acceptance. Arrangements for an interview and tour of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may be made by calling 1-888-245-9593 or by sending a letter addressed to the Senior Director of Admissions, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE Proficiency Policy

All applicants to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham whose first language is not English must demonstrate competence in the English language. Demonstration that English is an applicant's "first" language can be satisfied if the applicant submits a diploma from secondary school (or above) in a system in which English is the official language of instruction. If English is not the applicant's "first" language, the applicant will need to meet the minimum English Language Proficiency standard through submission of an official minimum score on the written Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or its TOEFL internet (iBT) equivalent. A minimum score of 480 on the written TOEFL or 55 on the TOEFL internet (iBT) is required for diploma programs. A minimum of 500 on the written TOEFL or 61 on the TOEFL internet (iBT) is required for all bachelor's and associate's degree level programs. Applicants should contact the Admissions Office to determine other examinations for which official scores, equivalent to TOEFL, are acceptable as an alternative to TOEFL.

Admissions Requirements

A prospective student seeking admission to a degree program at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham must be a high school graduate with a minimum high school cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 or hold a General Education Development Certificate (GED) with a minimum numeric score equivalent to a 2.0 GPA. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham reserves the right to request any additional information necessary to evaluate an applicant's potential for academic success. The Dean of Academic Affairs of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham must approve all exceptions. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham utilizes a placement test to assess students' preparedness to take college-level English and math. Minimum scores on the SAT (500 ­ Verbal, 500 ­ Math or ACT score of 19) may be used in lieu of the placement test. Additionally, students with an earned bachelor's degree and/or transfer credits for 100-level college English and math are exempt from the placement test. Placement testing is available daily and can be scheduled through the Admissions department.

International Admissions Policy

All international (non-immigrant) applicants to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham must meet the same admissions standards as all other students (See section under Admissions Requirements).

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Admissions Requirements for International (Non-Immigrant) Students

Applicants seeking to enroll in valid student non-immigrant status must submit each of the following items: · A completed and signed Application for Admission Form including required essay. · A completed and signed Enrollment Agreement. · Original or official copies of all educational transcripts (secondary school and, if applicable, university level academic records) and diplomas. These educational transcripts and diplomas must be prepared in English or include a complete and official English translation. Please note that official credential evaluations must be prepared and submitted by a member organization of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES); see www.naces.org. · Student is responsible for any fees for official credential evaluation of non-American educational credentials. · Proof of English language proficiency. · A completed and signed Sponsor's Statement of Financial Support; (This statement is not required if the student is self-sponsored). · Official Financial Statements. Financial statements (typically provided by a bank) must verify sufficient funds to cover the cost of the educational program as well as all living expenses. · A U.S. $50.00 nonrefundable application fee and a U.S. $100.00 refundable tuition deposit. · A photocopy of the student's passport to provide proof of birth date and citizenship (Students outside the United States who have not yet acquired a passport will need to submit a copy of their birth certificate). · For all non-immigrant applicants residing in the United States at the time of application: a photocopy of the visa page contained within the student's passport as well as a photocopy of the student's I/94 arrival departure record (both sides). · For all non-immigrant applicants residing in the United States at the time of application in either F, M, or J non-immigrant classification: written confirmation of non-immigrant status at previous school attended before transferring to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. · Proof of Health Insurance. Students who do not possess health insurance upon applying to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham must be prepared to purchase health insurance through an approved Art Institutes provider upon commencement of studies. If an applicant seeking to enroll in valid student non-immigrant status is transferring from a college or university in the United States, the International Student Transfer Clearance Form is also required. If the applicant is accepted, he/she will be sent additional information regarding the student visa application process.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS Transfer of Credits Policy from another Institution to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

In all cases, new students are responsible for informing their Assistant Director of Admissions (ADA) and the Admissions Coordinator during the application and enrollment process of any educational experiences they may have had which they feel could lead to advanced-standing credit at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Any documentation supporting the award of advanced-standing credit, including but not limited to copies of examination score reports, official copies of final college transcripts from other post-secondary institutions, or portfolios of outside work and any required supporting documentation, must be submitted to the Admissions Coordinator, via the Assistant Director of Admissions, well in advance of registration for a student's first quarter at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. No advanced-standing credit will be awarded later than the end of the fourth week of a student's first quarter. The Dean of Academic Affairs will award transfer credit based on an evaluation of the submitted transcripts. The Dean reserves the right to request additional information such as course descriptions and/ or an academic catalog prior to rendering the evaluation. If such additional documentation is requested, it must be submitted prior to the week-four deadline. The Dean of Academic Affairs reserves the right to extend the deadline due to extenuating circumstances. An official transcript is defined as: · Transcripts that are sent directly to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham and bear an official seal of the sending institution. · Transcripts that are delivered by the student to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham in an envelope sealed by the sending institution and that bear an official seal of the sending institution. · Faxed Transcript Policy: Transcripts faxed directly from the issuing school with a cover sheet also are considered official. Faxed transcripts must have a cover sheet along with all of the following criteria: 1. High School/GED identification 2. Name of official sending fax 3. Name of student 4. Telephone # 5. Indication that transcript is official The faxed transcript must include the signature of the school official. The faxed transcript also must include the back sheet indicating grade point values, grade scales, and information regarding accreditation, and other definitions or policies of the college/ university. Fax phone number and school name indicator must be on top of each page. Only college-level (100-level courses or their equivalent) taken at an accredited institution of higher education will be considered for transfer. No remedial or ESL courses (90 level or their equivalent) will be considered. Only courses with grades of "C" or better will be considered for transfer. Courses must be taken for a grade to be considered for transfer of credit. "Pass" and "Satisfactory" grades will only be considered if accompanied by a statement from the college or university that the "P" or "S" is equivalent to a "C" or better grade. In the case of RS099 - Student Success Seminar, a "P" or "S" grade will be accepted for transfer if the course content proves equivalent. The scope of the course work must be comparable to the equivalent course taught at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The number of credit hours must be equivalent to those awarded by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Transfer course credit is not calculated in maximum time frame or incremental completion-rate requirements. But transfer credits do reduce the total number of credits that must be attempted within the program. Therefore, the maximum time frame required for program completion for a student with transfer credit is one and one-half times the normal time frame allowed to complete the remaining credits. Grades for credits transferred from another school in The Art Institutes system or from non-Art Institutes system schools do not affect a student's cumulative grade point average (CGPA).

Disability Services Policy

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham provides accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. The Student Affairs office assists qualified students with disabilities in acquiring reasonable and appropriate accommodations and in supporting their success at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is committed to providing qualified students with a disability an equal opportunity to access the benefits, rights and privileges of college services, programs and activities in compliance with The American with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Students who believe they are in need of accommodations should contact the Disability Services office. If you have a concern or complaint in this regard, please contact the Student Affairs Office, telephone number 888-245-9593. Complaints will be handled in accordance with the school's Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment.

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No more than 50 percent of the credits required to graduate may be transferred from an institution outside The Art Institutes system of schools. Students may earn up to 75 percent of the required amount of credit toward their degree at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham as the result of coursework completed at another school of The Art Institutes or in combination with credit received as the result of a transfer agreement The Art Institutes may have with that postsecondary institution, as well as any testing or prior work experience credit. If students currently enrolled at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham change programs, their transcripts will be reevaluated for additional transfer credits by the end of drop/add of the immediate upcoming quarter. Grades earned prior to changing majors (grades earned in another major) before graduation will be computed in the CGPA. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham assumes no responsibility for classes remaining on students' schedules after the drop/add period where transfer or proficiency credits have subsequently been awarded or where exemption has been granted. Students will be charged for any courses remaining on their schedule after that period, even though advanced-standing credits may be awarded after the drop/add period has concluded. In addition, the awarding of advanced-standing credits does not guarantee students early completion of their programs due to possible prerequisite and scheduling restrictions.

Transfers from another Art Institutes System School

Students transferring from another Art Institutes system school must be accepted by the Admissions Committee prior to being placed into class. The Admissions Committee will automatically accept students who are in good academic and financial standing transferring from another Art Institutes system school. Students transferring from another Art Institutes system school who are not in good academic standing (termination, probation, or disciplinary status) from the originating Art Institutes school must be approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham in order to be accepted for admission.

Advanced Standing

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham recognizes that some students, based on their professional experience, may have exceeded certain course requirements. This experience and acquired knowledge may be used to receive advance credit or to participate in the credit-by-examination process. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will determine credit for advanced standing under the following guidelines: · Portfolios and other life/work experience must be documented and presented to the Admissions department prior to the end of drop/add week of a student's first quarter. · The Dean of Academic Affairs, in consultation with faculty, will review this documentation to determine proficiency and specific course substitution. · No more than 25% of the credit required to graduate may be awarded through advanced standing.

Transfer of Credits for In-School Students

Students who concurrently enroll in courses at another institution after they begin their program at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will not be allowed to transfer or apply those credits to their degree program unless approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Transfer of Credits Earned at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham to Other Schools

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is licensed by The Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina to confer to Associate of Applied Science and Bachelor of Art degrees. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools to award associate's and bachelor's degrees. The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools is listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States Department of Education and is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. ACICS can be contacted at 750 First Street NE, Suite 980, Washington, D.C. 20002. Telephone: 1.202.336.6780. However, the fact that a school is licensed and accredited is not necessarily an indication that another school will accept credits earned at that school. In the United States higher education systems, transferability of credit is determined by the receiving institution taking into account such factors as course content, grades, accreditation, and licensing. The goal of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is to prepare students for entry-level employment in your chosen field of study. The value of degree programs, like those offered by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, is their deliberate focus on marketable skills. The credits earned are not intended as a stepping-stone for transfer to another institution. For this reason, it is unlikely the academic credits you earn at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will transfer to another school. Programs offered by one school within The Art Institutes system may be similar but not identical to programs offered at another school within the system. This is due to differences imposed by state law, use of different instructional models, and local employer needs. Therefore, if you decide to transfer to another school within The Art Institutes system, not all credits you earn at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may be transferable into that school's program. If you are considering transferring to either another Art Institutes system school or an unaffiliated school, it is your responsibility to determine whether that school will accept credits from The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. We encourage you to make this determination as early as possible. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham does not imply, promise, or guarantee transferability of its credits to any other institution.

READMISSIONS PROCEDURE

Any student who has withdrawn from The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham for any time period must formally reapply for admission. To begin the process, the student must meet with the Assistant Director of Readmissions. The Assistant Director of Readmissions will ensure that the student's records are reviewed and the following school personnel will indicate approval: the Dean of Academic Affairs or Registrar will review for academic progress; Student Accounting will review for outstanding balances, and, if applicable, Financial Aid and Housing. If approval is obtained, the Assistant Director of Readmissions may proceed in the facilitation of the reentering process. Students who interrupt their education and return to school will be subject to any changes in fees, curricula, and graduation requirements that took effect during their leave.

PLACEMENT TESTING

All students applying for admission to a degree program at The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham must take the placement test. Exceptions will be made for the following: · · · · A minimum SAT score of 500 ­ Verbal, 500 ­ Math A minimum ACT score of 19 on applicable sections An earned bachelor's degree Transfer credits for 100-level college English and Math

Placement testing is available daily and can be scheduled through the Admissions department.

GRADUATION/COMPLETION RATES

Information on graduation/completion rates for first-time, full-time students is available through the Admissions Office. These rates are calculated according to the guidelines of the Student-Right-to-Know-Act.

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 11

CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 188 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name CUL 102 CUL 103 CUL 104 CUL 105 CUL 111 CUL 113 CUL 114 CUL 122 CUL 131 CUL 132 CUL 203 CUL 204 CUL 205 CUL 213 CUL 223 CUL 224 CUL 225 CUL 226 CUL 227 CUL 231 CUL 232 CUL 331 CUL 332 CUL 335 CUL 336 CUL 340 CUL 342 CUL 350 CUL 395 CUL 429 CUL 430 CUL 432 CUL 434 CUL 449 CUL 454 Sanitation & Safety Computer Literacy for Culinary Dimensions of Culinary Education Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques American Regional Cuisine Career Preparation Supervision Management by Menu Introduction to Baking Introduction to Pastries and Plated Desserts Garde Manger Purchasing & Product Identification Food and Beverage Cost Controls Food and Beverage Operations Management Essentials of Food & Wine Pairing A La Carte Kitchen Cuisines of Europe & the Mediterranean Cuisines of Asia Classical Cuisines Contemporary Cuisine Capstone Leadership & Organizational Management Applied Technology in the Foodservice Industry Quality Customer Service Management Advanced Beverage Management, Oenology & Viticulture Human Resource Management & Labor Relations Marketing Applications in the Foodservice Industry Legal Issues in Foodservice Property & Facilities Management History & Culture of Food Senior Culinary Practicum Global Management Managerial Accounting & Financial Management Management Externship Ethnic Cuisine

Credit Hrs . 3 1 2 9 9 2 2 3 3 6 6 2 3 2 2 9 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 8 3 3 3 4

Course Name General Education SOC 101 Sociology ECON 201 Economics COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II ENG 301 English III HIS 101 World Civilizations I HIS 102 World Civilizations II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy MAT 102 Statistics PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society SCI 102 Science, Technology & Society SCI 103 Nutrition Related Studies IN 401 Internship RS 099 Student Success Seminar Total Credit Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts Degree:

Credit Hrs . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 188

CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT

BACHELOR OF ARTS // 12 Quarters

The mission of the Bachelor of Arts Degree program in Culinary Arts Management is to provide a marketdriven, competency-based education that integrates academics and hands-on learning and instruction. The practical culinary skills and management courses in this program will offer a foundation for the graduate to enter in the Culinary Arts field as well as prepare them to seek entry-level management positions in the foodservice industry. Graduates will be prepared to seek entry-level positions such as Restaurant or Kitchen Manager.

The general objectives for the program are:

· To demonstrate the ability to professionally prepare standardized recipes using a variety of cooking techniques as well as the appropriate equipment and cooking skills. Plan, prepare, produce, and professionally present dishes while consistently maintaining a safe and sanitary work environment as defined by HACCP standards. · To describe and perform tasks related to common business practices within the culinary industry including planning, cost control, food purchasing, inventory, and menu design. · To develop a business plan that is flexible and appropriate for the business and the market, which includes appropriate integration of the key financial statements and how the financial statements interrelate. · To define and articulate the professional values of the culinary profession including the standards for presenting themselves to employers in a professional manner, personal commitments to respect coworkers, employers and equipment; well-defined career goals, and the value of life-long professional development. · To demonstrate professional leadership skills, including the ability to define professional ethics, supervision skills, and a plan for professional within the culinary field.

12 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

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CULINARY ARTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR CULINARY ARTS ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 112 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name CUL 102 CUL 103 CUL 104 CUL 105 CUL 111 CUL 113 CUL 114 CUL 122 CUL 131 CUL 132 CUL 203 CUL 204 CUL 205 CUL 213 CUL 222 CUL 223 CUL 224 CUL 225 CUL 226 CUL 227 CUL 231 CUL 232 Sanitation & Safety Computer Literacy for Culinary Dimensions of Culinary Education Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques American Regional Cuisine Career Preparation Supervision Management by Menu Introduction to Baking Introduction to Pastries & Plated Desserts Garde Manger Purchasing & Product Identification Food & Beverage Cost Controls Food & Beverage Operations Management Nutrition Essentials of Food & Wine Pairing A La Carte Kitchen Cuisines of Europe & the Mediterranean Cuisines of Asia Classical Cuisines Contemporary Cuisine Capstone

Credit Hrs . 3 1 2 9 9 2 2 3 3 6 6 2 3 2 3 2 9 3 3 3 6 3

Course Name General Education COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society Related Studies IN 201A Internship RS 099 Student Success Seminar Total Credit Hours Required for Associate of Applied Science Degree:

Credit Hrs .

CULINARY ARTS

4 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 112

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE // 7 Quarters

The seven-quarter Culinary Arts program is designed to prepare graduates for a variety of careers in the foodservice industry. This preparation is accomplished through practical experiences in industry-current kitchens, including simulated situations and real-world production applications in both the dining lab and internship environments. The program presents a broad introduction to the many aspects of the foodservice industry using a learner-centered approach to culinary education. Food production skills are complemented by courses detailing the business of culinary arts along with general studies to enable graduates to become well rounded. Graduates of this program are prepared to pursue entry-level positions in the field including Prep Cook, Line Cook, Pastry Cook, Assistant Kitchen Manager, and Assistant Food & Beverage Manager.

The general objectives for the program are:

· To demonstrate the ethical and professional values of the culinary profession (including demonstrating the ability to conform to professional standards of conduct related to timeliness, appearance, behavior in a kitchen, especially in relating to diverse populations among coworkers and customers) through successful preparation of a resumé and cover letter and the completion of team oriented tasks. · To describe and perform tasks related to common business practices within the culinary industry including planning, cost control, food purchasing, and inventory and menu design, as well as develop a business plan that is appropriate for the business and the market. · To describe the principles of food and beverage management as well as the functions essential to the operation of the dining room in a restaurant. · To define and articulate the professional values of the culinary profession including the standards for presenting themselves to employers in a professional manner, personal commitments to respect coworkers, employers and equipment; welldefined career goals, and the value of life-long professional development.

· To demonstrate knife skills, use of mise en place, appropriate use and care of equipment, selection of appropriate cooking techniques, and other recipe preparation skills (measuring and product identification) to successfully follow directions orally and from recipes. Plan, prepare, produce, and professionally present dishes while consistently maintaining a safe and sanitary work environment as defined by HACCP standards.

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FASHION MARKETING & MANAGEMENT

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR FASHION MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 188 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name FM 103 FM 111 FM 114 FM 121 FM 122 FM 123 FM 200 FM 202 FM 203 FM 204 FM 211 FM 212 FM 213 FM 222 FM 223 FM 232 FM 233 FM 307 FM 309 FM 311 FM 312 FM 318 FM 319 FM 328 FM 338 FM 410 FM 411 FM 420 FM 421 FM 432 FM 442 GD 101 GD 102 GD 113 GD 121 GD 125 GD 223 IMD 122 Fashion Product Knowledge History of Art & Fashion Fashion Presentation Fashion Industry Survey Forecasting Trends Fashion Coordination Fashion Sketching Visual Merchandising I Merchandise Marketing Retail Management Visual Merchandising II Buying I Textiles Buying II Entrepreneurship Event Promotion Garment Production Survey of Fashion Designers Principles of Advertising Consumer Behavior Business Law Business of Retailing Cosmetic Marketing Fashion Styling Apparel Evaluation Direct Marketing Portfolio Special Topics in Fashion Marketing Fashion Journalism Professional Selling Fashion Marketing Thesis Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Color Theory Image Manipulation Art & Design Concepts Photography Techniques Introduction to Authoring

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Name General Education SOC 101 Sociology ECON 201 Economics COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II ENG 301 English III HIS 101 World Civilizations I HIS 102 World Civilizations II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy MAT 102 Statistics PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society SCI 102 Science, Technology & Society SCI 103 Nutrition Related Studies IN 401 Internship RS 099 Student Success RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development RS 204 Principles of Marketing RS 308 Business Accounting Total Credit Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts Degree:

Credit Hrs . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

FASHION MARKETING & MANAGEMENT

BACHELOR OF ARTS // 12 Quarters

This program provides a market-driven curriculum for a professional career in fashion. Students have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive knowledge of the apparel industry and fashion cycles. Standard business practices are combined with creativity to help prepare students for a variety of entrylevel management positions. Emphasis is placed on the applied approach of providing practical experiences through team and individual projects while maintaining contact with current industry standards and instilling ethical and professional standards of behavior within the fashion industry. Graduates are prepared to seek entry-level management positions in the fashion industry such as buyer, product development manager, marketing manager, or coordinator.

The general objectives for the program are:

· To educate students in the aesthetic and commercial aspects of merchandising through a knowledge of the past, a perspective on the present, and a projection of the future. · To enable students to establish and internalize a code of ethics and professional conduct. · To ensure that students are instructed in and understand the techniques for translating theoretical merchandising and business practices into practical and realistic solutions. · To interpret and understand the concepts of industry reports, including mathematical concepts (i.e. planograms and buying reports). · To apply the fundamentals of the global supply chain process to the fashion industry.

3 0 3 4 3 3 188

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

16 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 17

FASHION MARKETING

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR FASHION MARKETING ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 112 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name FM 103 FM 111 FM 114 FM 121 FM 122 FM 123 FM 202 FM 203 FM 204 FM 211 FM 212 FM 213 FM 222 FM 223 FM 232 FM 233 FM 235 GD 101 GD 102 GD 113 GD 121 GD 125 IMD 122 Fashion Product Knowledge History of Art & Fashion Fashion Presentation Fashion Industry Survey Forecasting Trends Fashion Coordination Visual Merchandising I Merchandise Marketing Retail Management Visual Merchandising II Buying I Textiles Buying II Entrepreneurship Event Promotion Garment Production Portfolio Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Color Theory Image Manipulation Art & Design Concepts Introduction to Authoring

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Name General Education COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society Related Studies IN 201 Internship IN 201B Internship IN 201C Internship IN 201D Internship RS 099 Student Success Seminar RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development Total Credit Hours Required for Associate of Applied Science Degree:

Credit Hrs .

FASHION MARKETING

4 4 4 4 4 4

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE // 7 Quarters

This program offers a market-driven curriculum with a solid foundation in design, industry knowledge, and technology. Students have the opportunity to participate in both conceptual and applied coursework as well as in technology applications for the industry. Through extended internship opportunities, students will be guided in translating classroom experiences into practice in the work environment. Graduates are prepared to pursue entry-level positions in the fashion industry such as retail management, manufacturer's sales representative, stylist, visual merchandiser, and assistant buyer.

The general objectives for the program are:

· To educate students in the aesthetic and commercial aspects of merchandising through a knowledge of the past, a perspective on the present, and a projection of the future. · To enable students to establish and internalize a code of ethics and professional conduct. · To ensure that students are instructed in and understand the techniques for translating theoretical merchandising and business practices into practical and realistic solutions.

3 3 3 3 0 3 4 112

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 19

GRAPHIC DESIGN

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAPHIC DESIGN BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 188 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name GD 101 GD 102 GD 111 GD 112 GD 113 GD 121 GD 122 GD 123 GD 125 GD 204 GD 205 GD 206 GD 207 GD 208 GD 211 GD 212 GD 214 GD 216 GD 217 GD 219 GD 220 GD 223 GD 226 GD 228 GD 229 GD 233 GD 235 GD 239 GD 303 GD 312 GD 313 GD 336 GD 415 GD 419 GD 429 GD 430 IMD 122 IMD 225 Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Life Drawing Typography Color Theory Image Manipulation Illustration Design Layout Art & Design Concepts 3-Dimensional Design Design History Electronic Design Digital Illustration Digital Grid Systems Media/Marketing Design Electronic Pre-Press Advanced Typography Law & The Graphic Arts Corporate Identity Expressive & Experimental Typography Advanced Image Manipulation Photography Techniques Art Direction Graphic Symbolism Print Production Package Design Portfolio Conceptual Illustration Collateral Design Self Promotion & Marketing Advanced Marketing Strategies Graphic Design Studio Senior Project Digital Portfolio Portfolio II Graphic Design Capstone Introduction to Authoring Digital Animation

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Name General Education SOC 101 Sociology ECON 201 Economics COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II ENG 301 English III HIS 101 World Civilizations I HIS 102 World Civilizations II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy MAT 102 Statistics PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society SCI 102 Science, Technology & Society SCI 103 Nutrition Related Studies ART 101 Survey of Art History I ART 102 Survey of Art History II IN 401 Internship RS 099 Student Success Seminar RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development Total Credit Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts Degree:

Credit Hrs .

GRAPHIC DESIGN

BACHELOR OF ARTS // 12 Quarters

The mission of the Graphic Design Bachelor of Arts program is to help students develop creative conceptual thinking and group awareness and to produce advanced applications of design solutions. Experienced professionals support the educational pursuits of students by offering them training in problem-solving, group dynamics, and industry-relevant technology. Graduates of this program are prepared to demonstrate with confidence the skills necessary to compete, manage, and lead in a variety of creative environments involving print and digital media. The Bachelor of Arts program is designed to prepare these graduates to pursue entry-level employment opportunities as production artists, graphic designers, assistant designers, assistant art directors, production coordinators, and computer artists.

