Read D:\Student Handbook-2010-11- New students & MRes.pdf text version

2010/2011

Cardiff School of Biosciences

Handbook for Postgraduate Research and MRes Students (2010-2011 enrolment)

EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS

999 999 74444 University Emergency Services External Emergency Services ­ Fire, Police, Ambulance University Security

When telephoning for assistance in an emergency, the following information must always be given. 1) 2) 3) 4) Who you are. Where you are: the location and telephone extension from which you are telephoning. The nature of the emergency and what services are required. The exact location where assistance is required.

To ensure that your message has been correctly received ask for it to be repeated back to you. Please ensure that the identification of the location is clearly defined. Do not use "University terminology", i.e. the Ranch Site for instance means very little to the emergency services, neither does Tower or Preclin. Always give the correct name of the building and the street where it is located. If the University's Human Resources Division needs to be contacted in an Emergency: either dial 999, if on central University campus, or 874444/5 if outside central University campus. School Office BIOSI 1 School Office BIOSI 2 School Office BIOSI 3 Finance Office BIOSI 2 Joint Biological Services 74048 74974 79165 74109 76633/76634/75205

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Cardiff School of Biosciences Handbook for Postgraduate Students 2010/2011

Welcome to Cardiff School of Biosciences and we hope that your time in Cardiff will be productive and enjoyable. The School is one of the major academic research units in the University, delivering a wide range of high quality postgraduate training, supported by its research expertise in a variety of molecular, ecological and cellular disciplines. If you are a new research student then this booklet will provide you with information about the School, the postgraduate induction programme, other students and staff together with details of your research development and assessment procedures. If you are a returning student then many aspects will be familiar to you although with the continuing change in postgraduate education some of the enclosed information may be new or involve modifications in your training/assessment procedures. The Postgraduate Board of the School assumes overall responsibility for your training programme, its administration and monitoring procedures and some of the enclosed information is subject to change as the Postgraduate Board receives comments from students, supervisors and/or the School Research Committee. We want you to enjoy your time with us and if you have any queries or concerns please do not hesitate to contact the Postgraduate & Research Office in the first instance.

Professor Paul J Kemp Postgraduate Research Leader

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BIOSI Enrolment and Induction 2010

Monday 27th September 9.00 am 10.00am Online Registration ­ PC1, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students) Collection of Postgraduate Student Handbook, Information forms etc., Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students) Getting Networked (only applicable for students new to Cardiff) Mr Chris Stent Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students)

11.30am

Tuesday 28th September 10.00am Safety Training with Mark Lewis Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students)

Wednesday 29th September 10.30 ­ 10.45am 11.00-1.00pm Information on Graduate Centre (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students) Demonstrating Training Programme COMPULSORY for all 1st year Students Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students) Meeting with Professor Tim Jacob Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (MRes Students only)

2.00-3.00pm

Thursday 30th September 9.00-10.30am Information Retrieval with Mr Nigel Morgan, IT Room 2, Science Library, Main Building (Postgraduate Research and MRes Students)

Wednesday 6th October 1.00-1.30pm Meeting with Professor Paul Kemp (Postgraduate Research Leader) for second, third and fourth year postgraduates Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (Postgraduate Research students only) Meeting with Professor Paul Kemp (Postgraduate Research Leader) and Mrs Swapna Khandavalli (Postgraduate Secretary) Room W/0.12, Biomedical Building (BIOSI 2) (First year Postgraduate Research students only) ? Cardiff School of Biosciences and your Research Programme ? Research Organisation in Cardiff School of Biosciences ? Agenda Plan, Experimental Records, Personal Record

1.30-2.45pm

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Starting Out Conference

(New Postgraduate Research students) 2010: Friday 8th October, Thursday 14th October, Tuesday 26th October 2011: Thursday 20th January, Monday 11th April, Thursday 21st July

This event is an enjoyable opportunity to meet other research students and begin to develop those important personal and professional networks. It provides an introduction to research at Cardiff University including rights and responsibilities, the facilities and services offered by the University, Graduate Schools, and the Graduate Centre, and presentations by existing students on starting and enjoying your research programme. Importantly, the event will introduce the training and development opportunities at Cardiff University and enable you to begin planning your skills development. Lunch is included. All new BIOSI PhD students are e xpected to attend. (Optional for MRes Students). Details and booking information on www.cardiff.ac.uk/rssdp

Demonstrating Lab based session

2010: Tuesday, 5th October - 9.30 - 12.30 in Graduate School 2011: Tuesday, 11th January - 1:30 ­ 4:30 in Graduate School Please note that attending one of the above sessions in addition to the session conducted in the School during the enrolment week is mandatory. Students who do not attend Demonstrating Lab based session will not be permitted to undertake any demonstrating responsibilities.

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Communication

Changes of address or personal circumstances It is vital that you inform us of changes of address (home or term-time), telephone numbers, name, next of kin etc. This information should be updated in SIMS online (https://sims.cf.ac.uk) and also inform the Postgraduate and Research Secretary of these changes by email. There are a number of ways in which staff will communicate with students and students can contact staff. Email Staff and students communicate readily and conveniently by email. Do remember to check your Cardiff University email account for messages regularly. If your messages are redirected to an alternative private account, please ensure that this is emptied regularly; otherwise important messages may not be delivered. All PGR students should make sure that they are included in the bioscience postgraduate mailing list by contacting Chris Stent. This mailing list is one of the main communication media to receive any relevant information during your entire research candidature. A list of key members of staff is given overleaf. A full list of Biosciences staff http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/staff/index.html contact details can be found at

Notice boards It is important that you check notice boards regularly. The Postgraduate notice boards are located behind the Porters lodge on the ground floor of BIOSI 2 and outside the School Office in BIOSI 1. Pigeonholes Research Students located in BIOSI 1 will find their pigeonholes in the main school office. Students located in BIOSI 2 and 3 will find their pigeonholes labelled A-Z (taking the first letter of surname) in the post room . Personal mail should be directed to your term time /non-term time address whenever possible. You are advised to check for and remove items on a regular basis. The School takes no responsibility for the safe -keeping of any communication deposited in a pigeonhole. Blackboard Blackboard is a web-based learning environment which can be accessed both on and offcampus (http://cue.cf.ac.uk). Information on modules and announcements are regularly posted on Blackboard. Demonstrating allocation will be posted on Blackboard under `School of Postgraduate Studies'.

The School's Postgraduate Office

The Postgraduate Office is situated on the second floor of the West Wing of the Biomedical Sciences Building (Room W/2.01A) and is the focal point for contact between students and the School. All general enquiries should be made here in the first instance.

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Key Staff Contacts

Title Head of School Postgraduate Research Leader Director of Administration Programme Director (MRes) Programme Director ­ 4 Year PhD Integrative Neurosciences Pathophysiology & Repair Divisional PG Totor Neuroscience Divisional PG Tutors Biomolecular Sciences Divisional PG Tutor Organsims & the Environment Divisional PG Tutor Postgraduate Secretary and Demonstrating Coordinator Manager ­ Finance Office Deputy Manager ­ Finance Office Graphics DNA Sequencing IT Support IT Support IT Support Technical Manager & Safety Manager Assistant Technical Manager & Buildings Coordinator Technical GMO Radiation Horticulture Health & Safety Coordinator Autoclaves PGR Student Rep Name Professor Ole Peterson Professor Paul Kemp Mrs Sharon Burgess Professor Tim Jacob Professor Vincenzo Crunelli Room E/3.32 BIOSI 2 C/3.13 BIOSI 2 E/3.29 BIOSI 2 C/3.05 BIOSI 2 0.09 BIOSI 3 Extension 74108 79347 74089 74105 74091 [email protected] Director-biosi Kemp BurgessSC Jacob Crunelli

Dr Dipak Ramji

W/2.01C BIOSI 2

76753

Ramji

Dr Kerrie Thomas Dr David McGonigle Dr Helen WhiteCooper Prof Mike Bruford

2.07 BIOSI 3 Tower Building, Psychology W/3.21 BIOSI 2

79043 7650475492

ThomasKL5 McGonigleD White-cooperH

C/5.06 BIOSI 2

74312

BrufordMW

Mrs Swapna Khandavalli

W/2.01A BIOSI 2

75243

KhandavalliS

Mrs Janet Sullivan Mr Gareth Hurley Mr Bob Jones Mr Steve Turner Mr Kevin Munn Mr Chris Stent Mr Steve Booth Mr Bill Edwards Mr Bob Hemmings

W/0.09 BIOSI 2 W/0.10 BIOSI 2 C/1.06 BIOSI 2 0.43A BIOSI 1 2.40 BIOSI 1 C/1.06 BIOSI 2 C/1.06 BIOSI 2 E/3.27 BIOSI 2 W/0.08 BIOSI 2

75886 70191 76679 76655 76808 74092 79998 75136 76816

Sullivan HurleyGR JonesRM1 TurnerSG MunnK Stent Booth EdwardsWD Hemmings

Mr Dave Llewellyn Dr Hilary Rogers Dr Nick Kent Mr Lyndon Tuck Mr Mark Lewis Dr Liese Ganderton Mr Nicolaas Puts

W/0.07A BIOSI 2 W/0.11 BIOSI 1 E/3.20 BIOSI 2 TALYBONT W/0.08 BIOSI 2 C/2.05 BIOSI 2

74087 76352 79036 029 20628546 74441 75769

LlewellynD1 RogersHJ Kent LewisM GandertonL PutsNA

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Useful Web Addresses

Cardiff School of Biosciences http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/BIOSI/ Cardiff School of Biosciences Safety Information https://inside.cf.ac.uk/biosi/safety/index.html Cardiff University Safety Services http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/osheu/safety/index.html University Academic Registry Research Degrees Handbook http://www.cf.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/index.html Information Services Handbook http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/insrv/aboutus/handbook/index.html University Graduate Centre http://www.cf.ac.uk/gradc/index.html University Health Centre http://www.cf.ac.uk/osheu/healthcentre/index.html University Chaplaincy (multi-faith) http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/chaplaincy/index.html University Student Advisory Service http://www.cf.ac.uk/advice/index.html University Counselling Service http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/schoolsanddivisions/divisions/stude/cllng/index.html Careers Service http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/carsv/index.html Registry http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/index.html Blackboard http://cue.cardiff.ac.uk Research Fortnight Online http://www.researchresearch.com Library Catalogue http://library.cardiff.ac.uk/ Electronic Journals http://ejournals.cardiff.ac.uk/

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Health & Safety

Health and Safety Just as there are risks in any activity that we undertake in our daily lives, so there are risks to Health and Safety in working in a science department. However in the School of Biosciences we attempt to manage and minimise all risks by regular risk (re)assessments that lead to appropriate control measures. The two aspects of Health and Safety most likely to affect you during your time in the School are risks from Fire, and from practical work (which includes work in laboratories and in the field). Key features of the arrangements for evacuation in the event of a Fire, and for safety management in practical work are summarised below. For more information, see the School of Biosciences safety website at https://inside.cf.ac.uk/biosi/safety Fire Procedures in the Biomedical and Main Buildings Due to the nature of the work carried out in the School, Fire presents a particularly serious threat to people and property. All users of the building should guard against any action that might result in the outbreak of fire. The School has an automatic smoke/heat sensing alarm system, as well as manual fire alarm buttons. A system of fire alarm zoning has been introduced to reduce false alarms and minimise disruption to building users. When an alarm is activated in one zone, the continuous fire alarm will sound in that area and a full volume pulsed tone will sound in any adjacent zones. What to Do in the Biomedical Building: In an area with FULL continuous sounding alarm: You must evacuate the building in which there is a full alarm. Use the most direct route of evacuation. ONLY cross into another zone if it is the most direct evacuation route or if your normal direct route is obstructed by smoke or fire or other obstacles. Leave the building and proceed to the assembly point (Front lawn, Main Building) and wait for further instructions. · Do not loiter on the Deck or the ramps that lead to it because this will obstruct the access for the Fire Service · Do not delay evacuation to collect personal possessions etc. · Do not re-enter the building until told to do so by Security Staff or Fire Wardens · Follow the instructions of Fire Wardens / Security Staff · Never disregard a fire alarm · Never assume it is a false alarm · Never ever use a lift in a fire alarm situation In an area with PULSED alarm: If you are in a zone with a pulsed alarm, you may evacuate the building if you wish but it is not compulsory and you may stay in the pulsed zone until the alarm is either cancelled or progresses to a full alarm when you must evacuate as above. Emergency evacuation of people with a physical or mobility impairment The Cardiff School of Biosciences has introduced procedures to evacuate personnel who have restricted mobility or other disabilities that might hinder their evacuation from the buildings in the event of a fire or other emergency. These procedures are intended for people with either permanent or temporary disablement. Details of these procedures may be found on the School's safety information pages via the web (https://inside.cf.ac.uk/biosi/safety/local/disabled.html) or leaflets describing evacuation procedures for specific areas, available from the Biomedical Sciences Building Lodge. Procedure for assisted evacuation: You should inform the security staff at the entrance lodge when you arrive, and tell them where you will be working. You should evacuate regardless of the type of alarm, making use of the Refuge points located on the main lift lobbies on each floor and at the basement lecture 9

theatres. You may cross into zones receiving a pulsed alarm, and may make use of lifts in these zones to leave the building. Proceed to the School's assembly point as above. It is imperative that when the sirens are activated, an organised and efficient evacuation of the building is completed. Fire drills are undertaken at regular intervals, the alarms may also be activated when some other immediate threat to personnel in the building is detected, and should be treated as a fire alarm. If you have any queries or would like further advice, please contact the School's Safety Coordinator (tel ext 74441, e-mail: [email protected] ). You are strongly advised to contact the Safety Coordinator if you have a specific problem affecting your ability to access or evacuate from areas in the School, so that we can provide you with a Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan for your specific needs. Never ignore an alarm; proceed with the evacuation if the alarm is activated. Routine awareness · Wherever you happen to be in the School (or in the University), ensure that you are aware of the fire escape routes · Note the locations of Refuge points, which have red emergency phones installed · Note the locations of fire blankets and extinguishers · Report any missing or damaged items to the School Safety Coordinator · Note the designated assembly area to make for after evacuating the building · Report any electrical or equipment faults promptly, do not use suspect equipment Equipment Fire fighting equipment should only be used by personnel trained in its use. First-aid First aid equipment and members of trained First-Aid staff are located throughout the School. Contact details of First-Aiders serving each area are displayed on green and white notices displayed in Lift landings and Teaching areas. Safety in Practical Work and Field Courses In our Safety Policy, we recognise that our most valued and valuable resources are our staff and students. Achieving a safe working environment involves provision of good modern facilities, sound management and the development of a Safety culture in which everyone accepts that they have a role to play in safety. This will involve you as a student, not only in cooperating in the management of your own safety and that of your colleagues, but also in making safety training an integral part of your learning experience, especially in relation to laboratory work. Always wearing appropriate clothing and shoes is part of this approach. In practical work, the twin objectives of working safely and safety training - are achieved in the following ways: (i) The principal of Risk Assessment is used as a fundamental tool in the management of safety in practical work. Assessments are made during the development of each practical experiment and are reviewed regularly. These assessments are available in the appropriate teaching laboratory. Clear guidance will be provided in the notes relating to each experiment. Students will carry out their own Risk Assessments as part of their final year projects. The high-quality laboratories provide a wide range of facilities to enable students to carry out their practical work in a safe and secure environment. Staff and demonstrators are highly experienced and will be present to supervise and advise you. 10

(ii) (iii) (iv)

During your work you will encounter a range of signs containing important information relating to Health and Safety, these have a standard format and the most common formats are illustrated below. Safe Condition White text/signs on green. e.g. First Aid, and Fire Exits Hazard warning Black text/signs on yellow triangle, e.g. toxic material Compulsory (must do) White text/signs on blue circle. e.g. must wear protective equipment Prohibition sign (must not) Red circle with red diagonal

Vaccinations Check with your Module Leader to establish whether vaccinations are needed on a particular course (e.g. field course). You are responsible for the cost of the necessary vaccination(s). Some vaccinations may be obtained under prescription from your local General Practitioner (Doctor), but in most cases it is cheaper to have by your General Practitioner (GP) rather then the Health Centre. Health Services The university operates a Student Health Service for students seeking advice, or treatment for illness, injury or to discuss any health problems. Treatment is given immediately wherever advisable. However, the Health Centre does not operate a full GP service. It is essential that you register with a local General Practitioner (Doctor), to provide access to a 24 hr medical service. A list of local Practitioners is available from the Health Centre or the student diary. Remember, if you miss an assignment or an assessed practical, or cannot sit an exam, you will need a medical certificate, or note from the Health Centre The Health Centre is open from 9.00 am to 4.30 pm Monday to Friday and is available until 5.00 pm for emergency only. Reception / Appointments: Tel: 029 20874810. More information at: http://www.cf.ac.uk/osheu/healthcentre/studenthealth/ The Cardiff University Eye Clinic (http://www.cf.ac.uk/optom/eyeclinic/) offers a wide range of high quality optometric services for students. The clinic is an integral part of the Department providing eye care and eyewear at competitive prices. The Eye Clinic is staffed by qualified optometrists and runs a number of specialist clinics for people with special needs and visual impairment. The Eye Clinic is open from Monday to Friday 9.00am to 5.00pm throughout the year. To make an appointment, email [email protected] or phone 029 2087 4357. University No Smoking Policy The University has a no smoking policy and students are not permitted to smoke anywhere within the University grounds.

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Security As with any other buildings open daily in a public place, the safety and security of the buildings, its contents and its occupants are of considerable importance. The University has Safety and Security Officers to oversee the arrangements in all buildings. The Security officers can be found in the Lodge at the entrance to the Biomedical Building. The access to the Biomedical Science and Life Science Buildings is controlled by proximity card controls. The Biomedical Science Building Main entrance and Biomedical Library are open to students between 08.45 and 21.30 Monday to Friday, 10.00 and 17.30, on Saturday and 12.00 and 17.00 on Sunday during Semesters. The associated School offices are open 8.30am to 5pm Monday to Friday. To contact Security staff in an emergency, Dial 74444 Most issues of security are common sense: · do not leave valuable objects, wallets, purses etc unattended; · act sensibly within the University buildings with due regard for the safety and wellbeing of others; · if others are seen, or believed to be putting safety and security at risk, draw their behaviour to the attention of security officers. Any student who suffers an accident or loss should report this to Security Officers immediately.

Safety in Practical Work and Field Courses

In practicals, working safely and safety training - are achieved in 3 ways: (i) matters of safety (e.g. cautions, safe-working procedures for the experiments you do) are clearly identified in practical manuals and work-sheets. Your own safety includes the use of labcoats at all times, appropriate footware (not sandals) and the use of eye protectors when needed; the high-quality laboratories provide safety facilities such as fume cupboards, handand eye-wash facilities, automatic (non-glass) pipettes as standard, and minimum use of glassware; highly experienced staff and demonstrators will be present to supervise and advise you.

