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Hutchinson Community College and Area Vocational School

Systems Portfolio June 2010

Expanding the tradition of excellence through learning and collaboration

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Overview Helping Students Learn Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives Understanding Students` and Other Stakeholders` Needs Valuing People Leading and Communicating Supporting Institutional Operations Measuring Effectiveness Planning Continuous Improvement Building Collaborative Relationships Index to PEAQ Criteria

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Hutchinson Community College

OVERVIEW

June 2010

Hutchinson Community College`s mission is to expand the tradition of excellence through learning and collaboration. The college values ACCESS achieved through low tuition costs, state-of-the art facilities and virtual learning options; LEARNING for faculty, staff and students at all levels of preparedness; and COLLABORATION in which the college is a responsive and agile participant in a broad variety of relationships including active advisory committees and business and industry partnerships. HCC`s vision is to be the premier two-year educational institution in Kansas delivering accessible opportunities for learning, growth and improved quality of life. HCC offers a broad range of academic opportunities including pre-baccalaureate studies, career preparation, and short-term training programs that address workforce needs. In the 2008-2009 year more than 8,800 persons enrolled for credit classes; another 7,500 participated in noncredit instruction, primarily workforce training and retraining. Thirty-two technical programs allied health, trades and computer-supported curricula - prepare students for entry-level positions. In the last three years HCC has awarded an annual average of 600 Associate degrees and 90 one-year Certificates. The College was established in 1928 by referendum to serve as a postsecondary extension of the Hutchinson Public Schools. Following the passage of the 1965 Higher Education Act, the college became one of 16 public community colleges in Kansas with that number growing to 19 by 1969. Through the years HCC has grown and diversified into a comprehensive two-year public postsecondary institution capable of addressing the post-secondary education needs of the entire region. HCC`s student body is considerably younger than the students at community colleges of similar size (CCSSE Data 2006 - 50% of HCC students are 18-21 years old; 40% of students at cohort colleges are in this age range.) In 1992 the college absorbed the skilled trades programs of the Central KS Area Vocational School. This merger strengthened the college`s presence in the communities of McPherson (Practical Nursing program), Newton (instruction in Building Trades, Welding, and Machining) and in Hutchinson (Machining, Auto Collision Repair, Auto Mechanics, and Building Trades). Secondary and postsecondary students attend class together in high school locations in the latter two communities. The result has created improved efficiencies in instruction and provides a seamless transition for students to complete an Associate of Applied Science degree. The main campus, located at 1300 North Plum in Hutchinson, Reno County, has eight classroom / administrative buildings. Nearby are Davis Hall, a multi-story classroom building and residence halls for 400 students. Fire training grounds, farm ground, greenhouse facility and classroom buildings are located south of Hutchinson on the site of a former military base. Leased facilities throughout the college`s state-designated service area - Reno, McPherson, Harvey, and part of Rice County - house administrative and classroom facilities. The service area (outlined on the accompanying map) has a population of approximately 135,000 residents. HCC is the only public postsecondary institution within a 50-mile radius of Hutchinson.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

A seven-member board, elected by the county voters, governs the college. Reno County is the taxing base for the college, providing approximately 46% of our public budget. HCC and all public community and technical colleges are coordinated by the Kansas Board of Regents.

1.

What are your goals for student learning and shaping an academic climate? What are your key credit and non-credit instructional programs, and educational systems, services, and technologies that directly support them?

The college`s goals for student learning are academic success and the ability to assess the attainment of student learning. Our institution-wide student learning outcomes were developed in a collaborative process lead by the Dean of Instruction in 2002. All credit courses identify which of the four learning outcomes are addressed in course content and assessment activities. HCC`s desired outcomes for students who complete a degree or certificate are

I.

II. III. IV.

Demonstrate the ability to think critically and make reasonable judgments by acquiring, analyzing, combining, and evaluating quantitative and non-quantitative information. Demonstrate the skills necessary to access and manipulate information through various technological and traditional means. Demonstrate effective communication through writing and speaking. Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills.

The college`s goals for shaping an academic climate focus on learning, program improvement and expansion, and being responsive to identified needs. The Dean of Instruction has led HCC in the cultivation of a learning college` environment. Professional learning is provided for all faculty at the beginning of each semester. Understanding and engaging students has been a primary focus in recent years. As need is identified, resources are made available for faculty to participate in discipline-specific development to gain knowledge and effective facilitation skills in the classroom. Administrative and support staff are expected to annually complete 20 clock hours of learning applicable to their work.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Evaluation is used as a learning tool. Faculty evaluation is conducted in accordance with the schedule outlined in the Master Agreement. New faculty members are evaluated each semester for three years and tenured faculty are evaluated on a three-year rotation. Annually, all other fulltime employees are provided feedback about their performance in a formal evaluation conducted by their supervisor. The CCSSE and Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey (each administered biennially) provide feedback concerning student experiences at HCC and enable institutional leaders to learn what is important to students and their level of satisfaction. The college values revision and expansion of curricular offerings to meet current and projected needs. A formalized process for reviewing each academic area has been established. Faculty responsible for a program (academic or technical) report the program`s level of activity, and challenges and opportunities for growth. Triennially, program faculty members present their findings to the President, Dean of Instruction, and Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment. This setting allows for informal discussion of the program`s successes and future needs. Selected faculty members participate in reviews with colleagues from across the state to compare learning outcomes in general education courses and selected technical programs. These efforts are initiated by the Chief Academic Officers and the Kansas Board of Regents. Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs are created and/or improved in response to needs identified in the workplace. In recent years program expansion has occurred in the Associate Degree and Licensed Practical Nursing programs in response to the projected nursing shortage. Each program now has an on-line component to increase student access. Programs have been developed to prepare students for careers as Pharmacy Technicians and Physical Therapist Assistants in response to industry demand. Hutchinson Community College and Area Vocational School offers three Associate degrees: Associate in Arts ­ freshmen/sophomore level coursework in preparation for transfer to a four-year institution Associate in Science ­ meeting the requirements of the Kansas Public Community College Kansas Regents Transfer and Articulation Guide guaranteeing students who successfully complete this degree will transfer to any Kansas Regents institution with junior standing Associate in Applied Science ­ two-year programs of study preparing students for entry level work in a technical field In addition, HCC offers coursework for Certificates in career and technical education (generally one-year courses of study) Business training and retraining Continuing education in various professions

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

Adult Basic Education/GED completion Personal enrichment (non-credit and credit courses)

June 2010

All credit hour coursework is the responsibility of the eight academic departments. The Business and Industry Institute offers short-term, customized training to area companies for credit or non-credit, depending upon the company`s preference. HCC offers a limited schedule of non-credit, personal enrichment coursework. Transfer coursework is offered at the freshmen and sophomore level. Department chairpersons intentionally maintain relationships with colleagues at the four-year degree-granting institutions in Kansas to assure HCC course content meets expectations at the receiving schools. Approximately, 40% of all credit hour instruction is prerequisite or required courses in one or two-year career and technical education programs. These programs of study are listed below. The college also grants certificates to students in the technical areas printed in italics. Certificate curricula are comprised of the core courses; the degree curriculum incorporates a broader array of coursework including general education. Advisory committee input ­ each CTE program has an advisory committee that meets twice yearly - enables programs to be responsive to current workforce needs. Career and Technical Education Programs Agricultural Diesel Mechanics Auto Collision Repair Auto Mechanics Banking Building Trades Technology Business Administrative Technology Business Management/Entrepreneurship Chemical Technology Computer Drafting Computer Support Specialist Criminal Justice Early Childhood Education Electronic Engineering Technology Emergency Medical Services Farm and Ranch Management Fire Science Health Information Technology Machine Technology Manufacturing Engineering Technology Nursing ­ Associate Degree Paralegal Paramedic Pharmacy Technician* Physical Therapist Assistant Practical Nursing* Radiology Surgical Technology* Telecommunications Visual Communications Welding Technology

*Certificate only, no degree, is awarded

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Our primary course delivery method continues to be face-to-face in classrooms and lab settings. To date, HCC has been able to meet student demand for additional course sections (both faceto-face and on-line) as enrollment has increased. In this decade the growth of on-line courses has increased tremendously. Only 1.8% of all credit hour courses were offered online in 2001. In the Fall 2009 semester, 29% of all coursework was offered via the world wide web, serving 44% of our student body. (Many students enroll in both online and face-to-face classes.) Classroom-based instruction is web-supported as well. Faculty may electronically post syllabi, assignments, and supplementary materials. Students can access their coursework, tuition accounts, and academic records via the DragonZone portal. HCC`s on-line course development is completed by college faculty who also teach face-to-face classes. On-line course development is supported by instructional designers in the Instructional Technology /Distance Education Department. Students have access to technology when using academic support services. The Rimmer Learning Resource Center is open 90 hours per week during the academic year and houses 81 computing workstations for student use. The college`s Information Technology Services Department maintains 44 student computer labs (collectively housing more than 600 workstations) located throughout the campus and at outreach sites. HCC has programs for academic tutoring, decentralized advising, student orientation and supplemental instruction. 2. What key organizational services, other than instructional programs, do you provide for your students and other external stakeholders? What programs do you operate to achieve them?

The college Vision Statement addresses the institutional commitment to provide opportunities for learning, growth and improved quality of life. Four areas of service enable HCC to serve varying constituencies: Athletics, Community Service, Fundraising and Service to Business. Student athletes participate in twelve intercollegiate sports (six men`s, six women`s) within the Kansas Jayhawk Community College Conference. Our athletic program enables approximately 250 student athletes to compete at the collegiate level (almost all of whom are on athletic scholarship) and fosters community involvement. The National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) National Division I men`s basketball tournament is played each March in the Hutchinson Sports Arena, a large facility owned by the city and maintained by the college. The college sponsors community service programs to address community needs and provides enriching cultural activities for the community at large. The Volunteer Center matches volunteers with non-profit entities to expand their capacity to meet community need. In program year 2009, 828 volunteers contributed over 90,800 hours to 103 non-profit and governmental organizations in Reno County. KHCC, the college`s public radio station, was established in 1979. With the addition of KHCDFM in 1988 and KHCT-FM in 1992 the network`s name changed to Radio Kansas. The station serves approximately one million listeners across the central one-third of Kansas with classical music and nationally-produced public radio programming.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

The Dillon Lecture Series was created in 1981 to honor community leaders Ray and Stella Dillon and provide out-of-classroom educational experiences for youth and the community. Speakers of national prominence address issues in the arts, politics, science, and sports. Three or four speakers are scheduled each year and have included Maya Angelou, Olympia Dukakis, Lech Walesa, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Robert Ballard, Mario Andretti, Whitey Herzog, F. Lee Bailey, and Doris Kearns Goodwin. Fundraising enables community members and alumni to aid current and prospective students and to support capital campaigns that increase our capacity for quality learning environments. The President leads an ongoing campaign to fund construction projects. In the last ten years the college has renovated or expanded the student union, the library, and three classroom/lab buildings. The HCC Endowment Association fundraises and awards academic scholarships to current and prospective students. HCC has established or partnered to create programs that provide services to business. The Business and Industry Institute (B & I) is a rapid response entity, providing training and consultation for business and industry, primarily within the college service area. The institute uses expertise from the college to serve clients and coordinates customized training as requested. On a limited basis, B & I provides training throughout the state. The Workforce Development Center (WDC) operates under a contract with the Local Area 1 Workforce Investment Board to oversee One-Stop and Workforce Investment Act activities in sixty-two western Kansas counties. The center distributes Workforce Investment Act (WIA) funding to aid job seekers in gaining skills needed for employment and matches applicants with existing job openings. The WDC administers the Kansas WorkReady Certificate and provides other job seeker and employer services. 3. What are the short- and long-term requirements and expectations of the current student and other key stakeholder groups you serve? Who are your primary competitors in serving these groups?

Hutchinson Community College has identified the following student and stakeholder groups and determined their general needs and expectations. These were determined through formal surveying, an external marketing study, student focus groups, input from advisory committees, and in-house discussions among faculty and staff.

All Students Prospective Students Traditional (ages 16-24) Non-traditional (25+) Current Students Full-time (12+ credit hours) Part-time (1-11 credit hours) Short- and - Long Term Requirements/Expectations Accurate and timely communication in multiple modes ­ on-line, print, face to face, phone Campus atmosphere of welcome and interest Accessible opportunities for learning, growth and improved quality of life Scholarship and financial aid assistance Course schedule compatible with life style Appropriate learning environments Accurate advising Co-curricular and intercollegiate activities

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

First-year Returning Assistance to achieve academic and career success Transfer coursework accepted at receiving institutions

June 2010

Course offerings that lead to certificate, diploma, other recognized endorsement for immediate employment, or skill upgrade Safe campus environment Auxiliary services provided in a timely manner Fair and equitable treatment in administration of college policies (e.g., academic appeal)

Targeted student groups have specific requirements and expectations as well.

Selected Student Groups Honors Developmental Transfer General / Undecided Majors Requirements / Expectations Challenging coursework that is engaging Transferability to four-year institutions Assessment into appropriate level of instruction Coursework preparation for college-level classes Contacts with four-year institution personnel Transferable coursework Career exploration opportunities Accurate advising Broad curriculum choices Currency in curricula Labs that simulate workplace Assistance with job placement Opportunities to participate in sports Supportive coaching staff Access to four-year institutions` sports programs Academic and athletic skill development Assistance with appropriate accommodations Access to library, tutoring, advising services and prompt communication with faculty

Career / Technical Education

Student Athletes

Students with Documented Disabilities Students in On-line Courses

The expectations of HCC`s external stakeholders are listed below.

External Stakeholders Parents Short- and Long-Term Requirements/Expectations Relevant, quality education Safe environment Affordability Employers Alumni Well-trained entry-level employees Accessible, low-cost training for incumbent workers Life-long learning opportunities Opportunities to support college programs Maintenance /accessibility to academic records Community Members / Taxpayers Cost-effective, quality education Responsiveness to community needs Identification with college, e.g., athletic and fine arts events and interaction with students and staff

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

Legislators Quality education Well-educated workforce Responsible fiscal management Responsiveness to community/state needs

June 2010

Hutchinson Community College aggressively recruits students for transfer and for career education. There are many opportunities for education in Kansas. In addition to a host of proprietary organizations, the state supports 19 public two-year colleges, six technical colleges, six universities and a municipal university. Military recruitment and the job market (though lessened at this time due to general economic conditions) also vie for students who are the target market for HCC. 4. What are your administrative, faculty, and staff human resources? What key factors determine how you organize and use them?

All Hutchinson Community College personnel are categorized as either faculty, administrative or hourly. The college employs 114 fulltime, tenured-track faculty and 200 to 250 part-time faculty each semester as demand for coursework dictates. Eighty administrative staff support a variety of program areas: community services, student services, academic support, athletics, and the administrative functions of the college (e.g., physical plant, business office). Approximately 180 hourly staff (primarily maintenance and clerical) support the academic and administrative functions of the college. Personnel are organized by major function area, each headed by a Dean or the President. (Organizational Chart in Category 5). The Dean of Instruction is responsible for all teaching and learning functions, the Dean of Finance & Operations is responsible for administrative functions that support both students and staff needs, the Dean of Student Services is responsible for support services to students, and the Dean of Workforce Development/Outreach is responsible for business and industry training and coursework that is offered off-campus. The President directly supervises offices that serve the entire campus (e.g., Human Resources, Institutional Research, Special Projects). Clerical personnel are located in most work units to support administrative and teaching staff. The physical location of classrooms and labs partially dictate where faculty and support personnel are housed. Generally, faculty offices are located near their general teaching area, e.g., fire science and agriculture personnel are housed at South Campus, a rural facility that provides space for large instructional labs and outdoor firefighting simulation. Clerical and maintenance staff are assigned to each building. When possible, a single clerical person may support faculty from several academic departments who are co-located. Information Technology technicians are assigned to support specific academic and administrative offices and computer labs. The growth of on-line enrollment has led the college to employ an increasingly larger number of part-time faculty. Personnel who live within driving distance are provided shared office space.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Many part-time on-line instructors come to campus only for specific meetings or professional development and have no need for office space. 5. What strategies align your leadership, decision-making, and communication processes with your mission and values, the policies and requirements of your oversight entities, and your legal, ethical, and social responsibilities?

HCC employs multiple leadership and communication strategies to fulfill its mission, vision and values. So students may access postsecondary education at an affordable cost, the President actively participates in the Kansas Legislative and postsecondary governance processes. He testifies before committees as requested and collaborates with the Community College Council of Presidents to assure continued public funding. HCC`s senior leadership, in collaboration with the Board of Trustees, assures resources are sufficient to meet operating costs and payroll, to support construction and renovation expenses, and the expansion of on-line and face-to-face coursework and programming for the benefit of students and area residents. In order to maintain currency in learning, program areas are reviewed jointly by the President, Dean of Instruction, Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment and appropriate faculty every three years. This periodic review of all program areas (both technical and transfer) enables HCC to maintain currency in course offerings for the benefit of students who are preparing for careers or for transfer. Professional learning is offered to all faculty members and student services personnel at the beginning of each semester. Administrative and hourly staff are provided time away from job responsibilities to complete 20 clock hours of professional development annually. Funds are also made available for staff to enroll in six hours of credit coursework each semester. HCC personnel collaborate with high school, postsecondary and business partners. Annually, articulation agreements are updated with area high schools. Each year, department chairpersons and senior administrators visit one of Kansas` public four-year institutions. Personnel build professional relationships with host school colleagues for the benefit of HCC students transferring to four-year Kansas colleges. Industry representatives serving on CTE advisory committees collaborate with program personnel to improve course offerings and student learning. Communication at HCC is enhanced by participation in the college`s committee structure. Four institution-wide committees ­ Teaching and Learning, Professional Development and Training, Regulatory Compliance/Due Process, and Institutional Effectiveness - provide an effective process for stakeholder input from all areas of the college community and is the primary strategy used to create or revise procedures that affect multiple work areas and to draft policies for recommendation to the Board of Trustees. Committee meeting minutes are maintained on the college`s intranet site, Webservices, to enhance communication across the institution. The president prepares a state of the college` address at each semester`s inservice, an all-employee Convocation is held each spring, and the President sends a weekly email communication entitled First Monday to inform staff of current

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

issues and upcoming events and to recognize staff accomplishments. The president hosts multiple breakfast meetings, inviting all faculty and staff on a rotating basis during the academic year. In these small group settings, informal conversation and the exchange of ideas takes place. Formal assessment of the college environment is gathered on a biennial basis through the administration of the PACE (Personal Assessment of the College Environment) survey to all faculty and staff. All Board of Trustee meetings are open to the public. Their agenda and supporting materials are distributed electronically to all staff prior to the scheduled monthly meeting. Each meeting`s agenda provides two opportunities for faculty, staff, or public input. Hutchinson Community College has maintained continuous institutional accreditation since the early 1960`s. All seven Allied Health programs are accredited by their discipline`s accrediting body. Annually, the institution is granted an unqualified audit by an external accounting firm. Each spring a randomized sample of classes, both face to face and on-line, are surveyed using the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey or the Community College Survey of Student Engagement. Both student and staff survey results are shared formally in Administrative Council and then examined more closely by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee to determine possible areas for improvement. The college is an equal opportunity employer. The Affirmative Action Officer is responsible for institutional compliance with Title VII, Title IX, and the Americans with Disability Act regulations. An Accommodations Coordinator works with students and faculty to provide appropriate accommodations for student learning. 6. What strategies align your key administrative support goals with your mission and values? What services, facilities, and equipment do you provide to achieve them?

HCC`s administrative support goals are threefold: accessible facilities and information to support recruitment and learning; academic, personal and financial support for students; and collaborations for the benefit of learning. College facilities are well maintained by physical plant staff and meet ADA and Fire Marshall requirements. In 2008 and 2010 the outreach facilities in the communities of Newton and McPherson (respectively) were upgraded to consolidate most classroom and all administrative services in single locations. In the last twelve years, the college`s Student Union, Science Hall, Advanced Technology Center, Welding Center, and Industrial Technology Center have been renovated to improve learning and office environments. Institutional information (student, fiscal, administrative) is maintained electronically and is accessible to staff and faculty via passwordprotected systems. Students may access their personal information via DragonZone, HCC`s on-line portal that provides students` personal financial, course, textbook and grade information; the course add/drop procedure; on-line and web-supported course content; campus email; and student-controlled parent/guardian access rights.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Student services programs offer career advising and academic and personal counseling. HCC employs a decentralized advising system; 74 of our 130 faculty members who have fulltime or adjunct status are academic advisors. Advisors initially complete eight hours of training and two additional hours annually to assure quality and accurate service. The college`s financial aid and endowment offices help students fund their education. The department of Academic Support coordinates campus-wide tutoring services, library services, and supplemental instruction. Hutchinson Community College is intentional to participate in collaborations that benefit learning. The Business and Industry Institute creates and maintains relationships with entities needing a trained workforce. Each of the college`s 32 Career and Technical Education programs (listed in Overview Question #1) have an advisory committee comprised of industry representatives to advise faculty on curriculum and equipment needs to best prepare students for the workplace. The college partners with the local (Hutchinson) school district to share football and soccer facilities and with the City of Hutchinson for use of the city-owned Sports Arena for basketball and large-crowd events, including the Dillon Lecture Series. The college values and actively seeks collaborations with other educational entities: area high schools, other technical and community colleges, and Kansas four-year institutions. Our newest partnership will begin in Fall 2010 when the college`s Practical Nursing program will offer instruction in Salina (a community of similar size to Hutchinson located approximately one hour north). HCC was invited to collaborate with the Salina Area Technical College when community need for this level of nursing education was identified. The HCC program was selected because of its history of licensure pass rates and reputation for student success. 7. What determines the data and information you collect and distribute? What information resources and technologies govern how you manage and use data?

Multiple entities and processes, both internal and external, help the college define what data and information are collected and distributed. The college must be accountable to state and federal agencies to prove students are enrolled in credit hour coursework for which reimbursement is claimed. External state and federal organizations and their need for studentrelated information are listed below.