The general objectives for the program are:

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

· To utilize conceptual and visual skills in service of commerce to elicit a specific action. · To develop a message that is clear, credible, and focused. · To gain broad understanding and working knowledge of the design process. · To accomplish the technical implementation of design for multiple media. · To study and develop professional practices to solve real-world problems.

4 4 3 0 3 4 188

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

20 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 21

GRAPHIC DESIGN

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAPHIC DESIGN ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE 112 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name GD 101 GD 102 GD 103 GD 111 GD 112 GD 113 GD 121 GD 122 GD 123 GD 125 GD 204 GD 205 GD 206 GD 207 GD 211 GD 212 GD 214 GD 216 GD 217 GD 223 GD 225 GD 226 GD 234 GD 235 IMD 122 IMD 225 Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Survey of Media & Design Life Drawing Typography Color Theory Image Manipulation Illustration Design Layout Art & Design Concepts 3-Dimensional Design Design History Electronic Design Digital Illustration Media/Marketing Design Electronic Pre-Press Advanced Typography Law & The Graphic Arts Corporate Identity Photography Techniques Portfolio Preparation Art Direction Special Topics Portfolio Introduction to Authoring Digital Animation

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Name General Education ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II PSY 101 Psychology MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy COM 101 Effective Speaking SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society Related Studies IN 201A Internship (or Approved Elective) RS 099 Student Success Seminar RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development Total Credit Hours Required for Associate of Applied Science Degree:

Credit Hrs .

GRAPHIC DESIGN

4 4 4 4 4 4

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE // 7 Quarters

The Associate of Applied Science program in Graphic Design offers a broad foundation in advertising, design, graphic design, and illustration, and teaches the production skills needed to pursue entry-level careers in graphic design. The program offers a foundation of knowledge and skills together with training in practical subjects. Students have the opportunity to engage in both conceptual and applied course work as well as in hands-on technology applications. The student's creative and professional development is guided and enhanced by faculty members who provide skills and a basis for life-long learning. Graduates are prepared to pursue entry-level employment in the graphic design profession in positions such as junior graphic designer, production coordinator, graphic support coordinator, graphic artist, and digital designer.

The general objectives for the program are:

3 0 3 4 112

· To study foundation classes in color, design, drawing, and computer skills. and computer skills. · To focus on color and page design, visual expression, and print and interactive production. · To create a portfolio to show prospective employers.

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

22 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 23

INTERIOR DESIGN

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERIOR DESIGN BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 188 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name GD 101 GD 102 GD 121 GD 223 ID 105 ID 115 ID 117 ID 118 ID 125 ID 127 ID 129 ID 130 ID 209 ID 212 ID 213 ID 214 ID 216 ID 219 ID 221 ID 225 ID 234 ID 236 ID 246 ID 247 ID 256 ID 304 ID 305 ID 319 ID 322 ID 323 ID 324 ID 328 ID 401 ID 410 ID 411 ID 412 ID 420 ID 430 Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Image Manipulation Photography Techniques Basic Drafting Perspective for Interior Design Textiles for Interior Design Residential Working Drawings Rendering Product Knowledge History of Interiors I 3D Design History of Interiors II Lighting Space Planning Universal Design Architectural Detailing Computer Aided Drafting & Design Residential Design Commercial Design International Residential Codes Portfolio Development Commercial Working Drawings Professional Practices Codes & Standards Project Documentation Modern Art & Architecture Retail Design Healthcare Design Historic Preservation Hospitality Design Accessory Design Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting & Design Graduation Project Research Graduation Project Design Graduation Project Presentation Adaptive Reuse Advanced Textiles for Interior Design

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Name General Education SOC 101 Sociology ECON 201 Economics COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II ENG 301 English III HIS 101 World Civilizations I HIS 102 World Civilizations II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy MAT 102 Statistics PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society SCI 102 Science, Technology & Society SCI 103 Nutrition Related Studies ART 101 Survey of Art History I ART 102 Survey of Art History II IN 401 Internship RS 099 Student Success Seminar RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development Total Credit Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts Degree:

Credit Hrs . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

INTERIOR DESIGN

BACHELOR OF ARTS // 12 Quarters

The Bachelor of Arts program in Interior Design offers an applied competencybased education focused on sound interior design principles. Students will have the opportunity to develop strong observation and listening skills in addition to technical competencies that will enable them to meet professional standards. Graduates are prepared to pursue entry-level positions in residential and commercial interior design such as space planners, manufacturer representatives, and interior designers for historic preservation, adaptive reuse, hospitality, retail, and health care facilities.

The general objectives for the program are:

· To study foundations of drawing, color, and design, as well as the design process. · To study how interior design affects human behavior. · To develop and carry out a design concept from space planning to selection of materials, finishes, color, and furnishings. · To explore the various methods of visual communication necessary to communicate design ideas in manual and computer-aided drafting and rendering courses. · To focus on the relationship of interior spaces to architecture.

4 4 3 0 3 4 188

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

24 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 25

WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 188 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name GD 101 GD 102 GD 112 GD 113 GD 121 GD 123 GD 125 GD 207 GD 216 GD 217 IMD 116 IMD 122 IMD 123 IMD 124 IMD 125 IMD 201 IMD 203 IMD 206 IMD 208 IMD 212 IMD 215 IMD 216 IMD 217 IMD 223 IMD 225 IMD 226 IMD 230 IMD 232 IMD 236 IMD 301 IMD 302 IMD 303 IMD 305 IMD 336 IMD 402 IMD 410 IMD 415 IMD 420 IMD 424 IMD 425 Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Typography Color Theory Image Manipulation Design Layout Art & Design Concepts Digital Illustration Law and the Graphic Arts Corporate Identity Introduction to Audio & Video Introduction to Authoring History of Motion Media & Mass Communication Advanced Image Manipulation Digital Visual Composition Digital Typography Intermediate Authoring Introduction to Scripting Languages Introduction to User Centered Design Intermediate Scripting Languages Usability Testing Designing for Dynamic Web Sites Interactive Motion Scripting Designing for Server Side Technology Digital Animation Project Management Audio for Interactive Design Desktop Video Motion Graphics Advanced Scripting Languages E-Learning Design Advanced Authoring Special Topics Motion Graphics II E-Learning Applications Senior Project Research Portfolio Preparation Senior Project Application & Defense Senior Seminar Portfolio

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3

Course Name General Education SOC 101 Sociology ECON 201 Economics COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II ENG 301 English III HIS 101 World Civilizations I HIS 102 World Civilizations II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy MAT 102 Statistics PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society SCI 102 Science, Technology & Society SCI 103 Nutrition Related Studies IN 401 Internship RS 099 Student Success Seminar RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development RS 204 Principles of Marketing Total Credit Hours Required for Bachelor of Arts Degree:

Credit Hrs . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA

BACHELOR OF ARTS // 12 Quarters

Working in classrooms and computer labs, students in the Bachelor of Arts degree program in Web Design & Interactive Media have the opportunity to develop a strong foundation in drawing and design, digital image manipulation, multimedia system design, scriptwriting, sound, video, and animation. As they progress, they become involved in more complex coursework using software applications to integrate text, sound, images, animation, and video to complete a project. Graduates of the Bachelor of Arts degree program should be able to identify the requirements of effective interactive design, solve problems in 2D and 3D design, apply interface design principles, identify how businesses use multimedia design, ascertain audio requirements for field and studio production, capture and compress video, develop and maintain a web site, write HTML code, and discriminate between effective and ineffective animation sequences. With a Bachelor of Arts degree, graduates will be prepared to pursue entrylevel positions such as multimedia producer and website designer.

The general objectives for the program are:

· To explore art foundation skills in drawing and design theory. · To progress through more advanced aspects of graphic design, interface design, media production, information architecture, working as a team, and Web technologies. · To grasp a basic understanding of technology skills such as; digital production, design layout, advanced web design techniques, and front-end and/or back-end development skills. · To utilize common marketing and business strategies. · To create a digital portfolio to show prospective employers.

3 0 3 4 3 188

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

26 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 27

WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE

112 credit hours - comprised of all required courses, cumulative 2.0 grade point average, participation in graduate Portfolio Review

Course Name GD 101 GD 102 GD 112 GD 113 GD 121 GD 123 GD 216 IMD 116 IMD 122 IMD 123 IMD 124 IMD 125 IMD 203 IMD 206 IMD 208 IMD 212 IMD 215 IMD 216 IMD 217 IMD 223 IMD 225 IMD 226 IMD 232 IMD 235 IMD 236 IMD 255 Drawing & Perspective Fundamentals of Design Typography Color Theory Image Manipulation Design Layout Law & The Graphic Arts Introduction to Audio & Video Introduction to Authoring History of Motion Media & Mass Communication Advanced Image Manipulation Digital Visual Composition Intermediate Authoring Introduction to Scripting Languages Introduction to User Centered Design Intermediate Scripting Languages Usability Testing Designing for Dynamic Web Sites Interactive Motion Scripting Designing for Server Side Technology Digital Animation Project Management Desktop Video Portfolio Preparation Motion Graphics Portfolio

Credit Hrs . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Course Name General Education COM 101 Effective Speaking ENG 101 English I ENG 102 English II MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy PSY 101 Psychology SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society Related Studies IN 201A Internship (or Approved Elective) RS 099 Student Success Seminar RS 100* Computer Applications RS 202* Career Development Total Credit Hours Required for Associate of Applied Science Degree:

Credit Hrs .

WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA

4 4 4 4 4 4

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE // 7 Quarters

Working both in classrooms and computer labs, Web Design & Interactive Media students in the Associate of Applied Science degree program have the opportunity to develop a foundation in drawing and design, digital image manipulation, multimedia system design, scriptwriting, sound, video, and animation. Later, students become involved in more complex coursework in software applications to integrate text, sound, images, animation, and video to complete a project. Students who complete the Associate of Applied Science program are prepared to pursue entry-level positions in the fascinating interactive media field such as programmer, interface website designer, or graphic artist.

The general objectives for the program are:

3 0 3 4 112

· To explore art foundation skills in drawing and design theory. · To progress through more advanced aspects of graphic design, interface design, media production, information architecture, working as a team, and Web technologies. · To create a digital portfolio to show prospective employers.

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 29

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course Code/ Numbering System:

Course code prefix denotes the department that offers the course. Generally, the first digit in the course number denotes the academic year in which the course is intended to be taken within the specific program; the second and third digits denote the order of courses within a particular quarter. (Exception: General Education courses are non-sequential and may be taken during any academic year.) The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham uses prefixes to represent subject areas as follows: CUL IMD ENG ART FM IN SCI HIS GD RS COM ID MAT PSY SOC ECON = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Culinary Web Design & Interactive Media English Art Fashion Marketing/Fashion Marketing & Management Internship Science History Graphic Design Related Studies Communications Interior Design Mathematics Psychology Sociology Economics

CUL 103 Computer Literacy for Culinary

(22CH/11LE, 11LB) 1 quarter credit hour

CUL 113 Career Preparation

(22CH/22LE) 2 quarter credit hours

CUL 203 Garde Manger

(110CH/22LE, 88LB) 6 quarter credit hours

CUL 222 Nutrition

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 227 Classical Cuisines

(55CH/11LE, 44LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students examine basic computer applications used in the hospitality industry including basic computer hardware and software, word processing, and spreadsheet and menu applications.

(Prerequisites: None)

CUL 104 Dimensions of Culinary Education

(22CH/22LE) 2 quarter credit hours

Dimensions of Culinary Education profiles the hospitality industry and provides a sense of its scope. The primary issues of particular concern to students are addressed and include: education, career opportunities, and the experience required to pursue those opportunities, and the advantages and disadvantages of working in the hospitality industry. Students develop their communication skills, learn to present and assimilate information logically, make decisions, develop effective study habits, use available resources, improve interpersonal relationships, and increase their professional performance.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students develop techniques and strategies for marketing themselves in their chosen fields. Students assess their marketable skills, develop a network of contacts, generate interviews, write cover letters and resumés, prepare for employment interviews, and develop a professional appearance. Students receive instruction in developing self-confidence and flexibility. They explore methods of conducting a realistic job search and the effort required to conduct a successful search. Students will learn what to expect during the first 30 days in a culinary position and methods for retaining their positions.

(Prerequisites: None)

In this course, students learn the fundamental methods and theories related to cold food preparation. Hors d'oeuvres, display platters, charcuterie, salad preparations, cold sauces, quick-serve food items, and an introduction to ice-carving are addressed. Students develop Garde Manger skills and learn cold food display as they rotate through work assignments and prepare products. Production methods and safe food-handling techniques are emphasized.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety)

Through the study of nutrition, the student gains an understanding of the basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to health. Students examine the structure, functions, and sources of nutrients including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. Current issues in nutrition are reviewed including dietary guidelines, energy balance, vitamin supplements, and food fads.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students study and execute variations on classic preparations. The study of classical sauces is emphasized. Classical Haute Cuisine menus are studied, and students examine a comparison of classical versus modern preparations.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety)

CUL 231 Contemporary Cuisine

CUL 223 Essentials of Food & Wine Pairing

(22CH/22LE) 2 quarter credit hours

(110CH/33LE, 77LB) 6 quarter credit hours

CUL 204 Purchasing & Product Identification

(22CH/22LE) 2 quarter credit hours

CUL 114 Supervision

(22CH/22LE) 2 quarter credit hours

CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques

This course focuses on managing people from the foodservice manager's viewpoint. Emphasis is placed on techniques for increasing productivity, controlling labor costs, time management, and managing change. It also stresses effective communication and explains the responsibilities of the foodservice supervisor.

(Prerequisites: None)

In this course, students study a variety of food products in their raw form. They examine methods of identifying and purchasing products for production. Students study the size, season, packing, and general information on quality of a variety of produce, dry goods, dairy products, meats, fish, and poultry items. Students also study the purchasing cycle of a restaurant.

(Prerequisites: None)

In this course, students study the various wine-producing regions of the world and the types of wines produced in those regions. The basics of grape-growing and winemaking are introduced. Students learn proper methods of wine tasting and learn to identify the varied characteristics of wine. The basics of traditional and contemporary food and wine pairings are examined, while assisting the student in developing a basic knowledge of the correlation between food and wine.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course celebrates the culinary styles, restaurants, restaurateurs, and chefs currently in the industry spotlight. Their style, substance, and quality are discussed and examined. During the hands-on production aspect of the class, students have the opportunity to be exposed to specialty produce and products.

(Prerequisites: CUL 111 American Regional Cuisine, CUL 131 Introduction to Baking, CUL 132 Introduction to Pastries and Plated Desserts, CUL 203 Garde Manger)

CUL 232 Capstone

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

(165CH/33LE, 132LB) 9 quarter credit hours

(CH = Contact Hours/LE = Lecture-Oriented or Faculty Instructed Hours; LB = Faculty Supervised/ Instructed Lab Hours; IN = Internship Hours)

CULINARY ARTS

CUL 102 Sanitation & Safety

The fundamental concepts, skills, and techniques involved in basic cookery are covered in this course. Special emphasis is given to the study of ingredients, cooking theories, and the preparation of stocks, broth, glazes, soups, thickening agents, the grand sauces, and emulsion sauces. Lectures and demonstrations teach organizational skills in the kitchen, work coordination, and knife skills. The course also teaches the basics of vegetable cookery, starch cookery, and meat and poultry cookery. Emphasis is given to basic cooking techniques such as sautéing, roasting, poaching, braising, and frying. Students must pass a practical cooking examination that covers a variety of cooking techniques.

(Prerequisites: None)

CUL 122 Management by Menu

CUL 205 Food & Beverage Cost Controls

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 224 A La Carte Kitchen

(231CH/231LB) 9 quarter credit hours

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

This course prepares students for foodservice management positions through exploring and defining the important role of menu planning within operations. Topics covered include menu development, menu layout, pricing, evaluation, and facilities design and layout. Students are shown the critical role menus play in foodservice operations as a planning tool, source of operational information, and a merchandising method for reaching patrons.

(Prerequisites: None)

CUL 131 Introduction to Baking

(55CH/11LE, 44LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students are taught to appreciate the planning and control process in the restaurant service industry. This course introduces students to the tools required to maintain sales and cost histories and develop systems for monitoring current activities. It teaches techniques required to anticipate future issues. Students examine pricing support systems including food-cost breakdown, the fundamentals of purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and production, and the importance of budgeting and accurate profit and loss statements. Forms and suggestions for implementing effective cost-control procedures are given, and the menu's effect on planning and control are covered.

(Prerequisites: CUL 122 Management by Menu)

Students prepare modern and regional American and International cuisines in a public restaurant. Correct application of culinary skills, plate presentation, organization, and timing in producing items off a fixed-price menu and an a la carte menu are stressed. The principles of dining room service are emphasized, and the philosophy of food is further explored and examined in light of today's understanding of food, nutrition, and presentation.

(Prerequisites: CUL 131 Introduction to Baking, CUL 132 Introduction to Pastries and Plated Desserts, CUL 203 Garde Manger)

Through competencies developed with previous related-studies course work, students develop a complete business plan for a minimum 100-seat restaurant. The project includes: market analysis and marketing strategy, an operating budget, sales projections, opening inventories, capital equipment, standardized recipes, as well as costing of standardized recipes, menu, and facilities design. Students have the assistance of a chef/instructor to facilitate the completion of the capstone restaurant project. This course requires a grade of C or greater to meet graduation requirements.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

CUL 331 Leadership & Organizational Management

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

Sanitation & Safety introduces the student to food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. Attention is focused on food-borne illnesses and their origins and on basic safety procedures followed in the food service industry. This course is approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is recognized by 95 percent of state and local jurisdictions that require training and certification.

(Prerequisites: None)

CUL 111 American Regional Cuisine

(165CH/33LE, 132LB) 9 quarter credit hours

This course reinforces the knowledge and skills learned in the preceding classes and helps students build confidence in the techniques of basic cookery. The development of knife skills is accentuated. American Regional Cuisine explores the use of indigenous ingredients in the preparation of traditional and contemporary American specialties. The concepts of mise en place, time-lines, plate presentation, and team-work in a production setting are introduced and accentuated. Timing and organizational skills are emphasized.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety)

Students are introduced to the functions of ingredients such as yeasts, flours, and fats; mixing methods for doughs; fermentation techniques, proofing, and bread baking. Emphasis is placed on lean dough production and methods for enriching dough including laminating, rubbing, and cut-in. The student must pass a practical exam.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety)

CUL 225 Cuisines of Europe and the Mediterranean

(55CH/11LE, 44LB) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 213 Food & Beverage Operations Management

(22CH/22LE) 2 quarter credit hours

CUL 132 Introduction to Pastries & Plated Desserts

(110CH/22LE, 88LB) 6 quarter credit hours

Students prepare a variety of cakes and icings and learn to apply a variety of decorating styles and techniques. A variety of creams, custards, puddings, and sauces are studied and prepared. Selection and use of various chocolates used in baking and decorating are examined. Emphasis also is placed on dessert plating and presentation. The student must pass a practical exam.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety)

Topics covered include the psychology of service, professional standards of performance for dining room personnel, the fundamental skills required for serviceware handling, the service sequence, order taking, guest relations, and the liability and consumer dimensions of alcohol service. The specific management opportunities and challenges of managing a bar, lounge, or foodservice establishment serving alcoholic beverages are highlighted. Significant product-knowledge orientation, as well as cost control and purchasing, production, and service issues are addressed.

(Prerequisite: None)

Students prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional regional dishes of Europe and the Mediterranean. Emphasis is placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparation, and techniques.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety;)

CUL 226 Cuisines of Asia

This class covers leadership, organizational management and culture, and the relationship to current organizations. Operating businesses in today's market means possessing the skills to communicate, critically analyze, and grow beyond the management role in order to bring an operation to its highest level of success. Examination of leadership styles, development of strategic plans, and critical problem solving in the hospitality industry are the hallmarks of the course.

(Prerequisites: CUL 114 Supervision)

(55CH/11LE, 44LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students prepare, taste, serve, and evaluate traditional regional dishes of Asia. Emphasis is placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, preparation, and techniques representative of the cuisines of Japan, China, India, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam.

(Prerequisites: CUL 105 Fundamentals of Classical Cooking Techniques; CUL 102 Sanitation and Safety)

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CUL 332 Applied Technology in the Foodservice Industry

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 342 Marketing Applications in the Foodservice Industry

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 430 Senior Culinary Practicum

(183CH/33LE, 150LB) 8 quarter credit hours

CUL 454 Ethnic Cuisine

(66CH/22LE, 44LB) 4 quarter credit hours

FM 121 Fashion Industry Survey

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 204 Retail Management

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course concentrates on current technology and technological issues for the future as they apply to the foodservice industry. Students learn to use a Point-of-Sale system as a foodservice management tool and analyze reports that are generated with the POS system.

(Prerequisites: CUL 103 Computer Literacy for Culinary, CUL 205 Food & Beverage Cost Controls, and CUL 122 Management by Menu)

This class covers theories behind successful marketing strategies and plans. The student develops a marketing plan to target foodservice consumers. The menu is examined as the primary marketing tool and the class produces various types of advertisements and promotional pieces for a hypothetical foodservice establishment.

(Prerequisites: CUL 114 Supervision)

CUL 335 Quality Customer Service Management

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 350 Legal Issues in Foodservice

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

This is a practical capstone course in which students demonstrate Culinary Arts skills and the management theories of Culinary Arts Management. Students collaborate on a theme, menu, staffing schedule, marketing plan, budget, and procurement schedule, and prepare and serve a multicourse à la carte dinner served to the public in the dining lab during each quarter. This is the final project of the Bachelor program in Culinary Arts Management.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This class examines the role of service in the foodservice industry and explores how to give quality customer service. Service systems and training programs in quality operations are examined through the use of case studies and hypothetical scenarios. The class culminates with an examination of Charlie Trotter's service standards in what is often the best-rated restaurant in the United States.

(Prerequisites: CUL 114 Supervision, CUL 103 Computer Literacy for Culinary, CUL 213 Food & Beverage Operations Management, CUL 224 A La Carte Kitchen)

Students in this course study the regulations and statutes governing the foodservice industry. The course is designed to give the student an overview of legal issues arising in the foodservice environment using both a historical perspective and present-day applications. Students analyze foodservice cases and use problem-solving techniques to determine possible outcomes.

(Prerequisites: CUL 331 Leadership and Organizational Management)

CUL 432 Global Management and Operations in the Hospitality Industry

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 336 Advanced Beverage Management, Oenology & Viticulture

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 395 Property & Facilities Management

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course is designed to review the previous Culinary Arts Management courses and apply principles and theories to the global marketplace. The globalization of the hospitality industry has created an increasing need for competent and qualified managers of international hospitality operations. The class examines the social, cultural, political, and economic environment within which international hospitality operators compete for survival and growth.

(Prerequisites: CUL 331 Leadership & Organizational Management, CUL 340 Human Resource Management & Labor Relations, CUL 350 Legal Issues in Foodservice)

This course is an in-depth study of the various ethnic cuisines of the world. Advanced hands-on techniques are utilized in the production of ethnic menus. Students select to research, prepare a menu, recipes, and job assignments for fellow classmates based on various ethnic cuisines, including but not limited to soul food, American Indian food, Alaskan Indian food, kosher cuisine, vegetarian cuisine, Hindu cuisine, Muslim cuisine, as well as Anglo Saxon religious foods. Hands-on experience is attained in the preparation of menus for various cultural events in each of the ethnic studies. Cultural implications in the preparation of foods and the selection of menus are emphasized. Plate presentation, mise en place, organization, and utilizing the fundamental techniques of cooking, are reinforced at all times.

(Prerequisites: CUL 231 Contemporary Cuisine)

This survey course gives students an overview of the fashion industry and various careers within the industry. Students explore domestic and foreign markets as well as consumer characteristics which influence the market. Students research specific work environments in the local market leading to the selection of a potential work-internship site.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students obtain the requisite management skills to make decisions and set goals successfully, as well as train, direct, and motivate employees. Attention is given to the value of diversity and of developing sensitivity to the needs of various groups and individuals. Leadership styles are explored within the context of management needs at varying levels.

