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MEDIA RELEASE

CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY ROADMAP TO CHART TRANSFORMATION OF THE CONSTRUCTION SECTOR

- Enhancements to $250 million incentive package to encourage more firms to tap on Government funding for productivity improvement 1. In line with the Government's push towards productivity-driven

economic growth, the Building and Construction Authority (BCA) launched the $250million Construction Productivity and Capability Fund (CPCF) in June 2010, to incentivise mechanisation, upgrade the skill level of the workforce, and build up the capability of construction firms. To date, more than 500 firms in the construction industry have benefitted from various schemes in the Fund, of which 65% are small firms. Close to $7 million has been committed. 2. BCA has further consulted with the industry as well as an International

Panel of Experts in formulating a holistic framework - the Construction Productivity Roadmap, to tackle the challenges of lifting the construction sector's productivity in the long-term. The Construction Productivity Roadmap has been endorsed by the National Productivity and Continuing Education Council (NPCEC). It aims to realise the vision of a highly integrated and technologically advanced construction sector led by progressive firms and supported by a skilled and competent workforce in 2020, through the following 4-pronged approach: a) Regulating the demand and supply of low cost, lower skilled foreign workforce through foreign worker levy and MYE system; b) Enhancing the quality of the construction workforce; c) Imposing regulatory requirements and minimum standards to drive widespread adoption of labour-saving technology; and

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d) Offering financial incentives to encourage manpower development, technology adoption and capability building. (More details on the Roadmap are in Annex A). Regulate Demand and Supply of Foreign Workforce 3. To address the challenge of easy availability of low cost foreign workers and steer the construction firms towards greater adoption of technology, the Ministry of Manpower has further raised the foreign worker levy and cut the Man-Year Entitlement quota for foreign construction workers. Raise Quality of Construction Workforce 4. MOM/BCA is introducing the new tiered levy framework from July 2011, to distinguish the skills and experience of foreign construction workers, and encourage firms to upgrade and retain the more experienced and higher skilled workers. In addition, BCA will be enhancing its existing Construction Registration of Tradesmen (CoreTrade) scheme by increasing the number of high value construction trades recognised under the CoreTrade scheme from 7 to 17. This will take effect in the second quarter of 2011. BCA will also appoint additional training and testing centres from the private sector to provide training and testing facilities for CoreTrade registration. Impose Regulatory Requirements to Increase Technology Adoption and Integration Enhancing Buildability Framework 5. One of the key strategies under the Construction Productivity Roadmap is to strengthen the existing Buildability Framework to require designers to deliver more buildable designs upstream, and builders to adopt more labourefficient construction methods / technologies downstream. In this regard, BCA will be tightening the existing Buildable Design Score and introducing a new component called Constructability Score, which require the builders' contributions to buildability through the adoption of more labour-saving construction methods / technologies. These changes will take effect in the second half of 2011.

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Promoting Building Information Modelling 6. BCA has formulated a five-year plan to move the construction industry towards adoption of the Building Information Modelling (BIM), which brings about greater integration and collaboration between developers, designers, builders and fabricators across the construction value chain. BCA will mandate electronic submissions in BIM format for architectural, structural and M&E plans for building works for regulatory approval by 2015, starting with architectural e-submissions in 2013. The public sector will also take the lead in driving BIM adoption and work towards specifying this as a requirement in new building projects from next year. Increase Funding Support of CPCF Incentive Schemes 7. With the recent round of foreign worker levy increases, the Government recognises the need to reach out to more firms to incentivise them in switching to labour-saving technology. BCA will be raising the level of funding support and extending the funding coverage for schemes such as the Mechanisation Credit scheme, the Building Information Modelling Fund and the Productivity Improvement Project scheme under the CPCF. In addition, the Workforce Training and Upgrading scheme will be enhanced to co-fund the relevant training and skills assessments for the new trades under CoreTrade, as well as more productivity-related courses, including those at the PMET level. More details on the Enhancement to CPCF are in Annex B and Profiles of Construction-related firms implementing productivity improvements are in Annex C. 8. BCA will continue to work closely with all the stakeholders in the

construction value chain to implement the Construction Productivity Roadmap to build up the construction industry's productivity, capacity and capabilities in the long term.

Issued by the Building and Construction Authority on 3 March 2011

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Annex A Annex B Annex C

Construction Productivity Roadmap Enhancements to the Construction Productivity and Capability Fund (CPCF) Profiles of Construction-related firms implementing productivity improvements

About Building and Construction Authority The Building and Construction Authority (BCA) of Singapore champions the development of an excellent built environment for Singapore. At BCA, our mission is to shape a safe, high quality, sustainable and friendly built environment, as these are four key elements where BCA has a significant influence. In doing so, we aim to differentiate Singapore's built environment from those of other cities and contribute to a better quality of life for everyone in Singapore. Hence, our vision is to have "the best built environment for Singapore, our distinctive global city". BCA works closely with its education hub, the BCA Academy of the Built Environment, and industry partners to develop skills and expertise that help shape the best built environment for Singapore. For more information, visit www.bca.gov.sg.

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Annex A CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY ROADMAP In support of the Economic Strategies Committee's (ESC) recommendation to raise productivity for sustained economic growth. MND/BCA, in consultation with the industry and the International Panel of Experts, have formulated a holistic Construction Productivity Roadmap to transform the construction industry and raise its productivity. The Roadmap aims to realise the vision of a highly integrated and technologically advanced construction sector led by progressive firms and supported by a skilled and competent workforce in 2020, through a 4-pronged approach as follows:a. Regulating the demand and supply of low cost, lower skilled foreign workforce through foreign worker levy and MYE system; b. Enhancing the quality of the construction workforce; c. Imposing regulatory requirements and minimum standards to drive widespread adoption of labour-saving technology; and Offering financial incentives to encourage manpower development, technology adoption and capability building.

d.

