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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10

Summary In this unit, students will learn fourteen double-letter spellings for consonant sounds (e.g., `bb', `tt', etc.) and seven high-frequency tricky words. They will continue to gain practice reading decodable stories. Language Arts Objectives Core Knowledge READING FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS Print Awareness Demonstrate understanding that what is said can be written and that the writing system is a way of writing down sounds. Demonstrate understanding of directionality (left to right, return sweep, top to bottom, front to back). Identify the parts of books and function of each part (front cover, back cover, title page, table of contents). Demonstrate correct book orientation by holding book correctly and turning pages. Recognize that sentences in print are made up of separate words. Understand that words are separated by spaces. Demonstrate understanding of basic print conventions by tracking and following print word for word when listening to text read aloud. Demonstrate understanding that the sequence of letters in a written word represents the sequence of sounds in the spoken word. Recognize and name the 26 letters of the alphabet in their lower-case form. Say the letters of the alphabet in order, either in song or recitation. Phonological and Phonemic Awareness Demonstrate understanding that words are made up of sequences of sounds. Identify whether pairs of phonemes are the same or different, including pairs that differ only in voicing, e.g., /b/ and /p/. Orally blend two to three sounds to form a word, e.g., given the sounds /k/... /a/... /t/, blend to make cat. Phonics: Decoding and Encoding Demonstrate understanding that a systematic, predictable relationship exists between written letters (graphemes) and spoken sounds (phonemes). Blend individual phonemes to pronounce printed words. Read and write any CVC word, e.g., sit or cat. Read and write one-syllable words containing common initial and final consonant clusters such as tr-, fl-, dr-, sp-, etc.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved. 1

CCSS ELA READING FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS Print Concepts RF.K.1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print. a. Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page. b. Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters. c. Understand that words are separated by spaces in print. d. Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet. Phonological Awareness RF.K.2. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes). a. Recognize and produce rhyming words. b. Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words. c. Blend and segment onsets and rimes of singlesyllable spoken words. d. Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words. (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.) e. Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words. Phonics and Word Recognition RF.K.3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. a. Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one lettersound correspondences by producing the primary or many of the most frequent sound for each consonant. c. Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does). d. Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10

Core Knowledge Read tricky spellings that can be sounded two ways, e.g., the letter `s' sounded /s/ as in cats and /z/ as in dogs. Read and write chains of one-syllable words in which one sound is added, substituted, or omitted, e.g., read at > cat > bat > bad > bid. Recognize and produce rhyming words. Read words generally identified as very high frequency words. Oral Reading and Fluency Read decodable stories that incorporate the specific code knowledge that has been taught. Use phonics skills in conjunction with context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. Demonstrate understanding of and use commas and end punctuation while reading orally. Read aloud, alone, or with a partner at least 15 minutes each day. READING COMPREHENSION ­ ALL TEXTS Key Ideas and Details Demonstrate understanding of simple decodable text after reading independently. Answer questions requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts (i.e., who, what, where, when, etc.) about a text that has been read independently. Use narrative language to describe people, places, things, locations, events, actions, a scene, or facts from a text that has been read independently. Craft and Structure Understand and use words and phrases from a text that has been read independently. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Use pictures accompanying the written text to check and support understanding. LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS Form letters, words, phrases and sentences to communicate thoughts and ideas. Apply basic spelling conventions. Capitalize the first word in a sentence, the pronoun I. Identify and use end punctuation, including periods, question marks, and exclamation points. Fluency

CCSS ELA RF.K.4. Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding. READING STANDARDS FOR LITERATURE Key Ideas and Details RL.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. RL.K.2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. Craft and Structure RL.K.4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas RL.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity RL.K.10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. LANGUAGE STANDARDS L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. a. Print many upper- and lowercase letters. c. Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes). d. Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how). L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. a. Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I. b. Recognize and name end punctuation. c. Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes). d. Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships. L.K.6. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10

Core Knowledge Handwriting and Spelling Trace, copy, and print from memory the letters of the alphabet accurately in lower-case form. Write from left to right, leaving spaces between words, and top to bottom using return sweep. Begin to write phonemically plausible spellings for words that cannot be spelled correctly with current code knowledge, e.g., write bote for boat, sum for some, hunee for honey. Write words and phrases from dictation, applying phonics knowledge Form regular plural nouns by adding `s' or `es', i.e., dog, dogs, wish, wishes.

