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The UK International Education Conference

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Contents

01 01 01 01 01 01 01

Session Session Session Session Session Session Session

Conference Supporter

welc( )me

Wednesday 8 December

1200 1400

Registration Opening

Pentland

1430

Welcome and Opening address

Pentland Sir David Green, Director­General, British Council Neil Kinnock, Chair, British Council

I am delighted to welcome you to the Going Global conference in Edinburgh, the most comprehensive event so far mounted by the British Council in international education, bringing together international participants and speakers.

Education plays a central role in bringing countries together. From first perceptions of other countries learned at primary school through to lasting ties formed by graduate and post-graduate students studying overseas, our education systems are fundamental in encouraging international co-operation and mutual understanding. But in our increasingly globalised world, the nature of education is changing rapidly. International student mobility will increase: the global demand for international higher education could, one recent study suggests, rise from 2.l million places to 5.8 million by 2020. Trans-national agreements providing partnerships between educational institutions across frontiers will become increasingly common. New technologies already provide increased opportunities for school links and distance education, facilitating new means of learning and of building people-topeople contacts. Private sector participation has a huge role to play in areas as diverse as skills, vocational training and joint research with governments and universities. But while there are opportunities, there are also concerns, and this conference will address these too. How do we maintain quality? How do we balance the growth of global English with the defence of other languages critical to national and minority self-expression? How do we ensure that the needs of developing countries and the achievement of the Millennium Goals are met? The city of Edinburgh provides the perfect backdrop to the conference. For centuries, Scotland has looked outwards to the wider world taking its ethos of the central importance of education for all wherever its sons and daughters have travelled, traded and settled. Its capital city led the world in Enlightenment thinking in the eighteenth century. In the twenty-first, it plays host to the new Scottish Parliament and to an Executive determined to increase Scotland's international participation. This conference will provide you with opportunities to renew old acquaintances, make new friends, build networks and partnerships with fellow professionals from around the globe. We have also invited a number of international students to share their experiences with us. The Going Global conference forms part of the celebrations for the 70th anniversary of the British Council. Since our foundation in 1934, we have placed partnership and mutual understanding with other countries at the centre of our mission. We hold this conference in that spirit of mutual learning and understanding. That is why we have laid great emphasis on sharing experience and tackling emerging global problems and opportunities together. I wish to pay special thanks to all our partners and sponsors, without whom we would not have been able to deliver a successful event. We greatly appreciate the support they have provided. But above all, I hope that all of us will leave Edinburgh with new insights learned from each other.

1450

International education in the UK ­ present and future

Pentland Rt Hon. Charles Clarke MP, Secretary of State for Education and Skills

1520

The international perspective

Pentland Speaker (TBC)

1550 1605

Break Education and internationalism ­ a personal view

A panel session with presentations from international students from UK and overseas, facilitated by novelist Romesh Gunesekera

1700 1845

Conference closes Reception at Our Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, Edinburgh

A welcome address will be given by the Rt Hon. Jack McConnell, MSP, First Minister for Scotland

Sir David Green, Director - General, British Council

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6

Thursday 9 December

0900

Opening address

Rt Hon. Jim Wallace QC MSP, Deputy First Minister and Minister for Enterprise & Lifelong Learning, Scotland Introduced by Michael Bird, Director, British Council, Scotland

1225

Session 2

Fintry Sidlaw Tinto Moorfoot Kilsyth

0920

Appropriate technology for delivering education globally

Sir John Daniel, President, The Commonwealth of Learning, Vancouver, Canada Chair Professor Timothy O'Shea, Principal and Vice-chancellor, University of Edinburgh

English language qualifications

Presentation:

International student experience in the UK

Commissioned research presented by: Dominic Scott, Chief Executive, and Beatrice Merrick, Director of Services and Research, UKCOSA - the Council for International Education UKCOSA's research into the international student experience demonstrates the importance of delivering on our marketing messages

Models of TNE delivery

Presentations and discussion: Jonathan Darby Visiting Fellow, e-Learning Research Centre, University of Southampton Roy Leitch, Chief Executive Officer, Interactive University Dr Enrique Zepeda, VicePresident for International Affairs, Universidad Virtual De Technologica de Monterrey, Mexico

Why integrate activities? Some institutional perspectives

Presentation: Values, Strategy & Implementation ­ Integrated Internationalisation

Innovation in VET

Commissioned research presented by: Tom Leney, Principle Officer, Research (International) Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

1030 1100

Break Session 1

English as a global language Fintry International student mobility and marketing Sidlaw Trans­national education Strategy and policy Global skills and partnerships Kilsyth Dr Roger Hawkey, Consultant, Cambridge ESOL Examinations A study of IELTS impact, especially on candidates and teachers Chair: John Whitehead, Head, ELT, British Council

Tinto

Moorfoot

The Future of Does marketing English? where next? matter?

Commissioned research presented by: David Graddol Managing Director of the English Company (UK) Ltd Presentation of new demographic data and analysis of implications for international education Panel Reply Chris Kennedy Director of the Centre for English Language Studies, University of Birmingham Tony Millns Chief Executive, English UK Chair: Tony Buckby ELT Group, British Council Chair: Dr Christine Humfrey Director, International Office, University of Nottingham Presentation: Professor Colin Gilligan Professor of Marketing Sheffield Hallam University; Visiting Professor, Northumbria University In the light of huge forecast increases in demand for international study, is marketing still important?

Students experience and decision making in selecting TNE programmes

Commissioned research presented by: Alison Dorbar Marketing Manager, JWT Education New research aimed at understanding the decision-making processes of students following UK higher education programmes

The international education professionals and practitioners

Presentation and discussion: Dennis Murray Executive Director, International Education Association of Australia Representative from USA

Skills ­ the demand led approach

Presentations: Brandon Ashworth Skills for Business, Sector Skills Development Agency John Ramsay Chief Executive, Cogent oil and Gas, Sector Skills Council

Making the business case for a workforce development model derived from Exploring the roles and networks of professionals occupational standards. engaged in international Using the oil and gas extraction industry and education. emphasising the importance of competence assurance and management systems. Representative from UK Chair: Liz Speake International Manager Association of Scottish Colleges

Chair: Dame Alexandra Burslem, Vice-Chancellor, Manchester Metropolitan Providing contrasting examples of how 3 University international Universities have developed models of TNE delivery. What lessons can we learn?

Anneke Westerhuis, David Killick, Head, Office Head, CINOP the Dutch Centre for innovation of for International VET, Netherlands Programmes, Leeds Metropolitan University Phillip Grollmann, Deputy Head, Institut Technik Presentation: und Bilding, Universitat Bremen, Germany Internationalising the University: it's not about Providing insight into the money various international Vicky Lewis, Acting Head models of VET which engage learners in new of Marketing and methods of learning and Communications and acquiring competencies Professor Paul Luker, Pro-Vice-Chancellor Chair: Dame Patricia (Academic), Morgan­Webb. Bournemouth University

1335

Lunch

Cromdale Hall

1430

International education and world poverty ­ what are the links?

Pentland Professor Christopher Colclough. Professorial Fellow, Institute of Development Studies, the University of Sussex, Formerly Director, Education for All Global Monitoring Report, UNESCO, Paris Chair: Professor Geoff Whitty, Director, the Institute of Education, University of London and Chair, Education and Training Advisory Committee, British Council

1530

Break

Strathblane Hall

8

Thursday 9 December

1600

Session 3

Fintry Sidlaw Tinto Moorfoot Kilsyth

0915

Session 4

Moorfoot Sidlaw Tinto Fintry Kilsyth

English language qualifications

Presentation: Dr Roger Hawkey Consultant, Cambridge ESOL Examinations A study of IELTS impact, especially on candidates and teachers Chair: John Whitehead Head, ELT, British Council

International student experience in the UK

Commissioned research presented by: Dominic Scott Chief Executive, and Beatrice Merrick, Director of Services and Research, UKCOSA - the Council for International Education UKCOSA's research into the international student experience demonstrates the importance of delivering on our marketing messages Chair: Dame Alexandra Burslem Vice-Chancellor, Manchester Metropolitan University

Models of TNE delivery

Presentations and discussion: Jonathan Darby Visiting Fellow, e-Learning Research Centre, University of Southampton Roy Leitch Chief Executive Officer, Interactive University Dr Enrique Zepeda Vice-President for International Affairs, Universidad Virtual De Technologica de Monterrey, Mexico Providing contrasting examples of how 3 international Universities have developed models of TNE delivery. What lessons can we learn?

Why integrate activities? Some institutional perspectives

Presentation: Values, Strategy & Implementation ­ Integrated Internationalisation David Killick Head, Office for International Programmes, Leeds Metropolitan University Presentation: Internationalising the University: it's not about the money Vicky Lewis Acting Head of Marketing and Communications and Professor Paul Luker Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Bournemouth University

Innovation in VET

Commissioned research presented by: Tom Leney Principle Officer, Research (International) Qualifications and Curriculum Authority Anneke Westerhuis Head, CINOP the Dutch Centre for innovation of VET, Netherlands Phillip Grollmann Deputy Head, Institut Technik und Bilding, Universitat Bremen, Germany Providing insight into various international models of VET which engage learners in new methods of learning and acquiring competencies Chair: Dame Patricia Morgan­Webb.

English language Issues

Presentations: University English language policy: costs and benefits Dr Rebecca Hughes Director, Centre for English Language Education, University of Nottingham Presentations:

International student mobility: lessons from the past ­ predictions for the future

Presentations and discussion: Professor Peter Williams and Professor Lalage Bown Council for Education in the Commonwealth

The implications of new models of learning.

Presentation: Old Borders, New Boundaries

Developing offshore campuses ­ the Benefits and Risks

Presentations and discussion: Professor Geoffrey Copland Vice-Chancellor, University of Westminster

Partnerships in action

Presentation and discussion: Geoff Pine Principal, and Ali Hadawi Vice Principal Greenwich Community College The seminar will explore how one college uses a rich tapestry of internal, local and global partnerships to support the lifelong learning and multicultural needs of its students. Showcasing how it became involved in a capacity building programme with colleges in Iraq. Chair: Jo Clough International Policy Manager, Association of Colleges.

