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ESSENTIAL INPUTS AND DELIVERABLES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PROCESS SAFETY ­ 1 Day

Course

TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT OF PROCESS SAFETY ­ 2 Day Course

September 20-22, 2011 Residence Inn Raleigh-Durham Airport 2020 Hospitality Court Morrisville, NC 27560 919-467-8689 October 4-6, 2011 Doubletree Hotel Houston Intercontinental Airport 15747 John F. Kennedy Blvd. Houston, TX 77032 281-848-4000 December 13-15, 2011 Harrah's Las Vegas 3475 Las Vegas Blvd South Las Vegas, NV 89109 702-967-4000

Chilworth Technology, Inc. has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET), 1760 Old Meadow Road, Suite 500, McLean, VA 22102; (703) 506-3275.

About Chilworth Global

Chilworth Global

Chilworth Global has international consulting bases and laboratory testing facilities in the USA, UK, France, India, Italy, and Spain with state of the art dust explosion and electrostatic laboratories (with low humidity facility), and a specialist laboratory for the evaluation of thermal runaway reactions. Chilworth's goal is to provide services to business and industry to help identify, characterize, prevent, and mitigate potential fire, explosion, and thermal instability (runaway reaction) hazards in their processes by providing expert independent consulting, specialist laboratory testing and process safety training. Our laboratories are ISO-IEC 17025 accredited as well as GLP compliant. Chilworth employs a Doctorate Engineering and Scientific staff along with Graduate Engineers, Scientists and Technicians. Our senior consultants are internationally recognized experts in their specialist fields, and many have served on national and international standards committees. The client base of Chilworth Global covers more than 20 countries, and includes manufacturing companies in the fine chemicals/pharmaceuticals, bulk organics, food stuffs, paints, resins/plastics, dyestuffs, pigments, agrochemicals, soaps/detergents, oil/petrochemicals, and the legal and insurance fields. For further information telephone 1 609 799 4449; or email to [email protected] or visit www.chilworth.com.

ESSENTIAL INPUTS AND DELIVERABLES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PROCESS SAFETY Introduction

This course provides the attendee with a broad-based overview of the key ingredients necessary in programs to manage Process Safety. Such programs are essential for reducing the risk of process accidents applicable to general industry. Emphasis is first placed on WHAT a program to manage Process Safety is, WHY such a program is necessary, and HOW Process Safety is managed. Regulatory requirements and industry guidelines provide a historical foundation for current approaches to achieving Recognized and Generally Accepted Good Engineering Practice for a multitude of processes. This course engages the concept of a Flow Diagram to gain understanding of the informational and personnel resource Inputs and documented deliverables needed to support a management system for Process Safety. The course attendees are also involved in Process Safety staffing, skills, and training considerations. Action Planning with attention to costs versus benefits will be introduced to assist participants with responsibilities for implementing a system for management of Process Safety.

Who should attend?

This course is designed for the following personnel: Managers responsible for safe operations such as those responsible for protection of safety, health and the environment, Technical personnel such as Engineers and Project Managers involved in design and construction for safe facilities and operations, Operations, Maintenance, and other personnel who contribute to safe operations Prerequisites: A desire to apply a systematic approach to Process Safety

What You Will Gain

1. Explain WHAT a program to manage Process Safety is 2. Explain WHY a program to manage Process Safety is necessary 3. Understand Regulatory Requirements and Industry Guidelines applicable to management of Process Safety 4. Explain WHAT Inputs are needed to support management of Process Safety 5. Explain WHAT are expected deliverables of a Process Safety Management System 6. Understand the costs versus benefits of a Process Safety Management System 7. Understand Action Planning to implement management of Process Safety

Seminar Speaker

David E. Kaelin, Sr. (B.S.Ch.E.) David E. Kaelin, Sr., B.S.Ch.E., Mr. Kaelin has over 25 years experience in the specialty chemical manufacturing industry and 15 years specializing as a Process Safety Engineer. He has participated in the design and construction of numerous chemical processing facilities and provided support and training in all areas of PSM. As a Process Safety Engineer he has led process hazard analysis, risk assessments and facility siting reviews. At the corporate level he has created and taught courses in PSM and hazard recognition methods. Mr. Kaelin is an expert in the application of hazard recognition techniques including: HAZOP, FMEA. What-If, Fault Tree Analysis, Risk Screening and Checklist. He is an active member of AIChE, and NFPA.

