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Baroque Art Period

The humanities are the stories, the ideas, and the words that help us make sense of our lives and our world. The humanities introduce us to people we have never met, places we have never visited, and ideas that may have never crossed our minds. By showing how others have lived and thought about life, the humanities help us decide what is important in our own lives and what we can do to make them better. By connecting us with other people, they point the way to answers about what is right or wrong, or what is true to our heritage and our history. The humanities help us address the challenges we face together in our families, our communities, and as a nation.

Based on the definition above, in your opinion, what story, idea, or set of words has helped make the most sense of this world? Be sure to thoroughly explain your answer. This will be collected.

The Baroque period is an era in the history of the Western arts which roughly coinciding with the 17th century. Its earliest manifestations, which occurred in Italy, date from the latter decades of the 16th century, while in some regions, notably Germany and colonial South America, certain of its culminating achievements did not occur until the 18th century.

The work that distinguishes the Baroque period is stylistically complex, even contradictory. In general, however, the desire to evoke emotional states by appealing to the senses, often in dramatic ways, underlies its manifestations.

Some of the qualities most frequently associated with the Baroque period are: Grandeur, sensuous richness, drama, vitality, movement, tension, emotional exuberance, and a tendency to blur distinctions between the various arts. Do you know any other discipline of art that falls into the Baroque period?

Bach

Handel Vivaldi

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Baroque was not confined. It spread and populated all of the arts.

Visual artist who are consider to be "of" the Baroque period are:

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

The church really embraced its "majesty" and commissioned piece after piece until it was overwhelming.

Sir Anthony van Dyck

Flemish Baroque Painter

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

...was a Flemish baroque painter, born June 28, 1577, died May 30, 1640 who was most renowned. Considered to be THE northern European artist of his day, he is now widely recognized as one of the foremost painters in Western art history.

He "earned" this title by completing the fusion of the realistic tradition of Flemish painting with the imaginative freedom and classical themes of Italian Renaissance painting. In short, he fundamentally revitalized and redirected northern European painting.

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter Self-Portrait 1638-40

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

Christ and Saint John

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Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

Daniel and the Lion's Den

Christ's Descent from the Cross ­ 1611-14 Rubens's upbringing mirrored the intense religious strife of his age--a fact that was to be of crucial importance in his artistic career. His father, an ardently Calvinist Antwerp lawyer, fled in 1568 to Germany to escape religious persecution, but after his death (1587) the family moved back to Antwerp, where Peter Paul was raised a Roman Catholic and received his early training as an artist and a courtier.

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

Holy Family with St. Elizabeth ­ 1615

Rubens's upbringing mirrored the intense religious strife of his age--a fact that was to be of crucial importance in his artistic career. His father, an ardently Calvinist Antwerp lawyer, fled in 1568 to Germany to escape religious persecution, but after his death (1587) the family moved back to Antwerp, where Peter Paul was raised a Roman Catholic and received his early training as an artist and a courtier.

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

The Garden of Love ­ 1632

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

The Elevation of the Cross 1610-11

The Lamentation 1609-11

By the age of 21 he was a master painter whose aesthetic and religious outlook led him to look to Italy as the place to complete his education. Upon arriving (1600) in Venice, he fell under the spell of the radiant color and majestic forms of Titian, whose work had a formative influence on Rubens's mature style.

During Rubens's eight years (1600-08) as court painter to the duke of Mantua, he assimilated the lessons of the other Italian Renaissance masters and made (1603) a journey to Spain that had a profound impact on the development of Spanish baroque art.

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He also spent a considerable amount of time in Rome, where he painted altarpieces for the churches of Santa Croce di Gerusalemme (1602; now in Hopital du Petit-Paris, Grasse, France) and the Chiesa Nuova (1607; now in Musee de Peinture et Sculpture, Grenoble, France), his first widely acknowledged masterpieces.

Peter Paul Rubens

Flemish Baroque Painter

The Prophet Elijah Receiving Bread and Water from an Angel

His reputation established, Rubens returned (1608) to Antwerp following the death of his mother and quickly became the dominant artistic figure in the Spanish Netherlands.

Union of Earth and Water 1618

Virgin Child Enthroned with Saints 1627-28

Vermeer's artistic formation is still very uncertain. His father, Reynier Janz was an innkeeper and member of the Saint Luke's Guild. He bought and sold paintings. In those times, Inn keeping and art dealing often went together. As with every other Dutch painter, he was required to undergo a six-year apprenticeship with a master painter who belonged to the Saint Luke's Guild, a a powerful trade organization which regulated the commerce of painters and artisans. The young apprentice was thoroughly instructed in the art and craft of painting and, upon his admission to the guild, was permitted to sign and sell his own paintings as well as sell those of his fellow painters.

Vermeer Girl with Pearl Earring

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Vermeer Girl in Red Hat 1668

"Vermeer was required to pay an entrance fee of six guilders when he was admitted to the Guild of Saint Luke in 1653 (December). Normally, new students into the guild whose father had been members -- as was the case with Vermeer -- were required to pay three guilders, provided that they had trained for two years with a master of the guild. According to Van de Veen (1996) the only plausible explanation for the higher admission fee is that Vermeer's training had occurred outside of Delft." Vermeer used a color palette of only twenty colors compared to the over 100 colors used by Rembrandt. We do not have a large collection of works by Vermeer, however the works we have demonstrate a thorough training both from the Saint Guild's School and the Utrecht school.

Vermeer Soldier and a Laughing Girl 1658

Vermeer Christ in the House of Martha and Mary

Vermeer Young Woman with a Water Pitcher 1665

Vermeer A Woman Asleep at a Table 1657

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