Dr Neil Kemp Current trends in ELT and Director Education UK teacher training in China Marketing Division, The British Council Professor Zhang Lianzhong The session will review Director Foreign Language the predictions of the Education Research `Vision 2020' Centre, National Education international student Science Research Institute, mobility research in the People's Republic of China light of other research undertaken over the last Learning circles ­ low 25 years. tech solutions to global distance learning Chair: Professor Geoff Whitty Tim Moock Director, the Institute of BBC English and Education, University of Susan Fearn London and Chair, BBC World Service Education and Training Training Advisory Committee, British Council 1015

John Dickens Director, Learning & Development Directorate, and Richard Arnold Douglas Tallack Planning and Development Pro-Vice Chancellor, manager, University of University of Nottingham London External System A number of universities Presentation: have recently established new campuses outside their home country. This Transferable skills and session will explore the mobile students different approaches of two institutions at the Ann Puntis, Director Assessment Services, and forefront of these developments Sarah Maughan Assistant Director, Assessment Services, University of Cambridge International Examinations Chair: Richard Garrett Deputy Director Observatory on Borderless Higher Education

Break

Strathblane Hall

1045

The role of the private sector in the international delivery of post secondary education

Pentland Dr Joseph Duffy, Senior Vice-President, Sylvan Learning Systems, USA Dr Sugata Mitra, NIIT Ltd, New Delhi, India Professor Drummond Bone, Vice-Chancellor, University of Liverpool Chair: Baroness Diane Warwick, Chief Executive, Universities UK

10

Friday 10 December

1200

Session 5

Moorfoot Sidlaw Tinto Fintry Kilsyth

1415

Session 6

Moorfoot Sidlaw Tinto Fintry Kilsyth

Quality assurance of Meeting customer ELT providers needs: admissions and enquiries Panel discussion: handling systems for international Fiona Pape students

Manager English Language Quality Services, Presentation: British Council Admission of Rob McKim international students Sector Head of Education into HE: policies and and Training, UK Trade and instruments Investment Franziska Muche George Pickering Senior Officer, Academic Education Consultant and Cooperation Association, Trainer Brussels Richard Rossner Chief Executive, Bell International Sue Bromby Co-Chair, English UK An exchange of views on accreditation systems Chair: Sue Mace Consultant for Accreditation, British Council 1315 Presentation: Delivering competitive advantage through customer focus Tim O'Brian Director of International Development, Nottingham Trent University Chair: Suzanne Alexander Director Promotions, British Council

New strategies for partnership ­ blended learning in Africa

Presentations: Dr Michelle Selinger Education manager, Cisco Systems The impact and role of ICT in the delivery of education and training in Africa Dr Prem Naidoo Director, Accreditation and Co-ordinator at the Higher Education Qualitifcation Committee, Council on Higher Education, South Africa.

The international Undertsanding, education institution meeting and of the future managing international Presentations and students' discussion: expectations

Professor Di Yerbury Vice Chancellor, Macquarie University, Australia Professor Robert Boucher Vice Chancellor, University of Sheffield Presentations: How to keep a finger on the pulse of international student opinion William Archer Education Practice Head, Barkers

English for access

Panel discussion John Landon Senior Lecturer in Education Studies, University of Edinburgh Paul Gentle Dean of International Education, College of St Mark and St John John Clegg Freelance Education Consultant English and the developing world: vision and strategy Chair: Jeremy Jacobson Deputy Director ELT Group, British Council

What makes a top university? The importance of brand and league tables in international students' decisionmaking

Presentation Allison Doorbar Managing Partner, JWT Education

New strategies for partnerships ­ the example of British degrees in Russia

Panel John McGovern Director of Marketing and Recruitment, Lancaster University

Introduction to and assessment of implications of GATS

Presentations and panel discussion Prof Drummond Bone University of Liverpool OECD Representative

Partnerships for success: public, private, institutional and individual, both national and international

Presentation: A quality partner ­ working together to provide international quaifications David Pottinger Managing Director, NCC Education Ltd Presentation: Establishing a Destination for Internatioal Higher Education in Dubai Dr Abdulla Al Karam Chief Executive Officer, Knowledge Village, Dubai Chair: Professor Roy Leitch CEO, Interactive University, Scotland

What drives institutions The international student to internationalise? The experience in New successes and the risks ­ Zealand taking the long term view. Andrew Holloway Director, International Office, University of Transnational provision in Auckland, New Zealand South Africa Chair: Andrew Disbury Chair: Sir John Daniel Director Education, British President, Commonwealth Council, China of Learning

Olve Sørensen Nataliya Yablonskene, Moscow Higher School of Senior Adviser, Ministry of Education, Norway Social and Economic John O'Leary Sciences, member of Editor, Times Higher The session will provide BRIDGE expert group Education Supplement an introduction to GATS as it might apply to Phil Healy What are the most education services; the Higher Education significant factors implications for countries Consultant, member of affecting international will be reviewed in the student decision-making? BRIDGE expert group light of this. Representative from Chair: Jean Krasocki British Council, Moscow Managing Director, The Northern Consortium, UK An introduction the BRIDGE project (British degrees in Russia). What lessons have we learned so far and what are the wider implications for international partnerships? Chair: Kate Clark the Open University and Chair, Council of Validating Universities

Lunch

Cromdale Hall

1530

A personal review of the conference and its themes

Pentland Professor Laurie Taylor, BBC presenter and Times Higher Education Supplement columnist Chair Rod Pryde, Assistant Director-General, British Council

1630

Conference Ends

12

Thursday 9 December

1100

Fintry

The Future of English - where next?

Presentation of commissioned research with a panel reply

Speakers

David Graddol, Managing Director English Company (UK) Ltd Paul Sweeney, E-learning Manager, British Council The demand for English language learning has grown enormously over the past 20 years, as individuals, their parents, employers and politicians have judged competence in English as essential for educational and economic advancement. We believe that at least 750 million people are currently learning English worldwide. Demand for English outstrips capacity in many countries, and ICT is seen as a possible solution, particularly for educational authorities that wish to ensure that their citizens are skilled in both English and IT. The British Council itself aspires to work with partners to reach millions more learners of English by 2010, in part by using e-learning. The panelists will discuss the issues that they have encountered in trying to make these aspirations achievable, the obstacles they have met, and what they consider to be the key requisites for the successful introduction of e-learning in English language teaching.

Chair Panellists

National approaches to international marketing

Panel discussion Dee Roach, Director IDP UK, Australia Dr Christian Mueller, DAAD, Germany While the economic benefits of recruiting international students are undeniable, governments also recognise the importance of international students for economic, trade, cultural and political reasons. Many countries are now undertaking a co-ordinated national approach to attract and increase their numbers of international students, from branded marketing campaigns and exhibitions to scholarships, quality assurance and accessibility. Some countries are further down the line than others, and in some cases are prepared to make a very significant investment. Speakers in this panel session will introduce some different national approaches to international education marketing and compare experience.

Chair Speakers

Professor Leitch will discuss the model developed by Interactive University in Scotland

David Graddol, Managing Director, the English Company UK In 1997 the British Council published `The Future of English' by David Graddol. The document represented a combination of research on the present roles and importance of English in the world and reasoned projections on its future developments. The Future of English? remains one of the most influential strategic documents on the subject but recent world events and new political alignments as well as technological, commercial and demographic changes indicate many changes in the roles of English worldwide and in educational planning. David Graddol will report on the first stage of new research commissioned by the British Council to update and reanalyse the demographic data and take into account recent projections for student mobility. He will also identify some major (and sometimes surprising) trends affecting the use of English in the world which have emerged since the publication of The Future of English? in 1997. We shall hear about some striking future scenarios for the role of English in global education which might help us understand where recent developments are leading.

Technologico de Monterrey's International Strategy

Dr Enrique Zepeda, Vice -President for International Affairs, Universidad Virtual De Technologico de Monterrey, Mexico This session will present three different models of TNE delivery which have evolved in different contexts and countries (England, Scotland, Mexico), and examine how each has been developed. Focus will be on lessons learned from each case.

Chair

XXXXXX

1600

Tinto

Quality assurance in TNE

Panel discussion

Speakers

Caroline Moore, Director of IT Services, Teaching Centres and Examinations, British Council

Professor Colin Gilligan, Professor of Marketing, Sheffield Hallam University; Visiting Professor, Northumbria University

1100

Sidlaw

Dr Stephen Jackson, Director of Reviews, and Carolyn Campbell, Assistant-Director (International) Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) The QAA will explore their role in Transnational Education. The session will cover: Collaborative provision Learning from overseas audits Changing contexts for TNE providers The Code of practice for the Assurance of Academic Quality and Standards in Higher Education

Does marketing matter?

Presentation

Speaker

1100

Tinto

Panel reply

Chris Kennedy, Director, Centre for English Language Studies, University of Birmingham Tony Millns, Chief Executive, English UK Tony Buckby, ELT Group, British Council

Students experience and decision making in selecting TNE programmes

Presentation on commissioned research

Speakers

Professor Colin Gilligan, Professor of Marketing, Sheffield Hallam University; Visiting Professor, Northumbria University In the light of forecasts for high and sustained growth in the demand for higher education overseas, is marketing really important? Professor Colin Gilligan is well-known for his controversial and often provocative comments on UK higher education institutions and their approach to international education marketing. In this session Professor Gilligan will explore the importance of marketing and why getting it right is important - at both the national and institutional level.

Chair

Allison Doorbar, Marketing Manager, JWT Education, Australia Transnational education (TNE) refers to UK qualifications delivered internationally through a range of delivery modes: branch campuses; twinning and validation agreements; distance and e-learning. There are currently an estimated 190,000 young people and professionals studying for UK degrees in this way and a further half a million studying for professional qualifications. Global demand for TNE is forecast to increase dramatically and by 2010 demand for UK education delivered internationally is forecast to exceed demand for study in the UK. JWT Education have been commissioned by the British Council to undertake the first ever major survey of students studying UK TNE programmes initially in three key countries ­ Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. The research will present a profile of the target audience and will analyse the perceptions of students taking UK transnational programmes and their decision making processes, including perceptions and importance of the country the qualification is from.

Speakers

1225

Fintry

Dr Colleen Liston, Director International Planning and Quality, Curtin University Technology, Australia Australian universities are subject to Quality Audits undertaken by the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA). Curtin University of Technology has had a policy in place to regulate the establishment of offshore programmes since 1988. This paper focuses on the risks and issues to be considered when conducting international activities. It highlights the importance of having a robust structure, with supporting policies and procedures for offshore programmes.

English language qualifications ­ a study of IELTS impact

Presentation

Speakers

Dr Roger Hawkey, Consultant, Cambridge ESOL Examinations Cambridge ESOL has been carrying out a worldwide study of the impact of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test. The test is now taken by around 450,000 candidates annually, in more than a hundred countries, as an English language qualification for academic studies or for immigration, training and employment purposes in English-speaking countries. The impact study has collected and analysed views on the Test from candidates (before and after taking it), from teachers (on the test itself and also on teaching approaches, materials, and activities on IELTS preparation courses) and from the staff of institutions receiving IELTS candidates (on the relevance of the test to candidates' future studies and on key administrative matters). The data, analyses and findings of the IELTS impact study appear especially relevant to teachers on the complex matter of teaching-testing relationships. Roger Hawkey will examine Learner and teacher perceptions, and analyse examples from the classroom.

Chair

Dr Christine Humfrey, Director, International Office, the University of Nottingham

1225

Sidlaw

Chair

Name of chair

International student experience in the UK

Research presentation

Presenter

1100

Moorfoot

Dominic Scott, Chief Executive, and Beatrice Merrick, Director of Services and Research, UKCOSA - the Council for International Education Students are potentially our most authoritative ambassadors and persuasive marketers. The student experience in the UK - and this includes not only their academic studies but also living in the UK - is critical in forming and influencing their views. No matter how convincing and effective a marketing strategy may be, it must be supported and borne out by the subsequent experience of the students who responded to it. The last major survey of international students' experience in the UK was in 1994, and new research on this topic is therefore well overdue. UKCOSA, the Council for International Students, has carried out a major survey, covering support services for international students as well as academic systems and processes, and will present their findings.

