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Chatham Harwich Regional Educational Program Study

Educational Plan

Educational Strategies & Programs

Chatham and Harwich Educational Program Study

Introduction Recognizing the critical importance of strategic planning to every school district, a fundamental task of the transitional school committee will be to lead a strategic planning process that involves the communities of Chatham and Harwich in a discussion of the mission, vision and goals of the new regional district. This educational plan should serve as a guide to the process of discussion and planning that will lead to a new district built upon the strengths of two excellent school districts and create a high-performing region that is small, sustainable and reflects the values of both communities. Plan Overview This educational plan outlining the proposed merger of two high-performing Cape Cod public school districts highlights their common strengths and promises growth in areas of difference or specialization. Both Chatham and Harwich offer strong core academic and special education programs, with extensive opportunities for students to develop individual interests through curricular and co-curricular programs. Both the educational plan and the associated budget model have been developed with a commitment to regionalization as a means to enhance education by sustaining and expanding opportunities for the children of both communities. By combining district populations a region can maintain current programs and extend district-specific programs to the full regional district. A shared focus on science education demonstrates both aspects of this approach. Within the regular curriculum both districts provide strong science programs with a focus on experiential learning. In 2007 Harwich elementary and middle schools earned a Vanguard award from Mass Insight for excellence in science education designed around the local environment, an approach that also characterizes the Chatham program. Both high schools provide high-level science options through both common and individual course offerings. In an impressive array of district-specific programs Chatham has a collaborative relationship with the Marconi Center and Museum of Science Gateway Project, while Harwich is a member of the NEED Collaborative for environmental education at the National Seashore in Truro. With the opening of the Harwich Observatory this fall, the Harwich Schools will house the most powerful telescope on Cape Cod. Sharing resources as a region would build upon a strong common foundation and create additional opportunities by extending the district-specific programs to students of both towns. Excellence in academics, arts and athletics in a small, supportive learning environment committed to student success represents the mission of a Chatham-Harwich public school region. Building upon the strengths of the current Harwich and Chatham schools and

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communities, the proposed region would create a high performing, small but sustainable school district ­ "a private school education in a public setting," providing challenging courses and enrichment opportunities that engage all students in learning experiences that foster their individual growth and success. Combining student populations will address scheduling challenges and ensure that upperlevel courses continue to provide students rich learning opportunities. Maintaining or increasing the number of Advanced Placement course offerings at a regional high school will prepare students for competitive college admission processes and educational programs. Among other possibilities for establishing a high-performing region that a regional school committee should consider would be the implementation of an International Baccalaureate program.

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High-performing Districts The current levels of student achievement in Chatham and Harwich are similar and indicate both communities' support for education and educators' effective implementation of standards-based teaching and learning aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. This similarity is most clearly demonstrated by students' achievement on the Grade 10 MCAS tests. Both Harwich and Chatham Grade 10 MCAS scores are consistently among the highest on Cape Cod and compare favorably with high-performing districts across the state. It is no surprise then that for the past two years the Cape Cod Times has featured one of the towns in its front page coverage of MCAS results (Figure 1).

Figure 1 For the past two years the Cape Cod Times' annual MCAS coverage has led with spotlights on Harwich and Chatham student achievement. 10th-graders fare well on MCAS science

By ROBERT GOLD [email protected] September 25, 2008 Harwich High School has scored a Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System trifecta in the 10th-grade tests for English, math and science. No students failed the exams taken this spring, paving the way for their eventual high school graduation. School-by-school results released by the state Department of Education yesterday showed a mixed bag for Cape and Islands schools.

MCAS scores make grade statewide

By George Brennan [email protected].com September 03, 2009 As schools open today in Chatham, the optimism of a new school year will be greeted by across-the-board improvements statewide in the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System. Statewide results of the exams, given last spring to 554,000 students in grades 3 through 10, were released yesterday and show gains in most areas, including the high-stakes MCAS tests given to the state's high school sophomores in math, English and science.

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The intersection of Harwich and Chatham MCAS scores is striking in the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education graphs below which chart Grade 10 performance on the ELA and Mathematics tests from 2005 through 2009. Both districts show student achievement above the state average throughout the five-year span. More significant, however, is that the lines indicating the performance of the Chatham and Harwich tenth-grade students follow the same upward trend, crossing one another to reflect the variation in performance from year to year.

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In the Boston Globe's 2008 MCAS rankings of over 300 Massachusetts high schools, Harwich 10th graders ranked 27th in ELA, 15th in Math, and 36th in Science/Technology. In 2009 the Boston Globe ranked Chatham 10th graders 4th in the state for their performance in Biology, with 55 percent of students scoring advanced. In addition to Chatham and Harwich high schools' performance in the state's assessment system, student achievement on the Scholastic Aptitude Tests indicates the high level of achievement by students in both communities. The table below charts SAT mean scores for the past three years for Harwich and Chatham as well as for the state and nation. With few exceptions, both districts have consistently performed above state and national student populations in Critical Writing, Math and Writing. SAT 2010 Group Chatham Harwich Massachusetts United States Group Chatham Harwich Massachusetts United States Group Chatham Harwich Massachusetts United States Critical Reading 531 542 512 501 SAT 2009 Critical Reading 541 519 514 501 SAT 2008 Critical Reading 552 523 514 502 Math 551 531 525 515 Writing 555 514 513 494 Math 548 502 526 515 Writing 536 518 510 493 Math 541 566 526 516 Writing 506 536 509 492

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Regional District Structure Structurally a regional district combining the current Harwich and Chatham school districts would include four schools, an elementary school in each town and shared middle and senior high schools. Regional leadership would be provided by one central office, including a superintendent, assistant superintendent, special education/pupil personnel services director, business manager, facilities manager and support staff. The chart below outlines the organizational structure of the regional district using Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education data for 2009-2010. Combined enrollment for the region would total just over 2,000 students, making the regional district among the smallest districts on Cape Cod. Independent Chatham and Harwich Districts (2009-2010) Compared to Regional School District Model Independent Districts (2009-2010) Chatham Enrollment Harwich Elementary (PreK-4) 267 Elementary (PreK-5) [Prek-4 effective 9/10] Middle (6-8) Middle (5-8) 208 [5-8 effective 9/10] High (9-12) 199 High (9-12) Total 674 Total Regional Model Enrollment Regional Model Location 676 Town Elementary Chatham Schools (PreK-4) Harwich 289 Regional Middle 369 Regional High 1,334 Total Chatham Harwich Enrollment Separate 601 568 2,008

The anticipated structure of a regional district's administration would include: · Central Office · Superintendent · Assistant Superintendent · Director of Pupil Personnel Services · Business Manager · Facilities Manager · High School · Principal · Assistant Principal · Department Leaders

· Middle School · Principal · Assistant Principal · Department Leaders · Elementary Schools ­ current leadership structures

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Regionalization Implementation Timeline

Date

September 20, 2010 November/December 2010 November 2010 December 2010

Action

Recommendation by regional planning board Regionalization vote at special town meetings Establishment of Regional School District Interim School Committee With DESE approval CPS and HPS contract with Regional School District (RSD) to manage FY 12 transportation for both districts via existing contracts RSD begins process with MSBA for regional high school construction at current Harwich High School site and renovations to Chatham Middle Senior High School for use as district middle school. Appointment of RSD transitional superintendent Election of Regional School Committee Transition Year Transitional planning begins while current school configuration remains until preK-12 regionalization complete Official start of Regional School District

Comments

Subsequent steps premised on affirmative votes in both towns Members appointed. Sitting school committees continue to lead districts. FY 12 transportation becomes eligible for regional reimbursement at approximately 50%.

