Read 100 Day Plan Mayor's Report - City of Bellingham, WA text version

100-DAY PLAN MAYOR'S REPORT

Mayor Dan Pike March 3, 2008

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

MAYOR'S LETTER TO THE COMMUNITY ........................................................................................................... 1 100-DAY PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.............................................................................................................. 3 OBJECTIVE 1: PROTECT LAKE WHATCOM RESERVOIR ............................................................................ 5 ACTION STEP A: CITY/COUNTY INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT ...................................................................................... 5 2008: Joint Hiring of Lake Whatcom Watershed Manager ................................................................................. 5 ACTION STEP B: ONSITE STORMWATER RETENTION INITIATIVE .............................................................................. 6 2008: Residential Stormwater Retrofit Program ................................................................................................. 6 2008: Northshore Overlay, Pedestrian, and Stormwater Improvements ............................................................. 7 2008: Northridge Stormwater Pond Retrofit........................................................................................................ 8 2008: Stormwater Phosphorous Management Options ....................................................................................... 8 2008: Pervious Driveway Demonstration ............................................................................................................ 8 2008: Demonstration Home ................................................................................................................................. 8 2008: Miscellaneous Low Impact Density (LID) Projects ................................................................................... 8 Ongoing: Hayward Stormwater Project .............................................................................................................. 8 Ongoing: Pullman Filter Vault ............................................................................................................................ 8 ACTION STEP C: REVIEW WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM ........................................................................................... 9 2008: Engineering Review of the Water Treatment System ................................................................................. 9 Ongoing: Water Filtration Plant Surface Water Treatment Monthly Reports ................................................... 10 OBJECTIVE 2: PROMOTE GREEN BELLINGHAM ......................................................................................... 11 ACTION STEP A: REDUCE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF MUNICIPAL OPERATIONS ................................................ 11 2008: Executive-Team Level Sustainability Function ........................................................................................ 11 2008: Resource Conservation Management Program ....................................................................................... 11 Ongoing: Neighborhood Green Power Challenge ............................................................................................. 11 ACTION STEP B: INVENTORY RESOLUTIONS AND COMMITMENTS TO GREEN PRACTICES ....................................... 12 Inventory of Bellingham City Council Actions ................................................................................................... 12 Inventory of Commitments ................................................................................................................................. 15 ACTION STEP C: DEVELOP IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES .................................................................................... 17 2008: Climate and Energy Initiatives ................................................................................................................ 17 Ongoing: Climate and Energy Initiatives .......................................................................................................... 17 2008: Green Building and Planning Initiatives ................................................................................................. 18 Ongoing: Green Building and Planning Initiatives ........................................................................................... 19 2008: Green Transportation Programs ............................................................................................................. 20 Ongoing: Green Transportation Programs ....................................................................................................... 20 Ongoing: Watershed Protection Programs........................................................................................................ 21 Ongoing: Lake Whatcom Stewardship Programs .............................................................................................. 21 Ongoing: Habitat Protection/Restoration .......................................................................................................... 21 2008: Green Team Programs............................................................................................................................. 21 ACTION STEP D: RESEARCH NEW GREEN TECHNOLOGIES AND PRACTICES............................................................ 22 Model Programs ................................................................................................................................................ 22 ACTION STEP E: ENHANCE RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL GREEN PRACTICES ................................................... 27 2008: Climate and Energy Initiatives ................................................................................................................ 27 Ongoing: Climate and Energy Initiatives .......................................................................................................... 28 2008: Green Building and Planning Initiatives ................................................................................................. 28 2008: Green Transportation Programs ............................................................................................................. 29 Ongoing: Green Transportation Programs ....................................................................................................... 29 2008: Watershed Protection Programs.............................................................................................................. 30 Ongoing: Watershed Protection Programs........................................................................................................ 31 2008: Lake Whatcom Stewardship Programs .................................................................................................... 31 Ongoing: Lake Whatcom Stewardship Programs .............................................................................................. 32 2008: Habitat Protection/Restoration ................................................................................................................ 32

Mayor's Report - 100-Day Plan

Table of Contents

Ongoing: Habitat Protection/Restoration .......................................................................................................... 33 OBJECTIVE 3: CREATE HEALTHY WATERFRONT ...................................................................................... 36 ACTION STEP A: IDENTIFY EARLY ADOPTION PROJECTS FOR WATERFRONT .......................................................... 36 ACTION STEP B: FORMATION OF PUBLIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY ................................................................... 38 OBJECTIVE 4: SUPPORT NEIGHBORHOODS ............................................................................................... 41 ACTION STEP A: REVIEW ALL NEIGHBORHOOD PLANS .......................................................................................... 41 2008: Neighborhood Planning Work Program ................................................................................................. 43 2008: Phasing Plan for Neighborhood Plan Updates ....................................................................................... 43 ACTION STEP B: NEIGHBORHOOD CODE AND CHARACTER TASKFORCE ................................................................. 44 2008: Code and Character Taskforce ................................................................................................................ 44 ACTION STEP C: SCHEDULE SECOND PLANNING ACADEMY ................................................................................... 45 2008: Planning Academy II: Green Bellingham: Achieving Infill, Enhancing Character................................. 45 2008: Mayor's Neighborhood Advisory Commission (MNAC) Retreat and Planning Session. ........................ 45 2008: Neighborhood Issue Prioritization and Action ........................................................................................ 45 2008: Neighborhood Association Skill-Building Workshops ............................................................................. 46 OBJECTIVE 5: STREAMLINE PERMITTING PROCESS ................................................................................ 47 ACTION STEP A: CONCURRENT REVIEW PROCESS .................................................................................................. 47 ACTION STEP B: PROJECT MANAGER ASSIGNED TO APPLICATIONS ....................................................................... 47 ACTION STEP C: ESTABLISH PREDICTABLE TIMEFRAMES ....................................................................................... 47 2008: Implementation of Streamlined Permitting Process ................................................................................ 47 Old Review Process ........................................................................................................................................... 49 New Review Process .......................................................................................................................................... 49 2008: Implementation of Internal Project-Management Model......................................................................... 50 MAYOR'S CONCLUDING REMARKS ................................................................................................................. 51

Mayor's Report - 100-Day Plan

Table of Contents

Mayor's Letter to the Community

TO: FROM: DATE: RE:

Bellingham City Council and the Bellingham Community Mayor Dan Pike March 3, 2008 100-Day Report

One hundred days ago, I stood before you to be sworn-in as Mayor of this remarkable community. At that time I set before you my ambitions and goals for the first hundred days of my term. I had spent the past year on Bellingham's streets, in diners and on front porches, in public debates and in individual conversations with citizens. The year 2007 was, for me, a personal immersion in the depth of intelligence, breadth of ideas and fundamental goodwill and good intentions of this community. And I want the community to know that my first hundred days in office have been an immersion in the intelligence, creativity and goodwill of the staff and elected officials here at City Hall. In its essence, the 100-Day Plan is an act of good faith by the Pike Administration to the community. The function of the 100-Day Plan was to drive real, concrete and meaningful steps toward addressing the issues this community cares deeply about. The five broad objectives of the 100-Day Plan were: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Protect Lake Whatcom Reservoir Promote Green Bellingham Create Healthy Waterfront Support Neighborhoods Streamline Permitting Process

Clearly, none of those objectives were going to be realized in their entirety in a hundred days ­ with the exception of the fifth, the streamlining of the permitting process, which is discussed in the report. Rather, I challenged myself, beginning my first day in office, to make significant and consequential movement toward addressing these critical issues over the next ninety-nine days.

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As we worked together to implement the 100-Day Plan, we proceeded under the guiding principle that sound policy always trumps politics. As such, I asked city staff to revise any original action steps as necessary along the way to achieve a better outcome. Moreover, I was pleased to find that a few of the projects I proposed, before I became mayor, dovetailed with initiatives that city staff were already working on. In those instances, I aligned my efforts to support the staff purpose. I am also choosing to use this opportunity to promote the "transparent" government principle that will be central to my administration. I believe that ready accessibility to information is an important component of transparency. As such, within the 100-Day Plan Report, I am choosing to not only draw attention to the new initiatives and action steps that will be rolled out this year, but to inform the community about ongoing City efforts that speak directly to 100-Day Plan objectives. The fact of the matter is that we, as a community, have a lot of important work to do. But it is an equal truth that we have much good work both underway, and forthcoming. I believe that we deserve to celebrate what is healthy and successful about the city hall-community partnership, even as we work to make it even better. Not every action step of the original 100-Day Plan was fulfilled completely, as explained in this report. However, even in those instances where my reach exceeded my grasp, we have made solid and meaningful movement toward the intended outcome. If I had to do it over again, I would set the same high bar. It is also of note that in a couple instances the original action step was broadened, to be more far-reaching. Those are also discussed in detail in the report. The effort to realize the objectives of the 100-Day Plan has been remarkable, and it is absolutely a collective achievement. This community has clearly articulated its values, and we at City Hall have collaboratively worked to manifest them. I am honored to report to you our progress.

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100-Day Plan Executive Summary

Completed: Indicates that the intent of the action step has been met, e.g. by initiation of projects which may, in terms of scope, be ongoing. In process: Indicates that significant efforts are underway, and that the intent of the action step is close to realization. Objective 1: Protect Lake Whatcom Reservoir · · · Present and recommend to the City Council an Interlocal Agreement between the City of Bellingham and Whatcom County that initiates a search for a jointly appointed Lake Whatcom Watershed Manager*. In process. Establish a Quality Retention Initiative to encourage on-site stormwater management for households within City limits. Completed. Initiate review of City of Bellingham's water treatment system to ensure continued excellence in water treatment service. Completed. Promote Green Bellingham

Objective 2: · · · · ·

Maintain and enhance Bellingham's role as a national leader in environmental protection by reducing the environmental impact of municipal operations. Completed. Inventory resolutions and commitments to green practices. Completed. Develop inter- and intra-departmental implementation strategies. Completed. Research new technologies and practices utilized by other cities for their potential benefits to Bellingham. Completed. Enhance residential and commercial green practices. Completed.

Objective 3: Create Healthy Waterfront · · Identify a list of "early adoption projects," in partnership with the Port of Bellingham. In process. Initiate the formation of a public development authority (PDA) to implement development strategies*. In process.

Objective 4: Support Neighborhoods · · · Review all Neighborhood Plans. Completed. Establish Code and Character Taskforce to assist the City in designing and formulating curriculum for Planning Academy*. Completed. Schedule a second Planning Academy series of workshops to strengthen the collaborative relationship between the City and neighborhoods. In process.

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Objective 5: Streamline Permitting Process · · · Complete change from sequential processes through multiple departments to concurrent processes. Completed. Assign each permit application an ombudsman ­ or project manager ­ who will track and support the permitting process, through resolution. Completed. Establish a more predictable timeframe for permit processing. Completed.

*Language revised from original 100-Day Plan.

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City of Bellingham

100-DAY PLAN

Objective 1: Protect Lake Whatcom Reservoir

Action Step A: City/County Interlocal Agreement

Full text of Action Step Present and recommend to the City Council an Interlocal Agreement between the City of Bellingham and Whatcom County that initiates a search for a jointly appointed Lake Whatcom Watershed.

Original Action Step: Complete and recommend to the City Council an Interlocal Agreement between the City of Bellingham and Whatcom County for joint management of the watershed.