The international education professionals and practitioners

Presentation and panel discussion

Speakers

Chair

XXXXXX

1225

Tinto

Dennis Murray, Executive Director, International Education Association of Australia Representative from USA Representative from the UK 150 words max

Models of TNE delivery

Presentations Lessons learnt from the UK e-Universities experience

Speaker Chair

XXXXXX

Chair

John Whitehead, Head English Language Training, British Council

Jonathan Darby Visiting Fellow e-Learning Research Centre, University of Southampton, formerly Chief Architect at UK e Universities,

1225

Moorfoot

Why integrate activities? some institutional perspectives

Presentations

1600

Moorfoot

e-English: how teaching and learning are coming together

Panel discussion

Speakers

Chair

Dame Alexandra Burslem, Vice-Chancellor, Manchester Metropolitan University Sidlaw

Speakers

Distributing Education: forming value added international partnerships

Professor Roy Leitch, CEO, the Interactive University, Scotland

Speaker

Values, strategy & implementation ­ integrated Internationalisation

David Killick, Head, Office for International Programmes, Leeds Metropolitan University 14

1600

Andrew Thompson, Head of BBC Learning English

Thursday 9 December

Leeds Metropolitan University has taken a values-based approach to its Internationalisation Strategy. We have linked internationalisation to wider strategies on diversity and widening participation. Incorporating internationalisation within our Corporate Plan and our LTA Strategy provides a clear basis for implementation over the coming years. The paper will illustrate how this is being achieved through reference to a "toolkit" for programme review and development which will impact on LTA practice across the institution, and lead to a more cohesive process of student integration through the development of cross cultural capability

information and incentives they need. Why - because employers don't believe they can influence what is on offer. Why - because nobody is willing to challenge what is actually on offer. This session: asks why governments fund learning; asks if all learning is of equal value; asks why governments deliver a 19th century system for a 21st century need.

Chair

1998. Individuals have participated in Training Bridge projects from a wide variety of sectors including construction, engineering, hospitality, telecommunications and transport. So far, participating UK companies have included BAE Systems, Virgin Trains, British Telecom and most recently Southern.

Chair

Dame Patricia Morgan-Webb

Liz Speake, International Manager Association of Scottish Colleges (TBC)

Internationalising the University: it's not about the money

Speaker

1225

Kilsyth room

Vicky Lewis, Acting Head of Marketing and Communications and Professor Paul Luker, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Bournemouth University Phase 1 of the Prime Minister's Initiative has reinforced our tendency to think that international student recruitment is aimed at generating income. However, as globalisation gathers pace, it is increasingly important that we focus on preparing all our graduates for borderless careers, which depend on daily interaction with other cultures. Professor Colin Gilligan asserted in December 2003 that we need "a change in ... managerial mindsets [towards] internationalisation of the organisation". But how do we instigate such change? Should we be looking to the continental European model with its emphasis on educational and cultural rationales? What do staff understand by "internationalisation"? What barriers are there and how can we overcome them? Our paper will outline steps that institutions can take to move the international agenda to the heart of the University.

Innovation in VET

Presentation of research

Presenters

Tom Leney, Principal Officer, Research (International) Qualifications and Curriculum Authority Anneke Westerhuis, Head, CINOP the Dutch Centre for innovation of VET Phillip Grollmann, Deputy Head, Institut Technik und Bilding, Universitat Breman Working with a consortium of government, higher education and private sector researchers, The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) is just completing a major study for the European Commission on the contribution of VET to achieving the Lisbon goals. The study covers 31 European countries, and is one of the first to consider the enlarged European Union. Major conclusions include: The challenge for initial vocational education and training (IVET) in Europe is to maintain and improve quality, to make provision attractive to stakeholder and client groups, and to provide flexible linkages between pathways, and with general and higher education; To achieve the priority of implementing effective and inclusive lifelong learning strategies in practice, the existing low levels of participation in continuing vocational training (CVT) must be addressed as a matter of urgency in most countries and in most sectors, particularly for target groups such as older workers and those with low levels of education and qualifications The development of broad occupational competencies through workplace learning is the key dimension of VET innovation.

Chair

XXXXXX

1600

Fintry

National strategies for international education

Presentations and discussion

Speaker

Fiona Buffinton CEO, AEI Australia Juan J S Velasco, Director of Bilateral Affairs, Ministry of Education, Mexico Dr Jiang Feng, Director, Division of European Affairs, Ministry of Education, People's Republic of China Singapore Economic Development Board 150 words

Chair

Dame Patricia Morgan­Webb

1600

Kilsyth room

Be the difference

1100 Kilsyth room Presentation and discussion

Speakers

Skills ­ the demand led approach

Presentations

Speakers

Brandon Ashworth, Skills for Business, Sector Skills Development Agency John Ramsay, Chief Executive, Cogent Oil and Gas, Sector Skills Council Why do employers find they can't get the skills they need? Why do employers find they can't get the training they need to upgrade skills? Why do people find that the learning they have struggled to acquire has little value in the employment market? Why do some graduates find it difficult to find employment when they first qualify? Just what is required to deliver a VET system which actually meets the needs of an economy? Why - because suppliers of learning don't have the

Lawrence Cramer, Director Training & Development, Southern Trains Barry Bowker, Company Training Co-ordinator, BAE Systems Training Bridge is a British-German exchange programme which fosters business to business partnerships through funding training opportunities and work placements for apprentices and other employees on work based training programmes. Training placements in another country add an extra dimension to workforce development including individual knowledge and skills, international awareness and a mobile workforce. The Training Bridge scheme has enabled on average 70 apprentices and trainers from UK companies per year to work in a similar German company since it was launched by the Prime Minister and the President of Germany in 16

Friday 10 December

Friday 10 December

0915

Moorfoot

Chair

XXXXXX

Admission of international students into higher education: policies and instruments

Speaker

expectations

English language issues

Presentations 1200 Moorfoot Franziska Muche, Senior Officer, Academic Co-operation Association, Brussels The growing demand for international higher education has placed huge demand on the systems, processes and capacity of education institutions to deal with an increasing volume of enquiries and applications from students offering diverse qualifications from all over the world. This presentation is based on a recent study devoted to policies and instruments used in the admission of international students in Australia, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States.

Quality assurance of ELT providers University English language policy: costs and benefits

Speaker

How to keep a finger on the pulse of international student opinion

Speakers

Panel discussion

Panellists

William Archer, Education Practice Head, Barkers International students are increasingly knowledgeable, sophisticated and demanding customers, with high expectations. Meeting - and managing - their expectations is a critical success factor for education institutions. It is important to understand attitudes and expectations, and how these may vary, for example, between nationalities, subject and level of study, and destination country. This presentation will introduce a process for monitoring the expectations and experience of the international student body and a tool for national and international comparisons.

Dr Rebecca Hughes, Director, Centre for English Language Education, University of Nottingham This paper discusses the relationship between English language admissions policy and resource issues for higher education institutions. The presenter argues that the full costs and benefits of a gatekeeping policy for English language at degree level have not been analysed. Direct costs and benefits are discussed, at institutional, departmental and individual levels. The less tangible unintended consequences of rapid and intensive internationalisation of the student body are then put forward, and the case is made for language policy to be discussed as a core part of institutional business planning.

Rob McKim, Sector Head, Education and Training, UK Trade and Investment George Pickering, Education Consultant and Trainer Richard Rossner, Chief Executive, Bell International Sue Bromby, Co-Chair, English UK Fiona Pape, Manager English Language Quality Services, British Council A lively exchange of views on current issues in quality assurance in English Language Teaching (ELT) is expected from this panel of experts. This is a critical time of change for the sector with the recent government initiative to develop a register of publicly-funded and private learning providers in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The sector anticipates a move to compulsory accreditation in the next few years to better protect overseas students. Sue Mace, a consultant currently conducting a review of the EiBAS scheme for the British Council, will chair the panel. The discussion will focus not on any particular scheme but on the key issues underpinning and informing quality assurance in ELT. The Chair will encourage discussion and debate on controversial issues from criteria to consumer protection to exploring the role and relationship of quality assurance in ELT in relation to marketing and VISA issues. Panel participants include key players in the industry, educational consultants and representatives from UK Trade and Investment and UK and international ELT associations/schemes

Delivering competitive advantage through customer focus

Tim O'Brien, Director of International Development, Nottingham Trent University On-line enquiry and recruitment systems are increasingly widely used by education institutions. The challenge is to ensure that the benefits of these systems are enjoyed not only by the institutions themselves but also by the endusers in the form of improved services. This presentation focuses on the use of on-line systems to ensure effective contact marketing.

Chair

The international student experience in New Zealand

Speakers

Andrew Holloway, Director, International Office, the University of Auckland, New Zealand This presentation will report on the outcomes of recent surveys on international students' experience in New Zealand, together with an institutional case study from the University of Auckland illustrating how improvements have been introduced to enhance international students' experience.

Current trends in ELT and teacher training in China

Speaker

Professor Zhang Lianzhong, Director, Foreign Language Education Research Centre, China National Institute for Education Research The profound educational reform which China is undergoing has produced dramatic changes and challenges to traditional educational concepts and practice. English is now the major foreign language for over 260 million Chinese students. English has also become a major profit-making business through preparation courses for proficiency tests, publications and the mass media. The estimated ELT market in China is worth the equivalent of £10 billion annually. The government is also promoting English learning as preparation for the 2008 Olympics and for national competitiveness in global markets. The implications for ELT are clear: China will have to develop more quickly and systematically to meet expectations and demands.

Suzanne Alexander, Director Promotions, British Council

1415

Sidlaw

Chair

Andrew Disbury, Director Education, British Council, China

Chair

Sue Mace, Consultant for Accreditation, British Council

What makes a top university? The importance of brand and league tables in international students' decision-making

Presentations and discussion

0915

Tinto

The implications of new models of learning

Presentations and discussions

0915

Sidlaw

Speakers

International student mobility: lessons from the past ­ predictions for the future

Presentations and discussion

Speaker

Allison Doorbar, Managing Partner, JWT Education John O'Leary, Editor, Times Higher Education Supplement International students are looking for benefits from their education which will enhance their personal and professional development, delivering an effective return on their investment of time, effort and money, and have become increasingly "brand-conscious" in their choice of institution. Students have access to a vast and sometimes bewildering range of information resources to assist them in their decision-making. Faced with so much choice, students are looking for tools which help them to differentiate and compare institutions, both nationally and internationally, and "league tables" have proliferated. This session will look at the importance of institutional branding and the methodology behind the inaugural World University Rankings recently complied by The Times Higher Education Supplement.

