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Cal Performances Presents

Friday, October , , pm Saturday, October , , pm Sunday, October , , pm Zellerbach Hall

Miami City Ballet

Carlos Miguel Guerra and Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg in Nine Sinatra Songs. Photo by Joe Gato.

Edward Villella, Founding Artistic Director

Pamela N. Gardiner, Executive Director

Miami City Ballet is sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Aff airs, the Florida Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. Miami City Ballet's performances are part of Cal Performances' Focus on Twyla Tharp series. Focus on Twyla Tharp is sponsored in part by Nancy Livingston and Fred Levin, The Shenson Foundation. Cal Performances' ­ season is sponsored by Wells Fargo Bank.

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Cast

Miami City Ballet

Edward Villella Pamela N. Gardiner Roma Sosenko John D. Hall Haydée Morales Francisco Rennó Kathleen E. Warr Joan Latham Crista Villella Founding Artistic Director/Chief Executive Officer Executive Director Principal Ballet Mistress Production and Lighting Director Costume Designer & Director Company Pianist/Music Librarian Principal Stage Manager Ballet Mistress Assistant Ballet Mistress School/Company

The Company Principal Dancers Tricia Albertson Katia Carranza Mary Carmen Catoya Jeremy Cox Patricia Delgado Carlos Miguel Guerra Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Renato Penteado Rolando Sarabia Deanna Seay Haiyan Wu Principal Soloists Jeanette Delgado Isanusi Garcia Rodriguez Soloists Didier Bramaz Callie Manning Zherlin Ndudi Joseph Phillips Daniel Sarabia Marc Spielberger Andrea Spiridonakos Alex Wong Yang Zou Corps de Ballet Toshiro Abbley Daniel Baker Maira Barriga Kristin D'Addario Alexandre Dufaur Leigh-Ann Esty Sara Esty Katie Gibson Tiffany Hedman Kyra Homeres Elizabeth Keller Ashley Knox Jennifer Lauren Neil Marshall Allynne Noelle Lisa Reneau Heberth Riascos Stephen Satterfield Amanda Weingarten Zoe Zien Coryphées Michael Sean Breeden Company Apprentices Bradley Dunlap Cindy Huang Ezra Hurwitz Rebecca King Elice McKinley Chaz Meszaros Helen Ruiz Christie Sciturro School Apprentices Peter Doll Gabriela Gonzalez Elizabeth Smedley Amir Yogev

­ Company Representatives

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Cast

Staff of Miami City Ballet Pamela N. Gardiner Mark Cole E. L. "Pete" Upham Nicolle Noel Ugarriza Abram Best Irwin Williams Nicole M. Mitchell Brian Harris Edward Curington William Schwendel Apon Nichols Sean Michael Deceunick Ricardo Asturias María Morales Graciela Giraldo Amelia Paille Ana Maria Romero Martha Venegas Executive Director General Manager Director of Marketing & Communications Public Relations Manager Company Manager Director of Finance Assistant Stage Manager Production Carpenter Property Master Master Electrician Assistant Electrician Sound Engineer Wardrobe Master Costume Artist Draper & Pattern Technician Seamstresses

Exclusive Management IMG Artists Carnegie Hall Tower West th Street, th Floor New York, New York tel () - fax () - www.imgartists.com

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Program

Nine Sinatra Songs

Choreography Music Staging Scenic design Original costume design Costume re-creation Original lighting design Lighting re-creation Twyla Tharp Songs sung by Frank Sinatra Elaine Kudo Santo Loquasto Oscar de la Renta Haydée Morales Jennifer Tipton John Hall

In the wake of her investigation of the methods of turn-of-the-century exhibition/ballroom dancing for the movie Ragtime, Twyla Tharp created her Nine Sinatra Songs, each of them with its own musical and dance/theater character. The music is the voice of Sinatra himself, singing "My Way," "Strangers in the Night," "Somethin' Stupid" and "Softly, as I Leave You," among others, while the dances range in mood from the glamorous and the showy to tart, comic relief and what she herself refers to as a "bastardized tango." Seven couples, Oscar de la Renta gowns and Sinatra--here is Tharp at her most accessible, inventive and seductive. Miami City Ballet Premiere March , , Jackie Gleason Theater, Miami Beach

CASTING

Softly as I Leave You Haiyan Wu Jeremy Cox Strangers in the Night Callie Manning Isanusi Garcia-Rodriguez One for My Baby (and One for the Road ) Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Carlos Miguel Guerra My Way Haiyan Wu Jeremy Cox Callie Manning Isanusi Garcia-Rodriguez Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Carlos Miguel Guerra Somethin' Stupid Tricia Albertson Daniel Sarabia All the Way Deanna Seay Rolando Sarabia Forget Domani Patricia Delgado Alexandre Dufaur

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Program

That's Life Katia Carranza Renato Penteado My Way Ensemble

For Rhoda and Jerry Oster. The performance of Nine Sinatra Songs, a Tharpsm Ballet, is presented under license with W.A.T., Limited, and has been produced in accordance with Tharpsm Standard services. Nine Sinatra Songs choreography by Twyla Tharp, © . With appreciation to Sinatra Enterprises and to The Frank Sinatra Foundation. Tuxedos provided by Formal Wear of Westchester. Nine Sinatra Songs was underwritten for Miami City Ballet by R. Kirk Landon and Mike Eidson.

