Read Pig-heart Boy lessons text version

Pig-Heart Boy

SAMPLE LESSONS

MALORIE BLACKMAN

YEAR 7

Context of lesson

Students will need to have read chapter 4 in preparation for this lesson.

Objectives

W4: R7: Prefixes, including antonym prefixes, e.g. ir-, un-. Focus: antonyms Identify the main points, processes or ideas in a text and how they are sequenced and developed by the writer. Focus: dialogue Collect, select and assemble ideas in a suitable planning format, e.g. flow chart, list, star chart. Focus: flow chart

Wr2:

Starter

G G G

Write on the whiteboard or an OHT the words `advantage' and `disadvantage'. Ask students to explain the function of `dis-` (an antonym prefix). In pairs students take five minutes to come up with further words that use `dis-` as their prefix. Example: approve/disapprove. If necessary, students could use dictionaries to help with the task. Compiling a class list of pair-words, explain that the prefix has only one `s' and that words such as `disappear' are often misspelt by using a double `s'.

G

Introduction

As a class students share-read the extract on Worksheet 1, focussing on the way the dialogue between Cameron and Bryce brings out the different issues of the dilemma. Example: after most of the dialogue lines, the author tells the reader how the dialogue was spoken, or by whom to emphasise the meaning: ``And the only thing I stand to lose is my life,' I said quietly.', this could either show Cameron's desperation and fear or his mistrust of the adults.

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1

CASCADES SAMPLE LESSONS

Pig-Heart Boy

YEAR 7

Development

Explain that students are going to prepare a dramatic presentation of Cameron's `voices in the head' that will show both sides of his issue.

G

In pairs students list advantages and disadvantages of the operation and present these to the class. Collect key points and write a model of the planning diagram onto a flip chart using the examples below as a guide:

G

­

The operation could kill Cameron

+

The operation could save Cameron's life

Cameron doesn't trust his parents

Cameron is intelligent

Explain that students are going to write the next few paragraphs of the book, following on from the end of extract; you should use the model planning frame as a guide. Note: in this piece Cameron would consider his dilemma and reach a conclusion.

G

Students model the first few sentences through shared writing using some of the points collected on the flip chart. Note: they should demonstrate the use of: the1st person the past tense questions qualifying statements Example: `I couldn't help wondering whether...' references to the context of the story Example: consider what Cameron's Nan might say, the implications for the school life, swimming.

This exercise could lead into an independent writing task for homework or a future lesson. Note: for lower ability students you could work as a group led and draw up a planning diagram to collect `+' and `­` ideas before writing.

Plenary

G G

Choose a volunteer to `hot-seat' as Cameron. In pairs students prepare questions and points to put to the volunteer, who then responds in role.

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2

CASCADES SAMPLE LESSONS

Pig-Heart Boy

YEAR 7

WORKSHEET 1

Dr Bryce

The following extract is taken from pages 34­6, chapter 2.

`I wish that for once, just once, someone, somewhere would tell me truth,' I protested. `I know the truth already, don't you understand that? I'd just like to hear it from someone else for a chance.' My words echoed in the stunned silence of the room. First the tears, now the outburst. Where was all this coming from? `You're right of course, Cameron.' Dr Bryce was the first to speak. `The transplant does carry its own risks ­ every operation does ­ but it's a question of carefully weighing the advantages and the disadvantages and seeing which side comes out ahead.' `And in my case?' I asked. `In your case, you have everything to gain.' `And the only thing I stand to lose is my life,' I said quietly. `But I promise you I'll do my very best to make sure that doesn't happen.' `But as you said earlier, you can't guarantee it.' `No,' Dr Bryce agreed after a short pause. `Cam, I really think--` `No, Dad,' I interrupted. `It's my body and my heart so I have a right to ask questions and say how I feel.' `What's got into you today?' Dad asked, bewildered. `I was wondering that myself,' Mum added. `I realized something today,' I said. `I'm running out of time. Every breath I take is a countdown. SO I haven't got time to pretend to feel happy when I'm not. I haven't got time to keep quiet when all I want to do is shout at the top of my lungs. I haven't got time for any more lies.' `My God ... ` Mum breathed the words, stunned. `Cameron, we don't lie to you.' `We never have,' Dad agreed. `You don't tell me the whole truth though. You leave things out. It adds up to the same thing. `I knew my Mum was hurt and upset and so was Dad, but I was too tired to search for the right words to water down my feelings. Prevarication and skirting around the truth took strength, patience and stamina and I was running out of all of them. `D'you have any more questions for me Cameron?' `Are you going to operate on this woman or me?' I asked. `That's what I'm here to assess,' said Dr Bryce. I looked from Mum and Dad to Dr Bryce. That's the end of that then, I sighed inwardly. `I need to know how you feel about the possibility of undergoing this transplant operation.' `I started with surprise. Was Dr Bryce really still considering me after all the questions and the snapping and the bad atmosphere so evident in the room? It would appear so. `It's entirely up to you, Cameron. Your parents may sign the consent forms but it's your decision.' Dr Bryce smiled.