(Prerequisites: None)

FM 122 Forecasting Trends

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course explores how fashion professionals analyze, plan, and project fashion trends. Students learn forecasting and complete an analysis of its importance and how it relates to all fashion industries. Students also examine current trends in both domestic and foreign markets.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

FM 211 Visual Merchandising II

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students participate in hands-on practical application of the principles of visual merchandising. Students study and execute two-dimensional and three-dimensional visual presentations in the classroom as they relate to the retail environment.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation, FM 202 Visual Merchandising I)

FASHION MARKETING & MANAGEMENT

FM 103 Fashion Product Knowledge

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 123 Fashion Coordination

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 212 Buying I

In this course, students learn about opportunities in beverage management and emerging trends and challenges in managing a bar, lounge, or foodservice establishment. Advanced concepts in wine storage, purchasing, and wine as an investment are discussed. Students study the science of wine making including cultivation, harvesting, fermenting, aging, bottling, shipping, and marketing of wine and other distillates. Through research and tastings, students develop an appreciation of the different types of wine and learn the common criteria by which wines in the different regions of the world are evaluated.

(Prerequisites: CUL 223 Essentials of Food & Wine Pairing)

This course introduces the various engineering systems commonly associated with the hospitality industry: Heating, ventilating, airconditioning, plumbing, electrical, emergency systems, housekeeping, risk management, waste management, water systems, energy management, cost, and operating efficiencies. Emphasis is placed on preventive maintenance programs, safety regulations, building requirements, and energy conservation.

(Prerequisites: CUL 232 Capstone)

CUL 434 Managerial Accounting and Financial Management

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

CUL 429 History & Culture of Food

In this course, students examine the uses of internal accounting information to make business decisions in the management of a foodservice operation. Students discuss topics such as cost concepts and behavior, planning, and controlling costs using budget techniques, and cost-volume analysis.

(Prerequisites: CUL 205 Food & Beverage Cost Controls, CUL 332 Applied Technology in Foodservice Industry)

Students study fashion industry terminology as a basis for understanding product knowledge in the fashion retail industry. Attention is given to non-textile items such as trims, silhouettes, accessories, and finishes. Origins of terminology are explored in relation to social and cultural environments.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students explore the aesthetics of fashion and the responses evoked by color theme, style, and design. The course includes an overview of body shapes and silhouettes appropriate for various shapes. Students also learn the basics of copy writing as a vehicle for generating an aesthetic response in consumers.

(Prerequisites: GD 102 Fundamentals of Design)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course presents an analysis of the buyer's role in department and specialty stores and resident buying offices. Students thoroughly examine the buyer's merchandising responsibilities and study buying practices including research, planning, and forecasting. The research and planning in this course constitute the foundation for work in Buying II.

(Prerequisites: None)

FM 200 Fashion Sketching

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 111 History of Art & Fashion

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(33CH/11LE, 22LB) 2 quarter credit hours

CUL 340 Human Resource Management & Employee and Labor Relations

(33CH/33LE) 3 quarter credit hours

This course covers the wide spectrum of Human Resources in which foodservice professionals interact. The class includes examinations of employment laws, recruitment, selection, compensation, evaluation, training, labor issues, retention, employee safety, diversity, and ethics. Students gain an understanding of how to create an environment where employees can thrive and advance in their skills and add productivity to hospitality operations.

(Prerequisites: CUL 331 Leadership & Organizational Management)

This course provides students with a sound foundation in the history and culture of food. Students focus on the chronological evolution of food history and culture from pre-history to present day. Particular emphasis is placed on critical discoveries and noted events in food history with the main group project tailored toward developing menus from notable periods in food history. Students wishing to probe deeper into specific periods or geographic regions are provided with supplemental research information.

(Prerequisites: CUL 111 American Regional Cuisines, CUL 225 Cuisines of Europe & the Mediterranean, CUL 226 Cuisines of Asia, CUL 227 Classical Cuisines)

CUL 449 Management Externship

(98CH/8LE, 90IN) 3 quarter credit hours

This course is designed to allow students to observe and participate in the supervisory operation of a successful foodservice business. Students apply their professional skills in an effort to gain experience to enter and become successful in the foodservice business. Emphasis is placed on developing hospitality management skills.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

Students explore the development of clothing from the ancient world to the present and examine the influences of art periods on fashion. Theatrical and special effects costuming in the various periods are studied. Additional focus is placed on the design characteristics, markets, and lifestyles of leading designers from 1900 to present.

(Prerequisites: None)

The ability of potential designers to be able to sketch their ideas prior to producing is essential in the world of fashion. This class is designed to develop techniques that will enable the student to communicate ideas, moods, and details of a garment, while learning body proportions and the use of croquis.

(Prerequisites: GD 101 Drawing and Perspective)

FM 213 Textiles

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course explores textiles from fiber to finished fabric. Characteristics of the final product are addressed in relation to its intended use. Students also examine textile sources and the fundamental operations of the textile industry.

(Prerequisites: None)

FM 202 Visual Merchandising I

FM 222 Buying II

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 114 Fashion Presentation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students learn to incorporate the principles and elements of design in order to arrange images and text creatively through the use of marker renderings, a grid system for multi-component layouts, and computer software. Design projects include theme, concept boards, fashion catalogs, and direct mailers. NOTE: Fashion majors must complete this course before enrolling in GD 125 Art and Design Concepts.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students are introduced to visual merchandising techniques as applied to retail interiors and exteriors. Emphasis is placed on understanding the philosophy and psychology of visual presentations as well as the impact of visuals on the retail industry. Students will actively observe, critique, and design visual presentations.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course gives the student strategies and formulas necessary to develop and implement a six-month buying plan. Buying concepts examined include vendor sourcing, consumer research, industry fluctuation, and timing. Related technologies also are included. This course builds on the research and planning completed by the student in Buying I.

(Prerequisites: FM 212 Buying I)

FM 203 Merchandise Marketing

FM 223 Entrepreneurship

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students examine the concept of advertising and salesmanship. Emphasis is placed on the principles and procedures of advertising, selling techniques, and steps in the sales process. Students explore e-commerce, virtual shopping environments, and applications of technology in the retailing industry.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course explores multiple aspects of developing and operating a start-up business. Emphasis is placed on aspects of the retail environment including location, demographics, layout, marketing, and business planning.

(Prerequisites: None)

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FM 232 Event Promotion

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 311 Consumer Behavior

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 4 quarter credit hours

FM 338 Apparel Evaluation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 432 Professional Selling

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 111 Life Drawing

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 125 Art & Design Concepts

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course includes a study of the role of event promotion in projecting a company's image and in reaching its target market. Students engage in the process of planning an event and receive evaluation.

(Prerequisites: None)

FM 233 Garment Production

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course examines the cultural, social, and individual variables involved in consumer behavior. It also reviews how they are incorporated into the buyer decision processes and marketing practices. The student is involved in designing, administering, and analyzing consumer behavior information, and the effect of the information on the consumer choice and use of products and services.

(Prerequisites: FM 203 Merchandise Marketing)

Students learn to analyze construction standards and techniques used in the production of garments for the ready-towear industry. Research serves as the foundation for developing skills in garment specifications, assembly, and finishing.

(Prerequisites: FM 213 Textiles)

This course explores the manufacturing process within the fashion industry and analyzes the quality of design, materials, and construction techniques used in commercially produced apparel and accessories. Comparisons are made of manufacturing processes, sizing standards, principles of fit, and pricing in relation to the target customer in various markets. Students develop a specialized collection of apparel and prepare all technical information necessary for sourcing and production.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

FM 410 Direct Marketing

In this course, students study and apply the fundamentals of personal selling, sales training methods, motivating salesmen, simulation of sales techniques, behavioral aspects of persuasion, social, ethical, and legal responsibilities, activities performed by the sales executive, sales demonstrations, expense accounts, and the sales interview.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students continue to develop the various drawing skills first achieved in the first drawing course (GD 101). Emphasis is placed on the ability to depict gesture and motion, to capture the essence of movement and form in space, and to create compositions based on the four basic lighting situations.

(Prerequisites: GD 101 Drawing and Perspective)

This course emphasizes the conceptualization processes of art and design in problem solving. The student uses creative problem-solving and research techniques; specifically, problem identification, analysis, brainstorming, and idea refinement.

(Prerequisites: GD 102 Fundamentals of Design)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 312 Business Law

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 4 quarter credit hours

FM 235 Portfolio

This course is a study of the organization and role of business enterprises in society and their relationships in government. It examines how the legal environment is influenced by changing social and ethical values. The course addresses how the legal environment affects the fashion and retail industry. Topics include agency, antitrust, law of contracts, sales and warranties, equal opportunity, labor law, product liability, debtor and creditor rights, and property rights.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course utilizes a decision-making approach to techniques for developing, executing, and evaluating direct marketing programs. A concentration in catalog development is explored along with other forms of non-store retailing, such as electronic retailing, direct mail, multi-level marketing, telemarketing, and the internet.

(Prerequisites: RS 204 Principles of Marketing)

FM 442 Fashion Marketing Thesis

GD 112 Typography

GD 204 3-Dimensional Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course is primarily concerned with a student's knowledge of the substantive content of his/her major field as defined by the general program of study. The thesis is regarded as the student's culminating work and should draw upon all of the student's experiences.

(Prerequisites: FM 411 Portfolio)

FM 411 Portfolio

Students are introduced to lettering skills and the history and foundations of letterforms. The placement of display and text type in a formatted space is studied as well as the relationship between the appearance and readability of letterforms. Students work in the traditional context of hand-rendering type and are introduced to contemporary typesetting technology.

(Prerequisites: None)

In this course, design principles are applied to the development of three-dimensional product graphics. This course explores materials, processes, and industry guidelines for surface treatments including products, packages, and environmental graphics.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation, GD 123 Design Layout)

GD 205 Design History

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students synthesize ideas and projects from former classes to create a comprehensive portfolio. Lab and work time are supplemented by visiting lecturers, demonstrations, and discussions where appropriate. The emphasis is on quantitative and qualitative research, scheduling of the project, methods of presentation, and qualitative results. Additionally, students present and defend the portfolio to a professional audience. This course requires a grade of C or above in order to graduate.

(Prerequisites: Must be taken in final quarter of program, FM 121 Fashion Industry Survey)

FM 318 Business of Retailing

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course is an introductory survey of the business world with consideration of the structure and forms of business enterprise, the nature of business relationships, and the diversity and choice of business careers. This course explores perceptions and misperceptions of business and its role in society in a multi-cultural setting.

(Prerequisites: RS 204 Principles of Marketing)

In this course, students synthesize ideas and projects from former classes to create a comprehensive senior portfolio. Lab and work times are supplemented by visiting lecturers, demonstrations, and discussions where appropriate. The emphasis is on quantitative and qualitative research, scheduling of the project, methods of presentation, and qualitative results. Additionally, students present and defend the portfolio to a professional audience. This course requires a grade of C or above in order to graduate.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

GRAPHIC DESIGN

GD 101 Drawing & Perspective

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 113 Color Theory

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this fundamental drawing course, students explore various art and media, learn to use a variety of drawing tools, draw threedimensional objects in one-, two-, and threepoint perspective, and generate drawings that demonstrate correct proportions of models.

(Prerequisites: None)

In this course, students explore color theory including additive and subtractive color. Emphasis is placed on color and its relationship to composition through harmony and contrast in a variety of formats and media.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students examine the influences of art history and society on contemporary graphic design, advertising design, illustration, and photography.

(Prerequisites: None)

GD 206 Electronic Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 121 Image Manipulation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 319 Cosmetic Marketing

FM 420 Special Topics in Fashion Marketing

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 102 Fundamentals of Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 307 Survey of Fashion Designers

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course examines the work of the great names and creative geniuses of fashion, past and present. The history of fashion interpretation from Charles Frederick Worth to the most current designers is examined.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course introduces the historical usage of cosmetics, fragrances, toiletries, and the transition from household recipes to marketable retail products. It describes types of suppliers, vendor's retailers, and auxiliary services involved in producing and marketing the products of the industry.

(Prerequisites: RS 204 Principles of Marketing)

This course is a comprehensive exploration of the requirements for success in planning, developing, and managing new products. This course involves a particular aspect of marketing not covered in other marketing courses. The interests of both the student and the instructor determine the specific topics of this course.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This introductory course explores the principles of design, and introduces and develops the creative process. Design elements and relationships are identified and employed to establish a basis for aesthetic sensitivity and critical analysis. Design is presented as a tool of communication.

(Prerequisites: None)

Students develop basic image manipulation skills in a vector and raster-based computer environment. Emphasis is placed on mastering the fundamentals of scanning, color management, photo retouching, imaging, special effects, and filters and masks.

(Prerequisites: RS 100 Computer Applications)

The student explores the various means of indicating, placing, and manipulating visual elements in page design, systematically developing strong and creative layout solutions by means of a cumulative, conceptual design process. The ability to integrate effectively photographs, illustrations, and display and text type is developed using page composition software.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation, GD 123 Design Layout)

GD 122 Illustration

GD 207 Digital Illustration

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 103 Survey of Media & Design

FM 309 Principles of Advertising

FM 328 Fashion Styling

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

FM 421 Fashion Journalism

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course is an examination of the creative process, from strategy to execution, of advertising and promotional material. Students are required to develop the strategies, media plans, and draft executions of advertising and promotional materials.

(Prerequisites: FM 232 Event Promotion and RS 204 Principles of Marketing)

Fashion Styling is an introductory survey course exploring the skills required for this growing specialty in the fashion industry. The stylist creates the visual fashion story, whether it is for art, photography, video, window display, advertising, promotions, or fashion shows.

(Prerequisites: FM 123 Fashion Coordination)

The purpose of this course is to expose the student to fashion writing and its impact on the fashion industry. Topics include extensive fashion vocabulary, review of different types of trend reports, press release kits, and advertising.

(Prerequisites: FM 232 Event Promotion)

This course presents to the student a survey of the computer animation, graphic design, and multimedia industries with an emphasis on the characteristics of entrylevel jobs and responsibilities, career paths, necessary skills for success, regional differences in employment, and types of projects and products. It provides the student with an introduction to the conceptto-product path in each of the industries.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course presents an introduction to the conceptual development behind illustration and its use in the industry. Assignments focus on black-and-white and color techniques, using contrast, values, composition, and function.

(Prerequisites: GD 101 Drawing and Perspective; GD 111 Life Drawing)

This course assists students to communicate and design with the computer as a professional tool. Using different software applications, the student learns to demonstrate an understanding of electronic illustration. The course explores rasterized and vector-based graphic applications.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

GD 123 Design Layout

GD 208 Digital Grid Systems

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course, in conjunction with Electronic Design (GD 206), enables the student to design with type and visuals and utilize technology in problem-solving. Emphasis is placed on the process of design development from roughs to comprehensives, layout and marker techniques, and the use of a grid system for multi-component layouts.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation, GD 112 Typography)

This advanced layout course enhances and reflects skills developed in fundamental design courses. Critical analysis is applied through the usage of type and layout to create clear, communicative design. Portfolio-quality projects are developed as part of this process.

(Prerequisites: GD 123 Design Layout)

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GD 211 Media/Marketing Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 220 Advanced Image Manipulation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 229 Print Production

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 303 Collateral Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 429 Portfolio II

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 118 Residential Working Drawings

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course explores the relationship between marketing techniques and media with an emphasis on strategy, selection, implementation, and analysis.

(Prerequisites: GD 125 Art and Design Concepts)

GD 212 Electronic Pre-Press

This course builds upon the Image Manipulation class to integrate raster and vector graphics with concerns for varied formats, including web and print graphics. Students create visual messages and focused visual statements and gain an understanding of the differences in web and print graphics.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

This course prepares students in the electronic preparation of simple designs. Image reproduction, color specification, file preparation procedures, and binding and finishing techniques are explored. Discussion of various printing processes and paper selections are covered in this class.

(Prerequisites: GD 208 Digital Grid Systems, GD 220 Advanced Image Manipulation)

The role of graphic design in collateral materials is introduced and explored with a focus on brochures, billboards, posters, transit cards, point of sale materials, direct mail pieces, sales promotion materials, etc. The process of developing unified advertising collateral materials involving multiple presentations is emphasized.

(Prerequisites: GD 206 Electronic Design, GD 228 Graphic Symbolism)

This course focuses on the completion of the portfolio. The final portfolio should focus on the student's individual strengths. This work should reflect a student's uniqueness and ability to meet demanding industry standards. This course requires a C or above in order to pass or receive credit.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This course is a continuation of Basic Drafting (ID105). Students develop a comprehensive set of working drawings for a residential project to fulfill final portfolio requirements. Emphasis is placed on schedules, elevations, electrical drawings, and specifications as well as cross-referencing within a set of drawings.

(Prerequisites: ID 219 ComputerAided Drafting and Design)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students complete multi-paged electronic pre-press documents that include scanned and edited images, object-defined graphics, and text through the integration of a variety of file types. Students also study the place of the electronic page make-up in modern print production.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation, GD 123 Design Layout)

GD 223 Photography Techniques

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 233 Package Design

GD 214 Advanced Typography

Students study the anatomy of a camera, it's basic tools and film, and their intended purposes, as well as various photographic systems. In addition, students explore a variety of photographic techniques related to issues of aesthetics and applications. NOTE: Students are required to have a 35mm digital camera.

(Prerequisites: GD 102 Fundamentals of Design, GD 121 Image Manipulation)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 312 Self-Promotion & Marketing

GD 430 Graphic Design Capstone

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 125 Rendering

Students receive a broad overview that covers essential package design basics, including materials and production methods, structures and surfaces, product positioning, and environmental concerns.

(Prerequisites: GD 228 Graphic Symbolism)

Students formulate their career goals and develop a self-promotion and marketing plan. Students differentiate the pros and cons of self-promotion and representation.

(Prerequisites: GD 303 Collateral Design, GD 313 Advanced Marketing Strategies)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course explores printed communication and the use of typography as a major element of design. The development of marketable, original, and creative problem-solving solutions is examined with an emphasis placed on professional presentation techniques.

(Prerequisites: GD 112 Typography, GD 121 Image Manipulation)

GD 225 Portfolio Preparation

GD 234 Special Topics

GD 313 Advanced Marketing Strategies

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students in this course present a comprehensive understanding of their academic experience. Proficiency will be demonstrated in both studio and general education courses through a written, oral, and visual presentation. This course requires a grade of C or above in order to pass or receive credit.

(Prerequisites: GD 415 Senior Project)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course explores color theory and the psychology of color. Students will develop practical and finished applications of color to perspective drawings. Pens, color pencils, and Prisma Markers will be used in this process.

(Prerequisites: ID 115 Perspective for Interior Design)

ID 127 Product Knowledge

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 216 Law & The Graphic Arts

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course includes the study of basic legal principles related to the conducting of business. The course provides an overview of the legal system, contracts, personal property, intellectual property, real property, law of sales, agency and employment law, business organizations, security devices, bankruptcy, and alternative dispute resolution.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course prepares students for job interviews by assisting with the creation of a graphic design portfolio. Students must be able to demonstrate their conceptual, design, craftsmanship, and other skills as they assemble and refine their portfolio pieces. Working individually with an instructor, each student will select representative pieces to showcase work that reflects a unique style. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying short- and long-term professional employment goals as well as related strategies and resources. This course requires a grade of C or above in order to pass or receive credit.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

Students, in consultation with the instructor, identify an area of special interest in graphic design for focused skill development. Such skill development may include both community and curricular-based projects. At the end of the course, students prepare, present, and defend a graduate project suitable for a professional portfolio.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This course explores theories, methods, and strategies for effectively selling a product. It provides concepts of product, price, promotion, distribution, and benefit as they relate to advertising. The lectures include a review of the target audiences, budgets, strategy, and the company vision. It examines various management styles, techniques, and trends in the industry.

(Prerequisites: GD 235 Portfolio, GD 303 Collateral Design)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

INTERIOR DESIGN

ID 105 Basic Drafting

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students study the properties of materials used by interior designers and visit professional sources in the field.

(Prerequisites: None)

GD 235 Portfolio

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 336 Graphic Design Studio

This course in basic drafting techniques familiarizes students with the use of drafting equipment and materials. Areas of study include methods of graphic communication and an introduction to the concepts of orthographic projections as a means to reproduce three-dimensional spaces on paper.

(Prerequisites: None)

ID 129 History of Interiors I

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 226 Art Direction

GD 217 Corporate Identity

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This is an advanced design course that teaches the development of corporate identity programs as applied to corporate communications. Applications may include stationery, business cards, signage, packaging, and vehicles.

(Prerequisites: GD 112 Typography; GD 121 Image Manipulation)

This course includes an introduction to the principles of concept and problem solving for print, photography, and broadcast media as they relate to the function of the art director. Students examine the interaction of the creative team, marketing, and production functions in the promotion of ideas.

(Prerequisites: GD 217 Corporate Identity)

This course is designed to guide students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive portfolio. Students apply techniques and strategies to market themselves in their chosen fields. Emphasis is placed on the individual student's ability to assess his or her most marketable skills, design storyboards for individual interactive portfolios, create professional design layouts, create interfaces, backgrounds, buttons, audio/video elements, resumés, and print material to support their interactive portfolios. This course requires a grade of C or greater to meet graduation requirements.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course provides an in-depth evaluation of projects to be utilized in each student's professional portfolio. Portfolio materials are evaluated, refined, and finalized. The student also has an opportunity to do individualized research on a topic that is of particular interest to their area of study.

(Prerequisites: GD 226 Art Direction)

ID 115 Perspective for Interior Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students undertake a comparative study of visual arts in different time periods and cultures. Concentration is placed on the chronological progression of techniques and the evolving styles of artistic expression from ancient periods through the late 19th century. The basic principles of the theories of aesthetics are examined, and history is used as a tool to design within the present.

(Prerequisites: None)

GD 415 Senior Project

In this course, students represent design concepts through fast and accurate freehand drawings. Through the observation and application of one-, two-, and multiple-point perspective techniques, students draw three-dimensional forms as they relate to interior illustration.

(Prerequisites: GD 101 Drawing and Perspective)

ID 130 3D Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 228 Graphic Symbolism

GD 239 Conceptual Illustration

Students develop an independent project. Developing a long-term assignment and extending the skills learned in previous studio classes are emphasized.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

ID 117 Textiles for Interior Design

(44CH/22 LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

GD 219 Expressive & Experimental Typography

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Emphasis is placed on the expressive potential of typography. How the form of the written word(s) affects the meaning is studied experimentally. The emphasis is on design elements from the perspective of history, psychology, and artistic interpretation executed with digital tools.

(Prerequisites: GD 208 Digital Grid Systems, GD 214 Advanced Typography)

This course examines the importance of graphic symbols in design. Logos and other symbolic images are examined in historic and contemporary contexts. Graphic elements including typography, simplified imagery, and abstract shapes are then utilized to create individual logo designs and other symbolic images.

(Prerequisites: GD 125 Art and Design Concepts, GD 220 Advanced Image Manipulation)

Students research current evolving cultures, both domestic and international. Students then apply these images to create original illustrations in the genre of fantasy, humor, cartoons, and editorial commentary.

(Prerequisites: GD 125 Art & Design Concepts, GD 122 Illustration)

GD 419 Digital Portfolio

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course guides students through the process of compiling their work into a final interactive portfolio. This course also stresses the importance of professional development and helps the student obtain the necessary completion of the initial job search requirements.

(Prerequisites: GD 336 Graphic Design Studio)

This course is a study to familiarize students with soft materials used in interiors, including upholstery, carpeting, window treatments, and sources as well as proper allocation and usage of these materials from a technical and aesthetic approach. Texture, fibers, yarns, construction design colors, and finishes are covered.

(Prerequisites: None)

The theoretical aspects of designing in three dimensions are explored in this course. The student develops and executes three-dimensional projects using expedient materials. The student learns to produce compositions that demonstrate three-dimensional design principles and the relationship between humans and proportion, scale, and negative volumes.

(Prerequisites: ID 105 Basic Drafting)

ID 209 History of Interiors II

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students are introduced to movements and trends associated with modern art, architecture, and furniture. They will be able to apply theories and concepts to shapes, colors, textures, and concepts of architectural spaces.