Multi-pronged Prong 1:Regulating the demand and supply of low cost, lower skilled foreign workforce through foreign worker levy and MYE system

Associated Initiatives · Reducing Man-Year-Entitlement (MYE). To progressively cut the MYE to regulate supply of low cost foreign workers. In this regard, MOM has announced cumulative MYE cut of 40% by July 2013. Imposing Higher Levy. To moderate the demand for low cost foreign workers, MOM has announced 6-monthly levy increases till July 2013. Enhancing Construction Registration of Tradesmen (CoreTrade) Scheme. BCA will expand the key construction trades recognised under the CoreTrade scheme from current 7 to 17 trades in 1H2011. [See Appendix 1 on CoreTrade] Introducting New Tiered-levy Framework. From July 2011, unskilled workers will be phased out for the construction sector. A new tiered-levy

·

Prong 2:Enhancing the quality of the construction workforce

·

·

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Annex A

framework will be introduced to distinguish the "Higher Skilled" foreign workers from the "Basic Skilled" workers. The "Higher Skilled" workers, who are either CoreTrade-registered or possess minimum 4 years construction experience with relevant supervisory qualifications, will enjoy lower levy than the "Basic Skilled" workers who possess only BCA's Skill Evaluation Certification (Knowledge) [SEC(K)]. The levy differential between the "Higher Skilled" workers and "Basic Skilled" workers will be progressively raised to encourage the employers to upgrade and retain the more experienced and higher skilled workers. [See Appendix 2 on SEC(K)] · To facilitate the upgrading of workforce at all levels, the Workforce Training and Upgrading (WTU) scheme under the Construction Productivity & Capability Fund (CPCF) co-funds the cost of training courses and skills assessments. The supported training courses apply to PMETs, supervisory personnel, foremen as well as tradesmen. [See Appendix 3 on WTU] Enhancing Buildability Framework. BCA is enhancing the buildability framework to require architects and engineers to adopt "easier-to-construct" building designs. A new Constructability component will also be introduced to require contractors to adopt more labour efficient construction methods and technology. These changes will take effect in 2H2011. [See Appendix 4 on Buildability] Driving Adoption of Building Information Modelling (BIM). BCA has worked out a 5year BIM Adoption Roadmap to implement BIM across the sector. BIM, a 3D modelling tool, enables all parties in the construction value chain to visualise the design better, detect design problems early, enhance planning and coordination, and reduce reworks for projects. This integrated

Prong 3:Imposing regulatory requirements and setting minimum standards to drive widespread adoption of labour-saving technology

·

·

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Annex A

approach can result in time and cost savings for the entire project. BCA will be mandating BIM e-submission of architectural, structural and M&E plans for building works for regulatory approval by 2015. The public sector will also take the lead in driving BIM adoption and work towards specifying this as a requirement in new building projects from next year. [See Appendix 5 on BIM] Prong 4:Providing financial incentives to encourage manpower development, technology adoption and capability building · Enhancing the Construction Productivity & Capability Fund (CPCF). To help firms cope with the upcoming manpower policy changes, BCA is enhancing the CPCF to (a) extend the funding support to cover more industry stakeholders, (b) expand the scope of funding, and (c) raise the funding support levels to give a stronger push for firms to make the swift switch to technology in place of labour. [See Annex B for details of the enhancements to the CPCF]

To steer the industry towards raising productivity, BCA has established the Construction Productivity Centre (CPC) and the Centre of Construction IT (CCIT) to step up industry outreach efforts. The CPC and CCIT aim to educate and raise the industry's awareness and ownership on productivity improvements and manpower development. It adopts a customer-centric account management approach in chaperoning firms in their productivity journey and in administering CPCF incentives to encourage technology adoption, manpower development and capability building by firms. Some of the key initiatives of the CPC includes:· Showcasing best practices and successful stories in productivity improvements through a bi-monthly publication called "BuildSmart" for industry players; · Recognizing industry productivity leaders through awards to create a culture of productivity excellence; and · Establishing Benchmark indicators for productivity improvements to create greater ownership in productivity improvement across the sector. In April 2011, BCA is organising the inaugural Singapore Construction Productivity Week, to further heighten industry awareness of latest initiatives and best practices geared towards productivity improvements. The Week serves as a learning platform for the construction industry to gain valuable insights on best practices, new technologies and skills that have a positive

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Annex A impact on raising productivity at the individual, firm and industry level. The Week will have the following key events: · The Skilled Builder Competition, with four categories of trades (system formwork installation, drywall installation, telescopic handler operation, simulated crane operation) for skilled tradesmen to compete over two days (from 25 to 26 April 2011) · The Building Information Modelling (BIM) Competition, which is targeted at professionals and students, to use BIM software to put together a building design (25 to 26 April 2011). · The Build Smart Conference, a two-day conference at Singapore Expo on construction productivity (27 to 28 April 2011) · BuildTech Asia 2011 Exhibition, a three-day trade exhibition at the Singapore Expo focusing on innovative technologies and products to improve construction productivity (27 to 29 April 2011) · Build Smart Site Tours of innovative projects and construction technologies (29 April 2011). MND/BCA will continue to review and evaluate the effectiveness of the measures under the Construction Productivity Roadmap to steer the industry towards improving productivity and raising capability.

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Appendix 1 Construction Registration of Tradesmen (CoreTrade) The Construction Registration of Tradesmen, or CoreTrade in short, is a workers registration scheme administered by the Building and Construction Authority (BCA), for skilled and experienced construction personnel in key construction trades. 2. Objectives of CoreTrade. The CoreTrade scheme was introduced to facilitate the sector in building up a core group of competent and experienced tradesmen and trade foremen in key construction trades to anchor and lead the construction workforce, and thereby raise construction quality and productivity levels. 3. CoreTrade provides a platform to retain the better and more experienced workers by providing a clearer career progression path and giving them due recognition through a registration system. It allows one to move from a general worker, to a registered Construction Tradesman1 specializing in specific trades and eventually become a registered Construction Trade Foremen2. Workers who are eligible for registration include skilled locals as well as skilled and experienced foreign workers who have been working in the construction industry in Singapore. The registration of CoreTrade personnel commenced in December 2008. 4. Under the Building Control (Amendment) Act 2007, licensed Class 1 General Builders are required to deploy a minimum number of registered CoreTrade personnel in their projects of value S$20 million and more. This applies to new building works, addition and alteration works and civil engineering works. 5. There are currently 7 construction trades recognised for registration under CoreTrade (see Table 1). Since 1 April 2010, skills assessment has been made mandatory for tradesmen and foremen who wish to be registered as CoreTrade personnel. With MOM's implementation of the tiered levy framework from Jul 2011, construction work permit holders who are CoreTrade registered will also be able to qualify for higher skilled levy tier. To facilitate the upgrading of workers into the higher skilled levy tier as well as the building up of a skilled and experienced pool of workers, number of trades under CoreTrade will be increased from the current 7 to 17 by mid 2011, covering a total of 48 skills qualifications (See Tables 1 and 2).

