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Small Arms and Crew-Served Weapons Marksmanship Training Strategies Overview

1. Definitions. Webster's dictionary defines a marksman as "a person skilled in shooting at a mark or target". However, the intent of military marksmanship extends to killing or disabling the target. Therefore, Army marksmanship training is more than zeroing and qualifying with a weapon. It also includes-· Selecting and training Soldiers for crew-served weapons. · Employing the weapon system in a combat environment. · Training combat techniques of fire. · Using advanced optics. · Firing in limited visibility. Most importantly, the Soldier must be able to perform his combat mission any place, any time, under any environmental conditions. Leaders must allocate sufficient training time and resources to achieve this. This is necessary for Soldiers to be able to perform their combat mission when called on to do so. Merely going to the range as specified in DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training (commonly referred to as STRAC) only begins to train Soldiers in marksmanship skills. When developing training plans, the intervals that STRAC specifies for each marksmanship event should be the minimum that a leader considers. Although the organization only qualifies its Soldiers semiannually, test results show that sustainment training is needed at least quarterly to sustain marksmanship skills. 2. Comprehensive Marksmanship Training Program. A critical step in the Army's overall marksmanship sustainment training strategy is to develop a comprehensive program. This program includes evaluation by the chain of command and an SOP that requires leaders and trainers to receive training first. A major first step in an effective marksmanship program is to determine everyone's current marksmanship proficiency. Leaders must continually assess the program by directly observing training, spot-checking, and reviewing past training. They should immediately correct any deficiencies noted during the evaluations. Based on the evaluations, they can develop an effective marksmanship training plan. In it, they specify organizational marksmanship training goals and the periodic training events needed to sustain combat proficiency. While weapons qualification is a mandatory requirement for deployment, it is also a major tool for the commander to use to evaluate the effectiveness of his training program. 3. Training Plans. Leaders must think "outside the box" when developing training plans, especially for weapons proficiency. Training distracters must be minimized. Operating Force elements must maintain a viable marksmanship training program. Such a program begins with a train-the-trainer portion that develops in the trainer the confidence, willingness, knowledge, and skills so he can consistently train Soldiers to be effective in combat. (See Enclosure # 2 for information on a train-the-trainer program.) Trainers should be selected from the most highly qualified Soldiers available within the Operating Force. These Soldiers should be knowledgeable of the weapon system, demonstrate a high degree of proficiency in applying marksmanship fundamentals, and also demonstrate a motivated attitude. Additionally, refresher training on methods of instruction and any new tactics, techniques, and procedures must be established to maintain skills of trainers. Knowledgeable trainers in the Generating and Operating Force are the key to any successful marksmanship training program. The key to fighting and winning is an

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Small Arms and Crew-Served Weapons Marksmanship Training Strategies Overview

understanding of how to train to fight. Training programs must result in demonstrated tactical and technical competence, confidence, and initiative. Maintaining a battle focus helps Operating Force leaders consider their combat missions when establishing training priorities and developing training plans. Battle focus guides the planning, execution, and assessment of each unit's training program and ensures members train as they will fight. This not only applies to the tasks selected, but also to the conditions in which the tasks are to be performed. Combat marksmanship proficiency is key to military effectiveness in ground combat or security operations. To further simulate combat conditions, all marksmanship training and qualification should be conducted with the Soldier wearing Interceptor Body Armor and other required equipment. Incorporating situational, field, and live-fire training exercises that support marksmanship is another way to add realism to training. Fiscal constraints have caused the Army to rely on training aids, devices, simulators, and simulations (TADSS) to train Soldiers on some marksmanship tasks. A holistic approach to training that includes live fire and TADSS is needed to fully prepare Soldiers to survive in a hostile environment. Commanders must integrate TADSS into training plans to ensure poorly resourced events are still trained to standard. However, TADSS is no substitute for the required live-fire training in proponent approved programs of instruction (POI) or the STRAC. Personnel in any Table of Distribution and Allowance organization who are not assigned individual weapons are exempt from weapon qualification. However, leaders should still have a marksmanship training plan that includes training with the Engagement Skills Trainer 2000 and live fire with an MTOE unit if resources are available. 4. Goal. The goal of a marksmanship training strategy should be to organize, equip, train, and qualify Soldiers to perform all associated marksmanship tasks efficiently, accurately, and with speed in all environments. "Minimum standard" should not be the training goal of any Army leader. Every leader should strive to qualify 100 percent of their assigned soldiers in marksmanship tasks and then to reinforce those tasks through rigorous training quarterly. Although, a challenge, creative planning and the right priorities can make it happen! 5. Resources. Marksmanship training is resourced IAW the applicable POI, STRAC, and FM. When ranges or ammunition are unavailable, leaders should use the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 and the Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS) to conduct marksmanship training. 6. Marksmanship. Marksmanship training includes two components: initial and sustainment training. Effective initial training taught by competent instructors is essential. A task that is taught correctly and learned well is retained longer. DA Pam 350-38 (STRAC), applicable FMs, Soldier Training Publications, and Mission Training Plans prescribe the standards for marksmanship training. 7. Command Emphasis. Maintaining an effective marksmanship training program when leaders are faced with competing priorities requires command emphasis. The challenge is to ensure all Soldiers are trained to standard on marksmanship tasks so they are prepared to fight, win, and

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Small Arms and Crew-Served Weapons Marksmanship Training Strategies Overview

survive on a lethal battlefield. An effective marksmanship program also includes cross-training for Soldiers and crews on other organizational weapons. This will reduce the effects of personnel turnover. 8. Phases. Marksmanship training is progressive in nature and includes three phases: Preliminary, Basic, and Advanced marksmanship. It begins with non-firing individual skill proficiency and concludes with collective proficiency firing under demanding conditions. Even though remedial marksmanship training is not one of the three phases of marksmanship training, it is an integral part of each. Leaders must provide time and resources for remedial marksmanship training at each marksmanship training event. Tasks taught in marksmanship may differ between weapon systems; similar ones are discussed in the following paragraphs, while weapon specific tasks are covered in Enclosures 3 through 11. a. Preliminary Marksmanship Training. In this phase, the Soldier learns and demonstrates proficiency on individual skills that prepare him to fire live ammunition. Preliminary marksmanship training includes, as a minimum-(1) Mechanical Training. Although maintaining a weapon is taught as part of preliminary marksmanship training, Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services should be reinforced on a regular basis by leaders and trainers. A weapon that is not clean and free of corrosion will not perform properly when needed. (Corrosion is typically associated with rusting of metal; it can also include deterioration of other materials such as rubber or plastic.) (2) Fundamentals of Marksmanship. The four fundamentals of marksmanship (steady position, aim, breath control, and trigger squeeze) are initially taught during Basic Rifle Marksmanship; however, the fundamentals should be reinforced on a regular basis by organization marksmanship trainers. (3) Fire commands. (4) Sight adjustments, if applicable. (5) Traversing, if applicable. (6) Elevating manipulation, if applicable. (7) Crew drill, if applicable. (8) Qualification or familiarization firing (day/night), if applicable. b. Basic Marksmanship Training. In this phase, the Soldier learns and demonstrates proficiency in firing tasks. Basic marksmanship training will include, as a minimum-(1) Application of the fundamentals in live-fire or simulator exercises during day and night conditions.