(ii) (iii)

Full details of all safety aspects in the School of Biosciences can be found at http://inside.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/safety/index.html

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Equality and Diversity: Students with Specific Circumstances

Christine Sangster is the School's Disability Contact (ext. 74940; email: [email protected] Christine is the first point of contact for students that have any queries about disability issues. Their role is to help students communicate their needs to School staff and to specialist staff in the Student Services Division. This can range for example, from helping students with dyslexia to ensuring access to buildings for students with physical impairment. The School of Biosciences encourages students with disabilities/learning difficulties to disclose their disability and/or needs as early as possible to ensure that the appropriate support and adjustments to the curriculum can be made. If you have not previously disclosed your disability to anyone in the University, you may make a disclosure to any member of staff (but preferably the Disability Contact) in the School of Biosciences. It is better if you make an appointment and do this in person. Even if you have already disclosed your disability to a member of the Disability or Dyslexia staff you may still wish to inform your department, either through the disability contact or your supervisor. For further advice we strongly recommend that students contact the University's Disability & Dyslexia Service via email at [email protected] or [email protected] or visit the Centre at: Cathays Park: Disability & Dyslexia Service, Student Support Centre, 50 Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (Tel. 029 2087 4528) Facilities in Lecture Theatres Main Building The Wallace (0.13), Large Shandon (-1.64), Large Chemistry (1.123),Small Chemistry (1.122) and Beverton (1.40) lecture theatres are fitted with hearing induction loop systems which are effective throughout the room. Wheelchair users are advised to position themselves always at the rear of lecture theatres situated in the Main Building. This ensures immediate access to fire exits whilst not obstructing entry & exits routes. The Building does not have a flashing alarm system to alert those people who have a hearing impairment in case of emergency. There is a unisex disabled cloakroom on the ground floor in room 0.35. The lift is in the Biosciences Entrance area, near the Biosciences Stores. Biomedical Sciences Building The John Pryde (C-1.01), Anatomy (E0.09) and Physiology A (C0.07) and Physiology B (C1.04) lecture theatres are fitted with hearing induction loop systems which are effective throughout the room. The Shared (E1.21) lecture theatre has a hearing induction loop system which is more effective in the front half of the room. Wheelchair users are advised to position themselves always at the front of lecture theatres situated in the Biomedical Building. This ensures immediate access to fire exits whilst not obstructing entry & exits routes. The Biomedical Building does not have a flashing alarm system to alert those people who have a hearing impairment in case of emergency. There are unisex disabled cloakrooms on the ground floor in room E0.11 and on the first floor in C1.03. The appropriate lift is in the Central area near the Porter's Lodge. There is a Quiet Room in the basement of BIOSI 2 in W/-1.246, available to all School staff and students, of all faiths, for quiet reflection and prayer.

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Induction and Skills Development Activities

The Graduate Centre coordinates the Research Students Skills Development Programme (RSSDP) for research students. The programme incorporates both generic skills training and discipline based training offered by the (Research and) Graduate Schools. The Graduate Centre also coordinates the University level induction for new research students (PhDs, MPhils and MDs only), a conference titled "Starting Out" which is held on Friday 8th October, Thursday 14th October, Tuesday 26th October. Details can be found on the Graduate Centre or RSSDP web site www.cardiff.ac.uk/rssdp. All new BIOSI postgraduate research students (MRes optional) are expected to attend. Cost of attendance will be funded by the School. Research students receive a single annual brochure of all these opportunities and can book onto courses via the single web portal: https://rssdp.cardiff.ac.uk/. Note: (The event is repeated in January, April and July for the students starting in respective intakes) Thursday 20th January, Monday 11th April or Thursday 21st July. There are many different courses which are on offer between September and July through the University Graduate Centre. These cover a variety of topics including reading/note taking, presentation skills, PowerPoint, enhancing documents, project management, career planning, Excel, dissertation workshops, grant funding, working with business, to name a few. The courses are open to full and part-time research students AT NO CHARGE. Bookings are taken online at https://rssdp.cardiff.ac.uk or by following the links from www.cardiff.ac.uk/rssdp. The system allows you to browse the workshops and their descriptions by category, by date, or by keyword. Please note that once you book you are expected to attend. If you fail to attend Cardiff School of Biosciences will be charged a cancellation fee. The Postgraduate & Research Office will forward this to your supervisor for payment. You should all receive details of these courses upon registration. obtained from the Postgraduate Secretary. If not, copies can be

The Postgraduate & Research Office, located in the Biomedical Sciences Building (BIOSI 2) on the 2nd floor of the West Wing, has direct responsibility for all aspects of your postgraduate training. We will need to know the courses for which you have registered. At each appraisal (6 monthly) you will need to complete a course attendance form. This requires the signature of the course supervisor and your principal supervisor.

Graduate Schools

The Graduate Schools at Cardiff exist to foster an intellectually stimulating environment through a programme of events and activities where students are encouraged to share and develop research interests with peers from other schools, and to feel part of a wider research community. The Graduate Schools also provide mid-level skills training which is complementary to the generic programme offered by the Graduate Centre and the disciplinespecific, specialist training provided by Academic Schools. All postgraduate students in the University are automatically members of one of the Graduate Schools listed below. Students are also encouraged to take part in interdisciplinary activities that span subject areas and Graduate Schools in order to broaden their research experience. 14

? ? ? ?

Graduate School in the Biomedical and Life Sciences Graduate School in the Humanities Graduate School in the Physical Sciences and Engineering Research and Graduate School in the Social Sciences

The Graduate Schools are run from a central office at 60 Park Place and can be contacted on [email protected] or 029 2087 9406/9408. The office is open from 9.00am to 5.00pm Monday - Friday. The Research and Graduate School in Social Sciences also has an office in Room 0.22, Glamorgan Building and can be contacted on [email protected] or 029 2087 7158. Further information about Graduate School activities and membership is available from www.cardiff.ac.uk/gradschools. Research training and development A principal objective of the (Research and) Graduate Schools is the enhancement of training and development opportunities for postgraduate researchers. This includes co-ordinating discipline-based courses and events that can benefit both current research and future career prospects. This activity is incorporated into the RSSDP, as noted above. Research students receive regular updates on the RSSDP, which also highlight events for researchers. Events A range of events, such as Annual Lectures and student-led conferences, promote interaction between students and staff from different Academic and Research Graduate Schools, so that they can feel part of the wider postgraduate research community. The events are both intellectual and social, and they aim to enhance the postgraduate student culture. More Information Visit the Graduate Schools web site www.cardiff.ac.uk/gradschools or for full details of skills training opportunities visit the Research Students' Skills Development Programme web site www.cardiff.ac.uk/rssdp. The Graduate Centre's web site is updated daily and there are events pages and links to other helpful sites. There is a fortnightly email bulletin to all postgraduates and you'll be added to this list automatically after enrolment. If you are not receiving this, e-mail the Centre. Additional Optional Courses Ø Ø Ø Ø HO Animal Licence Course available through Dr Peter Hunt DNA Sequencing with Professor Andy Weightman Radiation Safety with Dr Nick Kent Written English can be arranged through the Postgraduate & Research Office if required

Details of the above courses will be emailed to students when arrangements have b een finalised, so it is important that you ensure that the Postgraduate & Research Office has been notified of your email address. Opportunities for Involvement The PostGrad Society (PGS) organises a number of events: look for PGS at the Societies Fayre or join the society at any of their events. The full-time Societies, Postgraduate and International Officer has responsibility for representing postgraduate students. There is also a 15

part-time Postgraduate Support Officer, who will be elected in the autumn by-elections. You can contact Union officers via the third floor of the Students' Union. The Centre is governed by a Steering Group which has student membership. There are also opportunities to provide feedback via one of our termly open meetings. See the web site for details.

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The Student's Responsibilities

Moving from undergraduate education to postgraduate research involves a significant change in emphasis in responsibilities. To a much larger extent you have to be responsible for your own academic development with guidance and support from the University. Many of your interactions will be with a small number of specific members of staff, your designated Supervisor(s), the Divisional Postgraduate Tutors and the Postgraduate Leader. These are very important relationships and the responsibilities of all parties are outlined below in order to help you understand the nature and importance of these interactions. Students for research degrees are expected to assure themselves of the terms of their candidatures (including any particular requirements stipulated by their sponsors) and their responsibilities towards the successful completion of their research work and timely submission of the thesis. The responsibilities of the Student include: · · · · · · · · · · · · Agreeing with the supervisor the topic for the research programme Agreeing with the supervisor an overall timetable for the completion of the work and a schedule of regular meetings at which the detailed planning/progress can be discussed. Identification of any generic and specific training needs and agreeing with the supervisor how best these can be met (PhD, MPhil and MD only) Alerting the supervisor and/or the Divisional PG Tutor, without delay, to any factors that have disrupted the schedule or otherwise impeded progress Agreeing with the supervisor the type of guidance and comment that would be most helpful Performing the research work according to the agreed detailed timetable and meeting with the supervisor(s) according to the agreed schedule Preparing adequately for meetings with the supervisor(s) Attending any development opportunities that have been identified and agreed with the supervisor(s) Submitting regular, written reports to your thesis committee, as required by the School's and University's Monitoring Procedure (PhD, MPhil and MD only) Maintaining, at all times, a proper and professional relationship with the supervisor Participating in Personal Development Planning (PDP) to help further your career development.Support for PDP will be provided by your supervisor. Being prepared to sign-up, at the appointed time, for D emonstrating for U ndergraduate Practical sessions; this becomes an expectation only after you have completed the first semester of your studies. Submitting, within the specified times, all Progression documents, as detailed later in this Handbook. Submitting your thesis at the end of the funding/fee paying period, or before 4 years (2 years for MPhil) from your start date, taking due heed of your supervisor's advice (PhD only)

· ·

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· ·

Maintaining contact with your supervisor in the interval between the end of funding/feepaying and actual submission of your thesis for examination (PhD, MPhil and MD only) Consulting your Divisional PG Tutor (MPhil and PhD only) or the MRes Programme Director (MRes only) in the event that the working relationship with the supervisor is problematic, or if you have any doubts about the quality of their supervision. You can also contact the PG Student Representative if you think it more appropriate. Contacting the Postgraduate Research Leader in the exceptional circumstances that problems cannot be resolved by the Divisional PG Tutors and/or the PG Student Representative. Appointments can be made at the Postgraduate & Research Office. Attending any interviews requested by the supervisor, the Postgraduate Research Leader, the Divisional PG Tutors or the Head of School. For Student Disciplinary Procedures, please refer to the link below:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/regs/3.01%20-%20Student%20Discipline%20Procedure.doc

·

· ·

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The Supervisor's Responsibilities

Supervisors are responsible to the Head of School for the management of the research degree students assigned to them. The duties of the supervisor will be those defined in the University's Code of Practice: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/a-code-of-pratice-for-research-degrees.html#supervisor The responsibilities of the principal supervisor include the following: · Nominating a second supervisor and an assessor and these three academics will constitute your Thesis Committee. This Thesis Committee, in conjunction with the Divisional PG Tutors, will oversee your Progression, from enrolment through to examination. The membership of this committee must be approved by the PG Leader and the details must be given to the Postgraduate & Research Office at, or soon after, enrolment. (PhD, MPhil and MD only). Determining at the outset, in consultation with the student, an agreed Research Plan, which will incorporate: a definition of the topic of research; the detailed strategy for achieving objectives within an agreed time-scale; a specification of the frequency of meetings between the student and supervisor. Providing guidance on: the nature of the research in the specific discipline; the standard of work expected in relation to the qualification aim; the planning of the research programme; sources, methods and techniques; the specialist research skills and the generic skills the student should acquire and how this might be done; Personal Development; matters of confidentiality; ethical considerations relating to particular techniques, sources or results; research integrity and the avoidance of plagiarism (PhD, MPhil and MD only). The identifying specific training requirements to facilitate the research programme. The Research Plan will be lodged in the student's file. The Research Plan will be regularly reviewed and may be revised over time, particularly in response to the outcome of progress monitoring procedures, changes in circumstances and unexpected research outcomes (PhD, MPhil and MD only). Strongly encouraging their postgraduate students to be involve in Demonstrating to Undergraduate Students Making arrangements for a Bar on Access, where necessary. If applicable, this must normally be agreed at the outset of the research programme and not exceed two years. An application for a Bar on Access must be approved by the University's Graduate Board (PhD, MPhil and MD only). Maintaining frequent contact with the research student and being accessible for academic and pastoral advice, within the context of a proper and professional relationship; responding to requests from the student for advice and guidance within a reasonable timescale. Monitoring the progress of the student in accordance with University and School procedures, including returning written work promptly and providing reports on progress to the Postgraduate & Research Office, and advising as necessary on the completion of the successive stages of the work so as to bring about the timely submission of the thesis for examination. Advising the Postgraduate Research Leader/Divisional PG Tutor/MRes Programme Director of any major changes in research direction which occurs where the expertise of another supervisor becomes necessary. Ensuring that students are competent to perform their tasks safely, and that they comply with University and School health and safety procedures. 19

·

·

·

· ·

·

·

·

·

·

Reading the draft progression documents/thesis/dissertation and providing detailed editorial comments/revisions to the student, within a time scale agreed with the student, at the time of draft submission. Providing guidance and detailed editorial comments/revisions to the student, within a time scale agreed with the student, should the thesis require an amendment and/or resubmission for further examination. Obtaining any permission necessary (e.g. Ethical Approval, Home Office Licence) for the experimental work. Discussing options with the students. Help in the choice of project and project title during the first semester. (MRes only). Choosing a second marker for the dissertation (MRes only).

·

· · ·

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Unfair Practice: Plagiarism and its Avoidance

1. Definition: what is plagiarism? Plagiarism is defined in the Academic Regulations Handbook as work that "uses the words or ideas of others without acknowledging them as such" 2. Introduction Plagiarism falls within the definition of `Unfair Practices' in the Cardiff University Academic Regulations that apply to assessment matters. These regulations and general guidance on how to avoid plagiarism are to be found in the University Academic Regulations Handbook (http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/regs/). The purposes of this document are to help students understand what constitutes plagiarism in the context of Biosciences degree schemes and to indicate ways in which to avoid it. This is necessary for a number of reasons: increasing variety of methods of assessment, increasing use of collaborative course work investigations, increasing use of IT in course work and the perception that plagiarism (both intentional and inadvertent) is increasing. Sometimes the distinction between acceptable and unacceptable practice is unclear. What follows is intended to clarify this distinction for Biosciences students. 3. Extensions of the Definition What work may not be plagiarised? · Anything written by another person in any format · Published or unpublished material · Other students' work · Notes distributed by academic staff · Material from the world wide web · Material from information retrieval systems · Your own work that was previously submitted for another assessment (selfplagiarism) What is proper citation of source? Whenever you use a source of information other than your own you should indicate this by: · · · including the source in a reference list at the end of your piece of work; indicating at the appropriate point in the text that you are referring to this work; enclosing in quotation marks ("") any material greater than 4 or 5 consecutive words quoted verbatim from the source, even if it is unpublished

See also How to Reference and Acknowledge Previous Reports in Written Work, including Final Year Projects earlier in this section. In what assessed (and non-assessed) work might plagiarism occur? · Essays and other written course work · Open book examinations · Where there is team and group work (e.g. production of posters or PowerPoint presentations) · Yearly Reports · Final thesis

21

4. How to avoid plagiarism · By remembering the simple rule that plagiarism is work that "uses the words or ideas of others without acknowledging them as such". · By familiarising yourself with what is meant by plagiarism A number of aspects of your course aim to develop a variety of proper scientific communication skills. Part of this process is learning the normally accepted methods of attribution and reference citation. Another very important skill in this context is the ability to assimilate and précis information from other sources. In addition, your tutors will be able to give guidance on any general uncertainties you may have. · Through liaison with your personal and/or academic tutor. · Through discussion with academic staff involved in the assessment process. Staff will be prepared to discuss with you any specific doubts or problems you may have in relation to course work that you are preparing for them. · By always ensuring that you use your own words in written work. · By not asking to borrow other students' assessed work nor lending your own for the purposes of cheating. · By not leaving the completion of course work, project reports, etc to the last minute, thereby increasing the pressure to cheat. This is the reason given most commonly by students who are found guilty of unfair practice. · By reading the guidance notes supplied by INSRV. · By visiting the Cardiff University web site and following the link https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/academic/index.html If in doubt, ask an academic member of staff. Claiming ignorance of the rules will not protect you from the conseque nces of being found guilty of plagiarism. 5. Examples of plagiarism Essay type assessments · The inclusion of unattributed sentences unmodified, or only slightly modified, from a textbook, information retrieval system or internet source into the essay, whether the source is included in the reference list or not. · The inclusion of material written collaboratively with another student(s). · The inclusion of material copied, with or without permission, from another student. Project and Poster work · Heavy reliance on a review article or internet source in writing the introduction of a desk project or developing an analytical approach in it. · The use of numerical data from another source, published or not, as if it were your own. · Reliance on a previous project dissertation in a similar area for textual material in your dissertation. · The inclusion of material written collaboratively with another student(s) (unless within the group or team assembled together to produce the project report or poster). Practical class reports / exercises Here there is a need to distinguish between proper collaboration among students in gathering data from practical work, etc. and the extension of this data gathering into collaborative analysis and report writing where the contribution of individuals is unclear. There are particular difficulties in relation to computer based or calculation based exercises where it is not uncommon for students to work together to solve a problem. Submission of an original computer output file by both students, or submission of the copied calculations will almost certainly be seen to constitute plagiarism. The best way to avoid this is for the students concerned to redo the exercise for submission independently at a later time. In cases of doubt it is essential to clarify matters with the member of academic staff responsible. In the absence of any indication to the contrary you should assume that identical or near identical analyses and interpretations will be treated as plagiarism. 22

6. The consequences of being found guilty of plagiarism Although the emphasis of this document is very clearly to help you avoid plagiarism, it is as well for you to be aware of the consequences of engaging in this form of cheating. The Academic Regulations covering unfair practice clearly indicate the procedure to be followed for cases of suspected plagiarism and the penalties involved for cases of proven plagiarism. For details you should refer to the University Academic Regulations handbook, issued to all students. Here it is sufficient to emphasize that the penalties for proven plagiarism are severe and could lead to substantial loss of marks, failure of the module or even exclusion from the course. Regrettably, these University procedures have been used recently for students in Biosciences. 7. All submitted work will be checked for plagiarism. Cardiff University is committed to helping students understand and identify ways in which plagiarism might occur and to helping them avoid accidentally plagiarising any sources of information during their studies. All work submitted for assessment will be tested for plagiarism. This will be done both manually and electronically. The University is committed to the elimination of all unfair practices in this respect, thereby protecting the standard of the degrees it awards. The software searches the World Wide Web and extensive databases of reference material to identify duplication. The software makes no decisions on whether a student has plagiarised, it simply highlights sections of text that have been found in other sources. In most cases this will be text that has been correctly cited. Work submitted by students will be stored electronically in a database or databases used for the study and may be compared against work submitted by the students within this University or from other institutions taking part in this study. It will therefore be necessary to take electronic copies of your materials for transmission, storage and comparison purposes and for the operational back-up process Unfair Practice Procedure

Help, I've just been told my practical / essay write-up is suspected of plagiarism, what happens now?