Old borders: new boundaries

Speakers

Learning circles ­ low tech solutions to global distance learning

Speakers

Tim Moock, BBC English Susan Fearn, BBC World Service Training The BBC World Service English Club initiative is very active in African countries and in China. The focus has been the production of print materials to support learners who are learning English via the radio. Printed materials were sent to 10,000 self-study learners, recruited via trails on BBC short wave radio. English Club members were encouraged to form clubs ­ known as Learning Circles ­ to promote supportive learning environments and to ensure that the material reached the widest possible audience. Over 750 Learning Circles were then encouraged to contact each other. Correspondence has shown that these clubs are indeed contacting each other to share experiences and set up information and resource sharing. So much so that English Club members have become learners, mentors and teachers rolled in to one.

Chair

Professor Peter Williams, Council for Education in the Commonwealth Professor Lalage Bown, Council for Education in the Commonwealth Dr Neil Kemp, Director, Education UK Marketing Division, British Council Professor Geoff Whitty, Director, the Institute of Education, University of London

John Dickens, Director, Learning and Development Directorate, and Richard Arnold, Planning and Development Manager, University of London External Systems The University of London has been involved in Transnational delivery for 150 years, and uses a broad mix of techniques and technologies top deliver and support these programmes worldwide. The relevant questions in the delivery of Transnational education have much in common with other globally traded commodities: Can institutions provide the services which people want, in formats they can access easily, at prices they are willing to pay and in accordance with their mission and purpose? This paper will summarise London external's current distance learning activities and will offer practical perspectives on these key issues.

1215

Sidlaw

Meeting customer needs: admissions and enquiry handling systems for international students

Presentations and discussion

Chair

Jean Krasocki, Managing Director, The Northern Consortium, UK

1200

Kilsyth

Understanding, meeting and managing international students' expectations

Transferable skills and mobile students

18

Friday 10 December

Speakers

Ann Puntis, Director, Assessment Services, and Sarah Maughan, Assistant Director, Assessment Services, University of Cambridge International Examinations The two key challenges fro an international examinations board identified in this paper are: The impact of internationally mobile students on secondary and tertiary education systems A new skills agenda required to meet the needs of knowledge economies This paper will explore these themes. It describes the implications of new models of learning on curricula & teaching strategies, and the harnessing of new technologies to improve access.

British Degrees in Russia (BRIDGE) project. The BRIDGE project provides funding to support UK-Russian university partnerships to develop joint programmes that will lead to mutually recognised qualifications. The project is sponsored by Department for Education and Skills, Department of Education (Northern Ireland) and is supported by the National Training Foundation in Russia The session will be a panel discussion and will cover: Background to the BRIDGE project Benefits to UK & Russian institutions Recent developments in Russian Higher Education which impact on international partnership development The difference a coordinated project makes to development of international partnerships

Chair

develop regional talent, the Dubai Government created Dubai Knowledge Village. This new destination for education was established to provide a regional meetingpoint between Middle Eastern students and global education, by attracting quality international academic institutes to Dubai.

Chair

Ali Hadawi, Vice Principal, Greenwich Community College Through a case study approach, the seminar will explore how one London college uses a rich mixture of internal, local and global partnerships to support the lifelong learning and multicultural needs of its students, staff, local community, employers and international partners. An opportunity to analyse partnership structures and the importance of shared responsibilities and outcomes. Topics covered include diversity, how the college delivers its services, how standards are maintained, how they can be responsive and flexible and how reputation building and management attracts educators and learners from non-traditional backgrounds. Sharing best practice/principals for working in partnership for successful projects will help others apply them to their own situation, as well as the wider priorities and strategies when considering regeneration of services.

Chair

Professor Roy Leitch, CEO, Interactive University, Scotland

0915

Fintry

Developing offshore campuses ­ the benefits and risks

Presentations and discussion

Chair

Richard Garrett, Deputy Director, Observatory on Borderless Higher Education

Kate Clark, the Open University and Chair, Council of Validating Universities

Speaker

1200

Tinto

Professor Geoffrey Copland, Vice-Chancellor, University of Westminster Douglas Tallack Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Nottingham 150 words

Jo Clough, International Policy Manager, Association of College

New strategies for partnership ­ blended learning in Africa

Presentation

1415

Kilsyth

Partnerships for success public, private institutional and individual, both national and international

Chair

XXXXXX

Impact and role of ICT in the delivery of education and training in Africa

Speaker

1200

Fintry

A quality partner ­ working together to provide international qualifications

Speaker

Dr Michelle Selinger Education Manager, Cisco Systems David Pottinger, Managing Director, NCC Education Ltd NCC Education is a leading global supplier of education and assessment solutions. It has been managing the delivery of international qualifications for over 36 years through strict centre approval procedures, a network of moderators and academic boards. Through its partnerships at every level, NCC Education offers quality assurance for the delivery of education overseas to enable: Qualification providers to reach global markets while maintaining quality Education centres to deliver internationally respected qualifications Students to study for recognised qualifications in their own countries Every year over 200,000 students at 350 education centres in 45 countries chose NCC Education as their pathway to an international qualification. In this presentation, David Pottinger provides an insight into how NCC Education has been inspired over one million graduates through its successful international partnerships.

The international education institution of the future

Presentations and discussion

Speaker

Transnational Education in South Africa

Speaker

Dr Prem Naidoo, Director, Accreditation and Co-ordinator, Higher Education Qualification Committee, Council on Higher Education, South Africa This session will explore the role of partnerships in the delivery of Transnational education in Africa. Michelle will present on her research and dissemination of effective solutions for e-learning in education and training in Africa. She works at the interface of academia and industry drawing on successful experiences from both sectors to help organisations develop their e-learning strategies and competences. Dr Prem Naidoo will discuss the experience of South Africa as both an importer and exporter of Transnational Education.

Professor Di Yerbury, Vice Chancellor, Macquarie University, Australia Professor Robert Boucher, Vice Chancellor, University of Sheffield 150 words

Chair

XXXXXX

1415

Fintry

Introduction to and assessment of implications of GATS

Presentations and discussion

Speaker

Chair

Sir John Daniel, President, Commonwealth of Learning

Professor Drummond Bone, Vice- Chancellor, University of Liverpool OECD Representative Olve Sørensen, Senior Adviser, Ministry of Education, Norway 150 words

1415

Name of room

New strategies for partnerships ­ the example of British degrees in Russia

Panel discussion

Speaker Speakers

Establishing a destination for international higher education in Dubai

Dr Abdulla Al Karam, Chief Executive Officer, Knowledge Village, Dubai Due to an under-value of knowledge acquisition the Middle Eastern suffers from a shortage of higher education institutes of an international quality, stated the UNDP, Arab Human Development Report, 2003. Many regional students would travel overseas to study and remain in that market upon graduation, leading to a deficit of skilled workers in the region. In 2002, to retain and

Chair

XXXXXX

John McGovern, Director of Marketing and Recruitment, Lancaster University Member of BRIDGE Expert group (UK) Philip Healy, Higher Education Consultant, Member of BRIDGE Expert group (UK) Nataliya Yablonskene, Moscow Higher School of Social and Economic Sciences, member of BRIDGE expert group British Council Russia representative (to be confirmed) In June 2004, the British Council announced the new

0915

Kilsyth room

Partnerships in action

Presentations and discussion

Speakers

Jo Clough International Policy Manager, Association of colleges Geoff Pine, Principal, and 20

Speakers Biographies

Dr Abdulla Al Karam

Chief Executive Officer of Knowledge Village since the inception in 2002, and appointed as the Director of HH Sheikh Mohamed Bin Rashid IT Education Project in 2004, his experience has been both corporate and academic. He held positions as Software Engineer for U.S start-up companies Knowledge Based Silicon Corporation and Conita Technologies. He headed the Simulator Section at the UAE Land Forcers and held a Software Developer position at EAABC in France at the 1990's. Recent positions also include Manager of Research Unit at Dubai Internet City and the CEO of Knowledge Access FZ LLC. In academic life, Dr Al Karam was researcher and teaching assistant at the University of South Carolina and Adjust Professor at the American University in Sharjah.

Barry Bowker

BAE SYSTEMS Company Training Co-ordinator, and currently employed for past 3 years at BAE SYSTEMS, Preston. Barry works with German colleague, Francois Maurice to organise the `Training Bridge' Apprentice Exchange. To date 23 BAE SYSTEMS and 21 EADS, Deutschland apprentices have taken part in the exchange programme.

chair of the housing committee and vice chair of economic development in the London Borough of Hackney 1980-86, and worked as a researcher and then Chief of Staff to Neil Kinnock 1981-92. From 1992-7 Mr Clarke was chief executive of a public affairs management consultancy, before his election as a Member of Parliament. Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for School Standards in July 1998, he was then appointed Minister of State at the Home Office in July 1999 and became Minister without Portfolio and Labour Party Chair in July 2001. Mr Clarke was appointed Secretary of State for Education and Skills in October 2002.

education and open and distance learning. He spent four years helping to establish Quebec's Télé-université, moved west to Alberta as VicePresident of Athabasca University and then returned to Montreal as Vice-Rector of Concordia University. In 1984, he became President of Laurentian University, Ontario. He moved to the UK as Vice-Chancellor of the Open University in 1990. Knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1994 for services to higher education, the honour recognised the leading role that he has played internationally, over three decades, in the development of distance learning in universities.

Professor Lalage Bown John Clegg

Retiring after 11 years as Director and Professor of Adult and Continuing Education, University of Glasgow, she is now Professor Emeritus and honorary Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Adult and Continuing Education. Her career includes 31 years experience in 6 African Universities in 4 countries, including positions as Director of Extra-Mural Studies, University of Zambia, Prof. of Adult Education, Ahmadu Bello University and University of Lagos, Nigeria and Dean of Education, University of Lagos. Since retirement, she has held honorary professorships at University of Warwick, University of London and Curtin University, Australia. As Joint Executive ViceChairperson, Council for Education in the Commonwealth, she chaired CEC's working group for report, Student Mobility on the Map, 2000. Her publications include: (as editor) Towards a Commonwealth of Scholars, 1994, Commonwealth Secretariat and "Building bridges for education in the Commonwealth ­ issues in student mobility" in Bown (ed), Education in the Commonwealth: the First Forty Years, Commonwealth Secretariat, 2003. A freelance education consultant based in London UK, he specialises in education through the medium of English as a second language in primary and secondary schools. He works mainly with teachers, schools and education authorities in content and language integrated learning in Europe, in English-medium and bilingual education in Africa and in multicultural education in the UK. He has worked with Englishmedium subject teachers in Africa for 20 years, most recently in South Africa and Ethiopia.

Jonathan Darby

Prior to his current post as UK eUniversities as Chief Architect with responsibility for the design, development and support of learning systems, where he has been since May 2002, he was Founder Director of Technology-Assisted Lifelong Learning (TALL) in the Department for Continuing Education of the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Kellogg College (1996 to 2002). The TALL unit is recognised in the UK and internationally as a leader in e-learning innovation and online course development. Jonathan is currently working on lessons learnt from the UKeU experience at the e-Learning Research Centre at the University of Southampton.

