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C

E L Foundations P M A S

lassical onversations

®

CurriCulum Guide for Grades K4-6

Third edition

A Publication of

Classical Conversations, inc.

P.O. Box 909 West end, NC 27376

Copyright ©2009 by leigh Ann Bortins

Kay Thomas, leah Bromen, and Sheila Taylor, Fine Arts Contributors

All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced without permission of the author. As purchaser of this book and curriculum, you are welcome to copy and use all of this information for your own students' use only. Families or teachers who join you in this endeavor must also buy this book and curriculum. Please do not copy it for them. if any tuition is paid or fees are earned using this curriculum, you must purchase a license to operate a Foundations program. Published in the u.S.A. by Classical Conversations, inc. P.O. Box 909 West end, NC 27376 iSBN 978-0-692-00116-5

For ordering information, visit www.ClassicalConversationsBooks.com Printed in the united States

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Publications and Services

Foundations Guide companion products: memory resource Cd memory Work Audio Cds memory Work Flashcards

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Words Aptly Spoken Series: Children's literature Volume A Children's literature Volume B Short Stories American literature American documents British literature Other events and services to equip and serve the everyday educator: Parent Practicums Student Practicums retreats Stanford Testing Academicrecords.net Classical Conversations Connected Community

Other publications by Classical Conversations: The essentials of the english language Guide Challenge A-iV Guides mock Trial Notebook

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The Journey ................................................................................................... 7 The Journey Continued ............................................................................. 11 About the Foundations Curriculum........................................................ 17 The Classical Model Used By Classical Conversations, Inc. ................ 20 Memorization Is Important ...................................................................... 21 The Classical Model at Home................................................................... 23 Joining a Foundations Community ......................................................... 31 FOUNDATIONS MEMORY WORK ....................................................... 33 Memory Master Page Sample............................................................ 35 Cycle 1 Memory Master Pages .......................................................... 37 Cycle 2 Memory Master Pages .......................................................... 59 Cycle 3 Memory Master Pages .......................................................... 81 "How to Memorize" Teaching Tips ...................................................... 103 APPENDICES Scripture Passages ............................................................................. 113 Science Experiments and Projects ................................................... 117 Fine Arts ............................................................................................. 133 Proof Sheets ........................................................................................ 173 Map Keys ............................................................................................ 179

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Contents

I knew I was going to homeschool my children from the time I was pregnant with my first son. Around that time, I watched a talk show about an "odd" homeschooling family. They did seem odd to me, but somehow I knew I should teach my children at home, too. All of this was odd because when my first son, Robert, was born in December of 1983, I was in the process of looking for fulltime work as an aerospace engineer. My husband, Rob, still had another semester at the University of Michigan to finish his aerospace engineering degree, so I knew I'd get to be a full-time mom at home with Robert for at least four whole months.

the last minute and then I was going home to be with our son. Since he had a number of children, he was very supportive. It was an interesting eight months. Rob and I intentionally got pregnant with John and looked forward to me being home with both our children by the following May.

When Robert was born, my husband and I were torn over the decision so many new parents face: How should we raise our children? Rob wanted me to stay home, but he also wanted me to pursue the career for which I had studied so hard. Because we each had engineering experience in college, we both had fabulous job offers from Boeing in Seattle making more money than average entrylevel engineers. Financially, we knew we could be set for life, but there was that precious little boy in our arms whom we loved more than life itself. So we compromised. I began working in May, and Rob asked Boeing if he could wait until September to start. They really wanted him, and he really wanted to be home with Robert. They waited for him. By the time Rob started work in September, our hearts were in unison. We found a likeminded mom to watch Robert in her home. I told my boss I was going to finish my contract out to

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We were also determined to have our own home by the time I quit work. We were told repeatedly that there was no way to save an entire salary in eight months, especially since we lived in a highly expensive area like Seattle. Well, I nursed Robert the entire time and even continued to do so after John was born. Baby food was too expensive, and nursing kept him bonded to me and not the sitter. We ate lots of peanut butter and rice and beans. By the time I came home in May, we had purchased a 730-square-foot cottage on a flat acre overlooking Lake Washington. We bought it from an 80-yearold woman who had planted the entire acre with shrubs, roses and perennials. It was a beautiful place to raise our little ones despite having only one bedroom for four people. We lived on a deadend dirt road and were surrounded by wonderful neighbors. We knew from our tight budgeting that we had only $50 a month to live on after fixed expenses, but we were determined that I would raise our sons. We used a wood stove so there'd be no heating bill. I did diapers by hand to save money. Birthday and holiday gifts to our family were only what relatives sent, but our boys have the best grandparents in the world, so they never did without. We had to walk or take a bus to buy