INTERMISSION

Agon

Choreography Music Re-staging Costume re-creation Lighting George Balanchine Igor Stravinsky After The George Balanchine Trust Haydée Morales (original design by Karinska) John Hall

Choreographed in , Agon was a collaboration between composer Igor Stravinsky and George Balanchine. Together they devised a sequence of musical numbers and dances that updated forms from the th century, such as the sarabande (a stately court dance), the gaillard and the branle. The title is the Greek word for "contest," and through this and the work's linear, geometrical look, Balanchine's masterpiece, Apollo, is invoked. Combining two frames of historical reference--ancient Greece and baroque France--with a modern sensibility, Agon is perhaps Balanchine's most distilled synthesis of classical and modern art, and one of the most influential works of art of the th century. Agon is packed with verbal and intellectual puns (though one need not know that to enjoy the ballet). For example, the work has dancers who interact in both symmetrical and asymmetrical arrangements of the number , and the music, which is composed on the -tone scale, develops its own -sided patterns. The work, labelled "world-conquering" by dance critic Arlene Croce, is completely engrossing. The heart of the work is an extended pas de deux for the leading couple which departs from classical pas de deux form and from Balanchine's usual observance of that form. The duet is built on the sustained, prolonged intertwining of the two dancers rather than being structured as a supported adagio followed by separate variations and a coda. It offers scarcely a break as it builds in tension, offering images of a bond that is tested but not broken. Perhaps more than any other part of Agon, the dramatic pas de deux (a metaphor for the complexities of a modern marriage or love affair), has influenced other artists ballets, and the dynamics and form of choreographed relationships. Adapted from a note by Anita Finkel

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Program

Miami City Ballet Premiere January , , Dade County Auditorium, Miami

CASTING

Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Carlos Miguel Guerra Andrea Spiridonakos Jeremy Cox Callie Manning Didier Bramaz Deanna Seay Alexandre Dufaur Amanda Weingarten Kristin D'Addario Allynne Noelle Tiffany Hedman

This performance of Agon, a Balanchine Ballet, is presented by arrangement with The George Balanchine Trust and has been produced in accordance with the Balanchine Style and Balanchine Technique, Service Standards established and provided by the Trust. © The George Balanchine Trust Agon, by arrangement with Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., publisher and copyright owner.

INTERMISSION

In the Upper Room

Choreography Music Staging Original costume design Costume re-creation Original lighting design Lighting re-creation Twyla Tharp Philip Glass Elaine Kudo Norma Kamali Haydée Morales Jennifer Tipton John Hall

Tharp thinks of the two women who initiate In the Upper Room in terms of ceramic, Chinese temple guard dogs. From the "cells" of their side-by-side moves, with stretching, kicking and swinging legs, the dramatic, nearly religious and hypnotic, on-rushing work pours forth as one of the most popular of Tharp's. (Standing ovations have become a consistent part of performance history.) An inky yet celestially lighted void frames the advancing, receding, exploding and imploding activities of the many-layered work. Beyond her "china dog" markers, the choreographer characterizes the running-shoe-wearing three couples as "stompers" and two pointe-shoe-wearing women as a "bomb squad." All work according to their nicknames, stomping, and "bombing" the space with their finesse, energy and force. The cast of "participants" builds gradually and, once established, evolves partly through an altering of costumes and through elaborating their dancing and their connection to the other dancers. Tharp has described her movements here as "fierce, driving, and relentless," aiming to make some furiously fast unison moves "burn the retina." The dancers play with and feed on the music's driving pulse, much of their locomotion can be seen as jogging, sometimes nonchalantly backwards. The "bomb squad" amplifies into the "ballet cadre" and their red costuming stands out with special fire in the black velvet surround. The music's unwinding, and unskeining character climaxes in a finale that encapsulates the entire ballet up to that point, with each recapitulation colored and/or twisted this way or that from its original presentation. With the first-time appearance of the entire cast, the piece winds down. In the process, it re-dramatizes the magical void created as a scenic component by Tipton's innovative lighting plot. The dancers variously disappear

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Program

into the dense, rich blackness that stands like a shadowy infinity behind the more immediate space showered by shafts of warm light. Two "stomper" men bolt backward into the void by way of throwing forward a sharp punch as they "disappear." For summary punctuation the "china dogs" cue the ringing down of the curtain by pulling down their fists, as if sharply closing shut a window blind. Miami City Ballet Premiere January , , Carnival Center for the Performing Arts, Miami

CASTING

I. Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Jeanette Delgado Alex Wong Jeremy Cox Daniel Baker II. Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Jeanette Delgado Tricia Albertson Deanna Seay Mary Carmen Catoya Didier Bramaz Katia Carranza Alexandre Dufaur Patricia Delgado Carlos Miguel Guerra III. Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Daniel Baker Tricia Albertson Jeremy Cox Jeanette Delgado Alex Wong IV. Katia Carranza Patricia Delgado Carlos Miguel Guerra Didier Bramaz Mary Carmen Catoya Alexandre Dufaur V. Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Jeanette Delgado Tricia Albertson Daniel Baker Alex Wong Jeremy Cox VI. Jeanette Delgado Didier Bramaz Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg Alexandre Dufaur VII. Alex Wong Jeremy Cox Daniel Baker VIII. Deanna Seay Alexandre Dufaur Carlos Miguel Guerra Didier Bramaz Mary Carmen Catoya Patricia Delgado Katia Carranza IX. Full Company

The performance of In the Upper Room, a Tharpsm Ballet, is presented under license with W.A.T. Limited, and has been produced in accordance with Tharpsm Service Standards. In the Upper Room choreography by Twyla Tharp, © Twyla Tharp. In the Upper Room by Philip Glass. © Dunvagen Music Publishers Inc. Used by permission. The Company Premiere of In the Upper Room was sponsored in part by Dr. Margaret & Mike Eidson, The State of Florida and Funding Arts Network.