Essential Inputs and Deliverables for Management of Process Safety

COURSE DESIGN AND OBJECTIVES

The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the essential inputs and outputs needed for effective management of Process Safety. Participants are given a working knowledge of the Process Safety Elements that typically are applied throughout the Life Cycle from Research and Development through facility design, startup, operation, and shutdown. During this one day course, participants will learn about the application of a multi-disciplined organization with an umbrella of management support to achieve a practical, Basis of Safety. Delivered in a classroom setting with brief participant exercises, questions and discussion are encouraged throughout the instructor's slideshow presentations, as possible, allowing for coverage of the course material.

Seminar Outline ­ Slide Presentation

Schedule: One day Course Contents: 1. Introduction a. Course Content and Introductions b. Terminology used by Process Safety practitioners The historical need to manage Process Safety

Video Presentation

2. Definitions for Process Safety a. Definition of Process Safety b. Life Cycle Process Safety c. Definition of a Management System 3. Process Safety Management Regulations and Guidelines a. Process Safety Management Regulations b. Industry Guidelines for management of Process Safety Participant Exercise #1 ­Comparison of Regulations and Guidelines 4. Inputs and Outputs for management of Process Safety a. Inputs needed to support management of Process Safety b. Staffing, Skills, and Training issues for management of Process Safety 5. Deliverables of a Process Safety Management System Participant Exercise #2 ­ System Deliverables a. Deliverables Discussion 6. Management System Topics a. Costs versus Benefits of a Process Safety Management System b. Action Planning to implement management of Process Safety Course Q&A and Closing Summary of Key Points for Objectives Skills Check Test Discussion of post-course action suggestions Course Evaluation Feedback Form

TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT OF PROCESS SAFETY Introduction

This course provides the attendee with a detailed working knowledge of the components of programs necessary to manage Process Safety. Such programs are essential for reducing the risk of accidents applicable to general industry. Emphasis is first placed on reviews of a Management System for Process Safety, Life Cycle application of Process Safety, and Key details of US Process Safety Management Regulations ­OSHA, EPA. The several US State, Canadian, and EU Seveso approaches to Process Safety mandates are discussed along with comparative details of prominent Industry Guidelines for management of Process Safety. Details of Recognized and Generally Accepted Good Engineering Practice (RAGAGEP) and the role of Technical Codes and Standards in Design, Operation, and Maintenance for Process Safety are discussed. Completeness of Process Safety Information needed is a building block essential for safe process activities and analysis. Course attendees are reminded of the benefits of and path to Management of Process Safety with a management supported, team-based organization. Cause and Effect Reasoning in Process Safety requires understanding Consequence Evaluation and the nature of Safeguards. The course includes topics of Estimation, Scheduling, and Prioritization for Action Planning with awareness of the Evergreen nature of Process Safety.

Who should attend?

This course is designed for the following personnel: Managers responsible for safe operations such as those responsible for protection of safety, health and the environment, Technical personnel such as Engineers, Project Managers and others involved in direct application of Process Safety programs to operations, maintenance, or technical aspects of facilities. Prerequisite: A suggested pre-requisite is the Chilworth course, ESSENTIAL INPUTS AND DELIVERABLES FOR MANAGEMENT OF PROCESS SAFETY, or equivalent prior experience.

What You Will Gain

1. Describe a Management System for Process Safety 2. Understand the different applicability of Regulatory Requirements and Industry Guidelines for Process Safety 3. Describe RAGAGEP role of Technical Codes and Standards in Design, Operation, and Maintenance for Process Safety 4. Understand completeness of Process Safety Information needed 5. Describe management support, skill-sets, experience, and team-building for Management of Process Safety with a Team-based organization 6. Understand Cause and Effect Reasoning in Process Safety 7. Understand Estimation, Scheduling, and Prioritization for Action Planning 8. Describe the Evergreen nature of Process Safety

Seminar Speaker

David E. Kaelin, Sr. (B.S.Ch.E.) David E. Kaelin, Sr., B.S.Ch.E., Mr. Kaelin has over 25 years experience in the specialty chemical manufacturing industry and 15 years specializing as a Process Safety Engineer. He has participated in the design and construction of numerous chemical processing facilities and provided support and training in all areas of PSM. As a Process Safety Engineer he has led process hazard analysis, risk assessments and facility siting reviews. At the corporate level he has created and taught courses in PSM and hazard recognition methods. Mr. Kaelin is an expert in the application of hazard recognition techniques including: HAZOP, FMEA. What-If, Fault Tree Analysis, Risk Screening and Checklist. He is an active member of AIChE, and NFPA.