(Prerequisites: ID 129 History of Interiors I)

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ID 212 Lighting

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 234 International Residential Codes

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 304 Project Documentation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 324 Hospitality Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 420 Adaptive Reuse

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 124 Advanced Image Manipulation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course introduces students to the characteristics of lighting, lighting design, and the methods of lighting control in order to achieve successful environments.

(Prerequisites: ID 105 Basic Drafting)

ID 213 Space Planning

This course familiarizes students with the International Residential Code (IRC) system for one- and two-family dwellings. The students also are introduced to the Building Officials and Code Administration (BOCA) in order to learn how to research the most current codes for residential design projects.

(Prerequisites: None)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course stresses the analytical, conceptual, and applied aspects of programming and space-planning through research and development of the design process.

(Prerequisites: ID 219 Computer Aided Drafting and Design)

ID 235 Portfolio Design

This course is a study of project specification guides and working drawings to enable students to effectively interpret and analyze the scope of a non-residential project. Students are exposed to industry standards through review of materials used on current projects by working professionals. Students learn architectural conventions for appropriate development of complete contract documents.

(Prerequisites: ID 246 Commercial Working Drawings)

This course is an exploration of the design challenges involved in hotel, restaurant, and convention facilities with emphasis on professional project development and presentation.

(Prerequisites: ID 256 Codes and Standards)

ID 328 Accessory Design

In this course, students identify an existing structure of historic significance and adapt the structure to function in a new role. Students gain permission to do field measurements and photographic documentation. Research on the history of the structure is required along with supporting information on the validity of the need for reuse of the building.

(Prerequisites: ID 323 Historic Preservation)

This course is designed to further enhance the skills acquired in previous image manipulation and technology-based classes. Emphasis is placed on advanced applications and the appropriate selection of variables for the required task. Integration of programs to achieve a required project also is emphasized.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 214 Universal Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

The refinement of previous residential and non-residential projects into a comprehensive collection representative of the interior design student's skills is the focus of this course. This course requires a grade of C- or greater to meet graduation requirements.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

ID 305 Modern Art & Architecture

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students are taught the portions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) that deal with the safety of people in building environments as well as ergonomic considerations. Universal Design concepts are applied to the home environment and to public and commercial spaces.

(Prerequisites: None)

ID 236 Portfolio Development

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 216 Architectural Detailing

Students produce a comprehensive portfolio that includes updated design presentation projects from previous classes. This course requires a grade of C or greater to meet graduation requirements.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This course traces the history of art and design in the modern world from the late nineteenth century to the present, including European and American painting styles, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Special emphasis is given to the early 20th Century avant-garde and contemporary art and design. This course includes specific works of art, architecture and their contextual influences, styles, and cultures.

(Prerequisites: ID 209 History of Interiors II)

The curriculum offers the opportunity to examine accessory design sources and techniques through design applications, demonstrations, and field trips. Emphasis is placed on non-residential projects that require accessories to be purchased in large quantities. Students also are taught how to work with a certified appraiser to determine the value of antique accessories.

(Prerequisites: ID 236 Portfolio Development)

ID 430 Advanced Textiles for Interior Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 125 Digital Visual Composition

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 401 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting and Design

This course is a study of the appropriate use of historic fabrics, textile design, and custom services, high-end fabric houses, and fabric costs/estimations. Students study methods of textile printing and design. Establishing business relationships with trade-only sources in the textile market is explored, including interior design workrooms.

(Prerequisites: ID 117 Textiles for Interior Design)

This course introduces students to the fundamental terminology, concepts, and techniques of digital visual composition for both static and moving images. Instruction is given on basic techniques of production including digital still camera as well as camcorder orientation, lighting, set-up, and operation. It focuses on the principles of using color, composition, lighting, and other techniques for overall thematic and visual effects of moving and static images.

(Prerequisites: IMD 116 Introduction to Audio & Video)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 319 Retail Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course stresses the importance of visualization, coordination, and drafting of the various components of interior spaces. Emphasis is placed on architectural woodwork detailing.

(Prerequisites: ID 105 Basic Drafting)

ID 246 Commercial Working Drawings

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 219 Computer-Aided Drafting & Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students are introduced to the basic principles and applications of computeraided drafting for the designer. Various orthographic drawings such as architectural elevations and plans, as well as simple threedimensional wire frames are produced.

(Prerequisites: ID 105 Basic Drafting)

This course develops documents in support of the ID225 Commercial Design course final project. Students will develop a comprehensive set of working drawings for a commercial project to fulfill final portfolio requirements. Emphasis is placed on schedules, elevations/details, electrical and reflected ceiling drawings, furniture plans, and specifications as well as crossreferencing within a set of drawings.

(Prerequisites: ID 219 ComputerAided Drafting and Design)

In this course students research and develop a plan for a small retail business. Included in this course of study, the company image and type of sales are matched to demographics in an assigned location. The marketing concepts of the retail business are reflected in the design. Codes for the type of establishment are implemented.

(Prerequisites: None)

The advanced use and application of the computer in interior design are explored in this course. Students are taught 3D modeling and how to use the computer to render drawings that create realistic presentations.

(Prerequisites: ID 246 Commercial Working Drawings)

WEB DESIGN & INTERACTIVE MEDIA

IMD 116 Introduction to Audio & Video

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 201 Digital Typography

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 410 Graduation Project Research

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 322 Healthcare Design

Students select an area from interior design, then research and program their graduate project. The emphasis is on quantitative and qualitative research, project scheduling, presentation methods, and qualitative results.

(Prerequisites: ID 319 Retail Design)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students learn the technical terms unique to audio/video production and industry uses of basic audio/video production equipment and techniques. Students also examine the tools and techniques used in multi-track recording and mixing. The course includes basics of critical listening, microphone techniques, console operation, tape machine operation, signal flow, signal processing, patching, and general studio operations.

(Corequisite: RS 100 Computer Applications)

This course is an examination of typographic structures for digital communication. Students learn principles of typographic composition with an emphasis on effective use of type in screen-based media.

(Prerequisites: GD 112 Typography)

IMD 203 Intermediate Authoring

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 247 Professional Practice

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 221 Residential Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students examine the elements unique to residential spaces based on client need and trace the design process from programming to working drawings and presentation. This course presents the students with the opportunity to produce projects for their professional portfolio.

(Prerequisites: ID 213 Space Planning, ID 127 Product Knowledge)

This course provides an introduction to business practices and procedures in the field of interior design and the methods necessary for their implementations.

(Prerequisites: None)

This is an upper-level studio course involving the total process of healthcare design from conceptual through design development. It includes researching codes, writing specifications, special interior detailing, and estimating quantities and cost. Course content centers on the interrelationships of the elements of three-dimensional space such as proportion and volume, as well as space planning, materials and finishes, and visual presentation boards.

(Prerequisites: ID 256 Codes and Standards)

ID 411 Graduation Project Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Using the selected concept development, students develop and prepare a comprehensive project incorporating and depicting the culmination of their acquired skills and technical knowledge.

(Prerequisites: ID 410 Graduation Project Research)

IMD 122 Introduction to Authoring

This course builds on the skills taught in the Introduction to Authoring class. Students design production-quality interactive presentations using intermediate-level scripting techniques that focus on good user-interface design and usability.

(Prerequisites: IMD 122 Introduction to Authoring)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 412 Graduation Project Presentation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course introduces the student to concepts and designs utilized in the development of education, sales, and marketing presentations. Students create an integrated, interactive multimedia presentation using the basic concepts and principles of multimedia and graphic design.

(Prerequisites: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

IMD 206 Introduction to Scripting Languages

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students develop and refine basic programming skills. The student acquires skills needed to design, develop, and produce practical applications with a specific scripting or programming language.

(Prerequisites: RS 100 Computer Application; Corequisite: GD 121 Image Manipulation)

ID 256 Codes & Standards

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ID 323 Historic Preservation

ID 225 Commercial Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

The focus of this course is to study the codes, standards, and laws that pertain primarily to non-residential structures. Students learn how to work with codes officials as a part of using the codes. Developing a codes and standards library is emphasized.

(Prerequisites: ID234 International Residential codes)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course emphasizes research, analysis and problem solving in the commercial design of office spaces such as corporate headquarters, banks, law offices, or insurance firms.

(Prerequisites: ID 213 Space Planning)

The course is designed to make the student aware of the growing efforts in this country to preserve and utilize our built environment. The course covers the history of the preservation movement, its social, economic, legal, and aesthetic ramifications, with an emphasis on preservation standards on a local and national level. The course includes a comparative analysis of American architecture based on elements of construction.

(Prerequisites: ID 209 History of Interiors II)

Students prepare, present, and defend a graduate project suitable for professional design presentation. This course requires a grade of C or above in order to graduate.

(Prerequisites: ID 410 Graduate Project Research)

IMD 123 History of Motion Media & Mass Communication

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course presents a survey of major events and development in the history of motion media and mass communication. The survey focuses on the relationship between technology and media development and explores the impact motion media and mass communications have on society and the economy.

(Prerequisites: None)

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IMD 208 Introduction to User Centered Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 223 Designing for Server Side Technology

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 236 Motion Graphics

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 336 Motion Graphics II

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 425 Portfolio

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

ECON 201 Economics

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of developing web sites that have, as a primary goal, addressing and solving user needs. By exploring the process step-by-step, students identify where user issues are raised and how they are answered. During the course, students physically create either a web site or a prototype. Students present and defend their decisions.

(Prerequisites: IMD 206 Introduction to Scripting, GD 121 Image Manipulation)

Students build on the skills taught in the Designing Dynamic Web Sites class. Students design and develop web content for server-based dynamic delivery. Focus is on incorporating serverside solutions into user-centered web design in order to provide an exchange of information between client and server.

(Prerequisites: IMD 216 Designing for Dynamic Web Sites)

This course focuses on motion design, concepts, and techniques. Students create motion graphics using design principles for timeline-based media.

(Prerequisites: IMD 232 Desktop Video, Corequisite: IMD 225 Digital Animation)

This course focuses on intermediate to advanced motion design, concepts, and techniques. Students create motion graphics using design principles for timeline-based media.

(Prerequisites: IMD 236 Motion Graphics)

IMD 255 Portfolio

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 402 E-Learning Applications

This course focuses on the completion of the portfolio and enables students to begin their career search. The student should come into this course with work for the portfolio and determine the quality of the work so those enhancements can be made. The student also completes a professional resumé and begins the job search.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This course provides an introduction to the principles of economics, emphasizing an analysis of the economy as a whole. Interrelationships among the consumer, business, and government sectors are explored from American and international economic perspectives.

(Prerequisites: None)

IMD 225 Digital Animation

IMD 212 Intermediate Scripting Languages

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44 CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students develop and refine intermediate programming skills. The student acquires skills needed to design, develop, and produce practical applications with a specific scripting or programming language.

(Prerequisites: IMD 206 Introduction to Scripting Languages)

This course focuses on digital animation concepts and techniques. Students create digital animation using basic principles of design for timeline-based media.

(Prerequisites: IMD 122 Introduction to Authoring)

This course focuses on the completion of the portfolio and enables students to begin their career search. The student should come into this course with work for the portfolio and determine the quality of the work so enhancements can be made. The student also completes a professional resumé and begins the job search. This course requires a grade of C or greater to meet graduation requirements.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 226 Project Management

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 215 Usability Testing

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course introduces students to concepts and techniques used in usability testing. Through theories presented in the course, students learn common ways to locate errors or problems with interactive products. This course focuses on Web design usability testing.

(Prerequisites: IMD 208 Introduction to User Centered Design)

This course focuses on the interactive design project management process and on development of the project team as key to the successful achievement of interactive design project goals. The process examines the main elements required in every proposal/ plan, time frame, and budget. Key areas of interactive design project teams serve to support the fundamental approach that every project team is tailored to achieve project results efficiently and effectively.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

IMD 301 Advanced Scripting Languages

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Through the course, students are introduced and gain experience in the design, development, and evaluation of effective e-learning programs. The course focuses on theoretical foundations of e-learning, types of authoring software, options for authoring systems, principles of effective design, instructional analysis, and production of e-learning materials. Students design, build, evaluate, and revise instructional applications using industry standard authoring systems.

(Prerequisites: IMD302 E-Learning Design)

DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES

ENG 090 Developmental English

(44CH/44LE) *4 quarter credit hours

ENG 101 English I

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

Students refine dynamic scripting skills to develop complex interactivity and applications. The course also examines client-side forms in conjunction with server-side scripting applications.

(Prerequisites: IMD 223 Designing for Server-Side Technology)

IMD 410 Senior Project Research

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 302 E-Learning Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

The student selects an Interactive Media Design topic for his/her graduate project. During the course, students research their topics and begin programming the applications for their graduate projects. The emphasis is on quantitative and qualitative research, scheduling of the project, methods of presentation, and qualitative results.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This developmental studies course emphasizes the skills needed to produce clear, competent English prose. Coursework concentrates on basic paragraph writing with its attendant skills including various sentence structures, spelling, subject/ verb agreement, pronoun/antecedent agreement, punctuation, and correct verb tense. A grade of C or better is required to complete this course. The course may not be attempted more than three times.

(Prerequisites: Placement Testing)

English I introduces students to collegelevel writing as a process of developing and supporting a thesis in an organized essay. The use of appropriate diction and language is emphasized along with reading and responding to the writing of others. Students adhere to the standard conventions of written English.

(Prerequisites: Academic placement or satisfactory completion of ENG 090 Developmental English)

ENG 102 English II

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

MAT 095 Developmental Math

(44CH/44LE) *4 quarter credit hours

IMD 216 Designing for Dynamic Web Sites

(44 CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 230 Audio for Interactive Media Design

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

Students apply user-centered design principles, database structure, and server side scripting to create dynamic web sites. Particular attention is paid to design issues relating to the display of dynamic content on the screen and how that dynamic content will be delivered.

(Prerequisites: IMD 122 Introduction of Authoring: Corequisite: IMD 212 Intermediate Scripting Languages)

This course focuses on the principles and practices of digital audio in an interactive design setting. Students learn to use current digital audio programs for recording, editing, sequencing, and mixing for a variety of outputs and applications.

(Prerequisites: IMD 125 Digital Visual Composition)

This course introduces students to the principles of instructional design as applied to e-learning. Skill development includes goal analysis, performance objective writing, instructional strategies, and instructional materials creation.

(Prerequisites: IMD 215 Usability Testing)

IMD 415 Portfolio Preparation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 303 Advanced Authoring

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 232 Desktop Video

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 217 Interactive Motion Scripting

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

An advanced course that applies motion graphics as an integrated interactive solution, students script interaction, sequencing, and motion for interactive projects. Optimization is a critical consideration in the creation of the user-centered experience.

(Prerequisites: IMD 122 Introduction to Authoring)

Students demonstrate knowledge of editing using non-linear editing software and hardware in a computer lab. Students produce and edit video and audio using digital desktop video techniques.

(Prerequisites: IMD 125 Digital Visual Composition)

This course builds on the skills taught in the Intermediate Authoring class. Students will design production-quality interactive presentations using advanced-level scripting techniques focusing on good user interface design and usability.

(Prerequisites: IMD 203 Intermediate Authoring)

In this course, students organize, select, and enhance project work to be included in their interactive portfolio. Emphasis focuses on exploring unique design concepts that showcase their body of work. This course requires a C or above in order to pass or receive credit.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

This developmental studies course focuses on the study of basic mathematical concepts. Specifically, the course covers concepts and applications of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, sets of whole numbers, decimal numbers, fractions, the use of percentages, and problem-solving configurations. A grade of C or better is required to complete this course. The course may not be attempted more than three times.

(Prerequisite(s): Placement Testing) * Developmental studies do not apply toward graduation requirements . They may be attempted no more than three times and require a grade of C or better to pass the course . Developmental studies are in addition to the required curriculum; thus, enrollment in these courses may affect the student's graduation date .

English II is the second of two courses in the English composition sequence. Student focus is on developing skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking. Students write essays to demonstrate their ability to analyze and evaluate the ideas of others and to integrate those ideas into their own writing. The course reinforces the students' experience with the conventions of standard written English and introduces students to the methods of research and the conventions of documentation. Students select, evaluate, and integrate a variety of sources to support a thesis in a research paper.

(Prerequisites: ENG 101 English I)

ENG 301 English III

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

IMD 420 Senior Project Application & Defense

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

IMD 305 Special Topics

This course is a continuation of Senior Project Research. Students prepare, present, and defend a graduate project suitable for professional utilization.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

GENERAL EDUCATION

COM 101 Effective Speaking

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

English III helps students develop the skills they need to communicate with business and technical documents. The course introduces students to the rhetorical principles and compositional practices necessary for writing effective and professional communications, such as reports, instructions, and documentation within their own business professions.

(Prerequisites: ENG 102 English II)

IMD 235 Portfolio Preparation

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

In this course, students organize, select, and enhance project work to be included in their interactive portfolios. Emphasis focuses on exploring unique design concepts which showcase their body of work. This course requires a grade of C or greater to meet graduation requirements.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

Students, in consultation with the instructor, identify an area of special interest in interactive media design for focused skill development. Such skill development may include both community and curricularbased projects. At the end of the course, students will prepare, present, and defend a project suitable for a professional portfolio.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director)

IMD 424 Senior Seminar

(22CH/11LE, 11LB) 2 quarter credit hours

This course is designed as a capstone experience, the purpose of which is to unify and provide a broader context for knowledge about the field of interactive media. Part of this process is exploring connections between both (1) oneself and the field of interactive media and (2) the rest of the world and interactive media.

(Prerequisites: IMD 410 Senior Project Research)

Effective Speaking enables students to develop and improve their abilities to present themselves successfully in a variety of contexts. Students learn how to evaluate the nature of an audience and structure material appropriately so that ideas and talent are conveyed in a professional manner.

(Prerequisites: None)

40 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 41

HIS 101 World Civilizations I

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

MAT 102 Statistics

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

SCI 102 Science, Technology and Society

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

IN 201-B Internship

RELATED STUDIES

ART 101 Survey of Art History I

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

(98CH/8LE/90IN) 3 quarter credit hours

RS 202* Career Development

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include religion, politics, economics, and social developments in Eurasian, African, Pan-American, and Greco-Roman civilizations, Christian, Islamic, and Byzantine institutions, and cultures of the Middle Ages, as well as emerging monarchies in Europe and the Far East. Emphasis is placed on historical developments and their impact on the premodern world. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations.

(Prerequisites: ENG 101 English I)

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on sampling, distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, Central Limit Theorem, confidence intervals, correlations, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Other topics include plotting data, graphing functions, and predicting outcomes.

(Prerequisites: Completion of MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy with a C or better)

PSY 101 Psychology

This course explores the basis of chemistry and physics, with an examination of the application of physical and chemical principles in technology. Topics include electricity, principles of mechanics, engines, gears, transmissions, fluid flow, the Periodic Table, simple optics, and an introduction to materials science. Examples are drawn from the physical sciences, technology, and biology. Historical figures and developments are discussed in an effort to understand the contribution of science and technology to the evolution of human societies.

(Prerequisites: SCI 101 Science, Environment and Society)

Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply acquired subject matter and professional skills in a real and practical situation. The main objective of the internship is to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses relating to their fields of study. Students gain experience needed to enter their field on graduation.

(Corequisite: IN 201-A Internship)

This course will conduct a comparative study of the visual arts in different time periods and cultures. It will concentrate on the chronological progression of techniques and the evolving styles of artistic expression.

(Prerequisites: None)

IN 201-C Internship

ART 102 Survey of Art History II

(44CH/44LE)

(98CH/8LE/90IN) 3 quarter credit hours

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

HIS 102 World Civilizations II

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the religion, politics, economics, and social developments of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on historical developments such as religious wars, Industrial Revolution, World Wars I & II and the Cold War, and their impact on the modern world. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations.

(Prerequisites: ENG 101 English I)

This course introduces students to the nature of psychology. Topics discussed include aspects of human development, personality theory, psychological aspects of stress, and the psychology of learning, creativity, and motivation. Students are introduced to this material through a combination of lectures, experiential exercises, group dynamics, and interpersonal analyses. The course provides insight into human behavior and self-awareness.

(Prerequisites: None)

SCI 103 Nutrition

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

SCI 101 Science, Environment & Society

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

This course centers on an explanation of the basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to health. The structure, function, and source of nutrients including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water are discussed. Current issues in nutrition are reviewed including dietary guidelines, energy balance, vitamin supplements, and food fads. Cultural, psychological, and economic implications of food choices are considered.

(Prerequisites: None)

Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply acquired subject matter and professional skills in a real and practical situation. The main objective of the internship is to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses relating to their fields of study. Students gain experience needed to enter their field on graduation.

(Corequisite: IN 201-B Internship)

4 quarter credit hours This course is a comparative study of art, sculpture, and architecture showing the evolving styles of artistic expression from the Baroque period to the present.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course gives bachelor students an opportunity to study chosen career fields in detail. Through careful research, in-depth interviews, and personal explorations, students will become acquainted with the industry employers relevant to their programs of study. They will prepare for job interviews, salary negotiations, benefits analyses, and other job-related topics. Students will enhance their presentation skills and build confidence in their job-search capabilities as they get ready to step into the career for which their study readied them.

(Prerequisites: None)

RS 204 Principles of Marketing

(44CH/22LE,22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

RS 099 Student Success Seminar

(20CH/20LE) 0 quarter credit hours

IN 201-D Internship

(98CH/8LE/90IN) 3 quarter credit hours

MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

Quantitative Literacy introduces students to the conceptual understanding of problem-solving and decision-making and develops analytical skills by dealing with quantities and their magnitudes. Students estimate, approximate, and judge the reasonableness of answers in order to solve everyday problems. The course includes set theory and representation, number theory using exponential operations, statistical analysis applicable to real-world data, and algebraic problem-solving. Students solve and graph linear equations, systems of equations, and polynomial functions. The use of measurement and graphs is emphasized throughout the course.

(Prerequisites: Academic placement or satisfactory completion of MAT 095 Developmental Math)

Science, Environment & Society introduces and examines the basic ideas underlying modern science such as mass, inertia, force, and physical conservation laws, and the fundamental ideas of physics, chemistry, earth science, and astronomy. An understanding of the kinetic molecular theory is developed and used to explain common phenomena, and application is made of physical principles to technology and biology. The role of major scientific figures in the development of important ideas is examined in a historical and social context. Upon completion, the student is able to use quantitative reasoning and basic scientific knowledge to solve problems, to explain the role of science in the modern world, and to define what characterizes scientific statements.

(Prerequisites: None)

SOC 101 Sociology

(44CH/44LE) 4 quarter credit hours

In this course, students explore the dynamics and structure of human society. The fundamental structures and processes responsible for the social organization of behavior are examined. Topics include culture, socialization, deviance, social structure, social stratification, and institutions. Current issues in society are also addressed.

(Prerequisites: None)

Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply acquired subject matter and professional skills in a real and practical situation. The main objective of the internship is to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses relating to their fields of study. Students will gain experience needed to enter their field on graduation.

(Corequisite: IN 201-C Internship)

This course will provide students with the concepts and processes required to ensure their success at the college level and beyond. Students will be encouraged to embrace their roles and responsibilities in the learning process, and in their lifelong education; to develop an attitude of inquisitiveness, driving them to pursue new experiences; and allow them to realize their capacity for expanding knowledge, and understanding of the world, and to continually enrich the quality of life, through learning. Acquired practical skills will include memory enhancement, note and test taking skills, effective reading, and listening, and time management.

(Prerequisites: None)

This course addresses the fundamental concepts and principles of marketing. The overview of marketing provided here will help students place their knowledge in a framework and understand how each component contributes to the strength and utility of a marketing plan. Students will also learn how to identify the ways in which world events and cultural assumptions influence marketing.

(Prerequisites: None)

RS 308 Business Accounting

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course studies the fundamentals of double-entry debit/credit business accounting preparation and analysis of business financial statements and practical accounting procedures for understanding assets, liabilities, and owner's equity.

(Prerequisites: MAT 101 Quantitative Literacy)

IN 401 Internship

(98CH/8LE/90IN) 3 quarter credit hours

RS 100* Computer Applications

INTERNSHIP

IN 201-A Internship

(98CH/8LE/90IN) 3 quarter credit hours

Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply acquired subject matter and professional skills in a real and practical situation. The main objective of the internship is to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses relating to their fields of study. Students gain the experience needed to enter their field on graduation.