Comment: In October 2007, then-Mayor Tim Douglas and County Executive Pete Kremen presented, to their respective Councils, a proposal for joint management of the Lake Whatcom watershed. Following approval by both Councils to move forward, the City engaged a consultant to facilitate the joint planning process. Among other tasks, the consultant identified key issues and stakeholders, and, in November 2007, launched a draft survey of stakeholders. In January 2008, newly-elected Mayor Pike, County Executive Kremen, and County Deputy Administrator Dewey Desler, agreed that the most efficient next step in the joint management project would be the hiring of the Lake Whatcom Watershed Manager. This position would be tasked with the design and subsequent management of the joint structure. 2008: Joint Hiring of Lake Whatcom Watershed Manager (Contact: Mayor's Office): The County Executive and Mayor are presently engaged in drafting a job description for the position of Lake Whatcom Watershed Manager, as well as a selection process timeline, and resolving associated administrative issues. Upon completion of this process, the City will ask City Council to approve an Interlocal Agreement launching the search for a jointly appointed Lake Whatcom Watershed Manager. The Manager will report directly to the County Executive and to the Mayor. Upon hire, the new Manager will be tasked with the design, formation, and operation of a Joint Management Structure for the Lake Whatcom Watershed, in conjunction with key staff and stakeholders. The Mayor is hopeful that such a structure will achieve the original ambitions of Mayor Douglas and County Executive Kremen, in providing greater "visibility, focus, and coordination of City and County efforts to protect the Lake Whatcom Reservoir." References: City Council Agenda Bill 17625 + supporting documents County Council Agenda Bill AB2007-397

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City of Bellingham

Action Step B: Onsite Stormwater Retention Initiative

Full text of Action Step Establish a Quality Retention Initiative to encourage on-site stormwater management of households within City limits. Comment: This objective was expanded to include both municipal and residential efforts to reduce direct stormwater runoff in the watershed, as well as to include efforts to reduce Lake Whatcom phosphorous levels. Although multiple efforts addressing the intent of this action step are underway, it seemed unnecessary to expend resources to repackage them, internally or externally, as a `Quality Retention Initiative.' 2008: Residential Stormwater Retrofit Program (contact: Bill Reilly, Storm & Surface Water Utility Manager): On February 12, 2008, Public Works was awarded a $189k grant from the Department of Ecology, the major funding source of a 2 to 3 year project designed to provide residents within the Lake Whatcom Watershed with residential retrofits. While a portion of this money will be spent within core areas of the City, the majority is targeted to Lake Whatcom. This project is directly pointed at improving the quality of stormwater to Lake Whatcom though the retention of runoff on individual properties. This project will also be used as a means of promoting and providing for water conservation. A smaller portion of this project will take place within the greater City area to reduce residential water going into our sanitary sewer system. The primary implementation strategy is the wide distribution (to approximately 300 households) of specially fitted rain barrels designed to meter storm flows to onsite soils. This will allow landscape areas and lawns to be more effective in infiltrating water and to reduce or eliminate off-site runoff. This project utilizes a very popular and simple management technique to engage residents in being part of the Lake Whatcom solution. The provision of rain barrels creates an opening and venue to provide education regarding the Lake. The education component will be used to provide information about other Low Impact Development techniques available to single family residents. Information will be also provided on phosphorus free fertilizers, pet waste and other source control topics. The Residential Stormwater Retrofit program will decrease stormwater flows detrimental to water quality in the Lake Whatcom Watershed and Bellingham Bay. This will be achieved by disconnecting downspouts connected to the sanitary sewer and detaining flows from roof-runoff into rain barrels for slow dispersal into the landscape.

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City of Bellingham

2008: Northshore Overlay, Pedestrian, and Stormwater Improvements (contact: Ravyn S. Whitewolf, Engineering Manager): This project is scheduled for implementation between May and September 2008. Originally slated for resurfacing in 2006, the project was expanded into a bike/ped project based on public input and the unique nature of the area. The overall project will result in a net decrease in impervious area in the watershed, and produce a lower quantity of direct run-off, which in turn will have been treated to exceed established Dept of Ecology standards. In addition, Public Works saw an opportunity to demonstrate low impact development techniques to a wide public audience. The design team evaluated multiple water quality designs. The preferred option includes treatment of most of the roadway surface by sand filtration, an established practice of phosphorus control and infiltration. The proposed design is loosely based on a recent project of the City of Olympia called RW Johnson Blvd, which uses porous bike lanes and sidewalks along a traditional roadway surface. Previous City construction projects have similarly incorporated green features: · The Depot Market Square project, started in Fall 2005, includes a rain garden in the south plaza and pervious pavers in the center of the parking lot. Green building elements treat stormwater run-off while providing a visually-pleasing landscape. · In Summer 2006, the Fraser Street Bike/Ped ES-246 project incorporated a "Percocrete" pervious sidewalk, the first public sidewalk of its kind in the City of Bellingham. In addition, that project included the use of bioswales for stormwater treatment. · The Puget Street Pedestrian and Bike ES-359 project (Summer 2007) includes an integrated system of rain gardens, within the ditchline on one side, and a sand infiltration ditch on the other, that treats all of the storm runoff from the project. · In Summer 2007, the Woburn/Alabama Right Turn Lane project included an innovative rain garden that treats stormwater from Woburn Street.

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City of Bellingham

2008: Northridge Stormwater Pond Retrofit (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): The Brentwood subdivision, Phases II and III, constructed in the late 1980's and early 1990's, has a stormwater pond that is out of date. The pond stores enough water to prevent downstream flooding, but provides little to no water quality benefit for the approximately 30 acres that drain to it. This pond will replaced with a combination pond-plus-sand filter that is capable of filtering phosphorus. This design is similar to the Park Place Retrofit from 2005, which has had success in limiting phosphorus. 2008: Stormwater Phosphorous Management Options (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): Public Works staff is actively evaluating further strategies to encourage onsite residential stormwater BMP (best management practices) in the watershed, as discussed in the October 2007 "City of Bellingham Lake Whatcom Stormwater Management Program: Evaluation of Stormwater Phosphorus and Recommended Management Options" report. 2008: Pervious Driveway Demonstration (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): Public Works has an agreement with a property owner to do a pervious driveway in 2008 as a demonstration project. 2008: Demonstration Home (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): Public Works has agreed to work with Sustainable Connections and WSU on a demonstration residence in the City portion of the watershed. This residence is to be remodeled and the owners are interested in utilizing a full suite of Low Impact Development (LID)and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) techniques on the site. Pervious systems for infiltration, water conservation, soil remediation and LID landscaping are part of the proposed plan. 2008: Miscellaneous Low Impact Density (LID) Projects (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): Some funds will remain available to encourage other LID demonstration projects that may come to our attention. These will be reviewed and instituted on a case by case basis. Ongoing: Hayward Stormwater Project (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): In 2007, the City installed the state-of-theart "Filterra" filtration system in the North Shore neighborhood, the first of its kind installed in Washington State. This retrofit project was established to allow performance monitoring of the facility throughout 2008 and 2009. Performance data will be utilized to determine the expanded use of this Best Management Practice in the watershed. Ongoing: Pullman Filter Vault (contact: Bill Reilly, SSWU Manager): In 2007 the City of Bellingham installed a phosphorus control sand filter vault near Northshore and Pullman Street. This filter is the product of research and development by our Post Point Laboratory personnel.

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City of Bellingham

The filter media utilized is a special blend of sand and alumina that is designed specifically for phosphorus removal. This filter will be undergoing testing in 2008 to determine its effectiveness. References: Letter from Department of Ecology to City of Bellingham Stormwater Manager re: Residential Retrofit Program Grant Application, 1/31/08 "City of Bellingham Lake Whatcom Stormwater Management Program: Evaluation of Stormwater Phosphorus and Recommended Management Options" report, 10/2007.

Action Step C: Review Water Treatment System

Full text of Action Step Initiate review of City of Bellingham's water treatment system to ensure continued excellence in water treatment service. 2008: Engineering Review of the Water Treatment System (Contact: Ted Carlson, Assistant Public Works Director): In January 2008, the consulting firm Reichhardt & Ebe Engineering was hired to conduct a review of the water treatment system. The scope of work included the following: · Discussion and comments regarding existing reports, studies, facilities and plans. · Description of alternatives available suitable for the City's raw water parameters, present and future (20 years). · Research and review of current technology and trends for water treatment and disinfection systems. Discussion of the age of the City's chlorine systems and when they may likely need replacement. · Review and description of other types of disinfection systems, and how they may affect the disinfection byproducts in the treated drinking water. · Discussion of the environmental sensitivity ("greenness") of the various disinfection systems. · Recommendations and conclusions. The consultant report concludes that the existing treatment plant provides excellent quality drinking water that exceeds all state and federal safety standards. Alternative disinfection strategies were reviewed with the recommendation that the plant remain in its current configuration. As identified in the 2005 Water System Plan, the plant is nearing capacity and will likely need major expansion within the next 5-8 years. During the expansion planning process additional technical studies, pilot testing, and detailed cost analysis will need to be completed to determine the best combination of treatment and disinfection for the water treatment facility.

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City of Bellingham

Ongoing: Water Filtration Plant Surface Water Treatment Monthly Reports (Contact: Peg Wendling, Laboratory Supervisor): The Water Filtration Plant staff generate a report each month which details key treatment system conditions (e.g.. turbidity, chlorine dose, flow rates). This report is submitted monthly to the Washington State Department of Health (DOH). The Chief Operator of the Water Filtration Plant reviews all data prior to submittal, and the Superintendent of Operations is provided a copy before it is mailed to the DOH. References: Reichhardt & Ebe Engineering, "Engineering Review of the Bellingham Water Treatment Plant," 2/21/08 Water Filtration Plant Surface Water Treatment Monthly Report, 1/08.

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City of Bellingham

Objective 2: Promote Green Bellingham

Action Step A: Reduce Environmental Impact of Municipal Operations

Full Text of Action Step Maintain and enhance Bellingham's role as a national leader in environmental protection by reducing the environmental impact of municipal operations. 2008: Executive-Team Level Sustainability Function (Contact: Mayor's Office): Sustainability will be a central tenet of Pike Administration policy. We are currently engaged in exploring the most costeffective, efficient and meaningful means of adding an executive level sustainability function, so that all City policy decisions can be refracted through the lens of sustainability. The City has existing flourishing partnerships with such visionary and expert community members as Sustainable Connections. It is time to take our commitment to sustainability to the next level, and to join communities across the nation in establishing a City sustainability program that will integrate social, natural and built environmental management practices into a long-term plan for the community. Much good work is already being done by the City. The purpose of appointing a point person is to centrally coordinate existing interdepartmental and community efforts, and to proactively identify opportunities for action. This position is especially critical at this moment in our history, as the City is currently engaged in long-term re-development and economic development planning, such as the Waterfront project. 2008: Resource Conservation Management Program (Contact: Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Beginning in January 2008, the Resources Conservation Management assistant is working to review facilities energy use and to promote energy conservation. It is expected that such proactive assessment and management of the City's energy use, along with implementation of conservation measures, will save the City tens of thousands of dollars annually on energy. Ongoing: Neighborhood Green Power Challenge (Contact: Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Bellingham is the first City in Washington State ­ and the most successful Green Power community in the country ­ to be designated a Green Power Community by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 2006, the City of Bellingham entered into collaboration with Sustainable Connections and Puget Sound Energy to conduct the Green Power Community Challenge. As of February 2008, more than 2,312 households, 127 businesses and 4 large volume customers have enrolled in the Bellingham Green Power Community Challenge.