Technical Management of Process Safety

COURSE DESIGN AND OBJECTIVES

The objective of this course is to provide detailed knowledge and guidance needed for effective hands-on management of Process Safety. Participants are given a technical basis of Regulations, Codes and Standards to be applied through Design, Operation, and Maintenance for a systematic approach to Process Safety. During this two day course, the participants will learn about the application of management support for a team-based organization with a detailed approach to plan and schedule for Management of Process Safety. Delivered in a classroom setting with brief participant exercises, questions and discussion are encouraged throughout the instructor's slideshow presentations, as possible, allowing for coverage of the course material.

Seminar Outline ­ Slide Presentation

Schedule: Two days Course Contents: 1. Introduction Course Content and Introductions Terminology used by Process Safety practitioners Review the meaning of a Management System for Process Safety Life Cycle application of Process Safety elements 2. Regulations and Guidelines for Process Safety Key Details of Process Safety Management Regulations ­ US OSHA, EPA, State, Canada, and EU Seveso Comparative details of Industry Guidelines for management of Process Safety Video Presentation 3. RAGAGEP role of Technical Codes and Standards in Process Safety Design Operation Maintenance Participant Exercise #1 ­Comparison of Regulations, Codes and Guidelines 4. Completeness of Process Safety Information needed Chemicals and Materials Technology of the process and Unit Operations Equipment and Instrumentation Database sources Participant Exercise #2 ­ Process Safety Information 5. Management of Process Safety with a Team-based organization Management Support Organizational Chart Skill-sets and experience Team Building Participant Exercise #3 ­ Team Dynamics 6. Cause and Effect Reasoning in Process Safety Data Sources and Calculations for Consequence Evaluation Understanding Administrative and Engineered Safeguards Participant Exercise #4 ­ Incident Cause and Effect

7. Implementing a Management System for Process Safety Estimation and Scheduling for a Process Safety Management System Prioritization for Action Planning, Selection of Alternatives, and Implementation Participant Exercise #5 ­ Prioritized Scheduling 8. Evergreen nature of Process Safety Awareness of Citations and Interpretations Considerations for your legal department Supplementing Process Safety Management Audits with Assessments References and Tools for management of Process Safety Course Q&A and Closing Summary of Key Points for Objectives Skills Check Test Discussion of post-course action suggestions Course Evaluation Feedback Form

REGISTRATION FORM

2011 - DATES & LOCATIONS

Please choose which location you will be attending.

Sept 20-22, 2011 Residence Inn Raleigh-Durham Airport 2020 Hospitality Court Morrisville, NC 27560 919-467-8689 October 4-6, 2011 Doubletree Hotel Houston Intercontinental Airport 15747 John F. Kennedy Blvd. Houston, TX 77032 281-848-4000 December 13-15, 2011 Harrah's Las Vegas 3475 Las Vegas Blvd South Las Vegas, NV 89109 702-967-4000

Name: Company: Address: City: Tel: Email: PRICE

$595.00 ­ 1 Day Course $1,190.00 ­ 2 Day Course $1,675.00 All Three Days

All course fees must be received before course commences. We accept Visa, Mastercard, Amex or company checks. Course fees including continental breakfast, lunch and course notes. Courses are from 9:00am to 5:00pm with continental breakfast starting at 8:30am.

State: Fax:

Zip:

Fax or email this registration form to: Chilworth Technology, Inc. 113 Campus Drive Princeton, NJ 08540 ATTN: Victoria R. Jones Tel: 609-799-4449 Fax: 609-799-5559 Email: [email protected]

Cancellation Policy

Absolutely NO refunds will be made if cancellations are made within 30 days prior to the course date; a possible credit may be arranged. Chilworth reserves the right to make last minute changes and/or cancellations.

Hotel Reservations

Hotel Reservations must be made directly with each hotel. The cost of accommodations is NOT included in the course fee. Hotel parking fees may apply. We strongly recommend making reservations as early as possible since the Hotels will only keep the Chilworth Group Block of rooms until 30 days prior to the course start date; after 30 days our group rates no longer apply and reservations are on a first come, first serve basis.

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