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Small Arms and Crew-Served Weapons Marksmanship Training Strategies Overview

(2) Grouping procedures. (3) Zeroing, if applicable. (4) Field zeroing, if applicable. (5) Transition firing, if applicable. (6) Qualification firing (day/night), if applicable. c. Advanced Marksmanship Training. In this phase, the Soldier (and crew, if applicable) learns and demonstrates proficiency in advanced firing techniques. Advanced marksmanship training will include, as a minimum-(1) Combat techniques of fire. (2) Weapon employment. (3) Live-fire exercises. (4) Limited visibility firing. (5) Firing in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) conditions. (6) Advanced optics and lasers (if applicable).

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Train-the-Trainer Program

1. Certification. Commanders should have a viable train-the-trainer certification program in place and operational if the organization's marksmanship training program is expected to succeed. Just as marksmanship is a perishable skill, teaching others marksmanship is also a perishable skill. Therefore, trainers should be certified on an annual basis. Additionally, the chain of command should monitor training sessions on a regular basis to ensure assigned Soldiers are being trained to standard. Weapons qualification is a major tool for the commander to use in evaluating the effectiveness of his training program. 2. Goal. The goal of a train-the-trainer program is to provide qualified trainers and achieve a high state of unit combat readiness. Knowledgeable, small-unit leaders and trainers are the key to any successful marksmanship training program. However, the entire leadership should be involved in the execution of training to standard. An effective train-the-trainer program reflects the priority, emphasis, and interest of leaders and trainers. Soldiers selected to be marksmanship trainers should be of the highest quality. They should obtain and maintain the respect of Soldiers in the organization by being technically and tactically competent. Additionally, trainers should have the full authority of the chain of command regardless of the military grade of the person receiving instruction. Commanders should plan, resource, and ensure timely accomplishment of trainerthe-trainer instruction. 3. Expertise. Before trainers can be certified, they should have a high level of marksmanship expertise as demonstrated by consistently firing as expert and frequently scoring the maximum score on individual weapons qualification courses (e.g., rifle 40 out of 40). They should also master all phases of the organization's marksmanship training program. Then, under the supervision of the chain of command, they should demonstrate mastery of marksmanship phases/tasks, their ability to train others these tasks, and their ability to diagnose and correct problem areas of Soldiers they are training. Ideally, personnel selected as unit trainers should have completed a formal marksmanship course. At a minimum, a train-the-trainer program should include the following. a. Orientation that includes-· A briefing on the concept of trainer certification (why and requirements for certification/recertification). Certification requirements should be developed by leaders as part of their marksmanship training strategy. · A briefing on the unit's marksmanship training strategy. · A briefing on instructional techniques and how adults learn. · A review of the unit's marksmanship standing operating procedures, training plan, and associated marksmanship task from applicable Field Manuals, Soldiers Training Publication, and other applicable publications. · A visit to training sites and firing ranges (includes marksmanship training devices). b. Completion of the local Range Safety course.

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Train-the-Trainer Program c. Completion of a Methods of Instruction course (in residence or on-line at Army Training Information Architecture [ATIA] https://atiam.train.army.mil/soldierPortal/). d. Demonstrated understanding of evaluation techniques. Note: Even though evaluation is an integral part of training, trainers should wear their coaching hat during instruction and only become an evaluator when a check-on-learning is required. e. Demonstrated competence in instructing the following. · Techniques of instruction · Fundamentals of marksmanship · Maintaining the weapon system · Performing a function check · Loading and unloading ammunition · Correcting malfunctions · Range estimation or determination · Zeroing with or without optics · Qualifying fire on all applicable ranges (record fire day, night, and during other periods limited visibility to include CBRN) · Understanding of combat techniques of fire · Understanding employment of the weapon system · Understanding of advanced optics and lasers · Understanding fire commands and fire distribution or control · Understanding and operating applicable marksmanship training devices · Mounting and dismounting sights or optics, if applicable · Mounting and dismounting a weapon on a bipod, tripod, and vehicle, if applicable · Boresighting, if applicable · Understanding crew drills, if applicable · Understanding range cards, if applicable 4. Training Folder. Leaders should develop a training folder for each trainer who has been certified through the unit's train-the-trainer program. The folder should include the following, at a minimum-· Task tracking sheet (lists each marksmanship task to be evaluated during the train-thetrainer certification program). · Weapon qualification score card(s). · Certificates from courses of instruction (Methods of Instruction, etc).

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the M16/M4 rifle/carbine that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, and Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· FM 3-22.9, Rifle Marksmanship M16A1, M16A2/3, M16A4, and M4 Carbine, April 2003. · Soldier Training Publication 7-11B1-SM-TG, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 11B, Infantry, Skill Level I, August 2004. · Soldier Training Publication 21-1-SMCT, Soldier's Manual on Common Tasks, Warrior Skills, Level 1, October 2006. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. The Generating Force strategy for Initial Entry Training (IET) includes the following phases of training for rifle marksmanship. Figure 2-1 portrays how the Army's marksmanship training strategy is implemented in the Generating Force during initial entry training. · Phase I ­ Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction · Phase II - Downrange Feedback · Phase III - Field Firing · Phase IV - Advanced Rifle Marksmanship · Phase V ­ Advanced Optics, Lasers, and Iron Sights (1) Phase I. Preliminary marksmanship instruction should include, at a minimum-· Weapon Safety. · Maintain. · Clearing. · Cycles of functioning. · Modes of fire. · Peer coaching. · Four fundamentals for firing. · Firing positions. · Firing positions with interceptor body armor. · Training devices (Engagement Skills Trainer [EST] 2000 and Laser Marksmanship Training System [LMTS]). (2) Phase II. Downrange feedback should include, at a minimum-· Grouping procedures.

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy

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· · · · ·

Organization of a 25-Meter Grouping Range Conduct of a 25-Meter Grouping Firing Shot Group Marking Single Shot Group Analysis Multiple Shot Group Analysis Zeroing procedures. Known distance range. Effects of wind and gravity. Ballistics. Proper wear and fit of interceptor body armor.