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The Journey

"True education should prepare us to love learning and to see the world from God's side of the sky." ~Leigh Bortins Echo in Celebration: A Call to HomeCentered Education

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groceries and have outings, but I was home with my children. And so the homeschooling adventure began. I found homeschooling neighbors, went to homeschool conferences, formed co-ops, paid professionals to teach me to teach, and invented my own curricula as there were few materials available to buy at that time. When Rob got a job offer with USAir in Winston-Salem, NC, Robert was 6 and John was 4, and I was already considered an experienced homeschooling mom!

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After we made the move to Winston-Salem in 1989, I immediately began making homeschooling friends. I taught all kinds of classes and organized many events so my boys would have the same opportunities as every other child. Then Robert hit middle school, and he began to lose his friends to traditional schools -- mostly because the parents didn't feel adequate teaching high school subjects. Robert and John still had a number of good homeschooled friends, but there were fewer with whom we could plan group activities.

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when I held a class, because they were held on a whim and for fun. This was going to be serious and would take time away from our newest son, William. We decided to charge a fee for my time and told the parents what books to buy for their children.

By that time I had stumbled upon the classical model of education through Douglas Wilson's books Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning and Classical Education and the Home School. I realized I had done a good job teaching dialectic skills to our boys, but they were weak in grammar and I didn't want them to miss out on a rhetorical education. I briefly searched our local area for a school using the classical approach, but no one offered what I wanted. So my husband suggested I invite a few students in once a week and start a rhetorical program. Previously, I had charged only for expenses

In the fall of 1997, 11 high school students and I began to meet weekly to discuss American literature, Latin, science, algebra, American government, economics, and Shakespeare. I enjoyed it, and the parents felt like they were getting some help. The students were making friends and being held accountable to a higher level of academics. The following year, I expanded the program and contracted with two longtime homeschooling friends to tutor six subjects each. We had Challenge A for junior high students and Challenge I and Challenge II for high school students. We called this the Challenge program because we didn't want it to be grade dependent. We wanted students to be in the Challenge level that best fit their academic needs. I recognized that even though I was considered a good homeschool mom, my children and I were accomplishing more than ever before because we had an accountability group. I wanted that same accountability at the grammar level with William and then our youngest, David, so along with a few friends, I started the Foundations Program for 4- through 12-yearolds and their parents. Today, in addition to our Foundations and Challenge programs, we offer Essentials of the English Language. Essentials helps late elementary-age students develop the language arts and writ-

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MEMO RY WO RK

In 1492, Columbus made the first of four trips to the Caribbean on three Spanish ships named the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria.

Memory Master and Homework Guide for Classical Conversations Foundations Program

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Veritas Press Flashcards: Green 1 Blue 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

An INFINITIVE is "to" plus a verb used as a noun, adjective, or adverb.

English

1s and 2s

Math

2 8 4 16 3 9 6 18

ACT IVIT IE S

1 2

1 7 2 14

4 10 8 20

5 11 10 22

6 12 12 24

Science Experiment Van Cleave Science Experiments #68

Hands-On Science Fine Arts

Drawing Basic Shapes -- OILS

History

MEMO RY W O RK

et and ut that sed but

History Sentence: Tell me about the Pilgrims In 1620, the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England signed the Mayflower Compact before landing in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

A PRESENT PARTICIPLE is a verb plus "ing" used as an adjective or a verb.

English

3s and 4s

Math

ACT IVIT IE S

Science Experiment Van Cleave Science Experiment #70

Hands-On Science Fine Arts

3 4

3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48

Drawing Mirror Images

History Focus: United States Science Topic: Human Anatomy

Cranium Vertebrae Ribs Sternum

Montpelier, VT Albany, NY Trenton, NJ Harrisburg, PA Dover, DE

Cycle 3 Week

Conjunctions

Latin

Which bones make up the axial skeleton?

