Read LA_3rdGr_2nd_9wks_StreetView_1011_ENG.pdf text version

Reading Street View

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3rd Grade

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Week 9

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October 19-22

Arc Focus 9: Cause and Effect Relationships in Non-fiction Texts

Unit: Community Unit 1 Week 3

Text Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA/ SR: Play Ball! (Treas.Unit 1 Student Book, pg.68) vocabulary (not related to organizational pattern) Earth Smart (Treas. Unit 1 Student Book, pgs. 70-73) Unit 1 Week 3 (cause/effect) Summer Break (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 74) Unit 1 Week 3 (cause/effect) The students will need to read nonfiction books during guided reading and/or during independent reading time. Provide students with explicit instruction in text structure types as listed below. Ask them to identify the forms (see below in genre) in their nonfiction guided reading books. For more suggestions link to :

Treasures' suggested texts for Guided Reading: Approaching Level: Resources All Around Us ELL: Resources All Around Us On Level: Resources All Around Us Beyond Level: Resources All Around Us

GR:

Additional Resources: Other stories with a community theme: Our Community Garden by Barbara Pollak The Rag Coat by Lauren Mills City Green by DyAnne DiSalvo Smoky Night by Eve Bunting Texts that lend themselves to Organizational Patterns of Nonfiction Texts of Sequence/Cause and Effect: · Textbooks · TFK articles (organized by cause/effect and sequence) For more suggestions link to:

IR

Tips for Independent Reading: Did you know you can print any leveled reader from McGraw-Hill from the ConnectED website? Using the Leveled Reader

Database, you can print any one of over 6,000 titles in English and Spanish. That way, students can have stories at their independent reading level to take home for practice and fun. Discussing Genre:

Authors often use a variety of text structures in nonfiction text. It is important to teach the different structures to our students to enable them to understand and process what they are reading. For third grade these include: 1. Cause and effect presents how an event or fact brings about another event or result

Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study: Unit 2 Week 1 Continue to teach word study explicitly. Objective: Decoding multisyllabic words with long e. Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 157C.

Fluency: Objective: Read fluently at an appropriate rate. Model: Transparency 3 at a moderate rate appropriate for expository text. Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 73A, Transparency 3, Practice Book p. 26 Tell students that rate is an important part of reading fluency. When reading an expository text readers often read at a slower or more moderate rate in order to figure out the meaning of unfamiliar words and information. Model reading the fluency transparency #3 at a moderate rate appropriate for expository text.

Vocabulary: Resources: Play Ball! (Treas. TE pg.68) and Treas. Student Book, pg. 68) (Unit 2 Week 1) Vocabulary: donate, unaware, members, contribute Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 69. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pgs. 77G-77H)

2. Time order organizes information into a chronological sequence. (second grade TEK)

Practice Book p.51,52, Transparency 6, Word Building Cards, Teacher's Resource Book p.83 Refer to the Phonics 5 day spelling activities in the Treasures TE.

**Note: This week's Student Expectation for third grade is 3.13C (identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts) which aligns with the 4th and 5th grade SEs about how non-fiction texts are organized in different ways (c/e, seq., comparison, prob/solution, description). This week's focus may be organized around comparing texts that are organized by chronological sequence (2nd grade SE) and texts organized by cause/effect relationships. Graphic organizers can be used to support how each text structure works but this SE is not about representing text information in different ways (outlines, graphs, etc, which is Fig. 19(L5) for 3rd grade.

Building Comprehension: Apply what students have learned about cause and effect (Week 3-Fiction) and elaborate on the cause-and-effect relationships within nonfiction text. Use Cause and Effect Transparency # 8 Explain to the students that a cause is the reason something happens. An effect is what happens. Point out that thinking about causes and effects in a selection helps readers understand why something happened. To find a cause and its effect readers can ask these questions What happened? (This is the effect) Why did it happen? (This is the cause) Some times readers find signal words or phrases such as, so, because, as a result, since and due to, that help them find causes and effects. Cause and effect is closely related to problem and solution and is signaled by many of the same words.

Topical Essential Questions:

In addition to the stopping point questions provided in the TE, use questions like these as you read with students:

1. How is the text organized? 2. What are two text structures that authors use to organize information? What are some clues to help you tell the difference between a selection written in sequential order and a selection written using cause/effect relationships? 3. How do readers use these text structures to gain meaning? 4. How do readers use graphic organizers to organize information that they have read? 5. How does knowing the text structure increase understanding of the text? 6. What happened in this selection? (effect) 7. Why did it happen? (Cause) Suggestions for Intervention: The students that are below grade level will probably need support in decoding, fluency and comprehension. While reading text which reflects a cause-effect text pattern, it helps for the reader to draw an arrow from the cause to the effect in the selection. It is beneficial for readers to learn and practice recognizing key and clue words. If a text contains transition words such as "first," "second," and "third," readers know this text structure is listing some concepts or events in order. When readers know contradictory key words including "however," "but," and "on the other hand," they know they are going to read something opposed to the information they have just read. Additional clue words like "moreover," "in addition," and "also," assist readers in expecting that they will gain extra facts or concepts related to the information they have read so far, or in understanding that the sentences they are about to read will describe events, concepts, or facts before these particular transition words. In sum, learning to spot major and clue words aids readers to read the text clearly. See Approaching Reproducible Handbook

Five Expository Text Structures and their Associated Signal Words: see sequence and cause and effect

Suggestions for Pre-Teaching/Applying the ELPS: Refer to the Treas. Visual Vocabulary Resources, pgs. 25-33 to pre-teach the key vocabulary, phrases, and basic words. See ELL Resource Book p.34 English and Spanish cognates: Treas. TE, pg. 77EE Additional Lesson Plan: Exploring Cause and Effect Using Expository Texts About Natural Disasters FCRR Cause and Effect Activity Academic Terms: cause, effect, sequence, chronological order, text structure, Nonfiction Text Features: As the students read nonfiction selections it is imperative to read and to pay attention to the various text features within the individual texts. Students need to use photographs, captions, labels, indexes, table of contents, diagrams, headings and other text features to enhance their comprehension on the subject. Students are encouraged to preview texts prior to reading paying close attention to these features and how they convey important information on the topic.

Preparation for Assessment: TAKS Stems: · What happens after _____________? · Fill in the empty box in the chart (events in a story). · What causes....? · What happened because...? · What is the purpose of __________________ (selection)? Academic Terms: structure, cause and effect, sequence, order of events Teacher Tips:

Anchors of Support: · Highlight key terms · See ORS Module on Text Structures: (sequence/cause & effect) · List the nonfiction characteristics · Recurring TEKS · Reading a Cause and Effect Article

The desired outcome for students' reading is the construction of meaning. The text structures, organizational patterns, and strategies introduced serve as a resource for readers needing a framework to organize text; however, an awareness of organizational patterns is meant to be a tool to support comprehension, not an end in itself.