(Prerequisites: None)

Through a field internship experience, students are able to apply acquired subject matter and career/professional skills in a real and practical situation. The main objective of the internship is to allow students the opportunity to observe and participate in the operation of successful businesses relative to their fields of study. The students gain the experience needed to enter the field upon graduation.

(Prerequisites: Permission of Academic Director) NOTE: Internship sites must be approved.

(44CH/22LE, 22LB) 3 quarter credit hours

This course introduces students to the basic operation of computer hardware on both Mac and PC platforms. File management and storage, basic word processing, spreadsheets, and database techniques are explored. The use of scanners, printers, external drives, and other equipment will be examined. Students will also be introduced to the Internet as a research and networking tool.

(Prerequisites: None)

*Classified as General Education for UNC Board of Governors

42 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 43

POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Academic Affairs

The Department of Academic Affairs, administration, and faculty have been carefully selected to support excellence in the educational process. The faculty members have professional experience and backgrounds in the career-related areas they teach. Students attend The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham to prepare for employment in the career of their choice. The major focus of the educational process is devoted to the development of employable skills and professional attitudes so that graduates are prepared for the working world. It is very important the student use every resource at his or her disposal and acquire the maximum benefit from every course. The student should consult with instructors or staff whenever there is need for additional instruction or support services. The Department of Academic Affairs serves the students, faculty, and the community through the development and implementation of post-secondary educational programs that are designed to prepare students with the necessary skills for entry-level positions in a variety of design and business-related careers. This department achieves its mission through: · The selection, development, and retention of exemplary faculty. · The careful, continual planning and development of a curriculum that is responsive to the needs of students and employers. · The promotion and support of an effective library that strives to make needed materials accessible. The Department of Academic Affairs includes faculty, Academic Directors, the Dean of Academic Affairs, the Academic Assistant, the Registrar, the Director of the Library, and all respective staffs. Faculty report directly to the appropriate Academic Director and indirectly to the Dean. The Academic Director is responsible for a particular program area including curriculum, faculty, student advising, and related issues. The Dean is charged with the day-to-day administration of the educational programs and staff. The Dean also meets with faculty, both formally and informally, throughout each quarter to ensure the facilitation of a strong and supportive learning environment. Regular faculty meetings are held to address administrative and procedural issues including classroom and laboratory scheduling. Issues at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham such as student success, faculty or classroom needs, and faculty-training opportunities are regular topics of discussion.

Academic Freedom

Faculty in the Art Institutes system who teach in accordance with the course syllabi and who utilize professional and academic teaching practices are assured of freedom in how they teach. Academic freedom assures that faculty are free to pursue the best means for realizing the goals and objectives set forth in The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's values, vision, and mission statements in keeping with standards of propriety and professional conduct. It is the role of the faculty to bring to the teaching/learning environment their expertise and enthusiasm and to convey the relevant information they possess to students. Faculty should endeavor to create an atmosphere in the classroom and/or laboratory that is conducive to the attainment of the course objectives. In accordance with this, faculty exercise the freedom to be creative in these pursuits.

Passwords and logon instructions for offcampus access to subscription databases are available to students and faculty upon request at the library's circulation desk. The library's web page provides links to the book catalog, subscription databases, recommended web resources, and research guides. The address is: http://airdlibrary.com The library is open 5 days a week including both day and evening hours. It contains computers, printer and photocopier for student use. The library houses public access computers that are primarily for the purpose of conducting information research. They also can be used to view DVDs. Headphones are available for checkout from the circulation desk, or users may bring their own. Current students, faculty and staff of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may check out materials from the library upon completion of the Borrower's Agreement form. A valid school identification card must be presented each time materials are checked out of the library. Library orientation classes are held each quarter as part of Student Success Seminar. In addition, library staff conduct classes on research, use of the databases, and the use of course-specific library materials.

Registration for Classes

Academic advising takes place during week 6 of each quarter for the upcoming quarter. Registration for classes is held during week 7. Students should see their Academic Department Director or Advisor for advising and scheduling of classes. Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. All students should meet with their Academic Director and register to ensure they receive the classes and class times they prefer. Notices are posted, announcements are made in class, and emails are sent through the on-campus student email system to alert students of registration events, dates, and deadlines. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham reserves the right to reschedule students at any time to accommodate institutional needs. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, through the Department of Academic Affairs, reserves the right to alter programs, course titles, course content, or the sequencing of classes, subject to regulatory approval, at any time for the purpose of enhancing the education program.

Additional hardware for certain courses may include: scanner, digital camera, and printer. Additional software for specific courses may includes the latest editions of: Microsoft Office, CAD, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Director, Acrobat, and Norton Antivirus. The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division may update technology requirements at any time; students will be notified of technology requirements by the Academic Advisor.

Homework

In addition to regular attendance at scheduled classes, the student will be required to devote additional time each week outside the classroom studying and working on assigned projects.

Student Readmission Services

Students seeking readmission to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham should contact the Assistant Director of Readmissions. Readmission is contingent on academic standing and space limitations and is at the discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs. Students who interrupt their education will be subject to any changes in fees, curricula, and graduation requirements that took effect during their leave.

Online Facilitation

The online environment offers three distinctive ways for students to communicate with their instructor and their fellow learners. First, each student must participate by posting on the message board. This serves as the classroom environment, where students may ask and answer questions, brainstorm, and problem solve as a unit. Each student receives a grade based on their level of participation. Second, a chat room is available in each online classroom so students can meet in large or small groups to work collaboratively on projects. Third, the email address of the instructor and each student are available to all students enrolled in each class. Specific questions for instructors and between students are fostered in this way to ensure privacy when discussing topics of concern, such as grades. Another avenue of student interaction includes a student "Cyber Café," where students of all programs and types can meet and mingle outside the structure of the classroom. In this way, PLUS students and students enrolled at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division can form relationships that may not otherwise be possible due to distance. If a student experiences difficulties with a personality during the course of their online class, they are instructed to contact their instructor and their Academic Advisor, to ensure a quick resolution to the issue.

Study Trips

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham arranges study trips to local cultural and commercial sites. These visits are an integral part of the learning process and offer students valuable exposure to places and events of importance to the student's field of study. In addition to local study trips that support the curriculum, out-of-town seminars, and tours may be planned in individual programs. Costs related to optional study trips are not included in regular tuition or fees.

Class Sessions

Classes may be held Monday through Saturday from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. As needs change, this schedule may expand to include other days and times. A degree schedule typically includes five to six classes a week. Degree students may be required to attend classes in any of the scheduled time slots, day or evening.

AiOnline PLUS Program

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham offers a variety of online courses in agreement with The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division. PLUS students may choose from selected courses approved within their program of study that equal the course competencies and outcomes of the equivalent courses offered "on ground." To enroll in online courses, students must meet all admissions requirements of on-ground students at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Students must also meet the course prerequisites citied in this catalog before taking online courses. In addition to the standard tuition, a $100.00 fee is charged for each online class. This fee covers administration and technical support and is added to the student's account. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's refund policy applies to all students taking online classes. Students who withdraw from a Session I or Session II online course after the drop/add period are treated the same as if they withdrew from an on-ground class. Session II classes begin the day after the Session I classes end and run 5 ½ weeks. The ending date of the second session may not coincide with the ending date of the on-ground classes. Drop/ Add period is two days from the start of the mid-quarter session. If you drop or add one or more classes, your financial aid eligibility may change. Please see your Financial Aid Officer before you drop or add a class.

Registrar's Office

The Registrar is responsible for the following services: · Maintenance of all permanent student academic records · Issuance of grade reports and/ or attendance reports · Issuance of student transcript records* Supervision of quarterly student registration activities; processing of student changes including: · · · · Leaves of absence Course and program interruptions Requests for program changes Veterans' enrollment certifications and reports · Social Security verification · Address changes · Verification of enrollment forms

*There is a $5 fee for each transcript. Requests are generally processed within seven to ten days of the day the request is received; requests must be made in writing. Failure to meet financial obligations may lead to the withholding of academic transcripts.

Academic Support

Students who experience academic difficulty at any time are strongly encouraged to consult immediately with their instructor(s) to develop a plan for resolving their academic needs and concerns. The Academic Directors and the Dean also are available for support. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Student/ Academic Success Center provides tutorial and support services in a variety of areas. Services are available to all students based on individual and small group needs. The student affairs coordinator along with faculty work at the center on a weekly basis.

EDUCATIONAL POLICIES & PROCEDURES Academic Grading System

The grading system incorporates letter grades, equivalent numeric values and letter codes as follows: Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D F Quality Points 4.0 3.7 3.4 3.0 2.7 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.4 1.0 0.0

Academic Support

PLUS students have access to up to 10 hours of online tutoring through Smarthinking, a partner with The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division, to provide online tutoring in core areas such as math, science, English, and writing projects. Online students may also use The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Student/Academic Success Center services in conjunction with their online classes. On-ground tutors and instructors are aware and supportive of PLUS students, and use the academic tools at their disposal to assist online students in their courses. Students interested in the PLUS program should contact their Academic Advisor during the regular advising and registration period.

Library

The mission of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Library is to support learning and to encourage intellectual curiosity within the academic community. The Director of Library Services works in conjunction with faculty to help students develop information literacy ­ the ability to find, evaluate, and use information to become independent life-long learners. The library's collection contains over 3800 volumes consisting of books, ebooks, CDs, videos, as well as 75 print magazine subscriptions, and 7 electronic database subscriptions, which provide access to magazine and journal articles, reference information, images, and stock footage.

The Registrar also provides a leadership role in supporting student efforts to persist in school through graduation.

Additional Letter Codes I S K P T TR W WF = = = = = = = = Incomplete Suspension External Transfer Credit Proficiency Credit by Exam or Portfolio Termination from course External Transfer Credit Withdrawal during weeks 1-9 Withdrawal after week 9

Academic Advising

Academic Advisors assist students in navigating their curriculum and in reaching their personal and career goals. Students may meet with Academic Advisors to discuss scheduling, curriculum, grades, school policies, study skills, and other student-related experiences.

Technology Requirements

Students wishing to take online classes must have a computer system and internet connection at their disposal seven days a week that must meet the following minimum technology requirements: Microsoft Internet Explorer v.5.5/6.0 (PC), Safari 2.0 (MAC), or Firefox.

44 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 45

GPA and CGPA

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham measures and records academic performance by computing the Grade Point Average (GPA) and Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for each student, using the letter grades, four-point scale, and credit-hour values. GPA is the average of grade points a student earns during one quarter. CGPA is the cumulative average of all grade points a student has earned over all quarters at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Quarterly Grade Point Computation: The quarterly grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total grade points earned for all courses attempted in a quarter by the total credits attempted for that quarter. Note: Internal policies state that the quarterly GPA is rounded up to the nearest hundredth if the last digit is 5 or greater. It is rounded down to the nearest hundredth if the last digit is less than 5. Cumulative Grade Point Average: The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is computed by dividing the total grade points earned for all courses attempted at the Institute by the total credits attempted. The resulting CGPA is expressed as a whole number and a tenth. The CGPA is used in all evaluations of student academic progress and/or standing. Note: Internal policies state that the quarterly CGPA is rounded up to the nearest hundredth if the last digit is 5 or greater. It is rounded down to the nearest hundredth if the last digit is less than 5.

· P ­ Proficiency credit is awarded through examination (e.g. articulated credit, CLEP or AP test,) documented previous work experience, or through portfolio review. Proficiency credits apply toward graduation credit requirements; however, they do not compute in GPA or CGPA and do not count as credit attempted. · N ­ Non-credit is assigned for courses such as Student Success Seminar with 0.0 credits. · W ­ Withdrawal is applied when a student withdraws from the total program of study by the end of the ninth week of the quarter or from individual classes after drop/add week but by the end of the ninth week of the quarter. Withdrawals do not compute in the GPA or CGPA but do count as credit attempted. · WF ­ Withdrawal Fail is applied when a student withdraws from individual classes or his or her total program of study after the ninth week of classes. Withdrawal Fail does compute in GPA and CGPA as an F and does count as credit attempted.

year. The academic year is defined as 36 credit hours. The student is assumed to devote appropriate time to preparation and study outside of the classroom. Measurements in credit hours or the listing of credits for courses is not intended to imply transferability into college programs at other post-secondary institutions.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Description

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham awards the Bachelor of Arts degree (B.A.) in the following five program areas: Fashion Marketing & Management, Interior Design, Web Design & Interactive Media, Culinary Arts Management, and Graphic Design. Each degree program includes 56 quarter credit hours in general education and 132 quarter hours in the area of specialized preparation, for a total of 188 quarter credit hours. In the degree programs, full-time students typically take 15 to 16 credits (five classes) per quarter for twelve quarters and may be scheduled for day or evening classes. The completion time may vary based on transfer credits, developmental studies, or failure/withdrawal from classes.

All students must complete any outstanding business (examples include but are not limited to Financial, Educational, and Student Service business) with The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham before attending class. Students who have not been cleared by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will not be permitted to attend classes for the quarter. Students missing class because they are not cleared will be marked absent. Please refer to Course Absenteeism and Performance Policy. A student whose enrollment is suspended for not attending class prior to the close of business on the first day of classes during Week 2 may be permitted to apply for readmission to the subsequent quarter. 2. Course Absenteeism and Performance Policy Accumulated absenteeism in any one course affects performance and grades. Absenteeism can be accumulated through missing the class meeting entirely or by being tardy or leaving class early. Excessive tardiness and leaving early accumulate hours absent. Excessive absenteeism totaled throughout the quarter may result in course failure. A student who accumulates ten (10) cumulative hours of absenteeism (or 23% of class meeting hours) in a scheduled course during any academic quarter will receive a grade "F" for that course. For the specific requirements in an individual course, refer to the course syllabus provided by the instructor; course syllabi take precedence over the catalog. It is the student's responsibility to remain current on his or her attendance status. 3."Two-Week Rule" The Registrar will automatically terminate from school any student who fails to attend all classes on his/her schedule for two (2) consecutive weeks of the quarter. 4. Absences for ONLINE courses A student is required to participate in the ONLINE course 4 out of each 7 days (each of the 4 log-ins during a separate 24 hour period). Each day less is considered an "absent day." Students missing 4 days as determined by The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division will be placed on probation in the course. Students missing 8 days as determined by The Art Institute of Pittsburgh -- Online Division will fail the course. 5. Perfect Attendance Awards Quarterly - Any student who attends every class meeting for all classes enrolled in during a particular quarter and is neither tardy nor leaves early for any class is given a certificate at the end of the quarter recognizing this accomplishment. At Graduation - Any student who receives a perfect attendance award each quarter of enrollment will be recognized at graduation for perfect attendance.

6. Add/Drop Period and Individual Course Withdrawal Policies The Add/Drop period begins with the first day of the quarter and ends at the close of business on the first day of class during Week 2. During this time, students may make registration adjustments, such as adding, dropping, or changing days or times of courses. After the end of the Add/Drop period, students who opt to withdraw from a course before the end of the ninth week of the quarter will receive a "W" grade. Students withdrawing from any course after the ninth week will receive a "WF" grade. If you drop or add one or more classes, your financial aid eligibility may change. Please see your Financial Aid Officer before you drop or add a class.

ability to enroll in and complete courses on a consistent manner. This ability is measured in two ways: cumulative grade-point-average (CGPA); and incremental completion rate (ICR). Failure to complete courses successfully for any reason may negatively affect academic progress. Failing courses or withdrawing from courses could result in the loss of financial aid. In order for a student to graduate, the minimum requirements are a CGPA of 2.0, and completion of the program in no more than 150% of total program credits.

Criteria for Honors Designation

To promote academic excellence and to recognize exemplary academic achievement, the following honors designations will be issued on a term basis and upon graduation. Term Honors Designation (at the completion of a quarter or semester) ­ Students who enroll for and complete 12 credits or more and meet the following criteria may receive the corresponding designation: Term GPA 4.0 3.7-3.9 3.5-3.6 Honors Designation President's Honor Roll Dean's Honor Roll Honor Roll

Mid-Quarter Session

Mid-quarter courses are available only to new students who elect to begin their program with usually 2 courses to be taken in an accelerated 5 ½ week time-frame. Mid-quarter begins on Thursday of Week 6 and continues through the end of the quarter. The Add/ Drop period begins on the first day of the mid-quarter session and ends at the close of business on the first day of class during Week 7. For students dropping or adding one or more classes, financial aid eligibility may change. Before dropping or adding a class, be sure to meet with a Financial Aid Officer to discuss the effects of the change.

Grade Changes

Final course grades, as recorded in student records, cannot be changed without extenuating circumstances. Grade changes require approval of the faculty member who gave the grade in question and the Academic Department Director. Approved grade changes are due to the Registrar before the end of the first week of class of the quarter following the quarter in which the grade was earned. For more information, contact the Registrar's office on the second floor.

Associate of Applied Science Degree Description

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham awards the Associate of Applied Science degree (A.A.S.) in the following four program areas: Culinary Arts, Fashion Marketing, Graphic Design, and Web Design & Interactive Media. This degree recognizes those who successfully complete programs that emphasize preparation for careers in the applied arts and sciences, typically at the technical or semi-professional level. Each degree program includes 24 quarter credit hours in general education and 88 quarter hours in the area of specialized preparation, for a total of 112 quarter credit hours. In the degree programs, full-time students typically take 15 to 16 credits (five classes) per quarter for seven quarters and may be scheduled for day or evening classes. The completion time may vary based on transfer credits, developmental studies, or failure/withdrawal from classes.

Honor Designation at Graduation ­ Students who achieve a CGPA of 3.5 or better are designated as Honor Graduates. Developmental studies classes are not considered when evaluating honors designations.

Grade Codes and Policies

In addition to letter grades, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham uses the following letter codes and policies in its grading system: · I ­ Incomplete. Used to indicate that one or more course requirements have not been completed. It does compute in GPA and CGPA as an "F" grade until it is converted to a grade or timeframe ends and defaults to an "F." Students must submit required coursework to their respective faculty member by Friday of the first week of the subsequent quarter. "I" grades that are not changed to a passing grade within the deadline will automatically become an "F." Exceptions to this policy may be made with documented, verifiable mitigating circumstances and approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs. · TR ­ Transfer credit is awarded for credit hours transferred from other accredited post-secondary (college-level) institutions. Transfer credits apply toward graduation requirements; however, they are not used to compute a student's GPA or CGPA, and they do not count as credit attempted.

Grade Reporting

Midterm and final grade reports are available via the online student portal at myaicampus. com after the grades are received by the Registrar's office. Midterm grades do not appear on transcripts with final grades.

Second Session On-Ground Courses

Continuing students may elect to enroll in courses offered during an accelerated 5 ½ week timeframe beginning on Thursday of Week 6 and continuing through the end of the quarter. This is known as Second Session On-Ground Courses. Students may register for the courses beginning on the first day of the quarter until the start of the Second Session. There is no Drop/Add period for Second Session On-Ground Courses. A student may cancel his/her registration in a Second Session course prior to the beginning of the course. Once the course has started, the student must withdraw from the course rather than cancel the registration.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR DEGREE PROGRAMS:

· At the end of second quarter (or the fifth session for mid-session starts), students must achieve a CGPA of 1.0 and an ICR of 33.33%. Anything below these milestones will result in probation. · At the end of third quarter, students must attain a CGPA of 1.0 and an ICR of 33.33%. Anything below these milestones will result in dismissal. · At the end of third quarter, students with a CGPA under 1.5, but at least 1.0 and/or an ICR below 50%, but at least 33.33% will be placed on probation. (NOTE: If you are on probation for ICR it will be very difficult for you to meet the sixth quarter ICR milestone of 66.67%. In some cases you may have to successfully complete all the hours you attempt in your fourth, fifth, and sixth quarters. Please consult with your academic advisor on your exact requirement.) · At the end of sixth quarter, students must accomplish a CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.67%. Anything below these milestones will result in dismissal. · While the Institute is bound by Department of Education requirements that a student be dismissed after his or her sixth quarter if the

Repeated Courses

Students receive grades quarterly. The grade report contains both the grade point average for the quarter (GPA) and cumulative grade point average (CGPA) for the program. When a course is repeated after failure, the grade earned upon repeating the class replaces the original grade in determining the grade point average, though the failing grade will still appear on the transcript.

Quarterly Clearance and Attendance Policies

In order to maintain current enrollment, students must abide by the following policies each quarter. The policies are listed by priority. 1. Quarterly Enrollment and Class Clearance Policy Each student must be cleared and attend class prior to the close of business on the first day of classes during Week 2 of every quarter in order to maintain enrollment as a student. Failure to do so may result in the suspension of enrollment.

Quarter Credit Hour

All course work at The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham is measured in quarter credit hours. One quarter credit hour is equivalent to 11 contact hours in a lecture-format class, 22 contact hours in a laboratory, or 33 hours of field experience. A class may be comprised of a combination of lecture and lab. For the purpose of federal financial aid, full-time enrollment is defined as 12 credit hours per quarter and 36 credit hours per academic

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Applicable to every student enrolled in diploma and undergraduate degree programs, the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy ensures that students make satisfactory progress towards successful completion of their academic programs. The evaluation points and milestones contained in the policy are meant to identify problems for which actions of early intervention and/or remediation can be taken. Most critical to this policy is a student's

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CGPA is below 2.0 and/or the ICR is below 66.67%, the Institute is permitted to place a student on probation in subsequent quarters if the CGPA falls below 2.0, but is at least 1.8, and/or the ICR falls below 66.67%, but is at least 60%. If the student is put on probation, the student will have to attain both a CGPA of 2.0 and an ICR of 66.67% at the end of the next evaluation point or be dismissed (note: evaluation points occur every other quarter after sixth quarter). This can only happen once after sixth quarter. · At any evaluation point after sixth quarter, a student with a CGPA below 1.8 and/or an ICR below 60% will be dismissed. · Students may not attempt more than 150% of the credits in their programs; anything in excess of 150% of the credits will result in dismissal. · Failure to complete courses successfully, for any reason may negatively affect academic progress. Failing courses or withdrawing from courses could result in the loss of financial aid.

Appeal Process

If a student appeals and is denied the appeal, he or she must remain out of school until one year after the quarter in which the appeal was denied. The student can then request an additional appeal for reinstatement, but would have to demonstrate accomplishments or changes that show a degree of college readiness that reliably predict success. Should the student have his or her appeal denied a second time, the student will be permanently dismissed from The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. If the student's appeal is granted, he or she will be placed on probation at the start of the term, and would be required to attain CGPA and ICR milestones by the next evaluation point. Failure to do so will result in a permanent dismissal. The student would do this through the reentry process. Other Standards of Academic Progress: Following is a comprehensive list of events that indicate there may be a mitigating circumstance which has negatively impacted academic progress: · Death of an immediate family member · Student illness requiring hospitalization (this includes mental health issues) · Illness of an immediate family member where the student is a primary caretaker · Illness of an immediate family member where the family member is the primary financial support · Abusive relationships · Divorce proceedings · Previously undocumented disability · Work-related transfer during the term · Change in work schedule during the term · Natural disaster · Family emergency · Financial hardship such as foreclosure or eviction · Loss of transportation where there are no alternative means of transportation · Documentation from the School Counselor and/or a Professional Counselor

Deans of Academic Affairs are responsible for determining the appropriateness of the mitigating circumstance in regards to severity, timeliness, and the student's ability to avoid the circumstance. Documentation from a school or professional counselor should not breach the student/ counselor relationship. A memorandum or letter on school or organizational letterhead indicating a counselor's opinion that student issues are contrary to satisfactory academic progress will suffice as proof of mitigating circumstances. Grades achieved in repeated classes will replace grades of `F', `W', or `WF'. Grades of `F','W', or `WF' are included in the maximum allowable time frame and incremental completion rate requirements. The grade `I' indicates Incomplete and is calculated as if it is an `F' until it is changed to another grade. Students may also retake classes in which they received a passing grade in order to improve their CGPA. However, a student cannot receive financial aid for repeating courses in which a passing grade has already been earned.

Transferring to another Art Institutes system school

Students wishing to transfer from one Art Institutes system school to another may do so only if they are in good standing at the sending school. Any student dismissed for academic progress cannot transfer to another Art Institutes system school until he or she has been reinstated at the sending school and is deemed to be making satisfactory academic progress.

