Read Layout 1 text version

Reviews of software, tech toys, video games & web sites

Volume 15, No. 2, Issue 83

1701 A.D. Adobe Digital School Collection Alex Rider: Stormbreaker American Dragon: Jake Long, Attack of the Dark Dragon (DS) Ant Bully, The Arthur and the Invisibles The Game Avatar: The Last Airbender (Wii) Barnyard (Wii) Bee-Bot Programmable Robot Bundle of Compromises Clubhouse Games Collage Machine Corgi iCar Dance Praise Expansion Pack Volume 3: Pop & Rock Hits Deal or No Deal Disney Mobile Disney Pixar Cars, The Video Game (Wii) Disney's Chicken Little: Ace in Action (Wii) DollHouse Eco Rangers Animal Adventures Eragon Excite Truck FLY Fusion Pentop Computer Gary Gadget: Building Cars Genji: Days of the Blade Happy Feet (Wii) Incite! Learning Series - Civil War: Life and Times KaleidoPix Killzone: Liberation Magical Starsign Math-O-Matic: Arithmetic Flash Cards Nicktropolis Over the Hedge: Hammy goes Nuts! Sex, Etc. Sid Meier's Railroads! SpongeBob Squarepants: Creature from the Krusty Krab (Wii) Star Wars Lethal Alliance TallTales Audio CDs Timo's Lesson Creator Tom and Jerry Tales Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam (DS) Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam (Wii) Tony Hawk's Project 8 (PS3) True Golf Swing WarioWare: Smooth Moves Webkinz World Wii Points Card Wii Sports

February 2007

MMOGs for Kids

A primer for adults, on the latest (Massive Multiplayer Online Games)

More Wii-Magic

Wario Ware Smooth Moves by Nintendo, p. 15

With new forms of literacy come new educational challenges

FOR PRESCHOOLERS Provide a variety of quality interactive materials to freely explore, alongside traditional materials. Let children find their names on a computer keyboard, and freely play with digital cameras, audio recorders and quality non-commercial software.

Did you know that back in 1830, the government would have classified you as being literate if you could sign your name? Today, many educators associate literacy with much more, including a mastery of information-based technologies. The digital native (Marc Presnky's term) of 2007 can a ferret out a sliver of information from the web in seconds using a few select keywords. Without thinking, they can type, IM, text message and program a GPS while dialing a cell phone with voice commands. But not for most of the population. The reality is that for more and more learners, these skills are remote dreams. Too many people, young and old, are less-and-less literate, simply because technology is advancing so quickly. So what do we do? Here are are some ideas.

Volume 15, No. 2, Issue 83

February 2007

CTR is published monthly in laser print and PDF formats.

EDITOR Warren Buckleitner, Ph.D., ([email protected]) [WB] MANAGING EDITOR Bobbie Nester ([email protected]) REVIEWERS Deena Cassella [DC]

SOFTWARE LIBRARIAN Lisa Della Fave ([email protected])

FOR EARLY ELEMENTARY CHILDREN Keep expanding a child's diet of digital media, and be sure to include a variety of game options. Replace passive TV time with social, active games, such as Wario Ware Smooth Moves (p. 15), Club Penguin (p. 4) or Webkinz World (p. 20). Provide handheld game hardware like the Nintendo DS, with games that provide ample opportunities for problem solving. When you feel they are ready, give them their own email address and be there to guide them as they learn encounter the Internet for the first time.

CIRCULATION & CONFERENCES Chris Grabowich ([email protected], 800-9939499)

SUBSCRIPTIONS $96 for a one-year standard electronic subscription (12 issues including online access). Send payment to Children's Technology Review, 120 Main Street, Flemington, NJ 08822 or call 800-993-9499. Other subscription options are available, including print and electronic, group, overseas, and online only that may be priced less. Visit www.childrenssoftware.com to learn more.

UPPER ELEMENTARY Keep empowering children, with digital music players, cell phones, cameras and digital publishing tools, along with plenty of quality, challenging games.

MIDDLE SCHOOL AND UP Help children exploit new technologies for creating content, with "real" tools like PhotoShop and Flash. Help them learn how to use digital camcorders, projectors, wikis and blogs. Teach children the ins and outs of search engines. Finally, be an information-age role model. The next time you struggle to get the photos out of a camera or a printer cartridge working, remember that the children are watching to see how you react to a new digital challenge. Most likely they'll follow your lead. We hope you enjoy this issue. Sincerely,

PRODUCT SUBMISSIONS. Send two products, with release information to Lisa Della Fave, Software Librarian, 120 Main Street, Flemington, NJ 08822 (Phone: 908-284-0404) EDITORIAL GUIDELINES. In order to protect review integrity, CTR follows a set of editorial guidelines found at (www.childrenssoftware.com/editorialguidelines.h tml). Highlights include: · We don't sell software or profit from the sales of products that we review. Review copies of software are donated to a non-profit foundation. · We don't distribute/trade or sell subscriber information. · No advertising content We want our readers to know that there are no ulterior motives behind our reviews. PUBLISHER INFORMATION Children's Technology ReviewTM (ISSN 1555-242X) is published monthly for $96 or $144 per year by Active Learning Associates, Inc. Send address changes or new subscriptions to Children's Technology Review, 120 Main Street, Flemington, NJ 08822. Use of this publication for any commercial publishing activity without prior written permission is strictly prohibited. Readers are subject to the TERMS OF USE found at www.childrenssoftware.com/disclaim.html Entire contents © 2006 by Active Learning Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Warren Buckleitner, Ph.D., Editor

This Publication is Your Key to 7624 Reviews

Your paid subscription to CTR includes access to the Children's Software Finder (TM) database-- our complete collection of reviews, archived since 1985. If you've lost or forgotten your password, please call 800-993-9499 between 9-3 PM EST. The temporary password for this issue is hearts

2

Children's Technology Review · February 2007

Directory

Early Elementary

Ant Bully, The, www.midway.com, p 7 Eco Rangers Animal Adventures, www.snaptvgames.com, p. 18 Gary Gadget: Building Cars, www.vivamedia.com, p. 11 TallTales Audio CDs , www.talltalesausio.com, p. 19 Dance Praise Expansion Pack Volume 3: Pop & Rock Hits, www.DigitalPraise.com, p. 17 Disney Mobile, www.disneymobile.com, p. 17 Nicktropolis, www.nicktropolis.com, p. 19 Sid Meier's Railroads!, www.take2games.com, p. 13 Webkinz World, www.webkinz.com, p. 20 1701 A.D., www.aspyr.com, p. 16 Corgi iCar, www.corgi-usa.com, p. 17 Deal or No Deal, www.globalstarsoftware.com, p. 9 FLY Fusion Pentop Computer, www.leapfrog.com, p. 18 Sex, Etc., www.sexect.org, p. 19

New titles are listed here, grouped by age or platform

Nintendo DS

Upper Elementary

Alex Rider: Stormbreaker, www.thq.com, p. 16 Clubhouse Games, www.nintendo.com, p. 17 Magical Starsign, www.nintendo.com, p. 19 Over the Hedge: Hammy goes Nuts!, www.activision.com, p. 19 True Golf Swing, www.nintendo.com, p. 14 Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam (DS), www.activision.com, p. 14 Killzone: Liberation, www.scea.com, p. 12 Star Wars Lethal Alliance, www.ubisoft.com, p. 13 American Dragon: Jake Long, Attack of the Dark Dragon, www.buenavistagames.com, p. 16 Tom and Jerry Tales, www.tomandjerrytalesgame.com, p. 20 Avatar: The Last Airbender (Wii), www.thq.com, p. 7 Barnyard (Wii), www.thq.com, p 8 Disney Pixar Cars, The Video Game (Wii), www.thq.com, p. 9 Disney's Chicken Little: Ace in Action (Wii), www.buenavistagames.com, p. 10 Excite Truck, www.nintendo.com Happy Feet (Wii), www.midway.com, p. 11 SpongeBob Squarepants: Creature from the Krusty Krab (Wii), www.thq.com, p. 13 Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam (Wii), www.activision.com, p. 14 WarioWare: Smooth Moves, www.nintendo.com, p. 15 Wii Points Card, www.nintendo.com Wii Sports, www.nintendo.com, p. 15 Genji: Days of the Blade, www.scea.com, p. 18 Tony Hawk's Project 8 (PS3), www.activision.com, p. 21

Arthur and the Invisibles The Game Collage Machine Tony Hawk's Project 8 (PS3) WarioWare: Smooth Moves Webkinz World Wii Sports

CTR Editor's Choice Selections for February 2007

Coming in the March Issue

PSP

As we go to press with this issue, we're testing the titles below. Have you used them? We welcome your feedback, at http://ctr.childrenssoftware.com/writeuser.html