(3) Phase III. Field firing should include, at a minimum-· Target Detection. · Field fire training (single timed and multiple timed targets). · Record qualification. (4) Phase IV. Advanced rifle marksmanship should include, at a minimum-· Advanced firing positions. · Combat fire techniques. · Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear firing. · Night fire training. · Moving target engagement. · Short-range marksmanship training. (5) Phase V. Advanced optics, lasers, and iron sights should include, at a minimum-· M68, Close Combat Optic. · AN/PAQ-4B/C, AN/PEQ-2A, and AN/PEQ-15 Infrared Aiming Lasers. · Backup iron sight. · AN/PEM-1 Laser Borelight System (LBS).

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy

b. Home Station Strategy. The home station marksmanship strategy for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes the following phases. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 portray how the Army's marksmanship training strategy is implemented at home station for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force. (1) Phase I. (Reinforce as required.) Preliminary marksmanship instruction should include, at a minimum-· Weapon safety. · Maintain. · Clearing. · Cycles of functioning. · Modes of fire · Peer coaching. · Four fundamentals for firing. · Firing positions. · Proper wear and fit of interceptor body armor. · Firing positions with interceptor body armor.

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy · Training devices (EST 2000 and LMTS).

(2) Phase II. Downrange feedback should include, at a minimum-· Grouping procedures. · Zeroing procedures. · Known distance range. · Effects of wind and gravity. · Ballistics. (3) Phase III. Field firing should include, at a minimum-· Target Detection. · Field fire training (single timed and multiple timed targets). · Record qualification. (4) Phase IV. Advanced rifle marksmanship should include, at a minimum-· Advanced firing positions. · Combat fire techniques. · Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear firing. · Night fire training. · Moving target engagement. · Short-range marksmanship training. · Squad designated marksmanship. The SDM must possess a thorough understanding and mastery of-- The fundamentals of rifle marksmanship. - Ballistics. - Elevation and windage. - Hold-off (adjusted points of aim). - Sight manipulation. - Range estimation. (5) Phase V. Advanced optics, lasers, and iron sights should include, at a minimum-· Training strategies and qualification standards. · M68, Close Combat Optic. · AN/PAQ-4B/C, AN/PEQ-2A, and AN/PEQ-15 Infrared Aiming Lasers. · AN/PAS-13 (V1), (V3) Thermal Weapon Sight. · AN/PVS-4 Night Vision Device. · Backup iron sight. · AN/PEM-1 Laser Borelight System (LBS).

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy

c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 should be used if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Weapon safety · Maintain · Clearing · Cycles of functioning · Modes of fire · Peer coaching · Four fundamentals for firing · Firing positions · Proper wear and fit of interceptor body armor · Firing positions with interceptor body armor · Advanced firing positions · Combat fire techniques · Training strategies and qualification standards · Borelight procedures d. Deployed Strategy. Deployed marksmanship training should include the following using available facilities. Figure 2-3 and Figure 2-4 portray how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Proper wear and fit of interceptor body armor. · Firing positions with interceptor body armor. · Combat fire techniques. · Night, CBRN, practice fire (if EST 2000 is available) · Range live fire (dependent on range availability).

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy · · · · · M68, Close Combat Optic. AN/PAQ-4B/C, AN/PEQ-2A, and AN/PEQ-15 Infrared Aiming Lasers. AN/PAS-13 (V1), (V3) Thermal Weapon Sight. AN/PVS-4 Night Vision Device. Backup iron sight.

3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current M16/M4 marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a

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M16 & M4 Rifle/Carbine Marksmanship Training Strategy marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS) or Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · Shot Grouping A002 · Battlesight Zero A003 · Downrange Feedback I A004 · Downrange Feedback II A005 · Downrange Feedback III A006 · Downrange Feedback IV A007 · Field Fire I A008 · Field Fire II A009 · Practice Record Fire (Sim) A010 · Record Fire (Sim) A011 · Burst Firing A012 · Protective Mask Firing A013 · Night Fire I A014 · Night Fire II A015 · Advanced Marksmanship I A016 · Advanced Marksmanship II A017 · Advanced Marksmanship-Qual (Sim) A018 · Quick Fire A019 · NBC Fire A020 · Night Fire I A021 · Night Fire II (w AN/PVS-4) A022 · KD Range I (Zero) A023 · KD Range II A024 · Rapid Fire A025 · Rapid Fire II A026 · AR Firing A027 · BRM Quick Zero None · IET Shot Group None · Brm Battlesight Zero None · BRM Shot Grouping None

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M9 Pistol Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes the marksmanship training strategies for the M9 pistol. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, and Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· Field Manual 3-23.35, Combat Training with Pistols, M9 and M11, June 2003. · Soldier Training Publication 21-1-SMCT, Soldier's Manual on Common Tasks, Warrior Skills, Level 1, October 2006. · Soldier Training Publication 7-11B1-SM-TG, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 11B, Infantry, Skill Level1, August 2004. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31B1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31B, Military Police, Skill Level 1, December 2007. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31E1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31E, Internment/Resettlement Specialist, Skill Level 1, October 2007. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp. 2. Strategies. Personnel required to fire the M9 pistol should receive training that includes three phases: preliminary, preparatory (basic), and advanced (combat) marksmanship skills. Throughout marksmanship training, the coach (trainer) and pupil method of training should be used. The marksmanship proficiency of a Soldier depends largely on how well the coach performs his duties. A fully qualified coach should be assigned to each firer. A list of duties and instructional proficiencies for the coach are addressed in FM 3-23.35, paragraph 2-13. a. Generating Force Strategy. Military Police, MOS: 31B, are trained to use the M9 pistol at Fort Leonard Wood, MO. The following subjects are part of the instruction that culminates in qualification. Figure 2-1 shows the strategy for the Generating Force. · M9 disassembly and assembly · M9 maintenance · M9 operation · M9 preparatory marksmanship · M9 care and cleaning · M9 pistol exam and review · M9 loading, unloading, and malfunction procedures · M9 target engagement

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M9 Pistol Marksmanship Training Strategy

b. Home Station Strategy. Home station training for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced pistol marksmanship and completion of firing tables I - VII. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 shows how the home station strategy is implemented. (1) Preliminary pistol marksmanship training should include, at a minimum-· M9 disassembly and assembly. · M9 maintenance. · M9 operation. · M9 preparatory marksmanship. · M9 care and cleaning. (2) Basic pistol marksmanship training should include, at a minimum-· M9 grip. · Aim. · Breath control. · Trigger squeeze. · M9 target engagement. · M9 firing positions. (3) Advanced marksmanship training should include, at a minimum-· M9 techniques of firing. · M9 close combat target engagement. · Traversing. · M9 combat reloading techniques. · M9 limited visibility firing. · M9 firing during CBRN. · AN/PEQ-14.