External Public Organizations Kansas Board of Regents KS Postsecondary Database (KSPSD) Federal Financial Aid (Dept. of Ed.) Integrated Postsecondary Educational Data System (IPEDS) Student Support Services (TRIO program ­ Dept. of Ed ) Other Grant Funders and Stakeholders Purpose or mandate State aid reimbursement/public accountability Accounting of students` demographic information and academic progress Financial aid distribution Institutional information available to the public Proof of student activity and academic progress and services provided Institutional accountability and evidence of appropriate expenditures

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

College-related data validates the work of the college, both academic and administratively. Student data defines each person`s existence, maintains their demographic and contact information, and serves as the official record of their learning so the college can determine the appropriate awarding of credits, certificates and degrees. Employee-related information is maintained similarly. To assure data are secure, all personal information is password-protected. In many institutions of higher education, proprietary software and hardware capabilities dictate office processes for securing, storing, and manipulating data. At HCC, information systems are engineered to meet office processes and information demands; process drives information technology rather than technology driving process. This approach requires programming time by a knowledgeable and willing staff and enables HCC to collect, sort and manipulate data at a level not possible at other institutions. Specific data collection and distribution is also determined by the desires of multiple stakeholder groups. Internal stakeholders need specific information maintained in order to serve selected populations ­ contact information for advisory committee membership, area companies desiring workforce training, and prospective student and donor files, to name a few. All data gathering systems are the responsibility of and under constant examination by Information Technology Services (ITS) personnel in collaboration with end users for the purpose of making improvements to meet the demands of college stakeholders. Individual college roles and levels of authority dictate access to information. All HCC employees can view information available to the public via the college`s public website, www.hutchcc.edu. All other collegerelated information is only accessible with usernames and passwords. Access to data is further discussed in 7P1. Centralized storage and management of college data is vital to the integrity of the college. ITS` role is to manage the information of the college (the institution`s most valuable commodity), assure information is only accessible to those who need it and have a legal right to it, and to recover data that may be temporarily lost. The use of the Rights and Roles module (software that controls data available to each college employee based upon the role of the employee) enables the college to manage data accessibility. The college seldom purchases software applications to serve a single or limited number of users; instead, HCC is migrating to web-based and web portal-only technology in which all institutional information is centralized and available via password-protected systems. Multiple software vendors have indicated that HCC is more centralized in its data storage then similar institutions. The use of college data and computing infrastructure is governed by the Information Technology Acceptable Use Policy and Addenda. This policy defines institutional data and infrastructure, its acceptable use, and outlines punitive action should inappropriate use occur.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

8. What are the key commitments, constraints, challenges, and opportunities with which you must align your organization's short- and long-term plans and strategies? The college`s commitments, constraints, challenges and opportunities are summarized below. COMMITMENTS

Strategic Initiatives ­ Access, Learning, and Collaboration Student Success Superior Advising Services Course Transferability Meeting Community and Workforce Needs State-of-the-art Technology for Employees and Student Learning State-of-the-art Learning Environments Open Door Institution Responsiveness

CONSTRAINTS

Main Campus is landlocked in established neighborhood State Funding is declining as demand for services is expanding Student level of preparation requires Developmental to Honors level instruction Reliance on local tax base

CHALLENGES

Assuring quality in all mediums of instruction Serving all levels of student preparation Providing state-of-the-art lab equipment for 32 technical programs Maintaining campus infrastructure Hiring and retaining quality CTE faculty Balancing public funding and tuition costs in order to maintain students` ability to access education Providing adequate scholarships as tuition costs increase

OPPORTUNITIES

Siemens (global conglomerate) building a manufacturing plant in Hutchinson to serve North America with wind energy equipment Reputation for meeting needs of community and industry Technical infrastructure and personnel in place for increased online enrollment Expansion of Allied Health programs Expanded outreach facilities in Newton and McPherson Articulation agreements with area high schools allow marketing of CTE programs to students Collaboration with other Kansas colleges

9. What key partnerships and collaborations, external and internal, contribute to your organization's effectiveness? Collaboration is foundational to our existence as stated in HCC`s mission Expanding the tradition of excellence through learning and collaboration. Key collaborative relationships are of three major types: governance /accreditation, business and community, and educational partners. These relationships are graphically represented on the right. Governance/Accreditation­ HCC has been continuously accredited by the Higher Learning Commission since 1963. Various programs maintain accreditation with the accrediting arm of their discipline. Our governing and accrediting stakeholders challenge us and expect us to continuously improve for the benefit of students.

Key Collaborative Relationships

Governance/Accreditation

Higher Learning Commission/AQIP Kansas Board of Regents

Specialized Accrediting Bodies

Hutchinson Community College and Area Vocational School Main Campus Newton Cent er McPherson Center Distance Learning

Busine ss and Community Advisory Committees Public/private contributors Taxpayers Employers

Educational Partners Community Colleges High Schools 4-year colleges and universities

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Business/Community ­ Each Career/Technical Education program has an active advisory committee that meets twice yearly. These committees, comprised of community members who have expertise in the discipline, HCC faculty, and college administrators, advise program personnel concerning workplace issues and offer feedback that enables programs to be current and provide the best preparation possible for our graduates. Area employers regularly host students in internship and job shadowing experiences and participate in short-term and customized training offered by HCC`s Business and Industry Institute personnel. The college shares facilities for the benefit of students. The City-owned Sports Arena is maintained by HCC personnel for sporting and other large crowd events sponsored by the college or external organizations. The college and Hutchinson school district jointly maintain and use Gowans Football Stadium and a soccer field located within the city limits. College baseball and softball games are played on city-owned park grounds. Educational Partners ­ Six public and two private school districts in Reno County are HCC`s primary feeder schools. 34% of Reno County`s 2009 high school graduates enrolled at HCC the semester following graduation. Another fourteen public school districts lie within the remaining three counties of the college`s service area. Approximately 12% of these graduates enrolled at HCC in 2009. Articulation agreements are entered into with area high schools to assure seamless articulation between secondary and postsecondary technical programs of study. HCC collaborates with the Hutchinson and Newton school districts to offer instruction of technical coursework for secondary and postsecondary students (see Overview opening narrative), and has formal agreements for the acceptance of specific technical coursework completed during high school toward Applied Science degrees. College representatives participate in various initiatives and partnerships with other Kansas higher education institutions as interest and need arises. Selected personnel attend the Kansas AQIP meetings, generally held twice each year. Senior administrators attend the Council of Presidents, Kansas Association of Community College Trustees, and Chief Academic and Business Officer meetings. Faculty and directors attend discipline-specific meetings pertinent to their position responsibilities. College personnel welcome partnerships that strengthen HCC`s mission and align with our vision. Internal collaborations are supported by our institution-wide committee structure and regularly scheduled meetings of representative of various departments including Academic Department Chairpersons with the Academic and Student Support personnel, Administrative Council (department heads and Deans), and President`s Council.

Overview

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Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY ONE Processes 1P1.

June 2010

How do you determine which common or shared objectives for learning and development you should hold for all students pursuing degrees at a particular level? Who do you involve in setting these objectives?

In 2002, the Assessment Coordinator collaborated with faculty to determine possible student learning outcomes that align with the institution mission and vision and are considered most important for students graduating from HCC with an associate degree or certificate. Once major themes were identified, the list was distributed to all faculty for input and refinement. Following this input, four institution-wide outcomes were presented to Administrative Council and the Board of Trustees for final approval. Personnel within the institution believe these outcomes are foundational and unlikely to change. However if individuals, units, or programs/transfer academic areas believe that changes need to be made in the institution-wide outcomes, their proposals would be considered through the college`s committee structure. (Discussed in Overview Question # 5 and Category 5) 1P2. How do you determine your specific program learning objectives? Whom do you involve in setting these objectives?

Program outcomes for technical programs are established by faculty who teach in those programs with input from various sources. Each program`s` advisory committee membership validates the outcomes are consistent with workplace expectations and reviews them regularly to assure currency with industry expectations. Technical program faculty collaborate with colleagues at other technical and community colleges to formulate common program outcomes under the direction of the Kansas Technical Education Authority, a Board of Regents committee charged with state-wide monitoring of technical education. Several technical programs must also consider external licensing and accreditation criteria when determining program outcomes. Faculty who instruct in general education/transfer curricula collaborate through the Kansas Core Competencies Project (a statewide collaboration of public two- and four-year institutions) to develop common competencies for selected general education courses. Professional relationships developed during Core Competencies meetings, annual bus trips to four-year institutions supervised by the Kansas Board of Regents (discussed in Overview Question #5), and consultation with other Kansas schools assure program learning objectives are consistent with those at other higher education institutions. 1P3. How do you design new programs and courses that facilitate student learning and are competitive with those offered by other organizations? The need for new program/transfer academic areas and new courses is identified by departments based on input from students, other schools, advisory committees, local businesses, and administration (discussed in 1P4). Programs/transfer academic areas and courses are designed and developed by individual instructors or department chairs with input from a faculty mentor (curriculum coach). Changes must be approved by the department in

Helping Students Learn

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which the course or program/transfer academic area will reside, the Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment, and the Dean of Instruction. The proposal then moves to the Curriculum Subcommittee for review and ratification. The Teaching and Learning Committee, Administrative Council, HCC Board of Trustees and, in the case of technical programs, KBOR, approves new offerings. If the proposed course or program /transfer academic area is not accepted at any level of the approval chain, it is referred back to the initiating department. This process is outlined in figure 1P3.

Figure 1P3

Individual or department proposes change

Proposal involves a technical program NO

YES NO Author meets with assigned Curriculum Coach to develop/revise proposal Change entered into HCC pending course and/or program inventory at KBOR YES

YES

Change entered into HCC and KBOR information systems

Department, Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment, Dean of Instruction, Curriculum Subcommittee, Teaching and Learning Committee, Administrative Council, and HCC Board of Trustees approve proposal

KBOR approves proposal

NO

1P4. How do you design responsive academic programming that balances and integrates learning goals, students' career needs, and the realities of the employment market? The impetus for course or program/transfer academic area change is primarily driven by revised expectations at four-year institutions (for transfer curricula) and changes in the workplace as identified by advisory committees and area employers (for technical curricula). Demand for courses and programs/transfer academic areas is partially based on the number of inquiries the college receives from students and enrollment in similar courses or programs/transfer academic areas at the institution and at other colleges across the state.

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In addition to its traditional face-to-face daytime offerings, the college participates in a number of education markets, including coursework offered at outreach sites, during evening hours, in the summer, through electronically-mediated instruction, in customized formats for business and industry, and through professional continuing education. If academic personnel determine on-campus programs have diminished, alternate means of delivery, such as online and evening, are pursued. HCC has received approval from the Higher Learning Commission to offer all degrees--AA, AS, and AAS--fully through distance education. Online courses are also developed in response to market issues. All courses offered online go through a rigorous development process using the HCC approved syllabi from face-to-face courses. The Instructional Designers in the Instructional Technology / Distance Education Department meet frequently with the course developer, offer suggestions, train in the necessary technology, and enable the course to go live to students. For online courses, development is a three phase process: 1. Initiation of development for an identified course 2. Design and development 3. Activation.

June 2010

1P4. When reviewing current literature on allied health careers, a co-chair of the Allied Health Department read several articles addressing the growing need for pharmacy technicians. She discussed the possibility of developing a Pharmacy Technician program with the Director of Community Services/ Special Projects and the Dean of Instruction about the possibility of developing a certificate (one-year) program. The Dean of Instruction was receptive to the idea and the Allied Health co-chair and the Director of Community Services organized a focus group. They met with Hutchinson Hospital, Walgreen's, Medicine Shoppe, and Dillon's (Kroger`s - a major grocery chain) pharmacists, who all agreed that trained pharmacy technicians were needed in the area. The Allied Health co-chair spoke with the State Association of Pharmacists, learning that pharmacy technicians can improve their employment opportunities if they are registered. She gathered information from other colleges with Pharmacy Technician programs and from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). After several meetings with area pharmacists, the Allied Health co-chair developed a curriculum. Since Kroger`s pharmacy and billing division is based in Hutchinson, the company encouraged the Allied Health co-chair to make the program available fully online so that all Kroger pharmacies could use HCC`s program to train people throughout the country.

Work in the instructional multiple learning activities to meet varying needs of students, and assuring content and learning activities target the associated assessments. To assure the quality of online courses, ITDE staff use a checklist (created in collaboration with the Academic Department Chairs) for the purposes of determining technical review and minimum quality standards for online course delivery. 1P5.

After the proposal completed the curriculum approval process outlined in figure 1P3, the college second phase, Design and Development, is based on accepted practices in hired professional staff to coordinate the program. design and includes directing learning based on identified in January 2009. The program went online outcomes, offering

How do you determine the preparation required of students for the specific curricula, programs, courses, and learning they will pursue?

The college has adopted mandatory assessment and placement for English Composition and math courses through College Algebra in an effort to provide students with the best opportunity for success in these gateway courses.

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When developmental classes were first created at HCC, enrollment was voluntary. Reviewing the success rates of students in both developmental and college-level courses and comparing those rates with the placement scores of students, it became apparent students scoring at certain levels were more likely to succeed than those scoring below those levels. Mandatory testing and placement for English composition and mathematics was instituted in 1991 and 1998 respectively. Now, multiple assessments are employed to determine placement including ACT scores, ASSET, COMPASS, ACCUPLACER, and Work Keys (for selected technical programs). Specific cutoff scores are aligned to placement in specific courses as indicated in Figures 1P5-1 and 2.

Figure 1P5-1 Mandatory English Placement Scores ACT Score 16 or below Asset Score 23-40 Compass Score 0-52 Course Placement EN098 Basic English EN099 Elements of Writing concurrently with EN100 English Composition IB EN101 English Composition IA

17-19

41-44

53-75

20 or above

45 or above

76-99

Figure 1P5-2 Mandatory Math Placement Scores ACT Score Accuplacer Score Compass Score NA NA NA 21 or above 0-24 25-56 57-74 75 or above Pre-Algebra 31-39 Pre-Algebra 40 or above Algebra 28-47 Algebra 48 or above

Course Placement MA097 Essentials of Mathematics MA098 Basic Algebra MA105 Intermediate Algebra MA106 College Algebra

The success rates of programs with selective admissions (e.g., nursing) have been compared to success in prerequisite courses, entrance exam scores, and scores on licensure examinations. This analysis further enables faculty to determine minimum standards required for program admission. 1P6. How do you communicate to current and prospective students the required preparation and learning and development objectives for specific programs, courses, and degrees or credentials? How do admissions, student support, and registration services aid in this process?

The curricular requirements for each program are made public through the online catalog http://www.hutchcc.edu/catalog. Students and employees can access learning outcomes for each course and program via the student and staff portals. Abbreviated versions of syllabi are available on the public website.

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All prospective students must complete the online application form and submit previous transcripts, placement scores and other selected credentials to complete the admission process. When Admissions Counselors communicate with prospective students, the guidelines for the programs/transfer academic areas in which the students are interested are provided to aid in decision-making. Advisors use placement scores and program requirements for academic and technical programs and courses to convey the preparation required. To better monitor students` academic progress, the Records Department has developed a degree audit system allowing advisors and students to check electronically if course, program and degree requirements have been met. As HCC moves to online enrollment, projected to be fully implemented for selected students in 2010-2011, the system will block students from enrolling in courses or programs/transfer academic areas for which they do not have the qualifications. A pop-up window will inform students why they are not able to enroll in the course or program/transfer academic area. 1P7. How do you help students select programs of study that match their needs, interests and abilities?

All students are assigned to either a program/transfer academic area advisor or a general studies advisor. HCC advisors must complete eight hours of initial training and annual refresher training to aid in the identification of students` strengths, weaknesses, interests, assessment scores and academic background. Advisors may recommend introductory courses to acquaint the student with the discipline or participation in the field ­ internship, part-time work, job shadowing. Advisors who counsel developmental, undecided, and general studies students are familiar with all of the programs offered at HCC. As the general advisor understands student needs, interests, and abilities, courses of study are suggested. Students are referred for services that may aid in the achievement of personal goals. Students who are undecided are encouraged to enroll in a Career Decision-Making course or to work with a counselor to determine their skills, interests, values and personality preferences using a variety of assessments. As of this writing, the Information Technology Services Department, in collaboration with the Directors of Advising and of Admissions and the Academic Department Chairs, is developing an Admissions Wizard (a query system) to help students select their areas of interest, review the curriculum and be assigned an appropriate advisor. This electronic service is projected to be functional in the Fall semester 2010. The Wizard is further discussed in 7R2. 1P8. How do you deal with students who are underprepared for the academic programs and courses you offer? To ensure student success, HCC mandates placement of students in math and composition classes (See 1P5). The mandatory reading policy requires students enroll in the developmental reading program during the first semester if assessment scores do not reflect the likelihood of success in courses with a heavy reading component. Some selective admissions programs require additional testing and remediation for students that appear to be at-risk of success. In 2007, the Adult Basic Education (ABE) program at HCC received a grant to help GED students

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transition into college classes. At the same time, a taskforce of the Teaching and Learning Committee reviewed placement scores and considered how the ABE program could assist the lowest scoring students to improve their performance to a level that would most likely enable them to be successful in developmental education courses. Collaboration between HCC developmental education personnel and the ABE program staff has allowed students to close deficits in their academic background prior to beginning college courses. IP9. How do you detect and address differences in students' learning styles? All first-time, full-time students are required to enroll in the Success Seminar/College Orientation course. This one-credit hour class includes a unit on learning styles. Students assess their personal style and identify strategies to improve their likelihood of success. Professional learning presentations have increased faculty awareness of students' different learning styles and provided methods to address this diversity. Instructional Designers help instructors create and apply visual, auditory, and interactive assignments in addition to traditional reading and discussion components. In 2008, ITDE piloted the electronic use of approaches to address learning styles: video conferencing, podcasts, audio comments on student work, and video clips. All HCC courses have a web-supported component so instructors may supplement information outside the classroom to reach students with diverse learning styles. Currently, over 75% of classrooms are equipped with multimedia devices. Personal Response Systems and Smart Boards are also available for faculty use to encourage more interactive learning. 1P10. How do you address the special needs of student subgroups (e.g. handicapped students, seniors, commuters)? An advisor specifically trained in disability issues is assigned to every self-identified student who has a documented disability. A minority advisor is available to address the special needs of minority students. The Student Support Services (SSS) program works with students who are members of groups at risk of success. Learning communities, Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions, Student Learning Assistance (SLA) support, and tutoring are available for students needing additional instruction. Developmental courses in mathematics, reading, and English assist under-prepared students, as discussed in 1P8. Advisor training provides information on working with persons of varying age groups and levels of preparation. Professional Learning Days in Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 focused on the characteristics and needs of students born since 1980. Two other professional learning sessions addressed the needs of students from poverty in order to sensitize faculty to cultural differences and problems faced by many students in their classrooms. Technology is available with the online platform (ANGEL) to compensate for the needs of visual or hearing impaired students. The ITDE Department emails a monthly newsletter to inform online students of college services. The ANGEL platform also allows students to communicate in formal and informal manners.

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1P11. How do you define, document, and communicate across your organization your expectations for effective teaching and learning? The two mechanisms employed to document teaching and learning are teacher evaluations and assessment of student learning. The current instructional evaluation system (adopted 2008) was an institutional Action Project and developed over a four-year period using Dr. Raoul Arreola`s model. It examines teaching, student development, service, and scholarship or professional development. Teaching is evaluated on content knowledge, course design, course delivery, assessment methods, and course management. Instructors are evaluated by students and supervisors, usually the Department Chairperson. Evaluation areas and weights for each were determined using input and feedback from faculty and students. The weights given to each role and each source of evaluation appear in Table 1P11.

Table 1P11: Evaluation of Instruction Components / Weighting Teaching - 70% Supervisor Students The Content Expertise Instructional Design Instructional Delivery Instructional Assessment Course Management Student Development - 10% Prepare Students Provide Information Determine Curricula Student Support Student Planning Service - 10% College Service Community Service Scholarship/Professional Development - 10% Personal and Professional Development Up to date in Discipline 75% 70% 80% 40% 20% 25% 30% 20% 60% 80%

Supervisor Students 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Supervisor Students 100% 100% 0% 0%

Supervisor Students 100% 100% 0% 0%

components of the student learning assessment plan (in place since 2008) are student success (percent of students receiving a grade of A, B, or C), student retention rates and assessment of specific learning outcomes. The latter is the process of faculty establishing outcomes for each course, determining common assessments for those outcomes, identifying methods to evaluate student performance on the assessment instruments that all instructors within the same discipline use, and establishing performance standards that demonstrate achievement of the outcomes. Outcomes and assessments for each course are listed in the course syllabus. Faculty are currently aligning course outcomes to program outcomes and/or institution-wide outcomes. Embedded assessment has proven to be the most efficient and cost effective method for the college to measure student learning.