Bone Monkeys vs. Dinosaurs BRAINtastic! Maths Break'em All Bubble Bobble Evolution Bust-a-Move Bash! Call of Duty 3 (PS3) Cartoon Network All-Stars ConceptDraw MINDMAP Professional Edition 4 Dance Dance Revolution Ultramix 2 ESPN Sportcast FIFA 07 Soccer Fight Night Round 3 Madden NFL 07 (PS3) Marvel Ultimate Alliance NBA '07 NHL 2K7 Nicktoons: Battle for Volcano Island Numbers UP! Volcanic Panic: Numbers & Operations Online Chess Kingdoms Phil of the Future Pixie Playing With Dinos Rainbow Islands Revolution Scooby-Doo! Who's Watching Who? (PSP) Scurge: Hive Sid Meier's Pirates (PSP) Solomon Says, Volume 2: Amazing Animals Spot Mouse Strawberry Shortcake Strawberry Land Games Sword of the Stars The Little Mermaid: Magic In Two Kingdoms (GBA) Tiger Woods PGA Tour 07 (PS3) Totally Spies! 2 (DS) Typing Tournament Ultimate Math Invaders Winning Eleven: Pro Evolution Soccer 2007 - DS Winx Club: The Quest for the Codex Words Rock!: Growing Word-Smart Kids Xiaolin Showdown (DS)

GBA

Middle and High School

Wii

School Supplement

Bee-Bot Programmable Robot, www.bee-bot.co.uk, p. 8 Collage Machine, www.protozone.net, p. 9 DollHouse, www.protozone.net, p. 10 KaleidoPix, www.protozone.net, p. 13 Timo's Lesson Creator, www.animatedspeech.com, p. 20 Adobe Digital School Collection, www.adobe.com, p. 16 Bundle of Compromises, www.findthefunproductions.com, p. 17 Incite! Learning Series - Civil War: Life and Times, www.donjohnston.com, p. 18 Math-O-Matic: Arithmetic Flash Cards, www-math-o-matic.com, p. 12 Arthur and the Invisibles The Game, www.atari.com, p. 7 Eragon, vugames.com, p. 18

Acknowledgments

Game Consoles

PS3

Thanks to the following individuals, including the members of the Mediatech Foundation, who contributed their valuable feedback during the testing process. Lorele Bennet, 15; Jenna Buckleitner, 11; Sarah Buckleitner, 15; Jared C., 2; Tyler C., 4; Claire Kneble, 15; Daniel Della Fave, 7; Nick Della Fave, 11; Kelly H., 11; Thomas H., 14; Mohamed Farid, 12; Luke Grabowich, 7; Ian Grabowich, 14; Jon Gick, 18; Laura Henry, 14; Ellie Hilgen, 4; Erin Hilgen, 11; Greg Shriener, 22; Sarah Klinger, 18; Matt Ivans, 21; Austin Lyons, 12; Connor Lyons, 10; Owen Lyons, 6; Colleen Nester, 11; Jose Rincon, 13; Tim Wolock, 15. New products are tested and stored for public access and research at the Mediatech Foundation (www.mediatech.org), 118 Main Street, Flemington NJ.

Children's Technology Review · February 2007

3

T

A Primer for Adults on

4

If you really want to know how an MMOG works, stop reading this and go to a browser. Visit any one of the services listed in this article (if you're reading this as a PDF, the links should be active). For example, Club Penguin http://www.clubpenguin.com offers free, easy access. In a matter of minutes you'll be wandering around with dozens of other chatting penguins, typing profound phrases like "lets go over to the Pizza shop" or "cool." First launched Fall 2005, this is both a free- and paidsubscription flash-based experience for children 8-up. There is no advertising content, but the service is good at pulling money from parent's purses, in order to upgrade the membership, for ($6/month or $58/year). There are a lot of informal learning opportunities. After registering (which requires a valid Email) and logging in, children are asked to choose one of several penguin worlds to join. Each world offers the same activities, but some fill up faster than others. A child wanting to meet up with a friend can choose to wait for an opening (like finding a seat at a popular restaurant) or go to a less popular world to kill time or meet new kids. There's a pizza cafeteria, coffee shop, a sledding race, a fishing game and a dance club. The games are not unique as games go, but when placed in a free MMO setting, they can be very interesting. At any time, children can use a map to jump in or out of a game, or visit their own igloo, that serves as a home base for saved awards, games, and/or decorations. Over time, children can earn money to purchase more decorations. It is very easy to socialize; just start typing and your public message appears over your penguin's head. You can also click on another penguin to invite him or her to your igloo, throw a snowball or make an addition to your Buddy List. There are two chat options. The Ultimate Safe Chat uses a predefined list of greetings, questions and statements as well as emotes, actions and greeting cards. These users can only see other Ultimate Safe Chat messages, as well as emotes (e.g., smile faces), actions, and greeting cards. The Standard Safe Chat allows players to type their own messages, that is first filtered for bad language or location information. In addition, the program claims that moderators watch what's going on. While there is no advertising content in Club Penguin, children are reminded to become full members in order to get more features they see on other penguins, like hats or igloo decorations. Judging from the number of snazzy penguins we spotted, the business model is working. Playing as a non-paying mem-

he news that Nickelodeon launched a new online meeting space (an MMOG) for children last week marked an important milestone in children's interactive media. Big media has arrived, with SpongeBob as a host. So what are "MMOGs" and what should teachers, parents and librarians know about them? As with many forms of new media, the best answer comes from watching children play. It turns out that the reason children like MMOGs is pretty old-fashioned. There are fun games, and people to talk to. Real people; not computer-generated puppies. The end result is a feeling of empowerment and a context for authentic publishing.

MMOGs for Kids

by Warren Buckleitner, Editor

ber means your penguin must remain sans cloths, which is like wearing sneakers to your high school prom, and some have criticized Club Penguin for promoting consumerism. The experience is also very easy to Dressing your avatar (the creature get into and play, with no that represents you on the screen) is risk or downloads other an essential part of building a child's than the Macromedia feeling of ownership in the experience. Flash, which is becoming standard on nearly every browser. As a language experience, the program gets children busily typing with others, and there are a variety of games that require logical thinking and strategy. All in all, this is a noteworthy service. Details: New Horizon Interactive, www.clubpenguin.com. Price: $free and $6/month for subscriptions. Ages: 7-14. One of the first and best established virtual pet sites, Neopets is a free, ad supported service. Content includes 160 games, trading, auctions, greetings and messaging. The service was created in the UK by two programmers (Adam Powell and Donna Williams) and has since been purchased by Viacom, who also owns Nicktropolis. You start by creating and decorating your own NeoPet (pictured to the right) which is both free and fun. You can then battle with other people, trade items and earn Neopoints by playing games. The site is packed with both advertising and addicting games. Pets and progress is saved automatically. Details: Price: $free, advertising, www.neopets.com, ages: 8-up.

Neopets.com

Children's Technology Review · February 2007

So what's the catch? How much is it worth to you to have your child NOT see ads like these? While there is no advertising content in Nickopolis, children will see these banners on related pages on Nick.com, making it easy for a child to get sidetracked into a celebration of junk food. Note that these banners are clearly labeled as Advertisments.

Another free, MMO (Massive Multiplayer Online Game) that launched January 30, 2007, this site is easy to sign up and get started. The format is very much liked Club Penguin, although it is too early to know if the games will be as well designed. There are some clever social games, however, like bumper cars, and a house of mirrors where your avatar changes its look. There are two forms of chat -- constructed (also called menu chat) form sentences and phrases using pre-selected messages, and free-filtered chat, that is also moderated. The latter requires registering with your parent's email. The site claims that it is not possible to enter personal information. You start by designing a human-like avatar. You can be a boy or girl, and select skin/hair/clothing colors. You can then create your own room with items that are purchased with Nick Points. While there are currently no ads inside Nicktropolis itself, the site leverages Nick viacom-related media, including Air Benders and SpongeBob, and children are exposed to an assortment of banner ads as they sign up. This is a service to keep an eye on. Details: Nickelodeon, Price: $free, leveraged licensed characters are featured on the site. Ages: 614. The highly anticipated game from Maxis/EA is better described as a MSO (Massive Singleplayer Online game) because personal interactions with other players are not really part of the experience. Instead, you interact with other people's work and ideas. Like the Sims, you start Spore by creating a creature, and then use it to populate a planet that looks a bit like Jurassic Island. As you play, you build strength and can upgrade your critter so that it is smarter. Others can create their own planets, and you can fly around and collect creatures from other people's tribes, or visit other servers (or solar systems). Details: Electronic Arts, Inc., www.spore.com. Ages: 10-up (our guess).