CCSS ELA

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Day-by-Day Lessons Prerequisite Skills for This Unit Understand that what is said can be written down and that the writing system is a way of writing down sounds. Understand directionality (left to right, return sweep, top to bottom, front to back). Identify the parts of books and function of each part. Hold a book correctly and turn pages. Recognize that sentences in print are made up of separate words. Understand that words are separated by spaces. Demonstrate understanding of basic print conventions by tracking and following print word for word when listening to text read aloud. Understand that a sequence of letters in a written word represents the sequence of sounds in the spoken word. Segment oral sentences into discrete words. Understand that words are made up of sequences of sounds. Understand that vowel sounds are produced with the mouth open and airflow unobstructed, whereas consonant sounds involve closing parts of the mouth and blocking the air flow. Supply words that begin with a target sound during riddle games. Indicate whether a target phoneme is or is not present in the initial/medial/final position of a spoken word. Listen to one-syllable words and tell the beginning or ending sound. Recognize the same phoneme in different spoken words. Identify whether pairs of phonemes are the same or different, including pairs that differ only in voicing. Orally blend two or three sounds to form a word. Segment a spoken word into phonemes. Identify the number of syllables in a spoken word. Understand that a systematic, predictable relationship exists between written letters (graphemes) and spoken sounds (phonemes). Blend individual phonemes to pronounce printed words. Read and write some CVC word. Read and write chains of one-syllable words in which one sound is added, substituted, or omitted. Read at least 15 words generally identified as very high frequency words. Ability to read and write /m/ spelled `m', /a/ spelled `a', /t/ spelled `t', /d/ spelled `d', /o/ spelled `o', /k/ spelled `c' and `k', /g/ spelled `g', /i/ spelled `i', /n/ spelled `n', /h/ spelled `h', /s/ spelled `s', /f/ spelled `f', /v/ spelled `v', /z/ spelled `z' and `s', /p/ spelled `p', /e/ spelled `e', /b/ spelled `b', /l/ spelled `l', /r/ spelled `r', /u/ spelled `u', /w/ spelled `w', /j/ spelled `j', /y/ spelled `y', /x/ spelled `x', /ch/ spelled `ch', /sh/ spelled `sh', /th/ spelled `th', /th/ spelled `th', /qu/ spelled `qu', and /ng/ spelled `ng'. Read decodable stories that incorporate the specific code knowledge that has been taught. Understand and use commas and end punctuation while reading orally. Understand simple decodable text after reading independently. Answer questions requiring literal recall and understanding of the details and/or facts about a text that has been read independently. Use pictures accompanying written text to check and support understanding. Use narrative language to describe people, places, things, locations, events, actions, a scene, or facts from a text that has been read independently. Hold a writing utensil and make marks on paper. Write own name. Copy lines and shapes independently.

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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Consonant Sounds and Spellings Taught in Unit 8 /m/ spelled `mm' as in hammer /n/ spelled `nn' as in funny /p/ spelled `pp' as in happy /b/ spelled `bb' as in tubby /t/ spelled `tt' as in mitten /d/ spelled `dd' as in madder /k/ spelled `cc' as in moccasin and `ck' as in sick Notes on Unit 8 Warm-Up We recommend a two-part warm-up for this unit. In the first part of the warm-up, the students should work on accurately hearing and producing the subtle differences between the vowel sounds /i/, /e/, /a/, /u/, and /o/. In the second part of the warm-ups, the students should practice the letter-sound correspondences for digraphs and other sounds and spellings. Double-Letter Spellings for Consonant Sounds The double-letter spellings taught in this unit almost always come after the vowel sound of a word or syllable, most often after a "short" vowel sound. The double-letter spellings for consonants will probably not cause much difficulty for the students when they are reading. However, they may cause some confusion when they are spelling. A student writing the word egg has to choose between two possible spellings for /g/--`g' and `gg'. Some students will need a lot of exposure to print before they are able to tell when to write a consonant sound with a single-letter spelling and when to write it with a double-letter spelling. At this point, you should praise and reward any spelling that plausibly represents the sounds in the word. Accept black and blak, fell and fel, buzz and buz, etc. Some of the double-letter spellings introduced in this unit are widely used in one-syllable words, e.g., `ff' (stuff, puff), `ll' (hill, bell), `ss' (dress, miss), and `ck' (rock, black). Others are rare in one-syllable words, and a few occur only in multi-syllable words. At this point, students should generally be asked to read only one-syllable words. However, it is necessary to make an exception for spellings like `mm', `tt' and `cc', which do not occur in onesyllable words. These spellings are presented in the lessons with two-syllable example words, like swimming. Tricky Words Up to this point, the students have only been asked to read words that are regular and "play by the rules." All of the words they have been asked to read, whether in chaining exercises or in their readers, have been 100% decodable. That means that the students can arrive at the correct pronunciation by recognizing and blending the letter-sound correspondences taught so far. In addition, the students have only had to wrestle with one "tricky spelling." The letter `s' can be pronounced /s/ as in cats and /z/ as in dogs. By now most students should be growing comfortable with reading words via blending. It is therefore time to introduce some very common words that cannot be read entirely via blending. In this unit you should introduce seven very common words that cannot be pronounced accurately using the letter-sound correspondences taught so far. We call these words tricky words. The seven tricky words that should be introduced in this unit are the, a, of, all, one, from, and was. These tricky words are seven of the most common words in the English language. Each one contains at least one letter that is not pronounced as the students might expect. But it is important to recognize that most of these words contain some parts that are regular as well. In the word from, the first two graphemes and the last one are pronounced exactly as one would expect; only the letter `o' is tricky (pronounced /u/ rather than /o/.) In the word the, the initial consonant spelling `th' is pronounced just as one would expect, but the vowel sound is generally pronounced as /u/, rather than as /e/ as the students might expect. In these two words, and in many other tricky words, the vowel spelling is the tricky part. /g/ spelled `gg' as in egg /f/ spelled `ff' as in stuff /s/ spelled `ss' as in dress /z/ spelled `zz' as in buzz /l/ spelled `ll' as in sell /r/ spelled `rr' as in earring