December 2010

2011 (winter) 2011 (spring) 2011-2012 (FY 12) 2011 July 1, 2012

Part-time position; CPS and HPS superintendents continue regular district management and leadership.

RSD, CPS & HPS all in operation

Areas to be addressed include: policy, curriculum, staffing, infrastructure, collective bargaining agreements.

Current 5-school structure remains in place with regional leadership (one central office). CPS and HPS transfer management and leadership to RSD.

9-12 students move to new facility, no changes to other buildings. Reduced population allows for work on building with Chatham grades 5-8 in building. Harwich 5-8 students move to renovated regional middle school, joining Chatham 5-8 students.

2012/2013 2014 2014 2015 2015

High school construction begins RSD high school opens Limited renovation of Chatham Middle Senior High School begins (modification of current spaces to create classrooms) RSD middle school opens Regionalization completed

Secondary schools shared by both towns and townbased elementary schools all under regional leadership.

2015/2016

Harwich Middle School building repurposed

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Curricular Offerings and Enhancement Programs

· · · · · · · · · · · Regional District Collaborative Opportunities International Baccalaureate Program K-12 STEM leader for Cape and Islands in teaching and learning Extensive Exploratory opportunities in the sciences, the visual and performing arts and civic education in collaboration with the communities and universities Center for observation and study of astronomy Enhanced foreign language offerings (Chinese, Arabic) State leader in governmental education Extended before and after school learning Established community internships and community service Increased sports and extra curricular Increase in district's special education program for low incidence students Enhanced early childhood opportunities including child care for families and staff Elementary Schools Elementary Academic Curricular Offerings (PreK-4) · English/Language Arts · Mathematics · Science/Engineering/Technology/Mathematics (STEM) · Social Studies · Foreign Language · Music · Art · Physical Education/Health · Computer Technology · Academic Support · Full day kindergarten · Experiential Learning · Performing Arts

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Enhancement Programs · Before and after school programs · Cultural and foreign language opportunities · Developmental guidance program · Specialized services for students with and without disabilities · Comprehensive early childhood program · School-wide positive behavioral support system · Collaborative education with Cape-wide museums and colleges Professional Learning Communities · Common planning time for teachers · Research based curriculum development · Data based instructional planning · Teaching assistance teams · Globalization focus on teaching/learning · Teacher instructional leaders · Differentiated instruction Middle School Middle School Academic Curricular Offerings (5-8) · English/Language Arts · Social Studies/History · Science/Engineering/Technology/Mathematics · Mathematics · Physical Education/Health · Modern and classical foreign language · Music · Art · Performing Arts · Seminars in enrichment · Computer/informational technology · Advisory program Approved September 20, 2010 10 of 41

Middle School (continued) Exploratory Programs · Engineering · Community Service Learning · Performing Arts · Fine Arts Middle School Enhancement Programs · Multiple foreign language offerings · Algebra · Extra - & co-curricular activities · Comprehensive community service learning · Developmental guidance program · School-wide positive behavioral support system · Specialized services for students with and without disabilities · Advisory Program · Enrichment opportunities to challenge students at all levels Professional Learning Communities · Common planning time for teachers · Research based curriculum development · Date based instructional planning · Teaching assistance teams · Globalization focus on teaching/learning · Teacher instructional leaders · Differentiated instruction High School High School Enhancement Plans · Advisory Program · Virtual High School

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· · · · · · · · · · ·

Increase number and types of Advanced Placement courses International Baccalaureate diploma program Increased number and types of foreign language courses Greater choice of personalized student learning including on-line options Community internship program at all grades Community service learning at all grades Alternative scheduling to accommodate specialized needs of learners (before/after school and evening courses) Guidance program with extensive career counseling and college planning beginning at grade nine Enhanced learning opportunities through the use of various technologies Increased opportunities in Visual and Performing Arts Governmental education (We The People)

Professional Learning Communities · Common planning time for teachers · Research based curriculum development · Date based instructional planning · Teaching assistance teams · Globalization focus on teaching/learning · Teacher instructional leaders · Differentiated instruction

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Regional Model

Curriculum and Instruction (PreK-12) Student performance in each district over the past five years indicates that students in the region will continue to demonstrate consistent and continuous improvement as measured by the state assessment (MCAS). In each district, more than half of the students in all grades scored in the Proficient or Advanced categories in English/Language Arts. Both districts have taken initiatives to improve student performance in mathematics, particularly in the middle school grades. In the regional district, increased opportunities for professional development will enable teachers to continue to improve teaching strategies in mathematics. Professional development opportunities will continue to grow and expand thus benefiting students. The region will provide opportunities for teachers to grow and learn within existing constructs in each district such as professional learning communities and data teams. Both districts demonstrate a commitment to creating time for job-embedded professional development through teacher collaboration, team meetings, and department meetings. Some existing initiatives in existence and that will provide increased opportunities to students in the new region are: · STEM programs · K-12 foreign language in French, Latin, Mandarin, and Spanish · International Baccalaureate program · Senior Project · Community Service Learning · Tools of the Mind In addition, both districts are strongly committed to using technology as an instructional tool to support 21st century skills. One-to-one laptop programs and on-line learning opportunities will be components of a regional plan for curriculum and instruction. At each building, grade level teams develop curriculum maps for English/Language Arts, mathematics, science and social studies. These maps focus on the essential understandings, concepts, skills, and vocabulary for each standards-based unit. Additionally, efforts with special education focus on making accommodations, and modifications where necessary and on infusing literacy based instruction and interventions across content areas. Both the elementary and middle schools have established an intervention block period to support differentiated instruction and interventions for at-risk students.