1P12. How do you build an effective and efficient course delivery system that addresses both students' needs and your organization's requirements? Department Chairs, the Virtual Learning Coordinator, and Outreach Coordinators review past course demand and consider current market influences to build a schedule of courses. Additional face-to-face and online sections of filled courses are placed on the schedule as qualified faculty and necessary resources (classroom/laboratory, instructional materials) are

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available. Occasionally Course by Arrangement enrollment is allowed if a very small number of students require a specific course to complete a program of study. Courses of various lengths are offered weekdays, evenings, weekends and during summer months to meet students` diverse schedules. Traditional fifteen-week courses are most frequently offered. The length of a few courses may vary from a single day to two semesters. Electronically-mediated instruction is offered through the internet (online), interactive television (ITV), and video. Online courses are offered on staggered start dates approximately every two weeks. Interterm sessions are offered following each fall and spring semester. To meet the needs of students across the state, HCC has developed a collaborative relationship with other Kansas community colleges and nine area high schools to offer low-enrolled courses through ITV. HCC provides online coursework for students planning to complete their degrees through virtual colleges at Fort Hays State University, Kansas State University, Emporia State University, and Pittsburg State University. Students complete lower level courses through HCC and meet baccalaureate degree requirements of the regents university. Chapter Nine further discusses collaborative partnerships with postsecondary institutions. 1P13. How do you ensure your programs and courses are up-to-date and effective? Advisory committee members for each technical program meet at least twice annually to provide input into program design and required resources. HCC faculty participate in the Kansas Core Competencies Project and the state technical program alignment project. When university expectations change, the college examines the content of its courses to maintain transferability. HCC employs a program review process to examine the effectiveness of academic programs on a rotating basis. Every three years each program prepares an in-depth report. Effectiveness is determined by analysis of the following data: Number of declared program/academic area concentrators (majors) Percent of completers employed in the field or transferring to a 4-year institution Direct instructional cost of program/academic area Student-to-faculty ratio Within-course retention in courses with program/academic area prefix Completer success in courses with program/academic area prefix Student success achieving course/program outcomes within the program/academic area Success of students on third party examinations (if applicable) 1P14. How do you change or discontinue programs and courses? When this need is identified, instructors in the program/transfer academic area follow the curriculum approval process discussed in 1P3. When review by the advisory committee or discipline group concludes that a course should be discontinued, the department chair notifies the Instruction Office to list the title on the retired course list. If review concludes an entire

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program should be discontinued, the department chair initiates the Program Retirement Process to examine various data elements including the history and level of demand by external stakeholders and students, student enrollment and success data, and the internal effect upon the college. When an academic department determines that a course should again be offered after placement on the course retirement list, the chair notifies the Instruction Office. If no major changes are needed, the course is again shown as active on the Master Course list. If major changes are needed, the course goes through the curriculum approval process described in 1P3. Any program brought out of retirement is treated as new and must complete the curriculum approval process as well. 1P15. How do you determine and address the learning support needs (tutoring, advising, placement, library, laboratories, etc.) of your students and faculty in your student learning, development, and assessment processes? Student needs become known to faculty and staff through formal surveying, examination of student success data, and anecdotal feedback. Each spring the college formally surveys a random sample of students using the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey or the Community College Survey of Student Engagement. Each survey inquires of student use, importance and satisfaction of available learning support services. Survey results are then shared formally in Administrative Council (monthly meeting attended by Academic Department Chairs, Deans, and department heads and chaired by the President) and then examined more closely by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

1P15. For many years faculty have been concerned about the success (or not) of students in courses that require heavy reading. Faculty believed students who were not proficient in reading (at least at a high school level) were at risk for academic success. Therefore, a task force created by the Teaching and Learning Committee examined three years of student data that compared success (grade of A, B, or C) in Sociology and Psychology classes with these same students` reading scores. After analysis and discussion, the task force recommended a reading cutoff score that gave students (based upon historical success data) a better than 50/50 chance of success in sociology or psychology. The Teaching and Learning Committee reviewed and agreed with the recommendation and presented the proposal to the Administrative Council where it was discussed and approved for a pilot period of time. The Task Force is continuing to review reading scores and course success data for correlation. In the Fall 2010 semester, the task force will review the entire process and determine if the current cutoff scores are appropriate to enhance student success in courses that require considerable reading.

Student-driven data, including assessment results, enrollment, retention and usage, are examined regularly (each semester or annually) by appropriate department leaders. This information, coupled with staff experiences and/or anecdotal feedback can prompt further examination. If data and preliminary research information is not satisfactory, the concerns are addressed in the appropriate committee. Often, learning support needs are addressed in the Developmental Education Subcommittee or the Department Chair Council in collaboration with the Teaching and Learning Committee.

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If revisions to current services are recommended and involve procedures affecting more than one area of the college or a change in policy, they are presented to Administrative Council for review and approval. Courses of action requiring institutional policy change are recommended by the Administrative Council to the Board of Trustees for final action. The college library staff regularly examines resource usage data for each academic department. If a department has ceased or rarely uses particular resources, the Coordinator of Library Services meets with personnel in that specific department to determine how to better serve the resource needs of students. 1P16. How do you align your co-curricular development goals with your curricular learning objectives?

Aligning co-curricular development goals with learning objectives has not yet been an institutional priority; rather we have focused on the alignment of academic and student services goals with the four institution-wide outcomes. Several co-curricular learning opportunities are available to students. The Presidential Scholarship award requires each recipient develop an independent project for presentation at the annual scholarship donor reception. These scholars are encouraged to participate in the college Honors program and Phi Theta Kappa, the two-year college honor society. Presidential Leadership Scholars are required to participate in a 50-hour internship with a community leader, join an HCC club or organization, and enroll in the Introduction to Leadership course. The Student Government Association (SGA) exists to provide the student body a forum for the expression of student views and interests and to be a voice for students` rights. Representatives from this group serve on all major institutional committees and Administrative Council. The college hosts a variety of student organizations, forums, performances, and internships linked to courses of study. In addition, the co-curricular offerings listed in Table 1P16 are available to students in selected fields of study.

Table 1P16: Co-Curricular Learning Program Of Study Pre-Professional Courses Trades and Drafting Business Management and Entrepreneurship Fire Science Performing Arts Ag/Diesel Mechanics and Farm and Ranch Mgmt. English/Writing/ Communication Nursing Journalism Business Administrative Technology Co-Curricular Offering Science Club Skills USA Competition Entrepreneurial Forums Wildland Firefighting; Student Firefighter Association Choral/Band/Theatre Performances Judging Teams, Block and Bridle Club Tulgey Wood ­ Publication of student literary works; Forensics Competitions Health Association for Nursing Students (ADN); Practical Nursing Students Association Weekly Newspaper, 3 issues of College Magazine Business Administrative Technology Association (student organization)

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Computer Support Broadcasting Transfer Curricula Social Science Dragon LAN, Skills USA

June 2010

Kansas Association of Broadcasters Competition Phi Theta Kappa, Honors Program Monthly forums addressing current topics

1P17. How do you determine students to whom you award degrees and certificates have met your learning and development expectations? Because all programs align course outcomes with institution-wide outcomes, students who successfully complete the courses required by the program are assumed to have demonstrated competency of the four institution-wide outcomes. Examination of the degree audit (discussed in 1P6) assures students have completed the required courses and achieved the required GPA (2.0) for graduation. In most llied Health programs students are required to sit for licensing or certification exams. Pass rates on those exams are monitored by appropriate administrators and faculty and shared with advisory committee members. Preliminary results from the student learning outcomes reporting pilot indicate HCC students are proficient in course outcomes. 1P18. How do you design your processes for assessing student learning? Our processes for assessing student learning are faculty driven. The Assessment Subcommittee (comprised of faculty) developed criteria for the college`s assessment plan under the leadership of the Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment. After reviewing multiple options they agreed embedded assessment was the most efficient and effective method for determining student achievement. The subcommittee presented their recommendations to the Teaching and Learning Committee. The recommended process was initially piloted in the spring semester of 2009, with all programs and departments participating. Full implementation is planned for fall 2010 when each fulltime faculty member will report the results of student learning outcomes for a minimum of six hours of their teaching load. While methods for student assessment are generally determined by the faculty teaching specific courses, the selection and implementation of student learning assessment will continue to be overseen by the Assessment Subcommittee. All courses will identify specific student learning outcomes, assignments that assess students` achievement of each of those outcomes, a method for evaluating the assignments and the level of achievement required to demonstrate proficiency. Courses that comprise specific programs of study (Career and Technical Education curricula) have courses outcomes are aligned to program outcomes. Each transfer academic area course must align a minimum of one outcome to one of the four institution-wide outcomes. Assessment measures for each course outcome are determined by the faculty teaching the course. They then report the percent of students completing the assessment who achieved the required standard of proficiency. The Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment aggregates the data for program and institution-wide outcomes and reports the information back to the programs and the college as a whole. Course outcomes tied to an institution-wide outcome are assessed using a standard rubric for each of the institution-wide outcomes. The

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Assessment Subcommittee has streamlined the assessment process at the course level by entering and storing assessment information, reporting forms, and data on the college intranet. Results 1R1. What measures of your students' learning and development do you collect and analyze regularly? HCC measures student learning and development by regularly monitoring: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Persistence rates (fall to spring and fall to fall) Graduation rates Transfer rates Course and program assessment success Credential and skill attainment rates (for CTE grads) Subsequent success rates in college-level courses for developmental students Success on third party examinations Subsequent success at four-year institutions Within-course retention rates Student success rates Success rates on student learning outcomes at the course and institutional level

Figures 1R1 and 2 provide information on persistence, graduation and transfer measures.

Figure 1R1: Persistence Rates

Fall-to-Fall Persistence

80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Full-Time Part-Time

Figure 1R2 shows graduation and transfer rates for the cohort of first-time, full-time students three years after initial enrollment at HCC. The transfer rate data shown after 2006 was provided by the National Student Clearinghouse, a national source on student transfer activity (based upon financial aid data).

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Figure 1R2: Graduation and Transfer Rates

June 2010

Graduation and Transfer Rates

40% 20% 0% 20052006200720082009 Graduation Transfer

1R2.

What are your performance results for your common student learning and development objectives?

In the pilot project in spring and fall 2009, members of the Assessment Subcommittee, Department Chair Council, and faculty volunteers reported student learning outcomes for at least one course. In spring 2009, the 1,597 outcomes were measured; in fall 2009, 5,416. The compiled student success rates on the four institution-wide outcomes, as measured by related course outcomes, are shown in Table 1R2.

Table 1R2 Success Rates on Institution-Wide Outcomes InstitutionWide Outcome Spring 2009 Fall 2009 Thinking Critically 80.83% 81.49% Communicating Orally and in Writing 90.82% 96.34% Accessing and Using Information 77.76% 78.25% Demonstrating Interpersonal Skills 73.41% 74.36% All Course Outcomes 79.59% 81.63%

1R3. What are your performance results for specific program learning objectives? All technical programs align course outcomes to program outcomes, but only the Associate Degree Nursing program provided data on student achievement of program outcomes in the 2009 pilot project. Those outcomes and the percent of students achieving those outcomes appear in Table 1R3-1.

Table 1R3-1 Associate Degree Nursing Program Outcomes Achievement Demonstrate through the use of the nursing process the ability to think critically and make reasonable judgments Utilize effective communication techniques with individuals, families, significant others and members of the health care team Incorporate the roles and responsibility of the nurse as a member of an interdisciplinary team to meet the bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual needs of individuals, families, and groups throughout the life cycle Demonstrate caring behaviors that are nurturing, protective, compassionate and person-centered Demonstrate accountability for nursing actions, judgments, and responsibilities consistent with one`s own scope of practice within the legal and ethical framework of the nursing profession Assume responsibility for personal and professional growth by participating in activities that enhance continuous learning, self-development, and ensure high standards of nursing practice

96.18% 97.35% 97.75% 98.29% 94.87% 96.08%

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Several Allied Health programs require external examination for licensure and subsequent employment. These pass rates provide additional information on student achievement of program learning objectives. The pass rates for selected programs are listed in Table 1R3-2.

Table 1R3-2: Pass Rates on Licensure Exams for Various Technical Programs 2006 2007 2008 2009 * Associate Degree Nursing Emergency Medical Science Health Information Technology * Practical Nursing 94% 89% 79% 100% 84% 80% 81% 94% 95% 80% 96% 94% 91% 90% 89% 90%

Radiology 100% 100% 100% 100% * First time examinees only, actual pass rate for each class of students is slightly higher.

1R4.

What is your evidence the students completing your programs, degrees, and certificates have acquired the knowledge and skills required by your stakeholders (i.e. other educational organizations employers)?

Technical programs requiring external certification and licensure use pass rates such as those indicated in table 1R3-2 to measure how well students have acquired the knowledge and skills required by stakeholders. Faculty receive anecdotal feedback concerning the performance of their graduates from their advisory committee members as well. The quantified levels of skill attainment and credential acquisition for all technical programs are shown in figure 1R4-1.

Figure 1R4-1 Perkins Skill Attainment and Credential Acquisition

Expected State... 2009

55% 66% 54% 92% 51% 96% 0% 50% 100% 150% Credentials Skill Attainment

2008

Transfer academic areas receive feedback from their colleagues at 4-year institutions. While this data is anecdotal, it does provide information on areas of concern that the programs or transfer academic areas may need to address. Quantitative data is provided by the Kansas Board of Regents comparing the academic performance of HCC transfer students, Kansas community college transfers, other transfers, and native students at the seven four-year institutions supervised by KBOR. HCC transfer students perform slightly better than transfers from other Kansas colleges but, in general, not as well as other transfers and native students. Student performance at the Regents` institutions is listed in Tables 1R4-2 and 3.

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Table 1R4-2: HCC Student Performance at Kansas Regent's Institutions Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Number of Students HCC First-Time Transfers All Kansas Community College First-Time Transfers Other First-Time Transfers First-Time Freshman Native Students Total First-Time 296 3386 3861 12162 19705 Mean Term GPA 2.66 2.66 2.73 2.68 2.69 % Passing All Hours 63% 62% 49% 63% 60% Number of Students 326 3483 4100 15711 23620 Mean Term GPA 2.61 2.61 2.67 2.62 2.63

June 2010

% Passing All Hours 65% 64% 51% 65% 62%

Success indicators for students who have been at four-year institution for more than one year and are nearing completion of a four-year program are listed below.

Table 1R4-3: HCC Student Continuing Performance at Kansas Regent's Institutions Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Number of Students HCC Continuing Transfers All Kansas Community College Continuing Transfers Other Continuing Transfers Continuing Native Students Total Continuing 509 6396 5115 39056 51076 Mean Term GPA 2.90 2.86 2.91 2.90 2.89 % Passing All Hours 70% 68% 69% 67% 67% Number of Students 582 7170 5452 38330 51534 Mean Term GPA 2.92 2.89 2.92 2.92 2.92 % Passing All Hours 76% 72% 72% 70% 71%

1R5. What are your performance results for learning support processes (advising, library and laboratory use, etc.)? The college monitors the success of students in their first college level course if they initially placed into a related developmental education course. In 2006, increased emphasis on success and retention, as well as a comprehensive review of strategies used in developmental English courses, increased the success of students transitioning from developmental English courses into college-level curricula. In 2009, the success rate slipped, but the retention rate was considerably higher, indicating that students did not withdraw from English Composition I, apparently thinking that they would succeed, even though they were ultimately unable to earn a grade of C or higher. Math success rates improved dramatically after department faculty members agreed to use common teaching strategies that had been proven to increase success. The Director of Academic Support also tracks the success of students who use tutoring and support services

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through the Rimmer Learning Resource Center and Student Support Services (SSS ­ a TRIO program). Retention for developmental students in the first college-level course and for students using tutoring and support services through RLRC and SSS are shown in figure 1R5-1. Success rates are displayed in figure 1R5-2.

Figure 1R5-1: Retention Rates for Student Receiving Academic Support

Retention Rates

100% 95% 90% 85% 80% 2007 2008 2009 English Mathematics RLRC/SSS Support

Figure 1R5-2: Success Rates for Students Receiving Academic Support

Success Rates

85% 80% 75% 70% 65% 60% 2007 2008 2009 English Mathematics RLRC/SSS Support

1R6. How do your results for the performance of your processes in Helping Students Learn compare with the results of other higher education organizations and, where appropriate, with results of organizations outside of higher education? HCC participates in the National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP). Withincourse retention and success at HCC has remained at or above the national average in most areas, with developmental mathematics and reading facing the greatest need for improvement. The English Composition II rates fall below national averages. All NCCBP measures are drawn from fall semester enrollment only. Because English Composition II is a course that students

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generally complete in the spring semester, the deficit is not as alarming as it appears. The college's performance relative to other community colleges participating in NCCBP on measures related to the institution`s performance in Helping Students Learn is show in Table1R6. Those in bold type are above the national mean; those marked with a single underline are slightly below the mean; and those marked with a double underline are significantly below the mean. National comparative data for the 2008-2009 academic year will not be available until September 2010. The HCC column for that year reflects increases or declines in performance comparable to institutional data for the previous academic year.

Table 1R6 Comparison of HCC's performance to NCCBP standards Retention 2006-2007 HCC Institution-Wide Credit Courses Credit, College-Level Courses Distance Education Courses Credit Developmental Courses Mathematics Reading English Core Academic Skills Courses English Composition I English Composition II Speech Algebra Success 2006-2007 HCC Institution-Wide Credit Courses Credit, College-Level Courses Distance Education Courses Credit Developmental Courses Mathematics Reading English Core Academic Skills Courses English Composition I English Composition II Speech Algebra 84.35% 71.93% 84.93% 72.64% 80.44% 81.16% 85.77% 73.08% 81.62% 80.45% 86.53% 77.81% 80.10% 81.47% 85.76% 73.49% 82.32% 79.38% 88.35% 80.45% NA NA NA NA 53.56% 60.00% 86.86% 67.66% 77.92% 75.04% 56.85% 71.43% 83.99% 54.43% 66.60% 63.35% 53.46% 75.86% 79.66% NA NA NA 84.57% 85.17% 84.57% National Mean 83.18% 84.58% 83.18% 2007-2008 HCC 86.03% 86.42% 81.66% National Mean 82.37% 83.13% 77.32% 2008-2009 HCC 84.28% 84.85% 79.79% National Mean NA NA NA 90.02% 76.68% 89.98% 87.50% 88.29% 82.84% 88.06% 79.57% 88.8% 86.06% 93.5% 88.05% 87.58% 84.17% 88.47% 81.53% 92.14% 90.65% 92.91% 89.82% NA NA NA NA 83.28% 90.91% 87.06% 83.31% 88.35% 87.66% 84.28% 82.35% 90.36% 84.65% 88.89% 84.65% 83.46% 100% 94.07% NA NA NA 93.47% 93.78% 90.50% National Mean 88.48% 88.78% 83.65% 2007-2008 HCC 93.82% 93.92% 92.07% National Mean 88.73% 88.83% 84.24% 2008-2009 HCC 94.15% 94.31% 92.19% National Mean NA NA NA

Helping Students Learn

1-17

Hutchinson Community College

Improvement

June 2010

1I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Helping Students Learn? 1. A Reading Task Force of the Teaching and Learning Committee reviewed the textbooks used in all 100-level courses to determine their readability level. The group recommended students who test below the reading level of the textbook be required to enroll in one of the developmental reading courses offered both on campus and online before enrolling in courses using textbooks of higher reading levels. This policy was implemented in 2009-2010. While success rates in selected courses were low (because many students enter the college with less than a seventh grade reading level), students who were successful in the required reading course experienced increased success in the following semester as reflected in their average GPAs. 2. Another task force of the Teaching and Learning Committee has collaborated with the Adult Basic Education (ABE) faculty to ensure students needing services below the levels offered by the college are referred to this program. Students may also enroll concurrently in other selected college courses and are advised by advisors specifically trained in the needs of developmental students in order to increase their likelihood of success. 3. The Honors Program Coordinator is currently leading a Task Force to expand course offerings and offer experiential opportunities to students of high academic potential. Honors courses are now clearly delineated in the course schedule. Enrollment requires the Coordinator's approval if the student has not been accepted into the Honors Program. Honors curricula have been developed in the courses most frequently taken for general education by transfer students. Faculty mentors have been appointed, trained, and monitored to ensure these students are receiving appropriate input on their individual pursuits. 4. When the Paramedic Program faculty reviewed graduate pass rates on the National Registry Exam prior to 2006, they discovered that only 67% of the students who successfully completed the program, many with A's and B's, passed. They also discovered students who used Platinum Tests to study for the Registry Exam were more likely to succeed. Consequently, the Emergency Medical faculty implemented the following strategies to help students master the coursework and necessary skill development. Increase cut scores to 80% (B) in both formative and summative modules Redistribute grading categories and weights so quizzes do not inflate exam scores Instructors collaborated to create common formative exams and a summative final Integrate test taking instruction to students in the basic EMT classes Provide remediation resources for students needing academic support

Helping Students Learn

1-18

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

1I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Helping Students Learn? By developing an assessment plan and evaluation of instruction instruments that allow the faculty greater autonomy and control in assessment of student learning and evaluation of their instruction, faculty have an increased willingness to examine quantitative evidence when revising their instructional methods. Employing a fulltime Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment has increased stakeholder awareness of data and encouraged its use. HCC's Instructional Technology Services (ITS) department works closely with the offices of Institutional Research and of Learning Outcomes and Assessment to report on student learning to both external and internal stakeholders. The data are retrieved from the student records database. Problems in closing the loop have surfaced because the intranet, the public website, and the registrar`s database do not easily communicate with each other. Therefore, even though data is available, it cannot always be readily accessed by decision-makers. ITS staff are currently reviewing programming that would allow easier generation of reports on student success.

Helping Students Learn

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Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY TWO Processes

June 2010

2P1. How do you design and operate the key non-instructional processes through which you serve significant stakeholder groups? Each area of service is led by an administrative staff member responsible for the day-to-day operation of the service, working collaborative with appropriate constituent groups, and the realization of program goals. Athletics: HCC`s intercollegiate athletic programs are supervised by the athletic director. He is supported with office staff and supervises each sport`s head coach. Program oversight is provided by the college president, the Kansas Jayhawk Community College Conference and the National Junior College Athletic Association. Community Service: The sponsorship of programs that serve the community at large is an important part of the HCC vision of improving the quality of life. The services of the Volunteer Center are led by a Director who is supported with office staff and administrative personnel responsible for specific programs sponsored by the Center. Oversight is provided by the college`s Coordinator of Community Services and Special Projects, an advisory council that meets monthly, and the requirements of the Corporation for National and Community Service and other funding sources. The General Manager of Radio Kansas is responsible for program operations in accordance with college expectations and external regulatory agencies. Issues of ownership, employment, and community service requirements must meet Federal Communications Commission expectations. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting provides benchmarks concerning staffing, budget, and programming. An annual audit provides further financial oversight. Twice each year the station sponsors a fundraising campaign. The Dillon Lecture Series is staffed by a part-time administrative assistant who reports to the college President. A committee comprised of community volunteers and representatives from Student Government and the College Board of Trustees use the services of professional speakers` bureaus to secure speakers. Patron membership, co-sponsors and foundation support provide the necessary funding for the series. Fundraising: The college president and the Executive Director of the HCC Endowment Association lead our fundraising efforts. The president meets regularly with potential donors to explain planned building projects and needed contributions for construction costs and or the donation of needed equipment. The Endowment Association, a separate entity with its own governing board, exists to provide scholarship assistance to HCC students. Ongoing fundraising is the responsibility of staff and board; each fall selected students staff a phonebased fundraising campaign. In collaboration, the President and the Endowment Association seek annual funding for Leadership and Presidential Scholarships. These awards attract students with demonstrated leadership and academic talent.