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 10: Inference (Nonfiction)

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3rd Grade

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Week 10

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October 25-29

Unit: Community

Text Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR),and Independent Reading (IR) RA / SR: Save Our Butterflies (Treas. Student Book, pg.192) to introduce vocabulary Home Grown Butterflies (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 194-203) Unit 2 Week 2 Guided Reading: Teachers should prompt students for more specific information, such as finding examples of inferences. When the students come across places in which they need to make an inference, they can write the inference on their sticky note along with the evidence to support the inference and place it in the text where they inferred.

Treasures' suggested texts for small group instruction will always be listed here. If they are not appropriate for your students, you will want to utilize your campus's literacy library:

Additional Resources: Other stories with a community theme:

Our Community Garden by Barbara Pollak The Rag Coat by Lauren Mills City Green by DyAnne DiSalvo Smoky Night by Eve Bunting See your school librarian for past issues of Time for Kids.

Treasures' suggested texts for Guided Reading:

Approaching Level: Purple Loosestrife ELL: The Marsh Monster On Level: Purple Loosestrife Beyond Level: Purple Loosestrife

Use Teacher Works CD for guided reading lesson plan.

IR Tips for Independent Reading: During independent reading, ask students to place a Post-it note on the text near the place they made an inference. Students are

encouraged to share one or two inferences they found with a partner or whole class during 5 minute sharing time after independent reading.

Discussing Genre: Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ When readers make inferences within Word Study: nonfiction they use details, facts, and evidence from the text to help them Unit 2 Week 2 come to a new understanding of the Continue to teach word study explicitly. text. Objective: Decoding multisyllabic words In the following selection Home Grown with silent letters. Butterflies the students will read about Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 191C. how a village in Costa Rica comes Practice Book p.61,62, Transparency 7, together to solve an important issue. Word Building Cards, Teacher's The children and students of the village Resource Book p.184 play a critical role in the development of Silent Letter Activity a butterfly farming project. Have students use their own experiences and background knowledge to help them make inferences as they progress through the text. Students should be able to explain how they inferred and what experiences of their own helped them to do so. Building Comprehension: Use Inference Transparency # 6

Inference: Explain that authors do not always state directly everything that takes place

Fluency: Objective: Read fluently at an appropriate rate. Model: Transparency 7 at a moderate rate appropriate for expository text. Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 205A, Transparency 7, Practice Book p. 66 There is a very strong correlation between reading fluency and student success in school. Teachers should be using the Flynt-Cooter to assess students' reading fluency for both speed (approx. 90 words per minute at this time off the year) and expressiveness. That data should be used to plan fluency instruction groups See ORS Fluency Module Topical Essential Questions:

Vocabulary:

Resources: Save Our Butterflies (Treas. TE, pg.192) and Treas. Student Book, pg. 192) Vocabulary: protect, harming, supply, capture, enclosure Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 193. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pgs. 209C-209D)

In addition to the stopping point questions provided in the TE, use questions like these as you read with students:

in a story or text. Readers must take what details the author does offer and make inferences, or reasonably assume, certain conclusions using relevant background knowledge. Good readers then use evidence from the text to support their understanding about what is taking place. Why is this important? Even though authors do not always reveal everything that takes place in a selection, or directly states every emotion a character or subject may feel, these emotions and events still contribute to the development of the selection. To make inferences, readers look for a situation in the text in which the author gives clues but doesn't state directly what is taking place. They combine clues with relevant experiences to make an inference, or a reasonable assumption, to explain what is taking place or why something has happened.

Suggestions for Pre-Teaching/Applying the ELPS:

Components of this strategy include inferring for word meaning and inferring about the text.

Additional practice activities for making inferences: See ELL Resource Book p.86 Remind students that they certainly do know how to make inferences; they continually make inferences throughout the school day. They make inferences based on their peers' physical appearance, actions, speech, or based on their teachers' facial expressions, body language and room arrangement. We need to help them transfer those skills and strategies to their interactions with text. Example: An old discolored t-shirt (with many holes and paint stains) is a great way to help students infer and support with evidence. The question, "Who Wears this Shirt?" is posed at the beginning of the lesson. Using the template from below, write students' responses under "Inference". Then link their inferences with all of the evidence with arrows. Examples may include: Template : Inference Question: Who wears this shirt? painted his house paint stains works a lot ripped all over must be a man size of the shirt had the shirt for a long time or washed it a faded color lot Evidence

What did the author mean by______? What clues in the text did you use to determine the author's meaning? What can you infer by looking at the graphics? Does the author tell us why___? What can you infer? Based on what the author has already said, what can the reader tell about______? 6. Given what the author has already told us, what do you predict will probably happen in the future? 7. Which sentence(s) best shows you what the author meant? 8. How did the author show you that...? 9. What was the clue in the text that helped you to figure that out? 10. What part of the author's message has been left unsaid? 11. With nonfiction text, infer the causes and effects. "I think ... will cause... because...." 12. With nonfiction text, infer comparisons. "... is like ... because..." Suggestions for Interventions: Remember the struggling students will need additional support in all components of reading (phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension). Structure your time to address several different components in each daily lesson. Progress monitor student growth to make sure instruction is effective.

Struggling students will benefit first from direct instruction on how to infer and/or graphic organizers that assist them with the skill.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

FCRR Activity and Instructional Support Inferring Cards to use in small group:

Provide scaffolds by pre-selecting stopping points and asking students to or to look for a deeper meaning--can help, and without these scaffolds, kids may gloss over important information.