William Archer

Co-author of the European Commission's official guide to higher education and recruitment and currently Education Practice Head at Barkers, William Archer spent 15 years recruiting international graduates for the world's leading employers. He has worked as an adviser to some of the world's best-known universities and as an independent expert for NGOs and charities. In 1999 he led a management buyout from London Business School to create a global recruiting alliance. Earlier he established the AsiaManagers Initiative, connecting employers in Asia with Asian nationals in universities worldwide.

Professor Chris Colclough John Dickens

Director of Learning & Development for the University of London External System, he was formerly Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Luton.

Richard Arnold

Planning & Development Manager for the University of London External System, he previously held administrative posts at the School of Oriental and African Studies and the Institute of Education

Dr Geoffrey Copland Sue Bromby

With over 25 years' experience in Further and Higher education, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, she began her career teaching Communications to mechanics and social workers. In 1978 she joined Oldham College, setting up their first ELT provision, moving in 1981 to St John's College, Manchester, as a TEFL trainer and coordinator of commercial Modern Languages courses. In 1998 she was appointed Director of EFL at the University of Salford, where, she is now Associate Head of the School of Languages, and involved in the development of international partnerships. Chair of BASELT from 2000 until it joined forces with ARELS to form English UK in May 2004, Sue is now Co-Chair of the new association, and has a particular interest in accreditation. Vice-Chancellor and Rector of the University of Westminster since January 1996, he studied Physics at Oxford University and has a doctorate in Solid State Physics. Two years as a post-doctoral researcher at Yale University in the USA were followed by eleven years researching and lecturing in physics at Queen Mary College and Queen Elizabeth College, both of the University of London. For six years from 1981, Dr Copland was Dean of Studies at Goldsmiths' College. In 1987 he was appointed as Deputy Rector at the University of Westminster (then known as the Polytechnic of Central London). He has been VicePresident of Universities UK since 2003 and ais also Chairman of the England and Northern Ireland Council of Universities. He has worked extensively on working groups and committees with DfES and QAA

Allison Doorbar

Managing Partner, Education Group Sydney, Australia, Allison heads JWTSC's research and planning group. She has worked in strategic marketing and planning for the past ten years and is a specialist in tertiary, employment and service sector projects. An Honours graduate of Sheffield University, she has over the last five years conducted numerous focus groups in North America, Asia Pacific Region, Europe and the Middle East. In the last six months of 2000, Allison conducted over 50 research groups with students. Allison has worked extensively overseas including the Middle East, Australia, Asia and Europe and is Managing Partner of JWT Education, a division of JWT Specialized Communications operating in the education sector.

Brendan Ashworth

Currently Head of Special Projects at the Sector Skills Development Agency (SSDA), he has spent 18 years in a variety of policy and operational roles on reforming and delivering the UK VET system in Government and its Agencies.

Doug Becker Fiona Buffinton

She has been Chief Executive Officer of Australian Education International since February 2004. AEI facilitates the internationalisation of Australian Education and promotes the capability of Australian education, science and training internationally. Prior to this she spent 21 years with the Australian Trade Commission and Department of Trade where her posts included Corporate Manager Government Industry and Policy and Senior Trade Commissioner London and National Manager NE Asia. Earlier she focused on the development of trade and investment between Australia and China, including a posting as Trade Commissioner to Hong Kong. She has also covered India, the Middle East and worked on wool, horticulture and minerals including China's early investment in the Australian resources sector.

Lawrence Cramer

In the Rail industry for 33 years, he spent twenty-five years within the rail union becoming a full time officer for the Midlands Region from 1988-99 with responsibility for a workforce of 10,000 and direct accountability for the negotiations and representation across 42 employer organisations. In 1999 he becme a lecturer in employment law, Health & Safety Law and industrial relations. He subsequently led the TUC lifelong learning programme linked to the government's initiative of attracting adults back into learning In May 2001 Lawrence became head of Southern Railway's learning and development team creating an L&D strategy which offers learning to all staff, introducing modern apprenticeship programmes for engineering staff, and programmes for graduates, management development, customer service and lifelong learning.

Susan Fearn

Until recently, a producer for BBC English, making ELT programmes for the World Service, she has worked on a number of landmark BBC projects, including the New European Initiative for Central and Eastern Europe, and on programmes for China. Before joining the BBC, she taught English in France, Japan, Hong Kong and the U.K. She is currently working in BBC World Service Training

Professor Drummond Bone

Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University, he was previously Principal of Royal Holloway, University of London. He was born in Ayr and educated at the Universities of Glasgow and Oxford. Formerly Senior VicePrincipal at the University of Glasgow, Drummond Bone is a Professor of English Literature internationally known for his work in Romantic Studies, particularly on Byron. He co-edits the journal Romanticism. As a University leader and manager he has been part of a number of initiatives at both institutional and national level, many of these aimed at bringing the worlds of business and industry closer to Universities.

Dr Jiang Feng Sir John Daniel

Rt Hon Charles Clarke MP Professor RF Boucher

Currently UK Secretary of State for Education and Skills, he was educated at Highgate School and Kings College Cambridge). He was President of the National Union of Students from 1975 to 1977. He was President and CEO of the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), prior to which he was UNESCO's Assistant Director-General for Education (2001-2004), where a key responsibility was the global Education for All program. Sir John is a leading authority on technology-mediated

Paul Gentle

Dean of International Education at the College of St Mark & St John 22

Speakers Biographies

since 2001, he has been involved in several consultancy and training projects under the auspices of the British Council in China, Malaysia and sub-Saharan Africa. From 1990-2001, he worked as head of EFL at the University of Central Lancashire, where he became Head of Department of Languages and International Studies. This followed several years of English Language Teaching in Finland, Denmark and Spain in the 1980s. His current research focus is on leadership of international education in the university sector.

German part of the 5FRP-project "Participa", which is looking at the factors contributing to individual's participation in lifelong learning processes. He has worked with national and international organisations, such as CEDEFOP, UNEVOC the European Commission.

Writing (CUP, forthcoming), TESOL, Applied Linguistics and the Spoken Language (editor, Palgrave-Macmillan, forthcoming). She has advised on University language policy for a number of years, including service as a Vice-Dean and chairing committees on international collaborative provision.

Rt Hon Neil Kinnock

Appointed Chair of the British Council from November 2004, he was until then Vice-President of the European Commission and Commissioner for Transport. From 1983-92 he was leader of the UK Labour Party and is still a Vice-president of the Socialist International. After graduation from Cardiff University he became a tutor for the Workers' Educational Association before being elected MP for Bedwellty and Islwyn in 1970. A distinguished parliamentary career followed in which he served on several House of Commons committees, was Parliamentary Under-secretary of State for Employment in 1974-5 and Chief opposition spokesman on Education. He became a Privy Councillor in 1983.

Romesh Gunesekera Stephen Jackson

Born in Sri Lanka and moving to Britain in 1971, Reef, his first novel, was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1994. His most recent novel is Heaven's Edge. His literary awards include a Premio Mondello Five Continents award (Italy) and the BBC's inaugural Asia Award for Writing. His is published in more than ten languages. He has been a judge for the David Cohen Prize for British Literature and the Amnesty Media Awards, and a guest Director at the Cheltenham Festival of Literature. He has also worked for the British Council.

Professor Colin Gilligan

Professor of Marketing at Sheffield Hallam University and a Visiting Professor at Northumbria University,he is the author of a variety of books on marketing, and over the past decade has acted as a consultant on marketing planning and strategy to a wide variety of organisations in both the private and public sectors. In 1999, he was commissioned by the British Council to conduct a study of the international marketing of British universities and colleges. The results of this were published in 2000 as The Gilligan Report: a study of international marketing practice. The report has subsequently had a significant effect on approaches to international student recruitment and marketing.

Jeremy Jacobson

Deputy Director English Language Teaching Group (Networks and Projects) at the British Council London, he has worked for the British Council since 1992, when he went to Romania. He eventually became Director ELT in Romania. Before Romania, he was Director of an International House school Catalonia. He has also worked as a teacher and teacher trainer in Portugal, the United States and in the UK and was Director of the Chilean-British Cultural Institute in the south of Chile. As well as working in ELT, Jeremy has taught Spanish and Latin American Studies and worked as a literary editor and as a translator.

John Landon

Senior Lecturer in Educational Studies, Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, he has been involved over many years in professional development of teachers working with emergent bilingual learners studying English as an additional language (EAL). John has established a Masters programme in Education Support (Bilingual Learners) which has provided teacher CPD in many centres throughout the UK and Ireland. He has also been involved in research and development in several European countries, Canada, Australia and currently, South Africa, where he is concerned with developing dual medium bilingual education in rural schools. John has researched on language-sensitive teaching in multilingual schools, bilingualism and literacy development, bilingualism and special educational needs, educational policy in multilingual contexts and the management of support in multilingual schools.

Ali Hadawi

Born in Iraq where he was educated up to secondary school, he travelled to the UK as an international student. He graduated in Electronics and Computer Engineering from the University of Birmingham. Ali is currently Vice Principal at Greenwich Community College in South East London, UK. He has worked in the Education and Training Sector as well as the IT Industry. His work in education spanned the further and higher education sectors in the UK and overseas, and has been an examiner and moderator for information technology. Ali is a member of the AoC (Association of Colleges) Iraq steering group. In the IT industry, Ali co-founded two computing and IT businesses, and worked in technical, management and senior management.

David Graddol

Managing Director of The English Company (UK) Ltd which provides consultancy and publishing services in applied language studies, he is well known as a writer, broadcaster and lecturer on issues related to global English. David's publications include `The Future of English?', a seminal research document commissioned by the British Council in 1997. David worked for 25 years in the Faculty of Education and Language Studies at the UK Open University and is now an eLearning consultant. This year he helped the British Council develop an eELT strategy in the Middle East and has just completed a multimedia eLearning project for undergraduates at an Italian university. He has undertaken educational consultancies in India, China and Latin America.

Dr Neil Kemp, OBE

Studying for a PhD in electron spectroscopy at University College, Swansea in 1971, following employment as an apprentice in manufacturing industry, he taught chemistry and physics at a college in Pakistan. He has worked for the British Council in Malaysia, India, Sri Lanka and as Director from 1995-2000, Indonesia. He is currently Director Education UK Marketing at the British Council, UK. In 1979-80 he was a research associate at the Institute of Education, University of London where his professional interests were in the economics of education and educational planning and management, particularly in relation to developing countries. His more recent work concerns the global market for international education and training. He is a member of the UK government's Education and Training Export Group, the Higher Level Steering Group for the Prime Minister's Initiative on International Students and is a Committee Member on the UK New Route PhD programme. He is a Governor at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex and also Priory School, Lewes.

Dr Robert Hawkey

He has led and participated in curriculum development projects in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America, with particular involvement in learner needs analysis, syllabus design and materials production, assessment and evaluation. With teaching and management experience at secondary, teacher-training and university levels his research interests are in teaching and evaluation, social factors affecting language learning, curriculum development and educational planning. He has written English language textbooks for primary, secondary and academic-purpose learners.