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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Notes on Unit 8 continued... In teaching tricky words, we ask that you first draw attention to the parts of the word that can be read via blending and then to the parts that must simply be remembered. There is an important difference between this method and teaching students that the whole word is tricky and must be memorized as a single unit. By drawing attention to the regular parts of the word, you remind the students that most tricky words contain some parts that they can read via blending. Even tricky words are generally only partial exceptions to this rule. You should be aware that the trickiness of a word can often be described in two ways. You can talk about a tricky word as a reading challenge or as a spelling challenge. For example, consider the tricky word from. When introducing it as a reading challenge, you would write the word on the board and then break it down into its component spellings. You would point out that the `f', the `r' and the final `m' are pronounced as you would expect. It is the `o' that is the tricky part: it is pronounced /u/ instead of /o/. Alternatively, you might talk about the tricky word from as a spelling challenge. You would begin by saying the word aloud and then talking about the spellings. The /f/, the /r/, and the /m/ sounds are all written exactly as one would expect. But the /u/ sound is the tricky part of the word. It is not written with a `u' but with an `o'. In both cases you are pointing out which parts of the word are regular and which parts are tricky. You can use either approach to describe what is tricky about a particular word. Beginning at the end of this unit, you can also introduce additional tricky words if you need to. Simply use the techniques described above. For example, when talking about Saint Patrick's Day, you could point out that most of this phrase can be sounded out using the letter-sound correspondences. The tricky parts are `ai' in Saint and `ay' in Day. You could explain that these are spellings for the /ae/ sound that the students will learn later. Using these strategies, you can introduce words that are important to you and your students but are not yet entirely decodable. Almost any word can be taught as a combination of regular and tricky (or untaught) parts. Tricky words that you have taught can be added to your word wall. We recommend using yellow cards for tricky words and green cards for words that can be blended. We also suggest that you try to have the regular words outnumber the tricky words by a ratio of 4:1 or 5:1. Increased Decoding Power Students gain significant reading power in the course of this unit. At the beginning of this unit, if students were asked to read 1000 words of natural text, on average, only 230 of those words would be completely decodable. By the end of the unit, an average of 414 words in 1,000 will be completely decodable. This increase is due mainly to the introduction of very common words like the, a, and of. In 1,000 words of natural text, 87 words will be the, 35 will be of, and 28 will be a.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

LESSON 1 Tricky Words the and a Sample Decodable Story Fish in the Pond Shep can fish with his dad in the pond. Fish swim and splish and splash in the pond. Shep's dad casts with a rod and gets a big fish. The fish twists and jumps. Shep's dad tugs on the rod and grunts. Shep's dad must tug and tug. Can Shep grab that big fish? He can with Dad's help. Shep gets the fish in the net and plops it in a box. The fish flips and flops in the box. Shep and his dad grin. Shep's dad plops the fish in a pot. Shep's dad gulps a lot of fish with broth. Yum! Discussion Questions Where are Shep and his Dad? What are they doing? Do they catch anything? LESSON 2 Tricky Words of and all LESSON 3 Tricky Words one and from LESSON 4 Review of Tricky Words LESSON 5 Tricky Word was LESSON 6 Double-Letter Spellings `bb', `dd', `ff', `gg', `cc', `ll', and `mm' and the Spelling `ck' for /k/ Sample Decodable Words will back well still off tell black rock fell thick hill eggs sell pick skill add neck stuff