1 2

Construction Tradesman is a worker who is skilled and engaged in a particular trade. Construction Foreman is a worker who takes charge of and co-ordinates a group of tradesmen in a particular trade

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Appendix 1 Table 1a: Existing CoreTrade Trades and Associated Skills Qualifications

S/N 1 Construction Trades Construction Plant Operation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 2 3 Electrical Work Plumbing and Piping Work 20 21 22 23 4 Reinforced Concrete Work 24 25

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Skills Qualifications SEC(K), SEC, CSC or BBC in Tower Crane (Saddle Jib) Operations SEC(K), SEC, CSC or BBC in Tower Crane (Luffing Jib) Operations SEC(K), SEC, CSC or BBC in Mobile Crane Operations SEC(K), SEC, CSC or BBC in Crawler Crane Operations SEC(K), SEC, CSC or BBC in Hydraulic Excavator Operations SEC(K), SEC, CSC or BBC in Telescopic Handler Operations SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Bulldozer Operations SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Track Shovel Operations SEC(K),SEC or BBC in Excavator Loader Operations SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Bored Piling Operations SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Driven Piling Operations SEC(K),SEC or BBC in Jack-In Piling Operations SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Bored Micro-Piling Operation SEC(K) or BBC in Jet Grout Piling Operation SEC(K), SEC or BBC Underground PipeJacking SEC(K) or BBC in Tunnel Boring Machine (Earth Pressure Method) SEC(K) or BBC in Tunnel Boring Machine (Slurry Method) SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Asphalt Concrete Paving SEC(K) or BBC in Crawler Drill Operation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Electrical Wiring Installation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Plumbing and Pipefitting SEC(K),SEC or BBC in Pipe Fitting

3 4

SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Gas Pipefitting

SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Timber Formwork SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Metal Formwork

SEC(K),SEC or BBC in Pipe Fitting is recognised under 2 Construction Trades, namely Plumbing & Piping Work and Structural Steel Work. 4 SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Gas Pipefitting is recognised under existing Construction Trade on Plumbing & Piping Work as well as the Additional Construction Trade on Gas Pipefitting Works (see Table 2 below)

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Appendix 1

S/N Construction Trades 26 27 28 29 30 5 Structural Steel Work 31 32 Skills Qualifications SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Steel Reinforcement Work SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Precast Concrete Component Erection SEC(K) or BBC in System Formwork Installation SEC(K) or BBC in Precast Kerb and Drain Laying SEC(K) or BBC in Aluminium Formwork SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Structural Steel Fitting SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Welding SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Pipe Fitting 6 Tiling and Stone Laying Work 7 Waterproofing Works 33 34 35 SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Tiling SEC(K) or BBC in Timber Flooring SEC or BBC in Waterproofing

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Note: Skills Qualifications underlined are additional relevant skills qualifications for existing CoreTrade Trades.

Table 2: Additional CoreTrade Trades and Associated Skills Qualifications

S/N 1 Additional Trades Cladding and Curtain Wall Installation 2 3 4 Glazing Drywall Installation Suspended Ceiling Installation 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 Doors and Windows Installation 7 8 6 7 Joinery Works Air-Conditioning Ducting Installation 9 10 11 8 9 10 Fire Protection Works Gas Pipefitting Works Lift Installation 13 12 Skills Qualifications SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Cladding Installation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Curtain Wall Installation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Glazing SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Interior Drywall Installation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Suspended Ceiling Installation (Acoustical) SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Suspended Ceiling Installation (Fibrous Plaster) SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Doors and Windows Installation (Timber) SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Doors and Windows Installation (Aluminium) SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Joinery SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Ducting Installation for Air-Conditioning and Ventilation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Thermal Insulation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Fire Sprinkler Installation SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Gas Pipefitting4 SEC(K), SEC or BBC in Lift Installation

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Appendix 2 BCA's Skills Certification System Objective of Skills Certification. The Skills Certification system was implemented by the Building and Construction Authority (BCA). It is a mandatory requirement that all foreign workers who enter the Singapore construction workforce must be skill certified to ensure they possess the adequate skill level and skill sets in the various key construction trades 2. Skills Test Requirements. BCA has implemented the Skills Certification System in the source countries since 1995 to facilitate the recruitment of foreign construction workers through skills testing and certification for the Singapore construction industry. The tests are carried out by BCA officers in source countries. Currently, there are 25 overseas testing centres (OTCs) in various source countries, including PRC, India, Bangladesh, Thailand and Myanmar. 3. Under the Skills Certification system, the foreign workers are tested on the specific trade knowledge and hand skills required for the individual trades. These foreign workers have to pass both written and practical test components to be awarded BCA's Skills Evaluation Certificate (Knowledge). The written test component requires the worker to know essential trade knowledge such as the materials, tools and equipment used in the trade, work sequence, good practices to be adopted and safety requirements. For the practical test component, the worker has to demonstrate his practical craft-skills competency to meet quality standards for the trade in the timely completion of a practical test project modelled based on the expected skills set of a skilled tradesman. A wide range of practical test projects has been implemented for the trade tests. 4. The skills test requirements are continually reviewed and the test standards raised progressively to improve quality, productivity and safety. This is to ensure the relevance of skill sets and that the workers are trained and certified according to existing project requirements, quality standards and good site practices.

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Appendix 3 Workforce Training and Upgrading (WTU) Scheme The Workforce Training and Upgrading (WTU) scheme is one of the 6 financial incentive schemes supported by the $250 million Construction Productivity and Capability Fund (CPCF) to help firms raise its construction productivity and to build capability. 2. The WTU Scheme seeks to facilitate the upgrading of workforce at all levels. Currently, the WTU co-funds up to 80% of the cost of skills upgrading and assessment of suitable personnel. This includes defraying the training and assessment fees for CoreTrade registration, as well as other suitable productivityrelated course fees for construction personnel, including PMETs employed by the consultants and builders. Please refer to Appendix 1 for the list of skills qualifications under CoreTrade and Tables 1 & 2 of this Appendix for the list of productivity-related training courses. Table 1: List of Higher Training Qualifications currently funded by WTU Higher Training Qualifications 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Certificate in Interior Finishing Coordination Certificate in Pavement Construction and Maintenance Certificate in Precast Concrete Construction Supervision Certificate in Waterproofing Supervision Certificate in Building Measurement Certificate in Geotechnical Instrumentation for Supervisors Certificate in Levelling and Setting Out Certificate Course for Structural Steel Supervisors NBQ in Project Supervision Higher NBQ in Project Supervision Advanced NBQ in Project Supervision NBQ in Supervision and Coordination of M&E Works Higher NBQ in Supervision and Coordination of M&E Works Advanced NBQ in Supervision and Coordination of M&E Works NBQ in Operation & Maintenance Higher NBQ in Operation & Maintenance Advanced NBQ in Operation & Maintenance

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Appendix 3 Table 2: List of Additional Courses to be funded by WTU Type of Courses

Specialist Diplomas (PMETs) 1. 2. 3. Certificate courses (PMETs) 4. 5. Building Information Modelling (BIM) Project Management for Professionals in the Building and Construction Industry (in collaboration with SPM) Construction Productivity Management (in collaboration with SCAL) Design of Precast Concrete structures for Engineers Workshop on Site Management of Precast Concrete Construction Builders Cert in Plumbing and Pipefitting SEC(K) in Precast Concrete Components Erection SEC(K) in Structural Steel Fitting SEC(K) in Interior Drywall Installation

6. 7. Certificate courses (Tradesmen / Foremen) 8. 9.