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Special Education (PreK-12) Full inclusion is the basis of the regional district's special education philosophy; however, students must be provided with a continuum of services in the least restrictive environment. Therefore, in the regional district students are provided with everything from classroom support to full-time residential placement depending upon individual needs. As mandated by law, placement decisions are formal team decisions. There is a basic belief among teachers that the education of all students is a shared responsibility. Special educators, teaching assistants, and therapists provide small group and individual services in academics. Flexible groups at the elementary level serve to provide many students access to support for specific skills. Service providers work in co-teaching models, pullout services and teaching assistant classroom support. Accommodations and/or modifications of the curriculum and instruction as well as service delivery and placement decisions all stem from the team. Parents play a crucial part as members of the team. A respect for parents as the most important source for what is best for their child combined with the recommendations of specialists in education and special education provide the guidance needed to do what is educationally, socially and emotionally right for each student. The regional district will have the opportunity to develop its own resources for providing special therapeutic services rather than contracting with agencies outside the district to provide services. The region will continue to provide specialized programs for identified groups of students in the areas of reading and mathematics, including Title I. English Language Learners (ELL) in kindergarten through grade twelve will continue to receive services as needed. The regional district will have integrated preschool classrooms for our three and four year old combined populations.

High School (9-12) If enrollment continues to decline and budget pressures remain steady or increase, both Chatham High School and Harwich High School will experience a significant impact that will affect our curriculum and our ability to offer our students opportunities to expand their learning beyond basic core courses. As we work to balance our budget reductions in staffing it would mean that upper level classes such as Advanced Placement calculus (C&H), Advanced Placement English Composition (H), level VI and V foreign languages (C&H), and trigonometry/advanced mathematics (C&H) would be eliminated. Important academic electives like creative writing (C&H), personal finance (C&H), global issues (C), Industrial Arts (H) some computer technology courses, film and culture (C), and Music Theory (H) would also be eliminated. The opportunity for students to continue in music would cease to exist in Chatham as band and chorus would also be eliminated due to enrollments that were too low to warrant their continuation. It is also a

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forgone conclusion that wood technology and culinary arts would be removed from the Chatham High School curriculum. With the diminution of available electives, students would be relegated to core courses with the possibility that some open periods in a student's schedule would need to be filled by a directed study, which would be a less than ideal situation and may put both schools in violation of DESE time on learning regulations. The combination of declining budget funding and decreasing enrollment will also impact both schools interscholastic athletic programs. First to go will be the junior varsity program which will clearly affect the quality of our varsity program drastically limiting the number students from both schools enjoying the full high school experience. After the junior varsity cuts, undersubscribed programs such as field hockey in Chatham and girls soccer in Harwich would also be eliminated. Regionalization would allow us to sustain many of the endangered core and elective courses mentioned above and would also ensure that we would be able to field a full complement of junior varsity sports. A full complement of junior varsity programs will offer athletic opportunities to 60 additional students per season in a regional school. It would also mean a blending of several specific and significant programs which each school would bring to the new regionalized high school. For example, Chatham High School's Community Internship program and championship We The People class would provide exciting new opportunities for Harwich students, as would classes such as marine science, film and culture, and Introduction to Forensics. On the other hand, the merger would provide new and exciting academic opportunities for Chatham students with the addition of AP Government, Engineering, Anatomy and Physiology, which are currently part of the Harwich High School curriculum. A real plus for students would be the strengthening of our collective performing arts program with many more students to expand band, chorus, and theater arts. Additional opportunities could be built upon to create academic concentrations in areas of study such as political science, health and nutrition, hospitality, and marine science. A strong internship program would further support in such concentrations Regionalization is really all about building capacity and sustainability which, in turn, creates many more exciting opportunities for the students in both districts. Simply put, it is about doing what is best for our kids.

Middle School (5-8) Opportunities for middle school students in academics, arts, athletics and activities will expand in a regional district. Academics: A regionalized middle school would continue to provide instruction in core academic areas using middle school theory and standards-based instruction as core principles. Individual support for struggling students and enrichment programs to challenge students would be provided.

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Foreign language would be offered for all grades, 5-8. The program would include exploratory language study followed by the selection of a single language in the 7th grade (Latin, French or Spanish). Two years of focused language study would prepare students to enter the second year of a language in the first year of high school, and continued study at high school would enable students to take Advanced Placement language courses in selected languages in their senior year. Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content areas would become a focus for experiential learning opportunities working with the NEED Collaborative, Marconi Center, Harwich Observatory, and Boston Museum of Science. Grantfunded programs in these areas are available to encourage students to pursue careers in the STEM fields. Arts Harwich and Chatham Middle Schools currently offer both vocal and instrumental courses at the middle school. Enrollment of a combined middle school would ensure that these programs continue and expand. Athletics and Activities Expanded opportunities for intramural and interscholastic participation will be possible with a larger student enrollment. Co-curricular activities in the fine and performing arts, community service, STEM, and other leadership and enrichment areas will be available after school.

Elementary Schools (PreK-4) In a regional district the Chatham and Harwich elementary schools will continue to serve local student populations, with the opportunity for intra-district school choice. Although the schools will remain focused on their individual communities of children, as part of the regional transition process curricula will be evaluated and revised where appropriate to provide the best opportunities for learning and to ensure that children from both elementary schools are well prepared for success at the middle school.

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Regionalization: Opportunities and Obstacles

Opportunities Increased, sustainable opportunities for students in: o Academic o Arts o Athletics o Activities Strong, varied programs with high academic expectations Small learning communities Greater enrollment to support programs that is sustainable over time Significant economies of scale that will help control expenses Transportation reimbursement for regional schools Obstacles Overcoming history of regionalization rejection Loss of local control

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Current Two-District Model Executive Summary: Curriculum and Instruction Chatham Student performance in Chatham as measured by state assessments (MCAS) indicates that in English/Language strengths in all grade levels with the exception of grade four. Chatham's improvement efforts are governed by their strategic plans. All the plans contain a goal related to curriculum and instruction. Traditionally Chatham has had six professional development days and three half days. Due to budget constraints this school year (FY 11) Chatham will have one full professional development day and three half days. There are differences in the capacities of each of the districts in organizing and supporting work in curriculum and instruction. As financial resources have diminished, professional development and curriculum work have been sacrificed. Chatham relies upon the administrative teams to lead this work with the support of a Director of Student Services and Curriculum whose responsibilities include professional development, curriculum review, and improving assessment/instructional practices within the district. For the past two years there has been a district wide initiative in developing a STEM curriculum. The district has partnered with Museum of Science in the Gateway Project, Marconi Center and the MIT club of Cape Cod to further the advancement of these skills in students developing skills in the 21st Century. Other recent initiatives involve a review of the text and course development in seventh and eighth grade Math as a response to AYP concerns and the review of the reading series and piloting of an ELA curriculum. We have also worked on training for literacy skills across the curriculum and teaching of positive behavioral supports for all classrooms. Protocols for intervention and a resource team are being developed in conjunction with RTI for this area. Staff was also trained in legal and compliance issues. In Chatham, renewed efforts at mapping curriculum PreK12 are underway utilizing the Understanding by Design (UbD) theory of curriculum design. The district has a six-year cycle of curriculum review and mapping. They utilize a software program; Tech Paths and the process is as described. At each level, grade level teams are developing maps for ELA, math, science and social studies focused on the essential understandings, concepts, skills and vocabulary in each unit. At the middle and high school level, individual teachers are revising curriculum guides to fit the Understanding by Design model. The work, linking assessments to performance tasks, and vertical alignment of curriculum units by subject/department will begin in the spring. Additionally, efforts with special education have focused on accommodations, modifications and focusing on infusing literacy based instruction and interventions across the content areas. Both at the elementary and middle school have established an intervention block period to support differentiated instruction and interventions for at risk students. Chatham High School, recently evaluated by NEASC, has developed several AP courses. Approved September 20, 2010 18 of 41