Split the class into groups and give each group a wordless picture book. Instruct each group to decide what is happening on each page and how they figured that out. Then have them share their thoughts with the class. See Approaching Reproducible Handbook Recurring TEKS

Preparation for Assessment: TAKS Stems: Anchors of Support: 13. From the article, the reader can tell that ______ does ___ because · Highlight key terms 14. The reader can tell that ­ Facts-Inference Chart 15. After reading the article, the reader knows that ___ will ___ if ­ Facts from the Text Inference 16. From the information in the selection the reader can determine that ­ Saber-tooth tigers have short legs and They must sneak up on their Academic Terms: inference, clues from text, background knowledge, conclude, cannot run fast. prey. infer, predict, draw conclusions, reasonable prediction, reader can tell, implicit (implied), unsaid, what the author meant Teacher Tips: If students do not have the experience portion of the equation (word clues + experience = inference), no matter how many words the author uses, the reader will not be able to think inferentially about the text. Therefore, it is critical for teachers to provide experiences that build the background knowledge

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 11: Summary of Non-Fiction

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3rd Grade

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Week 11

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November 1-5

Unit: Communication

Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA / SR: High Tech Bullies (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 348 ­349) to introduce vocabulary Messaging Mania (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 350-351) Unit 3 Week 3 Learning with Laptops (Time For Kids, pgs.16-19)

Approaching Level: Bright Ideas ELL: Bright Ideas On Level: Bright Ideas Beyond Level: Bright Ideas

Additional Resources:

TFK Supplemental Cards-Narrative 11 - Elephants Talk to Her- Katy Payne listens to the calls of the wild. Nonfiction: Tasmania Devil on Location by Swinburne The Way Things Work by David Macaulay The Top of the World by Steve Jenkins

GR:

IR:

Tell students that when they read a news story during independent reading, they should look for answers to the 5W's and H (Who, What, Where, When, Why and How). They can mark these places with post-it-notes, then use their notes to write a summary. Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study: Unit 2 Week 3 Objective: Decode multisyllabic words with three-letter blends Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 211C. Practice Book p.71-72 Transparency 8 Word Building Cards, Teacher's Resource Book p.185 Fluency: Objective: Read fluently with accuracy and phrasing Model: use Transparency 13 for emphasizing the accurate pronunciation of multisyllabic and difficult words. Resources: Treas. TE pg 353A, Practice Book pg. 130 How fast can you sell sea shells? Select a reasonably challenging tongue twister (e.g. Betty Botter bought some butter). Let students practice saying the tongue twister for 10 minutes. Then hold a contest to see who can say the tongue twister fastest. (see video on fluency for example) Vocabulary:

Resources:

Discussing Genre: Messaging Mania Unit 3 Week 3 is an informational article about the use of texting to communicate between friends. There are concerns that kids say things on a computer that they wouldn't say face to face. Parents are concerned that their children are not learning to spell correctly because they use the made up language of texting. Use this article to review all the expository text comprehension skills students have been learning over the past few weeks. For text features, ask questions such as: What do the illustrations and lines of text add to this article? Why did the author include them in this article? How do the subtitles help the reader? Can you predict what the article will be about using the subtitles? Discuss the text structure of this article. There are clear examples of cause and effect that students should be able to identify. Discuss the author's purpose and any inferences they make while reading the story. Building Comprehension:

High Tech Bullies (Treas. TE, pg.348) and Treas. Student Book, pg. 348) Vocabulary: record, estimate, focus Additional Words: Instant messaging, researcher, online, surveyed, cyberbullied, Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 349. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pgs. 357G---357H)

A reporter's job is to get the facts. People who read the newspaper, listen to news reports or watch news programs want the basic information behind a story. Basic information can be summed up by addressing the 5 W's and H: Who? What?

Topical Essential Questions: In addition to the comprehension questions provided in the TE use these questions as you read with students: · Who/what is the article about?

Where? When? Why? And How? Teachers can use the Reporter's Formula before, during and after reading to help students understand key information that can be used to write a non-fiction summary. See the ORS Module for Summary, pg. 18-19 for the NF Summary graphic organizer. Explain to students that after they have answered the questions with information found in the text, they will practice writing a summary from the list of facts they have compiled. The following link provides an alternative way to write an expository summary: Summary Graphic Organizers for Students. If you choose to use this graphic organizer, be sure students understand the difference between main idea and summary. The summary should be shorter than the original text, include the big ideas of the text, and reflect the structure or order of the text. Be clear that the main idea and summary are not the same and give an explicit example of how they are different. Suggestions for Pre-Teaching/Applying the ELPS: This week students will practice Summarization of Non Fiction Text. Remind students that when they summarize what they have read it helps them to better understand what the author is trying to tell the reader. Remind students of the SWBST anchor chart used for narrative summary. Say: This week we are going to practice summarizing with Non-Fiction texts. We are going to practice being reporters, or people who report just the facts, leaving out the extra information that is not important to the story. We will ask ourselves 5 questions as we read.... Use the reporter's Formula for Summarizing Non Fiction Text to introduce the 5W's. See the ORS Module for Summary, pg. 18-19 for the NF Summary graphic organizer. Refer to Treas. Visual Vocabulary Resources pgs. 143-151 See Treasures ELL Resource Book p.15 Preparation for Assessment: TAKS Stems: · Which is the best summary of this selection? · Read the first sentence of the summary below: · __________________ · Which of the following completes the summary above? TAKS Expository summaries contain: · W, W, W, W, W, (H) · No details · Summary is several sentences long In preparation for TAKS, it will be important for students to be able to recognize an effective summary and distinguish it from ineffective summaries. A discussion around this idea should be the basis for establishing criteria for an effective summary. See the document for Teaching Summarization to Struggling Students

· · · ·

What is the author trying to tell the reader? Why do you think the author included the photographs/illustrations? How do they help the reader summarize what the article(s) are about? Would someone who read my summary really understand the main points of the text?

Suggestions for Interventions: Have students use the graphic organizer to summarize a story they read in their local newspaper, magazine, school handbook, or a passage from a textbook. Start by skimming the text to get an idea of what the text is about. 1. Cross out sentences that are not necessary or that are redundant to help them pull out what is crucial to the message of the piece. 2. Mark key words and phrases and jot down notes about the main idea. Instruct students to look for signal words such as therefore, in conclusion, or in summary. 3. Have them verbally summarize the nonfiction piece to a peer. 4. Then, have them reread the text and write a summary paragraph. In the summary, students should state the text's main idea in the first sentence and include the most important information. Be sure that students have not included any opinions of their own or sentences word-for-word from the original text. See Approaching Reproducible Handbook See the document for Teaching Summarization to Struggling Students Anchors of Support: Use the reporter's Formula for Summarizing Non Fiction Text to introduce the 5W's. See the ORS Module for Summary, pg. 18-19 for the NF Summary graphic organizer.

Teacher Tips: Summarizing helps when reading science or social studies textbooks. After reading a social studies chapter, model through shared writing how to find the 5W + 1H and using that information to write a summary.

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 12: Compare and Contrast Texts

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3rd Grade

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Week 12

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November 8-12

Unit: Community

Text Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA / Mail for Matty (Treas. Student Book, pg.312, Unit 3) to introduce vocabulary SR: (Follow the Define, Example, Ask routine on p. 313 to quickly review vocabulary words for the week.) Dear Juno (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 314-339) Unit 3 Week 2 How we Keep in Touch (Treas. Student Book pgs 340-345 Time For Kids (2003) Cards with TAKS-Formatted Questions: The Galapagos Islands Face a Sticky Situation (Science Card #6) The Coral Reef Crisis (Science Card #7) GR:

Approaching Level: The E-mails ELL: Letters to Africa On Level: Dear Ghana Beyond Level: Faraway Home NOTE: if you are not able to locate the Time For Kids cards, contact the Language Arts department.