· · · ·

You will be invited to attend a meeting with the School Unfair practice coordinator and the marker of the assessment. This meeting will review the evidence and produce a statement, agreed and signed by all. The Chair of the appropriate Exam board will review the statement and if a case of unfair practice is established, will decide upon the nature of the penalty. The penalties range from a warning only, to the loss of all marks for that submission. A note will also be made in your student records to indicate an offence has occurred.

Note: should the Chair of the Exam board deem the offence sufficiently serious, he can choose to send the details to the University Committee of Enquiry (UCE) to adjudicate. The UCE has a far greater range of penalties that it can impose, including in the most serious of cases, exclusion from the University. 23

STOP! Before you submit, have you: · Included a word count · Submitted both a hard and an electronic copy · Attached a declaration of your own work · Either as a header or footer ( so that it appears on every page), put: · the name of the module · the title of the assignment · your student number

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Personal Development Planning (PDP)

What Is Personal Development Planning (PDP)? PDP is a structured and supported process that will help you to review your learning experiences, set personal and academic goals and evaluate your progress towards these goals. You may have participated in a process of PDP during your Undergraduate Degree, Masters Degree or in the workplace. At Research Degree level, PDP is designed to build on and enhance the skills which you have developed during your previous studies or work experience. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA), which conducts institutional audits on behalf of the government to assure quality in university degrees, embodied PDP within its revised Code of Practice for Postgraduate Research Programmes in September 2004. Consequently, PDP now forms a core element of Cardiff University's Skills and Employability Strategy. PDP is designed to assist you to further develop as an independent learner and will be of benefit not only during your time at Cardiff University, but throughout your career. What are the benefits of PDP? Get the most from your Research Degree ­ Studying at Postgraduate level is a huge commitment and it is important to ensure that you make the most of your time at Cardiff. The PDP process will help you to: · · · · · Identify your training needs Develop and enhance research-specific and transferable skills in many areas (e.g. oral and written communication skills, how to get grant funding) Monitor your personal and professional development Discuss your development needs with your Supervisor Enhance your ability to articulate and demonstrate your skills to a wide range of potential employers (both academic and non-academic) and professional bodies.

During your Research Degree Programme you will be expected to maintain a Research Student Log. This process is designed to p rovide a framework to help you reflect on your progress and as a tool for helping you to identify the training and support you need to make your Research Degree a success. During this process you will participate in the following activities: · · · · Identification of training needs via a skills assessment exercise Establish development objectives Reflect on progress Record progress

How Can You Record The Outcomes Of PDP? An on-line resource, designed to guide you through the process of PDP and help you construct an electronic record of your development is available to all students (hosted in Blackboard http://cue.cardiff.ac.uk). Format of the Module The Blackboard module provides guidelines for engaging in a process of PDP, a facility for recording personal development, and links to developmental opportunities available within the University and externally. Content is delivered via HTML, Microsoft Word documents and hyperlinks.

25

Using the Module Students are encouraged to work their way through the module systematically from the beginning in order to become familiar with the rationale for engaging in a process of PDP and to be aware of the opportunities available to them. Once a student is familiar with the module he/she can utilise any of the individual components as appropriate. The Main Components of the Module 1. Introduction to PDP It provides a rationale for engaging in PDP (including employability issues) and guidance on using the modular PDP recording facility to create a Research Student Log. 2. First Steps This section is aimed at students who are beginning their research degree programmes. It includes information on formulating research objectives and priorities, developing key techniques to be applied during the initial stages of the research project, and key areas for literature review. 3. Skills Audit The skills audit is a core component of the module. It provides information on the Joint Skills Statement of the Research Councils, and gives students the opportunity to monitor their personal development in line with the recommendations of the JSS. 4. Development Plan This section offers guidance on setting personal development objectives and suggestions for incorporating identified training requirements into a development plan. 5. Training Opportunities Provides links to training and other developmental opportunities available at Cardiff University. 6. Useful links Consists of two main sections: · a number of proformas that students might find useful (e.g. record of presentations, oral presentations feedback form) · links to developmental opportunities available outside the University

The Research Student Log

Students can draw on various proformas delivered via the module to construct a "Research Student Log." The Log can be retained in electronic format or printed depending on the students' personal preference. The Log can be used to keep a personal record of the student's development, both in terms of the research project and in terms of the development of key or transferable skills. Consequently, the Log can contribute to structuring student/supervisor meetings, enhancing a CV, determining training needs etc.

What Support Will You Receive?

While the responsibility for participating in the PDP process rests with individuals, the University is committed to supporting students in this activity. Support for PDP will be provided through the supervision process. All supervisors and students will have attended a workshop to familiarise themselves with the PDP process. Website address: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/gradschools/pse/pdp/index.html

26

Careers Advice

Careers Advice Options The Careers Service has Career Consultants that are linked to specific academic departments. They are available for appointments throughout the week. There are two types of appointment: Career Consultations 30 minute appointments with a career consultant who specialises in your degree subject area. You can discuss career options, career ideas (or lack of them), career strategies and planning. These appointments can be booked up to 2 weeks in advance by using the online Booking System. Quick Enquiry Appointments 15 minute appointments for brief queries or a CV/Application form check. These appointments are also a useful starting point if you have no idea what you want to do and need help to get started. These appointments can be booked on the day by using the online Booking System. Graduate Employment Advice Centre Based at the Careers Service, 5 Corbett Road, The Graduate Employment Advice Centre (GEAC) is a drop-in centre for all Cardiff graduates and postgraduates who have graduated from Cardiff University within the last three years. The Centre provides a first port of call to assess your career needs and ensure that you receive the most appropriate help and advice.

Contact Details: Email: Web: Phone: Extension: Address: [email protected] http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/carsv/index.html (029) 2087 4828 74828 5 Corbett Road Cardiff CF10 3EB

27

Working Practices/Holidays

Full-Time Students The University does not specify how much time a research student must spend at the University or in the school concerned. This is agreed between student and supervisor(s) and should be in accordance with the School Framework. Certain types of research necessarily involve periods of study away from Cardiff - for example, to collect data or samples or to carry out other fieldwork, or to visit libraries or archives. Students with industry-linked projects may be required to work for agreed periods at the premises of the collaborating company. The duration and timing of these periods should be established, as far as possible, at the outset, so that they can be addressed within the Research Plan. Students whose research is being carried out within a research group or whose project is laboratory-based, may be required to keep regular attendance hours at the school. Work patterns of some other students - whose research is library-based, for example ­ do not impact in the same way on other researchers or the progress of the research itself. Although 'attendance' requirements may change during the course of a research project, the general expectation must be conveyed to the student before admission. Regardless, of the agreed pattern of 'attendance', full-time students are expected to devote their efforts to the research project on a full-time basis. Using the definition used by the Government's Higher Education Funding Councils and the Research Councils of a full-time postgraduate student 'load', this is 1800 hours per year. (This calculates at approximately 39 hours per week, allowing for 6 weeks holiday per year.) In practice, though, most students devote a greater number of hours than this to their research study, especially at key stages of the programme. Part-Time Students Part-time students are expected to ac hieve the same learning outcomes by the end of their registered period and to devote the same efforts to research study but on a pro-rata basis, over the longer period. Specific arrangements for the supervision and monitoring of progress of part-time students are determined prior to admission. MRes Students only A notification of absence form can be obtained from the Postgraduate & Research Office.

Holidays

All PhD students are entitled to 6 weeks holiday per annum, including all public holidays. Students should arrange their holidays in consultation with their supervisors so that work plans are not disrupted. MRes students may take up to 2 weeks holiday in consultation with their Supervisor. For absences longer than 2 weeks, students must complete a Notification of Absence form available from the Postgraduate and Research Office (W/2.01A) to be signed by the MRes Course Director.

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Absence/Sickness Reporting

It is IMPERATIVE that every absence is reported appropriately and all Cardiff School of Biosciences students MUST contact the Postgraduate Office, Mrs Swapna Khandavalli 02920 875243 or email [email protected] or email [email protected] on the FIRST DAY OF ABSENCE. The Postgraduate Office will then notify your supervisor. If you are absent for 7 or more consecutive calendar days then you, or someone acting on your behalf, must inform Mrs Swapna Khandavalli: Ø Ø Ø Ø The nature of the illness (treated with confidence) The date the illness commenced The likely duration of the illness Confirmation that a medical certificate has been sent to the Cardiff School of Biosciences Postgraduate Secretary.

If the medical certificate covers illness for a period in excess of 14 days, a final certificate, from your doctor, stating that you are fit to resume work is required. In the event of hospital treatment the School will require "entry" and "discharge" certificates. The procedures described above apply to CONTINUING ABSENCE and the Postgraduate Secretary should be informed of progress no later than the FIRST WORKING DAY following expiry of EACH CERTIFICATE. Stipend payments during prolonged illness will depend on student compliance with the appropriate codes for reporting absence and each individual case is assessed in consultation with the Head of School and the Postgraduate Board. Normally, individuals with prolonged illness (reported correctly) can expect to receive a full stipend for a period of 13 weeks in line with research council recommendations. After this period, unless the School, in consultation with the sponsor (if applicable) decides otherwise, the stipend will be terminated. Withdrawal of sponsorship, for whatever reason, will also involve the termination of a stipend. Entitlements for payments for maternity leave and paternity leave vary depending on your sponsor. Details of these arrangements for Research Council studentships are available from the Postgraduate and Research Office. For all other studentships, it is important that students are aware of their entitlement and details should be obtained from their supervisor(s). The School has always taken a sympathetic approach to students with prolonged illness and will make every attempt to protect the educational career and well being of such students. However, the School, along with the University Code of Practice, agrees that "where absence on the grounds of sickness is due to, or attributable to, either a students' own misconduct or injury whilst working in his/her own time on his/her own account or for another employer for private gain, will not be entitled to an allowance (stipend) except at the discretion of the School". Under some circumstances, a student may wish to apply for LEAVE OF ABSENCE. All requests for an interruption of study e.g. ill health, parental leave, compassionate grounds etc, must be made on the appropriate form available from Mrs Swapna Khandavalli in the Postgraduate And Research Office who will submit this to the Postgraduate Research Leader for approval before submission to Registry. Where an application for an Interruption of Study is made on the grounds of ill health or parental leave, relevant medical evidence must be submitted with the application. An application for an interruption of study made on the grounds of exceptional professional commitments is only applicable to part time students, and must be accompanied by written confirmation and description by the employer of the exceptional workload borne by the student. 29

An application for an Interruption of Study made on the grounds of financial hardship is only applicable where these have arisen as a result of changed circumstances beyond the student's control and not in order to avoid payment of fees to the University. Please note this is not possible retrospectively and any student considering this possibility should discuss their case with the Postgraduate Research Leader.

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Extension to Thesis/Dissertation Submission Deadline (MPhil, MD and PhDs only)

The University, the School and the Funding Bodies keep records of submission rates. The maximal allowable time between initial enrolment and submission of the thesis is 4 years, although the UK Research Councils have stated that their expectation is for students to submit within their funding period. This "4 year rule" is absolute and even permitted University extensions may not officially be acknowledged by the UK Research Councils. In cases of close family bereavement, parental leave and major illness, the School and the University will, of course, permit extensions, but such extensions cannot be numerically recorded on our annual return. Note that extensions for "logistical" reasons (such as equipment malfunction, laboratory relocation, lost field work due to bad weather) are not permitted, and it is expected that the student and supervisor should include such possibilities in the research plan. The regulations governing extensions to thesis submission deadlines, including acceptable grounds, can be found at http://www.cf.ac.uk/regis/sfs/regs/1.08%20%20Extension%20to%20Time%20Limit%20Procedure.doc for postgraduate research candidates and postgraduate Master's stage candidates. All applications must be made on the appropriate form available from the Postgraduate and Research Office. A clear statement from the student's Supervisor must be supplied, supported by appropriate independent evidence providing a summary of the case showing that the case has been evaluated and that the request is considered to be appropriate and providing timescales for completion. Where an application for an extension is made on the grounds of ill health or parental leave, relevant medical evidence must be submitted with the application. Where an application for an extension is made on the grounds of exceptional professional commitments , relevant written verification of workload commitments must be provided by the candidate's employer. A timetable clearly defining the work to be done and timescales for completion must be submitted with ALL applications.

MRes Students

Because of the timing of the final exam board, extensions to the dissertation submission deadline will only be considered under exceptional circumstanc es.

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Plenary Lecture and Divisional Seminar Programmes

As part of the graduate programme, PhD students are required to attend all Plenary Lectures. Cutting edge scientists from around the world are invited to give lectures at Cardiff School of Biosciences. A list of arranged Plenary Lectures can be found online at: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/newsandevents/events/plenarylectureseries/index.html You are also required to attend appropriate Divisional seminar programmes, in consultation with your Supervisor or Research Group Leader. http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/newsandevents/events/plenarylectureseries/plenary-lectureseries-20102011.html ALL POSTGRADUATES ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND ALL PLENARY LECTURES AND THE MAJORITY OF THEIR DIVISIONAL SEMINARS

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Research Degrees Handbook

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/index.html This document contains all information regarding your study at Cardiff University and includes, for example:·

· · · · ·

A Code of Practice for Research Degrees · Introduction · The Research Degree · Responsibilities · Admissions Procedures · Induction · The Research Plan · Skills Development · The Employment of Research Students · Supervision Arrangements · Monitoring of Students' Progress · Student Representation and Feedback · Research Degree Examination · Research Students' Dissatisfaction and Complaints Appeals against Research Degree Examining Board Decisions The Code of Practice for the Involvement of Postgraduate Research Students in Teaching Activities Academic Integrity in Research Degree Study [Academic Regulations Handbook] Cardiff University Senate Regulations for Research Degrees [Academic Regulations Handbook] Appeals Procedure (Postgraduate Research Degrees [Academic Regulations Handbook]

Procedures & Guidelines: · · · · · · Procedures for the Conduct of Research Degree Examinations Procedures & Guidelines for the Conduct of Viva Voce Examinations by Electronic Means Procedure for Applying for a Bar on Access to Theses Procedure for Interruption to Study or Extension to Time Limit Procedure for Exclusion from Research Study Procedure for Appeals against Exclusion/Termination of Candidature

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Section 2

2009/2010

Handbook for Postgraduate Research Students (PhD, MPhil and MD only)

This section details information applicable only to research students. We have students undertaking either 3 or 4 year PhD programmes. Those registered on a 4 year (BBSRC sponsored) programme must, as part of their training, undertake modules BIT002, BIT010 and BIT011 of the Masters in Research course (Section 3). See details of these modules in the relevant sections of this handbook.

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Postgraduate Research Student Diary ­ 2010/11

September October Week 5 Week 1 Date 27th September 4th October 5th October 5th October 8th October 14th October 26th October Event Enrolment & Induction sessions MRes/4 ­Yr PhD teaching starts Demonstrating Lab based session ­ Graduate School Postgraduate Research Board Starting Out Conference for New Postgraduates Starting Out Conference for New Postgraduates Starting Out Conference for New Postgraduates

Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 November Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 February Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 September Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4

16th November

Postgraduate Research Board

December

January

11th January 11th January 20th January

Demonstrating Lab based session ­ Graduate School Postgraduate Research Board Starting Out Conference-New Postgraduates (Jan starts)

9th February

Year 1 Poster Event (all PhD students)

March

22 March

nd

6 Monthly Appraisal ­ All October starts National Science Week Postgraduate Research Board

April

11th April

Starting Out Conference-New Postgraduates (Apr starts)

May

4th May 24th May

Year 2 Poster Evening Postgraduate Research Board

June

July

1st July 21st July 1st August 1st August 31st August 1st September 30th Setember

Submission of Year 1 Report (all PhD students) Starting Out Conference-New Postgraduates(Jul starts)

August

Submission of Year 2 Reports (all PhD students) Submission of Year 3 Reports (4 year PhD students only)

Completion of Year 1 Appraisal

Completion of Year 2 and Year 3 (4y only) Appraisal

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Postgraduate Research Board

The membership of the Postgraduate Research Board is: Ø Professor Paul Kemp - Chair (Postgraduate Research Leader) Ø Mrs Swapna Khandavalli - Secretary (Postgraduate Secretary) Ø Professor Ole Peterson (Director of School )or Professor John Harwood (Deputy Director of School) Ø Professor Tim Jacob (Director of MRes Programme) Ø Mrs Sharon Burgess (Director of Administration) Ø Professor Mike Bruford (Organisms & Environment Divisional PG Tutor) Ø Dr Dipak Ramji (Pathophysiology & Repair Divisional PG Tutor) Ø Dr Kerrie Thomas or David McGonigle (Neuroscience Divisional PG co-Tutors) Ø Dr Helen White-Cooper (Molecular Biosciences Divisional PG Tutor) Ø Nick Puts (PGR student research representative) Remit:

To implement and / or provide the Research Committee and Supervisors with the best advice on the ways: · To maintain the highest quality standard in taught elements, communication and thesis presentation. · To implement the appraisal scheme by which this quality is maintained. · To provide a medium to resolve disputes or difficulties. · To provide criteria for the formation of a Graduate School. · To co-ordinate the allocation of studentships, including RCUK QUOTA studentships, and the selection of PGR students. · To co-ordinate the interview and quality control of non-QUOTA applications, (to be submitted through Postgraduate Office and signed off) and the applicants · To review the Postgraduate Student Assessment Programme. · To manage the postgraduate grievance/student complaint procedures. · To monitor the assessment process set out in the University regulations. · To ensure that in conducting its work, it will integrate consideration of equality and diversity issues into each item of business, (in addition to specifically related agenda items), with a view to valuing and promoting equality and diversity and eliminating discrimination. · To monitor the progression (or otherwise) of PGR students. · To ensure timely submission (within 4 years). · To report to the School' Research Committee. To Provide For Students:

· · · · ·

A manual outlining the expectations of the course, monitoring procedures and details of the School environment. The best working environment that encourages excellence in research by representation to the Research Committee. To provide an enrolment, induction and training programme.

A medium to resolve disputes or difficulties. The forum to be able to provide input into postgraduate education and appraise the manner in which postgraduate education is perceived by the students of the School.

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Postgraduate Research Leader and Postgraduate Secretary

The Divisional Postgraduate Tutors and Postgraduate Secretary (Mrs Swapna Khandavalli) are responsible for responding to day-to-day issues of postgraduate education/research. These include: Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø applications and admissions web information databases and hard files quality control general enquiries general disputes and difficulties student monitoring procedures thesis submissions and vivas course organisation research council postgraduate awards booklets/induction AREG requirements annual review demonstrator Allocation for Undergraduate Practical Sessions maintenance of School's postgraduate web pages

The students should first contact Mrs Swapna Khandavalli ([email protected] phone extension 75243) for any postgraduate related issues during or after their candidature at the School. The Postgraduate Research Leader has an open door policy and will make every effort to provide help and advice to both supervisors and students. Some problems which may be of a personal nature may be better discussed with someone who is independent of your working environment. If such a situation arises you are encouraged to contact Professor Paul Kemp ([email protected], or phone extension 79347). Confidentiality is guaranteed unless you request disclosure.