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

2-1

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Service to Business: HCC`s various services to business are coordinated by the Director of Business and Industry who reports to the Dean of Workforce Development and Outreach. Collaboration with external partners enables the college to provide One-Stop and Workforce Investment Act services to the public. Staff who are funded by the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) determine assistance available to job seekers desiring to gain skills needed for employment and matches applicants with existing job openings. Specialized college programs, some in collaboration with the institution`s Career/Technical Education programs, contract with employers across the central portion of the state to train and retrain workers in safety, health, computer skills, and the trades. 2P2. How do you determine your organization's major non-instructional objectives for your external stakeholders, and whom do you involve in setting these objectives? The consideration of potential new services arises when college personnel observe an opportunity not met elsewhere or stakeholders present unmet needs. These stakeholders may be faculty and staff, a member of an advisory committee, a community member at large, or personnel from other postsecondary institutions or regulatory agencies. These requests are brought to the President`s Council (President and four Deans) for initial discussion. Other staff, as appropriate to the proposed service, is involved in the discussion and possible planning. New opportunities for service are evaluated on the following criteria: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. How does this opportunity meet the mission of the college? How will it serve the needs of the community/stakeholders? What is the cost/benefit to the institution? Is funding available to underwrite start-up costs? Does the institution have, or can it develop, the capacity to provide resources to sustain the initiative after initial funding ceases?

2P3. How do you communicate your expectations regarding these objectives? The designated leader of each service and program referenced as a distinctive objective is supervised by college personnel ­ the President, a Dean, or a long-term administrative staff member. Program expectations drive much of the day-to-day work for each area. The supervision process focuses on the program and its staff working to meet expectations of the institution, the constituency the program exists to serve, and external funders and regulators. College supervisors serve on the advisory committees (if the program has one), understand the requirements of external funders and regulators, and are acquainted with the constituency being served. The annual job performance review (discussed in Category Four, Valuing People), annual program reviews and the analysis of appropriate metrics enable program staff and supervisors to discern the program supports the college vision of providing opportunities for learning growth and improved quality of life.

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

2-2

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

2P4. How do you assess and review the appropriateness and value of these objectives, and whom do you involve in these reviews? The college-provided supervisor is responsible to communicate college expectations and to determine that the program and its services remain relevant to the college`s mission and vision. Each of the distinctive objectives has criteria to assess and review progress toward the goals. Program performance is evaluated and/or overseen by the individuals or organizations listed in Figure 2P4-1.

Figure 2P4-1 Evaluators and Stakeholders Athletics National Junior College Athletic Association, Jayhawk Conference, College President Volunteer Center Radio Kansas Corporation for National and Community Service, annual evaluation conducted by the Center`s Advisory Council, Coordinator of Community Service/Special Projects Federal Communication Commission (FCC) and Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), College President Annual external audit, Endowment Board assessment; College President Workforce Development Board , HCC Dean of Workforce Development and Outreach

Fundraising Business and Industry

2P5. How do you determine faculty and staff needs relative to these objectives and operations? Personnel needs are reviewed by each program`s director in collaboration with his/her direct supervisor as part of the supervision process. Needs may be identified through expectations of external funders or regulatory agencies, through new or revised requests for service from each program`s constituent group, or through program and college staff identification. The annual program review process and accompanying summary data may also indicate need for program or staffing revisions. 2P6. How do you incorporate information on faculty and staff needs in readjusting these objectives or the processes that support them? When a need is identified and determined to be worthy of consideration and action, the appropriate departments or programs of the institution collaborate to brainstorm ideas and possible new processes and/or services. Recent outcomes of this collaborative process include revised provisions for academic support (tutoring, developmental classes) scheduled at times convenient to student athletes and collaborating with student life personnel to offer volunteer opportunities that appeal to the interests of traditional-aged students.

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

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Hutchinson Community College

Results 2R1.

June 2010

What measures of accomplishing your major non-instructional objective and activities do you collect and analyze regularly?

The measures for each distinctive objective are illustrated in 2R2. 2R2. What are your performance results in accomplishing your other distinctive objectives?

Athletics ­ The athletic department collaborates with local funders in the recruitment of student athletes and sponsorship of events. 2006 2007 2008 2009 Fundraising $65,900 $65,000 $58,500 $54,800 Corporate Sponsorship - # of games 21 20 21 20 Scholarship Contributions $59,600 $49,500 $40,800 $42,400 Best Team GPAs 3.38 3.03 3.09 3.42 # of full-time student athletes 260 250 240 258 # of students on scholarship 256 246 236 254 Athletics

Community Service - Volunteer Center - Volunteer records are maintained for two groups, persons older than 55 (Retired Senior and Volunteer Program ­ RSVP) and persons younger than 55 (Volunteer Action Center ­ VAC). The number of volunteers who were active in each year are listed below. The percent in the right hand column are those volunteers who participated in programs of significant community impact as recognized by the Corporation for National & Community Service (a major funder). These opportunities include volunteer income tax assistance and food bank distribution. Year RSVP VAC Total 2006 744 84 825 69% 2007 748 77 850 67% 2008 764 86 824 70% 2009 755 69 828 81%

Dillon Lecture Series - Estimated attendance for speakers of national prominence are listed below.

Year 2006 2007 Speaker Leah Walesa Slim Goodbody Jeannette Walls Bob Woodard Credentials Fmr. Polish President Health Advocate Author ­ The Glass Castle Author ­ All the President's Men, et al # of Students 600 1,100 800 600 # of Patrons 275 200 250 200 Community at Large 375 200 350 125

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

2-4

Hutchinson Community College

2008 2009 2009 Pat Roberts Soledad O`Brien Bob Schieffer Daniel Pink Kansas US Senator CNN News Correspondent CBS News Correspondent Author ­ A Whole New Mind, et al 300 700 1,000 450

June 2010

200 250 300 225 150 200 300 325

Radio Kansas ­ Twice yearly station staff staff mailin or or on-air fundraisers to generate fiscal support and to receive feedback on the programming preferences of their listeners.

Figure 2R1-4 Radio Kansas Data (Income In millions) Fiscal Year Total Outside Income Renewals New Members 2006 $1.55 3,424 313 2007 $1.54 3,470 207 2008 $1.68 3,795 411 2009 $1.50 3,729 514

Fundraising ­ The Hutchinson Community College Endowment Association raises scholarship dollars for students at HCC and the athletic program.

Years # of Annual Donors 417 566 585 580 # of Endowed Scholarships 142 148 190 211 Scholarship Dollars Fundraising $ for Athletics $230,262 $320,481 $369,565 $358,170 Corpus Endowed Funds $2,906,000 $3,327,467. $3,648,719 $3,695,101

2006 2007 2008 2009

$332,919 $340,356 $371,091 $434,420

The President leads the college`s efforts in capital campaigns to renovate and expand classroom and laboratory spaces. Since 2006, the president has secured a combination of public and private contributions to renovate the Industrial Center (welding), the Biotechnology and Physical Science Center, and the Industrial Technology Center (process technology). Service to Business - The Workforce Development Center Annually, performance standards are negotiated between state and federal Workforce Investment Act personnel. These standards then become the expectations of the local Center`s contractual agreement with the state. The figure below shows the negotiated rates and actual results for performance standards over the last three years for which data are available. All results, with the exception of the earnings, are listed as a percent.

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

2-5

Hutchinson Community College

ITEM Entered employment GROUP Adults Dislocated workers Adults Dislocated workers Adults Dislocated workers 2006 NEG. 76 83 87 93 $10,000 $14,000 2006 ACTUAL 84.8 96.8 80.4 96.2 $9,114 $14,692 2007 NEG. 81 88 88.5 91 $11,500 $14.500 2007 ACTUAL 89.9 93.8 94.2 99.1 $11,077 $14,656

June 2010

2008 NEG. 83 90 89.5 92 $12,000 $15,000 2008 ACTUAL 88.4 96.5 91.1 95.3 $17,492 $14,239

Retention Rate

Ave. Earnings

Business & Industry Training In academic year 2008-2009, the services of the Business and Industry Institute provided noncredit training to more than 9,200 students (duplicated headcount).

B&I Training OSHA & MSHA Motorcycle Safety Personal Enrichment Total 4,146 4,244 420 401 9,211

2R3. How do your results for the performance of these processes compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Staff have not, for the most part, compared program results with peer organizations outside the purview of the college. When attempts have been made across programs, staff discovered data is collected differently in other locations and true comparisons are difficult to discern. 2R4. How do your performance results of your processes for Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives strengthen your overall organization? How do they enhance your relationships with the communities and regions you serve?

Each Kansas community college is funded by a local property tax (in addition to state funds and student tuition). The sponsorship of these non-instructional programs enables the college to provide services to the local population who may not have need for traditional postsecondary instruction. Others have an avenue to be involved in the life of the college, through attendance at athletic and other performance events and through the investment of scholarship and capital campaign dollars for the benefit of future students. Our distinctive objectives enable HCC to address the portion of its Vision Statement that states the college will provide opportunities for learning, growth and improved quality of life. Improvement

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

2-6

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

2I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives? Each objective listed under in this category is long-standing. Each program remains viable because of processes in place that allow for stakeholder input, institutional input and latitude given to seek new and different means to serve the public within program parameters. 2I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives? The five criteria listed in 2P2 provide the foundation for the institution to determine new initiatives, both instructional and community-focused. The ongoing supervisor process enables appropriate targets for improvement to be set and evaluated.

Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives

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Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY THREE Processes 3P1.

June 2010

How do you identify the changing needs of your student groups? How do you analyze and select a course of action regarding these needs?

The College regularly surveys a randomized sample of students to determine their needs. Student surveys and results are discussed in 3R1. In addition, the college sponsors a Student Government Association (SGA) to serve as a representative organization of the student body. SGA was formed to provide a forum for the expression of student views and interests, to be the "voice" of the student body, to improve student cultural and social welfare, to ensure the continued existence of student's rights; both in principle and in practice. (SGA Constitution) SGA membership is comprised of two officers (elected in the spring for service the following academic year), eight students elected by a fall referendum of the student body and 13 building representatives who are either elected or appointed. These include students who attend classes in specific locations (including the outreach centers in Newton and McPherson) or reside in the college`s residence halls. The SGA also includes four non-voting alternate representatives and meets weekly with appointed sponsors and monthly with the college President to provide feedback concerning their collective perspective. SGA members serve on all major institutional committees and Administrative Council. The college employs specific processes to identify the changing needs of specific student groups as indicated in Table 3P1.

Table 3P1 ­ Change Monitoring Processes for Specific Student Groups STUDENT GROUP MONITORING PROCESS HONORS Honors Student Council; annual program survey DEVELOPMENTAL Evaluation of student success data; feedback from selected faculty TRANSFER Student anecdotal feedback following transfer; transfer success data provided by Board of Regents; collaboration with four-year institutions Advising process; Career Decision Making classes and GENERAL / UNDECIDED MAJORS guidance services CAREER/TECHNICAL Annual follow-up survey of program graduates EDUCATION ATHLETES Coaches` communication with academic personnel and student athlete success data ACCOMMODATIONS Accommodation Coordinator communication and accommodations required

When possible revisions to current policies and /or practices seem warranted, persons who are responsible for the processes or service and persons who deliver the service are involved in the investigation and planning. If possible revisions involve only a single work area, that unit has authority to made revisions as deemed appropriate to meet the needs of students and other stakeholders. If possible changes involve more than one work area, or might lead to a policy change, the institutional committee structure and processes, further discussed in Category 5 are employed. Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs 3-1

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Figure 3P1-2 illustrates how a course of action is determined once data are collected. Initially pertinent data is communicated to appropriate work units who analyze the results. If no action is required, current processes are stabilized. A regular review of data takes place when it is collected at an appropriate time period (often annually). If action is required, a committee, subcommittee, or task force utilizes various quality tools to determine possible solutions.

Figure 3P1-2 Data Analysis/Course of Action

Data Collected

3P2. How do you build and maintain a relationship with your students? Three process categories, involving multiple work areas of the institution, are used to facilitate our mission of learning and collaboration: recruitment/marketing, student services, and faculty involvement. The activities associated with each are listed in Figure 3P2-1.

Action Required (Yes)

Data Analyzed

Action Required (No)

Committee Processes Employed

Stabilize Processes

Annual Review

Figure 3P2-1 Student Relationship Building Actions Campus tours Hosting leadership and other conferences targeted to various student groups Information booths at Kansas State Fair and other public events Visits to high schools/College planning conferences Tele-consulting, targeted mailings Department/program open houses Program-specific brochures and curriculum guides Relationships with high school counselors, teachers, and administrators Academic advising Placement testing College website/Student Portal/Web-supported classes Career advising, counseling; assistance with job placement Intramural, intercollegiate sports; residence life activities Student Government Assn. sponsored activities, e.g. homecoming and involvement on college committees Competitive student-teacher ratio Student Surveys Student organizations Student newspaper/twice-yearly magazine Recognition of academic, athletic, and activity excellence Due process policies Relationships with four-year institutions in Kansas Honors Program Tutoring Services Computer lab availability Adult Basic Education services to students Contacts with business and industry for retraining opportunities Recruitment /Marketing X X X X X X X X Student Services X X Faculty Involvement X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X X

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

3-2

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

3P3. How do you analyze the changing needs of your key stakeholder groups and select courses of action regarding these needs? Table 3P3 lists those means by which the college receives and analyzes information provided by external stakeholders. The right hand column indicates the likely person or department to initially assess the information. Should internal action be deemed necessary, an appropriate committee, workgroup or task force gathers the necessary information and data to formulate possible changes for institutional review and consideration.

Table 3P3 External Stakeholders Analysis of Changing Needs Parents Employers Follow-up on parental concerns as needed Survey administered to employers of CTE graduates Advisory Committee feedback concerning curricula Feedback about quality/effectiveness of Business and Industry Training Feedback of Endowment Board Members Feedback from College Board of Trustees Feedback solicited at public meetings Feedback provided directly to college administrators Monthly attendance at statelevel meetings Invited presentations to Legislative committees Presidential involvement in Community College Council of Presidents Responsible Party to Determine Course of Action Student Services Personnel Dean of Instruction in collaboration with CTE Coordinators and Faculty

Dean of Outreach and Workforce Development in collaboration with Director of Business and Industry Executive Director of Endowment Ass`n. President and Senior Administration President in collaboration with Board of Trustees Appropriate staff as identified by Senior Administration President or Deans

Alumni Community Members and Taxpayers

Legislators

President

3P4. How do you build and maintain a relationship with your key stakeholders? HCC builds and maintains a relationship with key stakeholders in a variety of ways as listed in Figure 3P4-1.

Figure 3P4-1 Stakeholder Relationship Building Stakeholders Relationship Building Mechanisms Parents Campus visits College Planning Conferences College website Student portal with guardian access Newspaper articles, radio and television Advisory committees Employer follow-up survey Business and Industry contacts/training provided

Employers

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

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Hutchinson Community College

Alumni Responses to alumni requests Alumni newsletter Endowment Association communications and publications College website Newspaper articles, radio and television Performing and visual arts and athletic events President-hosted luncheons and other social events Open Houses of various Academic Departments State Legislative days Targeted meetings

June 2010

Community / Taxpayers

Legislators

3P5. How do you determine if you should target new student and stakeholder groups with your educational offerings and services? HCC actively seeks and is responsive to student and stakeholder requests for services or revisions to existing services. When approached concerning a need that is not currently being met by the college or entity in the area, personnel at HCC will investigate via environmental scanning the feasibility of the request, its compatibility with the college`s mission, and the potential capability of the proposed program or service to be sustainable. The criteria discussed in Question 2P2 are used in this evaluation process. Demand for a trained and expanded healthcare workforce is a recent example of the college being approached by external stakeholders (in this case, area healthcare providers) to offer new and expanded allied health programs. Since the 2006 Systems Portfolio was written the college has evaluated and met requests to offer programs for pharmacy technicians (further discussed in 1P4), physical therapist assistant, and respiratory therapy. The first two are currently serving students; lead faculty for the latter program has been hired as of this writing. The community of Salina (similar size to Hutchinson and located 60 miles north) identified the need for a practical nursing program in its community. Salina Area Technical College chose to partner with HCC to provide this education rather than initiate a new program. SATC personnel cited a primary reason for choosing HCC was the program`s consistently high pass rate on the PN-NClex examination (rates are listed in Table1R3-2). 3P6. How do you collect complaint information from students and other stakeholders? How do you analyze this feedback and select courses of action? How do you communicate these actions to your students and stakeholders? Board-approved due process policies are listed in the college on-line catalog http://www.hutchcc.edu/catalog and address nondiscrimination practices and student right to appeal academic and disciplinary decisions. Each policy outlines the process for filing a complaint or appeal. Once a complaint or appeal is filed, the appropriate administrative staff follows specifically outlined procedures and timelines to assure due process. Appeal decisions are always communicated in writing and confidential records concerning the proceedings and findings are maintained in a secured file indefinitely in the appropriate Dean`s office. The college strives to assure confidentiality when investigating all complaints.

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

3-4

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Complaints from other stakeholders are addressed by the receiving party and his/her supervisor in a confidential manner. Similar complaints from multiple parties or those that may have broad implications for the college may be forwarded to the appropriate institution-wide committee for consideration. Results 3R1. How do you determine the satisfaction of your students and other stakeholders? What measures of student and other stakeholder satisfaction do you collect and analyze regularly? In addition to employing the change monitoring processes cited earlier in this chapter, the college determines satisfaction by formal survey methods. Since the 1980`s, students have completed an exit survey as they apply for graduation. The most recent five years of comparison data is posted on HCC`s Intranet for college personnel to access. The Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey was administered in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, and 2007 and 2010. Noel-Levitz data provide the perspective of a random sample of our current students concerning the non-instructional support services the college provides. In 2006 and 2009 the college administered the CCSSE Survey (Community College Survey of Student Engagement) to formally gather cumulative data on student perceptions of their learning experiences. Plans are to administer these two surveys each spring semester on a rotating basis. Annually, the Office of Institutional Research surveys Career and Technical Education graduates and their employers. Students are asked what they are doing (working, further education, military) and how well their course of study prepared them. The annual employers` survey asks supervisors how well HCC graduates are prepared for entry level positions. 3R2. What are your performance results for student satisfaction? The Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory was revised prior to 2007. Data from the last two survey administrations that address student satisfaction with their requirements (Overview Question # 3) are listed in Table 3R6-1. Students rank each item using a 7-point scale (one being highly dissatisfied, seven being highly satisfied). The majority of measures indicate incremental improvement of student satisfaction between the two survey administration time periods. The CCSSE Survey addresses student satisfaction with college services and classroom experiences. Our data shows incremental increases in the areas of Knowledge and Student Services. These areas also address the short- and long-term requirements and expectations of our students as listed in Overview Question # 3. Knowledge results and national comparative data are listed in 3R6. Student Services results are listed in 6R5. The Graduate Exit Survey, administered annually, addresses how well the college meets graduates` expectations and requirements. These items are rated on a four-point scale with four being highly satisfied. See Figure 3R2.

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

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Hutchinson Community College

Figure 3R2 Graduate Exit Survey Results Expectation/ Requirement High Quality Advising Survey Item My Advisor was helpful in career /academic development Knowledgeable about HCC courses, policies procedures Knowledgeable about transfer issues Available by appointment, phone or on-line Had adequate time for student Kept student informed of important dates and issues Coursework for degree completion programs packaged in a manner that allowed me to complete my degree in the prescribed time Classes were scheduled at times, modalities and locations appropriate to my needs Facilities and furnishings were conducive to effective learning Technology was integrated into much of my coursework Career counseling was readily available and helpful in academic and career directions 2006 3.64 3.70 3.68 3.68 3.66 3.54 3.47

June 2010

2007 3.62 3.68 3.58 3.61 3.64 3.46 3.42

2008 3.60 3.66 3.61 3.65 3.64 3.44 3.46

2009 3.64 3.71 3.66 3.71 3.66 3.50 3.46

Schedule is compatible with life style

3.46 3.47 3.44 3.31

3.47 3.48 3.45 3.34

3.45 3.47 3.49 3.38

3.51 3.51 3.52 3.43

Appropriate learning environments Assistance to achieve academic and career success Scholarship and financial assistance

Personnel were able to address my questions and concerns

3.06

3.07

3.19

3.27

3R3. What are your performance results for building relationships with your students? Performance results for building relationships with students as measured by the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey are marked with an * in Table 3R6-1. 3R4. What are your performance results for stakeholder satisfaction? Annually the college surveys graduates who have completed a technical degree or certificate and their employers. Student responses are indicated below.

Has your vocational training helped you with your current position?

Class Yes No

2006 120 26

2007 135 35

2008 324 64

2009 208 71

How satisfied are you with the vocational training you received at HCC?

Class Very Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Unsatisfied Very Unsatisfied

2006 100 69 18 3 4

2007 104 72 21 6 0

2008 212 149 42 11 12

2009 127 107 40 3 2

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

3-6

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Employers of these same graduates are surveyed as well. Their cumulative results are below.

Class Excellent Good Average Below Average Poor Class Above Average Average Below Average Not Applicable Class Above Average Average Below Average Not Applicable 2006 26 37 5 0 0 2006 29 38 2 0 2006 28 38 2 0 2007 44 45 11 1 0 2007 48 52 3 0 2007 41 58 1 3 2008 53 53 12 2 1 2008 68 55 2 1 2008 56 63 3 4 2009 17 31 8 0 0 2009 30 38 2 0 2009 25 33 0 1

Compared with other employees with similar job responsibilities, rate how well this HCC graduate is prepared for jobs with your company.

Oral communication skills

Written communication skills

Technical knowledge related to specific job

Class Above Average Average Below Average Not Applicable

2006 36 32 1 0

2007 51 50 2 0

2008 79 40 3 4

2009 33 24 1 2

Quality of work accomplished

Class Above Average Average Below Average Not Applicable Class Yes No Unsure 2006 64 0 6

2006 47 18 3 0 2007 96 0 5

2007 65 36 2 0 2008 111 1 7

2008 86 35 3 2 2009 53 0 3

2009 38 19 1 2

Would you recommend HCC graduates to other employers?

3R5.

What are your performance results for building relationships with your key stakeholders?

Other than surveying employers and students concerning their level of satisfaction with HCC and its services, the college has not formally surveyed other stakeholders. 3R6. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Understanding Students' and Other Stakeholders' Needs compare with the performance results of other higher education institutions and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

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June 2010

The student satisfaction measures are listed in Table 3R6-1 and compared to national community college data as provided by Noel Levitz. Because Noel Levitz is not prescriptive as to when or how the survey is administered, the results are not a true comparison of student groups. Measures in bold type indicate HCC students express a higher level of satisfaction both years.