10. System Formwork Training 11. Mechanical Elevated Work Platform 12. Structural Steel Supervision Trade Diplomas (Foremen / Supervisors) 13. Reinforced Concrete Supervision 14. Plumbing Technology 15. Electrical Technology 16. Waterproofing Note: Courses underlined are new courses that will be introduced in 2011.

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Appendix 4

Enhanced Buildability Framework to Improve Site Productivity Since 2001, BCA's mandatory buildability framework has encouraged more labour efficient building designs and is one of the key contributing factors towards improving productivity on site. To give productivity a further boost, BCA is enhancing the buildability framework to require designers to deliver more buildable designs upstream, and builders to adopt more labour-efficient construction methods / technologies downstream through the following ways. 2. Requiring more buildable design upstream. The existing Buildable Design Score will be tightened by dis-incentivising designs which need labour-intensive construction processes such as brick walls and walls with plastering finishes, while at the same time, encouraging designers to adopt labour-saving and standardized designs. Buildable features such as the use of off-form external finished walls, prefabricated bathrooms and industry-wide standardised floor heights with standardised precast staircases would be recognised with more points. The enhanced buildable design scoring system would thus bring about wider use of buildable and easy-to-build construction that would help to reduce dependence on labour. 3. Requiring more labour-efficient construction methods ­ New Constructability Score. While the Buildable Design Score focuses on the use of buildable designs during the upstream design process, the introduction of a new Constructability Score would impact on the construction methods used during the downstream construction phase. Through the Constructability Score, the builders' contribution to raising site productivity can be increased by getting them to move away from traditionally labourintensive construction methods and switching to more labour-efficient construction processes. 4. The Constructability Score would assess the builders' choice on their usage of labour efficient systems and processes under the structural, architectural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing scope of construction works. For example, under the structural component, the use of traditional timber formwork and external scaffolding would be given much lower points to disincentivise their use. Comparatively, a builder who adopts the use of system formwork and climbing scaffolding, which would reduce the manpower usage on site, would be awarded with more points. Besides labour efficient construction methods, the adoption of good site practices, such as good project and site management is also critical to improving site productivity. Thus, the Constructability Score framework also awards points for Good Industry Practices such as use of BIM and trade productivity monitoring on site to achieve higher productivity. 5. Scope and Timeline for Enhanced Buildability Framework. For a start, the constructability score requirement will apply to projects with GFA more than 5,000m2. Builders will be required to submit the Constructability Score when they apply for the permit to commence work, or within 3 months after the permit has been issued (6 months for Design and Build projects) in the event that they require more time to plan for the type of construction methods / technologies to be adopted in the project. 6. BCA will launch the enhanced buildability framework by 1H 2011. The new requirements will take effect by 2H 2011.

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Appendix 5 Building Information Modelling Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a new three-dimensional modelling technology and an integrated process that allows the building professionals of various disciplines to explore the building project digitally, before it is built. BIM facilitates better teamwork among the professionals, helping to reduce unnecessary reworks when the project is being constructed. 2. 3D versus 2D. Traditionally, in a two-dimensional drawing, each building professional prepares their own plans. Due to the limitations of a two-dimensional drawing, certain design clashes (e.g., pipes running into the air-con ventilation tubes) would appear only during construction. With BIM, a three-dimensional model of a project and drawings can be shared among these professionals. This allows the professionals ­ architects, engineers and contractors ­ to analyse and resolve potential design clashes before construction begins. BIM will facilitate better teamwork among the professionals, helping to reduce unnecessary reworks when the project is being constructed. 3. Building professionals. The benefits of BIM to the various building professionals in the construction value-chain are listed in the table below:Building professionals Architects Benefits of BIM · · · Create three-dimensional models (that help other professionals to visualise his design better) Perform sustainability analysis, Coordinate the work on the project with other professionals from various disciplines, - produce construction documents and drawings quickly, and design changes can be incorporated consistently Perform structural analysis of the buildings in the project, and Design and produce construction documents and drawings of the building structures quickly Facilitate fabrication of elements with greater accuracy. Design the mechanical & electrical systems with greater accuracy; and Plan & optimise the distribution and routes of mechanical & electrical equipment within the building project. Plan the entire construction process and material delivery through the computer simulation; and Determine, review and optimise the sequence of the building's construction.

Structural engineers

· · ·

M&E engineers

· ·

Builders

· ·

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Appendix 5

4. Strategies in BIM Roadmap. BCA has set a target of getting 80% of the construction industry to use BIM widely by 2015. To increase the adoption of BIM in the sector, BCA has identified the following strategies: a) Removing impediments to ease transition from 2D to BIM; b) Incentivising early adopters; c) Creating the demand - Public Sector Taking The Lead; d) Building BIM capability and capacity; and e) Promoting Success Stories

a) Removing impediments. To ease the transition from 2D drawings to 3D BIM, BCA has developed BIM submission templates to help the industry to adopt BIM while reducing the learning curve. Architectural and structural BIM submission templates were introduced in Jan and Nov 2010 respectively, with mechanical & electrical submission template to be introduced in Apr 2011. To facilitate information sharing and shared building objects, BCA is also working with BuildingSMART Singapore to develop a design objects library and project collaboration guidelines by early 2012. b) Incentivising BIM adopters. To encourage the industry to come on-board the BIM journey as early as possible, BCA rolled out the BIM Fund under the CPCF in Jun 2010. $5.7 million has been set aside for BIM adoption, which covers costs on training, consultancy, software and hardware. c) Creating the demand - public sector taking the lead. Countries such as the Unites States, Finland and Norway have made BIM mandatory for public sector building projects. BCA is working with key agencies such as MOE, LTA and HDB on a number of pilot projects using BIM starting in 2011. To drive a much wider adoption of BIM, mandatory regulatory submissions using BIM would be progressively introduced for architectural submission (by 2013), structural and M&E submissions (by 2014) and eventually for plan submissions of all projects with more than 5000 m2 by 2015. d) Building capability. To ensure that industry practitioners and new entrants are BIM-ready, BCA has engaged institutes of higher learning (IHLs) to incorporate BIM as part of their curriculum, of which Singapore Polytechnic and NUS's Architecture Department have started teaching BIM. For the graduating batch of students, BCA will be organising intensive BIM training to equip them with the necessary BIM skill sets 17