Nicktropolis

Webkinz World

Spore

Children's Technology Review · February 2007

Each of the 60 varieties of squishy animals, sold either as Webkinz ($14) or as smaller $8 Lil'Kinz come with a sealed tag with a code that can be entered at Webkinz World (www.webkinz.com). Once the code is recognized, children meet a virtual version of their pet, that they can use to play games, chat with friends, move into it's own home, complete with furniture. From this point, the experience is a bit like a MMOG (Massive Multiplayer Online Game), minus the ability to freely chat. Instead, you can send messages to other animals using constructed chat, or sets of pull down menus that eliminate the possibility of worrisome contact with strangers. The best part are the 20 addicting games that include mazes, scavenger hunts, sorting contests and trivia 5

MMOG Definitions

Nicktropolis uses tools like a "dirty phrase checker" to automatically scrub children's text. questions (shhh, don't tell the kids that a former classroom teacher wrote the questions). Good scores win Kinzcash, which is used to buy more clothing or furniture for your house. To buy more time, you just buy another animal that will be around long after the web site expires. Details: Ganz, www.webkinz.com. Price: $8 or $14 including the stuffed animal. Ages: 6-up. Home grown by a group of math and science educators, this is an online community for middle school kids; girls in particular, although about half of the visitors are boys. After you register, you can move into a virtual community where you design an avatar, build a house, and work every day to earn clams. You get paid a salary by completing different science missions. There's a science and math emphasis to these, such as figuring out the payload mass of a rocket. The more missions you do, the more money you make, and the more parts you can buy for your avatar and house. Whyvillians also take it upon themselves to integrate science learning with reading and writing by submitting articles to be published in the Whyville Times, the town's weekly newspaper. The site is sponsor supported. Details: Numedeon, Inc., www.whyville.net. Price: $free. Ages: 10-15.

Whyville.net

Questions Every Parent Should ask About MMOGs

Visit http://www.consumerwebwatch.org/consumer-reports-webwatch-guidelines.cfm to learn more about how to know if a site is trustworthy. · Show me the money. What is the motive behind the site? Is it to sell subscriptions, ads, or to educate? Who paid the programmers who made the site? · Who's behind the curtain? Is there a contact person or business listed, along with a physical address and a working phone number? Does the information on the site match the "whois" information for the domain name? · If there are costs involved, are they identified upfront, in a straightforward manner? · Is it easy to use? Can children quickly and easily get started, and have a successful experience? · Can the experience be customized for the child, to build feelings of ownership? · Are there multiple challenge levels so the service can grow with a child? · If there are ads, are they labeled. · Is the experience responsive? Sites can get busy, and sometimes sluggish. · Are the activities well integrated with the overall theme, in a way that makes sense to children?

What They Teach Watch a child using an MMOG, and you'll observe plenty of informal learning taking place. · Typing. Children type a lot of words, and their typing fluency can increase quickly. · Math. There can be many quantitative (mathematical) relationships in MMOGs, such as keeping track of scores or managing a budget. · Creativity. The better MMOGs let you build your own home or dress your own avatar. · Spatial Reasoning. Most MMOs use some sort of map, which requires making a mental representation of the space. Children can draw maps and charts as they play.

Avatar. Your onscreen persona. This could be a penguin, stuffed animal or a person. Blocking. The ability to prevent another person from contacting you. You can also report a violation or a person to the site host, who can terminate the screen name. Of course, this doesn't prevent the same person from signing in again under a new identity. Constructed Chat. Also called "safe chat" this is a series of menus of preselected text, which can be sent to other participants. It is impossible to transfer personal information. Flash. The authoring language, published by Macromedia/Adobe, that is used to create many of the games in children's MMOGs. Free Chat. The ability to freely type messages to another person. Often times these are filtered. Most children prefer free chat to constructed, or menu-based chat, but it is not as safe and should be supervised. Halo. A popular, violent M-rated shooting MMOG that runs on the Xbox game console. MMORPG. Massive (or Massively) Multiplayer Role Play Game. There are hundreds to choose from, at http://www.mmorpg.c om, but only recently for children. RuneScape. A free, ad and subscription supported MMO that is popular with older children. WOW. World of Warcraft is one of the most sophisticated and largest services, for experienced players.

6

Children's Technology Review · February 2007

FEBRUARY 1, 07

Ant Bully, The

Feature Reviews

Page 7

Ease of Use 5 82% Fun but tricky to play, this one-player role-play game (RPG) for the Wii lets you explore Educational 8 an ant world, from the perspective of a tiny boy named Lucas. As the story goes, he has Entertaining 10 been shrunk to ant size and made to live in the colony. In this game, players steer Lucas Design Features 9 around in a fight to save the colony from extermination. The format of this game is like hundreds of others-- you move around a richly Good Value 9 illustrated 3D world, jumping, climbing and swinging a spear-like stick to wack at enemies. ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Cartoon Violence For example, to wipe out a bunch of nastly pill bugs, you hit them with your stick. This also earns you points and health. In another game, you defend a large caterpillar by fighting off enemies before time runs out. Our testers struggled at first with the controls of the PS2 version, but they found the Wii version to be both more fun and easier to control. There's a lot of rich, classical play content in this title, which loosly follows the story line of the movie. We did not test the Windows or GBA versions. Note that the Wii version requires a Nunchuk. Developed by A2M for Midway. The game website is www.theantbully-game.com. Details: Midway Home Entertainment, Inc., www.midway.com. Price: $30 ($50 for Wii). Ages: 9-up. Platform: PlayStation 2*, GameCube, Windows XP, Game Boy Advance, Wii*. Teaches: strategy. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.1 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Arthur and the Invisibles: The Game

This beautifully illustrated one-player adventure game is rich with problem-solving opportunities. Based on the movie, the game lets players control one of three characters -- each with different abilities. Each phase of a puzzle or combat requires using the skills of all three characters, each with their own unique but complimentary powers. While there is no shortage of fighting, the game it is equally mixed with innovative problem-solving, flying, driving and collecting. If you're looking for a great game and you're up for a challenge, get this. More information at http://www.atari.com/arthur. Created in France by Etranges Libellules for Atari. Details: Atari, Inc., www.atari.com. Price: $30. Ages: 10-up. Platform: PlayStation 2*, Windows XP, Nintendo DS, PSP, Game Boy Advance. Teaches: logic, strategy, problem solving. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.5 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Ease of Use 8 Educational 9 Entertaining 10 Design Features 9 Good Value 9

ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Violence

90%

Ease of Use 7 86% There's no shortage of fighting in this richly illustrated one player 3D exploration game Educational 8 for Wii, designed to let you move one of the Avatar characters through well-illustrated Entertaining 10 landscapes. Based on the Nickelodeon show Avatar: The Last Airbender, children can play Design Features 9 as all four main characters, including Aang, Katar, Haru and Sokka. Using the Wii's controller, they perform attacks in sweeping gestures to create combo-moves or they can Good Value 9 draw symbols on the screen to generate special moves. The graphics look amazing, and the ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Cartoon Violence story is complex. We discovered a logic game, called "Four Nationsl Mini-Game, which is a tile game. In other parts of the game, you trace over Chinese characters with the Wii remote; a very nice aspect of this game. On the downside, some of the controls are tricky. For example, in the advance bending move, you must hold two buttons at the same time, while swinging the remote upward. This takes a good deal of practice. If you like the show, you'll like this game, providing you spend the time to learn the controls. Details: THQ, Inc., www.thq.com. Price: $50. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: logic, memory, Chinese characters. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.3 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Avatar: The Last Airbender (Wii)

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 8

Ease of Use 7 82% The Wii version of Barnyard is very similar to the console versions in terms of content, Educational 8 but the controls are different. This is one of the few games we've reviewed where the Wii Entertaining 9 controls actually make things more complex, yet only in a few instances. Note that the Design Features 9 Nunchuk is required. In the game, you start by customizing a new cow, either as a boy or a girl. Next, you Good Value 8 help keep the farm running smoothly by collecting items and solving problems. Along the ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Cartoon Violence way, you must work cooperatively with 27 other animals on the farm to meet goals and Comic Mischief unlock the gate to the next level. Innovative features include day and night modes, each with a different set of goals. For example, in the day mode, you explore the farm smashing things to reveal things such as chocolate, ice, flowers, coins or ingredients for recipes. All of these items will have a function later in the game. As players explore, there's a nice variety of minigames to discover. Children find a hidden treasure with a metal detector, read secret notes, serve milk to the other animals, play pool, race cars, play a game of Whack-a-Mole, tip over sleeping cows or play darts. Reading is required in order to understand the dialog between the characters. The mini-games let you swing the remote like a golf club in golf, hold it and aim it like a pool stick in billiards, swing and strike with the controller to whack weasels in the Whack-a-Rac game, point and shoot the tomato gun to defend the farm, and use the Wii controller like a steering wheel to take the farmer's truck on a joy ride. Up to four games can be saved. All in all, this is a good game to borrow especially if you liked the movie. Created for THQ by Blue Tongue. Details: THQ, Inc., www.thq.com. Price: $50. Ages: 7-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: problem solving, some reading. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.1 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB] Bee-Bot Programmable Robot