Harwich Student performance in Harwich as measured by state assessments (MCAS) indicates that more than half of the students in all grades scored in the proficient or advanced categories in ELA. Harwich continues to build capacity in standards-based education by providing professional development opportunities for the staff in instructional strategies that improve student learning. During the school year, the district has two full professional development days and two half-days. Although logistically challenging, Harwich and Chatham have been able to share some professional development activities this year. Harwich has an Educational Council that oversees all curriculum decisions. The council is composed of district and building administrators and two teacher representatives from each building. The council works closely with the professional development committee to ensure that district initiatives are supported with the appropriate teacher training. We are developing and implementing a new writing program across the curriculum that includes an emphasis on non-fiction writing. Teachers are being trained in this new program. Harwich is part of a literacy partnership with the Cape Cod Collaborative and will be writing a new literacy plan for the district through a grant associated with this partnership. We also have a strong commitment to STEM subjects and we are part of a technology grant to create on-line learning modules in STEM subjects to support at-risk high school students. This year we will be launching our new Harwich Observatory, and creating integrated learning opportunities in the STEM subjects developed around our newly acquired Tectron Dobsonian Reflecting Telescope. In Harwich, the elementary teachers are mapping their math curriculum and in the middle school teachers are using their instructional calendars to address gaps in their curriculum and instructional practices. Teachers are incorporating essential questions and performance assessments into their instructional practice to ensure that students are learning. At the high school individual teachers use the Understanding by Design template and all teachers are continuing their work in formative assessments. This year we will be creating building level data teams to assist staff in looking at student work and in using data to improve student learning.

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Executive Summary: Special Education In order to provide required services, the districts each employ special education teachers, speech pathologists, occupational therapists, and adjustment counselors. We contract for physical therapy, vision and mobility services and audio logical consultation and BCBA services. Chatham employs one full time psychologist district wide who also serves as a Team Chairperson for initial and reevaluations. We employ instructional tutors/paraprofessionals to support student learning in general education classrooms and substantially separate programs. The district has one full time teacher for English Language Learners, a Title One Coordinator and Early Childhood Coordinator. The Title One and Early Childhood Coordinator are stipend positions. The Director of Student Services and Curriculum is employed and is responsible for ensuring compliance with special mandates and managing out of district placements. The director chairs out of district, selected high school team, preschool, elementary, and middle school meetings. Special education teacher/contact persons chair all other preschool, elementary, and middle school meetings. Administrative assistants are employed in each district to process special education forms, reports and IEPs and to support the director. Chatham strives to provide high quality in district programs that meet the educational and related needs of all of their students.

Each district provides a range of services and placements for students with disabilities as required by federal and state rules and regulations. The districts invest substantial dollars to educate students with disabilities both inside and out of district. Harwich brings specialized programs in working with students with Autism, Intellectual Impairment and Developmental Delay to the table. The elementary school fully includes 85% of their students with disabilities into the regular educational program. Challenges exist at the secondary levels in fully including students with disabilities. Both districts have undergone coordinated program reviews from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in the past three years and received the following commendations: Chatham - Reviewed 2010 Commendations: To be identified in final report due in mid August Special Education: All 54 areas were found in compliance English Language Learners: four areas of partial compliance Civil Rights: one area of partial compliance Title One: three areas of partial compliance

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Harwich ­ Reviewed 2007 and 2010 Commendation: The Community Vocational Ed Program at the high school was commended for its work with intellectually challenged students and its use of community resources. Special Education: The state found 44 of 59 areas in compliance. The district has corrected all but 4 of the 15 areas needing corrective action. According to the Mid-Cycle Coordinated Program Review held in 2010. The district will have corrected all but the space issue at the high school by the end of 2010. English Language Learners: The state found 6 of 18 areas in compliance. The district has corrected the four areas that were partially implemented and the eight areas that were not in compliance. The district has a thriving English Language Learner program staffed with a full time ESL teacher and a full time ELL tutor. Civil Rights: Eight areas in partial compliance. All areas have been corrected and are now in compliance. Chatham provides one integrated classroom to meet the needs of children with disabilities age three to four with an AM and PM session four days per week. Current enrollment is 24 students. Students with mild to moderate intensive needs are served in and out of class at all levels. The district has a fullday, fiveday, multiage program for students with intensive needs at each level. These programs are supported by the various specialists to provide appropriate related therapies. The high school also has a program for its students eighteen to twenty one years of age that focuses on school to work transition. It is community and employment based with an emphasis on community and work skills. Harwich provides one integrated classroom to meet the needs of children with disabilities ages three to four with an AM and PM session four days per week. Current enrollment is 49 students. Children with mild to moderate disabilities are included and served within our general education classrooms based upon the principle of Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). Pull-out services are also utilized to the extent appropriate and in compliance to the student's Individual Education Program (IEP). Harwich currently has 85% of all students in our elementary school fully included as defined by the state. Rates at our secondary schools are in the range of 45% to 48%. Harwich has four specialized programs for students with moderate to severe special needs. Our Developmental Growth Program (DGP) based in the elementary school delivers specialized services to students who have multiple disabilities and students on the Autism Spectrum and are also intellectually challenged. The new Harwich Autism Program (HAP), also based in the elementary school, works with students on the autism spectrum in an early intervention model. The Vocational Community Program (VCP) is

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based in our high school and offers adaptive learning and prevocational and vocational opportunities for secondary students with intellectual impairments and students on the Autism Spectrum who are also intellectually impaired. The Integrated Preschool works with students ages two years, nine months to five years who have mild disabilities based upon a 50% typical peer/50% disabled model. · · · · · · · · · Benefits Shared resources and knowledge Enhanced and new facilities utilizing universal design will directly benefit children with disabilities Combined expertise of the special education faculty and staff around issues such as inclusion, standards, achievement and transition. The addition of well established programs to help build capacity and reduce outside placements A new autism program that will allow students on the autism spectrum to receive their education locally. Challenges Developing a shared philosophy and belief system in regard to special education and service delivery. Aligning programmatic issues such as inclusion, progress monitoring, shared responsibility, co-teaching, resource rooms, distribution of resources and personnel, and Response to Intervention (RTI) standards will require time and effort. Increased financial burden to provide professional development and programs as the districts align programs Integrating special and general education expectations, beliefs and practices.