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Focus on Twyla Tharp

Twyla Tharp: A Brainy Populist Twyla Tharp began her choreographic career in the far reaches of the avant-garde. Specifically, in a room in the art department at Hunter College in New York City, on April , . The dance, less than minutes long, was given twice, so that the overflow audience could be accommodated. The title, Tank Dive, may have seemed ominous, but Tharp probably meant to suggest a feat of daring and optimism. Everything she's undertaken since has been charged with the same energetic confidence. Besides being one of the most prolific and accomplished choreographers of the last four decades, Twyla Tharp is a breakthrough artist. With a succession of dazzling dances, she has challenged the perception that art-dance is a specialized or esoteric taste. She embraced videotape in its infancy, as a tool for creating and learning dances. When other dancers mistrusted television and movies, she annexed those media as ways to reach a broader audience and preserve her repertory. A fusion artist to the core, Tharp has never confined her creativity to a single format. She built a distinctive movement style by utilizing everything she and her co-dancers could do, and then demanding more. She created an engaging repertory for the great ensemble of modern and ballet dancers she led in the s and s. After , Tharp re-invented her working situation several times, determined to avoid the burdens of running an independent dance company. As a freelance choreographer, she has crossed back and forth between ballet commissions, Broadway and groups developed for her own short-term projects. She has shown a new generation that there are alternatives to the conventional choreographercentered modern dance company model. Besides an immense talent, drive and wideranging taste, Tharp has a restless temperament. She hates repeating herself and fears getting stuck in her own success, but there's a tension between pushing on with new schemes and letting her past accomplishments disappear. In the midst of her ongoing relationship with American Ballet Theatre (she has created works for them to date), she embarked on an unprecedented three-year project to transfer six of her dances to Hubbard Street

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Dance Chicago. Nowadays, licensed revivals of her dances are performed by ballet, modern dance and student groups. An innovator to the core, Tharp has never been a true avant-gardist. When she left Southern California to attend college at Barnard as an art history major, the dance world was on the brink of a revolution. Experimental workshops and showings of radical new work were going on at Judson Church and in lofts, galleries, parks and alleyways. Happenings, new theater and cinema shook up the categories and overturned known definitions. Tharp explored the more conservative options first. Besides modern dance classes at Barnard, she sampled the major New York studios. She joined Paul Taylor's company as soon as she graduated, then left after a year to try her own hand. Tank Dive was a collage, heavily influenced by her partner at the time, painter Robert Huot. Huot, a proto-minimalist, introduced Tharp to his artist friends. She soaked up their endless discussions of new ideas. At Judson Dance Theater concerts, she studied the downtown aesthetic of the ordinary and the incongruous. She was receptive to the eclectic, even nonsensical performance assemblages, the disdain for glamour and artifice, the crossover collaborations between dancers, artists, musicians and poets. Huot had made performance pieces himself, and a version of his fauxcombat duet War was incorporated in Tank Dive. Tharp's debut concert had the Judson look. But it also had a message. Tank Dive was an inversion, a sort of anti-dance, suggesting in its very resistance that there were resources and subjects dance hadn't tapped before. She "starred" in the piece, demonstrating two crucial ballet moves (plié and relevé), a basic modern-dance stretch, and a couple of sportive gestures: she spun a yo-yo and took a running slide across the floor. She wore two pairs of inappropriate footwear (high heels and oversized wooden flippers). All these things, arbitrary as they seemed, referred to the potential scope of dancing. Even the accompaniment, Petula Clark's "Downtown," announced, ironically, that pop music was okay. The thing Tharp didn't like about the Judson avant-gardists' platform was their rejection of formal dance technique. Incongruity was all very well, but she was not going to give up the thrill of tech27

Focus on Twyla Tharp

nical, musical mastery that she had worked so hard to gain. From the beginning, she and her dancers studied with Merce Cunningham and took ballet class. Within two years she had stopped trying to banish dancing from her dances. It was Tharp's irrepressible facility for movement invention that brought her to prominence. Critics and audiences recognized an original talent almost immediately. The late s were an auspicious time for all dance. The first large-scale public funding had been put in place by the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. Theaters and cultural centers were opening around the country. Audiences were getting to see more dance, and to appreciate its diversity. When the first extended showcase for modern dance was scheduled for the Billy Rose Theater in , Tharp was one of three downtown choreographers included. (The others were Yvonne Rainer and Meredith Monk.) She and her company of six women presented three uncompromising dance pieces, all without noticeable music. Right after the Billy Rose, she responded to an invitation to perform in the Opera House at Brooklyn Academy of Music. Under the leadership of Harvey Lichtenstein, BAM was beginning its long campaign to establish an outpost for dance and theater in the presumed wilderness across the river from Manhattan. Facing the prospect of selling , tickets, Tharp decided to put the audience on the Opera House stage with the performers, thus giving it a close-up view and forestalling the possibility of empty seats. She called the evening "Dance for an Open Space." In an early sample of her genius for recycling and retooling her own work, she expanded Group Activities, which she had just premiered, from five to ten dancers. Instead of revising the dance, she simply divided the space in half and staged the same choreography, reversed left-to-right, in both sides. Generation, the other piece at BAM, consisted of five different solos performed simultaneously. Again, there was no music to hold the dances together, although she had used Beethoven to choreograph Generation and then discarded it. Onstage, a metronome ticked the pulse. Sharon Kinney kept time against a written score, cuing the dancers when they called out for help. Tharp had mesmerized the critics. Two years later, she won the hearts of the public. Having