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City of Bellingham

References: EPA letter to City of Bellingham, 2/11/08 Shoreline Environmental Sustainability Strategy: www.Cityofshoreline.com/Cityhall/departments/planning/sustainable/index.cfm City of Seattle: Office of Sustainability and Government: http://www.seattle.gov/environment/ City of Portland: Office of Sustainable Development http://www.portlandonline.com/osd/index.cfm?c=32927 City of Cleveland's Sustainability Program: www.City.cleveland.oh.us/government/departments/pubutil/sustainability/index1. html

Action Step B: Inventory Resolutions and Commitments to Green Practices

Full Text of Action Step Inventory resolutions and commitments to green practices. Inventory of Bellingham City Council Actions Resolution 2002-44 endorses the Earth Charter and the realization of its aims. This endorsement has provided support for the continued adoption of environmentally conscious resolutions, ordinances and programs. Resolution 2004-05 authorizes a Centennial Clean Water Fund Grant agreement with the State of Washington Department of Ecology for the restoration of urban streams. Accomplishments: · Completion of Whatcom Creek Fecal Coliform Total Maximum Daily Load study. · Collection of stormwater mapping and infrastructure data in the Whatcom Creek watershed. · Production of "Scoring Points Against Pollution." · Creation and distribution of "Stream Sense" booklet to every streamside resident. · Production of "Hounds for Healthy Watersheds" brochure. · Creation of storm system education signs for the Whatcom Creek Watershed. Resolution 2004-10 affirms the importance of conservation and protection of the Post Point Great Blue Heron nesting colony. Accomplishments: Public Works continues to contract with a consultant to monitor and evaluate the heron colony, and has undertaken the following protection measures: · Construction of a permanent fence to minimize canine and human access around the perimeter of the colony nesting area.

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City of Bellingham

· · · · ·

Protection of heron colony, native vegetation and nearshore habitat elements by restricting access to sections of the upland, shoreline and intertidal zones. Enhancement of the overall ecosystem function of Post Point lagoon by the removal of 2,000 cubic yards of fill from the shoreline, which increased salt marsh habitat by 70% and shoreline length by 18%. Planting native marine riparian buffer around the lagoon shoreline. Placement of large woody debris within and around the lagoon to increase habitat complexity. Installation of signs to educate visitors about herons, the value of nearshore ecosystem functions, and the cost effectiveness of the project.

Resolution 2005-08 commits the City to participate in the Cities for Climate Protection Campaign, and to take a leadership role in promoting public awareness about the cause and effects of climate change. The City has implemented the "5 Milestones" of the Cities for Climate Protection Program, to reduce both greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions throughout the community. Accomplishments: · Greenhouse gas emissions inventory and forecast to determine the source and quantity of greenhouse gas emissions in the jurisdiction. · Establishment of a greenhouse gas emissions reduction target for our municipal operations and the community. · Development and implementation of the Climate Protection Action Plan (see also Resolution 2007-10, below.) · Installation of twelve solar panels on the Environmental Learning Center. · Creation of a Resource Conservation Manager position to implement and monitor emission reduction measures (see also Ordinance 2007-11-087, below.) Resolution 2005-21 promotes the use of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards in the construction and renovation of City buildings and in the construction practices of the private sector. Where feasible, the City commits to meet the LEED "Silver" rating for all new construction, as well as in renovation projects of City buildings over 5,000 square feet, in which the City provides a majority of the funding. The City has committed to promoting LEED and Green Building construction practices in the private sector and to educating City staff on such practices, in conjunction with ongoing efforts to promote and implement low-impact development. Accomplishments: Bellingham currently has over 30 planned and completed LEED building projects City-funded building projects include: · Bellingham Art's and Children's Museum-LEED Silver · Depot Market Square-LEED Registered · Environmental Learning Center-LEED Silver · Laurel Village-LEED Registered · Kateri Court-LEED Gold

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City of Bellingham

Resolution 2006-28 declares the City's intent to take a leadership role in the promotion of renewable energy by promoting the purchase of renewable electricity within the community, becoming an EPA Green Power partner and purchasing green power for 100% of the energy used in municipally owned facilities. Accomplishments: · The City of Bellingham collaborated with Sustainable Connections and Puget Sound Energy to conduct the Green Power Community Challenge. As a result, Bellingham is the first city in Washington State and the most successful Green Power Community in the country to be designated a Green Power Community by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). · In the summer of 2007, a 2040-watt solar electric power system was installed on the roof of the City's Environmental Learning Center at Maritime Heritage Park with funding from Puget Sound Energy and the Bonneville Environmental Foundation. PSE donated the solar power system in recognition of Bellingham being named the nation's most successful Green Power Community by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. · PSE is funding a solar project on the south facing parking shed at the Depot Market, to be completed in Spring 2008. Resolution 2007-05 commits the City of Bellingham to implement an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program requiring the purchase of recycled, Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins (PBT) free and other environmentally preferable products with the maximum amount of post consumer material equal to or less than 120% of the price established by an annual bid. The City will specify energy efficient equipment and appliances whenever practicable and require contractors and consultants to used recycled, PBT-free and other environmentally preferable products whenever practicable. The City will continue to evaluate all uses of alternative fuels such as gasoline with at least 10% ethanol, ultra low sulfur diesel and biodiesel for appropriate applications. Accomplishments: The City has: · Researched and continues to research environmentally preferable products. · Purchased 30% post consumer recycled paper for letterhead. · Purchased 100% recycled toilet paper for facilities. · Added 13 hybrid vehicles in its fleet. · Replaced selected cleaning products with more environmentally preferable products and has reduced the number of cleaning products used (goal for 2008 is to implement a complete green cleaning program.) Resolution 2007-10 sets goals for the City to reduce annual greenhouse gas emission from municipal operations by 64% below 2000 levels by 2012 and by

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City of Bellingham

70% below 2000 levels by 2020. The City also adopted the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions resulting from activities of the entire community by 7% below 2000 levels by 2012 and by 28% below 2000 levels by 2020. In addition, City Council adopted the Climate Protection Action Plan and directed Environmental Resources staff to begin implementing programs and projects described in the Action Plan. Ordinance 2007-11-087 adds one limited-term position in the Public Works Environmental Resources group to support the Resource Conservation Management program, where no reallocation or appropriation of funds is required. Accomplishments: The Resources Conservation Management program position has been filled. Ordinance 2007-11-089 appropriates $334, 649 in unanticipated revenue in the wastewater fund to account for receipt and expenditure of an energy efficiency grant from Puget Sound Energy. The secondary treatment capacity was improved by replacing generated oxygen with nutrient-bound phosphorous in part of the secondary process. Essentially, Post Point generates oxygen for bacteria to gather up and to digest organics in the waste stream. By modifying the secondary treatment process, the energy source for the "gathering up" of organics was moved from plant-generated oxygen to phosphorous carried in the waste stream itself. With the modification to the secondary process, we are able to save energy both in producing oxygen and in the mechanical mixing of the plant flow. Energy was saved by reducing the need for oxygen and reducing the horse power for mechanical mixing. The overall horse power went from 200hp to 110hp for mixing, a 45% reduction. Ordinance 2007-11-097 appropriates $20,000 in additional resources in the parking services fund to account for the receipt and expenditure of a $20,000 donation from Puget Sounds Energy for a solar power project on the parking shed at Depot Market. Accomplishments: PSE is funding a solar project on the south facing parking shed at the Depot Market. Project is slated for completion spring 2008. Inventory of Commitments Washington Conservation Crews From 2000 to the present, the City has been partnering with the Department of Ecology's Washington Conservation Crews, to achieve the dual goals of providing the Corps members with diverse, quality natural resource management

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skills and knowledge while also providing the City with an effective human resource to achieve the many environmental restoration goals and activities. Tasks (2007-2010): · Salt marsh restoration at Post Point Lagoon · Whatcom Creek channel and floodplain enhancement at Red Tail Reach · Development of spring-fed rearing channel at Willow Springs/Squalicum Fields Park. · Padden Creek channel and floodplain enhancement between 24th and 30th Streets. · Large woody debris placement and bank stabilization on Padden Creek in Fairhaven Park. Centennial Clean Water Fund 2005 Funding Cycle: Salmon Habitat Restoration and Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The Bellingham Salmon Habitat Restoration and TMDL project directly confronts the impacts of urbanization on water resources at several levels. First, it provides immediate remedies for the negative impacts of urbanization through stream restoration. This includes improving degraded riparian functions and increasing channel complexity, diversity and habitat availability. Second, it will implement action items recommended in the Whatcom Creek Bacteria and Temperature TMDL Summary Implementation Strategies and Detailed Implementation Plans. Third, it will address the problem at its source, providing an education program to promote stewardship, and an understanding of how human land use impacts local streams while providing the necessary tools to clean up non-point stormwater. All grant tasks to be completed by 2010. Stormwater Management Implementation Grant 2008: Bellingham Water Quality & Habitat Improvement. The Bellingham Water Quality & Habitat Improvement project will implement TMDL and 4(b) Water Quality Improvement Plan actions on municipal properties in the Lake Whatcom Watershed and five streams within the City limits. Project elements will help identify pollution sources and improve water quality and habitat for ESA-listed salmonids. All grant tasks to be completed by 2012. Centennial Clean Water Fund 2009 Funding Cycle: Marine Nearshore Water Quality and Habitat Improvement. This grant project will implement and/or support several high priority restoration projects identified by the Whatcom County Marine Resources Committee and will directly improve critical habitat and water quality in Bellingham Bay and Chuckanut Bay. The project will also provide detailed, current information on the location and condition of sensitive marine nearshore habitats that is vital to successful implementation of regulatory protections such as the Critical Areas Ordinance and Shorelines Management Plan. A community based social marketing campaign will be implemented in cooperation with local and state agencies to ensure residents in nearshore areas help improve the health of Bellingham Bay and Chuckanut Bay. All grant tasks to be completed by 2013.

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Action Step C: Develop Implementation Strategies

Full Text of Action Step Develop inter- and intra-departmental implementation strategies to promote Green Bellingham.. 2008: Climate and Energy Initiatives 2008: Paper Savings (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Beginning in 2008, all City projects will involve electronic copies only to associated bidders; the City will no longer print out numerous extra copies of plans and specs. RFQs and on-call submittals will require double-sided, fixed number of pages with no lamination or bindings. In addition, since Spring 2007, City Hall staff have been reducing paper use by choosing double-sided printing, collecting paper good on one side to make notepads, and creating documents for electronic use only. 2008: Depot Market Square Solar Project (Contact: Public Works: Ravyn Whitewolf, Engineering Manager): A Puget Sound Energy (PSE)-funded 2kw solar project, initiated in Fall 2007, is underway for the south facing parking shed at Depot Market Square. Project completion is slated for June 2008. This is the City's second solar project: a PSE-funded solar project on the roof of the Environmental Learning Center (ELC) was installed in late July 2007. To date, the ELC roof has generated enough electricity to power 15 homes for a day, eliminating generation of green house gasses equivalent to that created by 33 average US cars in a day (895 lbs). 2008: Climate Action Plan Phase III (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Phase I and Phase II of the Climate Action Plan include Municipal and Community actions to reduce Green House Gas emissions. Many of those tasks and programs, initiated in 2006, are now being implemented and will be further pursued in 2008. Phase III, scheduled for 2008, will convene a community and staff committee to develop action plans that will further reduce our greenhouse gas emissions to our target levels. Ongoing: Climate and Energy Initiatives Ongoing: Sustainability Interns-Whatcom Community College (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Since Fall 2007, Whatcom Community College and the City have partnered to establish work-study positions dedicated to Sustainability efforts. One position is working with the Civic Field Toward Zero Waste project. A second position has been requested to work with Environmental Resources staff and the Green Government Team.