Professor Roy Leitch

Now Chief Executive Officer, Interactive University, as Deputy Principal of Heriot-Watt University, Roy helped to establish the University at the forefront of educational innovation. He is founder and director of the Intelligent Systems Laboratory at Heriot-Watt and has acted as consultant to governments in the UK, India and Italy. Roy is a Fellow of both the Institution of Electrical Engineers and the British Computer Society. He has overall academic and educational responsibility at IU, and is a frequent speaker on these matters throughout the world.

Sir David Green

Director-General of the British Council since July 1999, he was previously VSO Director and has a background in development, education and the voluntary sector. , David Green was the first VSO Director to have first-hand experience as a VSO volunteer. His placement as an English teacher in Pakistan was to have a profound influence on his future career. Between 1972 and 1976 he taught in comprehensive schools, before moving to the voluntary sector to become Director of Children's Relief International (CRI) where he oversaw a merger with Save the Children. In all, he worked for thirteen years for Save the Children in roles including Director of Personnel and Administration and as deputy to the Director-General.

Chris Kennedy Andrew Holloway

Director of the International Office at The University of Auckland, he heads the largest international student programme (6,000 international students) at New Zealand's flagship university. He has held International Director positions at four universities in Australia (Murdoch, the ANU, UWA and ECU). Andrew holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours), majoring in South Asian history, and a Diploma in Education from The University of Western Australia. He is a member of the Education Export Research Committee making grants annually on international student research projects of practical application to New Zealand Education Providers Director of the Centre for English Language Studies at the University of Birmingham, he is responsible for the development of Masters and PhD programmes in TEFL and Applied Linguistics. His main interests and publications are in language policy, curriculum innovation, and teacher development. He has travelled and worked in 50 countries, is a past President of IATEFL, and is the current Chair of the British Council Advisory Committee on English Language Teaching.

Tom Leney

Principal Officer, Research (International) Qualifications and Curriculum Authority in London, he is responsible for international research in the Research and Statistics Group (QCA Consulting). He has a wide experience of education and training as teacher and manager. Tom has taken part in and led a wide range of international initiatives and research projects mainly in Europe. He is UK Co-ordinator for the European ReferNet network and currently leads the Lisbon-toCopenhagen-to Maastricht consortium, which is completing a research project for the European Commission on the contribution of vocational education and training (VET) towards achieving the Lisbon goal of a knowledge-driven economy and an inclusive society in Europe.

Phillip Grollmann

Having studied education and economics at the Johannes ­ Guttenberg University in Mainz and the University of Regensburg, he graduated with a thesis on Vocational education in the process of societal transformation in eastern central Europe. After graduation he was employed as a researcher by the German Institute for international educational research. In 1998 he moved to the Institut Technik und Bildung (ITB) at the University of Bremen where he is the deputy head of the department of International Vocational Education" and also in charge of co-ordination of international and European projects. In ITB he co-ordinated the German part of the project "Scenarios and Strategies for vocational education in Europe" and currently the

David Killick Rebecca Hughes

Senior Lecturer at The University of Nottingham, and Director of the Centre for English Language Education, she is the author of English in Speech and Writing: Investigating Language and Literature (Routledge, 1996), Exploring Grammar in Context (co-authored with Ronald Carter and Michael McCarthy, (Cambridge University Press, 2000)), Teaching and Researching Speaking (Longman, 2002), Exploring Grammar in Currently a principal lecturer, with responsibilities for international student exchange programmes and for progressing Leeds Metropolitan University's Internationalisation Strategy, he has 20 years experience as an ELT lecturer and teacher trainer in the UK and overseas (Greece, Morocco, Japan, China), in the private and the public sectors. He also has substantial experience in overseas markets in a previous role for marketing and portfolio development in our School of Languages. David is a founder member of the International Association for Languages and Intercultural Communication.

Vicky Lewis

Head of the International Office at Bournemouth University, she joined the University in 2000 to set up the office from scratch. An Oxford University graduate in Modern Languages, Vicky has 10 years' experience in international education, having covered a range of International Office roles in universities in Wales, Scotland and England. 24

Speakers Biographies

Vicky is currently engaged in doctoral research into the different meanings of internationalisation for UK higher education.

Exports to the UK economy' published earlier this year. Rob also part funded the Morrow report into the English in Britain Accreditation scheme and represents UK Trade & Investment on the Prime Minister's overseas students initiative ( the PMI). Rob has spent over 20 years on trade and small business development work in DTI.

Franziska Muche

Senior Officer at the Academic Cooperation Association (ACA), a notfor-profit European organisation dedicated, amongst other issues, to the analysis of new trends in internationalisation, Franziska's responsibilities include the acquisition, development, and implementation of ACA projects, as well as the organisation of ACA conferences and seminars. She was responsible for the study on the admission of international degree students which was conducted by ACA in 2003-4. Before her appointment at ACA, she worked at the European Commission, for the Unit for Higher Education in DG Education and Culture, where she was dealing with issues linked to the Bologna Process.

Professor Colleen Liston

Involved in tertiary education since the late seventies, and in quality management and international education issues since the late eighties her PhD researched "The Structure of Educational Accreditation". She has presented at international conferences and published on managing quality and standards. Colleen is an Australian Business Excellence Framework Evaluator, an ISO Auditor and an Australian Universities Quality Auditor. Appointed by the Minister of Education in Western Australia to Chair higher education accreditation panels, she serves as a Subject Specialist for the US Distance Education and Training Council Accrediting Commission.

Beatrice Merrick

Director of Services and Research at UKCOSA, since 1998, her job involves promoting good practice in international student support in colleges and universities across the UK. She edits UKCOSA's members' magazine and other publications, organises the annual conference and delivers training in cross-cultural awareness and other topics. She was European Programmes Officer at the University of Sussex, and also chaired the UK Higher Education European Officers Association. She is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Studies in International Education. She is concerned to support international educators and offer them high quality networking and professional development opportunities.

partnership with English UK. With almost 400 members, the EiBA Scheme offers quality assurance of UK ELT providers to students overseas through a rigorous inspection system. Fiona previously worked in British Council offices in Tunisia, Spain, Morocco and, most recently, Italy where she held the post of Marketing Manager in Naples. Following an earlier career in business administration in the private sector, she retrained and began work in the field of ELT as a lecturer and EAP co-ordinator at a Canadian University 15 years ago. She has worked in ELT as a teacher, teacher trainer and manager in Southern and Eastern Europe, North Africa, South-East Asia and North America.

George Pickering

Educational coach, consultant and trainer and a senior teaching fellow at the University of Sheffield, he works on their Distance Learning Masters in Educational Management and in ELT. George is a tutor on the English UK Diploma in Language Teaching Management and is an inspector of language schools for the British Council in the UK (EIBAS). He has carried out research on ELT quality assurance schemes throughout the world and acted as a consultant on quality issues to organisations in four continents. He has also been an internal ISO 9002 auditor and an EAQUALS inspector. He is the treasurer of IATEFL (International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language) and the co-ordinator of the ELT Management SIG.

Christian Mueller

Professor Paul Luker

Starting working life as an avionics systems engineer, he metamorphosed into a computer scientist in higher education in 1971. He has worked at a variety of universities in the UK and in California, where he spent 9 years. He became Pro Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at Bournemouth University in 2000. His current responsibilities include: learning and teaching, widening participation, quality management, research, and international issues.

Tony Millns

He taught English as a foreign language in Finland before going to Oxford University in 1969. He lectured in Anglo-Saxon literature at the University of Cambridge and taught Middle English at Cambridge's second university (then CCAT, now APU) He was director of communications/marketing/PR for Cambridgeshire County Council (1981-4), the University of London (1984-91) and the Association of County Councils (1991-3). In 1993 he became Assistant Chief Executive of the School Curriculum and Assessment Authority (SCAA), where over the next four years he worked on all three of the Dearing reviews. In 1997, he became Assistant Chief Executive of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority. In late 1999, he was appointed Chief Executive of the Association of Recognised English Language Services (ARELS) Ltd, the leading trade and professional association for English language teaching, an industry which earns over £1.3 billion for the UK.

Dennis Murray

Foundation Executive Director of IEAA, he formerly held positions as Director International in the University of Adelaide and in the University of Ballarat. He is a Director of Murray-Goold International Pty Ltd and of the Institute for Global Education and is based in Melbourne.

Geoff Pine

Principal and Chief Executive of Greenwich Community College in South East London for twelve years, his background has been in education, covering colleges, schools and the prison service and in the entertainment industry. The College is situated in an area that suffers considerable social deprivation and has an ethnically diverse population. Geoff has also acted as an advisor in business studies to the Inner London Education Authority; he has been an examiner in Economics and a moderator for the Business Training and Education Council. He acts as a trustee for the Greenwich Community College Trust seeking to raise funds for students in financial hardship, and is a member of the Board of Charlton Athletic Race Equality Partnership (CARE) supported by Charlton Athletic Football Club and seeking to address equality and diversity through positive actions in sport. Geoff is Chair of the Greenwich Lifelong Learning Partnership and a Council member of the London East Learning and Skills Council. He is active in the Association of Colleges both regionally and nationally.

Sarah Maughan

Working with UCLES since 1996, she has been Assistant Director, Assessment Services, for one year. Prior to that, she worked as Group Manager of the Curriculum and Teacher Support Group in CIE and in the UCLES Research and Evaluation Division. Sarah's particular area of interest is the use of new technologies for both examination delivery and support. Prior to working at UCLES, Sarah taught internationally for six years, in Turkey, Yemen and Sri Lanka, working in primary schools and teaching English through the British Council.

Dr Prem Naidoo

Director, Accreditation and Co-ordination at the Higher Education Qualification Committee, Council on Higher Education, South Africa, he is also Director of the African Forum for Children's Literacy in Science and Technology (AFCLIST). Prior to this he was Chief Director of Research-Planning, Management and Administration at the University of Durban, Westville, and also worked for three years in the Centre of Science Development (CSD), now part of the National Research Foundation (NRF). He was Director of Research and Scholarship Funding for the Humanities and the Social Sciences in Centre for Science Development. He also was Director of the Macro-Education Policy Unit that conducted education policy research and lecturer in the Education Faculty of Durban, Westville.

Sugata Mitra Rt Hon Jack McConnell

A maths teacher between for nine years from 1983 and a member of Stirling District Council between 1984 and 1992, he also served as Leader of the Council. As General Secretary of the Scottish Labour Party (1992-1998), he managed the 1997 election success and coordinated Labour's Yes Yes referendum campaign in 1997.He was a member of the Scottish Constitutional Convention (1989-98) and was in 1999 he was elected as MSP for Motherwell and Wishaw. He served as Finance Minister and Education Minister before becoming First Minister in November 2001.

Tim Moock

Publications Editor at BBC English since 1994, Tim initially worked on materials for radio English learners, co-publishing bilingual books and cassettes with publishers in 13 republics of the Former Soviet Union. More recently, he has managed the BBC English Print Unit, where his activities have included setting up the BBC English Club for adult learners of English across Africa and China, running an information service and publishing a range of materials for learners and teachers around the world.