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Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

LESSON 7 Double-Letter Spellings `nn', `pp', `rr', `ss', `tt', and `zz' Sample Decodable Words less class glass grass cross loss Sample Decodable Story Shep in Class Shep sits at his desk in Miss Mack's class with a pen in his hand. Shep prints with the pen. "Print black cat," Miss Mack asks. Then Miss Mack checks Shep's printing. "That's a mess! Fix that!" Miss Mack is strict. At 3, the bell will ring and all the kids will run off and splash in the pond. The bell rings and Shep jumps up. "Sit and print!" yells Miss Mack. Shep sits and prints, but he is sad and glum. Will Miss mack let him run off and swim? Shep can't tell. Miss Mack checks Shep's printing and grins. She sends him off to swim. Shep grins. He will swim and kick his legs. The bugs will buzz and the frogs will hop. Such fun! Discussion Questions Where is Shep at the start of the story? Who is Miss Mack? What does Miss Mack tell Shep he must do? What does Shep want to do when he leaves school? LESSON 8 Review and Assessment LESSON 9 Review and Assessment LESSON 10 Review and Assessment LESSON 11 Review and Assessment Pausing Point

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dress moss kiss inn jazz

buzz hiss mutt mitt fuzz

Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Sample Exercises and Assessments Tricky Word Practice Tell the students that they will practice writing tricky words. Have the students take out a pencil and a piece of paper. Have the students draw a line down the center of their paper, from top to bottom. Write the on the board and have the students read it. Have the students copy the onto the left side of their sheet of paper. They should say the name of each letter as they copy the word. Erase the word the from the board. Have the students fold their paper along the line they drew earlier and position it so that the word they copied is facing the desk. Have the students write the from memory on their paper. They should say the name of each letter as they write the word. Tell the students to compare the word they just wrote with the word they copied earlier. Have the students correct the word if they misspelled it. Repeat these steps with additional tricky words. Colored Flashcards Print decodable words on green flashcards and tricky words on yellow flashcards. Explain to the students that the words printed on green paper are regular and can be read via blending. Green means go! Explain to the students that the words printed on yellow paper are tricky. Yellow means proceed with caution. Shuffle the cards and have the students read them one at a time. Word Concentration Note: This game is best played in small groups or in centers. Write each tricky word on two small cards: the, a, of, all, one, from, and was. Shuffle the cards and lay them face down on the table. Have the students turn over two cards at a time, attempting to find matching cards. If a student finds a match, he or she keeps the cards. Let the game continue until all matches have been found. Making Phrases Note: This exercise is best done in small groups or in centers. Write decodable nouns and decodable adjectives and the tricky words the, a, of, all, one, from, and was on cards, one word per card. Have the students create phrases or sentences with these cards. Then have the students copy the phrases or sentences on paper.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

9

Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Alphabet/Letter Names Tell the students that the sound pictures they have been learning are also called letters. Letters are listed and memorized in a special order, called "alphabetical order." Tell the students that you are going to teach them the letter names. Post a lowercase alphabet strip or write the lowercase letters on the board and say each letter's name as you point to it. Repeat twice and have the students repeat after you. The Alphabet Song Remind the students that the sound pictures they have been using are also called letters and that people have arranged them in a special order called "alphabetical order." Post a lowercase alphabet strip or write the lowercase letters on the board, and say each letter's name as you point to it. Tell the students you are going to sing a song that will help them learn the letter names. It is called, "The Alphabet Song." Explain that the alphabet is what we call the set of letters we use to write down the sounds of English. Sing the alphabet song slowly, pointing to each letter as you sing its name. Be careful to enunciate each letter name. Say, "el, em, en, oh, pee"--not "elemenohpee"--as some students may think that it is one letter name. Repeat the song, inviting the students to sing along. Alphabet Soup Place small cards for the 26 letters of the alphabet in a bowl or a hat. Have a student pull out a card, show it to the class, and say the name of the letter printed on the card and the sound or sounds that the letter stands for. Repeat with the remaining cards. Alphabet Walk Write each letter of the alphabet on its own sheet of paper. Tape the sheets of paper to the floor to make a path.Have the students step from sheet to sheet, saying the letter names as they step on the letters. Letter Name Bingo Make bingo cards with letters. Write the 26 letters on small paper slips and place them in a box. Give each student a bingo card and playing pieces. Explain that you will pull letters from the box and you want the students to put a playing piece on top of that letter if it is on their bingo cards. Explain that the students should say, "Bingo!" once all of the spellings are covered.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