Science

States & Capitals

2

81

Geography

History Focus: United States Science Topic: Human Anatomy

History Sentence: Tell me about Columbus

in apud per sine

in with through without

Connective Epithelial Muscle Nerve

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Augusta, ME Concord, NH Boston, MA Providence, RI Hartford, CT

Cycle 3 Week

Veritas Press Flashcards: Blue 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Prepositions

What are four types of tissue?

States & Capitals

1

History

Latin

Science

Geography

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Veritas Press Flashcards: Blue 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23

History

Pronouns

Latin

this him whose that it him

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Veritas Press Flashcards: Blue 24, 25; Green 2; Blue 26, 27, 28; Green 3, 4

History Sentence: Tell me about the Boston Tea Party In 1773, colonists dressed as Mohawks dumped tea from the British East India Company into Boston Harbor.

hic/hoc ipso/ipsum cui quod eam illum

What are 3 kinds of muscle? Skeletal Smooth Cardiac

Science

A PAST PARTICIPLE is a verb plus "ed" used as an adjective or a verb.

English

5s and 6s

5

History

Verbs

Latin

History Sentence: Tell me about the Declaration of Independence In 1776, the Continental Congress published the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, announcing the colonists' intent to form a new nation.

erat sunt est venit perhiberet crederent

was are is came bear believe

What are 3 parts of the nervous system? Brain Spinal Cord Nerves

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Math Science Math

14 56 16 64 21 63 24 72 28 70 32 80 35 77 40 88 7 49 8 56

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72

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States & Capitals Annapolis, MD Richmond, VA Charleston, WV Raleigh, NC Columbia, SC

Geography

History Focus: United States Science Topic: Human Anatomy

MEMO RY WO RK

Cycle 3 Week 3

ACT IVIT IE S

Science Experiment Van Cleave Science Experiment #74 Drawing Upside Down Image

Hands-On Science Fine Arts

States & Capitals Atlanta, GA Tallahassee, FL Montgomery, AL Jackson, MS Baton Rouge, LA

Geography

History Focus: United States Science Topic: Human Anatomy

Cycle 3 Week 4

M EM O RY W O RK

Verb: Principal Parts Infinitive Present Past Present Participle Past Participle

English

ACT IVIT IE S

Science Experiment Van Cleave Science Experiment #76

7s and 8s

Hands-On Science Fine Arts

7 8

42 84 48 96

Drawing Abstract Art

Memory Master and Homework Guide for Classical Conversations Foundations Program

WEEK 1 Tell me about Columbus In 1492, Columbus made the first of four trips to the Caribbean on three Spanish ships named the Niña, Pina, & Santa Maria.

WEEK 5 Tell me about George Washington In 1789, in New York, George Washington was granted the full powers and responsibilities of the presidency by the U.S. Constitution.

WEEK 9 Tell me about the Compromise of 1850 The Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Act, and the Dred Scott Decision preceded the secession of the Southern states.

WEEK 2 Tell me about the Pilgrims In 1620, the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England signed the Mayflower Compact before landing in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

WEEK 10 Tell me about Polk

WEEK 3 Tell me about the Boston Tea Party

In 1773, colonists dressed as Mohawks dumped tea from the British East India Company into Boston Harbor.

WEEK 4 Tell me about the Declaration of Independence

In 1776, the Continental Congress published the Declaration of Independence in Philadephia, anouncing the colonists' intent to form a new nation.

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WEEK 7 Tell me about the War of 1812 The War of 1812 gave confidence to the U.S. to write the Monroe Doctrine, warning Europeans not to attempt to colonize the Americas. WEEK 8 Tell me about Henry Clay In 1820, Henry Clay worked out the Missouri Compromise allowing Missouri to enter the Union as a slave state and Maine as a free state.

In 1803, the purchase of Louisiana from France prompted westward exploration by pioneers such as Lewis and Clark and Congressman Davy Crockett.

In 1853, after the Mexican War and the Gadsden Purchase, Polk's belief in the doctrine of Manifest Destiny was realized.

WEEK 11 Tell me about Abraham Lincoln

In 1861, President Abraham Lincoln went to war with the southern states which had seceded from the Union.

WEEK 12 Tell me about General Robert E. Lee In 1865, General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House in Virginia.

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Subject Summary

Cycle

WEEK 6 Tell me about the purchase of Louisiana

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3 History

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Appendix: Scripture Passages111

APPENDIX

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112Appendix: Scripture Passages

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Scripture Passages

Cycle 1 Exodus 20 The Ten Commandments

1And God spake all these words, saying, 2I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. 3Thou shalt have no other gods before me. nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:

4Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth: 5thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me;

6and showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments. 7Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain. 8Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.