STUDENT AFFAIRS & CAREER SERVICES

The mission of the Student Affairs and Career Services Departments is to supplement The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's educational goals by providing assistance and services to students in the areas of employment, counseling, international advising, and housing. Student Affairs encourages students to participate in activities that stimulate cultural awareness, creativity, and both social and professional development. Student Affairs and Career Services staff is available to: · Help students and graduates network, cultivate, and explore career opportunities. · Provide individualized job search assistance. · Provide appropriate school-sponsored housing or off-campus apartment referral services that are convenient and suitable to the students' needs and conducive to their educational goals. · Provide counseling services, activities, and events that support the educational process by enhancing social and cultural awareness, community involvement, and the active participation of students in these services. · Provide resources and assist international students with all issues pertinent to their transition into this country. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is dedicated to helping students achieve academic, professional, and personal goals. In order to achieve these outcomes students must be actively involved and committed to the learning process both in and out of the classroom. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham employees are ready to support and encourage students in this exciting and demanding endeavor.

including effective resumé and cover-letter writing, finding resources, networking skills, personal appearance, business etiquette, and negotiating skills. During the last quarter of study, Career Services will host a portfolio review showcasing student portfolios. A major function of Student Affairs and Career Services is to help student's pursue part-time employment while they attend The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. During advanced quarters, emphasis is placed on assisting students in seeking fieldrelated part-time jobs, internships, and freelance work in their programs of study.

Changes in Program

Students will be allowed only one change of program. On rare occasions and with good reason, the Dean of Academic Affairs may allow a student an additional change of program. Changing from day to evening in the same program is not considered a change of program. Changing from a diploma level to a degree level or an associate's level to a bachelor's level in the same program is not considered changes of program. Courses taken in one program applicable to the second program shall be transferred with the grade. If students have taken a course more than once, all grades pertinent to that course shall apply to the second program. Grades earned in the original program shall count towards the cumulative grade point average. However, in cases in which a student has graduated from The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham in one program then subsequently begins work in a different program, grades used in the CGPA of the previous program will not be applied to the student's new program CGPA calculation. The grades will be recorded as TR. For ICR purposes only, those courses transferred will apply to the new program. The maximum allowable timeframe shall be calculated as the total number of credits in the program minus the number of credits applied to the new program X 1.5. Example: if a student transfers 36 credits to a program consisting of 180 credits, the calculation would be 180 ­ 36 = 144 X 1.5 = 216 credits. Second example, if a student earned 36 credits in the original program that are applicable to the new program, but transfers 48 credits due to repeating failed classes then the maximum allowable timeframe is reduced to 198 credits.

Counseling

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham students may utilize the Student Assistance Program, which is a service available to students at no additional charge that provides confidential counseling 24 hours per day, 7 days a week. The program counselor may refer the student for limited visits with an area network mental health provider or assist the student with locating resources within the local community. For more information on this service, contact the office of Student Affairs.

Developmental Studies

Developmental Studies Courses are based on the results of the academic placement test. Like any course, students must successfully complete such courses in order to progress in the program. Developmental studies course credits do not count towards the total number of credits for graduation nor do they count in the CGPA; however, they do count in determining the maximum time frame and the incremental completion rate. Developmental studies courses may be individually attempted no more than three times. Failing or withdrawing from a transitional studies course three times will result in dismissal.

Transfer Credits

Transfer credits from other post-secondary institutions are not calculated in the maximum allowable credits or incremental completion rate requirements; however, transfer credits do reduce the total number of credits that must be attempted within the program. Therefore, the maximum number of attempted credits for a student with transfer credit is one and one-half times the number of credits required to complete for graduation. Example: if a student transfers 36 credits to a program consisting of 180 credits, the calculation would be 180 ­ 36 = 144 X 1.5 = 216 credits. Grades for credits transferred from any post-secondary institution (including an Art Institutes system school) will be recorded as "TR" in the Student Information System and will not affect the student's CGPA.

Student Housing

The Student Affairs department offers school-sponsored housing for The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham students in units at apartment complexes close to the school. Housing staff are available onsite and at the school for students.

Orientation

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham provides a comprehensive orientation program for all new students. Orientation is offered as a means of assisting new students' transitions into The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. For information on orientation, students may contact the Assistant Director of Admissions.

Career Services

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham maintains an employment assistance service for students. Career Services continually seeks new employment opportunities for students. Research is done on a regular basis by The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham's Career Service advisors to gain knowledge in areas of business relating to the different programs of study. Career Services responds to employer needs and gives guidance to students on industry trends that relate to their programs of study. Career Services advisors are available through the Career Services office. Although The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham offers no guarantee of employment, considerable effort is made to bring potential employers together with graduates who have the skills employers seek. In addition, a Career Development course is required to familiarize students with a variety of job-search techniques

Health Care

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham has a student health insurance plan available to its students through a 3rd party provider. Contact the student affairs office for more details. Furthermore, the Student Affairs office provides a list of local emergency facilities that are available to students. It is recommended that dependent students continue to be included on the health insurance policies of parents or guardians.

Milestones and Evaluation Points

Evaluation Point Degree End of Second Quarter End of Third Quarter End of Third Quarter End of Sixth Quarter * and every Quarter thereafter Milestones (CGPA and ICR) < 1.0 and/or 33.33% < 1.0 and/or 33.33% < 1.5 and/or 50% > 1.0 and 33.33% < 2.0 and 66.67% Required Action Probation Dismissal Probation Dismissal

Requirements for Graduation/Degree

In order for students to graduate, students must have successfully passed all required course work, have a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0, participate in graduate Portfolio Review, have satisfied all financial obligations to The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham and completion of the program in no more than 150% of total program credits.

If a student's CGPA falls below 2.0, but is at least 1.8 and/or the ICR is below 66.67% but at least 60%, the student may be placed on probation one time after he or she has moved beyond his or her sixth quarter. The student would then need to achieve the 2.0 and 66.67% milestones at the next evaluation point or be dismissed.

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FINANCIAL SERVICES Student Financial Services

At the time of initial enrollment, the student works with a financial aid officer and develops a financial plan designed to meet expenses involved in the education process (i.e., tuition, fees, school-sponsored housing, etc.). The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is eligible to offer its students the opportunity to apply for a variety of financial assistance programs. These programs include loans and grants for qualified applicants. Details regarding these programs are available in the Student Financial Services Office. Students who receive financial assistance are advised to be aware of the various responsibilities they must fulfill under these programs including: · Maintaining satisfactory academic progress as outlined in this catalog and/or student handbook. · Informing the Student Financial Services Office of address changes, schedule changes, program changes, or any other status changes that might affect the student's eligibility for financial assistance. Some students do not apply initially for financial assistance or do apply and are determined to be ineligible for assistance. The continuing student should be aware that the federal and state eligibility criteria are reviewed periodically and modified. Therefore, any student whose financial circumstances change or for whom a financial need arises is encouraged to contact the Student Financial Services Office for assistance. There are state, federal, and college deadlines for applying for financial aid. Please check with Student Financial Services for this information.

Federal Pell Grant

The Federal Pell Grant, unlike a loan, does not have to be repaid. The Pell Grant is a federally sponsored program to assist families in paying educational costs. The maximum award for the 2009-10 award year (July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010) is $5,350. Eligibility is based on need and is limited to undergraduate students who have not completed a previous bachelors degree. For many students, the Pell Grant provides a foundation of financial aid to which other aid may be added. To apply for the Pell Grant, students must: · Be a US citizen or an eligible non-citizen · Demonstrate financial need · Be working towards a degree, diploma or certificate, and be making satisfactory progress · Be or have been registered with the Selective Service, if required · Not be in default on a federal loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant · Not have certain drug convictions In order to apply for the Pell Grant, and for all Federal Aid, students are required to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) which is available online at http://fafsa.ed.gov or at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Financial Aid Office. If not completing the FAFSA online, the student can return it to the Financial Aid Office at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham.

National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants

SMART Grants are available to eligible students in the third and fourth years of certain Bachelors degree programs. Students must be receiving a Pell Grant, a US Citizen, and have a 3.0 GPA. If transferring from another school, the student must have a 3.0 in classes for which credits are being transferred. The admissions office can provide the student with a list of eligible programs. Awards are up to $4,000 per year.

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

The Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is not based on financial need. It is available for students attending at least half-time who do not qualify for the full amount of a Stafford Loan. The interest rate is fixed. Students will be charged interest payments from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. It is suggested students make interest payments while attending school. If the interest is not paid, it will be added to the principal, and the students may have a larger payment after they finish school. For dependent students, the combined Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford loans cannot usually exceed $5,500 for the first year, $6,500 for the second year, and $7,500 per year for the third and fourth years. Additional amounts available for independent students are $4,000 per academic year for the first two years and $5,000 per academic year for the third and fourth years. If a dependent student's parent is denied for a PLUS loan, the student may borrow Stafford Loans at the independent student amounts. Basic Federal eligibility requirements apply to Stafford Loans. Students should begin the loan application process with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students will also need to complete a Master Promissory Note (MPN) with the lender of their choice. The Financial Aid office will provide the student with a "preferred lender list" or the student may choose another lender.

The EPIC Program

The Art Institutes Early Payment Incentive Credit (EPIC) program is a risk-free financial incentive program created to enable families to make an earlier financial commitment and earn financial credits to a student account. The EPIC program offers a financial credit equal to the lowest of one of five consecutive monthly payments made prior to enrollment or equal to two of the lowest of ten consecutive monthly payments made prior to the start of class. If the applicant does not complete enrollment at The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham, all payments will be fully refunded within 30 days of the refund request. Complete details regarding the EPIC program are available by contacting a financial aid officer at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham.

Terms/Conditions: Applicants must submit a scholarship application form, a personal essay, a copy of their Student Aid Report (SAR), official copies of all college transcripts (new students must submit high school transcripts), a recommendation letter from a teacher, and, if a new student, a copy of your acceptance letter from The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Range of Award: Varies annually up to $500 per student, based on the availability of funds. Other Conditions: Scholarship winners must meet all general application and program enrollment requirements. Scholarships awarded by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may be used only at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. In the event education is terminated, either by the student or by the school, the scholarship becomes null and void. The scholarship is not redeemable for cash and may not be used to finance optional programs sponsored by the school. The scholarship covers tuition only and may not be applied against fees, housing, living expenses, or program supplies. It may not be transferred between affiliate schools of The Art Institutes.

Need Based Grant Program

The Need Based program provides grants to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham students who show evidence of financial need, and the motivation to complete the program successfully. To be considered for a Need Based award, the student must meet the following criteria: · Student must apply for the program through the Student Financial Services Office. · Student must be enrolled in a minimum of at least 9 credit hours in a degree seeking program at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. · The funds cannot be used to create a credit balance on the students account. · Student must maintain satisfactory academic progress. The approximate grant amount may vary from $200-$500 per quarter based on the academic program. Need Based grants are given on a first-come, first- serve basis, and are subject to fund availability.

SCHOLARSHIPS

While scholarship information is presented below, students should not count on financing their education by anticipating a scholarship. Consideration should be given to applying for financial assistance either through The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham or the federal and state governments.

The EDMC Education Foundation Scholarship

The EDMC Education Foundation is a nonprofit corporation that was created in 2002 to raise scholarship funding to support the academic and career goals of enrolled and prospective students. Scholarship applicants are evaluated annually by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Scholarship Committee based on financial need or merit. Information about applying for scholarships granted through the EDMC Education Foundation is available in the Admissions and the Academic Affairs offices. Annual awards vary in amounts up to $500. Eligibility: You must plan to enter The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham by October 2010 or be a student in good standing in Summer Quarter 2010, planning to continue in the Fall Quarter 2010. Deadline: All entries must be hand-delivered or postmarked no later than September 10, 2010. The winner(s) will be notified no later than the week of October 4, 2010. Apply to: Applications may be obtained from the Admissions Department and must be returned to the Scholarship Committee or mailed to: Scholarship Committee The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham 410 Blackwell Street, Suite 200 Durham, NC 27701

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG)

The Federal SEOG, like the Federal Pell Grant, does not have to be repaid. A limited amount of funding is available, so these grants are given to the neediest students based on the Department of Education's formula for determining need. Depending upon availability, an eligible student can receive $300-900 annually.

Scholarships for High School Seniors

Scholarship funds may be awarded to qualified students who begin classes in the summer or fall quarter of an academic year. High school seniors may compete for scholarships in The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's programs. General Competition Guidelines Eligibility: Students must be scheduled to graduate in the year of application from a U.S. high school or equivalent foreign institution. Deadlines: For complete details of dates and deadlines, please contact the Senior Director of Admissions at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Entry Preparation: · Up to nine (9), $1,000 scholarships are offered by The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham per academic year to high school graduates who demonstrate ability and commitment in one of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's programs of study. To enter, students must fulfill all general competition guidelines listed below and individual requirements for the chosen program. · Fulfill all individual program-entry requirements for the indicated program of study.

Plus Loan

The Federal PLUS Loan enables parents of dependent students to borrow funds to pay the education expenses of each child who is an undergraduate student enrolled at least half-time. The interest rate is fixed. Repayment begins 60 days after the final disbursement of the loan. The loan limit is equal to the cost of attendance as determined by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, minus any other financial aid received for the student. The loan applicant will be subject to a credit check; The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham recommends that the borrower use the "pre-approval" process that will be available with the lender of their choice. More information and a PLUS Loan "preferred lender list" are available in The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Financial Aid Office. Parent borrowers can use a lender on the list or choose their own, The borrower will need to complete a Master Promissory Note (MPN) with the lender of their choice.

Financial Aid

All eligible students may apply for financial assistance under various federal and state programs. Listed below are some of the financial aid programs or scholarships for which eligible students may apply. Additional opportunities may be available. Students should refer to "A Guide to Financing Your Education" provided in your enrollment packet or contact the Admissions Office or the Student Financial Services Office for a comprehensive listing of financial aid opportunities and the specific requirements of each. · Federal Pell Grant · Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG) · Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) · Federal Stafford Student Loan (subsidized and unsubsidized) · Federal Parent Loan (PLUS) · Federal Work Study Program · Various scholarships · Vocational Rehabilitation Assistance · Veterans Administration Benefits (Students who believe they are eligible for Veterans Administration Benefits should contact the Registrar's office for further information)

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan

A Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan can provide up to $3,500 during the student's first academic year, up to $4,500 for the second academic year or up to $5,500 per year for the third and fourth academic years, depending on the program. The loan is in the student's name, and the interest rate is fixed. This loan is awarded on the basis of financial need. The government pays the interest while a student is in school. The student does not begin repaying the loan until six months after his or her last date of attendance or the date that the student drops below half time attendance. Students must be enrolled at least half-time to be awarded the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan.

Academic Competitive Grant (ACG)

The Academic Competitive Grant is available to students who are receiving a Pell Grant, are full time in their first or second year of college in a degree program, who graduated from High School in 2006 or later, and who took a program of study in High School that was considered to be rigorous. Each eligible student may receive 2 years of ACG. The award is up to $750 the first year and up to $1,300 the second year. To receive a second year grant, the student must have a 3.0 GPA at the end of the first year.

Federal Work-Study

The Federal Work-Study (FWS) program provides jobs for some students who have remaining financial need and who express an interest in the program. FWS jobs are either on-campus providing services to other students or off-campus through a non-profit agency providing community service.

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· Submit a 250-word essay indicating specific goals and motivation for entering the area of study and for obtaining the scholarship. · Label all slides, prints, and other supporting materials with the following information: name and medium used (if appropriate). Slides must have cardboard or plastic mounts. Essays must be wordprocessed or typewritten and include the student's name and program for which the student is applying. For example, Graphic Design, Fashion Marketing, etc., should be indicated on the title page. · Submit a resumé stating his or her educational background, extra-curricular activities, hobbies, work experience, community involvement, artistic accomplishments, and/or related awards. · Submit the original versions of at least one recommendation letter from an arts-related instructor or academic career advisor. The letter(s) should be submitted on official school letterhead. · Submit a letter from a high school teacher or guidance counselor certifying that entry materials are the student's original creation. · Submit current high school transcripts. · Contact the admissions office for postmark cutoff dates. Entries must be contained in one package and mailed to: Senior Director of Admissions Scholarship EntryThe Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham 410 Blackwell St, Suite 200 Durham, NC 27701 Judging: School faculty, under the direction of the administration of the Department of Academic Affairs and the Academic Director of the entrant's program of study, will serve as judges for the competitions. Decisions will be final. Obligations of Winners: Scholarship recipients must maintain satisfactory academic progress. Scholarships will be suspended during quarters in which the student's cumulative grade-point average (CGPA) falls below 2.5. Winners must begin their course of study the summer or fall quarter of the award year. Entry Materials: All slides, prints, and other entry materials submitted for consideration become the property of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham on receipt. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is not responsible for loss, damage, or return of materials. Finalists and/or winners must be prepared to submit their original work on request and sign a release form that permits The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's use of the work for promotional purposes.

Other Conditions: Scholarships awarded by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may be used only at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. In the event education is terminated either by the student or the school, the scholarship becomes null and void. The scholarship is not redeemable for cash and may not be used to finance optional programs sponsored by the school. The scholarship covers tuition only and may not be applied against fees, housing, living expenses, or program supplies, and may not be transferred between affiliate schools of The Art Institutes. International Entrants: All written entry materials and documentation must be submitted in English, including original recommendation letters. When necessary, English translations must be attached. Scholarship winners must provide bank statements and letters of financial support to prove that the student and/or the student's sponsor has the capability to provide for living expenses, fees, and school supplies and any other related expenses not included in the scholarship. The letters from The Art Institutes system schools awarding admission and the scholarships, financial documentation, academic records, and other relevant documentation must be presented to a U.S. Embassy as part of an application for a student visa. Neither admission to an Art Institutes school, nor the awarding of a scholarship guarantees that the US government will grant a student visa. Individual Program Entry Requirements: Interior Design The applicant must submit at least four but no more than nine 35mm color slides/ transparencies showing original interior design projects. Slides should include: a. A rendering in any medium of a bedroom in elevations or perspective, b. A floor plan of the same room, c. A color scheme for that room showing actual fabric samples or color reproductions of wall, window, floor, and furniture coverings with each sample numbered, d. A one-page, typed chart that identifies the fabric type and usage of each sample. Fashion Marketing The applicant must submit a project titled "Create a Retail Store" (maximum 12 typed pages) which includes the following information: a. Imaginary store set-up, b. Store name, c. Product descriptions (line of merchandise), d. Display descriptions, e. Personnel descriptions.

Graphic Design The applicant must submit at least four but no more than nine 35mm color-slides/ transparencies of original artwork. Slides should be marked with the student's name and include: a) At least one poster design, b) At least one realistic illustration, c) At least one pen-and-ink or pencil drawing. Web Design & Interactive Media The applicant must submit a plan for an interactive kiosk for a local mall that demonstrates creative problem-solving skills. Plan a presentation (maximum 12 typed pages) that incorporates sound and text and moving and still pictures to inform shoppers of the benefits of patronizing a particular store. The plan should: a) Describe the presentation, b) Outline the different aspects of the presentation such as the text, audio, and visual components, c) Discuss how the viewer will interact with the presentation, d) Create computer artwork for any of the above (optional). The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham The applicant must create a four-course dinner for four people to include: a. A soup or salad, appetizer, entrée, and dessert, b. A printed multi-color menu describing your dinner, c. A recipe for each item scaled to four portions, d. The cost of each item, e. Four photographs of the student preparing the meal, f. A photograph of each course as the student would present the item, g. A cover sheet, h. All items bound in a notebook for presentation. Other Conditions: Scholarship winners must meet all general application and program enrollment requirements. Recipients must begin studies at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham by the start of classes in October, 2010. Scholarships awarded by The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham may be used only at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. In the event education is terminated, either by the student or by the school, the scholarship becomes null and void. The scholarship is not redeemable for cash and may not be used to finance optional programs sponsored by the school. The scholarship covers tuition only and may not be applied against fees, housing, living expenses, or program supplies. It may not be transferred between affiliate schools of The Art Institutes. DECA One student will be awarded $1000 for DECA's T. Carl Brown scholarship. Students must apply through their high school DECA program to compete at the annual North Carolina DECA Conference.

Merit The Merit Award Program provides scholarships to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham students who show evidence of merit and the motivation to complete the program successfully. To be considered for a Merit Award, the student must meet the following criteria: 1. If less than one year of previous postsecondary education, a final high school cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 2.5 OR at least one year of post-secondary education with at least a 2.5 CGPA at the previous institution OR, if presently an Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham student, the student must have maintained at least a 2.5 CGPA while attending The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, and 2. Must demonstrate financial need by completing the requisite financial aid forms. Merit Awards are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis and are subject to fund availability. In order to qualify, students in Bachelor and Associate Degree programs must be enrolled in at least 12 credit hours at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The approximate amount may vary from $300 to $500 per quarter based on GPA and the program they have chosen. If you have further questions or need school-specific information, contact the Admissions Department at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham.

Scholarships Awarded: National: First place Second place Third place Fourth place Fifth place Sixth place Seventh place Eighth place Ninth place Tenth place Local: First place Second place Third place $3,000 tuition scholarship $2,000 tuition scholarship $1,000 tuition scholarship $25,000 $20,000 $18,000 $15,000 $10,000 $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000 $2,000

The Art Institutes Best Teen Chef Culinary Scholarship Competition

High school seniors may compete in The Art Institutes Best Teen Chef Competition. Winners are awarded full- or partialtuition scholarships to The Art Institutes system schools that offer a Culinary Arts program. Students must apply to The Art Institutes system location of their choice. National Scholarships Awards: First Place: Full-tuition scholarship (tuition credit awarded evenly over all quarters) Second Place: Half-tuition scholarship (tuition credit awarded evenly over all quarters) Third Place: Quarter-tuition scholarship (tuition credit awarded evenly over all quarters) The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham Local Scholarship Awards Best Teen Chef: First Place: $3,000 tuition scholarship Second Place: $2,000 tuition scholarship All tuition scholarships are awarded toward a culinary associate's degree, diploma, or certificate program. Competition Eligibility: · You must be a graduating high school senior with a 2.0 minimum cumulative grade point average. · The Art Institutes system location to which you submit an application must offer a Culinary Arts program. · You must fulfill all individual culinary program requirements of The Art Institutes system location at which you enter the competition. Deadline: Contact the Senior Director of Admissions for further clarification at 888-245-9593. Entry Requirements: Based on the entry form and materials outlined below, a select number of winners will be chosen and will advance to the local cook-off competition. To enter, you must submit the following: · Your favorite recipe in standardized recipe format (standardized recipe form available for download at www.artinstitutes.edu/btc) · An original photo of your favorite recipe prepared (optional) · A copy of your current high school transcript · A short essay (maximum of 250 words) legibly handwritten or typed in English that addresses why you'd like to study Culinary Arts at The Art Institutes system school.

Local first-prize winners automatically advance to the national competition. An online gallery of all local first-place winners will be featured on The Art Institutes website. All decisions made by judges are final and may not be disputed. The Art Institutes are not responsible for lost or incomplete entries. National tuition scholarships will be awarded in addition to local prizes. Deadlines: For complete details, please contact the Senior Director of Admissions at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Categories and Criteria: Student submissions should show an understanding of the theme "Life is Better with Art in It," basic design concepts, and a keen eye for design. All entries should be PC format readable (i.e., saved with proper extension). The competition is open to graduating high school seniors. Poster size cannot exceed 11" x 17" and must be submitted in JPG format with a minimum resolution of 300 dpi. The poster must incorporate the "Life is Better with Art in It" theme. The poster must include The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts logos.

*Entries must be appropriate for promotional/ marketing purposes. Entries deemed vulgar or offensive will be disqualified. Artwork must be original and not copied from any other published sources, including books or magazines. No copyrighted, animated, or team-created work will be accepted. Original artwork or submissions will not be returned. A current high school transcript must be included with submission.

Family Scholarship

This scholarship of $500 per quarter is awarded to students from the same nuclear family (i.e., siblings, parents) that are enrolled in The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham concurrently. The Family Scholarship award is based upon fund availability. Students must be registered for at least 12 credit hours per quarter.