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smashed the avant-garde prohibitions against dancing itself, and sneaked bits of music almost at random into her works, she finally set a dance to music. Not "serious" music either. Eight Jelly Rolls, to the recordings of Jelly Roll Morton, set a new modern-dance precedent by taking on the beat, the swing, and the casual virtuosity of jazz. Eight Jelly Rolls had many distinctions, including an almost undetectable choreographic scheme that resembled the structure of jazz by showing off the dancers individually and as foils for the ensemble. The dancing was fast, articulate, funny and smart. Through some synergy of choreography, movement, music and engaging personalities, Eight Jelly Rolls humanized the dancers and endeared them to us. The dance inaugurated Tharp's lifelong inquiry into the vast resources of American popular music. When Robert Joffrey invited her to make a new dance for the Joffrey Ballet in , the longstanding philosophical rift between ballet and modern dance had not yet been bridged. Tharp wasn't the first modern dancer to choreograph for a ballet company, but she was the first to blend exemplars of the two styles into a single choreography. When she accepted Joffrey's invitation, she insisted that the work include her own company of individualistic modern dancers (Sara Rudner, Rose Marie Wright, Ken Rinker, Isabel GarciaLorca, Nina Weiner and herself). Deuce Coupe, in fact, turned out to be a ballet that was about reciprocity between the two dance styles. At the same time, it was a supercharged, witty entertainment about adolescence, set to recordings by the Beach Boys. Genuine graffiti writers were recruited off the streets of New York to spray-paint their signatures on a rolling backdrop during the course of each performance. The ballet was a sensation. Extra performances had to be added during that first Joffrey season at New York City Center. The two companies performed it on the Joffrey's spring tour to San Francisco and Seattle, and again during the following summer and fall. But obsolescence had been built into the ballet from the start. Tharp's company had its own busy touring schedule to fulfill. Deuce Coupe was put on hold until Tharp made a new model, Deuce Coupe II, for the Joffrey dancers alone, which premiered on tour and at City Center early in . Tharp reworked it again at least

CAL PERFORMANCES

Focus on Twyla Tharp

twice in the s for her own company, which numbered about dancers by then. For each version, she "customized" the ballet to suit the personnel and the evolving audience. The dance returned to the Joffrey Ballet in under the direction of William Whitener. As a Joffrey dancer he was in the original cast of Deuce Coupe. Whitener then joined Twyla Tharp's company for a decade; he's now artistic director of Kansas City Ballet. As a principal reconstructor for Deuce Coupe, Whitener has staged the present streamlined model, known to Tharp insiders as Deuce Coupe III, for Kansas City Ballet and the Juilliard Dance Theater as well as the Joffrey. Practicalities have eliminated the live graffiti writers, but a new backdrop with graffiti overtones was designed by Chris Foxworth of Kansas City, and it now travels with the production. After the tremendous success of Deuce Coupe, Tharp's company became a magnet for adventurous dancers who knew she wouldn't keep them in pigeonholes. Over the next decade, Tharp Dance grew from the core group that developed her jazzy signature style into a sophisticated ensemble that included William Whitener, Richard Colton and Christine Uchida from the Joffrey Ballet; Shelley Washington from Martha Graham's company; Raymond Kurshals, who had danced with Merce Cunningham; and dancers from other ballet and modern dance backgrounds. Tharp's inspired work gradually assimilated them all into a perfectly blended ensemble. Nothing demonstrates this better than Baker's Dozen, which, Tharp once told a writer, "represents my ideal society." With an unobtrusive but elegant compositional structure, the dance explores the ways twelve people can be divided into groups. Beginning with duets, it streams into trios, quartets, sextets and finally all the dancers get to solo against the rest, propelled all the while by Willie "The Lion" Smith's nonchalant jazz piano pieces. Strolls, chases, and tangos tumble after one another in the most amiable manner. Like the music, the dance keeps shifting our attention, so that each new combination of forces seems to bring out different aspects of the dancers. When Tharp talked about Baker's Dozen as a kind of utopia, she revealed her softest, most generous instincts. She did not want to express her feelCAL PERFORMANCES

ings, but this dance above all shows us her love for her dancers. She did not want to tell stories, but she tells a choreographic story here: the process of the dance is the story of a dance company. By distinguishing and recombining these versatile talents, she was showing how one style, one personality, one group could interact with another to make a new community. With her dances in demand, Tharp has delegated several trusted alumni to stage them around the world. The two Sinatra ballets in repertory have been directed by Elaine Kudo and Shelley Washington. Kudo, a member of ABT who joined one of the later Tharp companies, was Mikhail Baryshnikov's gorgeous partner in the video of Sinatra Suite shown on PBS in . Tharp began using the songs of Frank Sinatra in , right after her smash hit Push Comes to Shove. Push was the first American work to demand a new style from the great Russian dancer, who'd come to this country only two years earlier. Tharp stunned and delighted the ABT audience by transforming Baryshnikov into a goofy Lothario (to ragtime) and an even goofier classical star (to Haydn). After Push he asked Tharp to create a pièce d'occasion for the two of them, to be shown at an ABT gala performance the following spring. This became Tharp's first Sinatra dance, Once More Frank. ABT's gala audience, all set for Baryshnikov to perform the Don Quixote pas de deux or some other showpiece, was disappointed to see the hijinks of a couple of tomboy pals in shorts and polo shirts. It was one of Tharp's few failures, but rehearsals had been filmed for her extraordinary PBS special, Making Television Dance. That footage reveals a sweaty, sensuous partnership, as Tharp and Baryshnikov worked at the choregraphy in closeup. Tharp didn't give up on Sinatra's music, and five years later she made the long string of romantic duets for her own company that became Nine Sinatra Songs. Kudo and Baryshnikov took an abbreviated and refocused version, Sinatra Suite, into ABT's repertory in late . Romantic love was hardly Twyla Tharp's milieu, but romantic dancing intrigued her. Or, as she said in the narration for her Men's Piece, finding a way for a man and a woman to dance in each other's arms was a problem that could lead to