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Educational Program: Special Education Category Structure of Programmatic Organization Chatham (October 2009) Full inclusion is the basis of Chatham's special education philosophy but fully recognizing that students must be provided with a continuum of services in the Least Restrictive Environment. Given that, students are provided with everything from classroom support to full time residential placement depending upon individual needs. These decisions as mandated by law are TEAM decisions. There is a basic belief among most teachers that the education of all students is a shared responsibility. Special educators, teaching assistants and therapists provide small group and individual services in academics. Flexible groups at the elementary level provide many students access to support for specific skills. Service providers work in coteaching models, pullout services and TA classroom support. Support is provided in an inclusion setting at the middle and high school levels. Specific high school classes are designated for support and tutorial classes allow for some small group instruction. There are three substantially separate classrooms designated for specific needs, one preschool integrated, three moderate special needs programs; one at each level. In addition we provide reading support services to children K 8 for 23 of 41 Harwich (October 2009) Responsible inclusion is the basis of Harwich's special education philosophy. Adhering to the federal and state policy and of providing a Free and Appropriate Public Education in the Least Restrictive Environment guides the provision of services in Harwich. These decisions are made by educator/parent teams based upon appropriate and timely assessment and evaluation data. Parents play a crucial and necessary part as members of the team. Accommodations and/or modifications of the curriculum and instruction as well s service delivery and placement decisions all stem from the team. A respect for parents as the most important source for what is best for their child tempered by the recommendations of specialists in education and special education provides the guidance needed to do what is educationally, socially and emotionally right for each student. A partial program of tiered instruction, benchmarking, research based intervention and progress monitoring in the elementary school literacy program has proven effective in giving teams the flexibility needed to appropriately place students with disabilities. Highly qualified paraprofessionals, most with Bachelors Degrees, work side by side with general and special educators and are essential to the inclusion model. The district contracts with the Cape Cod

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children with and without special needs.

SPED Teachers

Specialists & Types

Preschool Integrated 1.0 preschool special educator Elementary School 2 Moderate Special needs 1 Intensive Special needs Middle School 2 Moderate Special Needs 1 Intensive Special Needs High School 2 Moderate Special Needs teachers for grades 9 12 1 academic/life skills teacher grades 9-12 and Ages 18-22 Various teaching Assistants at each level DistrictWide 1 speech therapist 1 occupational therapist 1 psychologist 1.0 FTE ELL teacher district wide 1 Title One Coordinator (stipend position) Pre-School 1 Early Childhood Coordinator (stipend position) Elementary School 24 of 41

Collaborative for Occupational and Physical Therapists. Speech, Reading and behavioral services and provided in-house. The district has the capacity to provide two substantially separate classrooms but has been able to include students with severe disabilities into the general classroom for limited amounts of time. We also provide resource room and academic support room settings at all levels. Integrated Preschool 2.0 Preschool Special Education teachers Elementary School 6.0 Moderate Special Needs Teachers 1.0 Intensive Special Needs Teacher 1.0 Teacher of Students on the Autism Spectrum Middle School 3.0 Moderate Special Needs Teachers High School 3.0 Moderate Special Needs Teachers 1.0 Intensive Special Needs Teacher Various teaching Assistants at each level Preschool and Primary Grades (PK-2) 1.0 Speech and Language Therapist Elementary School 1.0 Speech and Language Therapist 1.0 School Psychologist Middle School 1.0 School Psychologist/TEAM Chairperson 1.0 School Adjustment Counselor 1.0 Reading Teacher 0.8 Speech and Language Therapist

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Aides/Tutors

1 Guidance counselor Middle School 1 Guidance counselor High 1 guidance counselor .4 adjustment counselor Contracted Services Vision and Mobility Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Board Certified Behavior Analyst (PhD level) Physical Therapist All teaching assistants work with all students, even those designated 1:1. Preschool One FTE 1:1, One .8, one .5 and one .4 Kindergarten 2.0 FTE Elementary 1 FTE moderate, 4 FTE intensive Middle 2.0 FTE Moderate, 5 FTE intensive High 8 FTE moderate and intensive (combined because all students are included, 1.0 FTE job coach/developer Academic Tutors -Elementary 2.0 FTE( grant and local) Academic Tutors -Middle 1.0FTE(grant and local) Title One 2.5 FTE

High School 1.0 Alternative Education teacher 2.0 Guidance Counselors 1.0 School Psychologist/TEAM chair Contracted Services Vision Mobility Occupational Therapy Board Certified Behavioral Analyst Physical Therapy

Preschool Elementary School 16.0 Middle School 3.0 High School 5.0 Academic tutors for home/hospital tutoring needs varies Academic Tutors for students with special needs varies

Occupational Therapists

1

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Central Office Staff & Type/Duty

1 director of special education/student services/504 coordinator/curriculum/civil rights/Title One and ELL 1 FT administrative secretary and 1 PT (.4) who also process special education paperwork, assist with scheduling meetings, grant submission, data collection, Medicaid, circuit breaker, budget. The director is the team chair for all out ofdistrict and selected meetings. The school

psychologist for the district chairs all (Pre-K to 21 years) initial and re-evaluation meetings and participates in TAT and RTI meetings. Title One Program Target Assistance: Elementary and Middle School- 59 Students grades 1 through 8. Areas: of English Language Arts and Math English Language Learners- sixteen students-grades kindergarten through grade twelve. Preschool ­ one integrated half day classroom delineated by age Three full intensive multiage program One School to Work Transition Program (Ages 18-21 years, community based) Three full day kindergartens (all children attend full day)

ELL services-Kindergarten through grade twelve

1 Director of Student Services and Special education; IEP Team Chairperson (Elementary School); Director of Title 1; ELL Coordinator; 504 Civil Rights Coordinator 1.0 Administrative Assistant

Team Chairs

The Director is the Team Chair for all out of district placements and for the Preschool and Elementary School. The School Psychologists are also the Team Chairs at the Middle and High Schools. 0.5 Secretary to the Team Chair, assigned to the Elementary School. Title 1 Targeted Assistance Elementary School 2.0 Title 1 Teachers (1 ELA, 1 Math) 3.0 Title 1 Paraprofessionals English Language Learners Program (ELL) 1.0 Licensed ESL teacher 1.0 ELL Paraprofessional Both persons work with ELL students district wide

Specialized Programs

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Title One services-targeted assistance programs in English Language Arts and Math

Preschool Programs

One Integrated classroom with AM and PM sessions 4 days per week. The fifth day is designated for evaluations, meetings, screenings and home services. As of July 2010, 24 students were enrolled.