Professor Timothy O'Shea

Elected Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh in October 2002, he has a BSc in Mathematics and Experimental Psychology from Sussex University and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Leeds, and researched into. Artificial Intelligence research in USA and the University of Edinburgh. In 1997 he became Master of Birkbeck College and was awarded a Chair in Information and Communication Technologies by the University of London. In 2000 he was appointed also Provost of Gresham College and in 2001 ProVice-Chancellor of the University of London. He joined the Open University in 1978 and was awarded a Personal Chair in Information Technology and Education and in 1994 was appointed Pro-ViceChancellor for Quality Assurance and Research. In 1999 he was elected Fellow of the European Co-ordination Committee for Artificial Intelligence.

David Pottinger

David has twenty years of experience in the international education sector. He has lived and worked in France, Peru, Turkey, Nepal, and Pakistan, as well as managing UK-based transnational education businesses. Following a career as a foreign language educator and teacher trainer, David spent eight years with the British Council. His last post was Director Karachi. Prior to taking up his current position as Managing Director, NCC Education, he was Director of the Language Division of Nord Anglia Education plc, UK. He has an MA in Foreign Languages from Edinburgh University, an MA in Applied Linguistics from Lancaster University and an MBA from the Open University.

John McGovern Caroline Moore

Based in London she has been Director IT Services for the British Council's Teaching and Exams centres since 2003. She manages teams responsible for IT systems and the educational exploitation of ICT in the 57 countries where the British Council offers English Language courses. She has worked for the British Council in ICT and English Language Teaching for most of the last 14 years, most recently in managing the British Council's websites for learners and teachers of English. From 1995 to 1999 she worked with David Graddol on the project that resulted in "The Future of English?" and other projects that looked at the impact of technology on language learning.

Rob McKim

Sector head , Education and Training , UK Trade & Investment, which is the Government organisation that supports companies in the UK trading internationally and overseas enterprises seeking to locate in the UK. Rob leads a global team responsible for developing a strategy for HMG's trade development in education and training exports. Rob helped commission the report `Global value of Education and Training

Rod Pryde OBE

Rod went to George Watson's College in Edinburgh, studied French at Sussex and Japanese at SOAS, and did a PGCE in Teaching English as a Second Language at the University of North Wales in Bangor. He joined the British Council in 1981 after working in industry and as a lecturer in English in France. He has since worked in Italy, Spain, Japan, Hong Kong, Portugal and the UK in a range of roles, almost always with a 26

Fiona Pape

Manager English Language Quality Services with the British Council, she manages the English in Britain Accreditation Scheme (EiBAS) in

Speakers Biographies

strong focus on the English language and on education. He is currently Assistant Director-General with oversight of work in cultural relations, communications, press, PR, and equal opportunities and diversity.

further education colleges who are active internationally and a wide range of representative and specialist bodies.

Dr Juan J Serrato Velasco Ann Puntis

With UCLES ­ the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate ­ since 1997, she has been Director of Assessment Services in CIE for two and a half years. Prior to appointment to UCLES Ann Puntis has been involved in education for many years. Her career started as a teacher in secondary schools in England, and then moved to teaching in the further and higher education sector with a particular interest in Adult Education and in Lifelong Learning initiatives. In the early 90s she moved to work on the policy side, developing government funding methodologies most likely to promote the successful expansion of the UK further education sector. Director for Bilateral Affairs in the Mexican Ministry of Education, he took his Master's degree in Political Sciences from the University of Exeter, a Master's in Latin American Studies from LSE and a PhD in Social Anthropooogy from University College London. In his current post, he is responsible for supervising international links and activities in education, including a substantial scholarship scheme for Mexican students training abroad. He co-supervises a number of international programmes, notably with USA, France and Japan. Dr Serrato Velasco has been a Professor at the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey and worked for 6 months as an adviser to FAO in addition to his posts in the Mexican civil service.

had eight years industrial and sales experience, worked as a librarian in Liverpool, taught in a London comprehensive school, and was a professional actor with Joan Littlewood's Theatre Workshop Company at Stratford East. He is a consultant, writes for newspapers and magazines, contributes to television programmes and is an accomplished public speaker. He was recently made a Fellow of Birkbeck College and holds visiting professorships at the London Institute and Westminster University

of Education in Developing Countries at the Institute of Education in London. For many years Secretary of the Commonwealth Standing Committee for Student Mobility,he has written extensively on overseas student policy, his best-known work probably being The Overseas Student Question (which he edited for the Overseas Student Trust) in 1981. He chaired the Presidential Commission in Zimbabwe which paved the way for the creation of the National University of Science and Technology and led to the creation of the University in Bulawayo, and also served on teams establishing national universities in Namibia and Gambia.

Andrew Thompson

Born in Uruguay and brought up in that country, Argentina, and Brazil, Andrew Thompson has worked in BBC World Service since 1984. In his current position as Head, BBC Learning English he is responsible for on-air and online English language teaching, broadcast globally by World Service. He leads a new department ­ BBC Learning English ­ which is focusing on three key markets: China, the Islamic World, and a wider category called Global Learners. Earlier, he was Commissioning Editor for Education in World Service, and Development Manager responsible for the marketing of BBC radio programmes in English, Spanish and Portuguese throughout the Americas. Andrew earlier worked as a journalist in London, Rome. Mexico and Argentina. He started his BBC career as a commentator in the Latin America Service, and was successively head of the Brazilian (Portuguese) and Latin American (Spanish) services. He also received the 2001/02 Commonwealth of Learning Award of Excellence for Institutional Achievement in open and distance learning on behalf of the BBC, for its work in English Language Teaching.

Professor Di Yerbury

Emeritus Professor Di Yerbury is a Professor of Management and previous CEO of the Australia Council, who became Australia's first woman Vice-Chancellor in 1987 when she joined Macquarie University. She is now Australia's longest serving vice-chancellor. Professor erbury has served on committees and boards of education, government, business and arts organisations and has conducted reviews of personnel management, industrial law and relations, aspects of universities, arts funding and museums and collections for governments in Australia and overseas. She holds international positions, until recently President of IDP Education Australia (the company which supports educational exports), Founding President of the Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Network and a Director of the Association of Universities of the Asia-Pacific and the Commonwealth Association of Universities. Currently President of the Australian Higher Education Industrial Association, she has also been elected President of the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee for 2004 and 2005.

Dr Michelle Selinger John Ramsay

Chief Executive of Cogent the Sector Skills Council for Chemicals, Nuclear, Oil & Gas Extraction, Petroleum and Polymers, he was earlier Chief Executive of OPITO, the National Training Organisation for Oil & Gas Extraction. His involvement with OPITO began in 1991 when he joined the Board representing the International Association of Drilling Contractors. He became Chief Executive in 1995. From 1990 to 1995 John was the UK and European Personnel Manager for Smedvig Ltd, a Norwegian drilling contractor providing platform drilling services and mobile drilling rigs. His early career was spent in the construction sector. Employed by Cisco Systems as an education specialist, she is involved in advising and supporting e-learning initiatives and learning models within ICT environments. Prior to that she was a senior lecturer in ICT education at the Institute of Education, University of Warwick and Director of the Centre for New Technologies Research in Education (CeNTRE), a research and multimedia centre dedicated to research and development in ICT. Her research interests are in online communications and related pedagogies, and she is currently focusing on how ICT can affect and change the roles of teachers and learners. She holds a Senior Visiting Research Fellowship at the Institute of Educational Technology at the Open University.

Rt Hon Jim Wallace

Elected as MP for Orkney and Shetland in 1983, he was earlier in full time practice as an advocate at the Scottish Bar. He joined the Scottish Liberal Party in 1972 and in 1992 was elected Leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats. He was elected to the Scottish Parliament, as MSP for Orkney, and appointed Deputy First Minister and Minister for Justice in May 1999. After the 2003 Scottish election he was again appointed Deputy First Minister, and moved to become Minister of Enterprise and Lifelong Learning.

Dr Enrique Zepeda

Working at Universidad Virtual De Technologica da Monterrey since 1984, he started as Director of the MBA programme in Mexico City Campus. He was appointed Vice-president for International Affairs in August 2001. Dr Zepeda is a member of the Advisory Board of the Carnegie Bosch Institute for Applied Studies in International management and a member of the International board of the Washington Centre.

Olve Sørensen Dee Roach

Paul Sweeney Richard Rossner

Chief Executive of Bell International, one of the largest UK providers of English language training and of intensive English-for-academicpurposes courses for students entering UK higher education. Richard has over the last three years led the UK delegation to a CEN (Comité Européen de Normalisation) Working Group tasked with preparing a standard for `language study tour providers' across Europe. This standard is likely to come into force in late 200. Apart from its four centres in the UK, Bell has subsidiaries, partner centres and training programmes in nine other countries. Bell International is a Founder Member of EAQUALS, the European Association for Quality Language Services, which now has over 100 full member institutions across Europe. Apart from being closely involved in drawing up the EAQUALS codes of practice and inspection scheme, Richard is an EAQUALS inspector, and has served as Inspections Officer and Vice Chair. He is now one of two Special Advisors to EAQUALS. Originally from Dublin, Ireland he has lived most of his adult life in Spain, Portugal and Italy. He has worked for the British Council in roles relating to the exploitation of technology for learning for seven years. He currently holds the post of E-learning Manager, Educational Enterprises with the task of devising pedagogically valid and financially sustainable models of `blended' learning for the British Council Teaching Centre network.

Anneke Westerhuis Professor Zhang Lianzhong

Trained as an educationalist and researcher in the economics of education, at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, Anneke has wide experience of labour market research. Recently her research interest has concentrated on the links between VET policy and the development of VET systems. She is a researcher at the National Centre for the Innovation of Vocational Education and Training and Adult Education (CINOP) in the Netherlands. Her research team mainly works on projects at the national level: monitoring developments in VET, evaluating innovation and reform programmes, surveys (e.g. ITbased systems for communication between schools stakeholders), developing performance criteria for VET institutes. Anneke is also involved in a variety of international projects, for instance at the European level comparing VET developments in the Netherlands with developments in other EU countries. Currently Director of the Foreign Language Research Centre at the China National Institute for Education Research, Professor hang was deputy dean of the English Education Department, Capital Normal University Beijing, from 1988-97. He obtained a MA in applied linguistics at the University of Reading in 1985, and has been a visiting scholar with UCLES (1997), University of Melbourne (1995-6) and EEC Academy of Seoul (2004). He is a member of the board of expertise for drafting syllabus standards for the Chinese national English syllabus and chief editor of Student English Times. He has been a professional in ELT for over 30 years, researching and lecturing extensively.