Inspired by turtle programming, this robot puts programming in its most basic form. Designed in the UK, this is a durable, easy-to-use programmable robot that drives around on a clean, flat floor or table by following a series of up to 40 instructions. The bee-shaped toy is designed to introduce younger children to the first programming concepts. The direction options are limited to just four (front, back, left and right), and can only make 90degree turns. After you insert three AA batteries, you turn on the power using a small toggle switch located on the base. A second toggle switch controls the sound. Next, you enter a program by pressing the arrow direction keys, followed by the GO button. For example, pressing forward, left, forward, left, forward, left; followed by the green GO button starts the robot moving in a square. With each move, the bug's eyes light up. It is not possible to control the length of the segments or the degrees of the turn, but you could set up a pretty interesting obstacle course with blocks. Note that the wheels don't tolerate bumps very well, and although the product can be used to make SpiroGraph-like designs, it is not easy to attach a felt marker. Additional peripherals include different-colored shells and a lab pack. Runs on three AA batteries. This robot is sold in the USA by Terrapin Software (www.terrapinlogo. com). See also the Roamer. Details: TTS Group Ltd., www.bee-bot.co.uk. Price: $70.00. Ages: 3-up. Platform: Smart Toy. Teaches: programming, math. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.3 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Barnyard (Wii)

Ease of Use 10 Educational 9 Entertaining 9 Design Features 8 Good Value 7

86%

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 9

Collage Machine

If you've ever wanted to make your own "I SPY" puzzle, here's the software for the job. This creativity experience lets you drag and drop hundreds (we counted 441) of visual elements onto a screen, using a set of menus that includes shapes, letters (for spelling words) or objects. You can also import your own graphic elements, that can be saved. Once selected, each element can be moved around, faded, resized, or layered. In addition, you can draw on items, or save and print your creations for other projects such as framing or creating note cards. Our testers found the the software to be easy-to-use, noting that it could be useful for adding some spice to a school assignment or just to be creative with personal pictures. You can place pictures onto a background and move them around, changing their size, or even draw pictures using a pallet of colors and a pen. The end results can be animated with the click of a button. There are some drawbacks, however. Finding saved work is tricky, and it is not clear if you can export work to common formats on the hard drive. It is also possible to accidentally erase your work. All in all, this creativity program is worth a second look despite some limitations. We tried both the Windows and the Mac versions, with no problems. Details: Protozone, Inc., www.protozone.net. Price: $25. Ages: 5-up. Platform: Windows XP, Mac OSX and OS9. Teaches: creativity, spatial relations, movies, photography. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.3 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

Ease of Use Educational Entertaining Design Features Good Value

8 9 N 9 8

85%

Deal or No Deal

This fun computer version of the NBC guessing show asks you to choose a lucky briefcase that could be worth up to $1 million. Or it could be worth one penny. The game is designed for one to three players, and the goal is to leave with the most money by negotiating with a computer-controlled banker. Mini-games include a concentration game, where you match models with briefcases, a jigsaw puzzle, and a memory game called "5 Case Monte" where the goal is to locate the million dollar case as it's being shuffled. Our testers enjoyed this game, playing as a family. "We all had a great time." For $20 it is a great way to get people interacting. The graphics are lifelike, which helps you feel like you are a real contestant on the game. Details: Global Star Software, www.globalstarsoftware.com. Price: $20. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Windows XP. Teaches: logic and memory. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.3 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

Ease of Use 10 Educational 5 Entertaining 10 Design Features 9 Good Value 9

ESRB Rating: Everyone

86%

Disney Pixar Cars, The Video Game (Wii)

This is a racing and exploration game set in Radiator Springs featuring the cast of the movie Cars. The Wii version is very similar to the computer (Mac/Windows) and console (PS2, GameCube and Xbox) versions in terms of the content. The main difference is with the steering system. Like other Wii driving games, you hold the remote like a set of handlebars. The racing, which is the core of this game, is fun but limited to one player -- a disappointment with testers. While there is no shortage of quality movie-based music and humor straight from the film, the features are limited compared to most racing games. You can't wander off the track, for example, and if you run into something, the others cars will wait for you -- making this one of the few racing games that lets you win easily. The better you race, the more points you score, that can be used to unlock new tracks, car decorations and video clips. So the game unfolds as you play following a tried and true formula. We briefly played the Xbox 360 and PS2 versions, and found the graphics to be as good as any mainstream racing game, complete with skid marks on the track as well as a glossy shine on the cars. Content includes eight unlockable mini games, some for two players. Testers were disappointed that the main racing activity was not for two players. Created by Rainbow Studios and Incinerator Studios for THQ. Details: THQ, Inc., www.thq.com. Price: $50. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: timing, memory, car racing. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 3.8 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Ease of Use Educational Entertaining Design Features Good Value

8 6 8 8 8

76%

ESRB Rating: Everyone, Comic Mischief

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 10

Ease of Use 8 82% This first-person shooter for one player is about the farthest thing you can imagine from Educational 6 the Chicken Little children's book. Entertaining 9 It utilizes all the controls on both the Wii Remote and Nunchuk (required), creating a Design Features 9 control system that makes it easy and fun to blow things up. You use the Nunchuk controls to move around and the Wii remote to aim and shoot, by positioning a target on the screen. Good Value 9 The game is set in a variety of rich 3D outer space environments featuring three modes of ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Fantasy Violence play: Ace on foot as a soldier, Runt as a tank commander, and Abby as the pilot of a spaceship and hovercraft. This ads some nice variety to the game, and keeps things interesting. If you're looking for a good shooter, this is an option. Developed by Avalanche Software for BVG and inspired by the Chicken Little Movie. Details: Buena Vista Games, www.buenavistagames.com. Price: $40. Ages: 7-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: logic, strategy. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.1 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Disney's Chicken Little: Ace in Action (Wii)

DollHouse

Potentially creative but limited in features, this clever art program lets you decorate your own Dollhouse while experimenting with patterns, symmetry, shapes and colors. To change the pattern on the stairway rug, for example, you simple click on it and choose from a variety of patterns that you design using a set of stamps and drawing tools. By changing the designs on wallpaper, bedspreads or rugs, children will begin to notice patterns within the designs. Throughout the house, there are a variety of hidden surprises, such as a sink with running water or a ticking clock. At any time, you can print the designs to serve as templates for a "real" dollhouse. You can take your creations and print them out in order to use them in a real dollhouse. The program is easy to use, but limited in depth, because your designs are so limited to a single dollhouse, making this a powerful yet shallow experience. Details: Protozone, Inc., www.protozone.net. Price: $25. Ages: 5-up. Platform: Windows XP, Mac OSX. Teaches: patterns, creativity, art. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

Ease of Use 10 Educational 9 Entertaining 6 Design Features 9 Good Value 6

80%

Ease of Use 8 78% LIke other racing games, such as Burnout or ATV Off Road Racing, the goal of this Educational N game is to steer vehicles through 3D levels by holding the Wii Remote in both hands, like a Entertaining 8 steering wheel. You win points for creative jumps, landing on your wheels, and so on. When Design Features 7 players run over exclamation point icons on the course, the terrain changes into launch pads and ramps; a nice effect. The more points a player gains, the higher their status grows which Good Value 8 in turn unlocks new courses. ESRB Rating: Everyone, Mild Violence Each truck has a turbo charger that gives it a temporary speed boost, but if this feature is used too much, the engine can overheat. Why not a higher rating? Because compared to other Wii titles, there's not as much diversity or depth of content. We played the first level of this game, and found the controls to be clumsy at some points in the racetrack. Still, it is a fast-paced racing game and, at the very least, is worth borrowing. Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $50. Ages: 7-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: driving, timing, strategy. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 3.9 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Excite Truck

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 11

Gary Gadget: Building Cars

Ease of Use 7

8 7 7 6

First released in German in 1998 as "Building Cars with Willy Werkel" this CD-based Educational game lets children build a vehicle which they can drive and customize to perform specific Entertaining tasks by combining various parts from a junkyard. While the concept is good, and the Design Features watercolor-like illustrations are beautiful -- almost as if they were taken right out of a children's book -- the design feels clunky which lowers the rating. Good Value You start by choosing traditional car parts from a junkyard, where you'll find bumpers, ESRB Rating: Everyone batteries, engines, and tires; as well as nontraditional parts like the nose of an airplane or the basket to a hot-air balloon. By clicking on the camera, you can photograph your creation and add it to an album, that you can later view by clicking on the book in the bookshelf. If your car is incomplete, you have to go back to the drawing board to add the missing item. For example, if you don't put a steering wheel in, your vehicle crashes and you have to return to the junkyard to fix it. Not only do children have to add the all the correct parts, they also have to be sequenced correctly in order for the car to work. For example, if you try to put a part on out-of-sequence, such as the seats after the body of the car, the part just drops back down into the parts pile. You then have to click and drag the body off, place the seats on the chassis, and replace the body. Once your vehicle is complete, you can drive it to be judged at the car show or use it to complete missions. Missions are received via "mail" or by picking up the ringing phone in the shop. For example, you might receive an invitation to Malcolm Manners' home for a party, but when you arrive they are out of juice, so you have to go to the juice factory for more. There are also obstacles in the road that you will need the right car parts to overcome. If there are cows blocking the way, for example, you'll need a horn to scare them away; likewise, if there is mud, you'll need tires with special tread. We liked the idea of being able to customize the car in zany ways and the necessity of using real car parts to make it drivable. However, driving the car wasn't smooth -- no matter if you used the mouse or the directional arrows -- and the map provided only had tiny signs that might not be obvious to young children. Also, the sound effects and speech are repetitive. For example, no matter what car you bring to the car show, the judge says the same thing; the only difference being the number on the sign he holds up. Additionally, when trying to equip the car with the horn necessary to scare the cows, it would only stick to the roof which didn't make sense. We thought the concept here was good, but the sound effects and speech should have been more varied, and the driving and map graphics should have been more childfriendly. Details: Viva Media, www.viva-media.com. Price: $30. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Windows XP, Mac OSX. Teaches: problem solving, logic, taking things apart. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 3.5 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