Divisional Postgraduate Tutors

Each division has one embedded PG tutor responsible for student selection, welfare, project progress and supervisor/ student issues. · · · · Professor Mike Bruford - Organisms and Environment Dr Dipak Ramji - Pathophysiology & Repair Dr Helen White-cooper ­ Molecular Biosciences Dr Kerrie Thomas - Neuroscience

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Postgraduate Monitoring Procedure

Throughout the course of your research you will have the opportunity to obtain a broader perspective of science than just your chosen research area. To achieve this, the School will organise a number of courses, some of which are optional and others at which attendance is monitored, such as the School Seminar Programme. Your progress will be continually monitored by your supervisor but in addition, a number of more formal assessments will occur periodically throughout your three/four years. Details of the appraisal system set out on the following pages.

Successful completion of the 6-monthly appraisal and appropriate written Report must be approved by the Postgraduate Board (based on the recommendations of your Thesis Committee), and are required in order to progress to the next year.

Monitoring & Development for Postgraduate Research Students

Year One

v Attendance for all the sessions of the induction course except those described as optional (there will be a register). With guidance from your supervisor you are asked to select from the University Skills Development Programme and optional courses and confirmation of attendance at these will be monitored. v The Induction course is your introduction to University and School requirements and working practice which includes School Safety and Demonstrating requirements. Most of the optional courses are techniques based and have a direct application to your studies or you may wish to develop transferable skills. Most of the courses are short and do not involve a heavy time commitment away from your studies/research. You are therefore advised to make the most of the courses on offer. v Shortly after registration your supervisor will be asked to nominate a second supervisor and an Assessor. Together, these 3 academics will constitute your Thesis Committee. The second supervisor may be involved in the research programme where knowledge and skills are outside those of the principal supervisor. Your Thesis Committee will be responsible for appraising your work over the next three/four year period. The initial planning of your project with agreed agenda/milestones is very important (see advice on the Research Plan from the University's Research Degree Handbook

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/a-code-of-pratice-for-research-degrees.html#researchplan

v In February, each student must submit a poster on their project for review/judging their progress and feedback given. January, April and July starters must submit their 1st year poster during the following year (in February), although they will be technically classed as 2nd year students. All students will present to the group a two minute summary of their poster using one Powerpoint slide. Posters will be assessed by a small panel of invited academics from within the School. v After nearly 6 months, the Postgraduate Secretary will send (via your supervisor) a 6 monthly appraisal form. This has to be filled in promptly, signed and returned to the Postgraduate Secretary. The completion of this form is necessary to comply with University regulations and the Graduate Board of the University has to be informed of noncompliance. If you, or your supervisor, fail to complete TWO consecutive 6 month 38

appraisals, then your studentship/higher degree registration is subject to termination. All information on your progress is then retained in your personal School file. This is the first formal appraisal of your studies carried out with your supervisor and/or assessor. v By 1st July, each student (with a start date in October) must submit to the Postgraduate & Research Office, a typewritten report (abstract, contents, introduction, methods, results/ conclusions) of sufficient detail to describe progress. The format of this report is essentially a manuscript suitable for submission to the general scientific journal, Current Biology. Check the Instructions for Authors on the Current Biology web site http://www.cell.com/current-biology/authors. This is a real opportunity to think clearly through the project and to show that you can work towards precise and definitive aims. This report cannot be achieved overnight and thus you need to plan to meet this deadline. Your written submission may contain substantial sections which are useful for your final thesis. It should show clear understanding of the project, the areas of controversy and how your approach will improve matters. Your writing skills are also being assessed. Have you been precise? Could the reader repeat your work? There should be evidence that you are improving in both developmental design and technical expertise. Finally, you will have the opportunity to develop your oral communication skills and convince your Thesis Committee that you are on top of your study in the oral exam. v Your written report will be read by your Thesis Committee, who provide you with feedback on your progress. The Thesis Committee will require an oral defence of your study. Following a short oral exam, it will complete an assessment form and return it to the Postgraduate Board. You also have a section in the assessment form to complete and sign order for you to give your opinion on your supervision and progress. Recommendations to your sponsor and Postgraduate Research Board for continuation, and specifically to enable you to progress to the next year will be based on two factors: the satisfactory completion of the six month appraisal and the outcome of your written report before the end of august. A delay in completion of this appraisal process will mean that you will have to enrol as an MPhil student for the second year. Transfer to PhD status will only occur after successful completion of the appraisal process. For monitoring procedures: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/a-code-of-pratice-for-researchdegrees.html#monitoringofprogress If you disagree with the decisions taken on continuation or degree transfer/offer you may appeal (within 7 days) to the Postgraduate Research Board for an immediate review of your case. Your grounds for appeal should be clearly stated and given in writing to the Chairman of the Postgraduate Research Board, who, together with Head of Research Committee/Head of School, will form an independent review body.

IF YOU ARE A 4 YEAR PHD STUDENT, WE FULLY APPRECIATE THAT YOU WILL HAVE HAD LESS TIME TO CONCENTRATE ON YOUR RESEARCH BECAUSE YOU HAVE BEEN UNDERTAKING THE TAUGHT MODULES OF THE MRES. NEVERTHELESS, YOU MUST STILL SUBMIT YOUR 1ST YEAR REPORT ON TIME AND THE THESIS COMMITTEE WILL ASSESS YOU APPROPRIATELY Year Two for 3 year PhD students v At 18 months, together with your supervisor, please complete the six monthly appraisal

form and return it to the Postgraduate Secretary. v In May, each student must submit a poster on their project for review/judging their progress (by all members of School) and feedback given. As with the first year, each student will give a two minute introduction to the poster to the group using one Powerpoint slide. 39

v By 1st August, each student (registered in October) must submit a typewritten report of sufficient detail (maximum 10,000 words excluding figures, legends, references etc and the main body of the text should be in size 12 font and 1.5 line spacing) to show improvement in progress from the first year assessment. THIS IS ESSENTIALLY A MINI THESIS AND WILL PROBABLY FORM THE BASIS OF YOUR FINAL SUBMISSION ­ PLEASE TAKE IT SERIOUSLY. The report will be read by your Thesis Committee who will also conduct a mini viva and will report back to the Postgraduate Board on your progress. There is an opportunity for your supervisor to comment on your work and you are asked to sign the report and add any further comments you consider important. This is your opportunity to appraise this work with your supervisor and to write up the data for publication or thesis chapters. v Whilst the above describe the formal aspects of in-house appraisal for year two, you are likely to be involved in a variety of activities. In this year, we particularly encourage your attendance at any available management courses. We also hope that you will attend a scientific meeting at national, if not international, level and present your work as a poster or preferably by oral communication. If you do the latter at a recognised scientific meeting (confirmation required by supervisor), then you do not need to present an internal seminar within the School in year three. v Based on a successful outcome of t e 18 month appraisal, poster presentation and h second year written report, the Postgraduate Board will recommend to University Graduate Board that you should continue your studies into the third year.

Year 3 for 3 Year PhD Students

The intention is to minimise disruption of your final year in order that you may complete your experimental work and finish the writing of your thesis. It is never too early to be thinking about writing your thesis. At this point, approximately 75% of your time is complete and so this discussion is to direct you into organising a thesis format. Also discussed will be details of the viva organisation, what an examiner is looking for and how you can approach questions. v At 30 months, you and your supervisor need to complete a 6 monthly appraisal form and return it to the postgraduate secretary. ALSO REQUIRED WILL BE YOUR THESIS PLAN WITH A DETAILED TIMETABLE, WHICH MUST INCLUDE THE TIMING OF YOUR FINAL EXPERIMENTS AND THE TIMING OF THE WRITING-UP. v If you have not already given an external oral communication at a recognised conference/society meeting you may be asked to give a seminar within the School.

v At 36 months, you and your supervisor must complete a final 6 monthly appraisal form and

return to the postgraduate secretary who should also receive in writing your estimated submission date. Should this time exceed 42 months then the University requirements are that you and your supervisor continue to supply 6 month progress reports for the University Graduate Board.

2nd Year for 4 Year PhD Students

Your timetable will be slightly different from the 3 year students. Towards the end of Year 2 and by 1st of August, a synopsis of your work should be submitted to the Postgraduate and Research Office, again in the form of a Current Biology manuscript, which will then be forwarded to your Thesis Committee. You will have a viva and complete a report form along with a work plan/timetable for your future work. 40

3rd Year for 4 Year PhD Students v At 30 months, together with your supervisor, please complete the six monthly appraisal

form and return it to the Postgraduate Secretary. v By 1st August, each student (registered in October) must submit a typewritten report of sufficient detail (maximum 10,000 words excluding figures, legends, references etc and the main body of the text should be in size 12 font and 1.5 line spacing) to show improvement in progress from the first year assessment. THIS IS ESSENTIALLY A MINI THESIS AND WILL PROBABLY FORM THE BASIS OF YOUR FINAL SUBMISSION ­ PLEASE TAKE IT SERIOUSLY. The report will be read by your Thesis Committee who will also conduct a mini viva and will report back to the Postgraduate Board on your progress. There is an opportunity for your supervisor to comment on your work and you are asked to sign the report and add any further comments you consider important. This is your opportunity to appraise this work with your supervisor and to write up the data for publication or thesis chapters. v Whilst the above describe the formal aspects of in-house appraisal for year two, you are likely to be involved in a variety of activities. In this year, we particularly encourage your attendance at any available management courses. We also hope that you will attend a scientific meeting at national, if not international, level and present your work as a poster or preferably by oral communication. If you do the latter at a recognised scientific meeting (confirmation required by supervisor), then you do not need to present an internal seminar within the School in year three. v If you have not already given an external oral communication at a recognised conference/society meeting you may be asked to give a seminar within the School. v Based on a successful outcome of the 30 month appraisal, poster presentation and second year written report, the Postgraduate Board will recommend to University Graduate Board that you should continue your studies into the third year.

4th Year for 4 Year PhD Students

rd Your 4th year will then proceed as described above for the 3 year of the 3 year-funded students.

v If you have not already given an external oral communication at a recognised conference/society meeting you may be asked to give a seminar within the School. v At 42 months, you and your supervisor need to complete a 6 monthly appraisal form and return it to the postgraduate secretary. ALSO REQUIRED WILL BE YOUR THESIS PLAN WITH A DETAILED TIMETABLE, WHICH MUST INCLUDE THE TIMING OF YOUR FINAL EXPERIMENTS AND THE TIMING OF THE WRITING-UP. At this time, the postgraduate secretary who should also receive in writing your estimated submission date, which cannot be after the 48 month since enrolment. Note: Whether you are on a 3 or 4 year PhD programme the submission date of your thesis has to be within 4 years.

41

Part-time Students

PhD Students All part-time students will undergo a similar appraisal process as above with 6 monthly appraisal meetings with your supervisor. As with full-time students, a written report has to be submitted at the end of Year 1, 2 and 3. At the end of the fourth year, a brief synopsis of progress will be submitted along with a work plan/timescale for your final year's work. MPhil/MD Students All part-time students will undergo a similar appraisal process as above with 6 monthly appraisal meetings with your supervisor. A written report will be submitted 12 months after enrolment. The report should include an abstract, introduction, research methods and results section, plus an outline of future work. The report should not exceed 5000 words. The report will be assessed by your assessor/Assessor and a viva undertaken. Students are reminded of the need to avoid Plagiarism. Please carefully read the section on Plagiarism in General Information (See page 21)

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Submission of a Thesis and the viva for the Award of PhD

Time-Limits for Thesis Submission Time-limits are calculated in calendar years from the date of initial registration on the scheme. A candidature lapses if a thesis is not submitted within the time-limit stipulated below, and in the form and manner prescribed by University Regulations:PhD:3 years full-time study; 1 year writing up 4 years full-time study including writing up 5 years part-time study; 2 years writing up `Staff' candidates 7 years MPhil/MD:1 year full-time study; 2 years writing up 2 years full-time study; 1 year writing up 2 years part-time study; 3 years writing up `Staff' candidates 5 years

Although students are granted time for writing up, the School of Biosciences encourages submission within the candidature period (i.e. during fee paying status). Students who hold a postgraduate Masters Degree obtained by research or advanced study at an approved University which provides sufficient academic background, may be permitted to complete their proposed research within an agreed reduced period. In January of your final Year each student must attend the seminar on `Writing a Thesis' given by the Graduate School. This Seminar gives details of the submission process which is outlined below. If you would like a `Practice Viva', this can be arranged after thesis submission. Usually such a viva would be conducted by members of your Thesis Committee, but you can approach any member of academic staff, including the Divisional PG tutors and the PG Research Leader in this regard.

Essential tips and advice on `Thesis Writing'

What constitutes a thesis? Ø Title Ø Preface containing declarations, acknowledgements, abstract & contents pages Ø Introduction containing background to the project and project aims Ø Experimental section Ø General discussion Ø Bibliography Ø Appendices Ø Manuscripts Thesis layout A4 format, 1.5 or double spacing, minimum font size 12pt. Clear black print on one side of page only. Leave adequate margins for binding and trimming. Diagrams, maps or other documents that cannot be bound in the Thesis can be submitted in a portfolio. Items such as video tapes should be in a container containing same info as on the spine of the thesis. Need to submit 2 copies, normally temporary binding prior to viva. Details on the spine to include: surname + initials, full or abbreviated title, name of degree e.g. PhD, Year of submission, volume number. Word limit: The text of a PhD thesis should not normally exceed 80,000 words (excluding bibliographies and appendices). 43

Word limit: The text of an MPhil, MScD by Research, MD or MCh thesis should not normally exceed 50,000 words (excluding bibliographies and appendices). Bar on Access: should already have been applied for

Submission of thesis

Stage One: Submit two temporary bound copies of your thesis to the Postgraduate Secretary, Mrs Swapna Khandavalli, Room W/2.01A, BIOSI 2. Other documents required are: · Two copies of the `Notice of Submission' and `Summary of Thesis' forms. (available at http://www.cf.ac.uk/regis/resources/PGR_Submission_200701.doc; http://www.cf.ac.uk/regis/resources/SummaryofThesisform(PGR)PG-R-06-10.doc or from Postgraduate and Research office) · A cheque for the examination fee (Staff and resubmissions only) PhD - £269.00; MD, MPhil - £223.00 (payable to `Cardiff University') The supervisor also needs to provide: · Name and address, etc. of an external examiner who is willing to act (forms available from the Postgraduate & Research Office). The principal delay occurs with the nomination/acceptance of external examiner by the Academic Registry. · Name of an internal examiner (often your assessor) · Date of intended viva (if known at this stage) · A statement of whether the student wishes the supervisor to attend the viva · The Postgraduate & Research Office will arrange a Chairperson, in accordance with the agreed rotation system approved by the Research Committee. Stage Two: The Postgraduate Secretary or the Postgraduate Research Leader will notify the Academic Registry of choice of external examiner. Once approval of the external examiner has been received from Registry, the Postgraduate Secretary, will send the thesis to the external and internal examiner. A Chairperson will be appointed at this stage. The Secretary of the Postgraduate Board will: · inform the student of the date/time of viva · confirm the date/time of viva with the internal examiner · confirm arrangements with the Chair of viva Stage Three: The viva is overseen and conducted in accordance with University regulations and the Chair should receive: · a written report from the external examiner · a written report from the internal examiner · any additional report from both examiners following the viva examination The Chair of the viva then arranges for the appropriate forms to be completed, providing details of the outcome including · the signed pass list for successful candidates. · external and internal examiner reports 44

All completed paperwork must be returned to the Postgraduate & Research Office for processing immediately after the viva. Stage Four: On many occasions examiners ask for a number of minor corrections to a thesis. A guarantee that these are satisfied usually falls under the jurisdiction of the internal examiner who then needs to inform the Chairperson in writing that these are complete. Students are advised not to delay completing these corrections (University Regulations state that corrections must be completed 12 weeks of the viva date). Once the corrections are completed a successful candidate can have the theses permanently bound. Two copies should be returned to Mrs Swapna Khandavalli, who will arrange for one copy to be deposited in our own library and the other sent to the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. Stage Five: If all aspects have been completed successfully the Registry will inform the Head of School (and independently the student) of the outcome. This confirmation of pass list is retained on file by the Secretary of Postgraduate Board. Further information concerning viva voce examinations can be found on the following web pages: Research Degree Examinations: http://www.cf.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/procedures-for-theconduct-of-research-degree-examination.html Stage Six: (Graduation) If the student has chosen to attend the graduation ceremony (on the `Notice of Submission' form), Registry will contact students with all relevant details 3 weeks prior to the ceremony. For any further information, please contact the Postgraduate and Research Office. Students who wish to attend Graduation ceremony (in July) must make sure that they submit their final hard bound theses and the corrections are signed off by the internal examiner on or before 31st May. (if 31 st May falls on a weekend or a bank holiday, the deadline will the preceding Friday). If you fail to meet this deadline, you will have to wait to graduate in the following summer.

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Guidelines for Poster Presentation

The general format of the Poster event is that each student will, with a aid of a single Powerpoint slide, introduce their poster at the beginning of the event. This will help your peers and the assessors to put your work in the context before viewing the poster. Your presentation should not exceed 2 minutes. A formal assessment of your poster by a panel of judges will follow. The posters will be judged by several members of academic staff. Following a 2 -minute presentation session, judges will spend approximately 5-10 minutes talking to students about their work so students must be by their poster for the judging to take place. Students will be judged on the presentation of their poster and their ability to talk about their project. Below are some guidelines and criteria on which the posters will be judged: · A poster should visually appear "uncluttered" with necessary information. · Text should be large enough to read from a distance: Headings approx 50-60 pt, text no smaller than 20pt. · - Should have a title, student name and supervisor(s) name(s). · - Clearly state the hypothesis or overall objective of the project. · - Have a list of well-defined realistic Aims; these could, but not essential, be divided into short term (ie Year 1) and longer term aims (Years 2-4). · A short concise paragraph on the background to the proposed project. · The approach to be taken in your study and the methods to be used. Details of methods should be concise. · Use large relevant diagrams to describe your proposed study rather than text wherever possible. · Present any preliminary data again using well annotated figures/diagrams and limited text. The amount of preliminary data is NOT a criteria for marking. You are early into your PhD/MPhil studies and the amount of data will be very variable depending on the nature of the project. · Direct your reader through your poster in a logical and correct order using appropriate headings, numbers and/or arrows etc. · Summarise any conclusions from your preliminary data. · Conclude with expected outcomes and significance of the project. Judges will use a proforma sheet to assess the posters so that feedback on the good and bad points of a poster can be fed back to the students afterwards. Posters should be A0 in size. They can be either landscape or portrait in orientation. Please contact Bob Jones ([email protected] ), C/1.06, BIOSI 2 for poster printing. Please note that the electronic copies of the posters in A4 size must be submitted to ([email protected] ) at least a week prior to the actual event.