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3

Pig-Heart Boy

SAMPLE LESSONS

MALORIE BLACKMAN

YEAR 8

Context of lesson

Students will need to have read Chapter 13 in preparation for this lesson.

Objectives

S5: Recognise and exploit the use of conditionals and modal verbs when speculating, hypothesising or discussing possibilities. Focus: modal verbs Recognise bias and objectivity, distinguishing facts from hypotheses, theories or opinions. Focus: bias

R6:

Starter

G

Write the following on the whiteboard or onto an OHT: Cameron ____________ survive his operation. could may will might shall should must can

G

Ask students to investigate the effects of substituting these words in the sentence by considering: Which ones work best? Do they all `fit'? What jobs do these verbs do?

G

Explain that they are all modal verbs as they combine with other verbs and give judgements about the likelihood of events. Note: they are often used when predicting or speculating what might happen. Ask students to rank the words in a probability line from most likely to least likely; they should already be aware of probability lines from their maths lessons.

G

Introduction

G

Give students copies of Worksheet 2, the newspaper front page story of Cameron's operation. Ask them to read the text together and to discuss how the article tells the story differently from the rest of the novel.

G

Example: it is a news report whereas the rest of the book is Cameron's first person recount.

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4

CASCADES SAMPLE LESSONS

Pig-Heart Boy

YEAR 8

Note: Students will almost certainly comment that the news report is less reliable than Cameron's own account. In response to this you could consider why they may trust his version more?

G

Individually or in pairs, students should mark the text using two colours marking all the statements in the article that are factual and objective, whilst with the other, marking all statements that are inaccurate, exaggerated or biased.

Example: factual statement would be, `the heart of a pig has been transplanted into the body of Cameron Kelsey', and a biased statement would be, `No stranger to controversy, Dr Bryce has long sought to make his name ­ and his fortune ­ in this field.'

Development

G

Students need to write two alternative openings, of one or two paragraphs in length, of further Daily Press front page stories. One report should be written about Cameron making an excellent recovery and the other about Cameron's deteriorating health.

G

In preparation, students collect emotive words and phrases to include in each version. Example: delighted to report, speedy recovery, going from strength to strength, and grim news, fading fast, clinging on for life.

Plenary

Explain that students will enact a quick game of `fact or opinion'.

G

Students have to make statements about the story so that the rest of the group can respond with `thumbs up' if the statement is fact and `thumbs down' if it is an opinion. Example: fact either Cameron's new heart is to come from a pig The operation will be risky. opinion Cameron's parents should not let him have the operation

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©HarperCollinsPublishers 2002

5

CASCADES SAMPLE LESSONS

Pig-Heart Boy

YEAR 8

WORKSHEET 2

Newspaper article

D A I LY P R E S S

WORLD EXCLUSIVE!

"Cameron knows the risks, he knows that he faces a lifetime of check-ups and anti-rejection drugs, but all he can talk about is going swimming and playing football." Cameron's heart was damaged beyond repair by a viral infection two years ago, and his life ever since has been a slow decline punctuated by major crises. "When Dr Bryce approached us, it was a shock, yes, but it was the chance for my son to lead a normal life. I leapt at the chance, " said Mrs Kelsey. Although the idea of transplantation from other species into humans has been discussed and debated for a few years now, this is the first time that such an operation has actually gone ahead. Dr Bryce has received media attention before when he first presented his opinion that the only way to overcome the shortage in human organs available for transplantation was to look at the organs of other species. No stranger to controversy, Dr Bryce has long sought to make his name ­ and his fortune ­ in this field. Cameron Kelsey is known to be recovering in a private hospital and is thought to be doing well. Friends close to the family told us that Cameron's parents allowed Cameron to make the final decision. After long and agonising deliberation, Cameron finally decided that he really had no other choice. "It's simple really. I had to choose between living and dying ­ and I chose to live," said Cameron today. "And I'm feeling fine and fighting fit. I'd do the same thing again tomorrow!" Cameron continued, "I can't wait to get back to school and start leading the life of a normal boy. I can't wait to swim and run and play football without getting breathless every two seconds.! Mrs Sola Shange, headmistress of Cameron's school, Ashmead Primary, said, "I knew that Cameron was in hospital for a transplant, but no, I didn't know... continued on page 4

THE BOY WITH A PIG'S HEART INSIDE HIS BODY!