70%

Happy Feet (Wii)

Easy to play but limited in content, in the Wii version of Happy Feet, players help Mumble, a young penguin, try to find his heart song. In the game, children use the Wii Remote like a wand, to swat at arrows in order to help Mumble dance (a bit like Dance Dance Revolution, only with no mat), or hold it like handlebars to steer through a maze of underwater icebergs or belly slide down a hill. The goal is to win points as you navigate your way through a map. Games are saved automatically, for up to three players. Like the PS2 and PC versions of the game, the content looks like it's right out of the movie, with characters such as Lovelace, Gloria and others. There is a two-player mode where players can face off against a friend in a dance competition, and also a multi-player swimming challenge and cooperative belly sledding action. For some strange reason, the traditional Wii controls are not used for the setup menus. Instead, players have to use the arrow keys, which will confuse younger children. There are three challenge levels, and the youngest level is easy to succeed. The main drawback is that there's not much variety in what you can do compared to other Wii games. As an extension of the movie, this might be one to borrow; otherwise pass. Developed by A2M for Midway Home Entertainment. Our advice is to stick with the DS or PlayStation versions, and you'll have the most fun in the land of Happy Feet. Details: Midway Home Entertainment, Inc., www.midway.com. Price: $50. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: movement, spatial relations, rhythm. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.1 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Ease of Use Educational Entertaining Design Features Good Value

ESRB Rating: Everyone

9 7 8 9 8

82%

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 12

KaleidoPix

This powerful, visual creativity experience lets you mix-and-match imported images with stock drawings, leaves, doodles and snow flakes. Like the way a folded page of paper can be turned into a snowflake with a few select cuts, this program makes it easy to see how small changes to a "seed" shape can make a big difference in a panel. Watching a symmetrical design unfold on the computer was very rewarding for our five-year-old tester, although he needed adult help for an introduction. He had a great time creating pictures and then watching them played back using the program's movie feature. He was also able to navigate through the software with ease to create designs of his own. While you can import your own photos, it is not obvious how to export work in a format that can be read by other graphics programs. The program loaded and ran easily on both Macintosh and Windows computers. Details: Protozone, Inc., www.protozone.net. Price: $25. Ages: 5-up. Platform: Mac OSX, Windows XP. Teaches: creativity, geometry, patterns. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.3 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

Ease of Use 10 Educational 9 Entertaining 8 Design Features 9 Good Value 7

86%

Killzone: Liberation

Ease of Use 5

N 9 9 9

This complex first-person shooter follows a typical battle format. You wander around Educational maze-like battle fields, shooting bad guys, picking up bullets, and earning points in order to Entertaining unlock more weapons. You get the idea. Design Features Content includes 16 single-player and multiplayer (up to six players in Ad Hoc mode) missions, game-share capabilities, and third-person viewpoint. There's a lot of jargon, and a Good Value nice selection of weapons to earn, that will be important to fans of the game. We found it ESRB Rating: Teen, Blood hard to make it through the first level however, due to the need to master simultaneous Language keystrokes, such as kneeling to dodge fire or switching to a new gun. If you have a desire to Violence move an entire battlefield into your PSP, this might be your game. Otherwise, pass. Developed by Guerilla for Sony. Visit www.killzone.com. Details: Sony Computer Entertainment America, www.scea.com. Price: $40. Ages: 13up. Platform: PSP. Teaches: strategy. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

80%

Math-O-Matic: Arithmetic Flash Cards

Ease of Use 9

7 2 8 9

Do you have a student in need of some help with their 7's Times Tables? This set of Educational electronic math flash cards is designed to provide drills on specific sets of math facts, for Entertaining any length of time. After children sign in (progress is saved), they can then select which set Design Features of cards they want to use. Choices include addition, subtraction, multiplication or division -- for any time limit -- or specific set of facts. The cards can be displayed in two formats: either Good Value as a flash card or as an algebraic equation. The Help option is nothing more than a pop-up ESRB Rating: reference window, with a table of current math facts. There are no smart features to this program. A Student Report can be printed out to view the progress of each child, and progress is saved for any number of children in your class. Perfect scores are rewarded with music and flashing lights. If a test is completed with some errors, then children can view their mistakes by seeing the problem with the correct answer, along with the answer they gave. This program doesn't teach you how to solve the problems, but it does help to build fluency with math facts, providing you can force a child to stick with it. You can install the program on the hard drive, and it will run without the CD. We tested both the Mac and Windows versions with no problems. Details: Math-O-Matic, www-math-o-matic.com. Price: $25. Ages: 7-up. Platform: Windows XP, Windows 98, Mac OSX. Teaches: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, basic math facts. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 3.5 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

70%

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 13

Sid Meier's Railroads!

This fictional railroad tycoon simulation looks good, but requires a serious graphics card along with some time to figure it out. It could be a nice supplement to a unit on U.S. History, as long as you have the patience for the details. Based on one of the very first railroad sims, called Railroad Tycoon (1990), your goal is to start with $1 million and build a business empire by connecting cities and industry groups together, before your rivals do. To win, you must buy and sell stocks and lay new tracks, in order to increase the capacity of your railroad. We liked how the game automatically helps you lay track, by making a tunnel or bridge when needed. Note that you have to watch the news carefully as a financial collapse of an industry group or a hostile takeover can happen at any time. Content includes 40 trains, 20 types of products to load, and the ability to design your own steam engine. Offering four levels of difficulty, there are both single or multiplayer modes that include a tutorial during game play to help with any instructions. Also is a Train Table Mode, that is more of a simulation rather than a game. Games can be saved in order to revisit them. The graphics are appealing, and the concept of the game is challenging. Testers were frustrated by the long wait times between screens, and there was a lot of information to digest about the ins and outs of building a profitable railroad empire. Winning requires planning to succeed in building an empire. You can compare your status with your opponents at any time within the game. There is a long book of instructions and detailed information about opponents, the types of trains, industries, history of railroads, and scenarios to help challenge players. Developed by Firaxis for 2K Games. Note that you can download the original game by Sid Meier at http://www.2kgames.com/railroads/railroads.html. Details: 2K Games, www.take2games.com. Price: $39.99. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Windows XP. Teaches: logic, planning, creativity, economics. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [DC]

Ease of Use Educational Entertaining Design Features Good Value

6 9 8 9 8

80%

ESRB Rating: Everyone, Alcohol Reference

Ease of Use 8 84% Fun and fast-paced, this one-player 3D exploration game for the Wii combines car Educational 7 racing with a variety of clever puzzles. As with other SpongeBob games, there's a lot of Entertaining 10 jumping, smashing crates to collect coins, and ramps to navigate. There's also plenty of Design Features 9 SpongeBob humor, on par with the television program. The levels are well explained -- with a short preview of the challenge -- so it is easy to know what you have to do, and progress Good Value 8 is saved automatically. There's some creative use of the Wii controls, such as using the ESRB Rating: Everyone, Cartoon Violence remote to turn cranks to open doors. At other points, you flick the remote to smash things. Comic Mischief When you are in a car race, you hold the remote like handlebars to steer. Note that the Nunchuk is required in all the exploration parts of the game. All in all, there's a good deal of timing and fast thinking in order to make it to the end. This would be a fun game for just about any age. but younger children will need some help. Some parts are better than others, for example, most testers found the racing game to be rather lame. All in all, this is a quality SpongeBob title that is well worth the time. Details: THQ, Inc., www.thq.com. Price: $50. Ages: 7-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: logic, problem solving. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.2 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

SpongeBob Squarepants: Creature from the Krusty Krab (Wii)

Star Wars Lethal Alliance

Ease of Use 8

7 7 6 8

As the first handheld Star Wars game (for the Nintendo DS and PSP), this is mostly a Educational first-person shooter. While it has some collaborative two-player fighting modes, most of this Entertaining game consists of roaming around maze-like halls of space stations, shooting (and stabbing) Design Features bad guys. There are some clever features, such as holographic disguises, gun turrets to shoot out, laser doors, and so on; but saving games is tricky and the design is clunky in Good Value several parts. The story takes place between Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and Episode ESRB Rating: Teen, Violence IV: A New Hope. The DS version (rated E10+) uses the two screens to let you play each character separately, using the bottom screen to interact. There's also a unique Dual Cannon and several stylus-based minigames for up to four players in the wireless mode. The ratings apply to the PSP version. Created by Ubisoft Montreal for Ubisoft. Details: UbiSoft, Inc., www.ubisoft.com. Price: $35. Ages: 12-up. Platform: PSP*, Nintendo DS. Teaches: collaboration and strategy. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 3.6 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