46

Demonstrating and Demonstrators' Code of Practice

For logistical reasons 1st year Postgraduate students are not eligible for demonstrating until the Undergraduate Spring Semester (sign-up will be in October/November). 1. All postgraduates who are making satisfactory progress with their research programmes and have received appropriate training are eligible for demonstrating duties. Students must register for demonstrating on the allocated "Sign Up Days" this will be held by Mrs Swapna Khandavalli ([email protected]) ext 75243, in the Postgraduate & Research Office, Room W/2.01A, BIOSI 2, dates will be circulated with at least two weeks advanced notice. 2. There will be two "Sign Up Days" for each semester, on one of these days an afternoon will be dedicated to telephone allocations. Students should visit the office where they can choose which session they would like to do and also see the practicals they have already been requested for by Practical Leaders. Students will provide contact details and information regarding their skills on the day and be given a handout outlining their responsibilities regarding demonstrating. All will be given a print out of their allocations and there whole timetable will be circulated at a later date. THERE WILL BE ZERO TOLERANCE OF STUDENTS WHO DO NOT TURN UP TO THEIR ALLOCATED SESSION AND DO N OT INFORM THE POSTGRADUATE OFFICE AND THEIR PRACTICAL LEADER IN GOOD TIME. 3. All new postgraduates MUST attend a training session detailing the role of demonstrators, which will be held near the start of teaching in the Autumn Semester. A signed attendance register will be taken during this session. Non-attendance will lead to exclusion from the scheme. 4. Notices giving details of the allocation of demonstrators to specific practicals and the member of staff responsible for that class will be sent to all demonstrators via email, posted on Blackboard and on the designated notice board immediately outside the Biology office (BIOSI 1) or Postgraduate notice board (BIOSI 2). It is expected that demonstrators will act in support of the member of staff responsible for the practical class. They should familiarise themselves with the requirements of the practical by obtaining a copy of the appropriate practical schedule from the member of staff concerned, in advance of the briefing session, to allow time for necessary background reading. 5. Staff will either meet all demonstrators in the relevant teaching laboratory 20 minutes before the practical class to discuss procedures, potential areas of difficulty and to explain any calculations involved or hold a separate briefing meeting before the date of the practical. This meeting is a required part of your training. Attendance is compulsory and nonattendees may be excluded from the practical. The briefing meeting is the opportunity for demonstrators to raise any queries a bout procedures/theoretical background/content etc, but they should not hesitate to seek help from the member of staff during the practical itself if necessary. It is the responsibility of demonstrators to check their pigeonholes and email regularly for messages from staff and to contact the member of staff concerned if they are in any doubt about the time/venue of the briefing. 6. At the start of a practical, each demonstrator may be allocated a specific group of students or a specific area of responsibility. Demonstrators should circulate around the group of students and ensure that each of their `charges' understands the purpose of the practical, the methods and procedures and the safety precautions, providing assistance when necessary. Demonstrators should not just wait for students to approach them with queries/problems. 7. Demonstrators must wear their name badge in all practicals. 8. Demonstrators may be called upon to assist in the marking of practical exercises. Detailed marking schemes will be provided. Marked work should be returned by the specified date. 47

9. An appraisal of the performance of each demonstrator will be made by the staff member in charge of that practical. 10. The involvement of Postgraduate Research Students in Teaching activities is described in: University's Code of Practice http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/sfs/rdqh/a-code-of-pratice-forresearch-degrees.html#teaching 11. Advice will be given to postgraduate students who will be involved in teaching, during induction week.

Guidelines for Demonstrators

Demonstrators have a very important role in undergraduate teaching in our School. In order to maintain the School's excellent standard of teaching, it is vital that all demonstrators are thoroughly prepared for each practical/problem solving session, and that they carry out their duties enthusiastically and efficiently. The following guidelines may assist you in achieving these aims. DO Ø Check your pigeonholes and email regularly for messages from staff. Ø Attending the demonstrator "Sign Up Days" Ø Contacting the Practical Leader as soon as they have signed up to the practical and verifying that they are available and suitable to demonstrate the particular practical. Ø Obtain a copy of the practical schedule well in advance of the briefing meeting and read it thoroughly before the meeting. Ø Raise any queries or problems with the staff member at the briefing session or in the practical itself if the issue arises there. Don't be afraid to ask for help from staff nobody will think less of you for wanting to be absolutely clear about a particular point. If necessary arrange to see the staff member before the date of the practical. Ø Prepare for the practical thoroughly. Make sure that you understand both the theoretical background and the detailed procedures involved. Ensure that you do the necessary background reading to enable you to demonstrate in a thoroughly professional manner. Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Familiarise yourself with any equipment used in the practical. Familiarise yourself with the layout of the lab, location of fire exits, eye washes, etc. Familiarise yourself with the safety precautions to be adopted in the practical. Wear your name badge at all practicals. Students will also be wearing name badges. Address each student by name. Be friendly and approachable. Circulate around all students in your charge, giving each your personal attention. Check that each is progressing satisfactorily - the quiet student may be reticent to ask for the help that he/she needs and is therefore probably the most in need of help. If you are required to mark practical assessments, make sure that you understand the marking scheme fully before you begin marking. Do not hesitate to raise points of difficulty which arise during marking with the member of staff. Inform the staff member immediately of any accident, or other incident, that occurs during the practical. Tell the member of staff immediately of any safety hazard that you observe. Feel free to make suggestions about ways in which safety procedures could be improved. Tell the staff member of any ideas you have about modifications to the procedure/content of the practical. Staff will be happy to receive suggestions about ways in which the practical could be improved. 48

Ø

Ø Ø Ø

Ø Ensure that your training sheet and appraisal form are completed and signed before leaving the session. Ø If you can not make a practical at any point you need to contact the Postgraduate Office as soon as possible. THERE WILL BE ZERO TOLERANCE IF STUDENTS DO NOT TURN UP AND HAVE NOT INFORMED THE POSTGRADUATE OFFICE. Ø Postgraduates need to take the responsibility of demonstrating seriously, this entails being proactive in the laboratory. DON'T Ø Arrive late for the briefing session or practical. Ø Leave the practical for a break or at the end of a session without checking with the staff member. Ø Stand around in groups, chatting with other demonstrators. Ø Spend too much time talking to individual students at the expense of the others in your group. Ø Be evasive when you don't know the answer to a question - ask the staff member for help. Ø Wait for students to approach you. Be pro-active and check on the progress and understanding of each of your students regularly.

Demonstrating Payments

Registration Payment registration forms and applicable tax forms are available from Mrs Lindsey Evans (Finance Office, Room W/0.10, BIOSI 2, ext. 74170). Following completion, please return these to Lindsey Evans in the Finance Office BIOSI 2, where they will be processed and sent to the University's Salary Section, which will add your details to the payroll. Claiming Payment Claims are made by completing a "Demonstration Claim Form" available from the Finance Office. This form should then be returned to Lindsey Evans in the Finance Office. The academic member of staff associated with the relevant practical(s) MUST countersign completed forms. A member of the Finance staff is the authorised signatory who will sign the monthly return to the Salaries Section. Usually, claim forms should be submitted during the second week of the month. The Cardiff School of Biosciences Finance Section requires that all claims for payment are made within one month of the practical class for which you are claiming. Remember that if you are unable to demonstrate at the allocated time or wish to change with someone else you must inform the demonstrating coordinator so that the finance office can be notified and the correct payments are authorised. If you have any queries regarding your payments, please contact Mrs Lindsey Evans (BIOSI 2 Finance Office, room W/0.10, ext. 74170).

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Staff Responsibilities in the Demonstrating Scheme

1. All postgraduate supervisors should strongly encourage their postgraduate students to become involved in demonstrating. 2. Supplying the Postgraduate Office with their demonstrator request forms, this should detail the particular students they require and the skills they need demonstrators to have. This should be supplied in April for autumn semester practicals and October for spring semester practicals. 3. Consultations with demonstrators after the allocations have been made. This will include responsibility to find out more about the students if needed and to liaise with them regarding their skills. 4. Staff should ensure that their relevant postgraduates are advised of the need to complete Demonstrator's Registration with the PG office. 5. The final allocations will be sent to the Practical Leaders well in advance of each semester. This is when responsibility for communication is transferred from the Postgraduate Office to Practical Leaders and Demonstrators. 6. For each Semester, a list of staff and demonstrator duties will be prepared for all laboratory or other sessions requiring demonstrators. The names of demonstrators for each practical will also be sent to the relevant member of staff. Staff must ensure that demonstrators have a copy of the relevant practical schedule at least a week before the practical date. 7. Staff must meet their demonstrators for a "Training" session before the practical to explain the objectives and discuss any problems or organisational issues. This is part of the training the University requires us to provide for our demonstrators and you need to sign the demonstrators "Training Record" to record that this meeting has occurred, even if it is a fairly informal affair. Demonstrators should be asked specifically if they have any uncertainties. 8. At the start of the practical staff should allocate each of their demonstrators to a given group of students or assign them to a specific area of responsibility. The demonstrator will supervise these students or the particular activity. 9. Staff should assess the performance of each demonstrator in a practical on a five-point scale on the demonstrator appraisal form (available from the Postgraduate & Research Office, W/2.01A, BIOSI 2), and where appropriate should highlight those areas of performance which need to be improved. Demonstrators are entitled to see their appraisal form. All forms should be returned to the Postgraduate & Research Office. 10. Only staff in charge of a practical should sign the Demonstrators Claim Form. 11. If demonstrators are required to mark work, clear written guidance must be provided with a marking scheme and a statement of the deadline for the return of marked reports. 12. Inform the Postgraduate Office of any non-attendance.

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Section 3

2010/2011

MRes in Biosciences Student Handbook

This section details information applicable only to students registered for the Masters in Biosciences programme.

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MRes in Biosciences [Master of Research in Biosciences] Welcome

I would very much like to welcome you to the Postgraduate Master's in research programme and to the Cardiff School of Biosciences. On behalf of the whole School I hope that your time in Cardiff will be productive and enjoyable. You can find out more about the School of Biosciences from the School's intranet: http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/ (use your network username and password to gain access). The School is one of the major academic research units in the University, delivering a wide range of high quality postgraduate training, supported by its research expertise in a variety of molecular, ecological and cellular disciplines. See http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/research/index.html for a detailed description of the research activity within the School of Biosciences. If you are a new research student then this handbook will provide you with information about the course, the School, the postgraduate induction programme, other students and staff together with details of your research development and assessment procedures. Further information about the MRes teaching and available research projects can be found on Blackboard ­ MRes Core Information (http://cue.cf.ac.uk). If you are a returning student then many aspects will be familiar to you although with the continuing change in postgraduate education some of the enclosed information may be new or involve modifications in your training/assessment procedures. The Postgraduate Board of the School assumes overall responsibility for your training programme, its administration and monitoring procedures and some of the enclosed information is subject to change as the Postgraduate Board receives comments from students, supervisors and/or the School Research Committee. We want you to enjoy your time with us and if you have any queries or concerns please do not hesitate to contact the Postgraduate Office (W/2.01a) in the first instance: Rachel Paterson, MRes Secretary (W/2.01b), Ext 70860 (external: 029 2087 0860), [email protected]

Professor Tim Jacob Course Director

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MRes Programme ­ 2010/11

Stage 1 - Taught component of the programme Christmas Recess: Stage 2 - Research project

September October Date Mon 27th Sep Tue 28th Sep Wed 29th Sep Wed 29th Sep Mon 4th Oct 9-12 am Tues 12th Oct Fri 15th Oct (9am ­ 6:30pm) Fri 29st Oct Fri 29th October 10-11 am Wed 10th Nov 2pm Wed 10th Nov Wed 17th Nov (8am ­ 5pm) 14th-20th Nov 2pm Wed 24th Nov Tues 14th Dec (2pm-5pm) 5 pm Thurs 16th Dec Fri 17th Dec Fri 17th Dec Wed 5th Jan Tues 18th Jan Tues 18th (pm) Jan Wed 19th Jan Thurs 20th Jan Mon 24th Jan February Tues 1st Feb (10am-11am) Wed 2nd Feb (10am-12pm) 2pm Wed 23rd Feb April 2pm Wed 6th April May Thurs 5th May (10am-12pm) Fri 27th May June 11:00 am Wed 1st Jun 11.30 am Wed 1st Jun 2 pm Wed 1st Jun Wed 29th Jun (2pm-5pm) July 10 am Thurs 14th Jul August Fri 5th Aug Fri 12th Aug Tues 16th Aug Wed 17th Aug September 3pm Fri 2nd Sep 2 pm Wed 14th Sep Wed 21st Sep Thurs 22nd Sep (9am-5pm) 10:30 Fri 23rd Sep

Mon 4th Oct 2010- Fri 17th Dec 2010 Sat 18th Dec 2010 ­ Tues 4th Jan 2011 Tues 25th Jan 2011 ­ Fri 2nd Sept 2011

November

December

January

Event Enrolment Induction Sessions Induction Sessions Meeting with MRes Course Director (2 pm, E/1.03) Stage I and taught modules start First meeting with personal tutor in week beginning 4th Oct Presentations by Research Division Leaders Visit to National Botanic Gardens Deadline for the choice of research project supervisor (and title if possible) Submit BIT002 Portfolios for feedback Interim Portfolio meeting with Course Director Staff-student Panel (W/0.12) Field Trip (BIT002) READING WEEK MRes Schemes Board, CCCR, MRes student rep to attend Poster session (BIT011) in E1.03 Deadline for BIT011 Grant Application Submit signed Project Notification form to Postgraduate office Complete Portfolio pt 1 (BIT002) CHRISTMAS Deadlines: Portfolio pt 2 (BIT002) & Mini- Project (BIT010), (BIT011) portfolio Internal Exam Board Viva list posted VIVAs Interim Exam Board & Results released Meeting with Project Co-ordinator Stage 2 (Research Project) begins PROJECT Introduction to BIT013 (E1.03) Introduction to BIT011 (W0.12) MRes Schemes Board, CCCR, MRes student rep to attend PROJECT Third meeting with personal tutor MRes Schemes Board, CCCR, MRes student rep to attend PROJECT Introduction to Poster & Oral Presentation Assessments (E1.03) Deadline for Mid-Course Progress Form (hand in to P/g Office) PROJECT Interim meeting with Project Co-ordinator Staff-Student Panel MRes Schemes Board, CCCR, MRes student rep to attend Poster presentations (W0.12 and West Wing Foyer) PROJECT Dissertation workshop (E1/.01) PROJECT Deadline for draft dissertation. Project log sheet ­ discuss with supervisor Feedback on draft dissertation from supervisor Hand in Project Log Sheet to P/g Office Meeting with Course Director Deadline for final submission of dissertation MRes Schemes Board, CCCR, MRes student rep to attend Internal Exam Board Oral Presentations venue TBC Final Exam Board and results released

Please note: These dates may be subject to change. Please check Blackboard and your Cardiff University e-mail account regularly for timetable, changes and additions.

53

Course Administration

The main people that you need to communicate with during the programme are as follows. · · · · · · · · · · Professor Tim Jacob, MRes Biosciences Programme Director. Ext 74105, [email protected] Mrs Rachel Paterson, MRes Secretary, W2.01B. Ext 70860, [email protected] Mrs Swapna Khandavalli, Postgraduate Office. Ext. 75243, [email protected] Professor Paul Kemp, Postgraduate Research Leader. Ext 79437, [email protected] Professor Adrian Harwood, Module Coordinator, Research Techniques in Biosciences. Ext 79358, [email protected] Dr Rob Thomas, MRes Tutor. Ext 76653, [email protected] Dr Jo Lello, Module Coordinator, Data Handling and Statistics. Ext 75885, [email protected] Dr Hefin Jones, Module Coordinator, Key Skills in Research Practice. Ext 75357, [email protected] Computing and network matters: Chris Stent, ext 74092, [email protected] Your project supervisor (will be assigned during the year)

MRes Study Room

Your study room is Room 1.67a, Main Building. The entry code can be obtained from the Postgraduate Secretary.

54

Aims and Learning Outcomes: MRes in Biosciences

The Cardiff MRes in Biosciences provides students with postgraduate level research experience and skills in one of the areas of bioscience provided within the Cardiff School of Biosciences distinctive, high quality research groups. This overall aim is achieved by three compulsory initial modules taught over 4 months, followed by an eight month research project culminating in a dissertation. The research project is taken in one of the following six areas of expertise: Biodiversity and Ecological Processes, Connective Tissue Biology, Genetics, Microbiology, Molecular and Cell Biology and Neuroscience (see http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/research/index.html for details of the individual research groups). This course structure aims to provide students with high level technical and research skills, the ability to analyse molecular and numerical data, to design practical research experimental programmes or field work, to learn from literature and others and to produce a high quality scientific report. In this way students will be equipped to start careers in research in commercial, hospital or medical laboratories, research institutes, universities or similar organisations. They will be able to do this by direct entry into a research profession or after studying further for a PhD see below. This Master's level programme is especially suited to the preparation for PhD study by students who have taken a general bioscience or medically related course without a large research element. The aims of the MRes are governed by Benchmarks devised by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Master's level degrees. These state that, upon completion of a Master's degree students should be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. display mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skills. demonstrate expertise in highly specialised and advanced technical, professional and/or research skills. conduct research, or advanced technical or professional activity. design and apply appropriate research methodologies communicate results of research to peers. accept accountability in related decision making including use of supervision.

Specifically, the Modules within the MRes have the following aims: General Aims: · To provide advanced study which will be at, or informed by, the forefront of scientific knowledge · To provide an understanding of the major research disciplines in modern bioscience · To educate students in a range of state-of-the-art biological research techniques · To impart the skills necessary to be a professional scientist · To train the students in the necessary analytical skills to interpret scientific research data · To provide experience of independent, methodological research in Biosciences · To equip students with the skills necessary to present their work as a poster and an oral presentation Educational Aims: · To evaluate and interpret the results of different methods of biological data analysis · To choose between the uses of competing methodologies to solve biological problems · To understand and execute a wide variety of quantitative, statistical methodologies essential to modern biological research · To gain experience of scientific discussion and report writing · To integrate designing experiments, laboratory and/or field practical work, data collection and analysis, literature surveys and report writing · To develop scientific team working and leadership skills and provide students with knowledge, understanding and experience of a range of skills necessary to be a professional scientist 55

· · · · · ·

To assist students in developing transferable and generic skills appropriate and relevant to a future research scientist career To provide training and associated experience of scientific presentation, writing a scientific paper and preparing a research proposal To prepare and present a scientific research poster To prepare and present an oral communication To write dissertation (not normally exceeding 20,000 words) To provide professional development opportunities relevant to the student's future research and employment needs

A student awarded a Postgraduate Certificate in Bioscience Research Techniques will have achieved the same level of knowledge and critical understanding as students who have completed the MRes programme but without any research/practical elements or dissertation undertaken by those students pursuing the MRes programme.

Next steps

Applying for a PhD ­ you should start looking from November onwards for the following year. Look in New Scientist and www.findaPhD.com . Future careers ­ the Careers Office offers excellent advice and is free. Careers Service 5 Corbett Road, Cardiff, CF10 3EB Tel: (029) 2087 4712 www.cardiff.ac.uk/carsv/index.html Looking for jobs ­ try www.jobs.ac.uk , New Scientist (www.newscientistjobs.com), Nature (www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/ ) for a start.