Table 3R6-1 Noel Levitz Measure 2007 HCC results 5.32 5.20 2007 Nat'l results Na^ 5.14 2010 HCC results 5.54 5.36 2010 Nat'l results 5.27 5.16

* Admissions staff provide personal attention Staff accurately portray program offerings during recruitment * Faculty available outside of class 5.79 5.80 5.75 5.77 Seldom get the `run around' 5.00 4.98 5.31 5.07 * Staff are caring and helpful 5.67 5.58 5.75 5.63 Students feel welcomed 5.80 5.76 5.88 5.79 College has a good reputation 5.70 Na* 5.85 Na* * Faculty care about students 5.44 Na* 5.53 Na* Awards are timely to help in college planning 4.77 5.12 5.09 5.06 Financial aid counseling available 5.13 Na^ 5.37 5.32 College helps identify financial resources 4.94 Na^ 5.15 5.06 Tuition paid is worthwhile investment 5.53 Na^ 5.71 5.70 Classes scheduled at convenient times 5.65 5.36 5.72 5.51 Can register for classes with few conflicts 5.66 5.50 5.74 5.48 Sufficient courses are offered each term 5.50 Na^ 5.73 5.38 Computer labs adequate & accessible 5.84 5.70 5.95 5.73 Lab equipment/facilities are current 5.53 5.53 5.66 5.47 Faculty use technology and media 5.49 Na^ 5.69 5.61 * Advisor available when I need help 5.59 Na^ 5.64 5.33 Services help me decide a career 5.23 5.35 5.39 5.32 Advisor knowledgeable about program requirements 5.78 5.52 5.85 5.51 Advisor applies program of study to career goals 5.45 Na^ 5.59 5.27 Cultural activities enhance my educational experience 4.77 Na* 4.75 Na* Library resources /services are adequate 5.70 5.66 5.79 5.66 Instructional quality is excellent 5.69 5.65 5.73 5.71 * Counseling services available 5.23 Na^ 5.36 5.34 Timely feedback about progress 5.16 5.42 5.20 5.42 Assessment/course placement are reasonable 5.45 5.49 5.55 5.45 * Receive feedback about progress 4.84 Na^ 4.98 5.08 Classes deal with practical experiences and application 5.50 5.62 5.60 5.60 * Faculty are available outside class 5.79 5.80 5.75 5.77 Advisor knowledgeable about transfer requirements 5.31 5.18 5.41 5.17 Security responds quickly to assist 4.84 5.15 5.01 5.12 Parking lots well-lighted and secure 5.04 5.37 5.22 5.33 Campus is safe and secure for all 5.63 5.81 5.76 5.77 Student parking is adequate 3.34 4.56 3.48 4.45 Overall, campus is well maintained 5.77 5.84 5.96 5.84 Registration process convenient 5.70 Na^ 5.80 5.59 Tutoring is readily available 5.62 5.54 5.75 5.54 On-line access to services 5.93 Na^ 5.91 5.85 Convenient ways to pay school bill 5.63 5.71 5.78 5.66 Can do school-related business at convenient times 5.40 5.44 5.62 5.48 * Faculty are fair and unbiased 5.50 5.55 5.65 5.57 * Administrators available to hear student concerns 5.15 5.14 5.29 5.20 Na^ - New question on the revised Satisfaction Survey and sufficient national data was not available at the time of published survey results. Na* - HCC customized questions have no national comparison.

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

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June 2010

The University of Texas requires each participating institution to follow the same random surveying procedures when administering the CCSSE survey, which is spring semester and to randomly selected classes. Therefore, the inter-college comparisons are more reliable. Results are listed in Table 3R6-2. HCC results for each category increased incrementally between the two survey administrations while the national results remained relatively flat.

Table 3R6-2 CCSSE Knowledge Measures Broad general knowledge Job knowledge and skills Writing clearly Speaking clearly Thinking critically Solving numerical problems Computing 2006 HCC Results 2.81 2.50 2.50 2.43 2.61 2.31 2.54 2006 Nat'l Results 2.91 2.53 2.65 2.55 2.83 2.55 2.67 2009 HCC Results 2.98 2.83 2.63 2.63 2.94 2.51 2.86 2009 Nat'l Results 2.94 2.58 2.70 2.61 2.88 2.58 2.72

Improvement 3I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Understanding Students' and Other Stakeholders' Needs? A revised version of the Graduate Exit Survey has been administered annually since the 200506 academic year. This tool enables the institution to collect trend data from graduates. An academic advisor training plan was initiated in 2005, focusing on developmental advising. This was mandatory training for all advisors to achieve certification. Two hours of additional training is required every year. The college will continue to alternately administer and evaluate the results of the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory and the Community College Survey of Student Engagement. The data are analyzed by appropriate committees or task forces following the model illustrated in Figure 3P1-1 to determine possible steps for improvement. During the college`s 2007 Quality Checkup Visit students met with the reviewers and identified possible areas of improvement. These included providing a web-supported component to all classes, posting cafeteria menus on the college website, physical improvements to the residence halls and enforcement of no smoking policies. Each of these and other selected recommendations have since been addressed. 3I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Understanding Students' and Other Stakeholders' Needs?

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

HCC has not yet established targets for improvement in its processes that serve students and other stakeholders. The Institutional Effectiveness committee examines survey data closely and is beginning to discuss possible areas of opportunity for improvement.

Understanding Students` And Other Stakeholders` Needs

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Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY FOUR Processes

June 2010

4P1. How do you identify the specific credentials, skills, and values required for faculty, staff, and administrators? When a position vacancy occurs or the need and resources to support a new position are identified, the Director of Human Resources, in collaboration with members of the affected work or academic unit, reviews the existing job description and required qualifications for relevancy and currency. Appropriate revisions are made at this time. These may be influenced by the requirements of accrediting bodies, the College`s Master Agreement, how the work of the particular position has evolved and expectations of future responsibilities. 4P2. How do your hiring processes make certain that the people you employ possess the credentials, skills, and values you require? All applicants for any college position, including part-time positions, are required to complete a written application. The Human Resources Office provides a single application for faculty and administrative staff and a separate one for hourly personnel. Official transcripts and other evidence of credentials or formal training are required for persons seeking faculty or administrative positions. For each fulltime position, a search committee is assembled, usually comprised of the position`s supervisor, the Director of Human Resources and other persons knowledgeable of the position`s responsibilities. From the applications on file, candidates are selected for interview. Personal interviews are conducted with all members of the search committee present. The HR Director contacts applicants` references as directed by the search committee. Findings are shared with the committee and a final determination is made. Occasionally a candidate is interviewed a second time or, if no suitable candidate is found, the position is re-advertised. Background checks are required for child care personnel and faculty who supervise students in clinical settings. Applicants for clerical positions may be administered a skills test that is pertinent to job responsibilities. All faculty and administrative contracts are approved by the College`s Board of Trustees at a regularly scheduled meeting. 4P3. How do you recruit, hire, and retain employees? HCC recruits through the college website (www.hutchcc.edu), on internet job search databases, and local and regional media (Cable TV and newspaper). All position announcements are sent to HCC employees` (including part-time employees) work email address. The hiring process is outlined in 4P2. Fulltime HCC employees are provided a generous benefit package that includes 17 paid holidays for administrative staff, 14 for support staff; a fringe benefit of $510 per month toward the cost of a cafeteria plan of health insurance and other benefits; a sick leave day per month; enrollment in the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, and a small life insurance policy. Staff (and their dependent children) may enroll in six credit hours of their choosing each Valuing People 4-1

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

semester with supervisor approval. Faculty are granted two personal days within their 170-day contract. Administrative and hourly staff are provided vacation days upon hire that accrue to 22 days annually. The Human Resource Office oversees the probationary process for employees experiencing difficulties interfering with their work performance. In collaboration with the employee`s immediate supervisor, efforts are made to maximize positive performance with positive disciplinary measures. A commonly-used corrective action is the stipulation of a 90-day probationary period in which the desired work behaviors are delineated for all persons involved. Annually, all fulltime employees are evaluated by their immediate supervisor using one of two college-generated tools, one for professional staff, and another for hourly. HCC has very little history of laying persons off. When this has occurred, it has usually been dictated by a decision to discontinue the program the individual/s worked in or a loss of external funding. 4P4. How do you orient all employees to your organization's history, mission, and values?

All new employees meet with the HR director for orientation to institutional policies and procedures and enrollment in cafeteria plan benefits. Each new employee receives a three-ring binder with HCC`s mission and vision statements and brief history, AQIP values and the institutional policies and procedures. These include Conflict of Interest, Drug and Alcohol policies, employment and classroom policies and the appropriate handbook for their job. New faculty are provided a copy of the Master Agreement; other employees are provided the appropriate staff handbook (administrative or hourly). The HR Director leads new employees on a tour of the campus buildings enabling them to meet people in their offices. The HR director, over lunch, answers questions and becomes further acquainted. New staff have opportunity to become acquainted with other new employees who are also on tour. 4P5. How do you plan for changes in personnel? Because HCC is an equal opportunity employer, all position vacancies are made public, first inhouse, and then to the general public through the means listed in 4P3. The primary opportunity for planning occurs when a resignation or retirement is accepted by the Board of Trustees. At this time, the process delineated in 4P1 is followed. Specific to the position, specialized training may be provided to increase the skill level of the new hire. 4P6. How do you design your work processes and activities so they contribute both to organizational productivity and employee satisfaction? Each work area supervisor has the discretion to determine the work hours of persons in the work unit and their primary duties, approve occasional overtime, and to grant vacation and other scheduled leave. In general fulltime employees are expected to work 40 hours per week. A $.40 per hour pay differential is granted to hourly employees whose shift normally starts at 2 pm or later.

Valuing People

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Fulltime and adjunct faculty members` teaching loads are assigned each semester by the administration (per the Master Agreement ­ the negotiated contract). Release time is provided on an individual basis to faculty who also perform administrative functions, such as serving as a Department Chairperson. Employees of all classifications ­ faculty, staff, and administrative personnel ­ participate in the committee and task force structure. Several years ago (as an AQIP Action Project) the college examined the existing array of standing committees and consolidated all committees into four institution-wide committees ­ Teaching and Learning, Professional Development and Training, Regulatory Compliance and Due Process, and Institutional Effectiveness. Some committees have standing subcommittees; as appropriate, task forces are assembled to investigate and recommend changes in institutional policies and in procedures that involve more than one work area. This process allows for input from across the organization for revisions to policies and processes that affect multiple offices, students, and other stakeholders. 4P7. How do you ensure the ethical practices of all of your employees? The college follows several established practices to assure ethical behavior. The college business office follows division of labor practices that meet accepted standards of external auditors and of program monitors that provide external funding. Annually, an institution-wide audit is conducted by a certified public accounting firm. The Human Resources department conducts background checks on child care staff and selected faculty prior to employment. References are checked on all applicants being considered for employment. The college`s employment application asks candidates to reveal any record of felonies. When an employee is placed on probation for unsatisfactory work performance, positive disciplinary measures are followed. Employees scheduled to drive college vehicles are required to provide the business office a copy of their current license and permission to view their driving record. A staff member examines each employee`s driving history via online records maintained by the Kansas Division of Motor Vehicles office. Institutionally-approved guidelines prohibit those with an unsafe record from driving college vehicles. Annually, the HR office distributes electronically to all HCC email users institutional policies including the Drug and Alcohol Policy, the Acceptable (Computer) Use Policy, Right to Know information, Sexual Harassment, and Conflict of Interest. 4P8. How do you determine training needs? How do you align employee training with short and long-range organizational plans, and how does it strengthen your instructional and non-instructional programs and services? The Professional Development and Training Committee regularly surveys all employees for training needs and welcomes requests for specific training. Four days of professional development for faculty and student services personnel are included in the annual college calendar. Faculty representatives from each academic department serve on the Professional

Valuing People

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June 2010

Learning Subcommittee (a standing subcommittee of the Professional Development and Training Committee) and are responsible to survey their colleagues for professional development topics. The institution regularly surveys using the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) and the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory. In response to these results, the institution has provided professional development concerning student engagement, use of technology in the classroom, and understanding traditional aged students and students who come from a culture of poverty. Professional development approved for individual faculty members or administrative staff must meet at least one of the four criteria: Leadership Development State-of-the-Art Technology Applications Currency in Discipline or Position Student Engagement Personnel who participate in professional development opportunities deemed appropriate for institution-wide dissemination may be asked to share that information at a breakout session during the institution`s professional development days. Since 2006, all classifications of personnel have participated in HCC`s annual All-College Convocation. In this large group setting, employees provide feedback about institutional needs that may lead to improvement. Training in communication, customer service, and understanding students who come from a culture of poverty has also been presented at this annual meeting. The growth of on-line instruction, as a means of increasing access to education (one of HCC`s strategic initiatives), has created the need for specialized training for all online instructors. Each semester more than 40 fulltime faculty teach one or more online classes. In the spring 2010 semester, an additional 136 persons (primarily faculty hired on a part-time basis) also taught online. This training is the responsibility of the college`s Instruction Technology/Distance Education Department. 4P9. How do you train and develop all faculty, staff, and administrators to contribute fully and effectively throughout their careers with your organization? How do you reinforce this training? Professional learning (previously discussed in 4P8) conducted at the beginning of each semester provides our most comprehensive training opportunity for faculty and student support personnel. During this two-day period an evening of professional development is made available for part-time faculty who cannot attend the daytime sessions. Additional opportunities are available throughout the year for selected individuals as identified gaps in knowledge are made known and institutional initiatives require new expertise. Department and institutional dollars support faculty attending discipline specific conferences as recommended by their department chair. Faculty may enroll (at their own expense) in approved graduate courses for advancement on the salary schedule and may apply for sabbatical leave to further their education. Faculty

Valuing People

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

are able to move a column` on the faculty initial hiring schedule for every 15 hours of approved college level work completed. Annually, personnel attend institutional accreditation training. Twice the college has sent ten persons to participate in AQIP Strategy Forums. All staff and administrative personnel are required to complete and document 20 clock hours of training annually. This may be in-house or external training. The college, as a fringe benefit, pays tuition for staff to enroll in six credit hours of coursework each semester. Employees may enroll in any coursework offered by HCC that is offered on-line or during non-working hours. 4P10. How do you design and use your personnel evaluation system? How do you align this system with your objectives for both instructional and non-instructional programs and services? The evaluation process for faculty is governed by the Master Agreement, the negotiated contract between the Hutchinson National Faculty Association (HNFA) and HCC Board of Trustees. The evaluation process is discussed in 1P11. Annual administrative and support staff evaluations are coordinated by the Human Resources office. The administrative evaluation was rewritten in 2003 to align with AQIP core values and continuous improvement, e.g., leadership, learning, and collaboration. For each administrative and staff position, the supervisor completes an evaluation and the employee a self-evaluation. Personnel are evaluated by their job descriptions and revisions that have evolved overtime. This process allows for goal setting, an improvement plan if necessary, and documents professional development obtained or needed. Ratings are discussed in a private conference and a final copy is filed electronically in the HR office. 4P11. How do you design your employee recognition, reward, compensation, and benefit systems to align with your objectives for both instructional and non-instructional programs and services? HCC`s vision is to be the premier institution in the state of Kansas. Faculty and staff are the college`s most important resource to carry out our mission and realize our vision. Therefore, continued education and development opportunities for all classifications of employees, as previously discussed, is a major initiative for HCC. Compensation, benefits, and working conditions for all fulltime faculty are negotiated annually between the Faculty Association, the college`s only recognized bargaining unit, and the Board of Trustees. Annual compensation increases often correlate with the local economic reality. Typically administrative and support staff are afforded a similar percent of compensation increase. Fringe benefits are the same for all fulltime employees, regardless of classification. For fiscal year 2010, non-payroll benefits were provided ­ faculty received a third personal day and staff were given their birthday (or another chosen date) as an extra vacation day. The number of credit hours employees and or their dependents received the tuition benefit for was increased from three to six credit hours each semester. The college supports a number of opportunities to recognize excellence in teaching and support services. o Dragon Educator of the Year ­ Recognizes an outstanding faculty member identified by the Student Government Association

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Hutchinson Community College

o Golden Dragon Award peers

June 2010

­ Recognizes an outstanding faculty member nominated by

Both awardees are recognized at Commencement exercises. o o o o Employee of the Semester ­ Any employee may nominate a non-faculty employee for their excellent service. This individual is recognized during Professional Learning Days and receives a monetary gift and plaque. First Monday ­ Weekly, during the academic year, the college president writes an email for campus-wide distribution to recognize faculty, staff and students for their outstanding contributions and demonstration of True Blue Excellence. Attendance Award ­ The names of hourly employees who do not use sick leave in a quarter are entered into a drawing for a gift certificate. Years of service recognition ­ Persons with 10, 15, 20 etc, years of service are recognized at the opening meeting of the Fall semester.

4P12. How do you determine key issues related to the motivation of your faculty, staff, and administrators? How do you analyze these issues and select courses of action? The annual negotiation process between the faculty association and the Board of Trustees allows all parties to identify issues related to faculty motivation. Two processes, the ongoing supervision and annual performance evaluation process, and the biennial administration of the PACE (Personal Assessment of the College Environment) survey provide insight into the motivations of all employees. The negotiation process is used to analyze faculty issues and determine appropriate courses of action. Occasionally, a task force, comprised of faculty and administration, is assigned to study an important issue during the year and make a recommendation for the next negotiation cycle, typically held in the spring of each year. The results of the PACE Survey are shared formally in Administrative Council and analyzed more closely by the President`s Council to better understand the mood of employees and by members of the Professional Development and Training Committee for possible education opportunities. 4P13. How do you provide for and evaluate employee satisfaction, health and safety, and wellbeing? The PACE survey asks employees to rate their level of satisfaction in their work unit. All employees are provided opportunity to participate in wellness committee activities that are held throughout the year. This committee encourages healthy behavior by electronically distributing a monthly health newsletter and sponsoring healthy activities including group exercise opportunities. The Safety and Security Subcommittee, a standing subcommittee of the Regulatory Compliance & Due Process Committee, meets monthly and allows any staff member to bring forward health and safety concerns.

Valuing People

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Results

June 2010

4R1. What measures of valuing people do you collect and analyze regularly? The PACE survey, Personal Assessment of the College Environment, a program of the National Initiative for Leadership and Institutional Effectiveness (NILIE) at North Carolina State University is administered biennially in the fall. Employees are invited to complete a 46-item instrument measuring Institutional Structure, Supervisory Relationships, Teamwork, and Student Focus. This instrument measures HCC existing climate to four managerial systems found to exist in colleges and to a norm base of 45 colleges across North America. In each of the administrations of the PACE survey (2001, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008), HCC`s results indicate a healthy campus climate. The most recent survey yield a 3.64 means score on a scale five. This categorizes the college as a Consultative system which NILIE describes as an organization in which

decisions are made at the lower levels leaders consult with followers regarding decisions influence is exercised through the rewards process lower levels of the organization exercise cooperation toward the accomplishment of goals leaders are view as having substantial confidence and trust in employees employees are significantly involved in the decision-making process.

4R2. What are your performance results in valuing people? Individual item results for Supervisory Relationships and their comparison to the Norm Base are listed below.

Item 2006 Mean 2008 Mean Supervisor expresses confidence in my work 4.06 4.03 I receive timely feedback for my work 3.49 3.51 I receive appropriate feedback for my work 3.53 3.53 My supervisor actively seeks my ideas 3.60 3.71 I am given opportunity to be creative in my work 3.94 3.98 Opportunity to express my ideas in appropriate forums 3.41 3.53 Professional development opportunities are available 3.43 3.64* *T-test results indicate a significant difference between the 2006 and 2008 mean at the 0.05 level. Norm Base 4.03 3.48 3.51 3.62 3.93 3.49 3.59

The PACE survey allows each organization to create customized` questions to discern items specific to that institution. Included in HCC`s own question and results is the following one concerning professional development. No Norm Base is available for customized questions.

Item My supervisor allows me to participate in professional development opportunities 2006 Mean 3.77 2008 Mean 3.97

4R3. What evidence indicates the productivity and effectiveness of your faculty, staff, and administrators are helping you achieve your goals? HCC`s head count and credit hour generation has increased in the last two years in similar fashion to other public two-year institutions. As state fiscal support has declined, the demand

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for educational services has increased. Year-end counts are not yet available for the 20092010 year, but preliminary estimates indicate a student headcount increase of 600 and a similar increase (7%) in credit hours generated over the 2008-2009 year. Our faculty and staff have met the challenge well. Specifically, there have been enrollment increases in on-line and technical education and we are poised for expansion in the two outreach sites at McPherson and Newton, having recently consolidated services in newly renovated locations. Our preliminary assessment results and results for student success and retention rates (illustrated in 1R5) reveal a willingness to examine data for the purpose of driving improvement. We are further encouraged by incremental improvements in student satisfaction results as expressed in the CCSSE and Noel Levitz surveys (discussed in the results sections of Categories 3 and 6). 4R4. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Valuing People compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? The Norm Base results provided by NILIE for the PACE survey are listed in 4R2. Improvement 4I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Valuing People? Recent improvements in the Valuing People category include the completion of the Action Project Evaluation of Instruction in which faculty and administration collaborated to rewrite the tool used for faculty evaluation. PACE Survey results show incremental increases in employee satisfaction with professional development opportunities. For the 2009-2010 academic year, the creative expansion of benefits ­ increasing the credit hour tuition benefit and providing an additional day of leave ­ was applied when a monetary increase was not feasible. 4I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Valuing People? To date, HCC personnel have not set specific targets for improved performance results.