72%

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 14

Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam (DS)

Ease of Use 8

7 8 8 9

This fast-paced, single or multiplayer downhill skateboarding game integrates fun Educational tricks with interesting locations. There are several ways to play. The best place to start is Entertaining with the Lesson Mode, where you learn seven tricks, that you can use in such locations as Hoover Dam. In World Tour mode, completing goals like the Elimination Race and the Design Features Big Air Photo are the objective. Big Air Photo requires you to master moves such as Good Value grabbing floating camera icons above ramps or back flips over a bridge after grinding on a ESRB Rating: Everyone rail. The grinding maneuver requires being near a rail and a three-button combination which is fairly difficult. Jam Session is a downhill race where you have to knock over garbage cans and find a secret tape in order to win. There's also a Quick Race mode, where you can race against up to three opponents. We liked how you can customize your skateboarder by gender, skin color and apparel as well as skateboard customization including hand drawn or pre-made shapes and a large color palette. The variety of game modes, locations and music also adds to the depth. On the downside, our 14-year-old tester found multi-button moves such as grinding difficult to complete while moving at a fast pace and trying to avoid obstacles. Ramps come up pretty quick when you're going fast downhill so if you miss one, you can't usually get back to it due to the uphill factor. That said, we would easily recommend this game for a lot of fast-paced action. Details: Activision, Inc., www.activision.com. Price: $35. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Nintendo DS. Teaches: following directions, fine motor, art/creativity. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [AH]

80%

Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam (Wii)

In his new twist on a skating game, you hold the Wii remote like a set of handle bars. The game is more of a race than a contest, where you skate through eight different environments. At several pints, you shake the controller to go faster, or use the direction keys to kick to the side in order to knock down your opponents. Our testers gave it mixed feedback, finding it to be fun, but not as fun as the PS3 version of Tony Hawk Project 8. Does it compare to prior versions of Tony Hawk? "The races are definitely fun, although the split screen multiplayer options make it hard to see some of the upcoming challenges." This is a good game with an enough content to merit, at the very least, a borrow. But don't expect to find a typical skating game. Content includes the ability to unlock more (up to eight) skating levels. Created by Toys for Bob and Neversoft for Activision. Details: Activision, Inc., www.activision.com. Price: $50. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: sports, skating, timing, fine motor coordination. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.3 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Ease of Use Educational Entertaining Design Features Good Value

9 N 9 8 8

85%

ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Comic Mischief Mild Language Mild Violence

True Golf Swing

Ease of Use 8

7 9 9 9

This Nintendo DS golf simulation lets you play as one of eight characters (four male or Educational four female) in either single-player mode or with up to four players using the DS wireless play Entertaining -- in tournaments, practice or a regular round of golf. The touch screen is used to swing Design Features your stylus to launch shots down the fairway and angle your clubs to slice or hook the ball in either direction. It also lets you change clubs, camera angles or send messages to other Good Value players. The more you play, the more money you make, allowing you to buy better ESRB Rating: Everyone equipment to improve your game. Our tester, aged 12, liked the Quick Start option because you can play the game faster, and the stylus motion is good at giving the feeling of swinging a club -- unlike past golf sims. In his words, "I really liked this game and would buy it." Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $34.99. Ages: 8-up. Platform: Nintendo DS. Teaches: golf, sports. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.2 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

84%

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEATURE REVIEWS, FEBRUARY 1, 07

Page 15

WarioWare: Smooth Moves

Fun but hard, this fast-paced collection of 200 timed minigames for one player stretches your problem-solving abilities, while giving you a physical workout. The end result is one of the most requested Wii software titles since Wii Sports, the title that ships with each new Wii. WarioWare is actually a collection of micrograms (each lasting five to 10 seconds). You use the Wii remote to flip a frying pan into the air, without spilling the vegetables, or shave a funny guy's beard. There are four categories of activities, sorted by the way you use the Wii Remote in the game. There's the Remote, Umbrella, Chauffeur and Elephant, each with a short comical training video. For example, when in Umbrella Mode, you swat flies or balance a broom on your hand. The Chauffeur Mode has you holding the remote like a steering wheel to tilt maze, or balance on a ball. The Elephant Mode has you holding the remote to your nose to grab apples from a tree, or trying to carefully tilt a glass of water to a guy's mouth, without spilling. There's a bit of crude-room humor to note -- one game has you plucking nose hairs with a pair of tweezers; but overall there's not much to worry about. Of particular educational value is a very challenging sorting game where you tilt the controller to the left or right to direct an advancing stream of people according to the color of their clothing. So what's the overall point? The better you do in all these games, the more additional activities you unlock, and the closer you get to outsmarting the "bad guy" (Wario). Drawbacks to note are that some of the games are hard to figure out, and help is not readily provided which will leave some younger players behind. For example, all our testers, young and old, were confused by one game where you have to close a shop door. Of all the Wii games we've reviewed to date, this game makes the most creative use of the Wii controls, as well as being the most creative and diverse. Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $50. Ages: 8-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: logic (sorting), problem solving, quick thinking, fine and gross motor. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.6 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Ease of Use 8 Educational 9 Entertaining 10 Design Features 10 Good Value 9

92%

ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+, Crude Humor Mild Cartoon Violence

Wii Sports

Looking for a good workout? Wii Sports, the title that comes bundled with all Wii consoles, is a great option. In fact, it is one of the best designed Wii titles on the market. There are five sports on one CD: tennis, golf, bowling, boxing and baseball. In the tennis game, up to four players can swing at, hear and feel the ball using the Wii Remote to hit straight shots and lobs (with top spin or a slice) using their forehand or backhand. With each stroke, a sound comes from the Wii remote, indicating the smack of a ball, or signaling whose turn it is to serve. In the baseball game, players can hit or pitch a baseball using the Wii Remote while the characters on the screen mimic their movements. In the golf game, players can drive the fairways or putt for the cup simply by swinging the Wii Remote as if they were swinging a real golf club. All the games are excellent renditions of the sport they simulate, and there's a nice range of activity level. Testers as young as five were able to play the games, although they'll need help with some of the more technical sports. Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $50. Ages: 3-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: movement, sports, gross motor skills. Rating (1 to 5 stars): 4.8 stars. Review date: 2/1/2007. [WB]

Ease of Use 10 Educational 9 Entertaining 10 Design Features 10 Good Value 9

ESRB Rating: Everyone

96%

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

FEBRUARY 1, 07

New Releases

Page 16

1701 A.D. This 3D Empire-building strategy game was developed by Related Designs for Aspyr Media. Set in the 17th and 18th centuries, players set out to discover and inhabit new lands and grow their small colonies into thriving cities. Players must establish, expand and maintain a medieval metropolis while interacting with native peoples and other players through trade, diplomacy or conflict. Players can set their own goals and play more than 100 "sub-quests" that offer various rewards. Multiplayer mode allows up to four players to play over LAN or Internet in player-vs-player or cooperative modes. Details: Aspyr Media Inc., www.aspyr.com. Price: $39.99. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Windows XP. Teaches: strategy, logic, history. Review date: 10/27/2006. Adobe Digital School Collection This is a bundle of second-string Adobe programs for education settings, announced Oct. 5, 2006. Titles are Adobe Photoshop Elements 5.0 (for editing digital graphics, much like Photoshop minus professional features), Adobe Premiere Elements 3.0 (for editing video), Adobe Contribute 4 (for editing HTML), and Adobe Acrobat 8 Professional (for creating and editing PDF files). There is also a Teacher Resource CD with curriculum and training materials. The Adobe Digital School Collection is available to K-12 Districts and Schools only. Details: Adobe Systems Incorporated, www.adobe.com. Price: $150. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Windows XP, Mac OSX. Teaches: art, creativity, drawing, movie editing, teacher utilities, web design. Review date: 1/24/2007. Alex Rider: Stormbreaker Based on the movie, Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker, and inspired by the Alex Rider book series by Anthony Horowitz, this game lets children play as Alex Rider, a 14-year-old British spy, as they solve mysteries while using a number of combat moves, vehicles and gadgets. Players explore the Stormbreaker universe, with levels including Ian Rider's house, the breakers yard, and MI6's secret Liverpool Street headquarters and training facilities. Players received spy gadgets to aid in combat, navigation and the ability to unlock special mini-games. Note that the DS version is rated T for violence. Details: THQ, Inc., www.thq.com. Price: $29.99. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS*. Teaches: logic. Review date: 10/16/2006. American Dragon: Jake Long, Attack of the Dark Dragon (DS) Developed by Wayforward for BVG and based on the Disney channel animated series about an Asian American teenager who has the ability to turn into a dragon with special powers, this game allows you to play both as Jake Long and as the dragon. You must defeat trolls, collect focus points and try and save Jake's friend Rose. As Jake, you can use your kicking and punching power to defeat enemies and collect the focus points necessary to unleash your dragon powers. After you collect enough points, you can change into the dragon by yelling "Dragon Up" into the microphone or by using the touch screen to access the shield, fire and hover powers available to the dragon. The hover ability lets you fly over large gaps that Jake wouldn't be able to traverse. The fire ability lets you defeat enemies and break obstacles that Jake can't get through. The shield protects you from things like smoke plumes. You can also "Dragon Up" by waiting in the blue swirling funnels until the touch screen tells you to touch it for dragon powers. Periodically, tips from Jake's grandpa and mentor will pop up about when to use certain dragon abilities. We thought this game was true to the animated series, and we liked the ability to fly as the dragon and surmount obstacles that we couldn't when playing as Jake. Two things we noted that weren't favorites were the difficulty of moving from one level to the next and the fact that neither Jake nor the dragon can hang onto a ledge when hopping from one platform to another. If they don't make it, which happens often, the level ends, and you return to where you started. We thought these two features made this game too difficult for the intended audience of six- to 12-year olds. Fans of the animated series will probably want to play this one, but based on our 11- and 14-yearold tester's experiences, it will probably prove too difficult for them to advance and maintain their interest. Details: Buena Vista Games, www.buenavistagames.com. Price: $30. Ages: 6-12. Platform: Game Boy Advance. Teaches: memory, problem solving, following directions. Review date: 11/21/2006.