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M9 Pistol Marksmanship Training Strategy

b. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 should be used if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · M9 disassembly and assembly. · M9 preparatory marksmanship. · M9 care and cleaning. · Grip. · Aim. · Breath control. · Trigger squeeze. · M9 firing positions. c. Deployed Strategy. Deployed marksmanship training should include the following using available facilities. Figure 2-2 should be used if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · M9 disassembly and assembly. · M9 maintenance. · M9 loading, unloading, and malfunction procedures. · M9 firing. · M9 immediate action drill. · M9 care and cleaning. · M9 target engagement. · M9 firing positions. · M9 techniques of firing. · M9 close combat target engagement. · M9 combat reloading techniques. 3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current M9 pistol marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Laser Marksmanship

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M9 Pistol Marksmanship Training Strategy Training System (LMTS) or Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders should incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · Simulated Qualification - Table I B007 · Simulated Qualification -Table II B008 · Simulated Qualification - Table III B009 · Simulated Qualification - Table IV B010 · Simulated Qualification - Table V B011 · Simulated Night Qualification - Table I B012 · Simulated Night Qualification - Table II B013 · Simulated Night Qualification - Table III B014 · Simulated Night Qualification - Table IV B015 · Simulated Night Qualification - Table V B016 · Simulated NBC Qualification - Table I B017 · Simulated NBC Qualification - Table II B018 · Simulated NBC Qualification - Table III B019 · Simulated NBC Qualification - Table IV B020 · Simulated NBC Qualification - Table V B021 · Alt Sim Qualification - Table I B022 · Alt Sim Qualification - Table II B023 · Alt Sim Qualification - Table III B024 · Alt Sim Qualification - Table IV B025 · Alt Sim Night Qualification B026 · Alt Sim NBC Qualification B027 · Military Police Firearms Qualification B028 · Military Police Firearms Qualification B029 · Military Police Firearms Qualification B030 · Military Police Firearms Qualification B031 · Military Police Firearms Qualification B032

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M203 Grenade Launcher Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the M203 grenade launcher that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· Field Manual 3-22.31, 40mm Grenade Launcher, M203, 19 March 2007. · Soldier Training Publication 21-1-SMCT, Soldier's Manual on Common Tasks, Warrior Skills, Level 1, October 2006. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31B24-SM, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 31B, Military Police, Skill Level 2/3/4, February 2007. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31E24-SM-TG, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 31E, Military Police, Skill Level 2/3/4, March 2007. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp. 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. M203 grenade launcher marksmanship training conducted by the Generating Force consists of academic instruction and familiarization firing IAW the approved Program of Instruction (see Figure 2-1). Marksmanship training conducted at Generating Force locations includes-· Maintain an M203. · Operate an M203.

b. Home Station Strategy. The home station marksmanship strategy for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced marksmanship training. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 portrays how the Army's marksmanship training strategy is implemented at home station for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force. (1) Preliminary marksmanship instruction will include, at a minimum-· Maintain an M203 grenade launcher. · Operation and function of an M203 grenade launcher. · Adjustment of sights on an M203 grenade launcher. · Firing positions for an M203 grenade launcher.

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M203 Grenade Launcher Marksmanship Training Strategy · Operate an M203 grenade launcher.

(2) Basic marksmanship training will include, at a minimum-· Zero an M203 grenade launcher. · Day qualification with an M203 grenade launcher. · Mounting AN/PVS-4 on an M203 grenade launcher. · Zero AN/PVS-4 on an M203 grenade launcher. · Night qualification with an M203 grenade launcher (if assigned the AN/PVS-4). · Methods of fire control for an M203 grenade launcher. (3) Advanced marksmanship training will include, at a minimum-· Characteristics of fire of an M203 grenade launcher. · Classes of fire for an M203 grenade launcher. · Range estimation for an M203 grenade launcher. · Predetermined fires for an M203 grenade launcher. · Types of targets for an M203 grenade launcher.

c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 should be used if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Maintain an M203 grenade launcher · Operation and function of an M203 grenade launcher · Adjust of sights on an M203 grenade launcher · Firing positions for an M203 grenade launcher

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M203 Grenade Launcher Marksmanship Training Strategy · · · · · · · Operate an M203 grenade launcher Range estimation for an M203 grenade launcher Mounting AN/PVS-4 on an M203 grenade launcher Methods of fire control for an M203 grenade launcher Characteristics of fire of an M203 grenade launcher Classes of fire of an M203 grenade launcher Predetermined fires for an M203 grenade launcher

d. Deployed Strategy. Deployed marksmanship training should include, at a minimum, the following using available facilities. Figure 2-3 portrays how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Maintain an M203 grenade launcher · Operation and function of an M203 grenade launcher · Adjust of sights on an M203 grenade launcher · Firing positions for an M203 grenade launcher · Range estimation for an M203 grenade launcher · Mounting AN/PVS-4 on an M203 grenade launcher · Methods of fire control for an M203 grenade launcher

3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current M203 marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · Zero I (Leaf Sight) G001 · Zero II (Quadrant Sight) G002 · Simulated Record Fire I G003

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M203 Grenade Launcher Marksmanship Training Strategy · · · · · · Simulated Record Fire II Simulated Record Fire III Simulated Record Fire IV Simulated Record Fire V Zeroing the AN/PVS-4 Night Firing G004 G005 G006 G007 G008 G009

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Sniper Weapons M24, M107, M110 Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for sniper weapons that can be used from initial through deployment training. Publications that support this strategy include-· FM 23-10, Sniper Training, 17 August 1994. · Soldier Training Publication 21-1-SMCT, Soldier's Manual on Common Tasks, Warrior Skills, Level 1, October 2006. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp 2. Strategies. Sniper marksmanship is an extension of basic rifle marksmanship and focuses on the techniques needed to engage targets at extended ranges. To successfully engage targets at increased distances, the sniper team must be thoroughly trained and proficient in marksmanship fundamentals and advanced marksmanship skills. a. Generating Force Strategy. Sniper training conducted at Generating Force locations includes, at a minimum-· Target detection. · Range estimation. · Stalking. · Operation of the M24 Sniper Weapon System (SWS) · Maintain M24 SWS. · Field fire M24 SWS. · Zero, confirm and group M24 SWS with M3A. · Engage unknown distance targets using M24SWS (Sniper Marksmanship Record Fire 1). · Engage targets using Mil Hold-off. · Engage targets using alternate firing positions. · Identify angle fire techniques. · Engage moving targets. · Qualify on snap and moving targets (Sniper Marksmanship Record Fire 2). · Engage targets during limited visibility. · Zero, confirm, and group M24 SWS with AN/PVS 10. · Field fire with M24 SWS during limited visibility. · Engage moving targets with a M24 SWS equipped with AN/PVS 10 from 300 to 500 meters. · Engage moving targets during limited visibility. (Sniper Marksmanship Record Fire 3). · Engage an unknown distance target. (Final Shot). · Operation of the M107 Long Range Sniper Rifle (LRSR). · Zero M107 LRSR.