Valuing People

4-8

Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY FIVE Processes

June 2010

5P1. How are your organization's mission and values defined and reviewed? When and by whom? Administrative Council members participated in a formal process to draft the current mission and vision statements and recommended them and quality values to the Board of Trustees for formal approval. This process occurred and was finalized in 2005. Annually, the President`s Council (president and Deans listed in 4C) review the statements and values for relevancy. 5P2. How do your leaders set directions in alignment with your mission, vision, values, and commitment to high performance? The President`s Council meets weekly to discuss issues of institution-wide importance. As warranted, others attend to discuss specific issues or events. As opportunities present themselves, selected staff are charged to provide due diligence in determining the appropriateness of the action, taking into consideration the college`s mission and values and the needs and expectations of its stakeholders. Information gathered is then provided to senior administration and the decision to pursue the opportunity or not is made. 5P3. How do these directions take into account the needs and expectations of current and potential students and key stakeholder groups? Expectations of students are gained partially from the survey results and from input of various student groups, primarily the Student Government Association. Student representatives serve on major committees and have voting rights. Monthly the president meets with student government representatives to hear their concerns and feedback. Admissions personnel and others who work with prospective students would share their information and insights with the Dean of Students who is a member of President`s Council and, as appropriate, brings information to that body for further discussion and possible action. In addition to scheduled breakfast meetings with HCC faculty and staff, the president regularly meets with members of the community and other key stakeholders to understand service area needs and expectations. This input, coupled with the input provided by our Advisory Committees, and senior leadership involvement with the Kansas Board of Regents (state coordinating board for community and technical colleges) and the Kansas Legislature provides broad perspective for effective decision-making. As discussed in Overview Question #5 and Categories Three and Six, student surveying results are formally examined to discern needs and expectations as well. 5P4. How do your leaders guide your organization in seeking future opportunities while enhancing a strong focus on students and learning?

Leading And Communicating

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

The college President, in addition to overseeing the internal operations of the college, is externally focused. He regularly attends meetings of the Kansas Board of Regents, applicable Legislative hearings, and other state-system entities. In addition, he actively elicits feedback from the community via scheduled meetings with selected individuals and groups including representatives of area industry. Using these contacts, he seeks opportunities for growth in our current transfer and technical programs and for creation of new programs to serve unmet needs. Our Deans are responsible for understanding the needs of each constituent group they supervise ­ learning, student services, college finance and operations, and the needs of persons served through outreach and workforce development programs. 5P5. How do you make decisions in your organization? How do you use teams, task forces, groups, or committees to recommend or make decisions, and to carry them out? Regularly, heads of administrative departments meet to discuss operational concerns. Monthly, all academic department chairpersons, deans, and work area supervisors attend Administrative Council which is led by the college President. In this formal meeting, institution-wide committee reports are made, recommended policies are voted on (following first and second reading) for recommendation to the Board of Trustees, and other reports and information of institution-wide interest are shared. Minutes of Administrative Council meetings are distributed electronically. Bi-weekly, the Dean of Instruction meets with the Academic Department chairpersons; monthly all academic support leaders also attend to discuss issues pertaining to the improvement of instruction. The college`s institution-wide committee structure and formalized processes are used to make improvements in policies and in processes that affect multiple work areas. The revision of our committee structure was an AQIP Action Project from 2003 through 2005. The flow chart on page 5-7 illustrates the process for the creation or refinement of a college policy or process. The institution-wide committee chairs serve alternating two-year terms to assure continuity of leadership and comprise the Institution Wide Council (IWC). Most items brought forth by the constituency are immediately understood to fall under the purview of a specific committee ­ Regulatory Compliance / Due Process, for example, would review the college`s Academic Appeal Process. The assignment of other issues may not be so obvious requiring the IWC members to make that determination. Occasionally IWC will suggest two committees work together. Review of the Student Reinstatement Policy was recently examined by both the Regulatory Compliance/Due Process and Teaching and Learning Committees. In researching an issue, committee members may choose to have a standing subcommittee or a task force with subject matter experts providing input. This group`s recommendations are then presented to the full committee and follow the approval process outlined in the flow chart. Administrative Council members are expected to share the proposal with persons in their work unit and provide feedback at the following meeting. Policy recommendations are forwarded to

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June 2010

the college Board of Trustees. Revised procedures are instituted under the supervision of the appropriate Dean following a positive vote of Administrative Council. 5P6. How do you use data, information, and your own performance results in your decision making processes?

Types of data and information most commonly examined by institutional leaders and how that information is used in decision-making are listed below.

Table 5P6-1 Type of Data/Information Student Success/Retention Data and Student Survey Results Advisory Committee Feedback

Use of Data Determine if revisions to current services/instruction is needed Evaluation of programs of study in preparing students for success in the workplace; Determining program revisions, major equipment purchases and that workforce needs are met Determine if transfer curricula is adequately preparing students for academic demands Creation of course schedules to meet expected demand Budgeting, budget revisions Determine if current programs are appropriate, if investigation into new or revised programs is appropriate Reassign work load and justify additional employment to meet expected demand

Student Subsequent Performance at 4-year Institutions Enrollment Data Fiscal Community and Student Feedback Credit Hour Load and Workload Data

5P7. How does communication occur between and among the levels and units of your organization? Communication occurs primarily within meetings and electronically, replacing previously distributed paper copies of minutes, memos, and weekly calendars of campus events. All fulltime and most part-time employees have a personal e-mail account on their computer workstation with the ability to transmit and read attached documents. All users have access to an electronic calendaring system (GroupWise) for efficient scheduling of meetings and events. Regularly scheduled meetings include President`s Council (weekly), Department Chairs with Dean of Instruction (twice monthly) Services & Operations (twice monthly), Administrative Council (monthly), Institution-wide Committees and some Subcommittees (monthly). Single purpose meetings are scheduled as needed. The HCC Organization Chart on page 5-8 shows our structure. Dean and department heads are expected to communicate to their specific work groups information shared at meetings and to gather feedback on draft policies and procedures before final determination is made. 5P8. How do your leaders communicate a shared mission, vision, and values that deepen and reinforce the characteristics of high performance organizations?

Leading And Communicating

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

The President and Deans present information concerning college values and direction and items of institution-wide importance to faculty and staff at the all-employee meeting held at the beginning of each semester. On a rotating basis the President invites small groups of employees to a breakfast or lunch in his office where information concerning the college is presented in an informal matter. All employees are invited to one of these meetings sometime during the year. Weekly, the President sends an electronic e-mail First Monday to all staff. In this communication he highlights accomplishments of faculty, staff, and students, and conveys institutional direction and values. Each year since 2006 the college has held an institution-wide convocation. This half-day event serves as a celebration of the college and its personnel and purposefully creates conversation among employees for the purpose of enhancing community and collaboration to make HCC a premier institution. Each program area, both career/technical and transfer, are required to prepare a three-year report summarizing the program`s enrollment and course offerings, student assessment results, program accomplishments and challenges and plans for continued improvement and growth. Findings are presented in a formal meeting attended by the President, Dean of Instruction, the Director of Outcomes and Assessment, and appropriate faculty and Department Chairpersons. This setting enables faculty and senior leadership to dialogue about program goals, history, student success, and opportunities for growth and improvement. 5P9. How are leadership abilities encouraged, developed and strengthened among your faculty, staff, and administrators? How do you communicate and share leadership knowledge, skills, and best practices throughout your organization? Several practices are in place to develop and strengthen leadership abilities. Committee and subcommittee chairs alternate their two-year leadership terms to assure continuity. Department chair person positions are evaluated in the spring of even numbered years. Department faculty may nominate a colleague for the role. Candidates from this pool are interviewed by the President and Dean of Instruction before final selection is made. Department chairpersons attend Chair Academy` training as part of their orientation to this role. The Professional Development and Training Committee offer training in leadership to the campus community at large. 5P10. How do your leaders and board members ensure that your organization maintains and preserves its mission, vision, values, and commitment to high performance during leadership succession? How do you develop and implement your leadership succession plans? The Board of Trustees and senior leadership have not formally articulated this process. Results 5R1. What performance measures of Leading and Communicating do you collect and analyze regularly?

Leading And Communicating

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Biennially, the college administers the PACE (Personal Assessment of the College Environment) survey to all employees. It was most recently administered in the fall of 2006 and 2008. The assessment measures four climate factors: institutional structure, supervisory relationships, teamwork and student focus. Additional discuss and results from this survey are discussed in the Results Section of Category Four. 5R2. What are your results for leading and communicating processes and systems? PACE Survey results concerning leadership and communication for the 2006 and 2008 survey administrations and comparison to the Norm Base of community colleges are listed below. HCC results improve incrementally between survey administrations and rate slightly above the Norm Base which is derived from all climate studies conducted by NILIE at two- and four-year institutions since 2001. These include small, medium, large, and multi-campus institutions; community college districts; and statewide systems.

PACE Survey Element (Scale of five) Actions of this institution reflect its mission Institution-wide policies guide my work Administrative leadership is focused on meeting student needs I receive adequate information regarding important institution activities There is a spirit of cooperation within my work team Opportunity for all ideas to be exchanged within my work team. My work team coordinates its efforts with appropriate individuals

2006 3.73 3.53 3.59 3.43 3.79 3.59 3.65

2008 3.79 3.68 3.69 3.59 3.95 3.77 3.73

Norm Base 3.67 3.47 3.48 3.49 3.78 3.63 3.63

PACE survey results that address the college`s decision-making/committee structure and processes are listed below.

Element (Scale of five) Decisions are made at the appropriate level of the institution Institutional teams use problem-solving techniques My work is guided by clearly defined administrative processes Have opportunity to express my ideas in appropriate forums 2006 3.25 3.21 3.34 3.41 2008 3.29 3.28 3.36 3.53 Norm Base 2.98 3.09 3.28 3.49

In the 2006 and 2008 survey administrations the college listed customized elements to discern the opinion of the institution-wide committee structure. There are no comparative data for these results.

Element (Scale of five) Current committee structure contributes to my involvement in decision-making at this institution Committee structure is effective and efficient for advancing institution`s work I have participated in the current committee structure 2006 3.11 3.00 3.44 2008 3.21 3.15 3.61

In recent years, committee processes have yielded additional results in the revision or creation of several major policies. These include the creation of an institutional Conflict of Interest policy, Emergency Response procedures, a mandatory Reading Policy, a revised Academic

Leading And Communicating

5-5

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Reinstatement policy, an Institutional Copyright policy (in response to expectations of the Higher Education Opportunity Act passed by Congress), and addenda to the Acceptable IT Use Policy. 5R3. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Leading and Communicating compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?

Data comparing HCC`s PACE survey results to the Norm Base are listed in 5R2. Improvement 5I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Leading and Communicating? To increase communication the college has further developed information available to all full and part-time personnel on the college`s intranet ­ HCCWebservices. Available information includes committee minutes, student data, individual human resource information, college handbooks, budgeting and budget planning capabilities, textbook ordering when a new class section is added to the course schedule, course syllabi, and event scheduling. As indicated by a comparison of the 2006 and 2008 PACE data, employee involvement in the current committee structure has improved as has staff and faculty perception of HCC`s organizational structure. 5I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Leading and Communicating? The committee structure has provided the institution a mechanism to address issues that previously were of concern, but a means to discuss and resolve them in a systematic and purposeful manner did not exist. The institution-wide committee structure enables all stakeholders to bring concerns forward for consideration and has provided college faculty and staff the processes to address issues that improve the ways the college functions and the services it provides.

Leading And Communicating

5-6

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Institution Wide Council receives proposal/ concern/idea from constituent

5P5 Committee Decision Making Process

Referred to appropriate dean Divisional or Institution Wide

Which committee`s charter does the issue fall under?

Regulatory Compliance/Due Process Committee acceptance, discussion, and referral Teaching & Learning Subcommittee or Task Force?

Subcommittee develops proposal and reports, and recommends to full committee

Committee discussion and first reading

Members take items to constituent groups for input

Second reading and vote No Process Terminates

Yes

Item brought to Administrative Council for discussion and first reading

Institutional Effectiveness Members take items to constituent groups for input Item brought to Administrative Council for discussion and second reading HCC Board of Trustees discussion and first reading

Professional Development & Training

Administrative Council vote

Yes

Is this a policy?

Yes

Board second reading and vote Denied Process terminates

Yes

Policy is institutionalized

No Process terminates

No Institutionalize the procedure/process

Leading And Communicating

5-7

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Board of Trustees

5P7 Organizational Chart June 2010

President

Dean of Finance and Operations

Dean of Student Services

Dean of Instruction

Dean of Workforce Development and Outreach

Student Billing Manager/College Treasurer

Coordinator of Advising

Department I, Business, Agriculture, and Family and Consumer Sciences

Department V Chairperson, Public Safety

Director of Marketing and Public Information

Coordinator of Community Services and Special Projects

Executive Director of Instructional Services

Director of Business and Industry Training

Fiscal Systems/ Accounting Manager

Admissions Director

Department II Chairperson, Language, Literature and Communication

Department VI Chairperson, Computer and Industrial Technology

Director of Athletics

Coordinator of the Child Care Center

McPherson Site Coordinator

Coordinator of MSHA

Campus Store Manager

Director of Residence Life Department III Chairperson, Fine Arts Department VII, Natural Sciences and Mathematics Director of Human Resources Coordinator of Adult Basic Education/ GED

Newton Site Coordinator

Coordinator of OSHA

Director of Information Technology Services

Director of Student Financial Aid

Director of Plant Facilities

Director of Student Support Services

Department IV Chairperson, Social Science Department

Department VIII Chairperson, Allied Health

General Manager, Radio Kansas

Director, The Volunteer Center and RSVP

Associate Director of Continuing Education

Registrar

Executive Director, Academic Support

Director of Learning Outcomes and Assessment

Coordinator of Institutional Research

Director of Virtual Learning and ITDE

Leading And Communicating

5-8

Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY SIX Processes

June 2010

6P1. How do you identify the support service needs of your students and other stakeholder groups? Multiple processes and services are used to monitor the needs of HCC`s various stakeholder groups. The identified groups and processes specific to each are listed below.

Stakeholder Group Students Identification/Monitoring of Support Service Needs Cumulative placement scores Student success/retention data Student Government Association feedback Formal student surveying Anecdotal feedback to faculty and staff Review of student appeal processes Parent Orientation Parent-voiced concerns Guardian access availability on student portal Advisory Committee Input Business & Industry Partnerships Employer Survey of CTE Graduates Workforce Development Center Services Feedback from Alumni Board Members Donor requests and relations Events for cohort alumni groups (e.g., nursing grads) Presidential meetings/luncheons with community members Unsolicited community feedback to administration and Board of Trustees Public comment opportunity at Board Meetings Board of Trustee members Support of athletic and performing arts events Legislative Forums Invited presentations to select committees Networking with area legislators

Parents

Employers

Alumni

Community Members / Taxpayers

Legislators

6P2. How do you identify the administrative support needs of your faculty, staff, and administrators? Personnel needs for support are identified through multiple processes. Each employee is directly supervised by the President, a Dean, or Department supervisor. Faculty members are supervised by the appropriate Academic Department Chairperson in collaboration with the Dean of Instruction. Through the supervising and evaluation process, support needs are identified. It is the role of each supervisor to assess the appropriateness of the needs within the mission and values of the institution, consulting with peers or supervisors as needed. When the provision of support needs have significant budget, personnel, of physical plant implications, the decision of the President`s Council (President and Deans, See College Organizational Chart in Category 5) and /or Board of Trustees is final.

Supporting Institutional Operations

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

The Master Agreement, the formal negotiated agreement between fulltime and adjunct faculty, fulltime counselors and librarians and the Board of Trustees, lists specific support needs to be provided these groups of employees. These include calculation of teaching and advising load, office space and hours, office equipment, clerical support, parking, personal and professional leave, and extra duty and overload pay. Institutional policies that affect employees (e.g., Drug and Alcohol, Conflict of Interest, and Acceptable Use of Information Technology) provide additional guidelines for determining appropriate support needs. Revisions to institution-wide policies follow the same processes (the institution-wide committee structure is discussed in Category 5) as revisions to student-related procedures and policies. 6P3. How do you design, maintain and communicate the key support processes that contribute to everyone's physical safety and security? Safety and Security is a standing subcommittee of the Regulatory Compliance & Due Process Committee. This group, in monthly meetings, examines the physical campus and the safety of all employees and makes recommendations to the Director of Plant Facilities and other appropriate work groups. Working in collaboration with the local police department, the subcommittee provided instruction to the entire campus about appropriate responses to an armed intruder situation. In 2009 the subcommittee designed and led the campus in a mock bomb threat exercise and created and distributed emergency response protocols for a variety of situations, including threatening weather, armed intruder, fire, and gas leaks. Most recently, selected personnel engaged in a table top exercise with local law enforcement personnel concerning threatening weather and identified gaps in posted information concerning below ground shelter. A Behavior Intervention Team, comprised of the Dean of Student Services, the Director of Guidance and Counseling, the Registrar, the Director of Residence Life and the Affirmative Action Officer, was created in early 2009 to monitor the actions of students whose behavior is reported to be of concern in one or more campus settings. This team collaborates as needed with faculty, campus security, local law enforcement, and mental health professionals in accordance with FERPA guidelines. As necessary, campus personnel are notified of the Team`s decisions concerning specific persons. 6P4. How do you manage your key student, administrative and organizational support service processes on a day-to-day basis to ensure they are addressing the needs you intended them to meet? Each work area is supervised by a Director or Coordinator. In regularly scheduled unit meetings, needs and concerns are communicated, tasks assigned and progress evaluated. Representatives from work units that provide student and administrative support services meet bi-weekly to discuss processes that affect multiple work areas. Named the Services and Operations Council (SOC), these representatives coordinate functions that require the input of two or more work areas. Examples include student registration and records and computer programming upgrades.

Supporting Institutional Operations

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

6P5. How do you document your support processes to encourage knowledge sharing, innovation, and empowerment? Each position at the college has a written job description listing the primary duties and the required and preferred qualifications. All college policies, both academic and institutional, are posted on the college`s website. Some college policies separately list procedures to be followed. Some offices have written specific guidelines (e.g., Business Office, Financial Aid Office) to assure approved division of labor practices are followed and that the college is working within legal parameters. Results 6R1. What measures of student, administrative, and organizational support service processes do you collect and analyze regularly?

In the spring semester, students are randomly sampled using either the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey or the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE). Each year, graduates complete an exit survey as part of that application process. Annually, the college is audited by a professional accounting firm using A-133 standards (for the audit of nonFederal entities expending Federal awards). 6R2. What are your performance results for students support service processes? HCC results from the Noel Levitz and CCSSE survey are listed beside national survey results in 6R5. HCC Graduate Exit survey results for selected support services are listed below. In addition, following the Satisfaction with Library and Tutoring Services data is student success data for persons who used tutoring services three or more times in a given semester. SATISFACTION WITH ADVISING SERVICES

Graduate Exit Survey (Scale of 4) Advisor available by appt / phone /online Knowledgeable about HCC courses / programs Knowledgeable about transfer issues Helpful in career / academic development 2006 3.68 3.70 3.68 3.64 2007 3.61 3.68 3.58 3.62 2008 3.65 3.66 3.61 3.60 2009 3.71 3.71 3.66 3.64

SATISFACTION WITH FINANCIAL AID SERVICES

Graduate Exit Survey (Scale of 4) Communication understandable Personnel addressed my questions and concerns Personnel assisted me through FA process 2006 3.00 3.06 3.05 2007 3.06 3.07 3.07 2008 3.21 3.19 3.21 2009 3.27 3.27 3.28

The college`s current default rate was discussed during the October 2007 Quality Check up Visit. The visiting team strongly encouraged the college to reduce the existing rate even though it was within required federal limits. Following the visit, the Financial Aid Director investigated the practices of other colleges in Kansas and discovered those with a lower default rate used the services of a proprietary company to make follow-up contact with students who were behind in loan repayment. Following further research it was recommended to and approved by the Board of Trustees to contract with the company at a lower cost than hiring and orienting

Supporting Institutional Operations

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

additional staff to perform the services. HCC`s default rates for 2005 to 2008 in comparison with other Kansas schools are listed in 6R5. Students expressed great dissatisfaction with financial aid services in the early (2000-2002) administrations of the Noel-Levitz survey. In response the department staff created several performance goals including Students will receive their awards as timely as the policies and procedures of HCC and the federal Department of Education allow. New processes were put in place to meet this goal. Data showing the number and percent of financial aid awards made by August 18th of each year are listed below. FINANCIAL AIDE AWARD TIMELINES

Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 # of awards finalized by August 18th 769 1,787 1,688 1,674 1,613 1,945 % of awards granted to students by August 18 who applied before this same date 58% 83% 83% 86% 76% 80%

th

SATISFACTION WITH COMPUTERS AND OTHER LABS

Graduate Exit Survey (Scale of 4) Educational technology available/appropriate for educational needs Technology was integrated into much of my coursework 2006 3.51 3.44 2007 3.53 3.45 2008 3.51 3.49 2009 3.56 3.52

SATISFACTION WITH LIBRARY AND TUTORING SERVICES

Graduate Exit Survey (Scale of 4) Assistance in math/writing lab was beneficial Tutoring enhanced my educational experience Library resources/service were useful 2006 3.45 3.39 3.46 2007 3.41 3.35 3.47 2008 3.45 3.55 3.47 2009 3.47 3.65 3.49

STUDENT SUCCESS IN RELATION TO USE OF TUTORING SERVICES

Fall Semester 2006 2007 2008 2009 Math tutees* - # and % successful 45 / 77.5% 127 / 77% 78 / 87.6% 65 / 90.3% English tutees* - # and % successful 20 / 87% 104 / 83.9% 16 / 88.0% 22 / 84.6%

*Students in all levels of math or English instruction who attended 3 or more tutoring sessions in the semester and receive a final grade of C or above. Academic support staff have examined this data and discerned the percent of academic success remains fairly constant for students using tutoring services three or more times. Staff now understand they must better collaborate with instructional faculty to help promote attendance at the Tutoring Center. Increasing the number of students who attend tutoring has become a department goal and part of their program`s strategic plan. SATISFACTION WITH ADMISSIONS

Graduate Exit Survey (Scale of 4) Staff were generally knowledgeable and courteous Literature and forms helpful / easy to complete 2006 3.49 3.44 2007 3.48 3.44 2008 3.56 3.50 2009 3.58 3.51

Supporting Institutional Operations

6-4

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

6R3. What are your performance results for administrative support service processes? CAMPUS MAINTENANCE / PARKING

NOEL LEVITZ (Scale of 7) Security staff respond quickly to calls for assistance Campus is safe and secure for all Parking lots are well-lighted and secure On the whole, the campus is well-maintained Amount of student parking space is adequate 2007 4.84 5.63 5.04 5.77 3.34 2010 5.01 5.76 5.22 5.96 3.48

BUSINESS OFFICE OPERATIONS

NOEL LEVITZ (Scale of 7) Registration processes and procedures are convenient Campus provides online access to services I need Am able to take care of college-related business at convenient times I seldom get the run around` when seeking information 2007 5.70 5.93 5.40 5.00 2010 5.80 5.91 5.62 5.31

INSTITUTIONAL AUDIT Annually, the college receives an unqualified audit opinion from a certified public accounting firm. 6R4. How do your key student, administrative, and organizational support areas use information and results to improve their services? Data compiled from formal student surveys are formally presented to Administrative Council for review. Survey data are further analyzed by the appropriate committee and /or work group to determine if adjustments in processes or services need to be considered. Modifications that affect only a single work area are made under the direction of that area`s director. Revisions of a broader scope may be referred to the appropriate institution-wide committee for consideration. 6R5. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Supporting Organizational Operations compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?