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

OTHER NEW RELEASES FEBRUARY 1, 07 Bundle of Compromises Developed by Howard Egger-Bovet and American History for Kids, these DVDs are designed to make complex historical events easy and fun to understand. Topics featured include the power of Feudalism, the Articles of Confederation, the Magna Carta and the Constitution. They feature original music, drama, puppetry and interactive critical thinking questions designed to teach kids about early American History. Other DVDs available include The Civil War: American Against American ($72.00) and American Colonies/American Revolution ($54.00). Details: Find the Fun Productions, www.findthefunproductions.com. Price: $79.99. Ages: 10-14. Platform: DVD. Teaches: American History. Review date: 10/18/2006. Clubhouse Games Twenty games like Poker, Darts and Bowling come to the Nintendo DS platform and can be shared by up to eight players via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, DS Download Play or Multi-Card Play. In other words, the other players don't need to have the cartridge to download the games and compete. Games include Checkers, Darts, Pool, Backgammon, Bridge or Poker. An in-game chat feature lets players scribble text messages during the game. Clubhouse Games is part of Nintendo's Touch Generations library. Developed by Agenda for Nintendo of America. Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $30. Ages: 11-up. Platform: Nintendo DS. Teaches: logic, matching, classification. Review date: 5/28/2006. Corgi iCar Plug your iPod, stereo or MP3 player into this moving speaker system to see a model Cadillac Escalade jump to the music, flash its lights, or spin its wheels. The sound is not of very good quality, and there is no learning value. This is one of those gadgets that makes you scratch your head and say, "What on earth were they thinking?" It runs on six AA batteries or an AC adapter (sold extra). Note that a speaker mode plays audio only. A short audio cable is included. Details: Corgi USA, www.corgi-usa.com. Price: $40. Ages: 8-up. Platform: iPod accessory. Teaches: an iPod accessory. Review date: 10/28/2006. Dance Praise Expansion Pack Volume 3: Pop & Rock Hits This is an expansion pack for Dance Praise, the PC/Mac title that features 35 new songs from favorite Christian artists that include Stacie Orrico and Relient K. Each song offers three levels of steps, creating a total of over 100 new dances. Other expansion packs available include Modern Worship or Hi-Hop/Rap. Expansion pack requires the Dance Praise CD-ROM game and one or two dance pads. Details: Digital Praise, Inc., www.DigitalPraise.com. Price: $24.95. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Windows XP, Windows 98, Mac OSX. Teaches: dancing, strategy, physical fitness. Review date: 10/16/2006. Disney Mobile This is a wireless phone service from Disney and Sprint designed to help parents control of their kids' cell phone experience. One parent can be designated as the "Family Manager" and can set monthly spending allowances for each child (voice minutes, text messaging, picture messaging and downloadable content). The Family Manager will also receive alerts when a voice and text or picture messaging limit has been reached. They can then either ignore the alert and allow usage to continue, by increasing the limits, or suspend most phone functions using the Call Control Feature from their on-line account (disneymobile.com). Even with this suspension, children will always be able to call and receive calls from family members on their Disney Mobile Plan, call 911, as well as pre-determined "always on" phone numbers. The Call Control feature allows the Family Manager to choose the days of week or time of day the child is allowed to make calls (not during school hours, etc.). They can also program up to 20 "always on" numbers and can prohibit calls from up to 20 designated numbers. In addition, the plan features a Family Locator, which enable parents to locate their kids' handsets using advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. This can be accessed either from the parent's phone off the Internet, by entering a PIN and following the "locate" process on the handset or at disneymobile.com. The phones look like regular phones, with the exception of some Disney decorations. Many have a camera, and feel like "real phones" which is important to children. Prices start at $25/month for 200 Daytime minutes (Kid Start Plan) and go up to $170/month for 3500 daytime minutes. There is also a $35 activation fee, a two-year agreement required and a $175 early termination fee per line. Details: Disney Mobile, www.disneymobile.com. Price: $25/month and up. Ages: 8-up. Platform: Mobile Phone. Teaches: a cell phone designed for children. Review date: 1/17/2007.

Page 17

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

OTHER NEW RELEASES FEBRUARY 1, 07 Eco Rangers Animal Adventures In this interactive DVD, children team up with the Eco-Rangers to discover earth's most amazing creatures. There are 500 video clips of animals in the wild. The game features over 250 animals, five missions and hundred of questions. The missions include the Tropical Rainforest, Arctic Encounter, Wild Woodlands, Savanna Plains and Ocean Blue. Look for a full review in an upcoming issue. Details: Snap TV, www.snaptvgames.com. Price: $24.99. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Interactive DVD. Teaches: ecology, animals. Review date: 7/17/2006. Eragon This fantasy/action game is based on the book and film. Players battle using a magic-based combat system, dragon flight-based combat, and dragon summon attacks. There is also a two-player co-op featuring team attack bonuses and dragon fight/flight combo gameplay. In the PSP version, there is a dragon flight/arena combat game with a four-person feature, with 12 unlockable arena game types. The DS version uses the touch screen for spell casting. Developed by StormFront Studios and published by Sierra Entertainment for Vivendi Universal Games. Details: Vivendi Universal Games, Inc., vugames.com. Price: $29.99 - $59.99. Ages: 10-up. Platform: Xbox, Xbox 360, PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS, PSP, Windows XP, Windows 98. Teaches: logic. Review date: 9/11/2006. FLY Fusion Pentop Computer We had a chance to try a prototype of the next generation of the FLY Pentop computer (called the "Fusion") during a demonstration at our office provided by LeapFrog. Key changes from the last version include a smaller, more sleek form factor (it feels more like a pen), a USB connection to a computer (which also charges the battery and means no more cartridges to loose or batteries to replace), much more internal memory (from 16 to 64 MB), a built-in MP3 player, and the ability to store digital copies of print -- up to 100 pages, in memory. This last feature is the most interesting. We were able to scribble a few words and then transfer it to the computer screen by way of a USB wire. A software installation package displays the notes on the screen (they look like a scanned copy) and attempts to translate them into a word processor-friendly file. This means, quite literally, "digital notes." The new pen is coming "Fall 2007." All future FLY applications will be sold online as downloads, and FLY paper notebooks have been reduced in price. See the previous FLY review for more details on how the FLY works. Details: Leapfrog, www.leapfrog.com. Price: $80. Ages: 6-up. Platform: FLY. Teaches: an educational utility. Review date: 1/31/2007. Genji: Days of the Blade Developed by Game Republic and Sony of Japan, this single-player game is based on the PS2 game "Genji: Dawn of the Samurai" and is set three years after the last chapter of Genkuro Yoshitsune's life. It features more content (15 hours) more diverse levels of fighting, as well as the ability to swap between four playable characters at any time. Details: Sony Computer Entertainment America, www.scea.com. Price: $60. Ages: 13-up. Platform: PlayStation 3. Teaches: logic, problem solving. Review date: 11/15/2006. Incite! Learning Series - Civil War: Life and Times A new twist for special education publisher Don Johnston, this is a non-interactive collection of movies and worksheets that deal with the Civil War. The movies are good quality, consisting of 65 original five-minute movies stored on a set of 13 DVDs. Each DVD features five movies. For example, the first set, Civil War: Life and Times includes movies called 6th New Hampshire, Underground Railroad, Siege at Petersburg, and Atlanta Diary. Other topics include Civil War Politics, Battles, the American Revolution and Colonial America. The videos use real-life characters to act out the historical event, which makes the content much more interesting, at least compared to a textbook. The actors provide first-person narratives to help students learn more about opposing points of view. The series includes detailed lesson plans, with one unit taking one week to complete. Prices start at $150, and there are also subscription prices of $60 per set/site for the first year and $24.99 for renewal after first year. Overall, this series is a good investment for a school district looking to make their Social Studies curriculum more appealing to their students. Details: Don Johnston, Inc., www.donjohnston.com. Price: $149.99 per set/site. Ages: 9-13. Platform: Interactive DVD. Teaches: history, civil war, comprehension, memory, vocabulary, history. Review date: 10/16/2006.