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Focus on Twyla Tharp

many solutions. Although both Sinatra Suite and Nine Sinatra Songs use the Crooner's s recordings with their lush Nelson Riddle orchestrations, Tharp produced another two different takes on the music. The Nine is a straightforward exposition of ballroom dance styles for seven couples dancing consecutively. There's virtually no group choreography in the piece. Even in the two numbers where couples appear together on the stage, they are engrossed in their own partners. The dance is extroverted, almost impersonal, like a ballroom exhibition. As each couple introduces a different style--soft and floating, flirtatious, effervescent, passionate--you see how a certain kind of dancing can embody a sensibility and describe a relationship. In the Sinatra Suite, one couple dances all the numbers. The costumes are the same: tuxedos and suave Oscar de la Renta cocktail dresses. Some of the songs are the same, and even the choreography may be linked to its corresponding number in the bigger dance. But the Suite is not just a condensed version of the Nine. By zooming in on the intimate story of one particular relationship, it takes on a more dramatic and emotional gloss. Though she is probably best known for her dances to jazz and popular music, Tharp has always been drawn to classical ballet. Pointe work was used as a didactic device in Deuce Coupe, but right after that she made an all-pointe ballet for the Joffrey, As Time Goes By. She reveres classically trained dancers, and they are galvanized by working with her. After Push Comes to Shove, she formed the longstanding ties with ABT that resulted in new ballets, the adoption of repertory works, and, in , a more formal connection when ABT was headed by Baryshnikov. Tharp disbanded her own company and, with seven dancers, she joined ABT as an artistic associate. The arrangement fell apart when Baryshnikov resigned a year later, but Tharp continued to make new ballets for the company. She has also created works for Paris Opera Ballet, New York City Ballet, Boston Ballet and London's Royal Ballet, among other companies. Next spring, Miami City Ballet will premiere a new untitled piece to music of Elvis Costello. In the Upper Room, created on Tharp's own company in , went with her into ABT, and played the Opera House in San Francisco when

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ABT brought it here on tour in March . The ballet's general idea reflects Deuce Coupe: a rapprochement between two styles of dancing. But In the Upper Room makes its statement in formalist patterns, with no literal reference to popular culture. The ensemble is divided into ballet dancers and athletic contemporary dancers. They begin with identifying movement themes and then recombine and share their resources. As they shed parts of their Norma Kamali costumes, they seem to be getting less parochial. When she made it, Tharp described In the Upper Room as a piece about counterpoint, about floor patterns that call your attention to the foreground against the background, to speeds, vocabularies and exchanges of action. But with a driving minimalist score by Philip Glass and smoke and lighting effects by Jennifer Tipton, the dance rises in intensity to a theatrical and physical high that audiences cannot resist. Over the years, Tharp dance has made frequent appearances in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her own company has performed at Zellerbach Auditorium several times since its debut there in February of , and when her works were on during ABT tours, they could be seen at the Opera House. She tried out the Nine Sinatra Songs for two years on the road before bringing it to New York, and one of its first performances took place at Bill Graham's Warfield Theater in the fall of , and it was first seen in Berkeley in . Baker's Dozen was one of the eight dances on two programs Graham produced at the Warfield in the spring of . The Zellerbach audience saw it in March of , when Tharp's company set out on tour after the BAM season that marked its premiere, and again in and . Cal Performances' Focus on Twyla Tharp series gives Bay Area dance enthusiasts the most extensive look at Tharp's extraordinary dances since the days of her own touring company. © Marcia B. Siegel

CAL PERFORMANCES

About the Artists

Miami City Ballet Edward Villella (Founding Artistic Director), certainly America's most celebrated male dancer, did much to popularize the role of the male in dance through the supreme artistry and virility he exhibited during his performance career. Offstage, he has been as influential, accepting the role of Founding Artistic Director of Miami City Ballet in and achieving worldwide acclaim for the Company in a mere decade. In recognition of his achievements, President Clinton presented to Mr. Villella the National Medal of Arts. Also in , Mr. Villella was named a Kennedy Center Honoree, and was inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. He was also inducted into the Dancers' Hall of Fame at the National Museum of Dance in Saratoga in . Mr. Villella is recognized nationally and internationally for his contributions to the field of classical dance and arts education. He served as the Dorothy F. Schmidt Artist-in-Residence at Florida Atlantic University, he was also Heritage Chair, Arts and Cultural Criticism, at George Mason University in Virginia, and serves on the Board of Trustees of the School of American Ballet. He has served as chairman of New York City's Commission for Cultural Affairs and has been a member of the National Endowment for the Arts' Dance Advisory Panel and the National Council on the Arts. He served on the Board of Trustees of the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts. He served as Ida Beam Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa; was Visiting Artist at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; and was Regents Lecturer at UC Irvine. From to , Mr. Villella served as Artistic Director of Ballet Oklahoma, has been the Artistic Director of the Madison Festival of the Lakes. Among the distinguished honors awarded to him are the th annual Capezio Dance