Encl 6

Sniper Weapons M24, M107, M110 Marksmanship Training Strategy · · · · · · · Field fire with LRSR. Sniper Marksmanship Record Fire 4. Employ as a Sniper in MOUT environment. Engage targets with M9 pistol. Qualify with an M9 pistol. Operation of the XM110 Semi Automatic Sniper System (SASS). Engage targets at unknown distances with XM 110 SASS (Sniper Marksmanship Record Fire 5).

Note: EST 2000 does not currently support sniper training, but can support non-optic Squad Designated Marksman (SDM) training. b. Home Station Strategy. Figures 2-2 and 2-3 portray how the home station marksmanship strategy is implemented by the Operating and Reserve Operating Force for different sniper weapon systems. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Home station minimum skill training should consists of-· Observation. · Range estimation. · Concealment. · Concealed movement. · Rifle firing. · Stalking.

2

Sniper Weapons M24, M107, M110 Marksmanship Training Strategy

3

Sniper Weapons M24, M107, M110 Marksmanship Training Strategy

c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization training for the Reserve Operating Force should be conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. Figures 2-2 and 2-3 should be used as a guide if ranges and facilities are available. At a minimum, the following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. · Reinforcement of marksmanship fundamentals · Maintain the weapon system · Observation · Range estimation · Concealment · Concealed movement · Stalking

4

Sniper Weapons M24, M107, M110 Marksmanship Training Strategy

d. Deployed Strategy. Deployed marksmanship training should include the following using available facilities. Figures 2-4 and 2-5 portray how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges are available. · Observation · Range estimation · Concealment · Concealed movement · Stalking

5

Sniper Weapons M24, M107, M110 Marksmanship Training Strategy

6

Crew-Served Machine Gun M249 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the M249 machine gun that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, and Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed for the Automatic Rifle and Light Machine Gun roles. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· FM 3-22.68, Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56mm and 7.72mm, 21 July 2006. · Soldier Training Publication 7-11B1-SM-TG, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 11B, Infantry, Skill Level 1, August 2004. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31B1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31B, Military Police, Skill Level 1, December 2007. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31E1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31E, Internment/Resettlement Specialist, Skill Level 1, October 2007. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. Generating Force marksmanship training includes the following. Figure 2-1 shows how the strategy is implemented for initial entry training (IET). · Maintain an M249. · Operate an M249. · Mount AN/PVS-4 on an M249. · Dismount AN/PVS-4 from an M249. · Engage targets with an M249 using AN/PVS-4. · Mount AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight on an M249. · Dismount AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight from an M249. · Engage targets with an M249 using AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight.

b. Home Station Strategy. Home station marksmanship training for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced marksmanship training.

Encl 7

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 portray how this strategy is implemented. (1) Preliminary M249 machine gun training should include, at a minimum-· M249 dry-fire training. · M249 proficiency (performance) examination. (2) Basic M249 machine gun training will include, at a minimum-· M249 10-meter zero. · M249 10-meter practice fire. · M249 10-meter qualification fire. · M249 transition range field zero. · M249 transition range practice fire. · M249 transition range qualification fire. · M249 night zero. · M249 night instructional fire. · M249 night qualification fire.

2

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

3

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

4

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy (3) Advanced M249 machine gun training will include, at a minimum-· M249 crew training. · M249 weapon employment. · M249 combat techniques of fire. · M249 bipod and tripod mount operation. · M249 in an aerial defense. · M249 advanced optics and lasers. · M249 live-fire qualifications IAW STRAC. · M249 firing during CBRN conditions. (a) Crew training is conducted and or reinforced in each phase of marksmanship training and will include, at a minimum-· M249 associated equipment. · M249 crew formations. · M249 cross-training. · M249 inspection for bipod, tripod, and vehicle mount. · Place the M249 into action (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · M249 barrel changing procedures (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · Remove the M249 from action (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · M249 advanced gunnery crew exercises. (b) Weapon employment training will include, at a minimum-· M249 in the attack. · M249 in a base-of-fire element. · M249 in the defense. · M249 on a security mission. · M249 in pairs. (c) Combat techniques training will include, at a minimum-· M249 characteristics of fire. · M249 classes of fire. · M249 application of fire. · M249 predetermined fires. · M249 fire control. · M249 range determination. · M249 advanced gunnery. · M249 advanced crew gunnery exercises. c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 will be used as a guide if ranges, facilities, or simulators are available. · M249 dry fire training

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Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy · M249 proficiency (performance) examination

d. Deployed Strategy. Figure 2-4 and Figure 2-5 portray how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges and simulations are available.

6

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

7

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

8

Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy 3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current M249 machine gun marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS) or Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · 10 Meter Zeroing C001 · 10 m Controlled Burst Firing C002 · 10 m NBC Traverse & Search I C003 · 10 m Traverse & Search I C004 · Transition Firing I (Fld Zero) C008 · Transition Firing II C009 · Transition Firing III (Sim Qual) C010 · Transition Firing IV (Sim Qual) C011 · Transition Firing V (Sim Qual) C012 · Transition Firing VI (Sim Qual) C013 · Transition Firing VII (Sim Qual) C014 · Transition Firing VIII (Sim Qual) C015 · Night Firing I (Zeroing AN/PVS-4) C016 · Night Firing II C017 · Night Firing III C018 · Night Firing IV C019 · Night Firing V C020 · Night Firing VI C021 · Field Firing I (Zeroing) C022 · Field Firing ll C023 · Field Firing lll C024 · Field Firing IV C025 · Alternate Field Firing II C026 · Alternate Field Firing III C027 · Alternate Field Firing IV C028

9

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the M240B machine gun that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· FM 3-22.68, Crew-Served Machine Guns 5.56mm and 7.72mm, 21 July 2006. · Soldier Training Publication 7-11B1-SM-TG, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 11B, Infantry, Skill Level I, August 2004. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. Generating Force marksmanship training includes the following. Figure 2-1 shows how the strategy is implemented for initial entry training (IET). · Maintain an M240B machine gun. · Operate an M240B machine gun. · Mount an M240B machine gun on an M122A1 Tripod. · Dismount an M240B machine gun from an M122A1 Tripod. · Mount an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight on an M240B machine gun. · Dismount an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight from an M240B machine gun. · Engage Targets with an M240B machine gun using an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight. · Mount an AN/PEQ-2A Aiming Light on an M240B machine gun. · Dismount an AN/PEQ-2A Aiming Light from an M240B machine gun. · Engage Targets with an M240B machine gun using an AN/PEQ-2A Aiming Light.

b. Home Station Strategy. Home station marksmanship training for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced marksmanship training. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 portrays how this strategy is implemented.