Two integrated classrooms 50% typical peers and 50% students with disabilities. Preschool is divided into one AM and one PM session, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. The fifth day is designated for evaluations, meetings, screenings and home services. As of July 2010, 49 students were enrolled.

At the building level, what benefits could result from regionalization? · · · · · · · · Regionalization will allow the new district to incorporate the different special programs that each district has developed into a high capacity model of working with students with moderate to severe disabilities within the new district and thus decrease the need for outside placements. Professional development opportunities would be enhanced due to the number of staff incorporated into the new district. Transportation cost savings would be realized using the regional district eligibility for reimbursement. Inclusionary environments would become more widespread at the secondary level. Increased access to resources and services for special education students. Professional development opportunities would be enhanced due to the number of staff incorporated into the new district. Transportation cost savings would be realized using the regional district eligibility for reimbursement Increased access to resources and services for special education students. Capacity building and savings around occupational and physical therapy could allow for hiring these therapists as part of the district rather than contracting with an outside source. New and/or renovated facilities could enhance learning environments for students with special needs by following principles of universal design.

Are there any challenges, barriers or obstacles to regionalization? · Personnel issues may arise at the secondary level as the two districts merge their respective middle and high school special education populations. · There may be a bigger gap between central office special educational personnel and the providers at the school level. · Ensuring parent involvement in the special education pro Approved September 20, 2010 27 of 41

Executive Summary: Early Childhood & Elementary

Category Grades Served Total Enrollment Class Sections/Size ELA Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

Chatham (October 2009) PK-4 284 15 Classes, and 2 PK Average 18 per class K-4 Harcourt Grades1-3, Scott Foresman Grade 4, Tools of the Mind PK-K

Math Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used Science Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

Scott Foresman Grades 1-4 Tools of the Mind PK-K Various materials and resources to meet MA Frameworks Standards

Harwich (October 2009) PK-4 571 4 PK Sections average class size 18 Average 19 per class K-4 Scott Foresman Reading Street Scott Foresman ERI & Sidewalk programs Wilson Reading; Read Naturally Guided Reading leveled texts Zaner Bloser handwriting Gr 1-3 Handwriting Without Tears (PK-K) Tools of the Mind (K) Scott Foresman Investigations (supplemental lessons) Foss laboratory kits Standards based lessons and units developed PK4 Annual field experiences ­ Truro NEED collaborative Muddy Creek Red River Creek Courtyard garden lessons Grant funded additional field experiences and lessons Harcourt Brace Social: Studies States & Regions Social Studies Alive: Regions Of Our Country US History

Social Studies Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

McGraw Hill Grades K-1 Harcourt and Scott Foresman Grades 2 and 4, Massachusetts Grade 3

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Social-Emotional Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used Inclusion Practices

Tools of the Mind PK-K Peace Curriculum Grade 1-4 Positive Behavior Incentive Structure PK-4 Full Inclusion / Specific Instruction PullOut

Attendance Rate October 2009 # General Education Teachers # Special Education Teachers ELL # Special Area Teachers & Types

94.9 16 5.5 .5 1 Gym 1 Library/ Media .5 Computer .5 Art .5 Music

Responsive Classroom Character Counts Second Step Lunch/social groups Inclusion and pull-out services Developmental Growth program SPL/Occupational Therapist/Physical Therapist inclusion and pull-out services Title One inclusion and pull-out for Math and ELA 95.1 33 8 1 (K-12) 1 Physical Education 1 Music 1 Art 1 Technology 1 Spanish 1 Library/Media 3 Academic Support 1.6 PK Assistants 6 K Classroom Assistants 13 Special Ed Assistants 2 Title One ELA & Math 1 Nurse 1 School Psychologist 2 SPL (1.0 FTE) 2 Physical Therapist (.4 FTE)

# Aides/Tutors

Other Specialists ­ Number, Type, & FTE (Guidance .5, Nurse 1.0, Psychologist .25)

PK 1FT and 2 -.5 Assistants, K 4 -.5 Assistants, Special Ed. 7 Assistants, Title 1 2 - .5 Tutors, Reading Support 2 - .5 Tutors, Math Support 1 - .5 Tutor 1 Guidance 1 Nurse

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# Building Administrators

1 Principal

# Administrative Assistants

0

1 Occupational Therapist (1.0 FTE) 1 Behavior Consultant (.2 FTE) 1 Principal 1 Assistant Principal 1 Supervisor of Curriculum 3

At the building level, what benefits could result from regionalization · · · · Expanded resources for professional development Consolidated resources for specialized instruction Expand peer collaboration for grade level teams Review curriculum and materials in core content areas

Are there any challenges, barriers and obstacles to regionalization? · Assuring equity of resources at each building · Expense of new curriculum materials (could be addressed over a period of time)

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Executive Summary: Middle Schools Harwich Middle School Harwich Middle School will educate approximately 400 students in the 2010-2011 school year. HMS serves grades 5-8, with grades 5 & 6 have two teams and grades 7 & 8 having one team each. Teachers at grades 5 & 6 teach multiple subjects; teachers at grades 7 & 8 are departmentalized. Average class sizes are 23 students in grade 5 and 20 students in grades 6-7-8. Curriculum ELA- various novels including: The Report Card, Island of the Blue Dolphins, Kensuke's Kingdom, and Stargirl are examples of the rich literature appropriate for each grade level. Empowering Writers is a new writing program used to integrate writing across the curriculum. Math- Scott Foresman series in grade 5 and Prentice Hall in grades 6-7-8. General Math is offered in grades 5 & 6; Pre-Algebra and General Math are offered in grade 7; Algebra and Pre-Algebra are offered in grade 8. Social Studies- Teachers use various resources including Our Country (Silver-Burdett Ginn), Ancient World (Prentice-Hall), Geography: The World And Its People (McGraw-Hill), The American Nation (Prentice-Hall), technology, Internet, Time magazine, Scholastic magazine, and journaling for their programs. Science: Teachers utilize labs in all grades along with technology and Internet resources. Students in grades 5 and 8 are enrolled in the NEED Collaborative Environmental program. This program, which is held in Truro within the Cape Cod National Seashore, provides both spectacular views and a wide variety of habitats for nature studies. Harwich Middle School has established a support and enrichment program to support student on a daily basis. Arts and academic enrichment and support are offered during the last period on a daily basis, except for Fridays, when students participate in Advisory group, which is also their daily homeroom. STEM - Harwich Middle School has developed STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) initiatives in all grades. The NEED National Seashore program in Truro for Grades 5 and 8 integrates science, math and technology with projects centered on environmental studies. The engineering department at HMS continues to shift its focus onto integrating technology into the Engineering courses by developing design and drafting projects on the computer.