Appendix 5 before they join the industry. To equip the current industry practitioners, BCA will also launch a Specialist Diploma programme for BIM Coordinators & Managers in Jul 2011. e) Promoting success stories. In Sept 2010, BCA established the Centre for Construction IT (CCIT) to take up the role of chaperoning the industry in their BIM journey. The CCIT will also launch a portal in 2011 on BIM and produce online materials covering case studies and best practices to educate the industry on BIM. In addition, CCIT works with buildingSMART Singapore and industry partners to organise BIM related workshops and seminars on a regular basis. 5. Mandatory BIM e-submission. BCA will work towards mandating BIM esubmission of architectural, structural as well as mechanical & electrical plans for building works for regulatory approval by 2015. In addition, the public sector will be taking the lead in driving BIM adoption and target to specify this as a requirement in new building projects from next year.

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Annex B

Construction Productivity & Capability Fund (CPCF) The Construction Productivity and Capability Fund (CPCF) covers three key areas: (a) Workforce development and skills upgrading; (b) Technology adoption; and (c) Capability building. 2. To help firms in coping with the changes in manpower policy, BCA has reviewed the various schemes under the CPCF and is enhancing the schemes to (a) extend the funding support to cover more stakeholders in the industry, (b) expand the scope of funding, and (c) raise the funding support levels to give a stronger push for firms to make the swift switch to technology in place of labour. The table below shows the enhancement to the various schemes and the take-up rate:-

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Annex B

Enhancement to Construction Productivity and Capability Fund (CPCF)

Type of Fund What is Funded? (i) Workforce Development Workforce Training and Upgrading (WTU) Cost of selected skills assessment and training courses for tradesmen, foremen and supervisors · Up to 80% of the fees of selected trainings courses at supervisory level · Funding support has been extended to cover a total of Industry firms 33 training courses, including PMET training. Cofunding amount will be up to 80% of the cost of training and assessment for workers and up to 50% for PMET courses. Please refer to Appendix 3 to Annex A for the list of supported courses. Funding support will be extended to cover the additional 10 trades under CoreTrade, which will be introduced in 1H2011. With this, the Fund will support the training courses and skill assessments of 48 relevant skill qualifications associated with the 17 trades recognized under CoreTrade. Please refer to Appendix 1 to Annex A for the list of supported skills qualifications. Industry firms How Much is the Existing Funding? What are the Enhancement? (Highlighted in bold) Who is Eligible?

· Up to 80% of the fees of training courses and skills assessments for CoreTrade registration ·

BCA-Industry Built Environment Scholarship

Sponsorship of scholarship for undergraduate study in built environment courses (ii) Technology Adoption

· 50% of the annual scholarship sum, capped at $7,000 for each No change. scholar who is either a Singaporean or a Singapore Permanent Resident

Mechanisation Cost of purchasing or leasing of · Up to 50% co-funding for equipment purchase, capped at Credit equipment that improves $20,000, whichever is lower (MechC) productivity of the specific work · Up to 50% co-funding for equipment leasing, capped at process by at least 20% $5,000, whichever is lower · A cap of $25,000 will be applied for leasing and a cap of $100,000 for purchase of equipment for each company.

· Purchase Co-funding 1. For equipment purchase cost $100k, up to 50% cofunding or capped at $20,000, whichever is lower. 2. For equipment purchase cost >$100k, up to 20% cofunding or capped at $100,000, whichever is lower. · Leasing Co-funding 1. For equipment purchase cost < $30k, up to 50% cofunding or capped at $6,000, whichever is lower. 2. For equipment purchase cost >$30k, up to 20% cofunding or capped at $30,000, whichever is lower. · A cap of $50,000 will be applied for leasing and $200,000 for purchase of equipment for each company.

Contractors, specialist contractors & subcontractors

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Annex B

Type of Fund Productivity Improvement Project (PIP)

What is Funded?

How Much is the Existing Funding?

What are the Enhancement? (Highlighted in bold) Key Target Groups of the Scheme · Firm level PIP: Main contractors and subcontractors. · Group level PIP: All stakeholders - main contractors, subcontractors, developers, consultants, suppliers, etc. · Industry level PIP: Public sector agencies, contractors, subcontractors, developers, consultants, suppliers, etc. Supportable cost 1. Manpower cost 2. Equipment cost (up to 50% co-funding for cost of selected equipment) 3. Material cost (up to 80% co-funding for selected materials on the extra cost over conventional materials) 4. Consultancy service cost 5. Intellectual property acquisition cost

Who is Eligible? Developers, Consultants, Contractors, Suppliers and other construction related companies

Firm Level Cost of undertaking projects which involve the application of · Up to 50% co-funding of project cost, capped at S$100,000 technology and re-engineering per application of work processes to improve · Prefabricator - Up to 50% co-funding of project cost, capped at productivity by at least 20% S$500,000 per application generally (May raise the cap to $1mil for high impact PIPs. E.g.mechanisation/ automation of precast concrete production) Group Level ( A group of at least 2 unrelated companies) · Up to 50% co-funding of project cost, capped at S$500,000 per application Industry ­ To be led by public agency with a group of at least 2 unrelated companies. · Up to 70% co-funding, capped at S$1 million per application Supportable cost 1. Manpower cost; 2. Equipment cost (about 20% of the equipment cost) 3. Material cost (about 50% of the extra cost over conventional materials); 4. Consultancy service cost; and 5. Intellectual property acquisition cost

BIM Fund

Cost of adopting BIM Training Scheme technology into work processes · Up to 50% co-funding for training cost, capped at $7,000 per firm, whichever is lower. Firms can apply once only.

Firm Level Scheme · Up to 50% co-funding for training, software and hardware acquisition/leasing costs, capped at $20,000 per discipline, whichever is lower. Firms can apply maximum 3 Project Collaboration Scheme (involving more than 1 discipline) times. · Up to 50% co-funding for training, consultancy, software and hardware acquisition costs, capped at $ 70,000 per project , Project Collaboration Scheme (involving more than 1 discipline) whichever is lower. Firms can apply once only. · Up to 50% co-funding for training, consultancy, software and hardware acquisition/leasing costs, capped at $210,000 per project, whichever is lower. Firms can apply maximum 3 times and with a cap of $35,000 per discipline.