Encl 8

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy (1) Preliminary M240B machine gun training should include, at a minimum-· M240 machine gun dry-fire training. · M240 machine gun proficiency (performance) examination. (2) Basic M240B machine gun training will include, at a minimum-· 10-meter zero of the M240 machine gun. · 10-meter practice fire with the M240 machine gun. · 10-meter qualification fire with the M240 machine gun. · Transition range field zero of the M240 machine gun. · Transition range practice fire with the M240 machine gun. · Transition range qualification fire with the M240 machine gun. · Night zero of the M240 machine gun. · Night instructional fire with the M240 machine gun. · Night qualification fire with the M240 machine gun.

2

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

3

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy (3) Advance M240B machine gun training will include, at a minimum-· M240 machine gun crew training. · M240 machine gun weapon employment. · M240 machine gun combat techniques of fire. · M240 machine gun bipod and tripod mount operation. · M240 machine gun in an aerial defense. · M240 machine gun advanced optics and lasers. · M240 machine gun live-fire qualifications IAW STRAC. · M240 machine gun firing during CBRN conditions. (a) Crew training is conducted and or reinforced in each phase of marksmanship training and will include, at a minimum-· M240 machine gun associated equipment. · M240 machine gun crew formations. · M240 machine gun cross-training. · Inspection for the M240 machine gun bipod, tripod, and vehicle mount. · Place the M240 machine gun into action (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · M240 machine gun barrel changing procedures (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · Remove the M240 machine gun from action (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · M240 machine gun advanced gunnery crew exercises. (b) Weapon employment training will include, at a minimum-· M240 machine gun in the attack. · M240 machine gun in a base-of-fire element. · M240 machine gun in the defense. · M240 machine gun on a security mission. · M240 machine gun in pairs. (c) Combat techniques training will include, at a minimum-· M240 machine gun characteristics of fire. · M240 machine gun classes of fire. · M240 machine gun application of fire. · M240 machine gun predetermined fires. · M240 machine gun fire control. · M240 machine gun range determination. · M240 machine gun advanced gunnery. · M240 machine gun advanced crew gunnery exercises. c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 will be used as a guide if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. At a minimum, the following will be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station.

4

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy · · Dry fire training Proficiency (performance) examination

d. Deployed Strategy. Figure 2-3 portrays how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges and simulations are available.

5

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

6

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy

3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current M240B machine gun marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS) or Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · 10 Meter Bipod Firing I (Zeroing) D001 · 10m Bipod Firing ll D002 · 10 m Bipod Firing III D003 · 10m Bipod Firing lV W04 · 10 m Bipod Firing V D005 · 10m Bipod Firing Vl D006 · 10m Bipod Firing Vll D007 · 10m Tripod Firing Practice l (Zero) D008 · 10 m Tripod Firing Practice 11 D009 · 10 m Tripod Firing Practice 111 D010 · 10m Tripod Firing Practice lV D011 · 10 m Tri Firing Record Practice I D012 · 10 m Tri Firing Record Practice 11 D013 · 10 m Tripod Firing, Sim Record I D014 · 10 m Tripod Firing, Sim Record 11 D015 · 10 m Tripod Firing, Sim Record m D016 · 10m Tripod Firing, Record lV D017 · Transition Firing I D018 · Transition Firing II D019 · Day Defensive Firing I (Zeroing) D020 · Day Defensive Firing II D021 · Day Defensive Firing III D022 · Predetermined Fire I D023 · Predetermined Fire II D024 · Predetermined Fire III D025 · Predetermined Fire lV D026 · Predetermined Fire V D027 · Predetermined Fire VI D028 · Assault Firing I D029 · Assault Firing 11 D030 · Assault Firing 111 D031 · Conduct Or Stationary Firing I D032

7

Crew-Served Machine Guns M240B 7.62 mm Marksmanship Training Strategy · · · · · · · Conduct Or Stationary Firing II Conduct Or Stationary Firing III Conduct or Stationary Firing IV Conduct Or Moving Firing I Conduct Or Moving Firing II Conduct Or Moving Firing III Conduct Or Moving Firing IV D033 D034 D035 D036 D037 D038 D040

8

M2 Machine Gun .50 Caliber Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the M2 machine gun that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, and Reserve Operating Force at home station, premobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· FM 3-22.65, Browning Machine Gun, Caliber .50 HB, M2, March 2005. · Soldier Training Publication 21-1-SMCT, Soldier's Manual on Common Tasks, Warrior Skills, Level 1, October 2006. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. Generating Force marksmanship training includes the following. Figure 2-1 shows how the strategy is implemented for initial entry training (IET). · Maintain an M2 machine gun. · Mount an M2 machine gun on an M3 tripod. · Dismount an M2 machine gun from an M3 tripod. · Operate an M2 machine gun. · Set headspace and timing on an M2 machine gun. · Manipulate the T&E mechanism for a tripod mounted M2 machine gun. · Mount an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight on an M2 machine gun. · Dismount an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight from an M2 machine gun. · Zero an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight to an M2 machine gun. · Engage Targets with an M2 machine gun using an AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight.

b. Home Station Strategy. Home station marksmanship training for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced marksmanship training. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 portrays how this strategy is implemented.

Encl 9

Total Army Marksmanship Training Strategy for the M2 Machine Gun (1) Preliminary M2 machine gun gunnery will include, at a minimum-· Dry fire training for the M2 machine gun. · Range determination for the M2 machine gun. · Observation and adjustment of fire for the M2 machine gun. · Fire commands for the M2 machine gun. · M2 machine gun fundamental skills test. (2) Basic M2 machine gun gunnery will include, at a minimum-· 10-meter zero of the M2 machine gun. · 10-meter practice with the M2 machine gun. · Day practice fire with the M2 machine gun. · Day qualification fire with the M2 machine gun. · Night practice fire with the M2 machine gun. · Night qualification fire with the M2 machine gun.