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Ongoing: Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): In Spring 2007, Public Works Environmental Resources staff began collaborating with the Purchasing Superintendent and lead Buyers to implement the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program, in order to maximize the positive impact of purchasing decisions on the environment. Our target is the reduction of City greenhouse gas pollution by 64% from 2000 levels by 2012, and by 70% by 2020, by purchasing 30% to 100% post consumer recycled paper, recycled toilet paper and office supplies with recycled content. Ongoing: Buy Green Database (Contact: Public Works, Kym Fedale, Environmental Educator): Established in Summer 2007, the Buy Green database provides product information for green office supplies, event supplies and green vendor information. The database is used internally for staff to access Green event information such as options for caterers, venues and supplies; staff can also reference the database to find local stores that carry green products. Ongoing: Green Cleaning Products (Contact: Public Works: Myron Carlson, Facilities Manager): Beginning in 2006, staff facility managers researched, tried and adopted a variety of green cleaning products. City staff will continue to develop contracts for similar products for future use. 2008: Green Building and Planning Initiatives 2008: Art and Children's Museum Green Roof (Contact: Public Works, Ravyn Whitewolf, Engineering Manager): The City of Bellingham was awarded a 2008 Department of Ecology Centennial grant to fund the incorporation of a green roof into the construction of the Art and Children's Museum. 2008: Evaluation of boilerplate bid documents (Contact: Public Works, Ravyn Whitewolf, Engineering Manager): Beginning in 2008, the City will incorporate language into all future public works bid documents that standardizes practices the City has previously explored and successfully implemented to reduce environmental impact. 2008: City Green Team Participation in Planning Academy II: Green Bellingham: Achieving Infill, Enhancing Character (Contact: Planning, Kim Spens, Planner II): In 2006, based models from Portland and Olympia, the City Hall Green Team was formed. Originally, the Green Team's primary role was to facilitate an expanding recycling program. Green Team members were responsible for providing recycling education and incentives to staff, and for maintaining recycle bins within their department. In 2007 the team expanded to include representatives from all City departments. The team presently supports wider efforts to green the City's practices and helps implement the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing program. The City Green Team will participate in the upcoming Planning Academy in an educational and technical

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role. The team can provide technical information on green building techniques, low impact development strategies, transit-oriented designs, native planting, and many other green efforts. In addition to technical information, the Green Team will explore incentives and pilot programs relevant to the Planning Academy, building on our recent experience with several LEED pilots. In short, the Green Team's experience and interest in green-related activities will be a tool available to the Planning Academy; the Green Team will provide leadership to the public and private sectors. 2008: Parks Opportunities Assessment (Contact: Parks, Heather HigginsAanes, Environmental Program Coordinator): Parks have long been the caretakers of large tracts of public land. By definition, the Parks and Recreation Department strives to balance the recreational needs of people with the needs of the land and habitat they care for. In 2008, Parks staff, across divisions, will be actively assessing the current "green" baseline, and developing "deeper green" targets, and developing plans to reach prioritized targets. 2008: Park, Recreation, and Open Space Planning (Contact: Parks, Leslie Bryson, Design Development Manager): The six-year update of the Parks, Recreation, and Opens Spaces (PRO) Plan, scheduled for 2008, is in progress, to design the future of park facilities, property and programs. During the public input phase, citizens are invited to comment on the future of tall aspects of the park system through opportunities at public workshops, opinion surveys and public hearings before the Planning Commission and City Council. Ongoing: Green Building and Planning Initiatives Ongoing: Design Standards Work Group (Parks and Recreation, Leslie Bryson Design Development Manager): In 2004, the Parks Dept Design Standards Work Group was formed to develop a set of standardized design details and specifications for new development projects that incorporated LID standards and sustainable practices. In 2007, these Standards were posted online (http://www.cob.org/government/rules/guidelines/park-design-standards.aspx), and continue to be applied to all new Parks development projects. Ongoing: Squalicum Creek Park (Contact: Parks and Recreation Leslie Bryson, Design Development Manager): Squalicum Creek Park - Phase One includes the following LID practices: · Reuse of site of concrete plant and gravel pit and reversion of old gravel surfaces to vegetation · Emphasized use of local building materials · Reuse of existing paved surfaces in certain areas · Enhanced infiltration of stormwater run-off from paved surfaces and ballfield to ground water for inflow to Squalicum Creek

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· ·

Use of low volatile organic compounds in painted surfaces Ground water used for site irrigation reduces use of treated potable City water and associated long term costs.

Ongoing: Low Impact Development (LID) Integration into BMC Codes (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): In 2005, using a Puget Sound Action Team grant, the City received technical assistance from AHBL consultants in integrating LID concepts into City Codes. AHBL reviewed City codes and suggested code changes that allowed for and encouraged the use of LID practices. Many of the resulting code modifications were incorporated into the new Stormwater Ordinance (#2006-05-047) and adopted by Council. Other suggested codes amendments will be going to council in the near future including: residential LID street standards, parking space maximums for commercial and retail developments, and others. 2008: Green Transportation Programs 2008: Green City Business Trips (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): Beginning in Spring 2008, City employees will be encouraged to use alternative travel modes for City business. Bicycles at City Hall are presently available for employee use during the business day, and several City employees already consistently walk, ride bikes, and bus to meetings in town. The City will explore providing employees with bus passes, umbrellas and additional bicycles for local trips and Amtrak tickets for out-of-town trips in order to further promote mode shift behaviors. As a consequence, the City will reduce auto emissions, road congestion, and free up capacity of our fleet vehicles. 2008: Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Plan (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): This is a strategic plan to guide City staff, community members, and organizations as they work to develop a community where walking and biking are safe, convenient and practical ways of getting around. In Phase 1, to be initiated in Summer 2008, plans for a fully connected pedestrian and bicycle network will be developed in a coordinated effort between Public Works, Parks, and Planning. Phase 2, to be launched at a future date, will engage community stakeholders in the process of identifying infrastructure improvements, land uses, education programs and marketing efforts that will encourage more people to walk and bike. Ongoing: Green Transportation Programs Ongoing: Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): The City has a working Comprehensive Plan transportation mode shift goals of 12% reduction in automobile trips by 2022. Since 1997, in compliance with State CTR law, the City has implemented a CTR program that provides education and incentives to encourage employees to use alternatives to drive-alone commuting. In addition to our employee CTR program,

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the City collaborates with Whatcom Council of Governments and WTA to promote the use of alternative modes of transportation Citywide. Ongoing: Watershed Protection Programs Ongoing: Stormwater Projects (Contact: Public Works, Bill Reilly, Storm and Surface Water Utility Manager): The Public Works Environmental Resources staff collaborates with the Stormwater Utility Section Manager and staff to reduce stormwater impacts to Bellingham's aquatic resources. Activities of the two divisions dovetail in the following areas: Low Impact Development (LID), Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and culvert retrofit & replacement programs. Ongoing: Lake Whatcom Stewardship Programs Ongoing: Interjurisdictional Coordinating Team (ICT) (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): The ICT is the coordinating body for development and implementation of the Lake Whatcom Reservoir Management Plan. Members from City and County staff meet regularly to discuss joint administration of the Work Plan and share project updates. The ICT maintains communication between jurisdictions, as well as within jurisdictions, e.g. between City staff from several work groups in Planning and Public Works. Ongoing: Habitat Protection/Restoration Ongoing: Restoration Projects (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Since 2000, Public Works Environmental Resources collaborates with the Parks Department on a multitude of projects and topics. These include: City-wide riparian restoration efforts; open space issues; Squalicum Creek Park and the Willow Spring project; Padden Creek enhancement in Fairhaven Park; the Racine to Ellis trail adjacent to the RedTail Reach project on Whatcom Creek; Chuckanut Bay nearshore marine habitat restoration, Woodstock farm ivy control and livestock fencing; Little Squalicum Creek Park marine nearshore restoration; Lake Whatcom properties management concerns, property cleanups and social trails, and others. 2008: Green Team Programs 2008: City Green Team Program Areas (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Originally established in 2006, last year the team expanded to include representatives from all City departments. The team supports efforts to green the City's practices and helps implement the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing program, in addition to promoting LEED, Built Green and other sustainable development practices. Team members have participated in local conferences on green building and sustainability; conducted

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several pilot projects and a survey; written a draft strategic plan; attended training; formed working relationships with Sustainable Connections, the BIA's Built Green Program, and County staff; and are developing a Green Center display for the Permit Center. Recent discussions have led to the formation of a unified structure, with three program areas: Sustainable Building, Green Government and Sustainable Community. The Sustainable Building Program area will be addressed primarily by the Planning Team originally led by Kim Spens. Team members will focus on promoting green building practices through education and code changes. The Green Government Program area will be the focus of the Interdepartmental Green Team organized by Kym Fedale. The renamed Green Government Team will continue to focus on City green practices such as recycling, green events, education, and other sustainable practices throughout all City departments. The Sustainable Community Team will be comprised of members from the other teams along with other City staff with responsibility for some of the projects and tasks of this program area. Those include: support for sustainable development, alternative transportation, public facility siting, and implementation of Climate Action Plan tasks.

Action Step D: Research New Green Technologies and Practices

Full Text of Action Step Research new technologies and practices utilized by other cities for their potential benefits to Bellingham. Comment: Staff in the Environmental Resources Group of the Public Works Department researched innovative new technologies ­ with a track record of successful implementation ­ that have been practiced by municipalities nationally and internationally. The following list is a summary of some of these programs and practices. Over time, this work group will continue to keep abreast of innovative municipal practices, and bring to the Mayor's attention those they believe could be appropriately integrated into our own community practices: Model Programs Austin: Electrical Car Rebate Austin is providing electrical car rebates for electric car, scooter and bicycle owners, promoting reduced dependence on fossil fuel based transportation and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

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Austin: Residential Home Construction-Energy Use Every new Austin home built over the next 8 years is required to be so energy efficient that, with the addition of a solar energy system, they will consume no more energy than they produce. Australia: Incandescent Light Bulb Ban In early 2007, the Australian government announced the phase-out of all incandescent bulbs by 2010. The replacement of all light bulbs countrywide with energy efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) will reduce household electricity bills by up to 66 percent and eventually cut Australia's greenhouse gas emissions by four million tons a year. Chicago: Green Roofs and Cool Roofs Grant Program The City of Chicago's Green Roof and Cool Roof grant programs offer grants of up to $5,000 for installing a green roof, or grants up to $6,000 for installing a cool roof. A green roof uses plants and soil on top of a waterproof membrane, and covers a significant portion of the roof. A cool roof uses special materials to reflect the sun's heat off the roof instead of warming the building below. Green roofs and cool roofs create more efficient heating and cooling, and can create a longer lasting roof system. They also help lower surrounding urban air temperatures. Chicago: Waste to Profit Network In 2006, the City of Chicago launched the Waste to Profit Network to help local businesses establish connections to transform one company's waste, or byproduct, into an industrial input for another company. This process is known as byproduct synergy. Synergies formed between participants in the Network turn costly waste streams into productive revenue streams, while reducing the environmental impact of production. For example: a brick manufacturer uses incinerated cow bone ash from meat processing plants, industrial ash, and water treatment residue to create a new line of recycled `eco-bricks,' diverting 16,000 tons of waste from landfills each year. Customers of Southern California Edison: Holiday-Light Exchange Participating cities sponsor holiday-light exchanges where community members may exchange energy-inefficient lights with new energy-efficient LED lights. Not only are LED lights are safer, but they last 10 times longer; the exchange program both saves energy and reduces waste. Eugene: Recycling Toolkit for Public Events The City of Eugene, Oregon rents out recycling toolkits- an 8' by 10' cargo trailer with 90 collapsible recycle, compost and trash receptacles, signage, sorting table and a 10' by 10' canopy- for use at any public event in the City limits. The kit is dropped off and picked up from the event by City staff. This program provides recycling opportunities to events and businesses who cannot afford set-up or who do not have the expertise to create their own system.