Consultancy and construction firms

*Firms applying for the funds above should be registered and operating in Singapore.

21

Annex B

CPCF Take-Up Rate (as at 1 March 2011)

Total amount committed $ 0.38 mil No. of application approved/ committed 1,448 22 scholarship recipients 180

Fund

No. of Firms Big[1] 123 (30%) N.A. 40 (38%) 6 (55%) 22 (85%) 191 (35%) Small[2] 277 (70%) N.A. 66 (62%) 5 (45%) 4 (15%) 352 (65%)

Workforce Training and Upgrading BCA-Industry Built Environment Scholarship Mechanisation Credit (MechC) Productivity Improvement Project (PIP) BIM Fund Total

$ 0.32 mil

$ 2.6mil

$ 2.6 mil $ 1.1 mil $ 7.0 mil

10 23

Big firms refer to Contractor firms registered with BCA-Contractor Registry (CRS) A1, A2, B1, L6 and L5. For consultants, firms registered in the top 2 tiers (e.g. AR01, AR02) of PSPC panel are considered as big firms. [2] Small firms refer to firms registered with BCA-CRS B2/L4 and below and all other firms not registered under BCA-CRS. For consultants, firms registered in the lower 2 tiers (e.g. AR03, AR04) of PSPC panel are considered as small firms.

[1]

22

Annex C Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements Name of company: DLE M&E Pte Ltd Approved Grant from BCA: About $40,000. About the company: Based in Singapore, DLE M&E Pte Ltd (DLE) first started out as Double Lion Electrical & Plumbing Services in 1975 and became privatised under the name of Double Lion Electrical Pte Ltd in 1980. On 3 August 2009, Double Lion Electrical Pte Ltd changed its name to become DLE M&E Pte Ltd to better reflect its capability in both mechanical and electrical services, and in becoming a one-stop integrated contractor for our valued clients. DLE M&E Pte Ltd was founded by Mr Goh Gwek Soon. It is a registered contractor with the Building and Construction Authority ­ Electrical Engineering and Integrated building services workhead (L6 grade, with an unlimited tendering limit) and general building works (C1 grade, with $3 million tendering limit). DLE is also a licensed builder with BCA under the class 1 grade for General Building works. DLE's primary business is in Electrical Engineering works. The company's vast portfolio includes office fit-out works, retail shops for luxury brands, factories and private high-rise condominiums. The total contract value of more than S$124 million Singapore dollars had been awarded to the company in the past three years. More info on the company can be found at http:// www.dle.com.sg Initiatives undertaken by the company On technology adoption, DLE has applied for the Mechanisation Credit Scheme under BCA's CPCF. The company has used the fund for investing in scissor lift to replace the conventional scaffolding system. The aerial work platform not only shortens the erection and dismantling time of scaffolding, but also requires fewer workers.

23

Annex C

Through the adoption of technology, DLE can increase its productivity and undertake more complex projects. On workforce development, DLE has sent 8 workers for CoreTrade foremen skill assessment in Electrical Wiring Installation. The Workforce Training and Upgrading scheme under CPCF has helped the company to defray the CoreTrade assessment cost.

24

Annex C Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements Name of company: OSK Engineering Pte Ltd Approved Grant from BCA: About $42,000 About the company OSK Engineering Pte Ltd (OSK) was founded by Mr Tan Yeo Kee and Madam Oh Swee Kit in 1988. OSK's primary business is in Plumbing, Sanitary and Gas Installation works. The company's vast portfolio includes private housings, government housings, factories and private high-rise condominiums, commercial building and hotels. The total contract value of more than S$44 million Singapore dollars had been awarded to the company in the past three years. Some of the company's projects include Marina Bay Sand Integrated Resort (Package 6130, 6409, 6151, 6152), QuaySide Hotel at Sentosa, NUS New Town ­ Khaya and Angsana and Holland Hill Condominium. OSK is registered in various categories in BCA's Contractors Registry System Plumbing & Sanitary Works (L5 grade, with a tendering limit of $13 million), Cable/Pipe Laying & Road Reinstatement (L2 grade, with a tendering limit of $1.3 million), Civil Engineering (C3 grade, with a tendering limit of $0.65 million), Fire Prevention and Protection System ( L1 grade, with a tendering limit of $0.65 million), General Building ( C3 grade with tendering limit of $0.65 million). More info on the company can be found at http://www.oskpl.com.sg Initiatives undertaken by the company On technology adoption, OSK has applied for the Mechanisation Credit Scheme under BCA's CPCF. The company has used the fund for investing in the leasing of 2 scissors lift and a boom lift; and for purchase of 2 sets of pipe jointing equipment (Rautool Tool Kit) that could be used in its installation works for the "Flexible Piping System". On workforce development, OSK has sent four workers for CoreTrade foremen skill assessment in Plumbing & Pipefitting. The Workforce Training and Upgrading scheme under CPCF has helped the company to defray the CoreTrade assessment cost.

25

Annex C OSK Engineering Pte Ltd has also applied for the Productivity Improvement Project Scheme to invest in an "Innovation Method of Plumbing Installation works Using Flexible piping" to replace the conventional copper piping system. The innovative system not only shortens the installation time of the Plumbing installation, but also requires fewer workers. OSK Engineering Pte Ltd can increase its productivity, build its in-house expertise in deploying the "Flexible Piping System", develop new technologies and undertake more complex projects.

26

Annex C Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements Name of company: Fonda Global Engineering Pte Ltd Approved Grant from BCA: About $20,000 About the company: Fonda Global Engineering Pte Ltd was established in 1994. It is a BCA registered contractor in grade A1 in general building works, grade B1 in civil engineering works as well as registered in mechanical and electrical engineering works. Fonda Global Engineering Pte Ltd is also a licensed builder with BCA under the class 1 grade for General Building works. The company's principle activities were in general building works and civil engineering works. It was later expanded to integrated building services, mechanical & electrical engineering, air-con refrigeration & ventilation, plumbing & sanitary, housekeeping, cleansing, desilting & conservancy service and even Landscaping. More info on the company can be found at http://www.fonda.com.sg/main.html Initiatives undertaken by the company On workforce development, Fonda Global Engineering Pte Ltd had tapped on the Workforce Training and Upgrading (WTU) scheme under the Construction Productivity and Capability Fund (CPCF). The company has sent 28 workers for Coretrade tradesmen and foremen skill assessment in the following skills qualifications: · · · · Plumbing & Pipefitting; Steel Reinforcement Work; Welding; and Hydraulic Excavator Operation.