Student 'attendance'

Students are expected to attend all the taught components of Stage 1 of the MRes degree programme. For the research project, the University does not specify how much time a research student must spend at the University or in the school concerned. This should be agreed between the student and supervisor(s) and should be in accordance with any guidelines in the School Framework. Certain types of research necessarily involve periods of study away from Cardiff - for example, to collect data or samples or to carry out other fieldwork, or to visit libraries or archives. Students with industrially-linked projects may be required to work for agreed periods at the premises of the collaborating company. The duration and timing of these periods should be established, as far as possible, at the outset, so that they can be addressed within the Research Plan. Students whose research is being carried out within a research group or whose project is laboratory-based may be required to keep regular attendance hours at the school. Although 'attendance' requirements may change during the course of a research project, the general expectation should be understood by students and supervisors at its commencement. Regardless of the agreed pattern of 'attendance', full-time students are expected to devote their efforts to the research project on a full-time basis. Using the definition used by the UK Government's Higher Education Funding Councils and the Research Councils of a full-time postgraduate student 'load', this is 1800 hours per year. This calculates at approximately 39 hours per week or 160 hours per module in the first semester. In practice, though, many students devote a greater number of hours than this to their research study at key stages of the programme. 56

Cutting edge scientists from around the world are invited to give plenary lectures at Cardiff School of Biosciences. Plenary lecturers are specially chosen for their general appeal and relevance to the School's activities or because their research area is currently topical. It is compulsory that all postgraduates attend ALL plenary lectures as part of the graduate programme. A list of arranged Plenary Lectures can be found online at: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/news/index.html

Projects

The Research Division Leaders will give a series of research presentations during the second week of October outlining the research in their Research Division. Research Divisions: 1. Molecular Biosciences 2. Neuroscience 3. Organisms & Environment 4. Pathophysiology & Repair Further details about the research carried out in the Research Divisions can be found on the website: http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/research/index.html. Following the research presentations and study of the School's research website, you will choose the research area(s) in which you are interested and contact the Head of the relevant Research Division or their deputy. They will direct you to an appropriate supervisor(s). In discussion with your potential supervisor you will decide on a particular research programme (and devise a title if possible) by the end of October. As part of your coursework for BIT011 ­ Key Skills in Research Practice you will write a grant proposal for this research project.

Supervisor responsibilities

The responsibilities of the supervisor are explained in the Postgraduate section of this Handbook and on the University website: www.cardiff.ac.uk/Regis/sfs/rdgh/a-code-of-practice-for-research-degrees.html#supervisor

57

Structure of the MRes

A summary of the structure of the MRes is given in the following table and diagram: Course Type of Section work Months Stage 1 Taught Oct-Dec Stage 2 Research Jan-Sept Totals or means (for monthly columns) Stage 1 (Oct ­ Dec) Module Title Credits 20 20 20 Leader Prof Adrian Harwood Dr Jo Lello Dr Hefin Jones No. months 3 9 12 Final Award for full Credits Mark% completion 60 30 PGCert 120 70 MRes 180 100

BIT002 Research Techniques in Biosciences BIT010 Data Handling and Statistics BIT011 Key Skills in Research Practice Stage 2 (Jan­ Sept) Module Title

Credits 20 100

Leader Dr Hefin Jones Prof Tim Jacob

BIT013 Research Presentations BIT014 Practical Project in Biosciences This structure involves the following principles. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Last submission day for taught course work is the first day of the second semester. Single research project (Stage 2) chosen during the first semester and started in February, to finish in August. Stage 1 - 60 credits leading to a Postgraduate Certificate in Research Methods. Students can exit at this point, if desired. Stage 2 - 120 credits leading to the award of a MRes degree. Research project (Stage 2) assessed by poster, oral presentation and dissertation. The poster will contribute 40% and the oral presentation 60% of the marks for BIT013. The dissertation forms 100% of the marks for BIT014. All pass marks are 50%.

58

Staff/Student Panels

The School of Biosciences has a formal requirement to consult its students in relation to the development, provision and quality of its schemes of study. In this context the School welcomes the active participation of students in all its initial and post-graduate taught degree schemes. This is enabled mainly through the School's staff/student panels but also through student representation on the school's Masters Schemes Board and informal feedback through academic staff as tutors. In accordance with the University Academic Quality System, Staff/Student Panels are entitled to: · · · · · raise with the Schemes Board any matters concerning the appropriate scheme(s) or years of study to comment after appropriate consultation on major changes proposed to schemes or their constituent modules comment on processes for obtaining student feedback on staff teaching efficiency and module provision contribute to the annual review of schemes receive feedback from the Schemes Board on matters raised by them

NOTE : Any student can attend a staff/student panel if s/he wishes to make a specific comment regarding their course. If you are not an elected student representative, but wish to attend a panel meeting, please inform the student Chairperson.

Participation of Student Representatives in Staff/Student Panels at the Masters Schemes Board

One MRes student representative is a member of the Masters Schemes Board. Normally this will be the Chair of the Student Panel if s/he is a student, otherwise the student representative to the Schemes Board will be elected by the student panel members. The student representative is encouraged to present the panel minutes to the Masters Schemes Board.

Assessment Report Forms:

The following Assessment and Report Forms, included in subsequent pages are available from the Postgraduate Office. 1 2 3 4 Project Notification Form Mid-course progress form Poster research presentation Project log sheet

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the appropriate forms are filled in, signed and returned to the Postgraduate Office by the date specified.

59

Project Notification Form

This form is to inform the Course Director of your choice of project and to confirm you have the approval of your supervisor for this work. Title of project: ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Aims and objectives of the project:

___________________________________________________________________________________________ Synopsis of Research Project and approaches to be taken:

___________________________________________________________________________________________ Declaration by the student I have read and agree with the requirements laid out in the MRes Programme Handbook (in particular I have read the Responsibilities of the Student) and have discussed the project and agreed a programme of work with my Project Supervisor. I have read the School Safety Code (https://inside.cf.ac.uk/biosi/safety/index.html) and have been advised of any particular hazards and precautions associated with my programme of work.

-------------------------Print name of student

Declaration by the supervisor

--------------------------Signature of student

----------------Date

I have met with the above named student, and am prepared to act as his/her supervisor. I have discussed with him/her the roles of a supervisor and the student is familiar with the requirements of the School Safety Code. Any permissions (eg ethical approval) or Licences (eg animal licences) are or will be available by the start of the project.

--------------------------------Print name of supervisor

-----------------------------Signature of supervisor

----------------Date

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that this form is filled in, signed and returned to the Postgraduate Office, no later than Fri 17th Dec 2010.

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Mid-course progress form

Title of project: Name of Supervisor: Is the student satisfied with their laboratory research project? Yes/No Is the student achieving their objectives? Yes/No Has the student had regular meetings with his/her supervisor? Yes/No ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Comments

___________________________________________________________________________________________ Actions to be taken

___________________________________________________________________________________________ Declaration by the student I have discussed my general progress with my Research Project Supervisor and agree with the suggested actions

----------------------------Print name of student

-------------------------Signature of student

---------------Date

Declaration by the coordinator I have met with the above named student and discussed progress in their research project.

--------------------------------Print name of supervisor

------------------------------Signature of supervisor

---------------Date

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that this form is filled in, signed and returned to the Postgraduate Office, no later than Fri 27th May 2011.

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MRes Poster Assessment marking pro-forma Student's Name:

A - Content Abstract: Is it brief, to the point and engaging? Main Body: Appropriate sub-heading and text allowing the reader to understand the overall objectives and the outcomes to date of the project quickly Introduction: Is it accessible to the general audience with a good mixture of general background and some specific points? Figures and tables: Appropriately used with clear legends General Layout: Font size, colors used, logical layout, etc. Total for section A (max 50) _____ B - Presentation Explanation of the background and rationale of the project Ability to explain methods Communication of the major findings to date Suggestions for future directions of the project Enthusiastic and engaging presentation style Total for section B (max 25) _____

Marker's Name:

C ­ Interactive Skills Ability to answer questions Ability to articulate and explain difficult concepts Evidence of self-critical analysis Ability to engage in and sustain a discussion Total for section C (max 25) _____

TOTAL MARK (A+B+C)

___ %

Your poster will be assessed according to the Pro-forma above. Following the poster presentation you will receive formative feedback on this form. A prize will be awarded for the best poster. 62

Project log sheet

Meetings with project supervisor to review progress, provide feedback and agree timetable I have met regularly with my project supervisor.....Yes/No Date I have discussed when practical work will end: Signature of Supervisor

Dissertation plan discussed with Supervisor:

Draft dissertation handed in to Supervisor:

Draft dissertation returned to student with feedback (Deadline Friday 13 August):

th

___________________________________________________________________________________________ Title of proposed dissertation:

___________________________________________________________________________________________ Declaration by the student I have discussed my progress with my supervisor and intend to submit my dissertation by the deadline:

--------------------------Print name of student

--------------------------Signature of student

-------------Date

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that this form is filled in, signed and returned to the Postgraduate Office, no later than Tuesday, 16th August.

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Assessment

Stage 1 (Oct-Dec) ­ 60 Credits Each of the taught modules will be assessed as described in the Module Summary. Briefly, coursework, consisting mainly of portfolios, will be submitted (early January) and assessed by the respective module leaders. The marks will be considered by the Exam Board1 (in January) and students will be recommended for progression to Stage 2 if they achieve the necessary 60 credits. They may then receive a Postgraduate Certificate for Research Methods. Students will be allowed to retrieve ONE 20 credit module at the discretion of the Exam Board in the resit period (see "Retrieval" below). Formative feedback is provided throughout the course. The relative contribution of each module is summarised below: · · · BIT002 Research Techniques in Bioscience (20 credits) BIT010 Data Handling and Statistics (20 credits) BIT011 Key Skills in Research Practice (20 credits).

Stage 2 (Jan-Sept) ­ 120 Credits There will be THREE assessed components in Stage 2; a poster, an oral presentation (20 credits together) and a dissertation (100 credits). Advice will be given during the course of the research project and you will receive feedback on a draft version submitted in August. Following the poster presentation (June / July 2011) the marks and formative feedback will be provided by the assessors. The oral presentation (in September 2011) will be assessed by a panel of Internal Examiners. The External Examiners will be present to moderate. The final version of the dissertation will be submitted in September and will be graded by internal and external examiners. Their recommendations will be considered by the Final Exam Board which will meet in late September. This meeting will recommend the award of the MRes degree to successful students. The relative contribution of Stage 2 is summarised below: · · BIT013 Research Presentations (20 credits) BIT014 Practical Project in Bioscience (100 credits)

Students qualifying for an MRes in Biosciences with final mark of 70% are eligible for a distinction. The formal regulations are set out in the document: "REGULATIONS FOR THE MODULAR PROGRAMME OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF MRes IN BIOSCIENCE" which can be found in the Module Summary at the end of this Handbook.

Vivas

Vivas will be held at the end of Stage 1. Only those students who are borderline or failing modules will be given a viva.

Assessment Criteria

The Principles: Marks should be awarded proportionately to the ideal answer, using the aspects of the criteria below that are relevant to the assessment being marked.

1

Consisting of two External Examiners, module leaders and the Course Director

64

Marking Criteria for Written Assessments: LEVEL M 70­100%

Diligence Well organised, with high workload throughout the project. Made a major input to the content and direction of the work. Showed substantial initiative and originality with very little reliance on supervisor.

60­69%

Worked hard and conscientiousl y.

50­59%

Worked satisfactorily for the greater part of the time. Progressed the project as directed by supervisor. Some evidence of initiative and originality but needed assistance from the supervisor on points of detail. Displays limited evidence of critical analysis or application of knowledge. Satisfactorily written and presented with adequate technical content.

40­49%

Poor organisation led to insufficient work Relied heavily on the supervisor and did not always follow directions. Brought little thought or originality to the project.

0­39%

Inadequate input of time and effort.

Initiative, independence and originality

Progressed the work well and brought useful initiative and originality. Overcame problems of detail with little reliance on supervisor.

Required continual pressure from the supervisor at all stages. Showed virtually no originality or interest in the work.

Critical analysis

Presentation

Demonstrates an excellent degree of, critical analysis and application of knowledge. Very well organised and clearly written with good technical content.

Contains elements of critical analysis and application of knowledge. Well organised and clearly written with sound technical content.

Very limited evidence of critical analysis or application of knowledge. Poor style of writing with some parts difficult to follow. Poor organisation and presentation of material. Shortfalls in understanding apparent in some key areas.

Lacking any critical analysis, or application of knowledge.

Understanding

Achievement

Excellent conceptual understanding of underlying principles, techniques and context. Outstanding achievement. Excellent work indicating very strong potential for pursuing research at doctoral level.

Sound grasp of the underlying principles, techniques and context. Good quality work with sound outcomes and indicating at least some possibility of pursuing research at doctoral level.

Satisfactory general understanding, though somewhat lacking in depth. Satisfactory work and outcomes, but below the standard required for pursuing research at doctoral level.

Unconvincing outcomes and poor achievement. Well below the standard required for pursuing research at doctoral level.

Difficult to read and lacks a logical train of thought or argument. Very poor organisation and presentation of material. Demonstrated very little understanding of what had been attempted, or its relevance. Achieved almost nothing of value. No potential for research at doctoral level.

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Retrieval

If a student has not obtained sufficient credits (60) to proceed to from Stage 1 to Stage 2 of the programme but has obtained a minimum of 40 credits he/she shall be permitted one attempt to retrieve one failed module assessment. The Exam Board shall determine the nature and extent of the work necessary for retrieval and the deadline for submission of the work. The student may then continue into Stage 2 carrying 20 credits which must be redeemed before the assessment at the end of Stage 2. The student cannot be considered for the award of MRes until these credits have been redeemed and the Postgraduate Certificate stage passed. The maximum mark available for a retrieved module is 50%. The Postgraduate Certificate in Bioscience Research is available for those students who cannot complete the Programme or who do not satisfy the basic standards in research ability or knowledge learnt during the taught modules.

Guidelines for Writing the Dissertation

Planning and organisation are the key to writing a good dissertation quickly. Preparing figures and tables as you do the practical work will give you a distinct advantage when it comes to writing the dissertation. Use papers that you read as a guide to style and layout. However, there are specific differences relating to each type. The format that you should normally follow is shown below: · · · · · · · · · Title Page Abstract Introduction Materials and Methods Results Discussion Acknowledgements References Appendices

The dissertation should not exceed 20,000 words, and should be free from subjectspecific jargon and written in a style that can be understood by scientists from other fields. Details about each of the principal headings are given below. Title Page The page must bear the title of the project, your name, the name of your supervisor(s) and a statement that the dissertation is presented in part fulfilment of the degree for which you are registered, i.e. MRes in Biosciences. Abstract A brief outline of the aim of the project, the overall approach and the main findings. This should not be more than about 300 words. Introduction This should be concise and, by reference to previous work, should clearly set out the area of the research and the specific aims of the project. It should not be a lengthy account of all 66

aspects of the field. This merely puts the reader off and lessens the impact of your work. References should be quoted in support of any major statements you make. Materials and Methods In this section you should describe the methods which you have used in sufficient detail to allow others to repeat your experiments. It is essential that your descriptions be clear, accurate and unambiguous. Photographs or diagrams of equipment and procedures should be used where this will aid the reader. Important chemicals and biochemicals should be given, but detailed lists of constituents are often best kept for an appendix. For unusual chemicals and items of equipment, the name of the supplier should be given. Results The correct presentation of your results is extremely important. All relevant results should be included, but not normally raw data. This section should briefly describe the main features of the results, supported by tables or figures (usually graphs or histograms) giving detailed information: the conclusions reached from each set of results should be clearly stated. The form of presentation of your data should be selected with ease of interpretation in mind, but also ensuring that all the details necessary for a proper understanding and consideration of your results are included. Avoid needless duplication; it is usually unnecessary to present the same data in both tabular and graphic form. If you wish to provide raw data for reference purposes, these should be in an appendix. Do not consider the results in relation to previous work; this is best done in the discussion. Figures and Tables These should be used to illustrate the results obtained that you choose to describe and will therefore appear mainly in the Results section(s). You do not have to include everything that you have done. The same material should NEVER be presented in both a table and a figure. Each separate table and /or figure should be separately numbered and presented in the text as you refer to them. You can compile more than one graph into a composite figure if you choose to. In this case each part should be labelled (a), (b), (c) etc. and described in the figure legend or caption and refereed to as Fig. 2a, Fig 2b etc. in the text. A xes must be clearly labelled and the units used must be given, normally as part of the axis label (e.g. Protein concentration (mg/ml)). Ensure that each table and figure has a clear legend or caption with the figure or table number clearly given. Use footnotes for tables if extra information must be given. Keep table legends short, figure legends can be longer. Tables and figures should be understandable on their own without reference to the text. Always use the abbreviation Fig. for figure references in the text and headings. Do not abbreviate the word Table when referring to tables. Make sure that the Figures and Tables are numbered in the order they appear in the text. When possible both figures and tables should include some indication of the variability of the data by citing range, standard deviation, standard error of the mean, coefficient of variation or minimum significant difference. Discussion This section should attempt to place your findings in context by (a) drawing together the different parts of your work and (b) comparing them with results obtained by other workers and, in the case of simulation projects, the features of the process being modelled, so that you can produce conclusions about their validity and any novel information they reveal. Discussion of the limitations of the experiments, data or models and suggestions for future improvements or new approaches can be included. If your results have given you some new ideas about the subject or have generated new hypotheses, do not be afraid to discuss them here, but remember that you must cogently set out your reasons and supporting arguments. 67

Conclusions You should set out your conclusions concisely, listing the major points relating to the topic. Include in these novel proposals and hypotheses and suggested areas for future research. Acknowledgement You can write a short section acknowledging those that have helped you if you would like to. References You should make reference to the scientific literature to support methods, statements or points you make in your report. You should cite original papers, reviews, book chapters or books. You should ONLY cite websites if absolutely essential (e.g. as in the Blast searching section of this handbook) and then put in the text within brackets, not in the reference list. References should be cited in the text to provide extra sources of information that might be valuable to the reader or to support arguments that you have made. These should be cited in the main text of the report in the format style Bloggs & Bloggs (1993) or (Bloggs & Bloggs, 1993). Use the following guidelines for citing articles in the text. · · · · · With a single author work always cite the authors family name in full (i.e. Bloggs, (1993) or (Bloggs, 1993)). For a work with two authors use the family names of both authors (i.e. Smith & Jones (1989) or (Smith & Jones, 1989)). For more than two authors cite the first author by family name followed by et al. (i.e. Jones et al. (2002) or (Jones et al., 2002)) Treat Editors of complied books in the same as authors. When citing more than two references in support of points made use the following style (Bloggs & Bloggs, 1993; Smith & Jones, 1989; Jones et al., 2002).

Use the following styles and formats for compiling references in the reference list at the end of the report. Make sure they are listed in alphabetical order (this can be done by the Table/Sort command in MS Word).