Additional Resources: Revisit selections read from last week High Tech Bullies and Message Mania to compare with How we keep in Touch? For fiction: Stellaluna and Verdi by Janell Cannon Animal Dads by Steve Jenkins (comparing and contrasting) Actual Size by Steve Jenkins Internet activities for Compare and Contrast

IR

Tips for Independent Reading: Be sure to conduct reading conferences with students about the nonfiction books they are reading. The books should be at

their "just right" level and students can retell portions of the text with reasonable accuracy. Students are often attracted to nonfiction books that are too difficult because of the detailed illustrations and photographs. We want to assist students in finding books that they can read and understand in the same way we assist them in finding "just right" narrative books.

Discussing Genre: This week students will extend their connections beyond text to self and begin exploring text to text and text to world situations. We want make sure as we begin to compare and contrast texts that we help students identify when to make those connections. The comparisons the students are most likely to make are usually characters...how are the characters of the two stories alike, how are they different, did either character change from the beginning to the end? Encourage them to compare settings, problems and solutions. Also, model comparing fiction and nonfiction texts and finding the connections between them. Recognizing Text Patterns While Reading Authors of nonfiction writing use techniques to organize the information that they are explaining. The signal words that they use help the reader mentally organize the information. These signal words are used in textbooks, trade books, and test passages. Words that often signal a comparison pattern include: however, but, as well as, on the other hand, not only...but also, either....or, while, although, similarly, unless, and yet. Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study: Unit 2 Week 4 Continue to teach word study explicitly. Objective: Decoding multisyllabic words with diagraphs in context and independent of contexts Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 223C, Practice Book p.81,82, Transparency 9, Word Building Cards, Teacher's Resource Book p.186 FCRR Diagraph Activities Model: Transparency 12 ­ echo reading Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 339A, Transparency 12, Practice Book p. 120 Sing a silly song: Singing familiar songs with unfamiliar lyrics gives kids another opportunity to practice repeated reading for fluency. First, you can teach your students well-known songs like "Row Row Row Your Boat," and then, when they can sing that without looking at the lyrics, give them new lyrics to sing to the same tune. A search for "parody songs for kids" will get you to websites such as http://bussongs.com and http://www.make4fun.com that have a variety of both traditional and parody songs. Fluency: Objective: Read with expression and intonation Vocabulary: Resources: Dear Juno (Treas. TE pg. ) and Treas. Student Book, pg. 314-339) Vocabulary: crackle, starry, announced, noticed, soared Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 313. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pgs. 345C-345D

Academic Terms: compare, contrast, trade books, comparison,

Building Comprehension: Use Transparency # 5 Explain that when readers compare they tell how things are alike. When they contrast they tell how things are different. Comparing and contrasting characters or their relationships in a story gives a reader a better understanding of the plot. It can also show how the same characters or relationships change from the beginning to the end of the story. Compare and Contrast Activity FCRR Continue to reinforce and allow students the opportunity to monitor their own comprehension by summarizing what they read. Reinforce the strategy we use when we summarize a story (SWBST/fiction or 5W's/expository). This can be started as a group and completed with partners, but should be a practiced throughout the week. Also, have students identify the characters and discuss their role in the story, their interactions with other characters and any changes they may undergo within each story. This will ensure the students understanding of the one story before trying to compare it to another. Students then use the summaries to help them compare story elements of two or more texts.

Suggestions for Pre-Teaching Before beginning the lesson it would probably be helpful to introduce/review vocabulary for compare (how things are alike) and contrast (how things are different) and emphasize that these are academic words which mean the same as, alike and different. Say: This week we will be using these words specifically as we begin to compare and contrast what we are reading. To help us frame our thinking we will use a Venn Diagram (you may also use a tchart). We are going to look at two objects to see how they compare to each other. (You may choose any two objects: .lake/river, car/bike, flower/tree, sun/moon, truck/car, hairdryer/curling iron. For students who may not be familiar with the objects, or for ELL's you may want to provide a photo/picture of your objects. See ELPS See ELL Resource Book p.136 Begin by asking students to think about a bird's nest and their own home. How are these two homes alike? Have students turn and talk to a neighbor to find at least two similarities (possible answers: both provide shelter, can be made of wood, are used as a home, is where they live, take up space). Lesson Plan: Comparing and contrasting Little Red Riding Hood stories :

Topical Essential Questions:

In addition to the comprehension questions provided in the TE, use these questions as you read with student Fiction · · · How are the characters alike? Different? (Mail for Matty and Dear Juno) What is message is the author trying to tell us in both stories (Mail for Matty and Dear Juno)

How do I compare and contrast plots, characters and settings in different Stories? Nonfiction · · · How are the themes similar? How are they different?

Preparation for Assessment: TAKS Stems: · How are the stories alike? · An idea present in both selections is--· The difference between the article and the story is that the story-- · A similarity between these two selections is that both discuss-- · What do both selections have in common? Teacher Tips:

What solution or message do they both impress on the reader? Or, how are the solutions different? Suggestions for Interventions: Review phonics skills and re-teach previous skills not mastered. Go over all important vocabulary so students have a greater understanding of the text. See Approaching Reproducible Handbook Another Suggestion: Three Little Pigs and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (Any 2 versions of fairy tales would work!) Before Reading: Show students a version of The Three Little Pigs. Introduce the story The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. Ask students if they can tell anything that is alike about the characters by looking at the pictures? Lead a teacher text walk through the first few pages of both stories. Discuss how other characters affect the outcome of the book. Allow students to explain how picture clues help us find out what the story is about. List any similarities and differences between the two stories students have identified before reading. During Reading: Read The True Story of the Three Little Pigs aloud. Discuss similarities to the text of The Three Little Pigs. Discuss the characters and how the pigs affect the story. With help from the students, complete a class story map for each version of the book. Identify characters, plot, and setting. Anchors of Support: · Venn Diagram · Connecting our Ideas organizer--See ORS Module on Connecting Across Texts

Recurring TEKS

In is important to progress monitor the students that are working below grade level as a way of determining if interventions are working and if instruction needs to be adjusted.

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 13: Locate Facts & Details

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3rd Grade

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Week 13

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November 15-19

Unit: Communication This lesson will extend into the first two days of next week.

Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA /

Living in the Cliffs (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 212-213) to introduce vocabulary (Follow the Define, Additional Resources:

Example, Ask routine on p. 213 to quickly review vocabulary words for the week.)

The Choir Contest (Treas. Student Book pgs. 40-41) to introduce vocabulary Unit 2 Week 3

SR:

Go West! (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 214-217) Unit 2 Week 3 Nacho and Lolita (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 42-61) Unit 4 Week 2

Fiction: Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathmann The Sunday Outing by Gloria Jean Pinkney Nonfiction: They're Off: The Story of the Pony Express by Cheryl Harness Building a Tsunami Warning System (Treasures Time for Kids)

GR:

During guided reading, students will be reading books at their instructional reading level. The students should be in small flexible groups. The teacher provides support to students as they use comprehension strategies in context. The teacher should observe how the students are checking for understanding. (i.e. re-reading, questioning, making connections) For Guided Reading Basics: Treasures' suggested texts for small group instruction will always be listed here. If they are not appropriate for your students, you will want to utilize your campus's literacy library: Nonfiction Selections: Approaching Level: Communities Across America ELL: Communities Across America On Level: Communities Across America Beyond Level: Communities Across America Fiction Selections: Approaching Level: Turtle and Deer ELL: Paul Bunyan On Level: Paul Bunyan and Babe Beyond Level: A Country of Mice

IR:

Did you know you can print any leveled reader from McGraw-Hill from the ConnectED website? Using the Leveled Reader Database, you can print any one of over 6,000 titles in English and Spanish. That way, students can have stories at their independent reading level to take home for practice and fun. Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study: Unit 2 Week 5 Objective: Identify and read contractions, spell complex contractions, and monitor accuracy in decoding. Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 245C, Practice Book pgs. 91-95, Transparency 10, Teacher Resource Book p. 187 FCRR Contraction Activity Fluency: Objective: Read fluently with appropriate expression Model: Echo Reading Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 63A, Transparency 17, Practice Book p. 174 Reader's Theatres are another way for students to practice appropriate phrasing and expression. Resources for Reader's Theatres: Treasures Read-Aloud Anthology and Plays Vocabulary: Resources: Living in the Cliffs (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 212-213) Vocabulary: immigrants, established, traditional, culture, communicate Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 213. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pg. 221G-221H)

Discussing Genre: Go West! Is a nonfiction selection about how railroads changed the face of the South West. Before the railroad it took at least three months to travel from New York to San Francisco. This was rugged travel and many people died during their journey. With the new railroad routes it took only 8 days to make the same trip. Nacho and Lolita is a fiction selection about a colorful bird that finds himself out west at Mission San Juan Capistrano. This is a love story about how this bird and a migrating swallow

fell in love. A fact is that the swallows still migrate to Mission San Juan Capistrano every year. They have been arriving on the same day for as long as anyone can remember. Building Comprehension: Remind students that Reading is Thinking. Refer to the anchor chart you made earlier this year. It will be important for students to understand the difference between "right-there" and "think and search" questions. Students answer "right-there" questions by looking back and finding information in the text. "Think and Search" questions require the student to use information in the text to infer meaning that is not directly stated in the text. When students are Thinking Within the text, students are searching for and using all kinds of information (Fountas & Pinnell).

Also remember that searching for and using information is both a process and a task. Readers search for and use information as they read. This is a process. Fountas & Pinnell state, "Literal Understanding depends on accessing the important information in the text. Readers search all visible information in the text (print and illustrations) and decide what information is important for building meaning. When students are asked to go back to the text to locate specific information, searching for and using information is a task. This task is made easier if students have successfully gathered the important information as they read. It's important to ensure that students are given the opportunity for both the process and the task. Use words from this week's selection.

Topical Essential Questions: In addition to the stopping point questions provided in the TE, use questions like these as you read with students: 1. How does asking questions help us understand the text? 2. What do you do when you do not understand something you have just read? 3. Where do you look to find answers to the questions you have about the text? 4. What do you think the author is trying to tell you?

See ELPS Recurring TEKS

Suggestions for Pre-Teaching Refer to the Treas. Visual Vocabulary Resources to pre-teach the key vocabulary, phrases, and basic words for the suggested reading selection to all ELL students in your classroom as well as any other student(s) you think would benefit from these routines. See ELL Resource Book p.36 English and Spanish Cognates: Treas. TE, pg. 221 EE A fun way to get students warmed up to ask questions about their reading is to play the 20 question game. Students must ask questions in complete sentences. The teacher writes something down (a person, place, or thing) and the students take turns asking up to twenty questions to determine what the teacher wrote. The teacher can give 4 - 5 prepared questions to students to model, if the students are not familiar with the game. For example: (Turkey) Is it an animal? Does it have fur? Is it a carnivore? Does it walk on two legs? Does its habitat exist in America? Preparation for Assessment: For this focus, think of In the Book questions (right there questions and think and search questions) as you read through the selections. Academic Terms: text, support, evidence, verify, confirm, prove, questioning, locate, information.

Suggestions for Interventions: Model: Think Aloud questions that you have as you read part of a text. Write your questions down so everyone in the small group can see. (i.e. chart paper, white board) Plan your questions ahead of time so finding the answer to the questions can be modeled as well as by going back to the text to find the facts and details. Facts and Details Graphic Organizer Practice: Read aloud another part of the text. Have each student write at least one question using one of the Ws or how. After all questions have been generated, students and teacher answer 2 -3 teacher questions. Have the students support their answers using information from the text. Now, have pairs of students answer the student questions verifying their answers with evidence from the text. (Depending on time, the answer portion may need to be done during the next meeting.) See Approaching Reproducible Handbook for additional support. Anchors of Support: · Characteristics of Fiction and Nonfiction (First 20 Days) · Reading is Thinking (First 20 Days) · The Five Ws Hand for questioning (suggestions for intervention) · Anchor charts created with the students are more meaningful to the students and can be customized to your students' needs. The anchor charts should be easily accessible to all students.

Teacher Tips: This week's focus is mostly about locating specific facts and details found within the text. Students should not be limited to asking just these types of questions. Higher

level thinking questions should be welcomed and will add rigor to the classroom or small group discussion.