On technology adoption, Fonda Global Engineering Pte Ltd had applied for the Building Information Modeling (BIM) scheme to defray 50% of the cost of technology acquisition and capability building. The company has obtained a total of $13,100 grant for purchase of BIM software and hardware, as well as staff training and work practice consultancy.

27

Annex C Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements Name of company: Kong Hwee Iron Works & Construction Pte Ltd Approved Grant from BCA: close to $90,000 About the company: Kong Hwee Iron Works & Construction Pte Ltd (Kong Hwee) was founded by Mr Ng Lok Kai in 1960. Its primary business is in structural steel construction and metalworks. Some of the company's projects include The [email protected] Bay, Novena Suites, Woodland Checkpoint and Nanyang Polytechnic. The total contract value of more than S$ 150 million Singapore dollars had been awarded to the company in the past three years. Kong Hwee is registered in various categories in BCA's Contractors Registry System - General Building (C2 grade, with a tendering limit of $1.3 million), Fencing & Ironwork (L3 grade with tendering limit of $4 million). More info on the company can be found at http://www.konghwee.com Initiatives undertaken by the company Kong Hwee Iron Works & Construction Pte Ltd has applied for the Mechanisation Scheme (MechC) under BCA's Construction Productivity and Capability Fundto invest in high tech computerised steel fabrication cutting and drilling equipment to replace the conventional labour intensive equipment. The innovative system not only shortens the steel fabrication time and increase the quality of the final product, but also requires fewer workers.

28

Annex C

Besides that, they had also applied for funding to purchase 2 sets of scissors to speed up their steel installation works on site. Kong Hwee Iron Works & Construction Pte Ltd can increase its productivity, build its in-house expertise in using these new computerised equipments and undertake more complex projects. On workforce development, Kong Hwee Iron Works & Construction Pte Ltd has sent 3 workers for CoreTrade foremen skill assessment in Structural Steel Fittings. The Workforce Training and Upgrading scheme under CPCF has helped the company to defray the CoreTrade assessment cost.

29

Annex C Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements

Name of company: Technocrete Pte Ltd Approved Grant from BCA: $60,000 from MechC Scheme ($10,000 from leasing, $60,000 from purchase) About the company: Technocrete was incorporated in 1990 as a specialist subcontractor providing concrete repair, structural strengthening & controlled demolition services to the construction industry. They are a member of the Tat Hong group of companies. Technocrete is registered in various categories in BCA's Contractors Registry System ­ Workheads CR03 - Demolition, CR05 ­ Concrete Repairs (L2 grade with tendering limit of $1.3 million), CR09 Repairs & Redecoration (L1 grade with tendering limit of $0.65 million), CR13 Waterproofing Installation (L1 grade with tendering limit of $0.65 million) Their past projects include: (i) (ii) HDB upgrading sites concrete cutting works Concrete cutting for addition and alteration works at various projects/sites: Marina Square, Bishan Junction 8, CPF Building, Changi Airport People Mover System, MRT Systems Emergency Concrete Cuttings/Corings

(iii)

More info on the company can be found at http://www.technocrete.com.sg/ Initiatives undertaken by the company Technocrete Pte Ltd has applied for the Mechanisation Credit Scheme (MechC) under BCA's Construction Productivity and Capability Fund to purchase and lease equipment and machineries to improve productivity at their projects. These equipment and machineries include demolition machines; coring machine; boom lift; scissors lift; and equipment for mortar mixing, pumping and spraying.

Robotic Demolition Machine

Boom Lift

30

Annex C

Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements Name of Company: L S Construction Pte Ltd (subsidiary of Lian Beng Group Pte Ltd) Approved Grant from BCA: $100,000 About the Company: Incorporated in 1993, L.S. Construction. (LSC) has a B2 grading in the General Building category under BCA's Contractors' Registry System. LSC is able to tender for public sector's building projects of contract value up to $13 million. LSC is currently certified under the ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001 certification by BCA as well as the Workplace Safety & Health Council's bizSAFE Partner and bizSAFE STAR certification. L S Construction is a subsidiary of Lian Beng Group Ltd. Lian Beng Group was listed in SGX since 1999, with a staff strength of 500. Its main construction arm, Lian Beng Construction (1988) Pte Ltd, was registered in the highest grade (A1) of BCA's Contractors' Registry System under General Building category. More information can be found on website: http://www.lianbeng.com.sg/08%20construction.htm

About the Productivity Improvement Project - Adoption of movable integrated working platforms and perimeter safety screens to replace traditional scaffold 1. Working platforms and safety scaffolds are erected for building construction. The conventional method is that workers would have to erect scaffolds and working platforms manually around the elevations of a building under construction. As the building construction goes up progressively, the scaffolds would have to be extended to the next floor under construction. As the conventional platforms and safety screens covers the entire elevations and height of the building from the ground floor, obstruction to construction work especially construction of apron has always been a problem and has thus affected site productivity. 2. To save manpower, LS Construction Pte Ltd proposed to adopt the innovative movable integrated working platforms and perimeter safety screens to replace the conventional external safety scaffolds. The 4-tier working platforms and perimeter safety screens is preassembled on the ground and installed at the lower floors. The system will move up in tandem (lifted by the cranes) with the storey structural works as the building goes up. 3. The light, modular, movable integrated system makes hoisting easy during the lifting operations. Only four men are required to jump lift the platform to the next level. Hence, saving the manpower as compared to the conventional scaffolding method which require 10 men to erect working platforms and scaffoldings for every typical structural cycle. Innovation 4. Unlike the conventional method, this system integrates the working platform and safety perimeter screens together in a 4-strorey modular unit. In addition, it eliminated the problems of works at the lower floors being obstructed by the external scaffolding.

31

Annex C

Pilot Site 5. The use of the movable integrated working platforms and perimeter safety screens will be test-bedded at the Centro Residences, a residential development comprising a block of 34-storey residential tower (Total: 329 Units) with a 6-storey podium of car parks at Ang Mo Kio Avenue 8. The integrated system would also be used for future projects by the company after this pilot project. Productivity Improvement 6. The estimated manpower savings are shown below: Conventional External Safety Scaffold Integrated movable working platforms and perimeter safety screens 872 man-days Productivity improvement (%)

1,332 man-days

34.5%

7. As this is the first time LS is adopting this system, trainings would be conducted to upgrade the skills of the workers on the use.