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Award; the Frances Holleman Breathitt Award for Excellence, for his outstanding contribution to the arts and to the education of young people; the National Society of Arts & Letters Award for Lifetime Achievement (only the fourth dance personality to receive the Gold Medal); the Dance Magazine Award; the Cultural Service Award from the Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts, and the George C. Abbott Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Arts, presented by the South Florida Critics Association. He has been awarded honorary degrees by the State University of New York, Long Island University, University of South Carolina, St. Thomas University, Siena College, Fordham University, Skidmore College, Nazareth College, Florida Atlantic University, University of North Carolina at Asheville, the College of Charleston and Union College, which established the Edward Villella Fellowship in . Mr. Villella was a ­ Harvard Visiting Artist. He was also recently selected as one of "America's Irreplaceable Dance Treasures" by The Dance Heritage Coalition. He received the Kiphuth Fellowship Award from Yale University and the Distinguished Achievement Award from University of Florida. Mr. Villella served as Honorary Chairman for the USA International Ballet Competition in Jackson, Mississippi. Mr. Villella was born in Bayside, New York, in . He entered the School of American Ballet at age , but interrupted his dance training to complete academic studies. A graduate of the New York Maritime Academy, he obtained a BS in marine transportation, lettered in baseball and was a champion boxer. He returned to SAB following graduation in , and in was invited to join the New York City Ballet, where he was quickly promoted to Soloist (), and then to Principal Dancer (). Mr. Villella originated many roles in the New York City Ballet repertoire, among them Tarantella, the "Rubies" section of Jewels, and the role of Oberon in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Perhaps his most famous role was in the revival of Balanchine's masterpiece, Prodigal Son. Mr. Villella was the first American male dancer to perform with the Royal Danish Ballet, and the only American ever to be asked to dance

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Melanie Freedman

About the Artists

an encore at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. He danced for President Kennedy's inauguration and for Presidents Johnson, Nixon and Ford. He was producer/director for the PBS series Dance in America for a year and a half, and in won an Emmy Award for his CBS television production of Harlequinade. Mr. Villella has a son, Rodney, and two daughters, Lauren and Crista Francesca. He and his wife, Linda, a former Olympic figure skater and Founder and Director of Miami City Ballet School, reside in Miami Beach. The University of Pittsburgh Press reissued Edward Villella's autobiography, Prodigal Son: Dancing for Balanchine in a World of Pain and Magic, written with Larry Kaplan, in March . An arts management executive for the past years. Pamela N. Gardiner (Executive Director) brings to her position a background in law, business, academic administration and the arts. Ms. Gardiner feels blessed that, as an attorney with a lifelong passion for the arts, she gets to work in a creative environment and use her legal skills to benefit the company she loves--Miami City Ballet. Ms. Gardiner's -year working partnership with Edward Villella started in at the multiarts festival, Madison Festival of the Lakes, where Edward served as the Artistic Director and she served as the Executive Director. During her tenure there, she produced two major festivals and a mini-festival, totaling performing, visual and literary arts events. She also served as an Assistant Dean of Student Academic Affairs in the college of Letters and Science at the University of WisconsinMadison. She has also served as an Assistant Trust Officer at the Cleveland Trust Company. Ms. Gardiner joined MCB in , and ­ marks her th season with the Company. Several years ago, she was honored to be part of the creative team that Edward assembled to work on his full-length ballet, The Neighborhood Ballroom. Ms. Gardiner holds a BA in English literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an MA in English and comparative literature from Columbia University and a JD from Case Western Reserve University. Since , she has served on the Board of Directors of the Performing Arts

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Foundation of Greater Miami. She is a member of the Florida, Wisconsin and Ohio bars and of the Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Section of the Florida Bar Association. A former soloist with New York City Ballet, Roma Sosenko (Principal Ballet Mistress) works closely with Miami City Ballet dancers rehearsing them for each performance. Previously, she also taught at Miami City Ballet School and was the Children's Ballet Mistress for MCB's production of George Balanchine's The NutcrackerTM. During her career as a dancer, Ms. Sosenko danced roles in Jerome Robbins's The Four Seasons, The Goldberg Variations and Interplay and Balanchine's Ballo della Regina, Symphony in C, Chaconne, Coppélia, Jewels and Scotch Symphony, among others. She has been seen on PBS in Balanchine's L'Enfant et les Sortilèges, A Lincoln Center Special: A Tribute to George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins and Live from Studio H, and she performed the role of Columbine in the film of George Balanchine's The NutcrackerTM produced by Electra Entertainment. She also appeared in Ruth Page's The Merry Widow. John D. Hall (Production & Lighting Director) joined Miami City Ballet in and is responsible for coordinating all lighting and scenic design elements for the Company. Highlights of his lighting work with MCB include Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, Giselle, Coppèlia and Edward Villella's The Neighborhood Ballroom. Mr. Hall and his wife Shannon have two sons, John and William. Haydée Morales (Costume Designer & Director) was born in Puerto Rico and raised in New York City. Her professional career has enveloped both design and production for dance, Broadway, opera and film. She acquired her theatrical training at Barbara Matera Costume Shop in New York. She joined Miami City Ballet in , where her first production was El Amor Brujo. Since then, Ms. Morales has designed and overseen countless productions, including George Balanchine's The NutcrackerTM (in collaboration with Jose Varona) and Edward Villella's The Neighborhood Ballroom and Gismonti Brasil. In addition, she worked on Lynne-Taylor Corbett's MCB Kennedy Center