TODAY THE DAILY PRESS CAN EXCLUSIVELY REVEAL THAT CAMERON KELSEY (ABOVE), AGED 14 OF LARKIN ROAD, DEALWORTH IN LONDON HAS MADE MEDICAL HISTORY.

In a dramatic twelve hour operation sure to send waves of controversy around the world, the heart of a pig has been transplanted into the body of Cameron Kelsey. With time running out for the sick child, and no likely prospect of a human donor, the only hope seemed to be eminent surgeon and immunologist Dr Richard Bryce. His pioneering techniques for overcoming rejection between species have opened the way for a new wave of transplants between animals and man. Cameron Kelsey, the teenager from Dealworth, is remarkably cool about being a guinea pig on the frontiers of medicine. Asked about the special problems of using a pigheart, he said, "It's simple really. The only thing I have to be careful about now is taking my medicine to stop my body rejecting my new heart." His mother Catherine said,

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©HarperCollinsPublishers 2002

6

Pig-Heart Boy

SAMPLE LESSONS

MALORIE BLACKMAN

YEAR 9

Context of lesson

Students will need to have read the whole book in preparation for this lesson.

Objectives

S6: Compare and use different ways of developing, linking and completing paragraphs. Focus: connecting sentences Review and extend their own strategies for locating, appraising and extracting relevant information. Focus: extracting relevant information

R1:

Wr16: Present a balanced analysis of a situation, text, issue or set of ideas, taking into account a range of evidence and opinions. Focus: balancing issues

Starter

G

Write on the whiteboard or onto an OHT the following phrases: Some people believe that... On the other hand... Although... However... One view is... Nevertheless...

G

Model a possible dialogue in which two points of view are expressed about a particular topic. Note: each sentence has to begin with the next connecting word or phrase.

Example: `Some people believe that young people spend too much time on computers. On the other hand, computers are valuable educational resources.'

G

In pairs students rehearse similar discussions. Example: some people believe that school uniforms are unnecessary. Some people believe that there may be alien life forms on other planets. After five minutes ask students to read out their dialogues and point out how the connecting phrases and words used stitch the discussion together.

G

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©HarperCollinsPublishers 2002

7

CASCADES SAMPLE LESSONS

Pig-Heart Boy

YEAR 9

Introduction

Explain to the class that as well as telling a story, Pig-heart Boy explores an important issue: whether or not it is morally right to breed animals for the purpose of transplanting their organs into humans.

G

Using scanning, ask students to skim-read the book and identify moments where this issue is examined. Some of these moments can be found in: chapter 6 ­ where Cameron meets the pig chapter 19 ­ Julie's disgusted reaction chapter 20 ­ the protest letters chapter 21 ­ the encounter with the animal rights protester. Note: ask students to make notes as they read.

Development

Explain to students the main task for this unit is to plan a formal essay with the following title: `It is morally justifiable to breed animals for the purpose of transplanting their organs into humans. Discuss.'

G

Using the planning frame provided on Worksheet 3, students work individually or in groups collating key points for their discursive essay.

Note: remind students that the aim of this form of essay is to set out the key issues (for and against), not to argue a personal opinion. A good example of this type of text is a TV or radio report of a `hot' news story where we are not told the reporter's personal opinion.

Plenary

G G

Ask students to place their key points in rank order. Collect a class list of reasons for and against the central issue and place it onto a flipchart.

Note: students should not repeat a reason already offered but can add to or amend their plans as they hear others' ideas. Future work would lead to students writing and completing their essays. Strategies to support students would include:

G

Shared writing that would adopt the planning frame and model the appropriate use of formal language and useful connectives. Note: concluding paragraphs would need modelling if students are not used to this style of writing. Writing frames based on the planning frame, Worksheet 3. Note: if necessary, offer useful sentence starters and connecting phrases.

G

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©HarperCollinsPublishers 2002

8

CASCADES SAMPLE LESSONS

Pig-Heart Boy

YEAR 9

WORKSHEET 3

Essay planning frame

The following planning frame can be used when writing your discursive essay. Introduction

G

What the issue is:

G

Why it is important:

Reasons for:

G

Reasons against:

G

G

G

G

G

Conclusion Summary of arguments:

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©HarperCollinsPublishers 2002

9

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