The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts Poster Design Competition

Life Is Better With Art In It: From the intimate confines of your bedroom to the hustle and bustle of the streets, posters are everywhere. They can communicate so many things - imagination, innovation, an idea, or an ideal. When you create a poster, not only are you informing the world, but you also are crafting a piece of true art. By participating in The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts Poster Design Competition, your poster design just might earn you a tuition scholarship to The Art Institutes system location of your choice. It all comes down to how you interpret the theme "Life is Better with Art in It." The medium and the message are up to you. What is important is that you get inspired then inspire us with your original work. This competition is open to high school students planning to graduate in 2010 who plan to study graphic design. Qualifying students interested in other programs also may enter.

Additionally, students must submit a typed designer's statement in Microsoft Word explaining the design concept and why the student wishes to enter the graphic design field. Scholarship awards are contingent upon acceptance to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. All decisions made by the judges are final and may not be disputed.

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 53

The Local CookOff Competition

Aminimumof10semi-finalistsateach participatingArtInstitutessystemlocation willbechosentocompeteinlocalcook-offs. Thesecompetitionswilltakeplaceateach participatingArtInstitutessystemlocation. Semi-finalistswillprepareamenuissued inadvancebyTheArtInstitutes.Apanelof professionalchefsandculinaryfacultywill judgeeachcontestant'spreparedfood.The first-placewinnerofthelocalcompetition willreceivea$3,000tuitionscholarshipto TheArtInstitutessystemlocationatwhich theyentertheBestTeenChefCompetition. Visitwww.artinstitutes.edu/btcformore information.Alldecisionsmadebyjudges arefinalandmaynotbedisputed.ThefirstplacewinnerfromeachparticipatingArt Institutessystemlocationwilladvanceto TheArtInstitutesBestTeenChefCulinary ScholarshipCompetition.Alldecisionsby thejudgesarefinalandnon-disputable.

AlltuitionscholarshipsmustbeusedatThe ArtInstitutessystemlocationyourepresent andarenon-transferable.Uponacceptingthe scholarship,thestudentagreestobeginhis/ herfashionscholarshipinthesummerorfall quarterimmediatelyfollowingthecompetition. TuitionscholarshipswillapplytoTheArt Institutessystemlocationofyourchoice. TheArtInstitutesarenotresponsibleforany lostentries.Shouldyouwinthelocal-level competitionineithercategoryandtherefore progresstothenational-levelcompetition, yourentrywillnotbereturned.Allotherentries willbereturnedbyrequestonly.TheArt Institutesarenotresponsibleforlostentries. Formoredetailsonthecompetition,please contactyourAssistantDirectorofAdmissions.

Other Resources

Highschoolguidancecounselorsorpublic librariesaregoodsourcesforbooksand otherresourcesthatlistscholarshipsfor whichthestudentmayapply.Qualifications maybebasedonthefollowing: · · · · · · · · AcademicMerit ReligiousAffiliation EthnicorRacialHeritage CommunityActivities OrganizationalMembership SpecialTalents CareerPlans Parent'sEmployment

Interest on Outstanding Balances

Thestudentunderstandsandagreesthathe orshewillbeliableforinterestchargesthat areassessedonhisorheraccountbalance untilthebalanceispaidinfull.Interestis chargedat12percentperannumonthe student'sadjustedoutstandingbalanceatthe endofeachmonth.Theadjustedoutstanding balanceisdefinedasallchargesincurred bythestudentforattendanceattheschool attheendofthepriormonthincludingbut notlimitedtotuition,fees,housingcharges, lateregistrationfees,fines,damages,etc., lessthetotalamountpaidtothestudent's accountattheendofthecurrentmonth includingfinancialaidthatthestudenthas beenawardedbuthasnotreceivedfor thequarter,providedthatthestudentand/ orthestudent'sparent(s)havecompleted alloftherequirementsfortheaward.The studentunderstandsandagreesthathisor heradjustedoutstandingbalanceisdifferent fromhis/herpaymentplanandthatthe student'sfinancialaidawardmaybereduced oreliminatedifthestudentdoesnotcomplete alloftherequirementsforfinancialaid.

6. efundswillbemadewithin30calendar R daysaftertheapplicant's/student's requestorwithin30calendardaysafter his/herfirstscheduledclassday. 7. pplicantswhopostponestartingschool A aftertheoriginalstartdatenotedon theEnrollmentAgreementarerequired toreapplyandwillbesubjecttothe tuition,fees,andotherconditionson therevisedEnrollmentAgreement.

7.IntheeventTheArtInstituteofRaleigh­ Durhamcancelsorchangesacourseor programofstudyinsuchawaythata studentwhohadstartedtheprogramor courseisunabletocompleteit,TheArt InstituteofRaleigh­Durhamwillrefund allmoniespaidbythestudentforthe courseorprogramwithin30days.

Federal Refund Policy

Return of Federal Title IV Aid-Apercentage ofTitleIVAidwillbereturnedifthestudent withdrawsduringthefirst60percentof thequarter.Theamountreturnedisbased onthepercentageofdaysremainingin thequarter.Theschoolwilldeterminethe calendardayscompletedinthequarter dividedbythetotalnumberofcalendardays inthequarter.Iftheamountislessthanor equalto60percent,thenthatpercentage oftheFederalTitleIVAidreceivedisthe amountthatcanberetained.Thedifference willbereturnedtotheFederalTitleIVAid programforwhichfundswerereceivedin thefollowingorder:UnsubsidizedStafford Loan,SubsidizedStaffordLoan,Perkins Loan,PLUSLoan,PellGrant,ACGSEOG. IfFederalTitleIVAidFundshavebeen giventothestudent,andifthestudent withdrawsduringthefirst60percentof thequarter/semester,thestudentmay needtoreturnsomeofthosefunds.Ifthe studentneedstoreturnfunds,theschool willnotifythestudentregardinghowmuch isowedandhowitistobereturned. Adjustment of Charges-Inaccordance withtheNorthCarolinaAdministrativeCode, ifastudentwithdrawsfromschool,the schoolwillearntuitionandfeesbasedon whenthestudentwithdrawsasfollows: · First25percentofquarterin calendardays-25% · Afterthefirst25percentof thequarter-100% Theschoolwillfirstcalculatehowmuch needstobereturnedundertheFederal ReturnofTitleIVAidpolicy.Thatamount willthenbesubtractedfromtheamountthat waspaidforthequarterofwithdrawalto gettheadjustedamountpaid.Theschool willthencalculatehowmuchofthecharges canberetainedbasedontheschoolpolicy. Theamountthatcanberetainedwillbe subtractedfromtheadjustedamountpaid. Ifthereisadditionalmoneytoberefunded fromFederalTitleIVfunds,therefundwillbe madetothestudent,orwiththestudent's writtenauthorization,toFederalLoansfrom whichfundswerereceived,inthisorder: UnsubsidizedStaffordLoan,Subsidized StaffordLoan,PerkinsLoan,PLUSLoan.If thereisanadditionalcreditbalanceremaining aftertheFederalrefundismade,underschool policy,refundswillbemadeinthisorderto programsfromwhichfundswerereceived: UnsubsidizedStaffordLoan,Subsidized StaffordLoan,PerkinsLoan,PLUSLoan, otherloans,otheraid(ifrequired),student.If kits,componentsofakit,books,orsupplies

Refund Policy After Matriculation All Quarters

Intheeventofwithdrawalbythestudentor terminationbyTheArtInstituteofRaleigh­ Durhamduringanyquarterofstudy: 1.Prepaidtuitionandfeesforany periodbeyondthestudent'scurrent quarterwillberefundedinfull. 2.Astudentmaywithdrawvoluntarilyfrom coursesbynotifyingtheofficeofthe Registrarinpersonorinwriting.Written noticeofcancellationshalltakeplace onthedatetheletterofcancellation ispost-markedor,incaseswherethe noticeishandcarried,itshalloccuron thedatethatthenoticeisdeliveredto TheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham.The ArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durhamshallpay therefundwithin30businessdaysofthe date.Refundsshallbepaiddirectlytothe studentunlesspaymenttothelenderor otherentityisrequiredbythetermsofthe student'sfinancialplaninwhichTheArt InstituteofRaleigh­Durhamparticipates. Theterminationdatewillbethedateof noticeindicatedabove.Ifthestudenthas givennowrittennotice,TheArtInstituteof Raleigh­Durhamshalldeterminethedate ofwithdrawalfromwithin15calendardays afterthelastdateofattendanceandshall paytherefundwithin30calendardays ofmakingthatdetermination. 3.Forstudentsonawrittenleaveof absencewhofailtoshowupforclass followingconclusionoftheirleave, refundswillbemadewithin30days oftheirfirstscheduledclassday. 4.Intheeventofafully-documented extremeillnessorpersonalemergency thatmakesitimpracticalforthestudent tocompletetheprogram,TheArt InstituteofRaleigh­Durhammaymodify thetuitionrefundpolicyasdeemed appropriatetothecircumstances. 5.Aseparateleaseagreementandrefund policyexistsforstudentswholease housingaccommodationsarrangedby TheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham.The ArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durhamreserves therighttoapplyanystudentpayment, oranyrefundduetoastudent,toany studentfinancialaccountthatisinarrears. 6.Eachacademicquarteris11weeks indurationwithmid-quartersessions approximately5weeksinduration. Thecalculationofrefundsisbased uponthelastdayofattendancewithin thequarter.Anyportionofaweek's attendanceisconsideredafullweek ofattendanceforrefundpurposes.

Technology Student Association National Competition

MembersoftheTechnologyStudent Associationwhowinfirstplaceatthe nationalhighschoollevelcompetitiveevent willbeawardedthefollowingscholarships. WinnersofthecategoriesofCyberspace PursuitandImagingTechnologywillreceive a$3,000tuitionscholarshiptoTheArt InstituteofRaleigh­Durham.Students canlearnmoreaboutthecompetitive eventsbyvisitingtheTechnologyStudent AssociationWebsiteatwww.tsaweb.org orcalling703-860-9000.Winnersofthe competitionmaycontacttheAdmissions Officeforscholarshipdetails.National competitiveeventswillbeheldeachyear.

Awardsundertheseprogramsarebased onindividualneedandtheavailabilityof funds.ContactTheArtInstituteofRaleigh­ Durham'sStudentFinancialServicesoffice orvisitTheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham fordetailsaboutfinancialaidresources. Studentsreceivingfinancialassistancemust maintainsatisfactoryacademicprogress standardsasoutlinedinthiscatalog.

Passion for Fashion Competition

Ifyou'reahighschoolseniorinterested instudyingfashionmarketing,TheArt Institutessystemofschoolsisgivingyoua chancetoshowoffyourcreativity.Youjust mayearnafashionscholarshiptooneof ourschools.Note:Submissionsmayonly bemadeinacategoryattheparticipating ArtInstitutessystemlocationinafashion programthatisofferedattheschool. Deadlines: Forfurtherdetailspleasecontact theDirectorofAdmissionsatThe ArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham. Scholarship Awards: EachlocalFashionMarketing&Management competitionwinnerwillreceivea$3,000 tuitionscholarship;secondplacewillreceive a$1,500tuitionscholarshiptoTheArt Institutessystemlocationatwhichtheyenter thecompetition.Thefirstplacewinner's entryfromthelocalcontestwillmoveon tothenationalfinalsinNewYorkCity. Thenationalgrandprizewinnersinthe FashionMarketing&Managementcompetition areawardedafull-tuitionscholarshiptoThe ArtInstitutessystemwheretheyenteredthe competition.Secondplacenationalwinner inbothcategoriesreceiveahalf-tuition scholarship,andthenationalthird-place winnersareawardedaone-thirdtuition scholarshiptoTheArtInstitutessystem locationwheretheyenteredthecompetition. BothgrandprizewinnersreceiveaVIP triptoFashionWeekinNewYorkCityand meetwithtopindustryprofessionals.

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Inordertoremainingoodfinancialstanding withTheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham, studentsmustadheretotheagreed-upon paymentschedule.TheAccountingOfficeis sensitivetotheunforeseencircumstances thatcanaffectastudent'sabilitytomeet financialcommitments.Consequently,the accountingstaffworkscloselywiththe StudentFinancialServicesOfficetoassist studentsindevelopingasoundfinancial plan.Anystudentwhohasincurredor anticipatesafinancialproblemisencouraged toconsultwiththeaccountingstaff.Failure onthepartofastudenttomeetfinancial obligationsmayleadtoterminationfrom TheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham, withholdingofacademictranscripts,and/ orassignmenttoacollectionagency.

Refund Policy

Therefundpolicymaychangeiffederal, state,orotherpolicieschange.Shouldthe policychange,studentswillbenotified.

Refund Policy Prior to Matriculation

Applicantsmaycanceltheirenrollmentin personorinwritingbeforethebeginning ofclasses.Anapplicantnotrequesting cancellationbeforethescheduled startingdateindicatedonthisEnrollment Agreementwillbeconsideredastudent. 1. llmoniespaidbyapplicants A willberefundediftheyarenot acceptedforadmission. 2.Allmoniespaidbytheapplicantwill berefundedifrequestedbyapplicant withinfive(5)businessdaysafter signingtheEnrollmentAgreement(and makinganinitialtuitionpayment). 3.Alltuitionandfeemoniespaidbyapplicants willberefundedifrequestedwithinthree (3)businessdaysaftertheirfirsttourof theschoolandinspectionofequipment orifrequestedwithinthree(3)business daysofthestudent'sattendanceatthe regularlyscheduledorientationprogramfor theirstartingdate,whicheverissooner. 4. lltuitionandfeemoniespaidbythe A applicantwillberefundedifrequested withinfive(5)businessdaysafter theirfirsttouroftheschool. 5. pplicantsrequestingcancellationmore A thanfive(5)businessdaysaftersubmitting anapplicationtoTheArtInstituteof Raleigh­Durham,butlessthan90days priortothebeginningofclasses,will receivearefundofallmoniespaidtotheArt InstituteofRaleigh­Durham,lessthe$50 applicationfeeand$100enrollmentfee.

ProStart Invitational

First-placewinnersoftheNationalProStart InvitationalCulinaryCompetitionand ManagementCompetitionwillbeawarded a$3,000tuitionscholarshiptoTheArt InstituteofRaleigh­Durham.A$2,000tuition scholarshipforsecond-placewinnersand $1,000tuitionscholarshipforthirdplacewinnerswillalsobeawarded.Applicants mustbeenrolledinaProStartprogramtobe eligibleforcompetition.Formoreinformation, visittheProStartwebsiteatwww.nraef.org/ prostart/orcall1-800-765-2122.Winners oftheinvitationalmaycontacttheSenior DirectorofAdmissionsatTheArtInstitute ofRaleigh­Durhamat919-317-3050.

Information for Veterans

Studentswhoaresponsoredorassisted bytheVeteransAdministrationmayreceive assistancefromtheRegistrar'sOfficeinthe filingofappropriateforms.Thesestudents mustmaintainsatisfactoryattendance andacademicprogress(seethe"School Policies"sectionofthiscatalog).Students receivingVeteransbenefitsmustreportall prioreducationandtrainingreceivedbefore attendingTheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durham. TheArtInstituteofRaleigh­Durhamwill evaluatepriorcreditandacceptthatwhich isappropriate.Also,expectedmonthlyVA benefitsmustbereportedontheFAFSA priortoyourinitialfinancialaidinterview.

C-CAP Careers Through The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

StudentswhoareenrolledinaC-CAP programmaycompeteforatwo-yearfulltuitionscholarshipatTheArtInstituteof Raleigh­Durham.Forinformation,speakto theC-CAPDirectoratyourhighschool,visit www.ccapinc.org,orcall212-974-7111.

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 55

are returned to the bookstore in re-saleable condition within 21 days of withdrawal, a credit will be given to the student. All refunds and return of funds will be made within 30 days of the date on which the student notifies the school of his or her withdrawal. Examples of the calculations for this policy are available in the Student Accounting Office. NOTE: Any student who withdraws or is terminated from all classes at any point during a quarter and returns for any subsequent quarter is required to complete a new financial plan and is subject to any tuition rate increases in effect for the quarter in which he or she returns. Exceptions to this policy may be made only for unforeseen changes in a student's living situation. Exceptions must be requested in writing at the time of the occurrence and must be approved by the School President or other designated School Official. The student must provide documentation to support any written requests.

of the tuition, fees, and other charges that the length of the completed portion of the course bears to its total length. Any tuition that has been prepaid by the student for future quarters will be refunded in the event of withdrawal.

Professional Conduct

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham expects its students and employees to conduct themselves in a professional manner at all times. All students and employees are encouraged to report any unprofessional conduct to the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Guaranty Bond

In compliance with General Statutes of North Carolina, Article 8 115D-95, The Art Institutes has a bond on file in the amount determined by The University of North Carolina Board of Governors to be adequate to provide indemnification to any student or his parent or guardian under the terms of the bond.

Grievance Policy

Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment: The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham does not discriminate or harass on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, religion, genetic marker or any other characteristic protected by state, local or federal law in our programs and activities. The Human Resources Generalist is designated to handle inquiries and coordinate the school's compliance efforts regarding the non-discrimination policy: Human Resources Generalist 410 Blackwell St. Durham, NC 27701 Students who believe they have been subjected to discrimination or harassment in violation of this policy should follow the procedure outlined below. This complaint procedure is intended to provide a fair, prompt and reliable determination about whether The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham non discrimination policy has been violated. 1. Complainants are encouraged to file a complaint as soon as possible after an alleged incident of discrimination has occurred. Any student who chooses to file a discrimination complaint should do so for non-academic matters with the Human Resources Generalist, 410 Blackwell St., Durham, NC 27701, or for academic matters with the Dean of Academic Affairs, 410 Blackwell St., Durham, NC 27701. The complaint should be presented in writing, and it should describe the alleged incident(s) and any corrective action sought. The complaint should be signed by the complainant. In most cases, the person accused of discrimination will be notified of the complaint by the Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs. 2. The person accused of discrimination will have fourteen calendar days to respond to the complaint in writing. The signed written response should be submitted to the Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs. 3. The Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs will investigate the allegations. Both the complainant and the accused will have the opportunity to meet and discuss the allegations with the investigator and may offer any witnesses in support of their position to the investigator during the course of the investigation. A student may be accompanied during investigation meetings and discussions by one person (family member, friend,

STUDENT SCHOOL POLICIES Student Right-to-Know

According to regulations published by the Department of Education based on the Student Right-to-Know Act, the graduation/completion rates for first-time, full-time students who entered school and graduated/completed within 150% of the normal time to complete the program, as published in the catalog, must be made available to current and prospective students. You may obtain this information in the Admissions Office at 318 Blackwell Street, Suite 120M, Durham, NC 27701.

MID-QUARTER SESSION Refund Policy After Matriculation, All Quarters

This academic quarter is approximately 5 weeks in duration. Adjustments of the Tuition and Fee Charges Institutional PolicyIn accordance with school policy, the school will earn tuition and fees for the mid-quarter as follows: Week One Week Two Week Three After Week Three 25% 50% 75% 100%

Student Conduct

Students whose conduct is detrimental to the educational process or disruptive to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham environment may be subject to discipline pursuant to the Student Code of Conduct that is published in the Student Handbook. Instructors as well as students have the right to teach and learn in a safe and productive environment. No one shall infringe upon this right at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham reserves the right to suspend or permanently terminate any student whose conduct is detrimental to the teaching environment within the classroom or to the well-being of fellow students and/or faculty and staff members, or who causes damage to the appearance or structure of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham facility and/or equipment therein; cheats, copies, or otherwise plagiarizes the artwork or assignments/ projects of other students or professionals; verbally abuses, insults, physically, or psychologically threatens or intimidates other students, faculty or staff, or who otherwise displays conduct detrimental to his or her own academic progress or ultimate success in the field for which he or she is being educated. Disciplinary issues are handled through the Student Affairs office or through the Dean of Academic Affairs office. See Student Rights and Responsibilities and the Student Code of Conduct in the Student Handbook for a more detailed explanation of this subject.

etc.) who can act as an observer, provide emotional support, and/or assist the student in understanding and cooperating in the investigation. The observer may not be an attorney, unless otherwise required by local law. The investigator may prohibit from attending or remove any person who disrupts the investigation in the investigator's sole discretion. 4. The Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs will determine whether a violation of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham non discrimination policy has occurred. The Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs will issue a written determination as promptly as practicable. If the Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs determines that the policy has been violated, the Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs will also recommend corrective action. 5. The decision of the Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs may be appealed by petitioning the President's Office of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The written appeal must be made within twenty calendar days of receipt of the determination letter from the Human Resources Generalist or Dean of Academic Affairs. The President, or his designee, will render a written decision on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal. The President's decision shall be final. 6. Matters involving general student complaints will be addressed according to the General Student Grievance Procedures, a copy of which can be found in this Catalog and in the Student Handbook. For more information about your rights under the federal laws prohibiting discrimination, please contact the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education or visit the website at http://www.ed.gov/ocr.

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature where: a. Submission to such conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of a person's status in a course, program or activity or in admission, or in an academic decision; b. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an academic decision; or c. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment. Examples of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to: unwanted sexual advances; demands for sexual favors in exchange for favorable treatment; verbal abuse of a sexual nature; graphic commentary about an individual's body, sexual prowess, or sexual deficiencies; leering; whistling; touching; pinching; assault; coerced sexual acts; suggestive, insulting or obscene comments or gestures; stalking; and displaying sexually suggestible objects or pictures. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham prohibits all conduct of this nature whether or not such conduct violates any applicable laws.

Non-Fraternization Policy

Because of the unequal status that exists between faculty and students and the possibility of favoritism, social relationships between faculty and students are prohibited. Such relationships are also prohibited between staff and students.

Appeal Procedures

Students wishing to appeal a disciplinary decision may do so in the following manner: · The student initially must obey the terms of the decision: i.e., a student who has been suspended from the college may not be on college property; a student dismissed from college-sponsored housing must leave according to the directions indicated by the decision. · The student must write a letter of appeal addressed to the President of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham or her or his delegate. This letter will give the student the opportunity to indicate a position on the decision, and it must be thorough and complete. It must be delivered to the President or his or her delegate within seven calendar days following receipt of the decision. · The President or his or her designee may appoint an ad hoc committee to review appeals and make a recommendation regarding disposition of the appeal. This committee will be comprised of faculty or staff members not involved in making the initial decision. The student making the appeal may be provided an opportunity to address the committee in person. The student may be accompanied by one person (family member, friend, etc.) as an observer. The student may not be accompanied by an attorney. The committee may prohibit from attending or remove any person who disrupts the proceedings of the committee. · The committee will report back to the President or her or his delegate with its recommendation following its review of the appeal. The President or his or her delegate will render a written decision on the appeal within 30 calendar days from receipt of the appeal. · The President has the authority to make the final decision on any appeal. The President may, in his or her sole discretion, deny automatically any appeals without appointing an appeal committee to review the appeal.

Other Forms of Harassment

Verbal abuse, insulting comments and gestures, and other harassing conduct are also forbidden under this policy when directed at an individual because of his or her race, color, sex, sexual orientation, familial status, age, religion, ethnic origin, or disability. It is the responsibility of each employee and each student to conduct him or herself in a professional manner at all times and to refrain from such harassment.

Kit Return Policy

Students who leave school during the first three weeks of the mid-quarter session may return the starting kit and/or individual components of the starting kit within 10 days of your last date of attendance of the mid-quarter.Return of Title IV FundsThe Return of Title IV Calculation as described in the Enrollment Agreement for the mid-quarter session will apply using the mid-quarter start and end dates.

No Harassment Policy

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is committed to providing workplaces and learning environments that are free from harassment on the basis of any protected classification including, but not limited to race, sex, gender, color, religion, sexual orientation, age, national origin, disability, medical condition, marital status, veteran status, genetic marker, or on any other basis protected by law. Such conduct is unprofessional, unproductive, illegal, and generally considered bad for business. Consequently, all conduct of this nature is expressly prohibited, regardless of whether it violates any law.

Complaint Procedure

Students who feel they have been harassed should follow the Student Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of harassment or discrimination. Promptly after learning of such alleged conduct, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will conduct an investigation for the purpose of determining whether prohibited harassment has occurred. Efforts will be made to ensure confidentiality to the extent consistent with the goal of conducting an appropriate investigation. Students who initiate or participate in such investigations in good faith will be protected against school-related retaliation. If an investigation confirms the allegations, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will take prompt corrective action, which may include discipline, up to and including immediate dismissal.