CAL PERFORMANCES

About the Artists

Commission and premiere, The Mystery of the Dancing Princesses. This season, she will create the costumes for the Twyla Tharp/Elvis Costello world premiere. She has re-created costumes from the original designs of Balanchine's Prodigal Son, Jewels, Western Symphony, Who Cares?, Theme and Variations, Stars and Stripes, Ballo della Regina, Symphony in C, Stravinsky Violin Concerto and La Valse; Paul Taylor's Company B, Esplanade, Arden Court, Funny Papers and Piazzolla Caldera; Tharp's Nine Sinatra Songs; Trey McIntyre's The Reassuring Effects of Form and Poetry; and many others. Francisco Rennó (Company Pianist & Music Librarian) is the two-time winner of the Brazilian National Competition and winner of the Washington International Competition, as well as other national and international competitions. He holds diplomas from the Brazilian Conservatory of Music, Banff School of Fine Arts and Indiana University. He has appeared as soloist with the Brazilian Symphony Orchestra, the Brazilian National Symphony Orchestra, the National Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, the Longmont Symphony Orchestra and the Kansas City Camerata, among others. He has given solo and chamber music recitals in the main concert halls, and on radio and television, throughout South America. In the United States, he has performed at Carnegie Recital Hall, The Phillips Collection (Washington, D.C.), and in several concert series on the East Coast and in the Midwest, many of which were broadcast on NPR. Mr. Rennó was company pianist from the inception of the Kansas City Ballet in through to his joining Miami City Ballet in . For ballet performances, he was featured as soloist with the symphony orchestras of Kansas City, St. Louis, Berkeley, Naples and the Kennedy Center. He recently composed the original music to Edward Villella's The Waltz: Our Lady of Oblivion. Kathleen E. Warr (Principal Stage Manager) joined Miami City Ballet in . Originally from Arkansas, she received her MFA in stage management from Yale University, BFA in dance studies from Southwest Missouri State University, and completed the professional intern program at The

CAL PERFORMANCES

Juilliard School in stage management. Ms. Warr is also involved in the community as a sorority alumnus of Alpha Chi Omega and as an active member of the Junior League of Miami, through whom she recently earned a Presidential Volunteer Service Award. She is married to Derek Warr. Joan Latham (Ballet Mistress) joined Miami City Ballet in as a dancer and currently serves as Ballet Mistress. She began her dance training with Damara Bennett at the City Ballet School in her native city of San Francisco. She studied for two years at the Pacific Northwest Ballet School where she also toured and performed with their company. As a soloist with Miami City Ballet she was featured in such ballets as Balanchine's Valse Fantaisie, Pas De Dix, Who Cares?, "Diamonds," Theme and Variations, Divertimento No. , Raymonda Variations, Scotch Symphony and Symphony in C. She danced in Swan Lake, Giselle and Paquita; Paul Taylor's Funny Papers and Arden Court; and Edward Villella's The Neighborhood Ballroom. She also performed the role of the Sugarplum Fairy in George Balanchine's The NutcrackerTM. Ms. Latham danced at the Kennedy Center Honors, Jacob's Pillow, Aspen Festival, TorinoDanza Festival in Italy and the Kennedy Center's International Ballet Festival. She is married to former Miami City Ballet dancer Arnold Quintane and has two daughters, Emma Raymonde and Olivia Antionette. Principal Dancers Tricia Albertson (Santa Cruz, California) trained at SAB and San Francisco Ballet School. She joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Principal in . Katia Carranza (Monterrey, Mexico) trained at Escuela Superior de Musica y Danza Danced with Ballet de Monterrey. She joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Principal in . Mary Carmen Catoya (Caracas, Venezuela) trained at the School of Everest Mayora Studio and danced with the Youth Ballet of Venezuela,

33

About the Artists

Contemporary Ballet of Caracas, the Cleveland Ballet and the National Ballet of Caracas. She joined MCB as a Principal in . Jeremy Cox (North Haven, Connecticut) trained at New Haven Ballet and SAB. He joined MCB as a Coryphée in and was promoted to Principal in . Patricia Delgado (Miami, Florida) trained at Miami City Ballet School, Liana Navarro and Vivian Tobio Ballet School, Summer Intensives at SAB and ABT. She joined MCB in as a Company Apprentice and was promoted to Principal in . Carlos Miguel Guerra (Camagüey, Cuba) trained at the Professional School of Ballet and Plastic Arts in Camagüey and danced with the Professional Ballet Company of Camagüey and the Ballet Company of Santiago in Chile. He joined MCB as a Soloist in and was promoted to Principal in . Jennifer Carlynn Kronenberg (Queens, New York) trained with Teresa Aubel, Nicholas Orloff, Norman Walker, Barbara Walczack and at SAB. She joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to Principal in . Renato Penteado (São Paulo, Brazil) trained at Academy of Movement, Ballet Twin's Academy, Studium Marisa Ballet and Municipal Dance School in São Paulo. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Principal in . Rolando Sarabia (Havana, Cuba) trained at Alejo Carpentier Ballet School and National Ballet School of Havana and danced with Ballet National de Cuba and Houston Ballet. He joined MCB as a Principal in . Deanna Seay (Fork Union, Virginia) trained at North Carolina School of the Arts. She joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Principal in . Haiyan Wu (China) trained at Beijing Dance Academy and danced with the National Ballet of China. She joined MCB as a Principal in . Principal Soloists Jeanette Delgado (Miami, Florida) trained at Liana Navarro and Vivian Tobio Ballet School, Miami City Ballet School, Summer Intensives at CPYB and ABT. She joined MCB in as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to Principal Soloist in . Isanusi Garcia Rodriguez (Havana, Cuba) trained at the National School of the Arts in Havana and the Academy of Ballet and Jazz in Brazil. He danced with the National Ballet of Caracas, Torino Ballet, Ballet National de Cuba and Carolina Ballet. Isanusi rejoined MCB as a Principal Soloist in . Soloists Didier Bramaz (Geneva, Switzerland) trained at the Geneva Dance Center and SAB and danced with American Ballet Theatre. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Soloist in . Callie Manning (Hummelstown, Pennsylvania) trained at Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet, Summer Intensives at Kennedy Center, Pennsylvania Ballet and SAB. She joined MCB as a Coryphée in and was promoted to Soloist in . Zherlin Ndudi (Donetsk, Ukraine) trained at the Ballet School of Vadim Pisarev in the Ukraine and Heinz Bosl Stiftung in Munich. He danced with Donetsk Opera and Ballet Theatre Company in the Ukraine and joined MCB as a Soloist in . Joseph Phillips (Columbia, South Carolina) trained at South Carolina's Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities and North Carolina School of the Arts. He danced with San Francisco Ballet and joined MCB as a Soloist in .