9Six days shalt thou labor, and do all thy work:

10but the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou,

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13Thou shalt not kill. 15Thou shalt not steal.

11for in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it. 12Honor thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.

14Thou shalt not commit adultery.

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Appendix: Scripture Passages113

16Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. 17Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbor's.

Science Experiments and Projects

Overview

Weeks 1-6 Science Experiments from Van Cleave's 201 Awesome Experiments. Weeks 7-12 Science projects included in the Foundations Guide. Weeks 13-18 Science Experiments from Van Cleave's 201 Awesome Experiments. Weeks 19-24 Science projects included in the Foundations Guide.

Hands-On Activity: Science Experiments

One half of the Hands-On Science Activities for the year consist of science experiments. The goal of these two, six-week segments is to expose students to the scientific method and its vocabulary. Words like hypothesis, purpose, materials, process, results and conclusion should be used as you walk through each experiment. Pulling experiments from Van Cleave's 201 Awesome Experiments, students enjoy observing and helping facilitate science experiments that are loosely related to science facts from that cycle's science memory work. Parents and tutors should use the lab sheet included in this appendix for students to record notes from the science experiment.

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Hands-On Activity: Science Projects

The other half of the Hands-On Science Activities consist of science projects. The goal of these two, six-week segments is to provide students craft opportunities that relate to a the science memory work for the given cycle.

Instructions and project guidance is include in this appendix. Some projects can be done individually others are better in pairs or teams. Follow the information in the following pages as you plan and budget supplies for this portion of your academics.

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Appendix: Science117

What is your hypothesis (educated guess as to what will happen)?

2.MATERIALS: What materials did we use?

3.PROCEDURE: What did we do?

4.CONCLUSION: What did we learn?

118Appendix: Science

Sketches

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Scientific Experiment Lab Note Sheet

To be use with science experiments Weeks 1-6 and 13-18

Experiment Title:

1.PURPOSE: What is the purpose of our experiment?

Cycle 1 Science Projects

Weeks 7-12 The rock identification kits from Carolina are expensive but have a lot of activities in them that will last many years. You could just buy one kit and rotate the kit among the tutors to save money. You'll be able to use the kits for many years to come. For Week 7, dissect Crayfish (order from www. carolina.com). The students will identify only the external parts of the crayfish. There is no need for dissection tools. Instruct each child to use plastic forks, knives to gently probe the crayfish. 1.Go online to www.classicalconversations.com and click on Science Projects and then Crayfish. This will give the tutors good visuals of the crayfish to print off. If you want to investigate more, type "Crayfish Anatomy" in any search engine as there are many universities with wonderful dissection labs and visuals online. 2.Show the students the visuals while they probe their crayfish and identify parts. 3.Have the students sketch the crayfish and label the parts. 2.Sketch the animals and enter information about them into a nature journal page. Foundations Nature Study Walk

1.Give each student a plastic bag to collect specimens, a pencil/pen and scratch paper for notes.

2.Go outside and measure temperature and record. 3.Note weather conditions and record. Have each student: 4. Collect a leaf 5. Collect a seed.

For Week 8, dissect owl pellets ordered from Carolina Biological Supply. Instructions and lab sheets come with the pellets.

For Week 9, take a nature hike with identification books. 1.Take a walk and identify the animals they see.

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6. Collect a twig or bark. 8. Identify a bird. 9. Identify a mammal. 1. Date; 2. Location; 3. Time; 4. Temperature; 5. Weather conditions;

7. Collect an exoskeleton or dead bug.

10. Collect anything else dead, small and interesting they find.

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Appendix: Science119

Go back inside and make a nature journal entry. The student may want to sketch a practice page before making the real thing. Journal entry should include:

Probability Data Lab -- Week 19 Probability and Outcomes

Grammar: Probability: the likelihood that an event will occur, expressed as the ratio of the number of favorable outcomes in the set of outcomes divided by the total number of possible outcomes. Outcome: results of an action (i.e. selection). Supplies: 5 red and 5 white poker chips per child, paper plate per child

Warm-up: Tell the children you have a roll of candy in your hand. Tell them the roll has 3 white candies and only one red candy. What is the probability that the first candy when you open the pack is white and not red? Answer ¾. How could you even the probability of it being red or white? Answer: Have an even number of each color of candy.