Veteran Refunds

The following refund policy is applicable to students enrolled under the provisions of Title 38 United States Code, as amended. The institution maintains this policy for the refund of the unused portion of tuition, fees, and other charges in the event the person fails to enter the course or withdraws or is discontinued at any time prior to completion: The amount charged to the person for tuition, fees, and other charges for a portion of the course will not exceed the approximate pro rate portion

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 57

General Student Grievance/Complaint Procedure

If you have a complaint or problem you are encouraged to follow the Student Complaint Procedure. You should discuss complaints with the individual(s) within the appropriate department. Initial discussion should be with the person most knowledgeable of the issues involved or with immediate decision-making responsibility. If you feel that the complaint has not been fully addressed, a written account should be submitted to the Human Resources Generalist if related to non-academic issues or to the Dean of Academic Affairs for academic issues. The written account should indicate your name, phone number, and ID# and discuss the steps you have taken to remedy the situation. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham staff member or department will be notified of the complaint. A follow-up meeting with you and the Human Resources Generalist and/or the Dean of Academic Affairs will be held within ten school days of the date of the written complaint in an effort to resolve the issue. If you are not satisfied with the results, you may file an appeal with the President's Office. The appeal should be in writing and contain your name and phone number. You should summarize the steps you have taken to remedy the situation and indicate why the results are not satisfactory. You will hear the results of the appeal within thirty calendar days from the date the appeal is received. If you follow this complaint procedure and still feel dissatisfied with the results you may send a written copy of the complaint to: The University of North Carolina Board of Governors, 910 Raleigh Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688 (919-962-4559). Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, 750 First St, NE, Suite 980, Washington, DC 200024241 (telephone: 202-336-6780). Please refer to the school's Arbitration Policy for additional information regarding disputes or claims.

resolved by individual binding arbitration pursuant to the terms described herein. If you decide to initiate arbitration, you may select either, JAMS or the National Arbitration Forum ("NAF") to serve as the arbitration administrator pursuant to its rules of procedure. If AiRD intends to initiate arbitration, it will notify you in writing by regular mail at your latest address on file with AiRD, and you will have 20 days from the date of the letter to select one of these organizations as the administrator. If you fail to select an administrator within that 20-day period, AiRD will select one. AiRD agrees that it will not elect to arbitrate any individual claim of less than $5,000 that you bring in small claims court (or in a similar court of limited jurisdiction subject to expedited procedures). If that claim is transferred or appealed to a different court, however, or if your claim exceeds $5,000, AiRD reserves the right to elect arbitration, and if it does so, you agree that the matter will be resolved by binding arbitration pursuant to the terms of this Section. IF EITHER YOU OR AiRD CHOOSES ARBITRATION, NEITHER PARTY WILL HAVE THE RIGHT TO A JURY TRIAL, TO ENGAGE IN DISCOVERY, EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN THE APPLICABLE ARBITRATION RULES, OR OTHERWISE TO LITIGATE THE DISPUTE OR CLAIM IN ANY COURT (OTHER THAN IN SMALL CLAIMS OR SIMILAR COURT, AS SET FORTH IN THE PRECEDING PARAGRAPH, OR IN AN ACTION TO ENFORCE THE ARBITRATOR'S AWARD). FURTHER, YOU WILL NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE AS A REPRESENTATIVE OR MEMBER OF ANY CLASS OF CLAIMANTS PERTAINING TO ANY CLAIM SUBJECT TO ARBITRATION. THE ARBITRATOR'S DECISION WILL BE FINAL AND BINDING. OTHER RIGHTS THAT YOU OR AiRD WOULD HAVE IN COURT ALSO MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ARBITRATION. The arbitrator shall have no authority to arbitrate claims on a class action basis, and claims brought by or against you may not be joined or consolidated with claims brought by or against any other person. Any arbitration hearing shall take place in the federal judicial district in which you reside. Upon your written request, AiRD will pay the filing fees charged by the arbitration administrator, up to a maximum of $3,500. per claim. Each party will bear the expense of its own attorneys, experts and witnesses, regardless of which party prevails, unless applicable law or this Agreement gives a right to recover any of those fees from the other party. If the arbitrator determines that any claim or defense is frivolous or wrongfully intended to oppress the other party, the arbitrator may award sanctions in the form of fees and expenses reasonably incurred by the other party (including arbitration administration fees, arbitrators' fees, and attorney, expert and witness fees), to the extent such fees and expenses could be imposed under Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

The Federal Arbitration Act ("FAA"), 9 U.S.C. §§ 1, et seq., shall govern this arbitration provision. This arbitration provision shall survive the termination of your relationship with AiRD. If you have a question about the arbitration administrators mentioned above, you can contact them as follows: JAMS, 45 Broadway, 28th Floor, New York, NY, 10006, www.jamsadr.com, 800352-5267; National Arbitration Forum, P.O. Box 50191, Minneapolis, MN, 55405, www.arb-forum.com, 800-474-2371. The above supersedes any inconsistent arbitration provision published in any other document.

The following activities, without limitation, are specifically prohibited. Individual departments may impose additional prohibitions or restrictions as deemed appropriate by department management: · The display or transmission of sexually explicit or otherwise offensive images or communications, or the use of language that harasses or disparages another person on the basis of sex, race, color, age, national origin, ethnicity, religion, disability or sexual orientation; · The use of electronic resources to harass, intimidate, or defame others, or to interfere with the ability of others to work or study; · Sending, receiving, or downloading copies of documents, pirated music files or other materials in violation of copyright laws; · Sending chain letters or similar communications; · Solicitations, other than for The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham-approved activities; · Day-trading or any personal investment management; · Sending an electronic mail communication so that it appears to be from someone else; · Attempting unauthorized access to electronic resources or attempting to intercept or access any electronic mail transmissions without authorization; · Any use of electronic systems that threaten the integrity of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's system or the privacy or safety of others; and · Using The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham's electronic resources to gain unauthorized access to computing systems of other organizations or individuals. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham does not guarantee the privacy or security of e-mail or users' files or the anonymity of any user. Individuals are responsible for the use of their accounts and must take reasonable precautions including password maintenance and file protections to prevent unauthorized use of accounts. Users may not use, access, alter or copy the accounts, passwords, directories, files, programs, or the intellectual property of any other user without that person's consent. Questions or concerns about the appropriateness of specific uses of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's communications technology may be directed to the Dean of Academic Affairs. Individuals should promptly report to the Dean any known or suspected uses prohibited by this policy.

Crime Awareness and Campus Security

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham is committed to the safety and security of all of its employees and students and adheres to the requirements of the Federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Questions about crime awareness or campus security should be addressed to the Student Affairs or Human Resources Office at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The full copy of the report can be found in the student affairs office and is distributed to all faculty, staff and students on an annual basis.

When a record contains personally identifiable information about more than one student, the student may inspect and review only the information that relates to him/her personally.

II. Disclosure Of Educational Records

The Art Institute of Raleigh Durham generally will not permit disclosure of personally identifiable information from the records of a student without prior written consent of the student. Personally identifiable information is disclosed (some items are mandatory, some discretionary) from the records of a student without that student's prior written consent to the following individuals or institutions or in the following circumstances: 1. To The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham officials who have been determined by the school to have legitimate educational interests in the records. A school official is a. a person employed by the school or its corporate parent in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position. This includes, but is not limited to human resources and accounting staff for purposes of the tuition reimbursement plan; or b. a person employed by or under contract to the school to perform specific tasks, such as an auditor, consultant, or attorney, a person on the Board of Trustees, or a student serving on an official committee or assisting another school official. Any school official who needs information about a student in the course of performing instructional, supervisory, advisory, or administrative duties for The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham has a legitimate educational interest. 2. To certain officials of the United States Department of Education, the Comptroller General of the United States, the Attorney General of the United States, and state and local educational authorities in connection with state or federally supported educational programs. 3. In connection with the student's request for, or receipt of, financial aid necessary to determine the eligibility, amounts or conditions of financial aid, or to enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. 4. To organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school. 5. To accrediting commissions or state licensing or regulatory bodies to carry out their functions. 6. To parents of a dependent student, as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code. 7. To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. 8. To appropriate parties in health or safety emergencies. 9. To officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

Technology Use Policy

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham provides students with a variety of electronic resources including access to the Internet. The primary purpose of providing such resources is to support the educational goals of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham; other uses are secondary. By using electronic resources provided by The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham, the student accepts personal responsibility for appropriate use and agrees to comply with this policy, all other applicable Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham policies, and all applicable laws. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham reserves the right to change its policies including this policy. The electronic mail system and all communications and information sent by, received from or stored on The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham systems are, and remain, the property of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Electronic communications and information are not the private property of students; students should not have any expectation of privacy or confidentiality regarding messages sent, received, or stored on The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham's systems. Failure to comply with the following rules for acceptable use of electronic resources is a violation of the technology-use policy and may subject a person to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham reserves the right to suspend access to electronic resources immediately for violations of this policy or for any other reason deemed necessary by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Access to these resources is a privilege, not an entitlement. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham also reserves the right to access and monitor all use and contents of its electronic resources at any time, in its sole discretion, and without further notice to users. Therefore, students should not communicate or store personal or private information on any Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham system. No one may use The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham's electronic resources for unlawful activities, for personal monetary gain, or for business or commercial purposes.

FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended ("FERPA") sets out requirements designed to afford students certain rights with respect to their education records. In addition, it puts limits on what information The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may disclose to third parties without receiving prior written consent from the student.

I. Procedure to Inspect Education Records

Students have the right under FERPA to inspect and review their education records. A student who wishes to inspect and review his/ her records should submit a written request to the Registrar. The request should identify as precisely as possible the records the student wishes to inspect. If the requested records are subject to inspection and review by the student, arrangements for access will be made within a reasonable period of time but in no case more than 45 days after the request was made, and the student will be notified of the time and place where the records may be inspected. The school may require the presence of a school official during the inspection and review of a student's records. Certain limitations exist on a student's right to inspect and review their own education records. Those limitations include, for example, the following: (i) financial information submitted by parents; (ii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files prior to January 1, 1975; (iii) confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files after January 1, 1975 to which the student has waived his or her right to inspect and review and that are related to the student's admission, application for employment or job placement, or receipt of honors. In addition, the term "education record" does not include certain types of records such as, by way of example, records of instructional, supervisory, administrative, and certain educational personnel that are in the sole possession of the maker thereof, and are not accessible or revealed to any other individual except a substitute.

Arbitration of Disputes

You and The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham ("AiRD ") agree that any dispute or claim between you and AiRD (or any company affiliated with AiRD, or any of its officers, directors, trustees, employees or agents) arising out of or relating to this enrollment agreement or, absent such agreement, your enrollment or attendance at AiRD, whether such dispute arises before, during, or after your attendance, and whether the dispute is based on contract, tort, statute, or otherwise, shall be, at your or AiRD's election, submitted to and

Equipment Check-Out

Equipment provided for student check-out is subject to use restrictions set forth by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. Failure to comply with campus check-out policies may result in a fine and/or loss of privileges.

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 59

10. To an alleged victim of a crime of violence or a nonforcible sexual offense, the final results of the disciplinary proceedings conducted by the school against the alleged perpetrator of that crime or offense with respect to that crime or offense. 11. To persons in addition to the victim of a crime of violence or nonforcible sexual offense, the final results of the disciplinary proceedings described in paragraph 10 above but only if the school has determined that a student is the perpetrator of a crime of violence or nonforcible sexual offense, and with respect to the allegation made against him or her, the student has committed a violation of the institution's rules or policies. (The school, in such instances, may only disclose the name of the perpetrator not the name of any other student, including a victim or witness without the prior written consent of the other student(s)). 12. To a parent regarding the student's violation of any federal, state, or local law or of any rules or policy of the school governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to that use or possession, and the student is under 21 at the time of the disclosure to the parent. 13. Directory information (see Section IV below). 14. Student Recruiting Information as requested by the U.S. Military. Student recruiting information includes ONLY: name, address, telephone listing, age or date of birth, class level, academic major, place of birth, degrees received and most recent educational institution attended. It does not include and The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will not provide: social security numbers, race, ethnicity, nationality, GPA, grades, low performing student lists, religious affiliation, students with loans in default, veteran's status, students no longer enrolled. Students who opt out of the directory also opt out of student recruiting information.

IV. Directory Information

The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham designates the following information as directory information. (Directory information is personally identifiable information which may be disclosed without the student's consent): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Student's name Address: Local, email, and website Telephone number (local) Date and place of birth Program of study Participation in officially recognized activities Dates of attendance Degrees and certificates awarded Most recent previously attended school Photograph of the student, if available Enrollment status (i.e., enrolled, continuing, future enrolled student, reentry, leave of absence, etc.) Student honors and awards received. The height and weight of athletic team members

Notice of these categories and of the right of an individual in attendance at The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham to request that his/her directory information be kept confidential will be given to the student annually. Students may request nondisclosure of student directory information by specifying nondisclosure, in writing, to the Office of the Registrar, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham, 410 Blackwell St., Durham, NC 27701. Failure to request nondisclosure of directory information will result in routine disclosure of one or more of the above-designated categories of personally identifiable directory information.

V. Correction of Educational Records

Students have the right under FERPA to ask to have records corrected which they believe are inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of their privacy rights. The following are the procedures for the correction of records: 1. A student must ask Dean of Academic Affairs to amend a record. As part of the request, the student should identify the part of the record they want to have changed and specify why they believe it to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his/her privacy rights. 2. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham may either amend the record or decide not to amend the record. If it decides not to amend the record, it will notify the student of its decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing to challenge the information believed to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student's privacy rights. 3. Upon request, The Art Institute of Raleigh­ Durham will arrange for a hearing and notify the student reasonably in advance of the date, place, and time of the hearing. The hearing will be conducted by an individual who does not have a direct

interest in the outcome of the hearing. That individual may be an official of The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham. The student shall be afforded a forum for the opportunity to present evidence relevant to the issues raised in the original request to amend the student's education records. The student may be assisted by other people, including an attorney. 4. The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will prepare a written decision based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. The decision will include a summary of the evidence, and the reasons for the decision. 5. If, as a result of the hearing, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it will (a) amend the record accordingly; and (b) inform the student of the amendment in writing. 6. If, as a result of the hearing, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham decides that the information in the education record is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of the student, it shall inform the student of the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information in the record or stating why he or she disagrees with the decision of the school. 7. If a statement is placed in the education records of a student under paragraph 6 above, The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will: a. maintain the statement with the contested part of the record for as long as the record is maintained; and b. disclose the statement whenever it discloses the portion of the record to which the statement relates.

TUITION AND FEES FOR 2009-2010

Tuition is charged at $455* per credit (with an average of approximately 16 credits per quarter for Bachelor's Degree and Associate's Degree Programs). The current tuition and fees applicable to The Art Institute of Raleigh ­ Durham are as follows:

Web Design & Interactive Media (Bachelor) Web Design & Interactive Media (Associate) Fashion Marketing & Management (Bachelor)

Program

Graphic Design (Bachelor)

Graphic Design (Associate)

Fashion Marketing (Associate)

Interior Design (Bachelor)

Culinary Arts Management (Bachelor)

Culinary Arts (Associate)

Program Length Application Fee Enrollment Fee Tuition per Quarter Starting Kit** (optional) Lab Fees per Quarter Culinary Lab Fees per Quarter Student Activity Fee*** Current Tuition 1st Quarter & Fees* Current Total Tuition* Tuition per credit hour

12 Quarters

7 Quarters

12 Quarters

7 Quarters

12 Quarters

7 Quarters

12 Quarters

12 Quarters

7 Quarters

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$7280

$7280

$7280

$7280

$7280

$7280

$7280

$7280

$7280

$905

$905

$940

$940

$960

$960

$1195

$1410

$1410

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

$300

$300

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$50

$7530

$7530

$7530

$7530

$7530

$7530

$7530

$7780

$7780

VI. Student Right to File Complaint

A student has the right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education concerning alleged failures by The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the governmental office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office United States Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20202-4605

$85540

$50960

$85540

$50960

$85540

$50960

$85540

$85540

$50960

$455

$455

$455

$455

$455

$455

$455

$455

$455

III. Record of Requests for Disclosure

Except with respect to those requests made by the student themselves, those disclosures made with the written consent of the student, or to requests by or disclosures to The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham officials with legitimate educational interests and disclosures of directory information (or other exceptions described in the applicable regulations), The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham will maintain a record indicating the parties who have requested or obtained personally identifiable information from a student's education records and the legitimate interests those parties had in requesting or obtaining the information. This record may be inspected by the student.

Total Credit

188 Credits

112 Credits

188 Credits

112 Credits

188 Credits

112 Credits

188 Credits

188 Credits

112 Credits

* Based on current credit hour rate. Total cost will increase with each per credit hour tuition increase. ** NOT included in tuition totals *** One time fee payable upon enrollment ­ beginning with January 11, 2010 term

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PERSONNEL

Executive Committee Michael DePrisco President Monty Clark Dean of Academic Affairs Heather Armstrong Senior Director of Admissions John Pearce Director of Administrative & Financial Services Administration Jacqueline Blake Registrar Ashley Bullard Financial Aid Officer Colin Clark Financial Aid Officer Jacquelyn Demianczyk Human Resource Generalist Aimee Flynn MA, North Carolina State University BA, Central Connecticut State University Assistant Director of Career Services Alecia Glover Executive Assistant to the President Jeffrey Harelson Store Room Clerk Tony Jenkins Senior Desktop Analyst Nick Lamm Desktop Analyst Rebecca Lentz Residence Life/Student Affairs Coordinator Sharon Lightfoot Financial Aid Officer Elaine Murrin Assistant to the Dean of Academic Affairs Tara Pape Campus Bookstore Manager Rhonda Redding Associate Director of Student Financial Services Sheria Rowe Student Accounting

Admissions Jemonte Battle Assistant Director of Admissions Rose Roberson Receptionist Sarah Brown Assistant Director of Admissions Andrew Burns Assistant Director of Admissions Kristen Clark Assistant Director of Admissions Aunika Conyers Admissions Coordinator Kara Foster Assistant Director of Admissions Mike Heyl Associate Director of Admissions Simone Houslin Assistant Director of Admissions Heather Jacobsen Assistant Director of Admissions Ashley Kaplan Assistant Director of Admissions Deena Kaplan Receptionist Christy Lamm Associate Director of Admissions Kyle Miller Assistant Director of Admissions Kristina Oriolo Assistant Director of Admissions Erica Otey Admissions Coordinator Kathryn Page Assistant Director of Admissions Yvette Herrera Enrollment Processor Elizabeth Polovick Assistant Director of Admissions

Faculty Dilip Barman MS, Brown University MS, Marist College BA, Johns Hopkins University Web Design & Interactive Media Instructor Beth Bell MAT, North Carolina A&T State University BS, Appalachian State University AAS, Alamance Community College Fashion Marketing Instructor Jennifer Betton MFA, Syracuse University BFA, University of Central Florida BA, Grove City College Graphic Design Instructor Chef Edwin Brantley BS, Johnson & Wales University AS, Johnson & Wales University Culinary Arts Instructor Chef Catherine Coleman BA, College of Charleston AAS, The Culinary Institute of America Culinary Arts Instructor Mary Louise Creed MPD, North Carolina State University BA, Cedar Crest College Graphic Design Instructor Kerri Eckes MFA, East Carolina University BFA, Mount Olive College Graphic Design Instructor Keith Kiki Farish MFA, East Carolina University BS, Meredith College Graphic Design Instructor Patrizia Ferreira MS, Philadelphia University BS, Montevideo, Uruguay Fashion Marketing Instructor Chef Teresa Fox BA, Michigan State University Diploma, French Culinary Institute Culinary Arts Instructor Steven E. Gaddis MA, North Carolina State University BA, Duke University Interior Design Instructor Andrea Gebbia MFA, Savannah College of Art & Design BS, University of Florida Graphic Design Instructor

Suzzette Goldman MS, University of Tennessee-Martin BS, University of Tennessee-Martin Culinary Arts Instructor Joel Herrera MFA, University of Wisconsin-Madison BA, Baylor University Graphic Design Instructor Web Design & Interactive Media Instructor Sophia Khan MS, Syracuse University BS, New York Institute of Technology Interior Design Instructor Tara Konya MA, Monmouth University BS, University of North Carolina, Greensboro Fashion Marketing Instructor Jason McGee MS, Pratt Institute BS, Ohio State University Interior Design Instructor Susan Mitzner MS, Dowling College MS, Bank Street School of Education BA, Dowling College General Education Instructor Yvette Navarro MS, Nova Southeastern University BFA, University of Miami Graphic Design Instructor Christina Oliver MS, University of Liverpool, UK BA, Northeastern Illinois University Web Design & Interactive Media Instructor Jessica Palmer MFA, Savannah School of Art & Design BFA, East Carolina University Fashion Marketing Instructor Curtis W. Pittman MA, North Carolina State University BA, North Carolina Weslyan College General Education Instructor Chef John Singletary AOS, Culinary Institute of America Culinary Arts Instructor Chef Ashlyn Smith BS, Johnson & Wales University AS, Johnson & Wales University Culinary Arts Instructor

Kelly Smith-Campbell MA, Columbia College Chicago BA, Ohio Dominican University General Education Instructor Related Studies Instructor Ken Special MS, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University BS, University of Connecticut Interior Design Instructor Margie Stewart MFA, University of North Carolina-Greensboro MPD, North Carolina State University MEd, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill BS, Western Carolina University Graphic Design Instructor Chef Daniel Taylor MA, University of Phoenix BS, University of Phoenix Diploma, Culinary Arts, Western Culinary Institute Academic Department Director, Culinary Arts Chef Alvaro Thimann BS, Johnson and Wales University AS, Johnson and Wales University Culinary Arts Instructor Chef Janna Wardle BA, University of the South AAS, A-B Tech Community College Culinary Arts Instructor John Wells MFA, West Virginia University BA, Denison University General Education Instructor Emily Wilmoth MFA, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill BA, Meredith College Graphic Design Instructor Rebecca Wilson Psy.D, California Southern University MS Ed., Longwood College BS, Radford University General Education Instructor Yao Song MS, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill MA, Northwestern University BA, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill General Education Instructor

Library Sonia Wrather MLIS, McGill University, Montreal MSc, University of San Diego BS, McGill University, Montreal Director of Library Services

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The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham · 63

ACADEMIC CALENDAR

WINTER QUARTER

Important Dates New Student Orientation Classes Start School Holiday ­ Martin Luther King Jr. Day Drop/Add Period School Holiday ­ President's Day Mid-Term Orientation Mid-Term Start Registration for Spring Quarter Begins All Classes End

2010

January 11, 2010 ­ Friday, March 26, 2010 Thursday, January 7 Monday, January 11 Monday, January 18 Monday, January 11 ­ Tuesday, January 19 at 5:00 p.m. Friday, February 12 Wednesday, February 17 Thursday, February 18 Monday, February 22 Saturday, March 27

SPRING QUARTER

Important Dates New Student Orientation School Holiday Classes Start Drop/Add Period Mid-Term Orientation Mid-Term Start Registration for Summer Quarter Begins School Holiday ­ Memorial Day Portfolio Show Commencement All Classes End

2010

April 5, 2010 ­ Friday, June 18, 2010 Thursday, April 1 Friday, April 2 Monday, April 5 Monday, April 5 ­ Monday, April 12 at 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, May 12 Thursday, May 13 Monday, May 17 Monday, May 31 Thursday, June 17, 2010 Friday, June 18 Saturday, June 19

SUMMER QUARTER

Important Dates New Student Orientation Classes Start Drop/Add Period Mid-Term Session Orientation Registration for Fall Quarter Begins School Holiday ­ Labor Day Portfolio Show Commencement All Classes End

2010

July 12, 2010 ­ Friday, September 24, 2010 Thursday, July 8 Monday, July 12 Monday, July 12 ­ Monday, July 19 at 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 18 Monday, August 23 Monday, September 6 Thursday, September 23 Friday, September 24 Saturday, September 25

64 · The Art Institute of Raleigh­Durham

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