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About the Artists

Daniel Sarabia (Havana, Cuba) trained at Alejo Carpentier Ballet School and the National Ballet School of Havana and danced with Ballet National de Cuba and Boston Ballet. He joined MCB as a Soloist in . Marc Spielberger (Munich, Germany) trained at Ballet Schule Schulzke and the German Ballet Academy of Munich and danced with Deutsche Staatsoper Berlin. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Soloist in . Andrea Spiridonakos (Winsted, Connecticut) trained at Nutmeg Ballet School and SAB. She joined MCB as a Coryphée in and was promoted to Soloist in . Alex Wong (Vancouver, Canada) trained at Goh Ballet Academy and danced with Goh Ballet Company, American Ballet Theatre Studio Company and American Ballet Theatre. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in and was promoted to Soloist in . Yang Zou (China) trained at Xing Hai College of Music and Dance and Guangzhou Culture and Art School and danced with Guangzhou Ballet. He joined MCB as a Soloist in . Corps de Ballet Toshiro Abbley (Lomita, California) trained at Heinz Bosl Stiftung Ballet Academy in Munich. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Daniel Baker (Newcastle, Australia ) trained at SAB, Marie Walton Mahon Dance Academy and The Australian Ballet. He joined MCB as in Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Maira Barriga (Chiba City, Japan) trained at SAB and Liscombe International Ballet School (Chiba City, Japan) and danced with SAB workshops, NY Choreographic Institute and Stamford

CAL PERFORMANCES

Center for the Arts. She joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Kristin D'Addario (Laguna Beach, California) trained at Laguna Dance Theatre, SAB and Miami City Ballet School. She joined MCB as a Student Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Alexandre Dufaur (Vic-en-Bigorre, France) trained at the International Dance Center of Rosella Hightower and Paris Opera Ballet School, danced with Paris Opera Ballet and toured with Bangkok Opera Playhouse. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Leigh-Ann Esty (Gorham, Maine) trained at Maine State School for the Performing Arts, SAB Summer Program and Miami City Ballet School and danced with Maine State Ballet Company. She joined MCB as a Student Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Sara Esty (Gorham, Maine) trained at Maine State School for the Performing Arts, SAB Summer Program and Miami City Ballet School and danced with Maine State Ballet. She joined MCB as a Student Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Katie Gibson (Boston, Massachusetts) trained at San Francisco Ballet School, Ballet Workshop of New England, Summer Intensives with Suzanne Farrell and School of American Ballet. She danced with Oregon Ballet Theatre, San Francisco Ballet and Massachusetts Youth Ballet and joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Tiff any Hedman (Fresno, California) trained at San Francisco Ballet School and Boston Ballet School and danced with Boston Ballet. She joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Kyra Homeres (Alameda, California) trained at North Carolina School of the Arts, San Francisco Ballet School, Lamorinda Ballet Center, Summer Intensives at SAB, Hungarian National Academy

35

About the Artists

and The Rock School, and danced with the Carolina Ballet. She joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Elizabeth Keller (Houston, Texas) trained at the Royal Academy of Dance in London, The Rock School and Miami City Ballet School and danced with Houston Repertoire Ballet and Pennsylvania Ballet. She joined MCB as a Student Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Ashley Knox (Shelby Township, Michigan) trained at SAB. She joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Jennifer Lauren (Tuscaloosa, Alabama) trained at The Dance Centre in Tuscaloosa and with Wes Chapman and Roger VanFleteren at Alabama Ballet. She danced with Alabama Ballet and joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Neil Marshall (New York, New York) trained at SAB and danced with Pennsylvania Ballet and The Suzanne Farrell Ballet. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Allynne Noelle (Huntington Beach, California) trained at Ballet Acoma, Ballet Pacifica, Summer Intensives at Boston Ballet, Houston Ballet and ABT and danced with Inland Pacific Ballet and Los Angeles Classical Ballet. She joined MCB as a Coryphée in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Lisa Reneau (Los Angeles, California) trained at Pacific Northwest Ballet and SAB. She danced with Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, The Suzanne Farrell Ballet and Leipzig Ballet in Germany and joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Heberth Riascos V. (Cali, Colombia) trained at Incolballet in Cali and the National School of Ballet in Cuba and danced with the National Ballet of the Dominican Republic, Ballet Argentino, Julio Bocca and Alberta Ballet in Canada. He joined MCB as a member of the Corps in . Stephen Satterfield (Glens Falls, New York) trained with Pamara Perry at Adirondack Repertory Dance Theater and SAB. He joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Amanda Weingarten (Palm Harbor, Florida) trained at SAB, Classical Ballet Training Program in Tampa Bay and Florida Ballet School. She joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Zoe Zien (New York, New York) trained at SAB and Miami City Ballet School. She Joined MCB as a Student Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Corps in . Coryphées Michael Sean Breeden (Lexington, Kentucky) trained at Boston Ballet, SAB, Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet and San Francisco Ballet School and danced with Boston Ballet. He joined MCB as a Company Apprentice in and was promoted to member of the Coryphées in .

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CAL PERFORMANCES

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