What if you had 4 white and 1 red candies? What is the probability that the first candy would be white? Answer 4/5.

Activity: Use red and white poker chips to figure out the answer to the keeping the chances even question. Put 5 white and 5 red chips under a paper plate (or use a sock as a bag). 1.Write "RED" and "WHITE" on the board so you can keep a class tally. Allow older students to keep their own tally.

Calculate: Which chip color came up first the most, red or white?

Write the outcome in the form of a ratio. (Answers vary, but should be close to ½ when reduced) Did you get the outcome you thought you would? If not, can you think why? Think About: How could you test how many chips of a certain color you need to always get that color first? Try it! If More Time: Then experiment with different numbers of poker chips and different outcomes after 20 picks. Appendix: Science125

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3.Repeat 20 times.

2.Have each student draw one chip, record the color using a tally mark under the appropriate color word on the board or their paper, and then put chip back under the plate.

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132Appendix: Science

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Fine Arts Overview

Weeks 1-6 Weeks 7-12 Week 13-18 Weeks 19-24 Drawing Music Theory/Tin Whistle Great Artists projects Composers and Orchestra

Straight Lines -- any straight line no matter how thick Curved Lines -- any curved line that is not enclosed, which would then be a circle Angle Lines -- Two lines joined together, like the number 7 or the corner of a square

Drawing

We spend six weeks each year showing parents and students productive ways to draw effectively. The point is to teach the basics used by real artists. These can be used by children as young as four years old effectively. The tutor has a lot of latitude in the drawing portion of the program. For instance, you could sketch a cat or a dog to teach basic shapes, or use a still life or an Ed Emberley book to practice using the basic shapes in a drawing. This guide is to help you know the basics of drawing and how to teach them to your student. This is by no means in depth and can be built upon anyway a tutor sees fit. Drawing can be done well by young children, and this will probably be a skill all the students love to practice at home. In fact, young children can be taught drawing skills before handwriting skills. Week One -- Basic Shapes

There are five basic shapes that an artist looks for, uses, and builds upon. Dots -- any round shape colored in Circles -- any round shape not colored in

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Warm Up -- Draw on the board a simple animal for the children to copy as a "Before" to compare to their "After" at the end of the six weeks of practice.

Drawing Project -- Using a variety of simple drawings, encourage the children to really look at the pictures for the basic shapes the artist used. Let them practice drawing a variety of simple animals using the basic shapes. Week Two -- Mirror Images

Warm Up -- Come to class with a variety of halfdrawn pictures of simple shapes on a piece of paper. Make a copy for each student and then let the children try to complete the other half of the drawing. For example, draw the left half of a Greek column or a simple vase and let them complete the right. Remember to draw some right halves and let them finish the left. Which way is harder? Drawing Project -- Let them look at a drawing book that emphasizes basic shapes and practice drawing their own pictures.

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Fine Arts

Appendix: Fine Arts Drawing133

praise him with loud clanging cymbals. 6 Let everything that lives sing praises to the Lord! Praise the Lord!

Psalm 98:4-6 "4 Shout joyfully to the Lord, all the earth; Break forth and sing for joy and sing praises. 5 Sing praises to the Lord with the lyre, With the lyre and the sound of melody. 6 With trumpets and the sound of the horn Shout joyfully to before the King, the Lord."

Six-Week Overview

Week 1 Tin Whistle Introduce TW Instrument Theory Introduce Music Symbols

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2 3 Left-Hand Exercise Musical Symbols and Names Right-Hand Exercise Simple Tune More Tune Playing* 4 5 6 More Tune Playing* Musical Symbols and Rhythm Musical Scale Musical Dynamics Musical Dynamics (more)

Grammar/Vocabulary Tin Whistle, instrument, discord, cacophony, mouthpiece, fipple, finger holes, barrel, finger code, notes, staff, melody, symphony, harmonize whole note, stem, half note, head, quarter note, dotted half note, flag, eighth note, clef, treble clef

rhythm, time signature, measure, bar lines

scale, octave, sharp, flat, tempo dynamics, crescendo, legato, staccato, rest piano, forte, mezzo piano, mezzo forte, p, f, mp, mf

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Appendix: Fine Arts Music137

Week One: Introduction to the Tin Whistle and Musical Symbols

Grammar/Vocabulary: Tin Whistle, instrument, discord, cacophony, mouthpiece, fipple, finger holes, barrel, finger code, notes, staff, melody, symphony, harmonize PRACTICE:

Introduce them to the Tin Whistle. It is a new tool, called an "instrument", and it makes its own unique sound.