Page 18

10

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

OTHER NEW RELEASES FEBRUARY 1, 07 Magical Starsign This is a role-playing-game (RPG) set in a magical academy, designed for the Nintendo DS. Each student uses a different element of magic, and each type of magic works best against different enemies. In the story, students explore a galaxy in search of a missing teacher. Characters will gain levels and power as they earn more and more experienced points. There is also a multiplayer "amigo" dungeon which players can explore with up to six people and a Tag Mode that allows players to exchange data with one another and grow unique egg characters that slowly grow and hatch over time. We found the characters to be well-drawn and liked the touch screen controls, but did not like how the elemental astrology system decides what magic is most useful in cretin areas. Paying attention to this can become annoying. This game is for fans of fantasy games that are able to understand complex rules. Developed by Brownie Brown exclusively for the Nintendo DS. Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $34.99. Ages: 12-up. Platform: Nintendo DS. Teaches: logic, reading. Review date: 10/30/2006. Nicktropolis Nicktropolis is a free, MMO (Massive Multiplayer Online Game) that launched on January 30, 2007. It is very easy to sign up and get started. The format is very much liked Club Penguin, although it is too early to know if the games will be as well-designed. There are two forms of chat -- constructed (also called menu chat) form sentences and phrases using pre-selected messages, and free-filtered chat, that is also moderated. The latter requires registering with your parent's email. The site claims that it is not possible to enter personal information. You start by designing a human-like avatar. You can be a boy or girl, and select skin/hair/clothing colors. You can then create your own room with items that are purchased with Nick Points. While there are currently no ads inside Nicktropolis itself, the site leverages Nick viacom-related media, including Air Benders and SpongeBob, and children are exposed to an assortment of banner ads as they sign up. This is a service to keep an eye on. Details: Nickelodeon, www.nicktropolis.com. Price: $free. Ages: 6-14. Platform: Internet Site. Teaches: logic, typing, socialization, chat. Review date: 1/29/2007. Over the Hedge: Hammy goes Nuts! This one-player adventure has children controlling Hammy the squirrel, who leads RJ the raccoon, Verne the turtle, and other forest friends on a trip to the suburbs. When Hammy's cable TV goes out, his friends have to restore the signal. The game features 28 levels, and players can rearrange levels to achieve their goals as well as revisit unlocked levels to earn high scores in Quick Play mode. You can use Hammy's power and stop time, move invisibly through the world, or walk on water. You can use your touch screen to set traps and gags. In addition, in Multiplayer Mode, you can face off against partners and race to steal the most food from neighborhood homes. Details: Activision, Inc., www.activision.com. Price: $30. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Nintendo DS. Teaches: logic, reading. Review date: 11/3/2006. Sex, Etc. Designed to provide factual, medically accurate and balanced information about sexuality for teens, www.sexect.com is both an online hotline and a reference for teens looking for advice. Content (as of 1/07) includes videos, online postings, a very comprehensive glossary of terms, and a "in a crisis" button, with advice on what to do in case of rape, pregnancy or, "I just had unprotected sex. Is there anything I can do?" We were impressed by the objective quality of the information. This site is part of a Teen-to-Teen Sexuality Education Project developed by Answer (formerly the Network for Family Life Education). It is based and funded through the Center for Applied Psychology at Rutgers University. The site claims that all teen-generated posts are screened, so that users cannot divulge their personal information such as their last names and email addresses. Disclaimer: One of our reviewers [WB] is a staff member at Rutgers, however, he has had no affiliation with this project. Details: Answer/Rutgers University Foundation , www.sexect.org. Price: $free. Ages: 14-up. Platform: Internet Site. Teaches: sex education. Review date: 1/22/2007. TallTales Audio CDs TallTales Audio are original stories of pirates, old west adventures, mysteries, as well as tales about talking animals that are available both on CD and online. Titles include: Sheriff Daisy & Deputy Bud; Clem the Detective Dog; Rainbow of the Sioux; The Monotonia Chronicles; Raphie the Gopher; and Tibbodnock Stories. One unique feature is that children are encouraged to make up their own stories, with several unfinished stories on the website. Details: TallTales Audio, www.talltalesausio.com. Price: $12.95. Ages: 5-11. Platform: Audio CD and Internet Site. Teaches: creativity, storytelling, language. Review date: 10/18/2006. Children's Technology Review, February 2007

Page 19

OTHER NEW RELEASES FEBRUARY 1, 07 Timo's Lesson Creator Timo's Lesson Creator was developed to help teachers and parents create vocabulary lessons on any subject -- including current events and everyday situations -- for children with special needs. The lessons can be created in three simple steps: Step 1 - select images to be shown in the lesson (photos, clipart, etc); Step 2 - customize what Timo says by typing words or sentences into each lesson component of the program; and Step 3 - assemble the lesson on animated Speech servers and instantly download onto the lesson author's computer. You can then share your lesson with other teachers and parents, who may also further modify the lesson to suit their particular educational needs. The cost is $299 for eight students on one computer/$599 for eight students on three computers (a total of 24 students). Details: Animated Speech Corporation, www.animatedspeech.com. Price: $299/$599. Ages: 5up. Platform: Windows XP, Windows 98, Mac OSX. Teaches: a utility for teachers. Review date: 6/7/2006. Tom and Jerry Tales Play as Jerry (the mouse) to see if you can make it through a maze-like house and survive. There are mouse holes, cheese and mean cats, along with some mini-games. Developed by Sensory Sweep Studios for Warner Brothers. Details: Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment, Inc., www.tomandjerrytalesgame.com. Price: $30. Ages: 5-up. Platform: Game Boy Advance. Teaches: logic. Review date: 11/17/2006. Tony Hawk's Project 8 (PS3) This is the 14th Tony Hawk game we've reviewed, and this PS3 version is rated "the best ever" by our seasoned testers. Why? There are more goals, side-missions and secret areas. You can track your stats using in-game record keeping or just skate in free-play mode. The bail mode lets players control the body of the skater during falls to either minimize or maximize damage for fun. In other words, the more times you steer your skater over a cliff, the higher your hospital bill. Note that there's no shortage of cringe-inducing falls in this game, complete with blood spots on the concrete. Testers did not notice any other worrisome content, although the ESRB descriptors should be taken seriously, given the general skating theme of this game. If you're looking for a good skating game, and you have $60 to spend, this is the best you can get. Details: Activision, Inc., www.activision.com. Price: $60. Ages: 13-up. Platform: PlayStation 3. Teaches: sports, skating. Review date: 11/17/2006. Webkinz World A stuffed toy doubles as the key to a website, with Webkinz, a collectible toy that has been enjoying some playground buzz lately. Here's how it works. Each of the 60 varieties of squishy animals, sold either as Webkinz ($14) or as smaller ($8) Lil'Kinz, come with a sealed tag with a code that can be entered at Webkinz World (www.webkinz.com). Once the code is recognized, children meet a virtual version of their pet that they can use to play games, chat with friends and/or move into it's own home -- complete with furniture. From this point, the experience is a bit like MMOG (Massive Multiplayer Online Game), minus the ability to freely chat. Instead, you can send messages to other animals using constructed chat, or sets of pull down menus that eliminate the possibility of worrisome contact with strangers. The best part are the 20 addicting games that include mazes, scavenger hunts, sorting contests and trivia questions (shhh, don't tell the kids that a former classroom teacher wrote the questions). Good scores win Kinzcash, which is used to buy more clothing or furniture for your house. To buy more time, you just buy another animal that will be around long after the web site expires. Details: Ganz, www.webkinz.com. Price: $8 or $14. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Internet Site. Teaches: typing, logic, thinking, pretend play, the Internet. Review date: 1/10/2007. Wii Points Card The Wii Points card acts like a gift card. It allows you to download extra features and content to your Wii system, including the games from the NES, Super NES, N64, Sega Genesis and NEC TurboGrafx video game consoles. You just enter the Wii Points Card code on the Wii onscreen menu. Worth 2,000 Wii Points, each separately packaged Wii Points Card contains a scratch-off patch concealing the code that allows you to redeem your Wii Points. Details: Nintendo of America, www.nintendo.com. Price: $20. Ages: 6-up. Platform: Wii. Teaches: NA. Review date: 11/30/2006.

Page 20

10

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

11

Au Ed

Children's Technology Review, February 2007

Information

Layout 1

20 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

562582


You might also be interested in

BETA
jul 01 master
Layout 1