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Ireland: Plastic Bag Use Reduction In 2002, the Irish government implemented a .15 (about $.22) tax on all plastic shopping bags, with the goal of reducing litter and waste. The tax has cut Ireland's plastic bag usage by 90%, reduced plastic bag litter by 95% and raised 75 million euros in an Environment Fund, which is utilized for various environmental projects such as waste reduction programs and environmental awareness campaigns. London: Real Diaper Campaign In an effort to keep disposable diapers out of landfills and prevent the release of greenhouse gases as the diapers decompose, the City of London offers residents £50 (about $99) cash-back for the purchase of real, non-disposable cloth diapers or a diaper laundry service. The benefits of this campaign include reduced production of greenhouse gases, reduced waste and assistance to new parents to afford a more environmentally sound diaper option. Metro Dade County: Downsize of Fleet Vehicles This Florida project matches staff duty requirements to the smallest possible vehicle for the task and provides driver training to ensure vehicles are operated efficiently. These efforts increase average fleet fuel economy, provide incentives for employees who drive efficiently, and reduce costs of vehicle maintenance and ownership. New York City and the City of Ottawa: Diesel Electric Hybrid Buses In December of 2007, New York City and the City of Ottawa ordered a total of 1,050 total diesel electric hybrid buses for their respective transit fleets. These hybrid buses deliver up to 30 percent better fuel economy while greatly reducing emissions: 90 percent less particulate matter, and 30 percent fewer greenhouse gases. Oakland: Food Policy Council In December 2006, the City of Oakland created a Food Policy Council to aid in achieving Oakland's goals of sustainable development, economic development and community participation in food systems and production. The City has set a goal of having 30% of its food production to occur within a 100 mile radius. The Food Policy Council also promotes urban agriculture in the form of community and rooftop gardens and farmer's markets, and aims to promote a closed-loop food system, with zero waste produced. Portland: On-Site Stormwater Management Fee Discount "Clean River Rewards" is the City of Portland's stormwater utility discount program. Property owners who manage stormwater on their own property can receive up to a 100% discount on stormwater management charges. Onsite stormwater management protects rivers, streams and groundwater.

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San Francisco: Greasecycle Program The City of San Francisco has implemented the nation's first Citywide program to collect waste grease from city restaurants for conversion into biofuel for the City's municipal fleet. Used fat, oil and grease (FOG) is collected free of charge from participating restaurants. By keeping waste grease out of the sewers, the Greasecycle program will save San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) ratepayers nearly $3.5 million per year in grease blockage-related repairs. Recycled FOG from San Francisco restaurants is estimated to generate 1.5 million gallons of biofuel each year. San Francisco: Plastic Shopping Bag Ban In April 2007, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to ban plastic shopping bags in large City and County stores, requiring the use of recyclable paper, compostable plastic or reusable shopping bags. This ban will further the City's goals of 75% landfill diversion by 2010 and zero waste by 2020. San Francisco, Berkeley and Oakland: Styrofoam Ban San Francisco joined Berkeley and Oakland, in June 2007, in banning restaurants from using Styrofoam containers for food service. The ordinances require restaurants to use biodegradable, compostable or recyclable containers. Styrofoam has been banned in the City of Berkeley since 1990. The ban reduces the amount of Styrofoam thrown away in the community, reducing waste and increasing the use of compostable materials. San Francisco: Zero Waste by 2020 The City of San Francisco has implemented a goal of zero solid waste by 2020, and has directed the City's Department of the Environment to develop programs and policies to increase producer- and consumer-responsibility for diverting waste from landfills through recycling, composting or other means. The City also has a grant program, totaling over $800,000 dollars, to provide grants to non-profit organizations that capture tons of reusable, recyclable and compostable products. United States Department of Energy: Clean Cities Program The mission of the Clean Cities Program is to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector by encouraging the use of alternative fuel vehicles, idle reduction technologies, hybrid electric vehicles, fuel blends, and fuel economy. The program provides informational resources for coordinators, coalitions, fleet managers and others to insure cities are able to measurably reduce petroleum consumption. References: Austin: Electrical Car Rebate http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/cleancities/electricvehiclerebate.htm Austin: Residential Home Construction-Energy Use http://www.commondreams.org/archive/2007/09/28/4186/print/

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Australia: Incandescent Light Bulb Ban http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,21258888-421,00.html Chicago: Green Roofs and Cool Roofs Grant Program http://egov.cityofchicago.org Chicago: Waste to Profit Network http://egov.cityofchicago.org Customers of Southern California Edison: Holiday-Light Exchange http://www.fypower.org/news/?p=1974 Eugene: Recycling Toolkit for Public Events http://www.eugeneor.gov Ireland: Plastic Bag Use Reduction http://www.reuters.com/articlePrint?articleId=USL2122163820070221 London: Real Diaper Campaign http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/corporation/livingenvironment Metro Dade County: Downsize of Fleet Vehicles http://www.newdream.org/procure/activities.php New York City and the City of Ottawa: Diesel Electric Hybrid Buses http://www.daimler.com/dccom/0-5-7145-1-1029825-1-0-0-0-0-0-0-10748-0-0-00-0-0-0-0.html Oakland: Food Policy Council http://clerkwebsvr1.oaklandnet.com/attachments/15089.pdf Portland: On-Site Stormwater Management Fee Discount http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=43444& San Francisco: Greasecycle Program www.sfgov.org/site/mayor_index.asp?id=71394 San Francisco: Plastic Shopping Bag Ban http://www.sfgate.com/cgibin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/03/28/MNGDROT5QN1.DTL San Francisco, Berkeley and Oakland: Styrofoam Ban http://www.sfgate.com/cgibin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/06/28/MNG65JLQJ411.DTL

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San Francisco: Zero Waste by 2020 http://www.ilsr.org/recycling/zerowaste/index.html United States Department of Energy: Clean Cities Program http://www.eere.energy.gov/cleancities/ccn/

Action Step E: Enhance Residential and Commercial Green Practices

Full Text of Action Step Enhanced residential and commercial green practices. 2008: Climate and Energy Initiatives 2008: Geri Fields Automated Lighting (Contact: Parks and Recreation, Marvin Harris, Operations Manager): Installation of a computer-controlled light activation system is scheduled for the Geri ballfields in Summer 2008. The system will interface with the current reservation system to provide ball field lighting for reserved fields during reserved times only. The existing system provides only a manual on/off switch and relies on users to "remember" to turn off the multi array lights. Three fields are sometimes lighted all night when only one field is used for 3 hours. This system will significantly reduce energy use at the fields. 2008: Recycling in Parks ­ Pilot Program (Contact: Parks and Recreation, 2008 Rae Edwards, Volunteer Coordinator; and 2009 Marvin Harris, Operations Manager): Beginning in Summer 2008, Parks Operations will provide container recycling opportunities in selected community parks. This pilot project will be evaluated for diversion success rates, and changes made as needed. If the pilot is successful, staff will evaluate expansion to the entire system and seek funding for 2009. 2008: Toward Zero Waste (Contact: Parks and Recreation, Heather HigginsAanes, Environmental Program Coordinator): Sustainable Connections has chosen "Toward Zero Waste" (TZW) as its 2008 business challenge. The City is coordinating with Sustainable Connections, Farmer's Market, Western Washington University, Public Market, ReSources and Sanitary Service to develop a common waste reduction/recycling "brand" and signage for the community. This campaign will measure the waste reduction at community events, businesses, government facilities, Western Washington University and Whatcom Community College. A related objective is to designate Toward Zero Waste zones, much as Parks is doing at Civic Field. The pilot campaign at Civic Stadium, introducing recycling for containers and compostables, is scheduled to commence mid-August 2008, with the goal of diverting 50% of current solid waste away from landfill. The Environmental Learning Center also provides Toward Zero Waste options for all facility users. Staff is developing a training

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program to assist all facility users with understanding the goals and procedures to achieve waste reduction and recycling targets. 2008: Peak Energy Taskforce Formation and Strategic Planning (Contact: Fire Department, Andy Day, Assistant Fire Chief; or Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): A group of community members, including representatives from Bellingham Technical College, Whatcom Community College, Resources, Sustainable Bellingham, agricultural communities, City and County Councilors, and City staff have been meeting, since November 2007, to discuss and develop an action plan for addressing issues related to energy shortages, namely oil and natural gas. Impacts from rising oil prices and reduced supplies affect transportation of people and freight, land use shifts to a more urbanized setting, and agricultural disruptions and volatility. In addition, unemployment in certain sectors, and increased utility costs for lowincome citizens, put additional strains on social services and first responders, especially police. This group plans to bring forth, to both City and County Councils, a resolution suggesting the establishment of a Peak Energy Task Force whose charge will be the development of a Peak Energy Strategy for Whatcom County. The work of the Portland Peak Oil Task Force is a model for this proposed project. 2008: "The Greenest House" (Contact: Public Works, Geoff Smyth, Utilities Section Superintendent): The City of Bellingham Water Conservation Program is exploring, along with several community partners, the development of a realitytelevision show in which two families compete to enhance their household green practices over a three-month period. Ongoing: Climate and Energy Initiatives Ongoing: Neighborhood Green Power Challenge Awards (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): In March 2007, due to the success of the Green Power Challenge, Puget Sound Energy and Northwest Clean Air Agency awarded three Bellingham neighborhoods $1000 prizes to fund projects with a green focus. The Fairhaven, Columbia and Downtown neighborhood associations are now or will soon be selecting projects. Fairhaven neighbors have proposed distributing bus passes to both support alternative transportation and shopping locally in Fairhaven. 2008: Green Building and Planning Initiatives 2008: "Green Center" Display (Contact: Planning and Community Development, Kim Spens, Planner II): With technical and financial assistance from Sustainable Connections, a new public display will be installed in the Permit Center that will have an educational focus on green and sustainable practices and activities. The Green Team will work with other City staff to maintain the display, including stocking it with educational materials and posting featured projects.