1.Allow to doodle/blow for about 30 seconds. Once they've stopped, ask students to put their TWs down. ~~What they just created was "discord". Instead of music, you had noise, or "cacophony" -- where the sounds do not work together.

138Appendix: Fine Arts Music

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3.Identify the parts using the Tin Whistle diagram. The TW is a cylindrical metal tube with six finger holes and a mouthpiece at one end as illustrated. A sharp edge cut into the mouthpiece is called a fipple. When air is blown through the mouthpiece it breaks against the fipple and vibrates, producing sound. The pitch of the sound is varied by covering/uncovering the finger holes at different points on the barrel of the whistle.

2.Set the standard that no one is to play or doodle while you are teaching.

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Great Artists Weeks 13-18

Cycle 1 Renaissance & Post Renaissance Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 Week 16 Week 17 Week 18 Giotto Ghiberti Angelico Durer Michelangelo El Greco Cycle 2 Renaissance & Post Renaissance / Impressionists Rembrandt Linnaeus Gainsborough Monet Degas Morisot

160Appendix Fine Arts

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See Discovering Great Artists resource Visit www.ClassicalConversationsBooks.com to purchase

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Cycle 3 Modern -- Folk, Romantic, Realist, Pop, Cartoonist Grandma Moses Rockwell O'Keefe Wyeth Lichtenstein Davis

Orchestra and Composers

Weeks 19-24 Introduction for All Cycles This six-week study introduces students to the instruments of an orchestra and the music of famous classical composers. Your tutors will discuss composers and listen to their compositions in class, but hopefully you'll be able to study orchestra during large-group time. Before you begin your study of orchestra and composers (weeks 18-24), try to find a parent or tutor who loves music and would be willing to lead the orchestra section each week. If you can't find a parent to volunteer, it is perfectly fine to have each tutor just lead her own class in the activities. I have found the most efficient and effective (not to mention fun) way to complete the orchestra section is to keep the whole group together after opening ceremony and learn it then. This allows you to make use of the crowd. Your main resource for this unit is Classical Music for Dummies. I will refer to page numbers from this book; you will use the accompanying CD for the listening portions. Another valuable resource for teaching this section is the Dallas Symphony Orchestra website (www.dsokids.com). You may also want to incorporate the instrument puppets (pages 169-171). Here is the orchestra song. It is also on CC's Memory Work Resource CDs. Orchestra Song

Violins: The violins ringing like lovely singing. The violins ringing like lovely song.

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Clarinets: The clarinet, the clarinet goes doodle doodle doodle doodle dat. The clarinet, the clarinet goes doodle doodle doodle dat. Trumpets: The trumpet is braying, Ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta. Horns: The horn, the horn awakes me at morn. The horn, the horn awakes me at morn. Drums: The drums playing two tones They're always the same tones. The drums playing two tones. They're always the same.

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Appendix Fine Arts161

Cycles At-A-Glance

Cycle 1 Baroque and Classical Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 Week 16 Week 17 Week 18 Intro Handel Bach Mozart Handel/Bach Mozart Cycle 2 Intro

Classical and Romantic Beethoven Brahms Dvorak

Cycle One

162Appendix Fine Arts

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Baroque and Classical Arrangements

Week 19: Introduce the orchestra

Vocabulary: Baroque period, Classical Period, Orchestra (union of instruments), strings, woodwinds, percussion, brass, symphony (used to refer to an orchestra or a piece of music for a large body of instruments, and usually consists of four sections or movements). Large Group: Seat the children like an orchestra. You can find the various periods' seating arrangements at www.dsokids.com. Introduce them to both the Baroque arrangement as well as the Classical arrangement, as these are the time periods for this cycle. Note the harpsichord in the Baroque Orchestra (strings are plucked rather than struck as in the piano). Assign them to pretend instruments or paper puppet instruments and quickly talk about the instruments.

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Beethoven

Brahms/Dvorak

To help them understand how the instruments play together, but have different parts/harmonies, teach the children "The Orchestra Song." The sheet music is found on the dsokids.com website for free but that version is hard to read. You may purchase a beautiful guide from www.classicalconversationsbooks.com for a small fee. Teach each of the three parts separately and then put them together. Engage the parents as well.