In the following charts, HCC`s student satisfaction ratings on support services are compared to national Noel Levitz results and CCSSE institutions of similar size. For most measures, the national standard has held fairly constant, while HCC has increased incrementally. ADVISING SERVICES

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 5.59 5.23 5.78 5.31 2007 Nat'l results Na 5.35 5.52 5.18 2010 HCC results 5.64 5.39 5.85 5.41 2010 Nat'l results 5.33 5.32 5.51 5.17

Advisor is available when I need help Services help me decide a career Advisor knowledgeable about program requirements Advisor knowledgeable about transfer requirements

Supporting Institutional Operations

6-5

Hutchinson Community College

CCSSE Measure (Scale of 3) Satisfaction w/ Academic Advising Satisfaction w/ Career Counseling 2006 HCC Results 2.25 2.00 2006 Cohort Results 2.20 2.03 2009 HCC Results 2.41 2.17

June 2010

2009 Cohort Results 2.23 2.05

FINANCIAL AID SERVICES

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 4.77 5.13 5.63 4.94 2007 Nat'l results 5.12 Na 5.71 Na 2010 HCC results 5.09 5.37 5.78 5.15 2010 Nat'l results 5.06 5.32 5.66 5.06

Awards announced in timely manner FA counseling is available Convenient ways to pay tuition HCC helps identify resources to finance my education

CCSSE Measure (Scale of 3) Satisfaction with Financial Aid advising

2006 HCC Results 2.13

2006 Cohort Results 2.19

2009 HCC Results 2.19

2009 Cohort Results 2.21

COMPUTERS AND OTHER LABS

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 5.84 5.53 2007 Nat'l results 5.70 5.47 2010 HCC results 5.95 5.66 2010 Nat'l results 5.73 5.53

Computer labs adequate and accessible Lab equipment is kept up to date

CCSSE Measure (Scale of 3) Satisfaction with computer labs

2006 HCC Results 2.52

2006 Cohort Results 2.50

2009 HCC Results 2.59

2009 Cohort Results 2.50

SATISFACTION WITH LIBRARY AND TUTORING SERVICES

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 5.62 5.70 2007 Nat'l results 5.54 5.66 2010 HCC results 5.75 5.79 2010 Nat'l results 5.54 5.66

Tutoring services are readily available Library resources/services are adequate

CCSSE Measure (Scale of 3) Satisfaction with peer or other tutoring Satisfaction with math/writing lab

2006 HCC Results 2.11 2.09

2006 Cohort Results 2.13 2.23

2009 HCC Results 2.25 2.26

2009 Cohort Results 2.15 2.25

CCSSE doesn`t measure student satisfaction for the following support services. The College relies on Noel Levitz data for comparison with other institutions. ADMISSION SERVICES

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 5.32 5.20 5.45 2007 Nat'l results Na 5.14 5.49 2010 HCC results 5.54 5.36 5.55 2010 Nat'l results 5.27 5.16 5.45

Staff provided personalized attention prior to enrollment Staff accurately portray programs when recruiting Assessment and course placement procedures are reasonable

Supporting Institutional Operations

6-6

Hutchinson Community College

CAMPUS MAINTENANCE / PARKING

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 4.84 5.63 5.04 5.77 3.34 2007 Nat'l results 5.15 5.81 5.37 5.84 4.56 2010 HCC results 5.01 5.76 5.22 5.96 3.48

June 2010

2010 Nat'l results 5.12 5.77 5.33 5.84 4.45

Security staff respond quickly to calls for assistance Campus is safe and secure for all Parking lots are well-lighted and secure On the whole, the campus is well-maintained Amount of student parking space is adequate

BUSINESS OFFICE OPERATIONS

Noel Levitz Measure (Scale of 7) 2007 HCC results 5.70 5.93 5.40 5.00 2007 Nat'l results Na Na 5.44 4.98 2010 HCC results 5.80 5.91 5.62 5.31 2010 Nat'l results 5.59 5.85 5.48 5.07

Registration processes and procedures are convenient Campus provides online access to services I need Am able to take care of college-related business at convenient times I seldom get the run around` when seeking information

LOAN DEFAULT RATES

Federal Reporting Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 HCC Loan Default Rate 8.6% 11.9% 8.5% 4.2%

The default rate of other Kansas community and technical colleges ranges from 1.8% to 10.2% in 2005 (average is 6.3%) and from 1.6% to 16.9% in 2007 (10% average), the last year for which comparison data are available. Improvement 6I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Supporting Organizational Operations? The college has administered the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction survey on an almost biennial basis since 2000. However, only recently has the Institutional Effectiveness Committee begun analyzing the data with the intent of continuously monitoring the results and determining if modifications to services and processes need to be considered. Senior administrators, in collaboration with faculty, continue to consider renovation of learning environments as opportunities to acquire space and /or resources becomes available. When area surrounding the campus is available for sale, the college seriously considers purchasing the property for future demolition and renovation to expand parking or classroom buildings. The campus has taken a recent green approach to reduce its footprint on the environment. High efficiency windows, light bulbs, HVAC, motion-sensing lights, and low flush toilets are all components of our facilities upgrades. Further, the campus master plan is moving forward with new construction and repair of existing buildings. Supporting Institutional Operations 6-7

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

In the summer of 2010 the college will make the DragonZone student portal available for all students. This is an improved portal that provides, in one location, student-specific information concerning course schedule, billing, textbooks, campus events and services. It exceeds expectations outlined in the Higher Education Opportunity Act concerning student access. In addition, students may grant up to three other persons/guardians access to all or a part of their information. This feature is further discussed in Category Seven. The Safety and Security Subcommittee has provided training for all members of the campus concerning bomb threats, armed intruder and has updated response procedures for a variety of emergencies including inclement weather, fire and death. The Behavior Intervention Team was formed to address identified behavior issues of students and to communicate, as needed, to the campus community information to protect themselves and others. 6I2. How does your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Supporting Organizational Operations? Three ongoing processes enable the college to examine and consider ways to improve our performance. The institution-wide committee structure (process discussed in Category 5), advisory committees that solicit input from business and industry in order to improve technical instruction provided to students, and the examination of student success and retention data by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee and other appropriate task forces and work groups.

Supporting Institutional Operations

6-8

Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY SEVEN Processes

June 2010

7P1. How do you select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support your instructional and non-instructional programs and services? To assure appropriate access, the ITS staff designed and maintains a Rights and Roles Module. This software controls which data a specific person has access to in relation to the position he/she holds within the college. The college`s intranet ­ HCC Webservices ­ provides staff customized information (e.g., payroll and HR records) based upon the log-in information provided as well as college-wide information (student and course schedule information, staff handbooks and college policies, institution-wide data, and other communication, including meeting minutes). Academic department chairpersons and other managers have access to student or administrative data specific to their job responsibilities. 7P2. How do you select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support your planning and improvement efforts? Departments across the campus contribute to the selection of performance information to support planning and improvement. Management and distribution of those data are determined through collaborative efforts between President`s Council and the ITS director. Among the groups involved in selection of data are Department Chairs` Council, Services and Operations Council, Strategic Planning Council, and Institution-wide Chairs` Council. These groups submit their selections to President`s Council for evaluation and final determination. On a regular basis data results are formally presented to the Administrative Council as an information item (e.g., graduate and student surveys, enrollment data). In-depth analysis of data is conducted at the committee or work unit level in order to support planning and improvement efforts. 7P3. How do you determine the needs of your departments and units related to the collection, storage, and accessibility of data and performance information? As indicated in 7P1, employees have access to information based on their log-in information. For members of Administrative Council, this information includes data related to the specific unit each Council member supervises. Academic Department chairs, under the direction of the Dean of Instruction, regularly analyze student outcome information, faculty evaluation results, and other relevant data to assure the quality of their programs on campus, in outreach locations, and online. Similarly, student services personnel, under the supervision of the Dean of Student Services, determine pertinent data needs to assess and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of non-academic units that provide student services. The Dean of Finance and Operations also selects data to determine resources are adequate and distributed appropriately. The Dean of Workforce Development and Outreach Instruction is currently working with ITS to

Measuring Effectiveness

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

determine the data needs for non-credit offerings to plan for improvement in the non-credit and business and industry training areas. 7P4. How, at the institutional level, do you analyze data and information regarding overall performance? How are these analyses shared throughout the institution?

President`s Council meets with individual members or groups of members of Administrative Council to review data regarding institutional performance. Members of President`s Council have determined that it is generally not advisable to initiate major revisions before accumulating at least three collection points of data to determine trends, thus avoiding panic or unwarranted euphoria over single points of data. Once three collection points are available, President`s Council determines how the data will be shared, generally through links on the intranet, Webservices, or during all-employee meetings. The appropriate department or work group would then use the information to formulate possible revisions. 7P5. How do you determine the needs and priorities for comparative data and information? What are your criteria and methods for selecting sources of comparative data and information within and outside the higher education community?

Trend data showing recent annual activity within the college is the most often used comparative data analyzed by HCC staff. This information is used to determine growth, decline or anomalies over time. HCC participates in the National Community College Benchmark Project and the Kansas Study; both provide comparative data for a number of different areas. In addition, the Kansas PostSecondary Database provides some comparative data for community colleges, particularly performance of students from each community college at the universities governed by the Kansas Board of Regents. A formal criterion for selecting external comparative data has not been established 7P6. How do you ensure department and unit analysis of data and information aligns with your institutional goals for instructional and non-instructional programs and services? How is this analysis shared? Through various means of communication, college personnel in supervisory and decisionmaking positions understand the mission, vision and initiative of HCC. Supervisors are charged with educating their staffs and monitoring the analysis of data and information for the betterment of the institution and the fulfillment of its mission and vision. Analysis results are shared in appropriate meetings and are made available on Webservices. 7P7. How do you ensure the timeliness, accuracy, reliability, and security of your information system(s) and related processes?

Measuring Effectiveness

7-2

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Data collection that is developed institutionally is designed to be relational, online, and real-time. Data changes are available instantaneously to those with access. User access must be approved by a director level or higher before granted with the most sensitive data requiring dean level approval. Sensitive information (e.g., students` social security numbers) is prohibited from being stored on local computer hard drives. Results 7R1. What measures of the performance and effectiveness of your system for information and knowledge management do you collect and analyze regularly?

A primary measure of the effectiveness of our information system is the creation and use of automated processes that result in reduced staff time to gather information and that support ongoing processes and the reduction in or elimination of data entry and retrieval errors. 7R2. What is the evidence that your system for Measuring Effectiveness meets your institution's needs in accomplishing its mission and goals? Several recent improvements to our data management system have reduced staff time in the performance of repetitive functions. An automated Course Creation system enables a new class section to be added to the existing course schedule (enabling student enrollment) in less than 72 hours. Previously, the process required multiple paper shuffling` by multiple persons and could take weeks to accomplish. Now, the time span is greatly abbreviated and textbook adoption is integrated into this process. The integration of the course creation and textbook ordering processes practically eliminates the possibility of ordering the wrong textbook or of ordering an insufficient number. ITS staff have collaborated with various campus office personnel to design and create an Admissions Wizard. This online query system automatically adjusts the information made available to the applicant, requiring him/her to answer specific questions based upon data just entered. For example, a high school student who desires to enroll in concurrent coursework is provided different questions than someone who is inquiring about taking a class in an outreach location. The electronic application questions tree` to various new questions depending upon responses entered electronically by the individual. The new student portal, DragonZone, enables a student to allow up to three other persons access to all or part of his personal information, thus freeing staff of this data entry task. Via the college website, parents/guardians can request access to students` financial and academic information. The requester is issued a 16 digit alphanumeric number that provides no access until the student enters the number into his/her personal account and selects from a menu of items the guardian may view. For example, the student could choose for the guardian to see the financial aid or billing information, but not the course schedule or transcript. HCC students may assign up to three guardian access accounts to their specific information. Students may also update their own contact information, thus freeing office staff of this time consuming task.

Measuring Effectiveness

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

The student portal also addresses student and faculty electronic communication. Research indicated students, in general, were not accessing and reading their college-issued email account, but were accessing the student portal for information. That same study indicated faculty were communicating to students using the college-issued email addresses. DragonZone messaging was developed by ITS staff to enable faculty to send emails in the manner they are accustomed to and for students to receive those emails in the student portal. 7R3. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Measuring Effectiveness compare with the results of other higher education institutions and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?

HCC has not formally compared its information and data management capabilities with other institutions. Anecdotal data from various vendors indicate we are technically advanced in our centralized, relational databases and their level of effectiveness in supporting the mission of the college. Annually, in late May, the ITS department have an upgrade weekend` to change out major elements of the computing infrastructure and or install new system-wide software. A major modification in the 2010 upgrade weekend was converting the student email system to Google mail (gmail) enabling students to access information via mobile devices and other means they are likely to use. Improvement 7I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Measuring Effectiveness? Recent improvements in information processes and performance are listed in 7R2. The college continues to move toward a centralized data base, reducing dependence on information that is maintained on individual computers and increasing the security of data. 7I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Measuring Effectiveness? The college personnel in both the instructional and non-instructional areas are very accepting of technology. All staff have access to data as explained previously; they expect to use it daily and expect data and data-driven processes to serve them in their roles. Requests for new or modified applications to current systems are numerous. The college committee structure (discussed in Category Five) and the administrative structure help determine priority of requested revisions. HCC has a perpetual right and open source license for our student information system. This provides HCC the authority to make software improvements as necessary.

Measuring Effectiveness

7-4

Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY EIGHT Processes 8P1. What are your key planning processes?

June 2010

Planning is the joint responsibility of President`s Council, our senior administrators, and each work unit. In a day-long meeting at the end of each semester, the President`s Council reviews internal and external changes to the college environment, the progress of current activities, considers possible revisions, and reviews newly-identified opportunities that align with the institution`s three strategic initiatives ­ access, learning, and collaboration. As necessary, other college staff members are invited to provide updates and/or input. Under the direction of a Strategic Planning Committee, each work unit has been led in a process to determine values and mission, analyze internal and external influencing factors specific to their area, determine priorities and create operational action plans that align with the college`s mission, vision and institutional initiatives. 8P2. How do you select short- and long-term strategies? For planning purposes, the President and Board of Trustees have defined long-term to be 3-5 years and short-term to be 1-3 years. Institutional emphases were drafted by senior leaders and endorsed by the Board of Trustees several years ago. Annually, these are reviewed for continued currency and relevancy. These areas and their alignment with the college`s mission and vision are listed below. The emphases serve as an additional filter to evaluate the appropriateness of proposed strategies to fulfill the institution`s mission and vision.

Institutional Emphases Provide quality instruction and student services Recruit traditional and non-traditional students proactively Strengthen the transfer programs Enhance the technical programs Expand Business and Industry training opportunities Expand off-campus programs and distance learning opportunities Enhance cooperation with area school districts and four-year universities Identify and implement student retention strategies Increase student success in developmental education courses Provide community service opportunities Utilize state-of-the-art technology

Alignment with Mission/Vision Learning Accessibility Learning Learning Learning/collaboration Learning/collaboration/ accessibility Collaboration Accessibility Learning/accessibility Collaboration/ quality of life Learning/accessibility

8P3. How do you develop key action plans to support your organizational strategies? HCC`s work units complete multiple steps before putting their action plans into motion. These steps include the involved persons agreeing on the overall goal, assuring alignment with institutional initiatives, and determining the components necessary to accomplish the goal. This likely includes the identification of responsible person/s, resources necessary (i.e., time,

Planning Continuous Improvement

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

technical expertise, consultation with persons outside the work group), time frames, and outcome measures that will determine success. 8P4. How do you coordinate and align your planning processes, organizational strategies, and action plans across your institution's various levels?

Each college Dean is accountable for activities conducted in their area of responsibility. The coordination and alignment of planning and activities accomplished to meet targeted goals is conducted through our reporting structure as indicated on the Organizational Chart (Chapter Five). In President`s Council meetings, the deans and President communicate to assure activities conducted within each work area are in alignment with institutional initiatives and emphases. Planning and strategies are aligned with Action Projects required of AQIP institutions and Performance Agreements as required of the Kansas Board of Regents. Performance agreements are outcomes-based initiatives that meet system-wide goals of increased system efficiencies and seamlessness, learner outcomes, workforce development, participation of under-served populations, increased external funding, and improvement community and civic engagement opportunities. 8P5. How you define objectives, select measures, and set performance targets for your organizational strategies and action plans? Various processes and tools are used to define objectives, select measures and set performance targets for specific strategies and action plans. When a strategic unmet need is identified, staff most closely aligned with the area collaborate to understand the history and events that led to the current situation or seek to determine the feasibility of HCC meeting the identified need. An example of the former would be the goal to increase the success rates of underprepared students. The institutional decision to offer additional technical programs in the allied health area is an example of a goal to fulfill an unmet need. In both situations, a task force is likely to be formed and charged to seek historical information and pertinent data to understand the present situation. Best practices are researched, constraints and necessary resources are identified, determination is made to assure the identified need is long-term and within the college`s mission and vision, and a timeline with responsibilities identified is created. In collaboration with the appropriate Dean and President`s Council, the project is judged to be financially sustainable or otherwise vital to the college`s mission and vision. If seed` money is required to launch or pilot the proposed activity, assistance is provided by the Coordinator of Special Projects to locate those dollars. Senior administration makes the final determination as to the appropriateness and cost` of the proposal before a pilot project is enacted or, in the case of launching a new program, collaborates with the Board of Trustees for final approval.

Planning Continuous Improvement

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Several factors must be considered when setting performance targets. The task force or group that is considering the proposal must determine which contributing factors are within the influence of the college and which are not (e.g., being an open door institution, the college cannot revise admission policies, but can impose admission prerequisites for specific courses and programs). In considering student success targets, benchmark data (e.g., the National Community College Benchmarking Project or IPEDS) may be examined to find results attained by exemplary schools. A multi-year plan to meet or exceed external data might be considered. AQIP Action Project guidelines might be utilized to provide a format for achieving change. The requirements of external stakeholders, including accrediting bodies, must also be considered when setting performance targets. 8P6. How do you link strategy selection and action plans, taking into account levels of current resources and future needs? Once it is determined a proposed strategy supports the institution`s mission and/or vision and is desirable to strengthen the mission of the college, involved staff identify needed resources and, to the extent possible, quantify them. These can include determining the amount of time necessary for one or more staff persons to create the action plan and pilot the project, the cost of necessary training or visiting another institution that already provides the service in an exemplary manner, and the cost of staffing the new initiative. President`s Council weigh costs against the proposed benefits of the strategy being institutionalized and make a final recommendation to the Board of Trustees. 8P7. How do you assess and address risk in your planning processes? All strategic initiatives are considered in light of the college`s mission, vision and values. Final approval for new initiatives lies with the President in collaboration with the Board of Trustees. Factors they consider in assessing risk include community and stakeholder input (when appropriate) and perceived reaction, alignment with the college`s mission and vision, and sustainability. 8P8. How do you ensure that you will develop and nurture faculty, staff, and administrator capabilities to address changing requirements demanded by your organizational strategies and action plans?

Communication between and among all parties is our primary means of supporting changes that are necessary for HCC to maintain its mission and work toward its vision. Formal communication occurs between the president and the college community in oral presentations at the beginning of each academic semester and with weekly email communication (First Monday referenced in Chapter 5). Weekly, President`s Council members discuss issues of institution-wide importance after which each Dean is responsible to communicate to persons within his/her area of responsibility pertinent revisions and expectations. Monthly Administrative Council meetings are another formal means of informing the college community of change.

Planning Continuous Improvement

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Faculty and staff are further nurtured through professional development opportunities, the supervision process and mentoring. A formal mentoring program is held each year for new faculty. First year faculty are matched with a more experienced faculty member for one-on-one interaction as well as regularly scheduled meetings led by the Dean of Instruction to inform them of community college philosophy, teaching expectations and other information that enables faculty to understand and contribute to the mission and vision of Hutchinson Community College. Results 8R1. What measures of the effectiveness of your planning processes and systems do you collect and analyze regularly? Access ­ costs, physical plant, outreach sites, online education Learning ­ student success, examination of assessment data Collaboration ­ High School Articulation agreements, success of transfer students at four-year institutions, expansion of CTE programs to serve unmet community needs, 8R2. What are your performance results for accomplishing your organizational strategies and action plans?

HCC`s performance results within each of the strategic initiative categories are listed below. Access

Cost of Tuition Physical Plant Online enrollment Student Portal Remains relatively low - $76/credit hour in 2009-10; $79/credit hour in 2010-11 Physical and Biotechnology Science Center to be opened in Fall 2010; outreach sites in Newton and McPherson consolidated and renovated in 2008 and in 2010 Growth this decade is cited in Overview Question # 1; currently at 29% of all course offerings DragonZone expands student access to information; discussed in 6I1.

Learning ­ Student success and assessment data are discussed in Category One. Collaboration ­ HS articulation agreements are discussed in 9P1, student transfer success in 1R4 In the last four years, the college has expanded its Associate Degree Nursing program to include a calendar year on-line bridge` program for paramedic and practical nurses to complete the Associate Degree and sit for the RN-NLEX exam. Currently 40 students (the limit imposed by the Kansas State Board of Nursing) are admitted each January. Three new Allied Health programs, Pharmacy Technician, Physical Therapist Assistant and Respiratory Therapy, have been launched. Two trades programs, Electrical Engineering Technology and Manufacturing Engineering Technology, have experienced unprecedented enrollment increases in the 2008-09 and 2009-2010 academic years. Collaboration (active advisory committees, placing students in internship and part-time jobs) with area employers has enabled these five programs to be launched and expanded.