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2008: Old Town Floor Area Bonus for LEED Certified Buildings (Contact: Planning and Community Development, Tara Sundin, Special Projects Manager): The Old Town `urban village' sub-area plan has been supported by Planning Commission and is pending review and approval by the City Council. This plan encompasses a 53-acre area north of the Downtown core. Under the current draft, buildings that incorporate sustainable design receive a maximum 0.5 Floor Area Ratio (FAR) bonus (greater floor area). To qualify for this bonus, the proposed project must be a minimum LEED Silver certification (or equivalent). 2008: Green Transportation Programs 2008: Enhanced Pedestrian Crossings (Contact: Public Works, Ravyn Whitewolf, Engineering Manager): Safer crossings (such as those on Meridian, at Victor Street, and Ferry Street and Old Fairhaven Parkway), encourage greater use of alternative transportation, by increasing pedestrian and bike safety. An annual program for enhanced pedestrian crossings is specified in the City budget, beginning in 2008. Two locations, both on James Street, are under design for construction in 2008. Ongoing: Green Transportation Programs Ongoing: GreenStreets Connectors (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): Parks and Public Works collaborates with the Greenway Advisory Committee, Park Board, and the Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) to identify and improve connectivity between our off-road trail system and on street bike and pedestrian facilities. The work group is also looking at low traffic streets that can be improved and promoted for nonmotorized use. Ongoing: Share the Trails Campaign (Contact: Parks and Recreation, Paul Leuthold, Director): Beginning in Spring 2007, the Park Advisory Board worked with staff and numerous stakeholder groups to develop guidelines for all trail users to encourage successful multi use. These guidelines are now published on the Web and distributed on an ongoing basis through neighborhood newsletters. Ongoing: Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): Since 1992, the BPAC advises staff on the development of a comprehensive bicycle and pedestrian network, by identifying gaps in the existing system and recommending and prioritizing improvements. The committee also advises staff on pedestrian and bicycle facility design, develops safety education programs, and promotes bicycling and walking for both transportation and recreation. Ongoing: Safe Routes to School (SRTS) (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): Since 2005, the City has partnered with

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Bellingham School District and Whatcom County Health Department to develop SRTS programs in local elementary schools. Safe Routes to School programs aim to increase the number of students safely walking and biking to school by improving school route safety and providing education and encouragement to students. The benefits of SRTS include increased physical activity levels for children, the opportunity for children to learn pedestrian and bicycle safety skills, reduced traffic congestion around schools, and decreased pollution from automobile traffic. A SRTS improvement project for Larrabee Elementary School was completed in 2007. Ongoing: Neighborhood Traffic Safety Program (NTSP) (Contact: Public Works, Brent Baldwin, Development Manager): The City's NTSP works with residents to help identify neighborhood traffic problems and implement solutions to enhance the safety and livability of residential streets. Safe residential streets increase the likelihood that residents will use alternative modes of transportation such as walking, bicycling and taking the bus. Recent projects include speed humps on Vallette and W. Indiana, traffic circles on Texas Street and Nevada Street, and a speed table/crosswalk on St. Paul at the trail crossing. 2008: Watershed Protection Programs 2008: Pharmaceutical Collection and Disposal (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Staff is working on a proposal to coordinate with medical associations, hospitals, pharmacies and the Department of Ecology to launch, in Summer 2008, a program for the collection and disposal of surplus, expired and unused pharmaceuticals. The program will be similar to a King County pilot project. The goal of the program is to reduce and potentially eliminate the harmful impacts caused by improper disposal of surplus, expired or unused pharmaceuticals into the City's waste disposal system or into septic systems, and surface water bodies. 2008: Blue Leashers Program (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): The Blue Leashers Program will encourage best management practices for pet waste disposal at home and in yards. Pet owners who receive training and who practice proper pet waste disposal will be recognized in their neighborhood and community with a blue leash, signifying their commitment to the environment. 2008: Revival of Environmental Learning Center Environmental Program (Contact: Parks and Recreation, Heather Higgins-Aanes): The curriculum at the Environmental Learning Center provides a powerful adjunct and environmental context to existing core curriculum found in Bellingham Public Schools. Staff changes implemented in January 2008 allow Parks to continue with the twentyseventh year of place-based environmental education classes for students, focused on stewardship and urban streams. Additionally ELC staff is working to expand programming and build relationships with the community.

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Ongoing: Watershed Protection Programs Ongoing: Hounds for Healthy Watersheds (Contact: Public Works, Environmental Resources, Clare Fogelsong): The HHW program consists of volunteers educating dog walkers on the Railroad trail, volunteer monitoring of waste left on trails, marking of waste left on trails and rewards for dog owners who "Scoop the Poop". This is an ongoing effort to reduce dog waste left on trails and improve stream water quality. Ongoing: Watershed-Friendly Carwash Events (Contact: Public Works, Environmental Resources, Clare Fogelsong): This Surface and Stormwater Utility (SSWU) Education project was initiated in 2005 to reduce polluted run off from charity car wash events. Environmental Resources staff provide watershed friendly car wash kits to qualifying businesses. Business locations must have the infrastructure to support use of the kits and high visibility for charity car wash events. City staff maintains the pumps and hoses included in the kits. Community fundraisers are encouraged to sell car wash tickets to local car wash location to reduce pollution and conserve water use. Education is provided to potential fundraising groups and charity organizations, and includes presentations, on-site education, and video distribution. Ongoing: Dog Waste Disposal Stations (Contact: Parks and Recreation, Marvin Harris): Parks and Public Works have installed and now maintain 14 Doggie Pot dog waste stations in major community parks, and along the Railroad trail leading to Whatcom Falls Park. These stations provide new bags for pet owners. Additional dog waste receptacles are planned for installation along Whatcom Creek. Parks also installed 20 bag reuse stations throughout the system. These stations engage park users as part of the solution by providing receptacles for collecting reusable plastic bags. The outcome of the program is a reduction in dog waste left on trails, with resultant reduction of fecal contamination and improvement in stream water quality. Bag reuse additionally engages citizens and reduces staff and materials costs. 2008: Lake Whatcom Stewardship Programs 2008: Household Hazardous Waste and Phosphorus Fertilizer Collection (Contact: Clare Fogelsong): City staff is working with Silver Beach Neighbors to develop a Household Hazardous Waste collection event (slated for Spring 2008) at Bloedel Donovan Park targeting Lake Whatcom residents. Advertising and outreach to these residents is geared to increase awareness of household hazardous wastes. Proper disposal or reuse will prevent potential contamination of the Lake Whatcom Reservoir. 2008: Reduction of Sewer System Development (SDC) Charge (Contact: PW: Rory Routhe): On 2/25/08, the City Council approved an Ordinance reducing the

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sewer SDC charge by 80% for existing residents who currently have a septic system and want to connect to a sewer main. This incentive is expected to encourage septic system owners to convert to a sanitary sewer connection, which is a best management practice for development in urban areas, thereby reducing potential contamination of water sources. Ongoing: Lake Whatcom Stewardship Programs Ongoing: Onsite Septic System Education (Contact: Public Works, Water, Geoff Smyth): By agreement with the County Health Department, the City supports education of watershed residents in the proper use of OSS on single family lots in the watershed, on an annual basis. Ongoing: Phosphorus Retail Outreach (Contact: Public Works, Environmental Resources, Clare Fogelsong): Since Spring 2006, Environmental Resources staff has been working with nurseries, homes stores and garden supply stores to educate the public about ordinance 2005-06-044, which restricts the use of phosphorus fertilizers in the Lake Whatcom Watershed. Education efforts included signage, brochures, website information and information booths. This effort is geared at reducing the use of Phosphorus content fertilizer, with an attendant reduction in amount of Phosphorus reaching the lake. Ongoing: Lake Whatcom Stewards Pledge Program (Contact: Public Works, Environmental Resources: Clare Fogelsong): The Lake Whatcom Watersheds Pledge, originally launched in 1999, has been resurrected, renamed and improved to reach more people and help them understand their individual roles in protecting the drinking water of over 91,000 people. A web-based Lake Whatcom Stewards Pledge can be accessed on the City's website at www.cob.org . Here, watershed residents and others can learn more about the lake and commit to making small changes that will contribute to the health of our drinking water. Those taking the Pledge will be able to select from a menu of educational materials and recognition items, such as a yard sign or sun catcher. 2008: Habitat Protection/Restoration 2008: Redtail Reach Restoration (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Channel complexity will be enhanced through construction of off-channel habitats wand installation of log structures along Whatcom Creek in the area affected by the 1999 Olympic Pipeline explosion. Invasive species will be replaced by native riparian vegetation throughout the approximately 5-acre site. As a result of these actions, habitat used by anadromous salmon, including Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed steelhead trout and Chinook salmon, will be enhanced through construction of backwater rearing habitats and increasing the amount of "fast pool" habitat. Native riparian vegetation planted on the south side of Whatcom Creek will substantially increase

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shading along approximately ¼ mile of the channel, helping to meet temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) target shade levels. 2008: Willow Springs off-channel habitat development (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): A spring-fed stream and associated wetlands and off-channel habitat features will be developed along the western margin of the City's new Squalicum Fields Park. The springfed channel will provide stable, low velocity off-channel refugia for fish overwintering in Squalicum Creek, including ESA-listed steelhead trout. 2008: Padden Creek Restoration (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Environmental Resources staff will work with the Parks Department to reduce bank erosion, increase channel complexity and restore native riparian species at two sites along Padden Creek. This project will result in the restoration of native riparian vegetation, and reconfiguration of Padden Creek between 24th and 30th Street. The addition of Large Woody Debris (LWD) and bioengineered bank protection structures in Fairhaven Park will improve habitat used by anadromous salmon, including ESA-listed steelhead trout. Water quality will benefit from increased shade and reduced bank erosion. 2008: Fairhaven Street Marsh (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources Manager): Environmental Resources staff is working with Parks Department and the Marine Resource Council (MRC) to improve wetland function at the Fairhaven Street Marsh at the northeast end of Chuckanut Bay. Restoring hydrologic connectivity and improving wetland function in the Fairhaven Street Marsh will benefit water quality in Chuckanut Bay, an area that is currently closed for shellfish harvesting due to high pollutant levels. Improved wetland function will also benefit fish and wildlife. Ongoing: Habitat Protection/Restoration Ongoing: Habitat Restoration (Contact: Public Works, Clare Fogelsong, Environmental Resources): Urban fish and wildlife habitat restoration is an ongoing program supported by state and federal grants as well as a City Natural Resource Protection Trust Fund. Work encompasses monitoring, restoration and maintenance of natural habitats. The following are ongoing efforts: · Riparian Restoration along Urban Streams: Since 2002 the City has contracted with two Washington Conservation Corps Crews to restore and maintain native riparian vegetation along City streams. Results: To date, almost 60 acres of riparian habitat has been restored at over 40 separate sites along Padden, Whatcom and Squalicum Creek. Restored native vegetation provides shade and filters pollutants from runoff, helping to improve water quality in 303(d) listed urban streams. Squalicum Creek Restoration: The City is collaborating with NSEA to remove invasive weed species and replace them with native riparian

·

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·

·

·

·

Habitat used by anadromous salmon, including ESA-listed Chinook and steelhead trout, was enhanced through installation of log structures along 650 feet of channel in Squalicum Creek. Restoration of native riparian vegetation and reduction of bank erosion along over a mile of lower Squalicum Creek will increase shade and improve water quality in this 303(d) listed stream. Salmon Park and Cemetery Creek Restoration: In 2006, off-channel habitats and rearing ponds were constructed along Whatcom and Cemetery Creeks. A long-term monitoring program has been implemented to track project success. Results: Habitat used by resident trout and anadromous salmon, including ESA-listed Chinook and steelhead trout, was enhanced through construction of three rearing ponds, development of meandering channels and backwater habitats, and installation of 80 log structures along 1500 feet of channel in Cemetery Creek and 300 feet of Whatcom Creek. Long-term monitoring will guide future efforts and improve the regional understanding of the benefits of habitat enhancement in urban streams. Baker Creek Restoration: In 2006, channel complexity was enhanced through construction of off-channel habitats, installation of log structures, and replanting of native riparian vegetation along Baker Creek near Telegraph Road. Results: Habitat used by anadromous salmon, including ESA-listed steelhead trout, was enhanced through construction of off channel habitat, development of meandering gravel ­bed channels and installation of 3 log structures along 800 feet of channel in Baker Creek. Restoration of native riparian vegetation will increase shade and improve water quality in this 303(d) listed stream. Anderson Creek Restoration: The City began excluding livestock and replacing invasive weed species with native riparian vegetation within the City-owned right of way along Anderson Creek in the Lake Whatcom Watershed in 2004. Results: Exclusion of livestock and restoration of native riparian vegetation along over 4 miles of Anderson Creek downstream of Mirror Lake will increase shade and improve water quality in this tributary to Whatcom Creek. Post Point Saltmarsh Restoration: Saltmarsh, beach meadow and shoreline shrub vegetation communities are being restored and enhanced, since 2004, at Post Point Lagoon, one of seven pocket estuaries located within the Bellingham City Limits. Results: Pocket estuaries provide critical habitat for juvenile salmonids after they migrate downstream to salt-water. Increasing the area of saltmarsh, and restoring native beach meadow and shoreline shrub vegetation communities will improve habitat for ESA listed salmon and trout and other fishes, as well as benefitting other state species of concern including great blue herons from the nesting colony at Post Point. Saltmarsh vegetation will be increased by 70 percent within the project area and shoreline length has been increased by 18 percent.