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Cycle 3 Intro Romantic and Modern Tchaikovsky Debussy Stravinsky Tchaikovsky/Debussy Stravinsky

You may want to make the Instrument Puppets found in the back of this guide (especially with the younger children) and use them throughout the unit as the children listen to the music. You may also want to talk briefly about instrument families, but don't get bogged down. This is a 20 minute segment, so you won't have time. Introduce them to the wonderful sounds of the orchestra. It would be nice to take a field trip together

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F O R I N S T R U M E N T P U P P E T

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Appendix Fine Arts169

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What is / are... 4 types of tissue? bones make up axial skeleton? 3 kinds of muscle? 3 parts of the nervous system? your 5 main senses? some parts of the digestive system? 4 parts of the excretory system? 6 parts of the circulatory system? 4 parts of the lymph system? your endocrine system? the atomic number an element? parts of the respiratory system? the major purposes of blood?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

1's and 2's tables 3's and 4's tables 5's and 6's tables 7's and 8's tables 9's and 10's tables 11's and 12's tables 13's table (up to 13 x 13) 14's table (up to 14 x 14) 15's table (up to 15 x 15) Squares (to 15) Cubes (to 10 x 10 x 10) 100 meters = 1 km Area of a Square Area of a Circle Area of a Rectangle Area of a Triangle

Infinitive

Present Participle

CYCLE 3

M A S

SCIENCE M AT H

the parts of an atom? the first 4 elements? Circumference of a Circle 1 foot = 12 inches 1 inch = 2.54 cm Associative Law Distributive Law Identity Law 5,280 feet = 1 mile the second 4 elements? the third 4 elements? Theory of Evolution? Uniformitarianism? Catastrophism? Good Science? Natural Selection? do the Heavens declare? Commutative Law

P

ENGLISH GRAMMAR

to be to do to rise to lay to lie to raise to set to sit to beat to break to write to go to shake Subject Predicate

Past Participle

Verb: Principal Parts

E L

Appendix177

Phrase / Clause Independent Clause Subordinate Clause Sentence Structures Sentence Patterns

Proof Sheet

Director

Director

Director

Parent

Parent

Parent

Week

Other

Other

Other

Tutor

Tutor

Tutor

Tell Me About... Columbus Pilgrims Boston Tea Party Declaration of Independence George Washington purchase of Louisiana War of 1812 Henry Clay Compromise of 1850 Polk

TIME LINE CARDS

HISTORY

Alfred the Great

GEOGRAPHY

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

General Robert E. Lee 14th Amendment

Gutenberg Prints the Bible John Calvin and... Pilgrims build... Parliament acts...

L AT I N

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Creation Minoan Culture Famine in Egypt The Exodus Davidic Kingdom Prophets of God Architectural Advances Crucifixion, Resurrection Barbarian Invasion...

ME, NH, MA, RI, CT VT, NY, NJ, PA, DE MD, VA, WV, NC, SC GA, FL, AL, MS, LA MI, OH, IN, KY, TN WI, IL, IA, MO, AK

MN, ND, SD, WY, NE KS, OK, TX, CO, NM UT, ZA, NV, CA, HI MT, ID, WA, OR, AL Appalachian Mtns. (New England fea.) Appalachian Mtns. (Southern fea.)

178Appendix

M A S

Abraham Lincoln The Magna Carta tycoons like Vanderbilt Theodore Roosevelt immigrants coming to America President Wilson Pearl Harbor NATO The Constitutional Convention War with Mexico Bays The Monroe Doctrine Reconstructing the South Wright Brothers Trails Brown v. Board of Ed. U.S. astronauts Canals September 11, 2001 Preamble to the U.S. Constitution Bill of Rights US PRESIDENTS Wash-Ty US PRESIDENTS PolkGar US PRESIDENTS Ar-Coo US PRESIDENTS HooObama Deserts

Western Mountains Great Lakes

Northwest Mountains

Rivers (East)

P

E L

Prepositions Conjunctions Pronouns Verbs Verbs Nouns Nouns Nouns Rules: Verbs Rules: Articles Rules: Nouns/Pronouns In the beginning... and the word... This was with... All things were... and without Him In Him was life... and the light... and the darkness there was a man whose name was This man came for to bear witness that all men...