2

Total Army Marksmanship Training Strategy for the M2 Machine Gun

(3) Advanced M2 machine gun gunnery will include, at a minimum-· Operate the M2 machine gun against moving targets. · Firing M2 machine gun during CBRN conditions. · Mounted firing of the M2 machine gun. · Firing using fire commands with the M2 machine gun. · Crew training for the M2 machine gun. · Combat techniques of fire for the M2 machine gun. · Employment of the M2 machine gun. · M2 machine gun bipod, tripod, and vehicle mount operation. · M2 machine gun in an aerial defense. · Advanced optics and lasers for the M2 machine gun. · Live-fire qualifications for the M2 machine gun IAW STRAC.

3

Total Army Marksmanship Training Strategy for the M2 Machine Gun (a) Crew training is conducted and or reinforced in each phase of marksmanship training and will include, at a minimum-· Equipment for the M2 machine gun. · Formations for the M2 machine gun. · M2 machine gun crew duties. · M2 machine gun cross-training for crews. · Inspection for M2 machine gun bipod, tripod, and vehicle mount. · Place the M2 machine gun into action (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · Barrel changing procedures for the M2 machine gun (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · Remove the M2 machine gun from action (bipod, tripod, vehicle mount). · Advanced gunnery crew exercises for the M2 machine gun. (b) Weapon employment training will include, at a minimum-· M2 machine gun in the attack. · M2 machine gun in a base-of-fire element. · M2 machine gun in the defense. · M2 machine gun on a security mission. (c) Combat techniques will include, at a minimum-· Characteristics of fire for the M2 machine gun. · Classes of fire for the M2 machine gun. · Application of fire of the M2 machine gun. · Predetermined fires for the M2 machine gun. · Fire control for the M2 machine gun. · Range determination for the M2 machine gun. · Advanced gunnery for the M2 machine gun. · Advanced crew gunnery exercises for the M2 machine gun. c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 will be used as a guide if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Dry fire training with the M2 machine gun. · M2 machine gun fundamental skills test. d. Deployed Strategy. Figure 2-3 portrays how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges and simulations are available.

4

Total Army Marksmanship Training Strategy for the M2 Machine Gun

3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current M2 machine gun marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS) or Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · 10 Meter Firing I (Zero) E001 · 10 m Firing II E002 · 10 m Firing III E003 · 10m Firing IV E004 · 10 m Simulated Qual Firing V E005 · 10 m Sim Qual Firing VI E006 · 10 m Sim Qual Firing VII E007 · Transition Firing I (Sim Qual) E008

5

Total Army Marksmanship Training Strategy for the M2 Machine Gun · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Transition Firing II (Sim Qual) Transition Firing III (Sim Qual) Transition Firing IV (Sim Qual) Transition Firing V (Sim Qual) Transition Firing VI (Sim Qual) Transition Firing VII (Sim Qual) Transition Firing VIII (Sim Qual) NBC Firing I (Sim Qual) NBC Firing II (Sim Qual) NBC Firing III (Sim Qual) NBC Firing IV (Sim Qual) NBC Firing V (Sim Qual) NBC Firing VI (Sim Qual) NBC Firing VII (Sim Qual) NBC Firing VIII (Sim Qual) Night Firing Sim Qual (Zero AN/TVS-5) Night Firing Sim Qual II Night Firing Sim Qual III Night Firing Sim Qual IV Night Firing Sim Qual V Night Firing Sim Qual VI Night Firing Sim Qual VII Night Firing Sim Qual VIII Mounted Firing Exercise I Mounted Firing Exercise II Mounted Firing Exercise III Mounted Firing Exercise IV Mounted Firing Exercise V Mounted Firing Exercise VI Mounted Firing Exercise VIII Mounted Firing Exercise IX Mounted Firing Exercise X Predetermined Firing I Predetermined Firing II Predetermined Firing IlI Predetermined Firing IV Predetermined Firing V Predetermined Firing VI Predetermined Firing VII E009 E010 E011 E012 E013 E014 E015 E016 E017 E018 E019 E020 E021 E022 E023 E024 E025 E026 E027 E028 E029 E030 E031 E032 E033 E034 E035 E036 E037 E039 E040 E041 E042 E043 E044 E045 E046 E047 E048

6

MK19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, Model 3 Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the MK19 40mm grenade machine gun that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, Operating Force, and Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· Field Manual (FM) 3-22.27, MK19, 40-mm Grenade Machine Gun, MOD 3, November 2003. · Soldier Training Publication 21-1-SMCT, Soldier's Manual on Common Tasks, Warrior Skills, Level 1, October 2006. · Soldier Training Publication 7-11B1-SM-TG, Soldier's Manual and Trainer's Guide, MOS 11B, Infantry, Skill Level 1, August 2004. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31B1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31B, Military Police, Skill Level 1, December 2007. · Soldier Training Publication 19-31E1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31E, Internment/Resettlement Specialist, Skill Level 1, October 2007. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp. 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. MK19 marksmanship training conducted for the Generating Force consists of academic instruction and familiarization firing IAW the approved Program of Instruction (see Figure 2-1). Marksmanship training conducted at Generating Force locations includes-· Identify considerations for employment of the MK19. · Maintain the MK19. · Operate a MK19. · Mount an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight on a MK19. · Engage targets using an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight on a MK19. · Dismount an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight from a MK19.

Encl 10

MK19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, Model 3 Marksmanship Training Strategy b. Home Station Strategy. The home station marksmanship strategy for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced marksmanship training. Zeroing and qualifications will be accomplished with all applicable sights, optics, and lasers. Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 portray how the Army's marksmanship training strategy is implemented at home station. (1) Preliminary MK19 gunnery training will include, at a minimum-· Maintain the MK19. · Operate the MK19. · Manipulate the T&E mechanism on a MK19. · Zero the MK19. · Fighting positions for the MK19. · Mount an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight on a MK19. · Engage targets using an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight on a MK19. · Dismount an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight from a MK19. (2) Basic MK19 gunnery training will include, at a minimum-· Individual and crew skills for a MK19. · MK19 gun mount operations. · Day practice on a MK19. · Day qualification on a MK19. · MK19 gunnery test.

2

MK19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, Model 3 Marksmanship Training Strategy

(3) Advanced MK19 gunnery training will include, at a minimum-· Live-fire exercises using a MK19. · Combat techniques of fire for a MK19. · Employment of a MK19. · Night practice fire with a MK19. · Night qualification fire with a MK19. · Firing during CBRN and limited visibility conditions with a MK19. · Advanced crew gunnery for a MK19 (includes crew practice and crew qualification for Stryker).