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References: City Council Agenda Bill 17806 Ordinance 2008-02-015

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Objective 3: Create Healthy Waterfront

Action Step A: Identify Early Adoption Projects for Waterfront

Full text of Action Step Identify a list of "early adoption projects," in partnership with the Port of Bellingham. Comment: The redevelopment of Bellingham's waterfront is a project of tremendous magnitude and complexity. The vision of what the waterfront could become, and how it could reflect the values of our community ­ environmental health, aesthetic character and economic vibrancy ­ are dazzling and inspiring. But the successful implementation of this vision relies on the intelligent management of critical clean-up, infrastructure, utility, access and transportation issues. The Port and the City have many complicated issues to resolve. However, we are in agreement on significant and critical elements of the project. The following areas of agreement will drive our early steps: Access: The Port and City agree that that early City transportation and roadway funds must be expended to provide crucial access to certain areas of the waterfront. These transportation strategies must provide initial access for clean-up and construction needs, yet later serve the community in sustainable and meaningful ways. Smart access is paramount to Area 1, which the Port envisions transforming into a "Clean Ocean" marina, providing increased public access to the water, as well as restored salmon habitat. The City is actively formulating intelligent access solutions to Area 2. The City's vision is to develop Area 2 from the existing downtown out to the water. The City is committed to a strong connection between downtown and the waterfront, which is absolutely critical to the success of the waterfront project. We don't want to end up with "two towns" ­ a throwback to more than a century ago, when "Bellingham" and "New Whatcom" were separate towns. Nor will we allow our vibrant downtown fade into a `ghost-town' as a result of disconnected, suburban-style development on the waterfront. Parks: The Port and the City agree on the requirement for robust shoreline and upland parks. The City envisions at least 33 acres of parks and trails, with additional open space within each planning area. Diverse development: The Port and City agree that the redeveloped waterfront should serve the various needs of our diverse community and

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provide a solid economic foundation for our children and grandchildren. Together, we envision an extension of the downtown neighborhood that includes new residential, commercial employment, retail, cultural and marine trade uses. As part of this, we envision a Western Washington University presence on the waterfront. We envision NOAA here, utilizing our deepwater facility. Community voice: The Port and City are committed to developing and implementing the needs and ideas of the community, and to providing a variety of opportunities for active public participation. Green Bellingham: The Port and City are dedicated to the principles of smart growth, green practices, environmental health and sustainability, and to seeking practical means to enact these principles. The following is excerpted from Mayor Pike's speech to City Club, on February 27, 2008: "You may read the words `preferred alternative' in the newspaper. It is this vision, founded on what the public has been saying for years, and fleshed out with practical infrastructural and access strategies, that is the template for what we the City are calling the `preferred alternative.' We believe that it is important to identify a preferred alternative, so that we can move ahead efficiently and logically, before critical windows close, and the millions of dollars the federal government is offering us, now, are given away elsewhere instead. Since I have become Mayor, I have had many fascinating conversations with a lot of smart, visionary people. `What if?' we've been asking. `What if we went LEED platinum on the entire waterfront, setting the bar for the world for environmental excellence?' `What if the waterfront were scaled for people, not cars?' `What if, in the way that eastern Washington has agriculture, and Seattle has medicine and Microsoft, Bellingham becomes a regional center for green industry and sustainability, providing a solid economic base for our children and their families?' It is inspiring and intellectually challenging to have these conversations. The reality will be worked out on the ground, thanks to the strong, vibrant partnerships between the City, Port and community." References: Mayor's speech to City Club, on February 27, 2008: http://www.cob.org/documents/mayor/speeches/2008-02-27City_Club_speech.pdf

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Action Step B: Formation of Public Development Authority

Full text of Action Step Initiate the formation of a public development authority (PDA) to implement development strategies.

Original Action Step: Initiate an economic benefit analysis of redevelopment alternatives in collaboration with agencies and institutions of higher education.

Comment: The original action step was revised when it became clear that initiating yet another study was not the most effective next step toward realizing our underlying intent: the efficient creation of a healthy waterfront. On February 6, 2008, Mayor Pike proposed to City Council the formation of an entity called a Public Development Authority, or PDA. On February 25, the Bellingham City Council voted 6-0 to direct staff to prepare an ordinance and develop a business plan to that end. Public Development Authorities have been involved in many successful development projects in our region, including the Village Square project in Seattle's Chinatown-International District, the Seattle Art Museum, and Tacoma's Foss Waterway. The role of a Public Development Authority is not to set policy, but rather, to implement the vision and policy of the City, as articulated and regulated by the City government. In his proposal to the City Council, Mayor Pike wrote the following: I propose Council form a Waterfront Public Development Authority for the City of Bellingham, a separate legal entity led by a governing board appointed by the Mayor and approved by the City Council, to support the redevelopment of the Waterfront District. I urge Council to carefully consider this approach for the following reasons: · A Public Development Authority will provide a long-term business management model for making development and infrastructure decisions; · A Public Development Authority will enhance partnership opportunities on the waterfront, both public and private, allowing for more expeditious development; · As is the case with the Bellingham-Whatcom Public Facilities District, this proposal allows the City to bring citizen expertise to bear in a manner that enhances the probability of better ultimate outcomes; and · This action provides the City a mechanism for refining and focusing the City's management efforts for the Waterfront District, and allows City departments to focus on day-to-day operations.

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Other municipalities have used Public Development Authorities successfully to manage large, complex projects by professionals independent of the City government, given the untraditional nature of such enterprises and the importance of responding to the unique needs of the private sector. Essential to the success of such an entity, if established by the City of Bellingham, will be appointing a governing board composed of key stakeholders and people with the financial, legal and development expertise necessary to implement a project of this size, complexity and public/private nature. It is anticipated that funds in the current waterfront budget would be transferred to the Public Development Authority, as well as properties as determined by the City Council. Benefits of the Public Development Authority to the City of Bellingham The Waterfront District redevelopment will require an extended management effort on behalf of the City of Bellingham, estimated at several decades. As we envision it, a Public Development Authority would facilitate the launch of early Waterfront District redevelopment projects as well as long-term management and oversight for redevelopment efforts on behalf of the City. This would include implementing City obligations under the development agreement with the Port of Bellingham, and reviewing and approving City responses to future developers as potential successors to the development agreement. This would not include regulatory reviews by the City. A Public Development Authority, anticipated to have a small staff, would hire and direct professionals with the specialty skills necessary to achieve the City of Bellingham's objectives for the Waterfront District. This includes a number of anticipated management efforts, including: · · City-owned real estate: Finalize development plans consistent with the approved Master Plan, and maximize value and related benefits to the City of Bellingham. City/Port-owned real estate: Finalize development plans in which joint development planning is necessary to implement the redevelopment. Examples of this ownership, includes Area 1 (Marine Trades Area) and Area 10 (west Cornwall site on the water); Coordinate the delivery of infrastructure to the redevelopment sites, consistent with the approved Master Plan and Development Agreement. Management and coordination of City mandates and obligations as part of the development authority, including delivery of infrastructure and parkland redevelopment.

· ·

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References: City Council Agenda Bill 17809 Memorandum, Mayor Pike to City Council, 2/6/08 "Public Development Authorities," by Jay Reich, Stacey Crawshaw-Lewis and Deanna Gregory, Preston Gates and Ellis LLP, excerpted from Budget Suggestions for 2004, MRSC Information Bulletin No. 416, August 2003

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Objective 4: Support Neighborhoods

Action Step A: Review All Neighborhood Plans

Full Text of Action Step Review all neighborhood plans. Comment: The following is excerpted and modified from a Memorandum (2/14/08) to Neighborhood Associations, the Planning Commission and the City Council, authored by Tim Stewart, PCD Director, summarizing the 2008 Annual Review of Neighborhood Plans: Background and GMA Process Requirements Bellingham has a great history of neighborhood empowerment and planning. Neighborhood-based planning is one of the reasons Bellingham is such a great place to live, work and play. But Bellingham's 23 neighborhood plans were adopted long before the State's Growth Management Act (GMA), and initially included not only goals and policies (standard fare), but also the actual development regulations which govern land use and determine how and what can and cannot be constructed. The passage of GMA and other state laws regarding land use laws caused a significant change in how we regulate and legislate planning and development in Bellingham. The City received legal advice that it should remove and separate the development regulations from the neighborhood plans and completed this effort a few years ago. GMA also limits general amendments to our Comprehensive Plan and Neighborhood Plans to once per year. Additionally, the Bellingham Municipal Code (BMC) generally requires that any amendment be "initiated" by the Planning Director, the Planning Commission or the City Council through a process called "docketing." Once a proposal is initiated (docketed), it proceeds through a public review process involving a neighborhood meeting, staff report and recommendation, Planning Commission public hearing and Commission recommendation, then another public hearing in front of the City Council, before final Council action. That final action may then be appealed to the State's Growth Management Hearings Board. Neighborhood planning in the GMA era is not a simple thing. Director's Promise During the Bellingham Planning Academy for Neighborhoods nearly two years ago, Planning Director Tim Stewart heard lots of frustration about neighborhood planning. One neighborhood representative reported that his neighborhood had updated its neighborhood plan on their own, but the City refused to initiate their

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request. Other neighborhood representatives expressed that they were ready and willing to undertake the challenge of updating their own plans if given the chance. With this information in hand, the Director took the following three actions: 1. Stated that he would initiate any neighborhood proposed amendment if it met three criteria: it must be consistent with the City's Comprehensive Plan, it must be the result of a broad-based inclusive process that reached a strong neighborhood consensus and it must not simply reduce the planned residential densities. 2. Committed $2,500 of City funds for each neighborhood to assist with plan updates, public meeting information, newsletter or other neighborhood improvements such as small and simple grants. 3. Committed five hours of professional planning staff time for each neighborhood. The result was a huge response from neighborhoods across the City seeking to improve the quality of life by participating in grass roots neighborhood plan updates, incredible effort by many City staff eager to help and some concern and suspicion from the development community that neighborhood-based planning had "gone too far." Lessons Learned After about a year and a half of effort, all involved parties learned the following: 1. Updating Neighborhood Plans takes a lot of effort. Five hours of staff time and $2,500 is inadequate. PCD estimates that the development of the Old Town Sub-area Plan, for example, took more than four years, with more than 1.5 years of a full-time employee and more than $100,000 in outside consultant services. 2. Updating Neighborhood Plans requires a partnership of the City and the neighborhood, with the City bringing technical planning assistance and information and the neighborhood bringing the personal knowledge and values of the neighborhood. 3. Neighborhood Planning is often full of conflict and acrimony and that the status quo usually prevails when neighbors cannot agree. 4. Neighborhood Planning can result in positive outcomes. The rezones in the York Neighborhood, the constructive debate and compromises in the Lettered Streets and the collaboration in the development of the Old Town Sub-area Plan are all rewarding. 5. The City does not have adequate resources to meet the high level of expectations of many neighborhood representatives. 6. The City must carefully choose where and how to target its limited planning resources, if we are to continue our traditional of strong neighborhood planning.