Fry, J. C. (1993). One-way analysis of variance, p. 1 -40. In J. C. Fry (ed.), Biological Data Analysis. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Madigan, M. T., Martinko, J. M. & Parker J. (2000). Brock's Biology of Microorganisms, 9 edition. Prentice Hall, New Jersey. Zhou, J., M. A. Bruns, & J. M. Tiedje (1996). DNA recovery from soils of diverse composition. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 62:316-322. These articles are respectively (i) a chapter in an Edited book, (ii) a multi-authored book and (iii) an original paper in a journal.

th

Appendices If appropriate, the data upon which the tables and graphs are b ased should be given in appendices and placed at the end of the report. This information need not be typed but must be neatly and legibly presented. If you are in doubt about the need for appendices, consult your supervisor.

68

Procedures for Submission of Work

MRes ­ Handing in the dissertation Please download and complete www.cf.ac.uk/regis/sfs/postgrad/index.html the following TWO forms from

(1) Notice of submission of thesis http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/resources/PGR_Submission_200701.doc (2) Summary of thesis form http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/regis/resources/SummaryofThesisform(PGR)PG-R-06-10.doc ----------------The Declarations/Statements page in Form (1) should be bound into the dissertation. One Abstract in the dissertation is enough (so there is no need to also bind in the Summary). ----------------The deadline for submission to the Postgraduate Office, BIOSI 2 is 3pm on Friday 2nd September 2011. Please ensure that you submit: (1) two bound copies (temporary binding) (2) one electronic copy of their dissertation, the electronic copy to be uploaded to S:/teaching/MRes/Dissertations (3) Notice of submission of thesis: postgraduate research degrees (the section of Form (1) following the Declaration/Statements page) (4) Summary of thesis form The Postgraduate Office will issue a receipt for the copies of your dissertation and your completed forms.

Penalties for Late Submission

Work handed in late in either hard copy or in electronic format will be given a zero mark. Submissions on CD will NOT be accepted. Unless there are acceptable specific circumstances, there will be NO exceptions for late submission. According to University regulations, this penalty may only be waived if there is documentary evidence of medical or compassionate reason(s) for late submission. In this case you should submit a request on the appropriate form [Notification of Specific Circumstances / Absence] available from the Postgraduate and Research Office before the deadline for submission of the work. Submission of this form after the deadline will only be allowed in exceptional circumstances.

69

Cardiff School of Biosciences MRes in Biosciences

Module Summary & Regulations

Contents Research Techniques in Biosciences (BIT002) Data Handling & Statistics (BIT010) Key Skills in Research Practice (BIT011) Research Presentations (BIT013) Practical Project in Bioscience (BIT014) Regulations for the Modular Programme of Study leading to the Degree of MRes in Biosciences Module Timetable and Structure

Page 71 75 80 85 89 94 97

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MODULE DESCRIPTION

Module Code: Module Title: Number of Credits:

(only applicable for modules that will be available on modular programmes of study).

BIT002 Research techniques in Bioscience 20

Number of Semesters: Approximate dates when the module is to be taught Level*: School Responsible: Module Tutor:

1

Semester*: Autumn October-January

M Cardiff School of Bioscience Professor Adrian J. Harwood

Prerequisite Modules: Code: None Precursor Modules: None Code:

Title:

Title:

Co-Requisite Modules: None

Code:

Title:

Other Prerequisites: None Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Compulsory: Title of Programme: M.Res. Bioscience M.Sc. Biophotonics Years: 1 1 Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Optional: Title of Programme: Years:

Module to be offered on a Free-Standing basis? No Please identify any additional restrictions to Free-Standing status: N/A

71

AIMS OF THE MODULE: (Aims define the broad purpose of the module) The aim of the module is to: 1. provide an understanding of the major research disciplines in modern bioscience. 2. educate students in a range of state-of-the-art biological research techniques. 3. develop a knowledge of how these research techniques can be combined in specific biological research projects. Students should be able relate how current research techniques are used in bioscience, and know how to plan and direct a research project in most areas of biological research. LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE MODULE: (Learning outcomes are statements of what a typical student is expected to know, understand and be able to do.) On completion of the module you should: Understand the basis of the current techniques used in the biosciences, and be able to choose appropriate methods for particular research projects and critically evaluate the methodologies and experimental work of others. In particular, you should: Appreciate the nature of biological knowledge and how it is obtained through experimentation. Understand the differences between research disciplines within biosciences, and how these may interact to form new research fields, such as systems biology. Appreciate the chemical and physical differences between biomolecules, and how this influences research technology. Know the principles and limitations of common biological research techniques. METHODS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING: Basic syllabus content will be taught by formal lectures and accompanied by studentcentred independent study and group activities. Unscheduled opportunities will be available to discuss individual problems and difficulties. Practical experience and skills will be developed through timetabled practical sessions (e.g. Laboratory session, demonstrations, a field trip and an industrial site visit). You will therefore learn by formal teaching, practical experience and extensive independent learning and teamwork. Teamwork and informal group discussions are encouraged, although all submitted work must be produced by yourself. ASSESSMENT: (Description of how the assessment (both formative and summative) will enable a student to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes) You will amass a portfolio of literature-based research and practical exercises during the course. This Biotechniques Portfolio will form your own personal reference for the duration of the course, and hopefully beyond. You will receive personal feedback on your progress at regular intervals throughout the module. The completed module portfolio will be examined at the end of the semester.

72

METHOD(S) OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: The methods of assessment of a module should be completed in the following table. Notes of guidance for completion of the table are provided below. Type CW % Contribution 100 Title Bioscience Research Technique Portfolio Duration (if app) October- January

Notes of Guidance: 1. All assessments which contribute to the module mark must be separately identified in the above table. Continue on a separate piece of paper (if necessary) and attach it to the completed module description. 2. Type EXAU EXSP EXSU EXPG PCEX the school CT CW LW PW FW Examination Autumn Semester Examination Spring Semester Examination Summer Period Examination held outside Autumn, Spring and Summer periods Practical Examination held within the school and organised by Class Test Coursework Laboratory work Project work Fieldwork

A module may have more than one assessment component of the same type e.g. if a module is assessed by two essays, both essays would need to be listed with the type CW. 3.

4. 5.

Percentage contribution: The contribution of the assessment component towards the calculation of the overall module mark

Title: A descriptor of the assessment component e.g. examination paper title.

Duration: The duration of an examination or class test.

SYLLABUS CONTENT: 1. Recombinant DNA technology, including detection and analysis methods, cloning and site-directed mutagenesis. 2. DNA analysis and sequencing: including DNA sequencing methods, SNP analysis and high throughput genomic sequencing. 3. Cell manipulation and transgenic animals, including genetic manipulation of cells and whole organisms, gene ablation and RNAi technology. 4. Field and population sampling, including research in biodiversity related research fields. 5. Neuroscience techniques, including electrophysiology, patch clamping and ion channels analysis. 6. Cell and tissue imaging, including light microscopy techniques, electron microscopy and MRI. 7. Protein Biology, including separation techniques, immunological detection, enzymology, Mass Spectrometry, structural analysis. 8. High throughput and array based technologies, including microarrays and proteomics. 9. Stem Cell Biology 73

INDICATIVE READING LIST: The aim of the course is to provide a background in the latest research techniques and ideas in the Biosciences. Given the current place in bioscientific research, any textbook is unlikely to be fully up-to-date. When completed, Biotechniques Portfolio will serve that role. We therefore suggest as a useful background reference book for the module: Alberts, B. et al. (2002) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 4th Ed., Garland Science But you may find the following useful as the starting point for further reading: Primrose, S. B., Twyman, R. M., Old, R. W. (2001) principles of Gene Manipulation, Blackwell Science (UK). Scopes, R. (1987) Protein Purification: Principles and Practice, Springer-Verlag, Berlin. Further reading will be suggested during the module. We would welcome suggestions for other reference books and texts, if you discover them during the reading for your Biotechniques Portfolio.

CATALOGUE ENTRY

During this module the students will be introduced to a range of state-of-the-art biological research techniques. They will learn how these research techniques are used in bioscience and how they can be combined in specific research projects. Teaching will be by practical work, lectures, seminars and independent guided learning and group work. Lectures will be given by research experts in each of the areas of research within the School of Biosciences.

74

MODULE DESCRIPTION

Module Code: Module Title: Number of Credits:

(only applicable for modules that will be available on modular programmes of study).

BIT010 Data handling and statistics 20

Number of Semesters: Approximate dates when the module is to be taught: Level*: School Responsible:

1

Semester*: Autumn October ­ January

M Cardiff School of Biosciences Module leader: Dr Joanne Lello

Module Tutors:

Other teaching staff: Dr Rob Thomas, Dr Ian Vaughan & Professor Mike Bruford Title:

Prerequisite Modules: Code: None Precursor Modules: None Code:

Title:

Co-Requisite Modules: None

Code:

Title:

Other Prerequisites: None

Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Compulsory: Title of Programme: M.Res. Bioscience Years: 1

Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Optional: Title of Programme: Years:

Module to be offered on a Free-Standing basis? No Please identify any additional restrictions to Free-Standing status: N/A 75

AIMS OF THE MODULE: (Aims define the broad purpose of the module) To train students in logical thinking and critical analysis of numerical data. To equip them with the skills to understand and undertake high level statistical analysis and to interpret and evaluate statistics in a biological context. LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE MODULE: (Learning outcomes are statements of what a typical student is expected to know, understand and be able to do.) On completion of the module a student should be able to: · · · Formulate clear and testable hypotheses. Understand the principles and limitations of basic and complex statistical analyses. Undertake a range of statistical analyses including: o Basic parametric and non-parametric statistical tests o Multivariate statistics o Generalised Linear Modelling o Generalised Linear Mixed Modelling and understand the correct application of these statistical methods Understand the principles of spatial statistics Analyse gene sequences to build phylogenetic trees and assess population genetic diversity. Understand some of the basic forms and uses of theoretical / mathematical models.

· · ·

Knowledge and Understanding: On completion of the module a student should: · · · Understand the conceptual links between basic and complex statistical analysis. Appreciate how different statistical approaches can be combined and integrated to solve complex biological problems. Understand the basic principles of DNA sequence analysis, spatial statistics and theoretical / mathematical modelling.

Intellectual Skills: On completion of the module a student should be capable of: · · · Using logic in experimental design and hypothesis formulation. Comparing and integrating different data-analytical methodologies to reach robust conclusions. Critically evaluating statistical analyses described in reports and papers.

Discipline Specific (including practical) Skills: On completion of the module a student should be able to: · · Appropriately apply and biologically interpret both basic and higher level statistical techniques. Analyse phylogeny and genome architecture.

Transferable Skills: On completion of the module a student should have: · · · · A rigorous hypothesis-driven approach to science. The ability to analyse the majority of biological datasets that a bioscientist may encounter. The vocabulary needed to talk to statisticians in their own language. The capacity to analyse problems that do not have perfect solutions. 76

· ·

The capabilities to report statistical methods and results to scientific and non-scientific audiences. Proficiency in the use of the R programming language and ASReml statistical software package and the ability to analyse, interpret and explain biological data using these software.

METHODS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING: All of the syllabus content will be covered by interactive workshops consisting of teaching and practical exercises, computer based demonstrations, class discussions, student-centred reading and self-taught student problem solving exercises. Through learning by a combination of formal teaching and practical experience, the students will become independently capable of biostatistical analysis.

ASSESSMENT: (Description of how the assessment (both formative and summative) will enable a student to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes) Formative assessment: Students will carry out problem solving exercises and will receive continuous feedback on their performance through 1-to-1 discussions with the module tutors throughout the course of the module. Summative assessment: § Assignment Portfolio (40% of the module mark). The portfolio will consist of fortnightly assessments which will evaluate the students' ongoing progression through the key elements of the module and / or relate to the background to their mini-project datasets (see below). § Student centred mini-project (60% of module mark). Students will be provided with a choice of datasets at the beginning of the module and will work with their chosen dataset throughout the module period. They will submit a full report on the analysis of this data in early January. The report will take the form of a bioscience journal article (including; abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion, reference section and appendices). The article will present a biological question, relevant to the dataset, which will be answered using the higher level statistical techniques taught on the module.

METHOD(S) OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: The methods of assessment of a module should be completed in the following table. Notes of guidance for completion of the table are provided below. Type CW PW % Contribution 40% 60% Title Assessment portfolio Student centred mini-project, a written report Duration (if app) Fortnightly assignments Early December-January

77

Notes of Guidance: 1. All assessments which contribute to the module mark must be separately identified in the above table. Continue on a separate piece of paper (if necessary) and attach it to the completed module description. Type EXAU EXSP EXSU EXPG PCEX the school CT CW LW PW FW Examination Autumn Semester Examination Spring Semester Examination Summer Period Examination held outside Autumn, Spring and Summer periods Practical Examination held within the school and organised by Class Test Coursework Laboratory work Project work Fieldwork

2.

A module may have more than one assessment component of the same type e.g. if a module is assessed by two essays, both essays would need to be listed with the type CW. 3.

4. 5.

Percentage contribution: The contribution of the assessment component towards the calculation of the overall module mark

Title: A descriptor of the assessment component e.g. examination paper title. Duration: The duration of an examination or class test.

SYLLABUS CONTENT: 1. Experimental design & data collection 2. Logic, probability & hypothesis testing 3. Descriptive statistics & data exploration 4. Tests for differences 5. Tests for associations 6. Dealing with complex data 7. Ordination & classification 8. ANOVA 9. Simple linear regression 10. Generalised Linear Modelling 11. Mixed Modelling 12. Introduction to spatial statistics 13. Analysis of population genetic diversity 14. Analysis of DNA sequence evolution 15. Phylogeny construction 16. Introduction to theoretical / mathematical modelling

78

INDICATIVE READING LIST: 1. Crawley, M. (2007). The R Book. John Wiley & sons Ltd., Chichester. 2. Field, A. (2005). Discovering Statistics, Using SPSS for Windows (2nd edition) SAGE Publications Ltd., London. 3. Fry, J. C. (ed). (1993). Biological data analysis: a practical approach. Oxford University Press, Oxford. 4. Hall, B. G. 92004). Phylogenetic trees made easy. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Maryland, USA. 5. Nei, M. and Kumar, S. (2000). Molecular Evolution and Phylogenetics. Oxford University Press, Oxford. 6. Rumsey, D. (2003). Statistics for Dummies. Wiley, New Jersey. 7. Rumsey, D. (2007). Intermediate Statistics for Dummies. Wiley, New Jersey. 8. Ruxton, G. D. & Colegrave, N. (2006) Experimental design for the life sciences (2nd edition). Oxford University Press, Oxford.

CATALOGUE ENTRY During this module students will learn to apply appropriate statistical analyses to answer questions involving complex datasets. The course will begin by covering basic statistical concepts, including experimental design and the formulation of clear hypotheses, and will eventually lead the student through to an understanding of the more complex statistical techniques.

79

MODULE DESCRIPTION

Module Code: Module Title: Number of Credits:

(only applicable for modules that will be available on modular programmes of study).

BIT011 Key Skills in Research Practice 20

Number of Semesters: Approximate dates when the module is to be taught: Level*: School Responsible: Module Tutor: Prerequisite Modules: Code: None Precursor Modules: None Code:

1

Semester:* Autumn October ­ December

M Cardiff School of Biosciences Dr T Hefin Jones Title:

Title:

Co-Requisite Modules: None

Code:

Title:

Other Prerequisites: None

Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Compulsory: Title of Programme: M.Res. Bioscience Years: 1

Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Optional: Title of Programme: Years:

Module to be offered on a Free-Standing basis? No Please identify any additional restrictions to Free-Standing status: N/A

80

AIMS OF THE MODULE: (Aims define the broad purpose of the module) The module aims to: i. ii. iii. iv. v. provide knowledge, understanding and experience of a range of foundation skills necessary to be a professional scientist. provide training and associated experience of science presentation, writing a scientific paper and preparing a research proposal. assist students in developing transferable and generic skills (e.g. writing, presentation, reviewing) appropriate and relevant to a future research scientist career. integrate the training from Modules BTI001, BTI002 and BTI011 provide professional development opportunities relevant to the student's future research and employment needs.

LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE MODULE: (Learning outcomes are statements of what a typical student is expected to know, understand and be able to do.) On completion of the module a student should be able to: i. ii. iii. iv. v. Prepare a range of different styles of scientific presentations. Determine and evaluate the organizational, management, ethical and intellectual property aspects of a research proposal. Use and integrate analytical (BTI002) and experimental planning (BTI001) skills in a science research context. Prepare a scientific research proposal. Assess and improve personal scientific effectiveness.

Knowledge and Understanding: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. Knowledge and understanding of scientific methodology and approaches. Knowledge and experience of the value of a range of scientific presentation approaches. Understand issues of science research, intellectual property and ethical aspects. Understanding and experience of critical assessment of scientific literature. Understanding of what is expected in writing a scientific manuscript for journal submission. Understanding of how to write a research proposal. Learning how to determine research approaches by discussion with others.

Intellectual Skills: i. ii. iii. iv. v. Assessing and determining ethical and intellectual property aspects of a scientific research project. Assessing and determining information to include in scientific writing. Assessing and determining relevant material for scientific presentation. Synthesis and reviewing of scientific literature. Designing, self-assessing and critically reviewing research proposals.

Discipline Specific (including practical) Skills: i. ii. iii. Writing and presenting bioscience research proposals. Critical reviewing of scientific literature in the biosciences and related disciplines. Scientific paper-writing. 81

iv. v.

Scientific oral and poster presentation. Appreciation of Health and Safety aspects of bioscience research.

Transferable Skills: i. ii. iii. iv. Writing and oral presentation skills. Evaluation of different approaches. Time management and personal effectiveness. Literature research skills.

METHODS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING: The syllabus content will be covered by lectures, workshops, some external courses, tutorials, and supervised self-directed teaching. In this way the student will learn by a combination of formal teaching and independent learning; this will provide a progression from direct information provision to learning independence. Some group work will be integrated into the teaching and learning approaches.

ASSESSMENT: (Description of how the assessment (both formative and summarise) will enable a student to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes) Formative assessment: this will be based on the student portfolio of exercises associated with different aspects of the module syllabus. Students will receive individual and group feedback on their performance. Summative assessment: this will be based on : (i) an individual student portfolio of specified selected activities, tasks and group discussions held during the Semester (ii) research project proposal; this will be carried out prior to the start of the project and will give the student an opportunity to use their knowledge from the taught modules to produce, in consultation with others (e.g. project supervisors), a proposal for their individual research project METHOD(S) OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: The methods of assessment of a module should be completed in the following table. Notes of guidance for completion of the table are provided below. Type CW CW % Contribution 40% 60% Title Module Portfolio Research Project Proposal Duration (if app) October ­ December October - December

Notes of Guidance: 1. All assessments which contribute to the module mark must be separately identified in the above table. Continue on a separate piece of paper (if necessary) and attach it to the completed module description. Type EXAU EXSP EXSU EXPG Examination Autumn Semester Examination Spring Semester Examination Summer Period Examination held outside Autumn, Spring and Summer periods 82

2.

PCEX the school CT CW LW PW FW

Practical Examination held within the school and organised by Class Test Coursework Laboratory work Project work Fieldwork

A module may have more than one assessment component of the same type e.g. if a module is assessed by two essays, both essays would need to be listed with the type CW. 3.

4. 5.