32

Annex C Annex 3-7 Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements Name of company: Unison Construction Pte Ltd Contact Person: Tan Soon Kian, Director Mobile: 90127633 E-mail: [email protected] About the company: Founded in July 2009, Unison Construction was formed by building professionals, each of whom has more than 20 years of experience in the building and construction industry. Unison Construction has managed projects such as condominiums, HDB apartments, landed and clustered housing, factories, warehouses and upgrading works. Unison's past achievements include winning the RosPA Occupational Health & Safety Awards, BCA Construction Excellence Award, BCA Green Mark Awards, BCA Best Buildable Design Award, WSH Practices Awards (from MOM) and HDB Quality Award. Some of the company's projects include Ferrell Residences, Urbana and Amaranda condominiums. Initiatives undertaken by the company Unison Construction has applied for the Productivity Improvement Project under BCA's Construction Productivity and Capability Fund. The company intends to use the fund for investing in an advanced aluminium formwork system to replace the conventional formwork system. The advanced system not only shortens the erection and dismantling time of formworks, but also requires fewer workers. Through this project, Unison Construction can increase its productivity, build its inhouse expertise in deploying advanced integrated formwork systems, develop new technologies and undertake more complex projects.

Traditional timber formwork

Advanced aluminium formwork

33

Annex C

Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements

Automation of Precast Concrete Production at Tiong Seng Prefab Hub Name of Company: Approved Grant: Tiong Seng Contractors Pte Ltd $1,000,000

About the Company: Tiong Seng is principally engaged in building construction and civil engineering in Singapore. With an established track record of over 50 years, Tiong Seng is one of the leading building construction and civil engineering contractors in Singapore. It holds the highest grading of A1 from the Building Construction Authority of Singapore (BCA) for both general building and civil engineering, which qualifies the Group to undertake public sector construction projects with unlimited contract value.

About the Productivity Improvement Project - Automation of Precast Concrete

Production at Tiong Seng Prefab Hub 1. Conventional precast concrete production is mainly done in an open yard factory with no shelter. The process is limited by the weather and very often, operations have to be halted due to inclement weather. In addition, movement and hoisting of the completed precast components often involves the extensive use of manual labour and cranes, which reduces the efficiency of the precast concrete production process. 2. With this in mind, Tiong Seng Contractors Pte Ltd intends to set up the automated precasting facilities in the new 3-storey factory at Tiong Seng Prefab Hub, located at Tuas South Avenue 1, to improve on its existing production process. The Prefab Hub will have two automated production lines incorporating new equipments to be brought in from Germany (adopting Avermann's technology for one of the production line, and Vollert and Weckmann's technology for the another line). 3. When completed, the Prefab Hub will allow concrete pre-casting works to be carried out under sheltered conditions to minimise disruptions due to unfavourable weather. In addition, the automation is expected to reduce the labour required by 50% to 70%. Furthermore, the facility is capable of operating a 24-hour production process to boost its output to meet the expected rising demand for pre-cast components. Objectives 4. The objective of this Productivity Improvement Project (PIP) is to automate the precast concrete production systems to achieve time and manpower savings as well as raise the supply of precast concrete production to meet the rising needs in the industry. Project Description 5. The Automated Precasting Facility in the Tiong Seng Prefab Hub will be divided into two phases.

34

Annex C · Phase 1 comprises a 100m run of Automated Pre-stressing Line to produce prestressed planks or normal flat panel. Precast specialist from Germany, Avermann, will assist the company with the Phase 1 setup. Phase 2 comprises 40 pallets Rotation Automated Line, which will be setup with the help from precast specialist, Vollert and Weckermann.

·

Expected Impact on site Productivity Improvement Area of Improvement Projected Outcomes Before After Implementation Implementation (Current open (With the yard automated production) precasting facilities and conveyor belt system) Manpower Saving 100 to 110 50 to 70 (Number of Workers) Productivity 0.91 Improvement 0.35 manday/m3 manday/m3 (manday/m3)

Improvement Expected (in percentage)

36 to 50% 62%

The fully automated precast facility has a capacity of doubling its current output to more than 100,000 m3 of precast components annually.

New Capabilities/Competencies that Will be Developed 6. Such automated precasting facility is first of its kind in Singapore. Complex work processes will be automated, such as the marking-out of dimensions with high precision, and the automated pallet circuits to transport precast products from one

35

Annex C workstation to another for processing. The manufacturing process will be controlled by a centralised computer system which reads information from computer-aided drawing (CAD) data files and maintain production data and records. The new precast facility will also include a curing chamber to reduce time spent on curing the precast products. 7. The acquisition of the state-of-the-art system in precast automation from Germany, and sending their management and technical personnel to Germany for extensive training on the usage of the automation systems, greatly enhances the capability of the company in precast concrete production and competencies of its staff. Current status 8. The Tiong Seng Prefab Hub is under construction and targets completion by 3Q 2011.

36

Annex C Profiles of Construction-related Firms Implementing Productivity Improvements

Name of company: Alpine Bau GmbH

Approved Grant from BCA: About $53,000 About the company: Founded in 1965 as a small construction machine dealership, ALPINE is today one of the leading construction groups in Europe and an internationally recognised company. In recent years, ALPINE has continuously increased its construction output through acquisitions and expansion into foreign markets. This massive yet quality-oriented growth allowed ALPINE to strengthen and expand its position on the home market as well as in Central and South-East European markets. ALPINE also successfully operates in Singapore, India and China. ALPINE is active in more than 30 countries world-wide. ALPINE BAU GmbH is registered under BCA's Contractors Registry System with a workhead of CW02- Civil Engineering (A2 grade, with a tendering limit of $85 million), GB1 General Builder (Class 1) and SB(GS) Specialist Builder (Ground Support and Stabilisation Works). They are involved in the construction of the Circle Line and the Downtown Line projects in Singapore. More info on the company can be found at http:// www.alpine.at Initiatives undertaken by the company On technology adoption, ALPINE has applied for the Mechanisation Credit Scheme (MechC) under BCA's CPCF to purchase various equipment and machinery. The company has used the fund for investing in a Bobcat material mover (skid loader) to reduce reliance on the manual labour required to physically move the materials around during construction works.

ALPINE has also tapped on MechC to purchase 2 sets of automatic wheel washer systems which use pressure jets to clean the tyres of vehicles leaving the site. Using recyclable water and a filter system, the automatic wheel washer system replaces the need for manual labour,

37

Annex C

permanently stationed at the washing bay at the exit of the construction sites, with hoses to wash the tyres of departing vehicles.

38

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