Douglas Tallack

Professor Laurie Taylor Dominic Scott

Chief Executive of UKCOSA -The Council for International Education, since summer 2004, he previously had a 25 year career with the British Council including posts in Norway, Egypt and India and was, for 2 years, Deputy Director of a `cross Whitehall' initiative, the Britain Abroad Task Force. UKCOSA exists to serve and support the interests of international students and those who work with them. Its membership includes all UK universities, the majority of higher and Visiting professor in the department of politics and sociology at Birkbeck College, University of London and currently presenting Thinking Allowed and Room for Improvement on Radio 4, he began his broadcasting career as a regular contributor on Robert Robinson's Stop the Week. Laurie was educated at St Mary's College, Liverpool, the Rose Bruford College of Drama in Kent and Birkbeck College, University of London where he obtained his BA. He then went on to do an MA at Leicester University. then an English teacher before joining the Sociology Department of the University of York where he went on to become Professor of Sociology. Before entering academic life, he

Professor Peter Williams

An education planner, specialising in policy and practice in developing countries, he is Honorary Secretary of the Commonwealth Consortium for Education and Joint Deputy Executive Chair of the Council for Education in the Commonwealth. He serves on the Education Committee of the UNESCO National Commission. He is a former Director of Education at the Commonwealth Secretariat and Professor 28

Practical Matters

Level 3

Administrative notices

Please wear your badge at all times when inside the Edinburgh International Conference Centre (EICC). Security staff are required to challenge visitors not wearing conference identification. Safety and emergency procedures are outlined in the EICC orientation guide which is in your delegate pack. Please study this carefully so that you are clear on what to do in an emergency. There is a cloakroom for coats and bags at the EICC which will be manned during conference hours (closing 30 minutes after the last session each day). On Thursday 9 December, the cloakroom will reopen at 1900 for the gala dinner and close at 0030. On Friday 10 December there will be a secure left luggage facility, situated in the Lomand Foyer, from 0800 to 1700.

DRESSING ROOMS GLADSMUIR ROOM

PENTLAND

We welcome your comments on the organisation and content of the conference which will help us when organising future events. Please send your views by e-mail to [email protected], which will remain open until the end of February 2005.

Please see the map (opposite?) which indicates the location of Our Dynamic Earth, in relation to the EICC. Please also note that coaches will be available to assist delegates to reach Our Dynamic Earth, from the EICC at 1815.

SIDLAW

FINTRY

Exhibition

There will be an exhibition of Conference sponsors and supporters in the Strathblane Hall of the EICC. Stands will be manned during registration (1200-1400) and from 1700-1800 on Wednesday 8 December, and from 0815 ­ 0900, during breaks and over the lunch period on Thursday 9 and Friday 10 December. There will also be a British Council information and registration stand which will be manned from 0800 to 1800 on Thursday 9 and from 0800 to 1730 on Friday 10 December

Gala dinner

The Gala dinner will take place in the Cromdale Hall of the EICC on Thursday 9 December. Pre-dinner drinks will be offered from 1915 in the Strathblane Hall and dinner is at 2000. After dinner there will be dancing to a live band until midnight, and a cash bar will be in operation until 2330 (with last orders at 2300). Dress code for the dinner is smart/ national dress

There are toilets on all floors which are clearly signposted. Taxis are available from the rank outside the EICC

Level 1

1 2 3

Social events

There will be a cash coffee shop, open during conference hours, on the ground floor of the EICC, in the Strathblane hall. The EICC has a business centre which will be open to all delegates between 0800 and 1800. Services include internet access, photocopying and faxing. You may access the internet free of charge in Ochil 1 on level 1 of the venue. There will be a system for signing up for timed sessions on the computers. This is a non-smoking conference. If you wish to smoke, we ask you kindly to do so only outside the building.

3

Opening reception The opening reception will take place at Our Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, Edinburgh, EH8 8AS, from 1845 until 2030 on Wednesday 8 December. All registered conference participants are invited ­ you will find an invitation card with further details in your delegate pack. The welcome address will be given by the Rt Hon Jack McConnell, MSP, First Minister for Scotland. Dress code for the reception is business attire/ national dress

GALLOWAY SUITE

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30

Conference Partners

Conference Supporter

addition to qualifications for teachers. All our qualifications are recognised by universities, employers and educators across the globe. CIE has been a world leader in assessment and examination for more than a century. During this time we have worked with governments around the world, developing educational and examination systems. Our unique connection with one of the most respected universities in the world, and the extent of our activities over time, gives us the broadest base of expertise and experience. We are well placed globally to listen carefully to the needs of those who engage in educational reform and can provide integrated solutions that span curriculum and assessment development and capacity building for teachers. CIE has a strong pedigree in development and research. We constantly review our provision and introduce new subject areas and qualifications. We also strive to improve the support we offer our network of registered Centres and utilise innovative technology for delivery, assessment and administration. www.CIE.org.uk

Executive civil servants are accountable to Scottish Ministers, who are themselves accountable to the Scottish Parliament. The Executive's plans and priorities are set out in a Partnership Agreement which was drawn up following the 2003 election.

University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations

University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations (Cambridge ESOL) offers the world's leading range of certificated exams for learners of English. The exams are taken by over 1.5 million people each year and are accepted by educational organisations and employers throughout the world as proof of English language ability. For most candidates, a Cambridge ESOL certificate is a passport to practical benefits ­ to gain entrance to a university or college, to improve their job prospects and to measure progress in English. Qualifications are available for English language learners at all levels and in all contexts, including General English, Business English, English for Young Learners and English for Academic Purposes. The exams are linked to the Council of Europe's Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and Cambridge ESOL is an active member of ALTE (Association of Language Testers in Europe). ALTE aims to clarify how qualifications achieved in different languages correspond to each other and what they actually mean in practice, helping to make qualifications more usable and increasing people's potential mobility. Cambridge ESOL works closely with government bodies and other partners worldwide to deliver language assessment services tailored to local needs. Recent partnerships include collaboration with the Ministry of Education in Chile, the Shanghai Professional Testing Authority in China and the Society for Testing English Proficiency in Japan. The Cambridge ESOL exams are increasingly taken in state secondary and vocational schools, as well as in the language school sector and higher education. Cambridge ESOL is one of the three partners (along with the British Council and IDP Education Australia) that jointly own and run IELTS. Cambridge ESOL's uncompromising commitment to quality, both in terms of assessment processes and of educational impact, is supported by the largest dedicated research team of any UK-based provider of English language assessment, and by an extensive pretesting programme which helps to ensure that the questions and tasks used in the exams provide an accurate measure of test takers' true abilities. www.CambridgeESOL.org

Kaplan is a proud sponsor of the British Council's Going Global Conference.

Kaplan Inc. is one of the world's largest, most dynamic and innovative private providers of educational and career services. Kaplan is owned by The Washington Post Company and is now its largest subsidiary with annual revenues exceeding USD$1 billion. Kaplan provides education services to nearly a million students at more than 3,000 classroom locations around the world. In the higher education sector, Kaplan offers associate, bachelor and masters degree courses through some 70 higher education colleges and online to over 18,000 students. As a key international initiative, Kaplan is forging partnerships with selected UK universities to offer pathway programs for international students at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Kaplan intends to establish a network of International Colleges across the UK the first of which will be at Nottingham Trent University starting in 2005. Kaplan International, 6th Floor, 48 Gracechurch Street, London EC3V OEJ. Tel: 020 7398 2580. Fax: 020 7398 2599. Email: [email protected]

Jack McConnell MSP, First Minister, Scottish Executive

He was a maths teacher between for nine years from 1983 and a member of Stirling District Council between 1984 and 1992. Whilst on the Council he served as Leader. As General Secretary of the Scottish Labour Party (1992-1998), he managed the 1997 election success and co-ordinated Labour's Yes Yes referendum campaign in 1997. He was a member of the Scottish Constitutional Convention (1989-98) and was in 1999 he was elected as MSP for Motherwell and Wishaw. He served as Finance Minister and Education Minister before becoming First Minister in November 2001.

Jim Wallace MSP, Deputy First Minister and Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning, Scottish Executive Knowledge Village

Establishing a Destination for International Higher Education in Dubai Due to an under-value of knowledge acquisition the Middle Eastern suffers from a shortage of higher education institutes of an international quality, stated the UNDP, Arab Human Development Report, 2003. In addition, what academic institutes there were invariably did not offer modern courses in scientific disciplines or practice R&D. This directly impacted on the region's long-term strategy to develop into a knowledge, people not oil, driven economy [Fergany, 2003]. Due to the above factors many regional students would travel overseas to study and remain in that market upon graduation, leading to a deficit of skilled workers in the region. In 2002, to retain and develop regional talent, the Dubai Government created Dubai Knowledge Village. This new destination for education was established to provide a regional meeting-point between Middle Eastern students and global education, by attracting quality international academic institutes to Dubai. Dubai Knowledge Village will accelerate the region's move into the knowledge economy by providing the ongoing resources for the development of knowledge workers. He joined the Scottish Liberal Party in 1972. In 1992, he was elected Leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats. He was elected to the Scottish Parliament, as MSP for Orkney (the Westminster Orkney and Shetland constituency being split into two), and appointed Deputy First Minister and Minister for Justice in May 1999. After the 2003 Scottish election he was again appointed Deputy First Minister, and moved to become Minister of Enterprise and Lifelong Learning. He was elected as MP for Orkney and Shetland in 1983. Before this, he was in full time practice as an advocate at the Scottish Bar.

www.ntic.org.uk

Department for Education and Skills

The Department for Education and Skills is responsible for education and lifelong learning in England. These include strategic responsibility for nursery education and childcare, primary and secondary education, further and higher education, and adult education and skills. It also has wider responsibilities for a range of policies, some of which it shares with other government departments, to ensure children and young people are safe, well and ready to learn. The Department's aim is to help build a competitive economy and inclusive society by: Creating opportunities for everyone to develop their learning. Releasing potential in people to make the most of themselves. Achieving excellence in standards of education and levels of skills. The Department's objectives are to: Give children an excellent start in education so that they have a better foundation for future learning. Enable all young people to develop and to equip themselves with the skills, knowledge and personal qualities needed for life and work. Encourage and enable adults to learn, improve their skill and enrich their lives.

University of Cambridge International Examinations The Scottish Executive

University of Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) is the world's leading provider of international assessments. As part of the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), we have a long history of delivering high-quality examinations and assessments, which are now available in over 150 countries through our network of registered Centres. Cambridge is committed to encouraging positive educational experiences and providing qualifications and services that are relevant, accurate, reliable, affordable and internationally recognised. Our qualifications are designed for all and are available for a wide range of abilities and age groups. Our school assessments include Cambridge Checkpoint, Cambridge IGCSE ­ which CIE pioneered 16 years ago ­ Cambridge A and AS Levels and the AICE Diploma. We also offer vocational qualifications ­ Cambridge International Diplomas ­ in a range of business-focused areas including Management, ICT and Business, in The Scottish Executive is the devolved government for Scotland. It is responsible for most of the issues of day-to-day concern to the people of Scotland, including health, education, justice, rural affairs, and transport. (devolved and reserved matters) It manages an annual budget of more than £20 billion in the financial year 2002-2003 that is due to rise to almost £26 billion in 2005-2006. The Executive was established in 1999, following the first elections to the Scottish Parliament. It is a coalition between the Scottish Labour Party and the Scottish Liberal Democrat Party. The Executive is led by a First Minister who is nominated by the Parliament and in turn appoints the other Scottish Ministers who make up the Cabinet.

32

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