Planning Continuous Improvement

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

8R3. What are your projections or targets for performance of your strategies and action plans over the next 1-3 years? Projects have not been established at this time, given the uncertainty of the economic climate. 8R4. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Planning Continuous Improvement compare with the performance results of other higher education institutions and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? HCC has not formally explored this with other institutions. 8R5. What is the evidence that your system for Planning Continuous Improvement is effective? How do you measure and evaluate your planning processes and activities? The current economic downturn, while not as severe in Kansas as other parts of the country, has shown that HCC has effective systems in place to provide services to an increased student population and to offer sufficient courses to meet student demand while launching new programs to meet workforce needs. To date, the college has not frozen positions, but is able to replace key personnel who retire or resign. Our planning and activities are evaluated by the results realized. At the close of each semester the President`s Council formally reviews institutional results and considers additional challenges and opportunities. Improvement 8I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Planning Continuous Improvement? In the spring of 2008, the Administrative Council voted to create a fifth institution-wide committee, Strategic Planning, for a two-year pilot to lead the various work units of the college in the creation of mission statements and action plans that are in alignment with the college mission, vision and strategic initiatives. In the 2010-11 academic year, the council will review the pilot work and make organizational and functional revisions. These department level goals and action plans serve as a pool of ideas for future AQIP Action Projects. 8I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for improved performance results in Planning Continuous Improvement?

Planning Continuous Improvement

8-5

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Faculty and staff within the various academic departments and work units of the college may access data and information to use the process illustrated in 3P1-2 to begin research that may support a new initiative or process or revise an existing one. Should preliminary research indicate a more thorough investigation is warranted, the committee process is employed (for processes involving two or more areas and for policy revision ­ Flow Chart in 5P5) or the supervisory process is used to determine possible courses of action. It is the role of President`s Council to set targets for improved performance results with input from the appropriate staff who are most knowledgeable of the involved program.

Planning Continuous Improvement

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Hutchinson Community College

CATEGORY NINE Processes

June 2010

9P1. How do you create, prioritize, and build relationships with the educational organizations and other organizations from which you receive your students? HCC`s Admissions Office leads the campus in maintaining relationships with counselors and administrators at feeder high schools. They market programs and the entire institution to students by making scheduled visits, participating in college planning conferences (where multiple schools are represented), hosting students and their families on our campus, and making follow-up contact, via letters, phone calls, e-mail and texting. Our general marketing efforts (newspaper, television, radio, mailings) encourage logging onto the college website (www.hutchcc.edu) for information about programs, coursework, and scheduled events. A work group established by the President to advise the Marketing Department is focusing on a two-track system ­ High Tech and High Touch. Still in development, High Tech marketing will focus on creating and maintaining an engaging and searchable website and on the use of social networking to create and sustain interest. High Touch marketing capitalizes on face-toface contact with student groups, families, targeted groups, and the general public to create and sustain relationships. Annually, the President meets with area school superintendents to address common concerns and share (via cumulative data) the success of their high school graduates who attend HCC. Various academic departments host student high school groups on campus ­ e.g., Math and Science Open House, Leadership Academy, Fire Science Field Day, Fine Arts and SKILLS USA (Technical education) competitions. Face-to-face and ITV college credit courses are taught each semester in area high schools to selected students. As of Spring 2010, HCC has 209 articulation agreements with 75 high schools throughout central Kansas. Each agreement specifies common competencies met in high school technical education courses and beginning level college courses. Articulation plans benefit high school students as they prepare for entry into an AAS Degree program by receiving college credit for courses they completed in high school. Upon completion of higher level HCC courses in a chosen area of study, the appropriate technical education credits are placed on the student`s transcript. The Business and Industry Institute maintains regular contact with area employers and offers onsite or on-campus training as requested. The local Workforce Development Center office is located on HCC`s campus. Individuals seeking employment are referred, as appropriate, for specific career education training and provided assistance with the enrollment and financial aid process. The college prioritizes its collaborations primarily by geographic location. We expend the most resources on developing and maintaining relationships with those feeder schools and businesses that lie within or near our service area.

Building Collaborative Relationships

9-1

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

9P2. How do you create, prioritize, and build relationships with the educational organizations and employers that depend on the supply of your students and graduates that meet those organizations' requirements? HCC creates and maintains relationships with other educational institutions and employers by a combination of personnel contacts, regular requests for feedback, and the provision of information. Career/Technical Education program advisory committees, annual employer surveys of our CTE graduates, Business and Industry Institute contacts with area employers, and the previously mentioned relationship with the Workforce Development Center are the primary means we use to create and maintain relationships with the business community. Department chairpersons, student services personnel, and advisors who work with transfer-oriented students maintain contact (e-mail, phone, face to face) with colleagues at four-year institutions. The Dean of Students and the Dean of Instruction collaborate with their counterparts at the four-year institutions across the state to maintain positive transfer relationships for the benefit of our students. 9P3. How do you create, prioritize, and build relationships with the organizations that provide services to your students? HCC contracts with several area entities to provide services to students. The college employs Great Western Dining Services to provide food service for the campus. This formal contract is reviewed annually. The Dean of Students and the Dean of Finance and Operations are responsible for maintaining relations with the Director of Food Service and communicating any revisions. The college contracts with the Hutchinson Police Department to provide security at large crowd events and uses a local security firm to provide security during non-business hours. Student Health services are provided by Hutchinson Area Student Health Services, Inc., a private medical group that provides health services to area students of all ages. 9P4. How do you create, prioritize, and build relationships with the organizations that supply materials and services to your organization? College personnel follow board approved purchasing policies when procuring materials for the organization. These include documenting a minimum of three quotes for unit cost items ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 and preparing specifications and vendor contact information for items or projects expected to cost in excess of $10,000. Sealed bids are accepted by the business office and the Board of Trustees approves the recommended purchase at a regularly scheduled meeting. As appropriate, services to the organization are solicited via a request for proposal process also approved by the Board of Trustees upon recommendation of the administration. These processes eliminate partisanship and promote a culture of fairness to vendors. 9P5. How do you create, prioritize, and build relationships with the education associations, external agencies, consortia partners, and the general community with whom you interact?

Building Collaborative Relationships

9-2

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

HCC creates and maintains relationships with other institutions and employers by a combination of personal contacts, regular requests for feedback, and the provision of information. Prioritization is based upon the importance of the collaboration to the college`s mission and vision. Table 9P5 lists these entities, the nature of the partnership and the responsible personnel. General marketing is used to build and maintain a presence with the community at large. The college`s mission ­ Continuing the tradition of excellence through learning and collaboration ­ is used on billboards posted in the community, on mailings and on paid radio/TV and newspaper advertisements.

Table 9P5 ­ Collaborations COLLABORATOR Feeder High Schools NATURE OF COLLABORATION Market HCC to students Provide graduate success data Articulation agreements Technical coursework offered in the high schools Shared facilities for athletic events Advancement of education Assure transferability of coursework Provide input to maintain currency Support college operations, capital improvements, scholarships Host internship experiences Employee training/retraining Accreditation State-wide coordination Program level accreditation RESPONSIBLE HCC PERSONNEL Admissions Office staff College President Articulation Coordinator, Technical Program Coordinators Dean of Workforce Development and Outreach Athletic Director, Director of Plant Facilities Senior leadership and assigned Directors Dean of Instruction, Department Chairpersons Dean of Workforce Dev/Outreach Technical Program Coordinators President Director of Endowment Association Technical Program Coordinators Business & Industry Institute personnel President, Dean of Instruction President Appropriate Program Coordinator

Hutchinson and Newton High Schools Hutchinson USD, City of Hutchinson Kansas Higher Education Institutions 4-year Institutions Academic Department Heads Advisory Committee members Public and Private Financial Contributors Area Employers

Higher Learning Commission Kansas Board of Regents Discipline-Specific Accreditors

9P6.

How do you ensure that your partnership relationships are meeting the varying needs of those involved?

The college ensures these relationships remain positive for all partners by assigning primary responsibility to the appropriate college personnel. Regular communication among the responsible parties takes place as needed to assure that these collaborations change as needed and continue to be effective. 9P7. How do you create and build relationships between and among departments and units within your organization? How do you assure integration and communication across these relationships? Collaboration is highly valued at HCC as evidenced in the college mission statement and strategic initiatives. Several formal and informal events and processes occur regularly to build relationships. Annually since 2006 the college holds an all-employee convocation to elicit staff input to the direction of HCC. Several social events are held during the year including the President and his wife hosting all employees and guests for a Christmas Building Collaborative Relationships

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Open House, a back-to-school picnic each August, and an all-campus soup day hosted by several departments. Individual departments will invite the campus to their office area to celebrate a particular employee`s birthday or retirement. Formally, relationships are built among persons who serve on committees or task forces. Communication to the entire campus is enhanced by formal minutes that are posted on the college`s intranet, WebServices. Results 9R1. What measures of building collaborative relationships, external and internal, do you collect and analyze regularly? The college measures internal collaborative relationships by administered the PACE survey biennially. Externally, the college annually survey employers of CTE graduates, updates and revises as needed articulation agreements with area high schools, assures transferability of coursework with state four-year institutions, reviews scholarship and funding contributions, and maintains current articulation agreements with Kansas fouryear institutions, both public and private. 9R2. What are your performance results in building your key collaborative relationships, external and internal?

PACE Survey data results are listed in 5R2. Employer responses concerning the preparation of CTE graduates are recorded in 3R4. The articulation agreements (209) and collaborating high schools (75) are discussed in 9P1. The academic success of HCC students who have transferred to a state four-year institution is recorded in 1R4. Scholarship and funding contributions are discussed in 2R2. At the close of the Spring 2010 semester, HCC has articulation agreements with each of the six public four-year institutions in Kansas and with several four-year private colleges. 9R3. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Building Collaborative Relationships compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? Institutional staff have not compiled comparative data for these measures. Improvement 9I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your processes and performance results for Building Collaborative Relationships? The college has elevated the previous Associate Dean of Instruction position to Dean of Workforce Development and Outreach to provide illustrate the importance the college holds in the creation and maintenance of partnership and collaborations. Admissions and various academic and student services programs within the college are using Facebook and other social networking means to building and maintain relationships with prospective students who rely on these processes for communication. Building Collaborative Relationships

9-4

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

9I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets? Collaboration is one of HCC`s three strategic initiatives and is foundational to the work of the college. The President`s Council, with input from work units each Dean supervises, semiannually reviews existing partnerships and discusses current and future opportunities to expand relationships with feeder high schools, transfer institutions, business and community partners, and other appropriate entities.

Building Collaborative Relationships

9-5

Hutchinson Community College

Index to Evidence for the Criteria for Accreditation

June 2010

Criterion 1 ­ Mission & Integrity The organization operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff, and students. Core Component 1a - The organization's mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization's commitments. HCC`s mission, vision and values were developed and approved by the institution in January 2005 and are reviewed by President`s Council annually. [5P1] The institutions mission and vision appear on the HCC website www.hutchcc.edu/accreditation are published in major institutional marketing publications, and are displayed in multiple locations across campus. [9P5] Core Component 1b - In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves. The institution`s mission, vision and value statements emphasize commitment to diverse stakeholders by stating that HCC is committed to delivering accessible opportunities for learning, growth and improved quality of life. [Overview] Value statements found at www.hutchcc.edu/accreditation demonstrate the institution`s commitment to diversity by stating that HCC strives for broad-based participation, supports the systematic development of all individuals, and demonstrates responsible institutional citizenship by treating people and organizations with equity, dignity, and respect. Core Component 1c - Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization. Learning expectations are aligned with vision and mission. [1P1] Non-instructional objectives must align with the college mission. [2P2] [2R4] Decisions to target new student and stakeholder groups are determined by compatibility with the college mission. [3P5] Mission, vision and values are used by President`s Council in decision making. [5P2] The Strategic Planning Committee insures that action plans align with mission and vision [8P1] The institution prioritizes collaboration efforts by potential compatibility with the vision and mission. [9P1] Core component 1d - The organization's governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission. All areas of campus (academic departments, outreach sites, business office, student services etc.) are represented in the committee structure and on Administrative Council ­ the decision making and governance entities. Administrative Council members are expected to share proposals with persons in their work unit and provide feedback at the following meeting. [5P5]

Index

I-1

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

HCC`s organizational chart defines a communication network to share information and gather feedback for all issues that are considered by the institution-wide committees or Administrative Council. [5P7] President`s Council uses the institutional mission as a guide for decision making. [5P2] Student representatives serve on major committees and have voting rights. [5P3] The institution`s administration is committed to establishing collaborative processes with external stakeholders. [9P5] Core component 1e - The organization upholds and protects its integrity. The college follows several established practices to assure ethical behavior including acceptable division of labor in the business office, annual audit, background checks on child care staff and selected faculty prior to employment, and annual distribution of institutional policies. [4P7] The institution is fair in dealings with internal and external stakeholders through board approved due process policies, non-discrimination practices and student right to appeal academic and disciplinary decisions. [3P6] Institutional integrity is validated through continued accreditation through the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, maintaining standards set by the Kansas Board of Regents, and supervision by a 7 member Board of Trustees who are elected by Reno County voters. [Overview] Decision making processes provide opportunity for all employees and students to participate. [5P5] Confidential information is protected by password protection and college policy. [Overview, 7P7] Criterion 2 Preparing for the Future The organization's allocation of resources and its processes for evaluation and planning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill the mission, improve the quality of its education, and respond to future challenges and opportunities. Core Component 2a - The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends. HCC has established a Strategic Planning Committee to direct institutional planning. [8P1] Opportunities and trends that might affect the institution are discussed and monitored by President`s Council every semester. [8P1] Advisory committees monitor curriculum of all technical programs to insure relevancy and currency. [1P13, 1R4] Student surveys, graduate exit surveys, student feedback to the college president and results of the Noel-Levitz student satisfaction survey are reviewed to establish planning directives. [3P1, 3R1] The institution has the flexibility and technical infrastructure to implement program expansion or new programs to meet identified needs. [5P7, Overview] As student expectations for electronic access to information increases, the college is able to respond by improving the student portal and adopting social networking as a recruiting tool. [7I1, 9P1]

Index

I-2

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Core Component 2b ­ The organization's resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future. Information systems are engineered to meet office processes and information demands rather than allowing software and hardware capabilities to dictate office processes. [Overview] Identified needs are funded through the annual budget planning process that is approved by President`s Council and the Board of Trustees. [8P6] Human resources are used effectively, and the institution provides training through employee orientation activities and the Professional Development and Training Committee to all employees. [4P1, 4P2, 4P3, 4P4, 4P8, 4P9] The institution`s commitment to maintaining safe and modern facilities is demonstrated by recent upgrades to main campus buildings and the outreach centers in Harvey and McPherson Counties. [8R2] Core Component 2c ­ The organization's ongoing evaluation and assessment processes provide reliable evidence of institutional effectiveness that clearly informs strategies for continuous improvement. The Assessment subcommittee and faculty have developed an embedded system for assessment of course outcomes and assessment of institution-wide student learning outcomes to provide evidence that student performance meets expectations. [1P18, 1R1, 1R2] Effective performance evaluation processes are in place for all employees. [1P11, 4P10] The Noel-Levitz Survey of Student Satisfaction, Community College Survey of Student Satisfaction (CCSSE) and Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) surveys are administered on a rotation to provide trend data on student and stakeholder needs that is reviewed by the Institutional Effectiveness Committee, appropriate deans and work units. This data is compared to national norms and previous results for HCC. The national benchmarking project also provides comparison data for analysis. [1P15, 1R6, 3R1, 4P12, 5R2] The Program Review process provides an opportunity for all academic programs to evaluate effectiveness and set goals for improvement. [1P13] Skill attainment and credential acquisition results and feedback from Kansas four-year institutions provides evidence of student success. [1R4] Core Component 2d ­ All levels of planning align with the organization's mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission. The Strategic Planning Committee coordinates individual work units in developing an action plan that aligns with the college`s mission, vision and institutional initiatives. [8P1, 8P3, 8P4] President`s Council uses the institutional mission as a guide for decision making. [5P2] The planning process allows flexibility to meet unforeseen needs when they arise as demonstrated by the implementation of an expanded practical nursing program in collaboration with Salina Area Technical College. [3P5] Criterion 3 ­ Student Learning & Effective Teaching The organization provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission. Core component 3a - The organization's goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational program and make effective assessment possible. Index

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Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

The institution-wide student learning outcomes, program and course outcomes are clearly stated on every syllabus and are the framework for the institution`s embedded assessment process. [1P1, 1P2, 1P18] Core component 3b - The organization values and supports effective teaching. Faculty evaluation provides feedback from students, supervisors and self for improving teaching and recognizing effective teaching. [1P11, 4P10] Teaching excellence is recognized through two awards revealed at commencement. [4P11] Professional Learning is provided every semester and provides an opportunity for faculty training on topics related to effective teaching. [4P9] Instructors who teach on-line receive training and support that includes pedagogy for webbased delivery from the Instructional Technology and Distance Education office. [1P8] The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) is administered to evaluate student perceptions of HCC`s instruction. [6R1] Course content is developed by qualified faculty and all new and modified curricula is approved by the Curriculum Sub-Committee, Teaching and Learning Committee, Administrative Council and Board of Trustees before being filed with the Kansas Board of Regents. [1P3] The institution supports faculty pursuing additional education by covering expenses for approved training and offering advancement on the salary schedule for instructors who successfully complete additional college credit. [4P9] Core component 3c - The organization creates effective learning environments. Mandatory assessment and placement for English, math and reading insure that students are enrolled in appropriate levels of coursework. [1P5, 1R5, 1I1] The institution`s vision and mission focus efforts on student learning. [5P1, 5P2, 5P4] Students are assigned to advisors in their academic discipline and the advising process focuses on academic success. [1P7] All first-time freshmen are enrolled in Success Seminar/Freshman Orientation where learning styles are identified and study skills emphasized. [1P9] Student success, state of the art technology and state of the art learning environments are key commitments in the planning process. [Overview, 8P2] Co-curricular offerings enhance classroom instruction through additional learning and networking opportunities. [1P16] The institution is deliberate in efforts to create relationships with students. [3P2, 3P4] Needs of specifically identified student groups are addressed. [3P1] Core component 3d ­ The organization's learning resources support student learning and effective teaching. Noel Levitz results indicate that students are satisfied with the institution`s student support. [6R2,6R5,6R7] State of the art technology is a key commitment for planning [Overview, 8P2] Professional Learning is provided every semester and provides an opportunity for faculty training on topics related to effective teaching. [4P9] Instructors who teach on-line receive training and support that includes pedagogy for webbased delivery from the Instructional Technology and Distance Education office. [1P8] Index I-4

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Criterion 4 ­ Acquisition, Discovery and Application of Knowledge The organization promotes a life of learning for its faculty, administration, staff, and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice, and social responsibility in ways consistent with its mission. Core Component 4a - The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning. The Board of Trustees and Administrative Council have both approved the institutional mission and vision statements emphasizing learning as a value. [5P1] Lifelong learning for faculty and staff is demonstrated through the various training opportunities and Professional Learning activities provided by the Board of Trustees and Administration. [4P8, 4P9] Sponsorship of the Dillon Lecture Series supports lifelong learning for students, faculty and staff, and the college`s service area. [2R1] Student mastery of the institution-wide student learning outcomes provides a foundation for lifelong learning. [1P1] Core Component 4b - The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs. All technical programs have established outcomes approved by their advisory committees that require acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills. [1P2] The institution`s curricular and co-curricular offerings cover a broad array of disciplines and technical skills. [Overview, 1P16] Institution-wide student learning outcomes are comprehensive in their expectations for student performance. [1P1] The institution has adopted a decision making process that emphasizes data analysis and use of quality tools. [3P1] Core Component 4c - The organization assesses the usefulness of its criteria to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society. Periodic program review provides an opportunity for each academic unit to evaluate curriculum and student success. [1P13] Advisory committees regularly review academic offering for relevancy to the workplace. [1P13] HCC faculty collaborate with faculty from other Kansas community colleges to align course competencies through the Kansas Core Competencies Project and the Kansas Board of Regents Technical Program Alignment Project. [1P13] The institution works to build relationships with educational organizations from which we receive students and the employers and transfer institutions that accept our students. [9P1, 9P2, 9P5] Core Component 4d - The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly. The institution`s organizational structure, official policies and governance provide checks and balances to ensure ethical conduct and fair treatment of all people. [Overview, 3P6, 4P2, 4P7, 5P5, 5P7, www.hutchcc.edu/catalog] Index I-5

Hutchinson Community College

June 2010

Criterion 5 ­ Engagement and Service As called for by its mission, the organization identifies its constituencies and serves them in ways both value. Core Component 5a ­ The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations. HCC has identified stakeholder needs and strives to meet those needs. [Overview, 3P1, 3P3, 3R1-3R6] The institution administers a variety of formal surveys to determine stakeholder satisfaction and reviews results for gaps. [6R1] The planning process includes review of currency and relevancy of the institution`s emphases and identification of resources necessary to achieve success. [9P2, 9P3,9P4] Core Component 5b ­ The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities. HCC is committed to collaboration through the institution`s mission to provide learning, access and collaboration. [5P1] The institution regularly surveys constituencies to ensure satisfaction. [Overview, 3P1, 3P3, 3R1-3R6, 6R1] Collaborative relationships are established and supported. [9P1 ­ 9P6] Processes are in place to build and maintain relationships with stakeholders. [3P2, 3P3, 3P4] Core Component 5c ­ The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service. The Business and Industry Institute meets the training needs of area employers [Overview, 2P1] HCC reviews formal survey results, evaluations and recommendations of advisory committee to make improvements where needed. [6R1 ­ 6R5, 6I1, 1P11, 1P13] The institution collaborates with other educational institutions through articulation agreements and transfer agreements. [9R2] Core Component 5d ­ Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides. Graduate exit survey results indicate student satisfaction with experiences at HCC. [3R1, 3R2, 3R4] Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction data indicate incremental improvement since the inventory was last administered. [3R2, 3R6] Alumni and community members are generous in making donations to the college`s endowment fund for scholarships and to make improvements on campus. [2P1, 2R2] Employee satisfaction is stable and improving incrementally as measured by the PACE Survey. [4P12, 4R1, 4R2, 5R2] Employers report satisfaction with HCC graduates. [3R4]

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