10

Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Circling Sounds Write the word glass on the board. Have a student come up to the board and circle each of the sound pictures in glass. Ask the students which sounds are written with single letters and which sounds are written with letter teams. Repeat with the following words: sock, chest, dress, mitt, shut, cuff. Erase the Words Write three to five words on the board and have the students read them. Say a word and have a student erase it from the board. Start over when all of the words have been erased. Continue until all of the students have had their turn. Wiggle Cards Make a set of large cards with decodable words and phrases written on them. Each word or phrase should describe a motion or activity that the students can act out. Show the students a wiggle card, have them read it, and let them perform the action. Use the wiggle cards during transitions. buzz hiss quack sniff cross the legs kiss one hand Teacher Chaining Write ill on the board. Ask a student to read the word, first in a segmented fashion and then blended. Add `f' to create fill. As you make this change, say to the students, "If that is ill, what is this?" Continue this process with the remaining words in the following chains: ill > fill > chill > chick > pick > lick > slick > slack > smack > snack fun > fuss > fuzz > buzz > butt > mutt > muff > huff > puff > puck ring a bell tap on the back huff and puff lick the lips pick it up stand stiff and still

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11

Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Chaining Dictation Have the students take out a pencil and a piece of paper. Tell the students that you are going to say a number of words. Explain that each new word will be very similar to the previous word, but one sound will be different (e.g., bell > yell > sell, etc). Tell the students to write each word that you say. For each word that you say, hold up one finger for each sound: for a two-sound word hold up two fingers, for a three-sound word three fingers, etc. Ask your students to count the sounds in the word and then draw a line on their paper for each sound that they hear. For example, for the word bell, three lines would be drawn on the paper: __ __ __. Once the students have written one line for each sound in the word, instruct them to write the word's sound pictures on their respective lines. Finally, ask the students to read the word back to you. If your students are having trouble remembering the letter forms during dictation, draw their attention to your lowercase alphabet strip, or write the letters on the board. As you move from one word to the next, use the chaining phrase, "If that is bell, show me yell." bell > yell > sell > shell > fell > fill > fit > fish > wish > wick rest > rust > rut > rot > rock > lock > clock > clack > clash > class toss > loss > gloss > glass > brass > bass > back > black > block puff > huff > muff > mush > much > such > suck > sack but > bet > bell > bill > fill > hill > chill > chick > check > chess Dictation with Words Tell the students to take out a crayon and a piece of paper. Explain that you are going to say a number of words. Tell the students to write each word that you say. For each word that you say, hold up one finger for each sound. Ask your students to count the sounds in the word and then draw a line on their paper for each sound that they hear. For example, for the word gull, three lines would be drawn on the paper: __ __ __. Once the students have written one line for each sound in the word, instruct them to write the word's sound pictures on their respective lines. Finally, ask the students to read the word back to you. gull dress glass chick fuzz grill fluff gills mess bells buzz hangs chess quack back bluff doll bass black bill brick bunch clocks mitt

Note: See sample activities in earlier units for additional suggestions for sound-symbol practice, if needed.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

12

Tricky Words & Double-Letter Spellings

Skills Strand: Kindergarten ­ Unit 8 of 10 Day-by-Day Lessons

Unit Assessment Note: We advise that you date and keep each student's assessment results in an individual portfolio. As additional assessments are administered over the course of the year, they can be added to the portfolios to provide a tangible documentation of each student's progress. Reading Assessment This assessment involves pulling aside each student individually and having him or her read aloud ten words printed on cards. Write the following words on index cards, one word per card: egg, dress, snack, was, chat, fuzz, smell, add, the, stuff. Show the cards to a student one at a time. Note the number of words the student was able to read. Students who read at least 8 of the 10 words correctly are ready to move on to Unit 9. Provide additional practice in the specific letter-sound correspondences and/or blending if students make more than 2 errors.

Copyright © 2010 by the Core Knowledge Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All Rights Reserved.

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