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Conflict Management

Facilitator Guide

Facilitator Guide Legend:

Presentation = Blue text = offers some suggestions of what you can say to the group (explanation, presentation, etc.) Green text = indicates possible presentation text also found in the participant workbook.

PowerPoint Slide =

PowerPoint PowerPoint Slide Slide

Flipchart Activity =

Group Activity =

Role Play/ Skills Practice =

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Agenda

Participant Workbook Page # Facilitator Guide Page #

TIME Required

CONTENT

30 10 30 15 5 60 10 30 20 30 60 30 45

Welcome and Workshop Opening Icebreaker Introductions & Expectations Workshop Objectives What is Conflict? Diagnosing Patterns of Conflict/ Sources Sources of Conflict Check-up Conflict Management Styles Conflict Styles Worksheet Conflict Case Studies Confrontative and Collaborative Techniques Tips for Communicating Non-Defensively including video program Win-Win Negotiation -- What is It? Challenging Conflicts Worksheet Roleplays Workshop Ending Summary Evaluations

1-2 3 4 5-7 8 9 10-13 14-16 17 18-20 20-23 24-29 30 32 33

1 2 3-4 5 6-13 14 17 18-19 20 21-22 23

375 minutes

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1

Welcome and Workshop Opening

Conflict Management Conflict Management

1

1

Welcome

Welcome participants to the workshop and introduce the facilitator(s).

Introduce yourself to the class. Ask participants to form groups of three and do very quick introductions in the triad in less than 3 minutes. Tell the whole class that we'll get to know the entire group during our opening activity.

Icebreaker Activity

Preparation: This opening activity can be adapted to your meeting room and whatever items you have room to play with. · If you have a large classroom, group up to 15 chairs (chair stacks work well for this) up in the front of the room. If your room is tight, you can use stacks of books, cardboard boxes, colored blocks, or even paper cups. · Mark two open areas of the room with a large 1 and 2. · Create three sets of instructions in envelopes and distribute randomly among the triads.

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3

What is Conflict?

Workbook Page 2

Brainstorm in Table Groups

Give flipcharts sheets to each table group. Ask the table groups to brainstorm for 7-10 minutes to answer two Brainstorm: Brainstorm: questions. Someone should volunteer to What is Conflict? What is Conflict? record and report out:

1. What is your definition of conflict? 1. What is your definition of conflict?

1. What is your definition of conflict?

2. What triggers conflict for you? 2. What triggers conflict for you?

2. What triggers conflict for you?

3 3

Ask a couple of table groups to share their lists. If time is short, not every table needs to report out both questions.

Debrief and Define

Our workshop definition of Conflict is: Conflict is a situation where the concerns or interests of two or more parties appear to be incompatible. Conflict occurs when a person experiences a threat to their sense of self worth.

Conflict Definitions Conflict Definitions

·· Conflict is a situation where the concerns or Conflict is a situation where the concerns or interests of two or more parties appear to interests of two or more parties appear to be incompatible. be incompatible.

·· Conflict occurs when a person experiences Conflict occurs when a person experiences a threat to their sense of self worth. a threat to their sense of self worth.

4 4

This definition might seem very simple, and it is the most basic definition we have that will encompass most of the ways you have defined conflict.

NOTE: Check the group flipcharts -- are most of their definitions more negative than positive? If so, ask the group:

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5

Sources of Conflict -- Check-up

Workbook Page 4-5

PRESENT

Use the scenarios on Page 5 to see how well participants understand the idea of "Sources of Conflict". Quickly read each scenario out to the large group and let participants offer sources in each scenario. Some may have multiple sources, so expect discussion if you give them the "best answer." Better answers in each scenario might be: 1. Style is the source. (If participants have taken the MBTI, Gladys may be a J and Jim is likely a P). 2. Values, self perception, goals are all possible answers 3. Values (the boss might be "old school" and may think women have to stay close to home or need permission from a spouse to travel.) 4. Opinions, Organizational factors, self perception, goals 5. Goals, style, personality 6. Organizational factors

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7

Conflict Styles Worksheet

Workbook Page 14-16

Recognizing Styles: Conflict Styles Worksheet

This is a good worksheet to use for a "check-up" to make sure participants really understand the five conflict management styles. You can do this as an individual activity or assign a case to a table group. The relative rank isn't as important as participants recognizing the conflict style. Ask for volunteers to explain their logic when assigning a "1" to a particular style. Others may disagree and this open discussion actually drives home the point that there is not one best conflict management style -- it is really situational. Not all of the alternatives fit cleanly into one of the 5 styles. For example, getting your boss to do the dirty work for you to avoid confrontation can be both avoiding and dominating since your goal is to have your boss side with you. Use the model and slide your finger along each axis to get participants to see that it is fluid. And, the goal isn't to label 100% correctly, but to generate a discussion about the implications of each one of the choices. Ask participants to decide which would have the best chance of success and under what conditions. Key for the cases:

CASE 1 You have noticed a pattern developing in that Sam, an employee from another department, regularly stops in your department to chat with one of your employees, Terry. Unfortunately, Terry's work is often late being done, and others are beginning to resent the amount of time these conversations take up. If you were Marge, you would: Dominate _____ A. Talk to Terry and tell her to limit her conversations during on-the job time.

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2. Did any of the teams withhold information from the other team? 3. When did you realize that your team had different uses for the Rugose Orange? Did the other team openly share the interests they had in the oranges? (skin vs. juice?) 4. What lessons did we learn about negotiation?

PRESENT

If we are trying to create a Win-Win when we negotiate with others, it requires collaboration. Many years ago, a great little book called "Getting to Yes" set out some basic principles for using Win-Win or principled negotiation. If we can adhere to these basic principles when we negotiate a conflict with others, we have a much better chance of a resolution that benefits us as well as others.

Creating a ""Win-Win"" Win- Win" Creating a Win-- Win" Win Win

Principled Negotiation Principled Negotiation

·· Separate the people from the problem Separate the people from the problem ·· Focus on interests, not positions Focus on interests, not positions ·· Explore and create options Explore and create options ·· Apply fair criteria Apply fair criteria ·· Build relationships separate from substance Build relationships separate from substance

12 12

Here are the basic principles:

It is principled negotiation -- neither hard nor soft but collaborative. We aren't playing hard ball but we also aren't giving away the store. That's the basis of principled negotiation -- collaboration. It separates the people from the problem.

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