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 14: Locate Facts and Details

·

3rd Grade

·

Week 14

·

November 22-23

Unit: Helping Others Continuation of last week

Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA / SR:

Life in Antarctica (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 144-145) to introduce vocabulary (Follow the Define, Example, Ask routine on p. 145 to quickly review vocabulary words for the week.) Penguin Chick (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 146-165) Unit 5 Week 1 Frog and Locust (Treasures Read-Aloud Anthology, pgs. 96-98)

Additional Resources:

Fiction: Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco Dandelions by Eve Bunting Squanto's Journey: By Joseph Burchac NonFiction: What do you do with a tail like this? By Steve Jenkins Squanto and the First Thanksgiving by Joce Kessel A Picture book of Louis Braille by David Adler

GR:

Treasures' suggested texts for small group instruction will always be listed here. If they are not appropriate for your students, you will want to utilize your campus's literacy library: Approaching Level: The Weddell Seals of Antarctica ELL: The Weddell Seals On Level: The Weddell Seals of Antarctica Beyond Level: The Weddell Seals of Antarctica

IR:

Students should be given time to discuss what they have been reading. A text talk could be done in an interactive journal between student and teacher or between students.

Discussing Genre: Refer back to the nonfiction and fiction anchor chart from the First 20 Days. Ask the students what are some characteristics they might find in nonfiction stories that they most likely will not find in fiction. (i.e. index, glossary, captions) Penguin Chick is a nonfiction selection about penguins living in Antarctica. The author describes what life is like during the year in Antarctica and how the mother and father penguins work together to tend to the egg and then later the baby chicks. Throughout the selection are interesting facts and details about the penguins.

Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study: Unit 3 Week 1 Objective: Decoding one syllable and multisyllabic words with controlled vowels. Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 287C, Practice Book pgs. 105, 106 Transparency 11, Teacher Resource Book p. 188

Fluency: Objective: Read accurately at an appropriate rate Model: Echo Reading Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 167A, Transparency 21, Practice Book p. 214, Fluency Solutions Audio CD Read a speech with great expression: Speeches are meant to be read with good timing, phrasing, and intonation. How effective would the Gettysburg Address have been if Lincoln was mumbling and stumbling over the words?

Ask your students to practice reading famous speeches until they can read them with great clarity and timing.

Vocabulary: Resources: Life in Antarctica (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 144-145) Vocabulary: fierce, echoes, shuffles, huddle, down, junior Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 145. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pg. TE 171C-171D)

Building Comprehension: Use a graphic organizer to help students record facts and details as they read. Have students compare what they wrote and what their neighbor wrote. Have them discuss which details are important and support the main idea and which are not as important. If the student does not have the background knowledge to understand something in the story, the teacher should fill in the gaps for the student. The pre-teaching vocabulary routine will help build students' background knowledge.

Topical Essential Questions: In addition to the stopping point questions provided in the TE, use questions like these as you read with students: 1. How does asking questions help us understand the text? 2. How do you find the answers to the questions you have while reading? 3. What do we know so far? 4. When should you reread part of the text? 5. What is the author mostly talking about?

Suggestions for Pre-Teaching ELPS Refer to the Treas. Visual Vocabulary Resources to pre-teach the key vocabulary, phrases, and basic words for the suggested reading selection to all ELL students in your classroom as well as any other student(s) you think would benefit from these routines. See ELL Resource Book p.250 English and Spanish Cognates: Treas. TE, pg. 171AA Read aloud Antarctic Anthem (Treasures student book, pgs. 168) to students. Ask the students "What is the weather like on Antarctica?" Then, have the students write down words or phrases from the text that supports their answer. Explain they will have three minutes to write as many words as they can find. Compare student words and phrases. On chart paper or the overhead, write "I know Antarctica is cold, because the author says.... Write all the words that the students found that support the answer. Repeat this activity with other poems or parts of text as needed. Connect this activity to this week's focus of locating facts and details. The facts and details may be found in any kind of text, including poetry. (The time may vary depending on the needs of your class.) Recurring TEKS Preparation for Assessment: As students answer questions or explain his/her thinking, ask them to support their answers or thinking with evidence from the text. Ask open ended questions that require an explanation rather than a single word response. Academic Terms: text, support, evidence, verify, confirm, prove, questioning, locate, information. Teacher Tips:

Suggestions for Interventions: Meet with you struggling students every day regardless of special activities planned. These students need daily small group instruction that is in addition to the regular whole group class instruction. If they receive interventions with a specialist it should not replace your class instruction for reading but should be in addition to that. Teachers can help the reader process text by modeling strategies. Model: Teacher models the Read-Cover-Remember-Retell strategy to a small group. After you read a "handful of text", you cover the text and tell what is important about what you just read. If you don't know, you reread the part of text again. Plan ahead so the part you reread helps answer one of the questions you had during reading. Show the students the part in the text that helped you answer your question. *Not all the questions students ask will have an answer! This sometimes takes further investigation into the subject. Practice: As students read a "handful of text", help them define what an appropriate handful of text is for them. After they have practiced reading and answering what is important about what they just read ask some deeper level questions. Students can practice this strategy while "buddy reading". Their partner can check to see if they retoal the information correctly. See Approaching Reproducible Handbook for more suggestions. Anchors of Support: Characteristics of Fiction and Nonfiction (First 20 Days) Reading is Thinking (First 20 Days) Read-Cover-Remember (ORS module) Anchor charts created with the students are more meaningful to the students and can be customized to your students' needs. The anchor charts should be easily accessible to all students.

This week's focus is mostly about locating specific facts and details found within the text. Students should not be limited to asking just these types of questions. Higher level thinking questions should be welcomed and will add rigor to the classroom or small group discussion.

Reading Street View

Arc 15: MOY Testing

·

3rd Grade

·

Week 15

Unit: Helping Others

·

November 29 - December 3

Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading RA / SR: GR: Additional Resources for Read Aloud:

Note: MOY Testing is scheduled for this week. A new comprehension focus is not introduced.

IR:

Tips for Independent Reading:

Discussing Genre:

Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study:

Fluency:

Vocabulary:

Building Comprehension:

Topical Essential Questions:

Suggestions for Pre-Teaching/Applying the ELPS: Preparation for Assessment: Teacher Tips:

Suggestions for Interventions: Anchors of Support:

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 16: Main Idea (Section of a passage)

·

3rd Grade

·

Week 16

·

December 6-10

Unit: Helping Others

Text Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA / SR: Community Works (Treas. Student Book, pg.8) to introduce vocabulary (Follow the Define, Example, Ask routine on p. 9 to quickly review vocabulary words for the week.) Seven Spools of Thread (Treas. Student Book, pgs. 10-33) - NONFICTION Unit 4 Week 1 Guided Reading: Treasures' suggested texts for Guided Reading: Approaching Level: Androcles and the Lions ELL: The Diamond On Level: A True Hero Beyond Level: The Lost Brocade Additional Resources: Other stories with a Helping Others theme: Herman the Helper by Robert Kraus Stone Soup by Marcia Brown This Little Light of Mine by Earl B. Lewis To Hilda for Helping by Margot Zemach Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen by Dyanne Disalvo-Ryan Boxes for Katje by Canda Tumbleweed Stew by Susan Stevens