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2008: Neighborhood Planning Work Program (Planning and Community Development, Nicole Oliver, Departmental Communications Coordinator): At the end of 2007 the City received 23 proposals seeking to be docketed in the 2008 Annual Review. Mayor Pike and Planning Director Tim Stewart, after careful consideration of each proposal, and of staff capacity, have proposed City resources and efforts be focused on these Steps Forward: 1. Initiation of the Sehome Neighborhood Plan and the Samish Way Urban Village, with an expectation that the plan will be approved in 2008, but that the development regulations may not be ready until 2009. 2. Initiation of the Samish Neighborhood Land Use and Infrastructure Plan Update, including a plan for the concurrent development of transportation, parks, trails, stormwater, water and sewer systems, with an expectation that the Plan will be developed in 2008 but that adoption and development regulations may not be ready until 2009. 3. Initiation of the Silver Beach Neighborhood Plan, with an expectation that the future work by the neighborhood will be forthcoming and the plan may not be completed until 2009. 4. City-sponsored design charrette of a site-specific parcel in the Sunnyland Neighborhood (the former WSDOT site) with an expectation that neighbors, the property owner and the City will reach a "Development Agreement" as the basis for a Plan amendment and zoning change in 2008. A design charrette is a public involvement tool that enables stakeholders to collaborate with designers to formulate a design solution. A City-sponsored charrette will reinforce the neighborhood's involvement in this terrific infill project, and will support a better final result for the community. 5. City-sponsored design charrette of a site-specific parcel in Fairhaven (the Haskell property) with an expectation that neighbors, the property owner and the City will reach a "Development Agreement" as the basis for a Plan amendment and zoning change in 2008. In this circumstance, a charrette will ensure that the neighborhood is involved in making this rezone an asset to the adjacent neighborhood and historic commercial district. 6. Implementation of Bellingham Planning Academy II and Code & Character Taskforce, (see pages 45 and 46). 7. Any additional work program items that may be initiated by Planning Commission or City Council. 2008: Phasing Plan for Neighborhood Plan Updates (Planning and Community Development, Nicole Oliver, Departmental Communications Coordinator): While many other plan amendments have been proposed, staff resources are simply not available to adequately support these efforts. In addition to the work program recommended for 2008, Planning & Community Development staff will work on a phasing plan to establish a timeline for the remaining neighborhood plan updates to occur over the next five to 10 years. Meanwhile, neighborhoods will continue to be encouraged to focus their

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planning efforts on specific priority amendments to their plans, rather than fullscale rewrites without the benefit of adequate City staff and technical assistance. The City wants neighborhoods to succeed with this work, and does not want their efforts to be in vain. The City's goal is to develop both the capacity of the staff and the capacity of the neighborhoods, so that we may continue the proud tradition of neighborhood-based planning in Bellingham. References: Memorandum, from Tim Stewart (PCD Director) to Neighborhood Associations, Planning Commission and City Council, 2/14/08

Action Step B: Neighborhood Code and Character Taskforce

Full text of Action Step Establish Code and Character Taskforce to assist the City in designing and formulating curriculum for Planning Academy.

Original Action Step: Establish Neighborhood Code and Character Taskforce to develop recommendations for resolving inconsistencies between zoning code and neighborhood character.

2008: Code and Character Taskforce (Contact: Planning and Community Development, Nicole Oliver, Departmental Communications Coordinator). The taskforce was designed to involve a diverse group of community stakeholders, including representatives of community health, neighborhoods, local economies, and green developers/ builders, in designing and formulating curriculum for Planning Academy II: Green Bellingham: Achieving Infill, Enhancing Character. Taskforce members are scheduled to serve in March and April 2008. The following individuals have been appointed to the taskforce: Elizabeth Jennings, Executive Directory of Whatcom Coalition for Healthy Communities. Nick Hartrich, Sustainable Connections Danne Neill, Muljat Group, Inc. Brian Evans, Green Mountain Homes Allen Matsumoto, Neighborhood Association President Jim Bishop, Bishop Construction, Inc. Bob Ross, Bob Ross Architecture Ted Mischaikov, M:KOV, Inc. Kurt Baumgarten, president of Birchwood Neighborhood Association, (Mayor's Neighborhood Advisory Commission representative)

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Action Step C: Schedule Second Planning Academy

Full Text of Action Step Schedule a second Planning Academy series of workshops to strengthen the collaborative relationship between the City and neighborhoods. Comment: The original objective was broadened to include other City initiatives directed at strengthening its collaborative relationship with neighborhoods, beyond the Planning Academy. 2008: Planning Academy II: Green Bellingham: Achieving Infill, Enhancing Character. (Contact: Planning and Community Development, Nicole Oliver, Departmental Communications Coordinator). The second City-sponsored Planning Academy, a series of 4-6 workshops, is scheduled to take place in Spring 2008. The intended outcome of the workshop series is to provide neighborhoods with a toolbox of infill strategies they can choose from to implement their urban infill goals. Such strategies include, but are not limited to various types of infill development and character protection mechanisms such as cottages, townhouses, small lots, accessory dwelling units, shared access lots, prevention of `garage-scapes,' using alleys for access, neighborhood commercial design, etc. All course materials will be available on the web, and the Academy workshops videotaped for BTV10. The Code and Character Taskforce, composed of diverse members of the community, will be assisting the community in designing the curriculum for the Planning Academy. 2008: Mayor's Neighborhood Advisory Commission (MNAC) Retreat and Planning Session. (Contact: Executive Department, Linda Stewart, Neighborhood Services Coordinator). The MNAC retreat, which took place in February 2008, was designed to address the following objectives: · Review and clarify member roles and responsibilities. · Refine the process of working together for 2008. · Initiate 2008 MNAC Workplan development. 2008: Neighborhood Issue Prioritization and Action Planning (Contact: Executive Department, Linda Stewart, Neighborhood Services Coordinator): This project will initiate in March 2008, and is intended to: · Engage and support neighborhoods in identifying their key priorities and challenges and associated action steps. · Understand the issues, needs and challenges of neighborhood associations.

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2008: Neighborhood Association Skill-Building Workshops (Contact: Executive Department, Linda Stewart, Neighborhood Services Coordinator): These workshops, tentatively scheduled for Fall 2008, are geared to provide neighborhood leaders with access to capacity-building resources and training, and to assist neighborhoods in aligning activities with identified priorities and action steps.

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Objective 5: Streamline Permitting Process

Action Step A: Concurrent Review Process

Full Text of Action Step Complete change from sequential processes through multiple departments to concurrent processes.

Action Step B: Project Manager Assigned to Applications

Full Text of Action Step Assign each permit application an ombudsman ­ or project manager ­ who will track and support the permitting process, through resolution.

Action Step C: Establish Predictable Timeframes

Full Text of Action Step Establish a more predictable timeframe for permit processing. Comment: This objective of the 100-Day Plan was expanded to include an internal overhaul within the Planning and Community Development that is expected to result in a net increase in Planning Department efficiency and effectiveness. 2008: Implementation of Streamlined Permitting Process (Contact: Planning and Community Development, Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director) The Planning & Community Development Department (PCD) has been working since October of 2007 to develop a project management system to improve the timely completion and management of permits and projects. The City's Permit Center Leadership Team (PCLT) has been focusing that effort to examine the City's current permit review processes to identify specific changes that will improve efficiency and customer service. These efforts were reinforced and accelerated by the Mayor's 100-Day Plan. The identified changes include: · Eliminating "completeness review," · Creating submittal categories, or "permit bins," · Reviewing permits concurrently among the various technical areas, and · Upgrading permit review software. The first significant change was the elimination of a five-business-day "completeness review" period. Instead, front-counter staff has been re-trained to conduct this completeness review for the various technical disciplines in real time, with the customer, when the permit is being submitted and paid for. The net

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result has been an immediate time savings of five business days for the customer and one less step taken by staff. Another significant change is the development of "permit bins" or categories, to identify the complexity of a building permit upon submittal. A summary graphic of these permit bins is shown below. The bin categories are 1) Quick Response, 2)Standard, and 3) Major Development. These categories were developed by the PCLT in order to enable concurrent processing time commitments from all technical disciplines, including planning, building, utilities, stormwater and fire.

The current system of linear permit review processing (in which one technical discipline reviews a permit application, and then passes it on to the next) has been abolished. In its place, a system of concurrent permit review processing has been established, whereby all technical disciplines review a given permit application at the same time, within a predetermined timeframe. The graphics below illustrate the differences between the old and new processes:

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Old Review Process

New Review Process Within the new, concurrent permitting system, each permit application will be assigned a project manager, who will function as a primary liaison between the customer and the City, and who will track and support the application through the permitting process. Significant changes in software programming were required for this

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transformation of the permitting process; these programming changes were completed during the weeks of February 11 and 18. A pilot period occurred the week of February 25, with full implementation beginning March 3. The collective result of these changes is a system that will offer the customer a clear level of predictability and commitment from the City for the review of a given building permit. A measurable savings in processing time is also anticipated as a byproduct of these changes. 2008: Implementation of Internal Project-Management Model (Contact: Planning and Community Development, Jeff Thomas, Assistant Director). In addition to initiating improvements to the permit review process, Planning and Community Development (PCD) staff will begin implementation of a projectmanagement based system for the completion of projects and permits. Work will be divided into two broad areas: "Permits" and "Projects." Permits involve a customer applying and paying a fee to do some type of land use or development on their property. Projects include things such as creating master plans or running grant programs. Steering committees have been established to oversee the project managers in each area of work; the project managers, in turn, will lead the project teams to accomplish the given tasks. Project management will also be applied to permit review, where one staff contact will be responsible for organizing permit review and communicating with the customer. The net result of this change will be increased efficiency and effectiveness, with clear assignments of responsibility and accountability for both internal and external customers.

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City of Bellingham

Mayor's Concluding Remarks

I prepared the 100-Day Plan last November between the election and my swearing in. Today I stand at the head of the complex organization that is our City government. The first hundred days have passed, and now hundreds of days lie before us. We may be on the threshold of national economic troubles. Certainly our own city budget is extremely tight. Yet, there are many more objectives and priorities that my administration is deeply committed to, in areas like social services, economic development, public safety....I can tell you this for sure: throughout the next four years, this administration will continue to strive for outstanding public service, and for operational excellence. And, as your Mayor, I am dedicated to the mindful stewardship of the taxpayer dollar. Above all, I am committed to my continuing conversation with you. When a proactive, energized city administration is engaged in the service of a proactive, energized community, a powerful synergy is created. The success of the 100-Day Plan, to my mind, bodes very well for the future of our community. The success of the 100-Day Plan affirms my abiding conviction that we are One Bellingham, and that we can move deliberately together into our good future.

Mayor's Report - 100-Day Plan

Page 51

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100 Day Plan Mayor's Report - City of Bellingham, WA

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