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Grade level teams meet once a week to work on planning and interdisciplinary curriculum, child study concerns, or strategies for intervention to utilize for support and enrichment. Co-planning with departments takes place twice a month when teachers work on common planning and developing common assessments. Special education utilizes the pull-out model for reading, English, and math. The inclusion model is utilized for social studies, science, foreign language, and unified arts classes. Middle school leadership includes a fulltime principal and assistant principal. There is also a fulltime psychologist and adjustment counselor. These staff members work as a team and meet once a week to plan support strategies for students in all grades. There is a fulltime school nurse. Average daily attendance is 95 percent. Chatham Middle School We are a small school (210 students, grades 5-8) bursting with the big ideas and energy of young adolescents and of the talented teachers who instruct them. Children in the "middle years" have distinct educational, psychological and social needs. Our purpose as a middle school is to meet these unique needs, to ease and celebrate the transition from childhood to adolescence, and to bridge the span from the self-contained elementary school to the departmentalized high school. Because our class sizes average 19 students, we can offer each child a personalized educational experience, with an emphasis on collaborative teaching and hands-on learning. We also value self- and social-awareness. We guide our children to become first-rate scholars with strong habits of mind and work and first-rate human beings with the maturity to assume responsibility for their words and actions; who extend a kind hand when someone's in need; who habitually reflect on and learn from mistakes; who make it a point to understand, include and respect kids who might easily be left out; and who have the courage to stand up for what is right, even and especially when this isn't the easiest or most popular thing to do. In other words, we take seriously the mission to educate "the whole child." CMS provides STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) initiatives in all grades. Inquiry-driven STEM courses are required of all 7th and 8th grade students. Our weekly enrichment/remediation block ("Seminars") in grades 7 and 8 offer students a challenging array of courses to further their academic, physical, artistic and social development. We are moving toward the use of RTI (Response to Intervention) model to inform all of our academic interventions with students.

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Education Program: Middle Schools

Grades Served Total Enrollment Class Size ELA Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

Chatham Grades 5-8 210 17-20 Reading embedded throughout curriculum: "Reading to Learn": poetry, novels, nonfiction at all grade levels ELA and Social Studies integrated in grade 7/8 "Humanities" courses Title I funding and support in ELA, grades 5/6 Literacy tutor supports students in all grades Every Day (Chicago) Math, grades 5/6 Impact Math, grades 7/8 Big Ideas Math, grades 7/8 2 course offerings in grade 7: Math 7, PreAlgebra 2 course offerings in grade 8: Pre-Algebra, Algebra Title I funding and support for Math, all grade levels Hands-on labs at all grade levels Emphasis on field work and field trips Strong ongoing relationship with Cape Cod Audubon program

Harwich 5-8 400 20 Novels such as The Report Card, Island of the Blue Dolphins, Kensuke's Kingdom, and Stargirl are examples of the rich literature appropriate for each grade level. Empowering Writers is a new writing program used to integrate writing across the curriculum

Math Instruction Methodology and Programs Used

Scott Foresman, Prentice Hall

Science Methodology and Programs Used

Hands-on labs at all grade levels: physical, life, and earth science labs Emphasis on field work with the NEED Collaborative program. This program, which is held in Truro within the Cape Cod National Seashore, provides both spectacular views and a wide variety of habitats for nature studies.

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Social Studies Methodology and Programs Used

Social-Emotional Instruction - Methodology and Programs Used

Inclusion Practices

Attendance Rates for December 2009 # General Education Teachers # Special Education Teachers

Internet resources, Our Country (Silver-Burdett Ginn), Ancient World (Prentice-Hall), Geography: The World And Its People (McGraw-Hill), The American Nation (PrenticeHall), Time, Scholastic, Journaling "Second Step" Social Competency program Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens - used integrated into Humanities curriculum, all during Advisory once a week along with grade levels; journaling and reflective writing on socialth "Planet Girl" offered to all 6 grade girls, a emotional concerns of the students. wellness program to advance girls' power, Bullying Prevention programs through MARC health and leadership; (Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center) "B3" offered to grade 6 boys, a program to Ambassador Club: after-school club for develop social competencies and leadership developing friendships and doing service for skills; other students 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, seminar HUGS (Harwich United in Giving Service) is an offered in grades 7/8 after school program for HMS students willing "Friendship" and other social-skills to service HES students. intervention groups facilitated by guidance counselor Promote full inclusion; goal is least Social Studies, Science, Foreign Language, restrictive environment for all students; we Unified Arts pull out according to students' IEPs 95% 95% 12 3 20 1.0 Grade 5 Special Education Teacher 1.0 Grade 6 Special Education Teacher 1.0 Grade 7 Special Education Teacher 1.0 Grade 8 Special Education Teacher 0.8 Speech and Language Teacher

Social Studies integrated with ELA in grade 7/8 "Humanities" courses

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# Paraprofessionals and Tutors

3 Title One Tutors 1 Literacy/Math Tutor 7 SPED Teaching 1 SPED Tutor (grantfunded 2009-10, 2010-11) Guidance 1.0 Nurse 1.0

Other Specialists ­ Number, Type & FTE (Guidance .5, Nurse 1.0, Psychologist .25)

1.0 Grade 5 Special Education Assistant 1.0 Grade 6 Special Education Assistant 1.0 Grade 7 Special Education Assistant 1.0 Grade 8 Special Education Assistant 1.0 Student Support Teacher Assistant 1.0 Nurse 1.0 Psychologist 1.0 Adjustment Counselor 1.0 Reading Teacher: Wilson

At the building level, what benefits could result from regionalization? · · · · · · · · Increased academic and extra-curricular programs for all students. Curricula, pedagogy, and philosophy would be discussed collegially. Common educational philosophy in high expectations for all students. Merging technologies. Class sizes remain small. Foreign Language program in all grades. Expanded pool of dedicated professionals who can collaborate on a regular basis. Networking opportunities for all staff.

Are there any challenges, barriers and obstacles to regionalization? · Developing a consistency of expectations for students, staff, and community. · Professional development and training of staff developed out of a common vision and mission. · Time for administration teams to meet to coordinate curricula, practices, and resources. · Developing a strategic plan to identify implementation strategies.