Texts that lend themselves to Main Idea (Part): The Important Book by Margaret Wise Brown A Chair for My Mother by Vera B.Williams Fables by Arnold Lobel The Blind Men and the Elephant by Karen Backstein (Fable)

IR

Tips for Independent Reading: While conferring with your students, you should be taking particular notice of the notes that students are making as they are

reading. Are your students relying heavily on one particular strategy rather than using all strategies as they read? It is a good idea to re-visit strategies that good readers use as they read through text if you are seeing that students are leaning on one instead of exhibiting evidence of all. It might be time to do a whole class review mini-lesson on how good readers make connections or ask questions, but then search and find the answers as they read. Discussing Genre: Seven Spools of Thread is a fable. Share with students that fables are a special kind of tale. In most fables, animal characters act like humans (personification). Explain that a fable teaches a moral (or lesson) about humans. Emphasize that a moral is drawn from what happens in a fable. The moral is usually revealed at the end of the fable. Sometimes the moral is delivered as a statement, such as "Be happy with what you have," or "It is easier to think up a plan than to carry it out." Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Word Study: Unit 3 Week 2 Objective: Decoding multisyllabic words with r-Controlled Vowels ar, or Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 311C. Practice Book p.115 Transparency 12 Word Building Cards, Teacher's Resource Book p.189 R Controlled Word Work Fluency: Objective: Repeated Reading: Phrasing Model: Transparency 16 with appropriate phrasing. Resources: Treas. TE, pg. 33A, Transparency 16, Practice Book pgs. 160,161 Silly Poems. Teach the students that poetry can be serious and sophisticated, but it can also be fun and silly. Select poems from resources like http://www.gigglepoetry.com that the students can practice and read aloud for the whole class. Just like with jokes, the presentation of the poem is half of the humor, so give students time to practice with a partner so they can present the poem with eloquence. Vocabulary:

Resources: Community Works (Treas. TE, pg.8) and Treas. Student Book, pg. 8) Vocabulary: argued, possessions, fabic, purchased, quarreling Vocabulary Routine outlined in the TE on page 9. For more vocabulary practice: Build Robust Vocabulary (Treas. TE, pgs. 37C-37D)

Building Comprehension:

Topical Essential Questions:

Explain that the main idea is the most important point an author makes, or what a selection is mostly about. The main idea is sometimes explicit, or stated in the text. Usually, however, the main idea is implied, or not directly stated in the text. Whether or not the main idea is directly stated, students must still ask themselves what the sentences in the paragraph have in common, and classify these details to determine the main idea. They can then state the main ideas and supporting details in a text in ways that maintain meaning. Point out that this will help students remember the most important information that they've read. This week we are working with the main idea of a paragraph or a section of text containing 2-3 paragraphs. Main idea of an entire text was taught in a previous week, Suggestions for Pre-Teaching/Applying the ELPS: Explain: Discuss how identifying the main ideas and supporting details can help students summarize a passage. Write this information on the board: Sea turtles get caught in the nets of fishing boats. Many are hit by speedboats or other ships. Sea turtles are also hunted for their shells. Read the sentences with students. Tell them that they will be identifying the details and the unstated main idea of the paragraph. Guided Practice Say: You can usually find the main idea of a passage, even if it is not directly stated, by summarizing the details that are given. Let's summarize the most important details on the board. (Sea turtles get caught in fishing boat nets. Many are hit by speedboats or other ships. Sea turtles are hunted for their shells.) The main idea of this passage seems to be that sea turtles face many dangers. Explain how you arrived at this main idea (all sentences are about sea turtle getting caught in nets, being hit by speed boats and being hunted. All these are bad things that can happen to turtles. We call these dangers to turtles. Therefore sea turtle face many dangers is the main idea. Practice: Write this statement on the board: People can help sea turtles. Tell students this is a main idea that has been stated. Ask students to brainstorm sentences that give more information to support the main idea and write the details on the board. (Possible answers: Fishing boat crews can carefully remove turtles from their nets and return them to the ocean. Speedboats can watch for turtles and avoid hitting them. People can stop hunting the turtles for their shells.) ELL Resource Book p.190 Recurring TEKS

In addition to the stopping point questions provided in the TE, use questions like these as you read with students: 17. What is the main idea of this paragraph? 18. What is the author's message? 19. What is the author trying to tell us in this paragraph? 20. What is the author mostly talking about in this paragraph? 21. Which details does the author include to support his/her main message? 22. Retell a portion of the story Suggestions for Interventions: Have students use the Word-Building Cards that come with Treasures to build and practice the phonics and spelling concepts. Refer to the phonics transparencies and use those in your small groups to revisit and provide additional practice. Main Idea Suggestion from FCRR Main Idea Task Cards: for additional practice Try This: Get the Gist is a strategy that assists students in finding the main idea by helping them to limit the number of words and focusing on important ideas rather than on details. When using Get the Gist, place students in small heterogeneous groups or pairs. Students benefit from the discussions that arise when working with others. When introducing Get the Gist to students, it is recommended that teachers model each step using think-alouds. · · · Get the Gist Who or what is the paragraph mostly about? What is the most important thing about the "who" or "what"? Put together the answers and tell the main idea in 10 words or less.

Preparation for Assessment: TAKS Stems: Anchors of Support: 23. Paragraph ___ is mostly about...... · Highlight key terms 24. What is the main idea of section____________? · Get the Gist Chart On TAKS, main idea is tested in fiction with parts of text. · See Approaching Reproducible Handbook for additional suggestions for On TAKS, main idea in fiction is the topic of the paragraph or group of paragraphs interventions. Academic Terms: gist, main idea, identify, summing up, topic sentence Teacher Tips: In the new ELAR and SLAR standards, the Student Expectation for main idea is included under the Reading Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text only and not included under Fiction. Until the TAKS test is revised for the 2012 administration, main idea may still be tested on text that is narrative/fiction.