Director

Director

Director

Rivers (West)

Territories and Terrains

Prominent Features More Prominent Features

CYCLE 3

Director

Parent

Parent

Parent

Parent

Week

Other

Other

Other

Other

Tutor

Tutor

Tutor

Tutor

M A S

P

E L

Map Keys

Appendix Maps179

180Appendix Maps

M A S

P

E L

Northwest Territories

Baffin Bay Great Bear Lake Great Slave Lake Hudson Bay

Quebec Ontario

Labrador Sea

Nova Scotia

New England Middle Colonies Southern Colonies

Gulf of Mexico

New Brunswick

M A S

Yucatan Peninsula

Atlantic Ocean

Venezuela

Guyana Surinam Suriname

Pacific Ocean

Columbia

French Guiana

Brazil

Ecuador

Peru

Bolivia

Paraguay

Uruguay

Chili

Argentina

Maya Civilization Olmec Civilization Aztec Civilization

P

Arabian Sea

Great Indian Desert Ganges River

Himalayas

Huang He River

(Yellow)

Bay of Bengal

E L

Mongolia

AnYang x

Korea

Japan

Sea of Japan

China

x

Yellow Sea

Chang Jiang River

(Long)

Mt. Fuji Kyoto

x

Tokyo

Pacific Ocean

Indian Ocean

Lake Texcoco

Gulf of Mexico Chichen Itza Mayapan

x

x x

x

Mexico City

Oaxaca

World Map: Asia and the Americas

Cycle 1

Foundations

Foundations Program ©2007 Classical Conversations Inc.

Appendix Maps181

USA States and Capitals -- Cycle 3 -- Key

©2009 Classical Conversations Foundations

M A S

P

E L

Appendix Maps189

Puget Sound Olympic Rain Forest

Mt. Rainier Mt. St. Helens

PLATEAU TRIBES

M

ive issouri R r

St

.L

Cascade Mountains

Trail

Black Hills

h & Erie C Wabas a

San Francisco Bay

ifo Cal

rn i

ra a T il

Great Salt Lake GREAT BASIN TRIBES

PLAINS TRIBES

M

PACIFIC OCEAN

190Appendix Maps

M A S

Death Valley

d Ol

do ra olo C

R.

Sierra Nevadas Mt. Whitney

orm on T rai l

an

a Fe Trail Sant

o Ohi

Sp

Ri

is

h Trail

Mt. Ebert

Pikes Peak

Misso

River

Mohave Desert

Grand Canyon

Colorado Desert

Painted Desert

Ri ve r

Ozark Highlands

Sonora Desert

Gila

Trail

SOUTHWEST TRIBES

Re d

River

CALIFORNIA TRIBES

Ri o

P

La ke

Lake Michigan

Miami &

l na

Lake

Superior

Green Mountains

Adirondack Mountains

wr ence

©2009 Classical Conversations Foundations

a

EASTERN Falls WOODLANDS ie TRIBES Er e (Northeast) Pennsylvania ak

rio Onta al Erie Can Niagara

L.

Pennsylvania Canal

L

& Ohio Canal

Alleghany Mountains

berland Cum

ve

r

Ohi

E Road& o

ri e

Chesapeake & Ohio Canal

River

NORTHWEST COAST TRIBES

USA Physical Features -- Cycle 3 -- Key

Mammoth Caves

of

Tea r

Cumberland Mountains

s

E L

Hudson Bay White Mountains ATLANTIC OCEAN Blue Ridge Mountains Chesapeake Bay Appalachian Valleys Ridge Valley Great Valley Pamlico Sound Mt. Mitchell Okefenokee Swamp

ron Hu

O

on reg

M

ip iss iss

r ive pi R

as dre An San

Erie

i ur

lt Fau

ka Ar

ns a

il Tra

s

Great Smoky Mountains

Mis

siss ippi River

G

EASTERN WOODLANDS TRIBES (Southeast)

National Forest Swamp Desert River Canal Historic Trail

Everglades Swamp

nd e ra

ve

Ri

r

Idi

SUBARCTIC TRIBES

Mississippi Delta GULF OF MEXICO

od tar

ARCTIC TRIBES

ail

Tr

Mt. McKinley

Bering Sea

Gulf of Alaska

NORTHWEST COAST TRIBES

Information

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