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Executive Summary: High School Harwich High School Having recently received National recognition over the last two years (2009 Business Week, Most Improved Public High School in the Commonwealth and 2010 US News and World Report, Silver Medal School) Harwich High School offers an array of academic and co curricular opportunity for a school of under 400 students. With an average class size in core curriculum classes of 16 students are offered personalized instruction in a safe and encouraging educational environment. The only school in Southeastern Massachusetts to require four years of Social Studies, students' at Harwich High takes civic engagement the next level attending Inaugurations, exit polling in NH and testifying at the Statehouse in Boston in recent years on important issues such as genocide prevention and lowering the voting age. In addition to offering seven Advanced Placement courses Harwich High has many engaging elective courses including Engineering, Anatomy and Physiology, Environmental Studies, Accounting I & II, Studio, Peer Leadership, and Music Theory. This offering with our 60 hour Community Service Learning requirement makes Harwich High School the perfect spot for all students to learn and thrive. Chatham High School Chatham High School offers a highly personalized, private school educational experience in a public school environment with an 8:1 student to teacher ratio, average class size of 16 which includes college prep, honors and Advanced Placement courses offered in a 4 x 4 block schedule as well as a school-wide advisory program. The school offers a wide range of elective classes, including Personal Finance, Global Studies, Creative Writing, Forensics, and Engineering as well as extensive student access to technology, a wide variety of co-curricular clubs and activities, and a full interscholastic athletic program which competes in the new Cape and Islands League. In addition, several programs help make CHS unique, most notably our "We the People" government program, the Community Internship Program and our Elementary Education Experience. All of this and more in a small, safe, and supportive school environment.

Chatham Grades Served 9-12 9-12

Harwich

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Total Enrollment 2008-2009 Student/Teacher Ratio Class Size ELA Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

199 8.7:1 14 (average)

English 9 CP, 9 H English 10 CP, 10 H English 11 CP, 11 H English 12 CP, 12 H AP English Literature and Composition, Creative Writing, Film and Culture, Journalism, Mass Media Algebra I Transition Geometry CP, Geometry H Algebra II CP, Algebra II H Trigonometry/Adv. Math CP Trigonometry/PreCalculus H Calculus H AP Calculus AB Discrete Math, Statistics Math Strategies

366 366 students with 35 FTE 10.46:1 15.3 (average)

English 9 CP, 9 H English 10 CP, 10 H English 11, 11 H, AP Language & Composition English 12 H, AP English Literature & Composition, English Lit & Contemporary Novels, World Literature, Creative Writing, Film Studies Algebra IA Algebra I Geometry Geometry H Algebra IB Algebra 2, Algebra 2 H Pre Calculus, Pre Calculus H, Advanced Math AP Calculus

Math Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

Science Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used

Macro Biology CP & H Microbiology CP & H Chemistry CP & H AP Chemistry Physics Honors Marine Science Introduction to Forensics Introduction to Engineering

Integrated Science Biology CP Biology H AP Biology (2011-2012) Chemistry CP & H Physics H Anatomy & Physiology Environmental Studies Engineering I Engineering II

Social Studies Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Approved September 20, 2010

World History II CP & H US History I (1600-1877)

World History I CP, World History I H America & the World I, America & the World I H, AP

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Used

Foreign Language Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used Social-Emotional Instruction ­ Methodology and Programs Used Inclusion Practices Attendance Rate for December 2009 # General Education Teachers # Special Education Teachers # Special Area Teachers & Types

US History II (1877-Present) AP US History US Government CP US Government H (We The People program) Global Issues Personal Finance Law and Society AP Psychology Latin II-IV CP French 1-V CP Spanish I-V

US History I America & the World II, American & the World II H, AP US History II US Government, US Government H, AP US Government AP European History, Economics, Psychology

Advisory Program Student Teacher Assistance Team Vocational SPED Program Full inclusion with appropriate assistance provided 95% 23.4 3 1 Physical Education 1 Art .4 Music .8 Health .6 Computer 1 Industrial Arts 6 1 Guidance Counselor .6 Adjustment Counselor

French I-III French IV H Spanish I-III Spanish IV H Latin I ­III Latin IV H Peer Leadership Spirit Committee Best Buddies Freshman & Sophomore Team All students are fully included unless documented disability requires instruction in a separate educational setting. 93.5 23.4 3.6 1.6 Physical Education 2 Art 1 Music 1 Health 1.4 Computer 1 Industrial Arts 5 FTE 2 Guidance Counselors 1 Psychologist

# Paraprofessionals/Tutors Other Specialists ­ Number, Type & FTE

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# Building Administrators MCAS Competency Determination 2009 Graduation Rates 20082009

.6 Nurse .33 Psychologist 1 Principal 2009 ­ 100% 4 year cohort ­ 87.9 4 year cohort (adjusted) ­ 91.7

1 Nurse .33 ELL 1Principal 1 Assistant Principal 2009 ­ 100% 4 year cohort - 77.6 4 year adjusted cohort ­ 80.4

At the building level what benefits could result from regionalization? · · · · · · · · · A more diverse academic and co-curricular program with the ability to increase our capacity for more a challenging and engaging course of study. More diverse and challenging academic course offerings Greater co-curricular opportunities Increased diversity Potential for academic concentrations (e.g. environmental studies political science, journalism) Expanded opportunities for internships and real-world experiences Increased Advanced Placement opportunities Enhanced interscholastic athletic program Potential International Baccalaureate program

Are there any challenges, barriers, and obstacles to regionalization? The most significant barrier, which can certainly be overcome, will be the mixing of the cultures of two like communities who have been athletic adversaries for decades. · · · Merging two distinct school cultures into one Fear of the loss of autonomy Concern for the loss of each school's identity

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Executive Summary: Facilities Facilities Elementary School Year Built Major Renovations Chatham 147 Depot Road 1956 Harwich 263 South Street 1940 5 renovations occurring in 1986, 1990, 1998 and 2003 Additions completed 1970, 1974, 1999 and 2003

Middle School Year Built Major Renovations

425 Crowell Road* - Shared Campus 1963 1998

204 Sisson Road 1937 1990­ Major classroom additions & Cafeteria and Gymnasium 1990 ­ Major renovation & asbestos removal 1998 - septic system and mechanicals replaced 75 Oak Street 1963 1970's ­ Modular classroom units installed 1986 Roof replacement 1990 Guidance Suite, Mechanicals replaced, maintenance shop renovated and asbestos removed

High School Year Built Major Renovations

425 Crowell Road* - Shared Campus 1963 1998

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Regionalization: Opportunities and Obstacles for Facilities

Opportunities State-of-the-art high school for 500-600 students with infrastructure and resources to support 21st Century learning Middle school originally designed with high-school-level amenities (e.g. labs, fields) Obstacles Massachusetts School Building Authority control of building and renovation funding

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