3

MK19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, Model 3 Marksmanship Training Strategy · Advanced optics and lasers for a MK19.

(a) Crew marksmanship training is conducted and or reinforced in each phase of gunnery training and will include, at a minimum-· Operation and function of the MK19 and associated equipment. · Crew drill formation for a MK19. · Cross training with a MK19. · Inspection for MK19 bipod, tripod, and vehicle mount. · Placing MK19 into action (tripod & vehicle mount). · Barrel changing procedures for a MK19 (tripod & vehicle mount). · Transport of the tripod mounted MK19. · Remove a MK19 from action (tripod & vehicle mount). · Common crew tasks for a MK19. · Leader tasks for a MK19. · Critical crew tasks for a MK19. · Advanced crew gunnery tasks for a MK19. (b) Weapon employment training will include, at a minimum-· MK19 in the attack. · MK19 in the defense. · MK19 in the retrograde. · MK19 in patrolling. · MK19 in rear area security. · MK19 in urban operations. · MK19 in special operations. · MK19 in pairs. (c) Combat techniques training will include, at a minimum-· Characteristics of fire for the MK19. · Classes of fire for MK19. · Application of fire with a MK19. · Predetermined fires for a MK19. · Fire control for a MK19. · Range determination for a MK19. · Advanced crew gunnery exercises for a MK19. c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 will be used as a guide if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Function of the MK19 · Manipulation of the T&E mechanism on a MK19 · Fighting positions for a MK19

4

MK19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, Model 3 Marksmanship Training Strategy · · · Operate an MK19 Mount an AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight on a MK19 Dismount a AN/TVS-5 Night Vision Sight from a MK19

d. Deployed Strategy. Deployed marksmanship training should include the following using available facilities. Figure 2-4 and Figure 2-5 portray how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · MK19 gunnery tests · Combat techniques of fire for a MK19 · Employment of the MK19

3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current MK19 grenade machine gun marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all

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MK19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, Model 3 Marksmanship Training Strategy National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · Instructional Fire III F003 · Instructional Fire IV F004 · Instructional Fire V F005 · Instructional Fire VI F006 · Dismounted Range Card III F010 · Dismounted Range Card IV F011 · Dismounted Range Card V F012 · Dismounted Range Card VI F013 · Dismounted Range Card VII F014 · Dismounted Range Card VIII F015 · Mounted Combat II F018 · Mounted Combat III F019 · Mounted Combat IV F020 · Mounted Combat V F021 · Night Fire II F024 · Night Fire III F025 · Night Fire IV F026

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12-Gauge Shotgun Marksmanship Training Strategy

1. Overview. This document summarizes a marksmanship training strategy for the 12-gauge shotgun that can be used from initial entry through deployment training. It includes strategies for the Generating Force, the Operating Force, and the Reserve Operating Force at home station, pre-mobilization, and while deployed. Scenarios that can be used in the Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) 2000 are listed at paragraph 3. Publications that support this strategy include-· Soldier Training Publication 19-31E1-SM, Soldier's Manual, MOS 31E, Internment/Resettlement Specialist, Skill Level 1, October 2007. · DA Pam 350-38, Standards in Weapons Training, http://www.atsc.army.mil/TPIOLive/strac/firspage.asp. 2. Strategies. a. Generating Force Strategy. Shotgun marksmanship training conducted for the Generating Force consists of academic instruction and familiarization firing for the Military Police School in training of Soldiers who will perform as corrections personnel. Figure 2-1 portrays how the strategy is implemented by the Generating Force. Training includes· Maintain a 12-gauge shotgun. · Operate a 12- gauge shotgun. · Engage targets with a 12- gauge shotgun.

b. Home Station Strategy. The home station marksmanship strategy for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force includes preliminary, basic, and advanced marksmanship training. When combined with special ammunition, the shotgun is an outstanding breaching tool. Shotgun ballistic breaching is used primarily against unanticipated barriers or as an alternate breaching method. Figure 2-2 portrays how the Army's marksmanship training strategy is implemented at home station for the Operating and Reserve Operating Force. (1) Preliminary shotgun training should include, at a minimum-· Prepare shotgun configurations, if applicable. · Maintain a 12-gauge shotgun. · Operate a 12-gauge shotgun. · Engage targets with a 12-gauge shotgun. · Identify 12-gauge shotgun ammunition. · Firing positions for a 12-gauge shotgun.

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Shotgun Marksmanship Training Strategy

(2) Basic shotgun training should include, at a minimum-· Operate the 12-gauge shotgun using a stationary target (instructional and record fire of both configurations, if applicable). (3) Advanced shotgun marksmanship training will include, at a minimum-· Conduct short-range marksmanship (practice and record fire). · Conduct a ballistic door breach (practice and record fire). · Conduct non-lethal marksmanship (practice and record fire). · Employment. · Non-lethal engagements. · Collective training.

c. Pre-mobilization Strategy. Pre-mobilization marksmanship training for the Reserve Operating Force is conducted at home station prior to moving to the designated mobilization station. The following should be trained using armory or center facilities to prepare for marksmanship training at the mobilization station. Figure 2-2 will be used as a guide if ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Prepare shotgun configurations, if applicable. · Maintain a 12-gauge shotgun. · Employment. d. Deployed Strategy. Deployed marksmanship training should include the following using available facilities. Figure 2-2 portrays how the Operating Force's deployed marksmanship training strategy is implemented when ranges, facilities, and simulators are available. · Prepare shotgun configurations, if applicable. · Maintain a 12-gauge shotgun. · Employment.

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Shotgun Marksmanship Training Strategy 3. Marksmanship Simulations. The following is a list of current shotgun marksmanship scenarios with scenario numbers that can be used in the EST 2000 in support of marksmanship training strategies. Marksmanship simulators are not readily available at all National Guard Armories and Reserve Centers. Execute portions of the strategy that require use of a marksmanship simulator as live-fire events when an EST 2000 is not located with 55 miles of the armory or center and when ranges are available. When available, the Fire Arms Training System (FATS) will be incorporated into NG & USAR marksmanship training as an interim measure until replaced by the EST 2000 IAW an Infantry School Memorandum, dated 23 Oct 2007. As simulators become available, commanders will incorporate them into the marksmanship strategies as shown in this document. · Shotgun 25 M Qualification (Table 1) I001 · Shotgun 25 M Qualification (Table 2) I002 · Shotgun 25 M Qualification (Table 3) I003

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