Reading Street View

Arc Focus 17: Fact and Opinion (Persuasive Texts)

·

3rd Grade

·

Week 17

·

December 6-10

Unit: Helping Others

Text Recommendations for Read Aloud (RA), Shared Reading (SR), Guided Reading (GR), and Independent Reading (IR) RA / SR: A Higher Goal, (Treas. Student Book, pg.70) to introduce vocabulary (Follow the Define, Example, Ask routine on p. 71 to quickly review vocabulary words for the week.) A Growing Interest, (Treas. Student Book, pgs.72-75) - Non Fiction Unit 4 Week 3 Kids Helping Kids (Treas. Student Book, pg.76) - Non Fiction Approaching Level: Our City Gardens ELL: Our City Gardens On Level: Our City Gardens Beyond Level: Our City Gardens Additional Resources: Revisit selections read from Week 13--Go West! · TFK Level 3-Soc Stds Card #13: Saving the Planet Starts at Home · TFK Level 3-Soc Stds Card #10: Kids' Agenda for the Nation · TFK Level 3-Language Arts Card #2: The City News · TFK Level 3-Persuasive Card #8: Uniforms Rule in Public Schools

GR:

IR

Tips for Independent Reading: Have students identify 5 facts and 5 opinions using post-its during independent reading time. Students share facts and opinions with a partner, explaining how they know they are fact and opinion during the 5 minute sharing after reading.

Discussing Genre: Phonemic Awareness/Phonics/ Authors use persuasive texts to change Word Study: a reader's mind about a topic or to help support the author's ideas on a topic. It Unit 3 Week 3 is important that students learn to Objective: Decode multisyllabic words identify when the author is writing to with prefixes. Resources Treas. TE pg. 347C persuade, how he uses facts and opinions that are intended to evoke Practice Book p. 125, 126 emotion from the reader. Transparency 13 The students will be reading about how Word Building Cards community leaders recognized the need Teacher's Resource Book p. 190 for students to understand where food comes from. By educating teachers and students how to grow and maintain gardens now many schools within the United States are growing an abundance of food. Building Comprehension: What to do and what to watch for. A Fact is information that can be verified or Proven. You can't argue facts. An Opinion is information that Cannot be proven or verified. Opinions are someone's belief or personal judgment. You can agree or disagree with an opinion. Recognize facts. Just because something is printed, that doesn't make it a fact! A fact can be proven. A fact is either true or false. You can't argue facts. Decide if the statement can be proven or verified. Can you check it out in a reference book? Can you prove it? Is your source a reliable or scientific source? Individual feelings or emotions do not influence facts. That means it doesn't make a difference if you agree or disagree. It's a FACT. That also means it doesn't matter if you like or don't like the fact, it is still a FACT! Recognize opinions. Opinion statements are different from facts. If the writer is trying to convince you of his point of view, it may sound like a fact, but it is still just an opinion,

Fluency: Objective: read fluently with accuracy and good phrasing Model: echo reading emphasizing accuracy and good phrasing, pausing for commas, hyphens and periods Resources: Treas. TE p. 226, Transparency 18, Fluency Solutions Audio CD, Practice Book 184

Vocabulary: Resources: A Higher goal (Treas. TE p. and Treas. Student book p. 70). Vocabulary: utilize awareness, pollution, emphasize.

Topical Essential Questions: In addition to the stopping point questions provided in the TE, use questions like these as you read with students: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What is the author's message? Why did the author write this story? What language does the author use to persuade the reader? What is the author's opinion on the subject? How is an opinion different from a fact?

For a fun Friday activity follow this link Fact or Opinion Football

because you can agree or disagree. Opinions cannot be proven or verified by an impartial source, because they only express an individual point of view. Opinions argue one point of view, and you can disagree with an opinion. Opinions evaluate, judge or express feelings and emotions. Statements about the future are always opinions, because you cannot prove the future. It didn't happen yet! Look for opinion signal words: believe, best/worst, feel, in my opinion, least/most, may/may not, probably, possibly, should, should not, think, etc... Suggestions for Pre-Teaching/Applying the ELPS: Modeling/Active Involvement: Review fact and opinion by giving some examples of each and having students identify what each statement is. Next, explain to students that they are going to participate in an activity called "Fair or Unfair" which will allow them to state their opinion. For the fair or unfair activity, divide the room in half and explain that one half is fair and the other is unfair. Then, give students different scenarios and have them move to the appropriate side of the room. Some examples of scenarios are: driving age 16, no hats at school, school uniforms, etc. Put students in pairs or small groups. Have them practice defending an opinion through role play. Have one student be the audience and the other student be the one who is trying to give his or her opinion about a topic and then defend it to the audience. Encourage students to give three reasons supporting their opinion. Connect all the activities to the main focus; fact and opinion. ELL Resource Book p.230 Another suggestion: Bring in different objects and the students tell me a fact and then an opinion about the object. EXAMPLE: a teddy bear---FACT--The teddy bear is brown. OPINION--The teddy bear is cute. apple--FACT--An apple grows on a tree. OPINION-An apple is the best fruit. Also, try putting students in pairs. I say a word and the student on the right of the pair writes a fact using my word and the student on the left writes an opinion using my word. Example: elephant---Fact--An elephant has a long trunk. Opinion--An elephant's ears are ugly.

Suggestions for Interventions: Some students may need extra practice identifying the difference between a fact and opinion. Create anchor chart to help students identify difference between the two: Fact Opinion Can be checked by Can be a Feeling-the reading, observing or best, magical, amazing researching Can be proven true or Something you false think=nothing like it, new and improved, sensational Have students practice with given statements (use TFK ENF Level 3 Teacher Resource Notebook page 108 Fact/Opinion Exercise). Once students have practiced with given statements, teachers can use advertisements to have students identify facts/opinions. Questions to ask: What is the author trying to persuade the reader to do? What language/words does the author use? Do you agree with the author's opinion? Why? Why not? See Approaching Reproducible Handbook

Preparation for Assessment: · Which statement in the article is a fact? · Which statement in the article is an opinion? How do you know? · What is the author trying to persuade the reader to think? · What language does the author use to convince the reader his opinion is best? · What problem does the author try to solve? Recurring TEKS

Teacher Tips:

Anchors of Support:

Anchors of support should: · Include key terms related to fact and opinion · Highlight the difference between fact and opinion with examples from a familiar text · Show how context helps readers figure out whether a statement is factual and accurate. Look for phrases such as: I think..

Put statements to the test! Can you prove or disprove the statement? Can it be verified by a reliable source? Can you check it out in a reference book? Does it express an individual's feelings, thoughts, beliefs, judgments, argument, agreement, disagreement or advice? Examples: Special Vitamin Cereal is the best cereal because it has more vitamins. Brazil is the largest country in South America. (Opinion: Signal word "best"; cannot be proven; a point of view) (True Fact: can be proven by checking reference books) Scientists believe that the world is billions of years old. There are eight million people in the city of New York. (Opinion: signal word "believe"; cannot be proven and is only a theory) (Fact: can be proven true or false by checking census records) There are nine hundred students in this school. The United States will always be a democracy. (Fact: can be proven by checking school records) (Opinion: future tense "will-" can never be proven; it didn't happen yet)

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