Percentage contribution: The contribution of the assessment component towards the calculation of the overall module mark

Title: A descriptor of the assessment component e.g. examination paper title Duration: The duration of an examination or class test.

SYLLABUS CONTENT: Using a range of approaches, workshops, tutorials, discussion groups, lectures and selfdirected teaching, the module will cover: i. Research Environment a. Science and Ethics b. Intellectual Property c. Commercialisation and Business Start-up d. Health and Safety Research Management a. Searching Research Literature b. Critical Reviewing Scientific Literature c. Scientific Research Funding Environment d. Writing Research Proposals Communication Skills a. Poster Production b. Scientific Oral Presentation c. Paper / Manuscript Preparation d. Dissertation Workshop e. Communicating Science to Non-Specialists Networking and Teamworking a. Team and Research Group Development b. Working in Groups Personal Effectiveness a. Self-organization b. Time Management

ii.

iii.

iv.

v.

83

INDICATIVE READING LIST: 1. Hart, C. (2001) Doing a Literature Search. Sage Publications Ltd 2. Punch, K.F. (2000) Developing Effective Research Proposals. Sage Publications Ltd. 3. Amos, J-A. (1998) Managing your Time. How-To-Books Ltd 4. Swetnam, D. (2000) Writing your Dissertation. How-To-Books Ltd 5. Harris, J. (2001) Bioethics. Oxford University Press. 6. Cooper, J. ( 2003) Effective Presentations. Kogan Page

CATALOGUE ENTRY During this module students will experience and develop abilities in a number of transferable researcher key-skills. As well as appreciating the `scientific method, exploring bioethics, and instruction on avoiding plagiarism students will also develop competence in presentation skills (oral, poster and writing), grant writing and communicating their work to the general public. Teaching will be via lectures, tutorials and a series of workshops. The module will provide appropriate foundation for BIT013.

84

MODULE DESCRIPTION

Module Code: Module Title: Number of Credits:

(only applicable for modules that will be available on modular programmes of study).

BIT013 Research Project Presentations 20

Number of Semesters: Approximate dates when the module is to be taught: Level*: School Responsible: Module Tutor: Prerequisite Modules: Code: BIT011 Precursor Modules: Code: BIT002 BIT010

1

Semester*: Spring January - September

M Cardiff School of Biosciences Dr T Hefin Jones Title: Key Skills in Research Practice Title: Research Techniques in Bioscience Data Handling and Statistics

Co-Requisite Modules: None

Code:

Title:

Other Prerequisites: None Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Compulsory: Title of Programme: M.Res. Bioscience Years: 1 Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Optional: Title of Programme: Years:

Module to be offered on a Free-Standing basis? No Please identify any additional restrictions to Free-Standing status: Not Applicable

85

AIMS OF THE MODULE: (Aims define the broad purpose of the module) 1. To prepare and present (i) a research poster and (ii) a conference-style oral presentation 2. Provide training and associated experience (further to that gained in BIT011) of science presentation (poster, oral and discussion) 3. Integrate the training from Modules BIT011 and BIT012 4. Assist students in developing transferable and generic skills appropriate and relevant to a future research career.

LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE MODULE: (Learning outcomes are statements of what a typical student is expected to know, understand and be able to do.) On completion of the module a student should be able to: i. ii. iii. Present their work to an audience as a poster Present their work to an audience as an oral presentation supported by Powerpoint slide-show Appreciate the characteristics and usefulness of different styles of scientific presentations

Knowledge and Understanding: i. ii. iii. Knowledge of how to organise and prepare and give scientific presentation Knowledge and experience of the value of a range of scientific presentation approaches Understanding of the requirements of a scientific presentation

Intellectual Skills: i. ii. Assessing and determining relevant material for different scientific presentation Determining the appropriateness of what information to present in different presentation contexts

Discipline Specific (including practical) Skills: i. ii. Scientific oral and poster presentation Critical reviewing and deciding of what constitutes relevant presentation material

Transferable Skills: i. ii. iii. Poster presentation skills Oral presentation skills Discussion, question and answer session skills

METHODS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING: The module will be supervised directly by the Module Co-ordinator and indirectly by the allocated Project Supervisor. There will be no formal lectures etc as the foundation teaching has already been provided in BTI0011; the Module Coordinator will, however arrange up to 6 tutorials during the period (January ­ August) to provide formative advice and ensure that assessments are being completed. Teaching will be via this support network and learning will, therefore, be largely independent using the skills taught in the pre-requisite module. 86

ASSESSMENT: (Description of how the assessment (both formative and summative) will enable a student to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes) Formative Assessment: 1. Meetings between Module Coordinator and Project Supervisor where informal feedback will be provided. 2. Non-assessed and voluntary symposium will be held in July / August where Module Coordinator will provide formative feedback on oral presentations. Summative Assessment: 1. June/July: poster presentation based on Research Project. This will be assessed by a panel of Internal Examiners. Formative feedback will also be provided. 2. September: oral presentation in day-long M.Res Research Symposium. This will be assessed by a panel of Internal Examiners. External Examiners will also be present at the Symposium for moderation. METHOD(S) OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: The methods of assessment of a module should be completed in the following table. Notes of guidance for completion of the table are provided below. Type CW CW %Contribution 40 60 Title Poster Oral Presentation Duration (if app) June ­ July September

Notes of Guidance: 1. All assessments which contribute to the module mark must be separately identified in the above table. Continue on a separate piece of paper (if necessary) and attach it to the completed module description. 2. Type EXAU EXSP EXSU EXPG PCEX the school CT CW LW PW FW Examination Autumn Semester Examination Spring Semester Examination Summer Period Examination held outside Autumn, Spring and Summer periods Practical Examination held within the school and organised by Class Test Coursework Laboratory work Project work Fieldwork

A module may have more than one assessment component of the same type e.g. if a module is assessed by two essays, both essays would need to be listed with the type CW. 3. 4. Percentage contribution: The contribution of the assessment component towards the calculation of the overall module mark Title: A descriptor of the assessment component e.g. examination paper title. 87

5.

Duration: The duration of an examination or class test.

SYLLABUS CONTENT: 1. Self-taught work as follows contributing to the module objectives, with support from supervisor and designated staff: 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4. 1.5. production of publication quality figures and tables for poster. production of figures and tables for oral presentation designing poster critically appraising what material to include in presentations appreciating different role of poster and oral presentations

2. Preparation and presentation of a poster. 3. Preparation and presentation of conference-style oral presentation, including question and answer session

INDICATIVE READING LIST: 1. Cooper J (2003) Effective Presentations. Kogan Page 2. Hailman JP and Strier KB (1997) Planning, Proposing and Presenting Effectively CUP Science

3. Walliman NSR (2001) Your Research Project: a step-by-step guide for the first time researcher. Sage Publications. An updated reading list will be provided in the appropriate Handbook

CATALOGUE ENTRY: During this module students will present a poster and an oral presentation on the work related to their research project. This will be based on, and will extend, the skills learned in the Key Skill in Research Techniques module (BIT010) and in addition, students will receive support from the module leader.

88

MODULE DESCRIPTION

Module Code: Module Title: Number of Credits:

(only applicable for modules that will be available on modular programmes of study).

BIT014 Practical project in Biosciences 100

Number of Semesters: Approximate dates when the module is to be taught: Level*: School Responsible: Module Tutor: Prerequisite Modules: Code: None Precursor Modules: Code: BIT002 BIT010 BIT011 Code:

1

Semester*: Spring January - September

M Cardiff School of Biosciences Professor Tim Jacob Title:

Title: Research techniques in Bioscience Data handling and statistics Key skills in research practice Title:

Co-Requisite Modules: None

Other Prerequisites: None Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Compulsory: Title of Programme: M.Res. Bioscience Years: 1 Programmes of Study For Which This Module Is Optional: Title of Programme: Years:

Module to be offered on a Free-Standing basis? No Please identify any additional restrictions to Free-Standing status: N/A

89

AIMS OF THE MODULE: (Aims define the broad purpose of the module) 1. 2. 3. 4. To provide experience in independent, methodological research in Biosciences To integrate designing experiments, laboratory and/or field practical work, data collection and analysis, literature surveys and report writing To develop independent and/or team research skills To write a ~20,000 word dissertation

LEARNING OUTCOMES OF THE MODULE: (Learning outcomes are statements of what a typical student is expected to know, understand and be able to do.) On completion of the module a student should be able to: Organise and carry out a programme of research Work within a research team Knowledge and Understanding: Know how to operate laboratory or field equipment commonly used in the research project area Integrate research literature with a real biological research problem Learning new approaches and combinations of methodologies by discussion with others Intellectual Skills: Designing experiments to test and validate methodologies Integrating practical experiments or field work and data analysis Appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of different practical and data handling approaches Relating published scientific research to the students own research work Discipline Specific (including practical) Skills: Working independently on a biological research topic How to learn new techniques and ways of working from others Using a variety of project specific methodologies and equipment Transferable Skills: Literature research Organising practical research work Team work Presentation skills Data analysis

METHODS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING: During this module students will undertake an independent research project. Every project will be done within on of Cardiff School of Bioscience's designated research groups. They will receive overall support from a designated supervisor (who shall be a member of academic staff and of the BIOSI Graduate School), and normally some practical support from a PhD student, research technician or post-doctoral research scientist. Teaching will 90

be via this support network and learning will be largely independent using the skills taught in the precursor modules.

ASSESSMENT: (Description of how the assessment (both formative and summative) will enable a student to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes) Formative Assessment: 1. Formal meetings between the student and the supervisor (at least) at monthly intervals and informal feedback provided 2. A draft dissertation shall be informally assessed by the supervisor or another appropriate member of staff, who will provide feedback to the student to help with the final version of the dissertation. Summative Assessment: 3. A dissertation (normally not exceeding 20,000 words) consisting of a review of the literature in the area of the project, a description of the methods used, details of the results obtained and an analysis of these results followed by a conclusion(s). The dissertation should be free from subject-specific jargon and written in a style that can be understood by scientists from other fields.

METHOD(S) OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT: The methods of assessment of a module should be completed in the following table. Notes of guidance for completion of the table are provided below. Type PW/FW %Contribution 100% Title Dissertation Duration (if app) January ­ September

Notes of Guidance: 1. All assessments which contribute to the module mark must be separately identified in the above table. Continue on a separate piece of paper (if necessary) and attach it to the completed module description. 2. Type EXAU EXSP EXSU EXPG PCEX the school CT CW LW PW FW Examination Autumn Semester Examination Spring Semester Examination Summer Period Examination held outside Autumn, Spring and Summer periods Practical Examination held within the school and organised by Class Test Coursework Laboratory work Project work Fieldwork

A module may have more than one assessment component of the same type e.g. if a module is assessed by two essays, both essays would need to be listed with the type CW. 3. Percentage contribution: The contribution of the assessment component towards the calculation of the overall module mark 91

4. 5.

Title: A descriptor of the assessment component e.g. examination paper title. Duration: The duration of an examination or class test.

SYLLABUS CONTENT: 1. Student chooses project from those offered and receives project outline. 2. Initial discussion between supervisor with student, might include other support staff. 3. Self-taught work as follows contributing to the project objectives, with support from supervisor and designated staff: 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4. 3.5. 3.6. 3.7. 3.8. experimental design, execution of practical work, collection and recording of protocols and results, data analysis, integration of experiments and current literature, drawing valid conclusions, analysis of relevant literature, production of publication quality figures.

Preparation of a dissertation.

CATALOGUE ENTRY:

During this module students will undertake an independent research project. Every project will be done within on of Cardiff School of Bioscience's designated research groups. They will receive overall support from a designated supervisor (who shall be a member of academic staff and of the BIOSI Graduate School), and normally some practical support from a PhD student, research technician or post-doctoral research scientist. Teaching will be via this support network and learning will be largely independent using the skills taught in the precursor modules.

92

INDICATIVE READING LIST: 1. Alley, M. (1998). The Craft of Scientific Writing, 3rd edition. Springer, New York. (Good reviews) 2. Bond, A. (Ed). (2006) Your Masters Thesis: How to Plan, Draft, Write and Revise (Studymates in Focus): How to Plan, Draft, Write and Revise (Studymates in Focus) (Paperback). Studymates, Abergele, UK. 3. Day, R. A. (2006). How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper, 6th edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 4. Ford, E.D. (2000). Scientific Method for Ecological Research. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 5. Jones, A., Reed, R. and Weyers, J. (2002). Practical Skills in Biology. Pearson education, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, USA. 6. Walliman, N.S.R. (2001) Your Research Project: A Step-By-Step Guide for the First-Time Researcher. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks,California, USA. 7. Bui, Yvonne N. (2009) How to write a master's thesis. Thousand Oaks, CA ; London : Sage. Location:Nursing & Healthcare Library, Cardiff: 4 week loan Classmark: 808.02 BUI Number of Items: 1. An updated reading list will be provided in the appropriate Handbook

93

REGULATIONS FOR THE MODULAR PROGRAMME OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF M.Res. IN BIOSCIENCES

1

GENERAL These regulations shall be read in conjunction with and conform to the Senate Regulations for Taught Postgraduate Programmes of Study ­ Modular Programmes.

2 2.1

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Candidates must satisfy the requirements of the Cardiff University General Entrance Requirement and, in addition, will normally possess, or expect to achieve, an initial degree in a relevant biological, biomedical or biomolecular science subject, awarded by a recognised institution at a Lower Second Classification or Higher, or equivalent from an overseas university. Applications will be considered for Stage 1 of the course (Postgraduate Certificate) from candidates with at least 5 years relevant commercial experience who do not possess the above qualifications. All candidates will be interviewed where possible and, where this is not possible, candidates must include a personal statement with their application in which they state their research interests and how these relate to the Research Groups in the School of Biosciences and their future ambitions in bioscience. The equivalent of a undergraduate degree at level 2:2 (or higher) in a relevant biological, biomedical or bio-molecular science subject. Applications will also be considered from candidates who have a minimum of 5 years relevant commercial experience who only wish to undertake Stage 1 of the Programme (Postgraduate Certificate) If English is not your first language we require one of the following English language qualifications:

· · · · ·

2.2

2.3

2.4

IELTS 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element TOEFL Paper Based Test = 580 TOEFL Computer Based Test = 250 TOEFL Internet Based Test = 92 GCSE/IGCSE grade C or above STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAMME The programme has 2 academic stages, leading to the award of: Postgraduate Certificate

3 3.1

Stage 1 shall extend for 1 Semester for full-time students and consist of 3, 20 credit modules of which 1 shall be at Level 3 and/or 4.

Masters Degree The programme shall extend for 1 calendar year for full-time students and consist of 5 modules, to the value of 180 credits, which shall include oral and poster presentations 94

(20 credits) and a dissertation of 100 credits (at Level M) and of which 1 module may be at Level 3 and/or 4. 4 TIME LIMIT The Master's programme must be completed within one calendar year for full-time candidates from the date of initial registration on the programme. The exact completion date will be in accordance with that approved for the specific session. 5 PROGRAMME OF STUDY The Programme of Study shall comprise the modules detailed in the relevant Module Timetable which shall be deemed to form part of these regulations. 6 6.1 ASSESSMENT Assessment shall be conducted in accordance with the Cardiff University Senate Assessment Regulations for Taught Programmes of Study.

6.2

The method of assessment for each module shall be determined by the School Board upon the recommendation of the relevant Board of Studies and shall be specified in the Module Description.

PROGRESSION Postgraduate Certificate 7.1.1 At the end of the Stage 1, the Examining Board shall consider the progress of each student in each module pursued during the programme/stage in accordance with Senate Regulations and shall determine whether he/she: (i) has obtained a minimum of 60 credits at Stage 1 (of which one can be at Level 3 or higher) and shall be eligible for the award of Postgraduate Certificate; and (ii) has obtained a minimum of 60 credits (of which one can be at Level 3 or higher) and shall be permitted to proceed to the next academic stage of the programme; or (iii) has not obtained sufficient credits to proceed to the next academic stage of the programme but has obtained a minimum of 40 credits and shall be permitted one attempt to retrieve one failed module assessment at the next resit examination period, or with or without attendance on the module during the following session or calendar year; or (iv) 7.1.2 is not eligible to proceed to the next academic stage of the programme and is required to withdraw from the programme of study.

7 7.1

Where a student is permitted to attempt to retrieve one or more failed module assessments, the Examining B oard shall consider the performance of each student in these assessments in accordance with Senate Regulations for Postgraduate Taught Programmes of Study ­ Modular Programmes and shall 95

determine the status of the student in accordance with 7.1.1 (i), (ii) and (iv) above. 8 8.1 DISSERTATION A student's dissertation, which shall not normally exceed 20,000 words and supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject, shall embody the results of his/her period of project work. The subject of each student's dissertation shall be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee. The dissertation shall be assigned 100 credits and shall be weighted 52.5% for the purpose of calculating the final award. AWARD OF QUALIFICATION In order to be considered for an award, a student shall be required to have satisfied the criteria detailed in Senate Regulations for Postgraduate Taught Programmes of Study ­ Modular Programmes. The award of the qualification with distinction shall be determined by the final Examining Board in accordance with the Senate Regulations for Postgraduate Taught Programmes of Study ­ Modular Programmes. The award of the qualification shall be determined in accordance with the procedures described in Senate Regulations for Postgraduate Taught Programmes of Study ­ Modular Programmes and shall be based upon the performance of each students in the modules specified in the Module Timetable. For the purpose of the calculation of Distinction, modules shall be weighted in accordance with their credit ratings as shown in the Module Timetable. Or For the purpose of the calculation of Distinction, modules shall be weighted as follows: A) Module(s) BIT 002 BIT 010 BIT 011 BIT 013 BIT 014 B) Stage(s) Stage 1 Stage 2 9.5 Weighting in final award assessment 10 % 10 % 10 % 17.5 % 52.5% Weighting 30 % 70 %

8.2 9 9.1

9.2

9.3

9.4

A student who fails to qualify for the award shall be dealt with in accordance with Senate Regulations for Modular Postgraduate Programmes of Study.

96

MODULE TIMETABLE

Title of Programme of Study: Mode of Study: Stage: M.Res. in Biosciences Full Time 1-2

STRUCTURE

In the Autumn Semester, Candidates shall be required to pursue: All Modules in Stage 1 In the Spring Semester (Master's stage only), Candidates shall be required to pursue: The Modules in Stage 2

MODULES*

STAGE 1: Core Modules Assess ment C C C

Code BIT002 BIT010 BIT011

Title Research techniques in Bioscience Data handling and statistics Key skills in research practice

Level M M M

Credits 20 20 20

Semester A A A

STAGE 2: Project/dissertation Module Assess ment C C

Code BIT013 BIT014

Title Research Presentations Research Project

Level M M

Credits 20 100

Semester S S

FOOTNOTES: Assessment: C = Contributes to final award DNC =Does NOT contribute to final award Semester(s): A = Autumn S = Spring AS = Autumn and Spring A/S = Autumn or Spring * Some modules have special requirements (pre-requisites,co-requisites or pre-cursors). Full details of any such requisites can be obtained by reference to your departmental module catalogue(s).

97

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