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energy zone

Energy Education in the 5-14 Curriculum Ideas for Learning and Teaching

Contents

energy zone

Framework for Environmental Studies Acknowledgements Social Subjects: knowledge and understanding - people in the past

· · · · People, events and societies of significance in the past Change and continuity, cause and effect Time and historical sequence The nature of historical evidence

Page

ii iii iv 1 3 5 7

Social Subjects: knowledge and understanding - people and place

· · · The physical environment The human environment Human-physical interactions 9 11 13

Social Subjects: knowledge and understanding - people in society

· · · People and needs in society Rules, rights and responsibilities Conflict and decision making in society 15 17 19

Science: knowledge and understanding - earth and space

· · Materials from Earth Changing materials 21 23

Science: knowledge and understanding - energy and forces

· · · Properties and use of energy Conversion and transfer of energy Forces and their effects 25 27 29

Science: knowledge and understanding - living things and the processes of life

· Variety and characteristic features 31

Technology: knowledge and understanding - technology

· · · Needs and how they are met Resources and how they are managed Processes and how they are applied 33 35 37

Expressive Arts: knowledge and understanding - music - using materials techniques and skills

· · · Investigating and exploring sound Using the voice Using instruments 39 41 43

Expressive Arts: knowledge and understanding - music - expressing feelings ideas thoughts and solutions

· Creating and designing 45

Expressive Arts: knowledge and understanding - art & design - expressing feelings ideas thoughts and solutions

· Creating and designing 47

Annex I Resources for Energy Annex II Resources for Energy Annex III Resources for Energy Annex IV Resources for Energy -

Organisations Web Sites Catalogues Cross-curricular Planning

49 57 58 62

i)

energy zone

First published in 2000 by the Energy Saving Trust, Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre (AEEC), Eco Schools Scotland and Aberdeen City Council, energyzone has been sought by teachers to assist with planning a learning and teaching programme about energy, with a particular focus on energy efficiency at school and in the home. Over 1000 copies were distributed to schools throughout Scotland, and to countries in Europe and Asia. In 2001 the Centre for Research, Education and Training in Energy (CREATE) adapted energyzone to support the curriculum of schools in England. The original energyzone provided teachers with ideas for learning and teaching, and matched these to suggested resources. Every school in Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire and Moray received a hard copy. The publication was made freely available to all schools as a printable download via the internet. Feedback was provided by teachers and other professionals from industry and commerce. All appreciated the ease of use, breadth of ideas, and simplicity of design. This revised energy zone takes account of teachers wishes for a more comprehensive publication containing a broader look at energy. Many more ideas for learning and teaching have been added drawing on the knowledge and experience of colleagues working in education, the environment, and industry. All contributors have a close interest in educating young people about energy. Raising awareness of the need for energy conservation in schools will encourage active participation of schools and their future citizens. The revised energy zone will also contribute to the Governments commitment to reducing UK carbon dioxide emissions by 20% of 1990 levels, by 2010. The Energy Saving Trust runs an Energy Certification for Schools programme, which encourages effective energy management in schools by providing advice and support on energy saving measures, and encourages energy education. For information contact www.est.org.uk/schools or the ECfS Helpline on 0870 128 2820 The revised energy zone aims to encourage the inclusion of appropriate learning and teaching ideas which will contribute to energy education. It contains all the information in the Environmental Studies 5-14 National Curriculum Guidelines document published by Learning and Teaching Scotland. The Attainment Targets have been numbered to provide an easy link with learning and teaching ideas. The back pages contain Cross-curricular Planning sheets with some learning and teaching ideas for popular topic studies. Much thanks is due to Janice Lyon and Bill Roseburgh of Aberdeen City Council Community Services Department for their support and inspiration. Additional ideas are welcomed and anyone wishing to contribute can do so via the energy zone web page, located on the Aberdeen Grid for Learning web site : www.aberdeen-education.org.uk/resources/energyzonef.htm

ii)

Framework for Environmental Studies

Environmental studies encompasses a range of disciplines and subjects. Consequently it requires an organisational framework that recognises the different components, outcomes and strands. The framework also describes each component in terms of knowledge and understanding, skills and attitudes. 2.1 The components Environmental studies comprises three components for the organisation of knowledge and understanding, skills and the development of informed attitudes to the environment. These are: · social subjects · science · technology. 2.2 The attainment outcomes, strands and targets Each component is described in terms of attainment outcomes for knowledge and understanding, skills and the development of informed attitudes. These reflect the different forms of knowledge and ways of thinking and working within social subjects, science and technology. The attainment outcomes in social subjects are: · people in the past · people and place · people in society. These outcomes relate principally to aspects of history, geography and modern studies. The attainment outcomes in science are: · earth and space · energy and forces · living things and the processes of life. These outcomes relate principally to aspects of chemistry, physics and biology. The attainment outcome in technology is: · technological capability. This outcome relates to aspects of technology including those that are associated with home economics and technical education. The attainment outcomes provide a means of organising a large part of what pupils should know and be able to do as a result of their learning within environmental studies. Learning and teaching approaches, as well as coordinated planning, should help pupils to recognise the relationships between one outcome and another. For each outcome a system of strands is used to identify the key ideas involved in the development of knowledge and understanding, skills and attitudes. Within each strand detailed attainment targets provide specific statements of what pupils should know and be able to do at each of six levels A - F. These provide a clear indication of progression in pupils' learning, either in terms of specific content or broad concepts. Developing informed attitudes does not lend itself to a six-level model; consequently these are set out as a number of important ideas to be developed within each component. Attainment targets have been grouped at six levels of progression, based on the following descriptions of levels. Level A: Level B: Level C: Level D: Level E: Level F: Extracted from : should be attainable in the course of P1 - P3 by almost all pupils. should be attainable by some pupils in P3 or even earlier, but certainly by most in P4. should be attainable in the course of P4 - P6 by most pupils. should be attainable by some pupils in P5 - P6 or even earlier, but certainly by most in P7. should be attainable by some pupils in P7 - S1, but certainly by most in S2. should be attainable in part by some pupils, and completed by a few pupils, in the course of P7 - S2.

Environmental Studies

Society, Science and Technology 5-14 National Guidelines © Crown Copyright 2000

published by Learning and Teaching Scotland

iii)

Acknowledgements

Vanessa Chew Elizabeth Curtis Susan Jenkins Ruth Legdon Janice Lyon Finlay McKichan Jean S. Morrison Nicola Pirie David Rodger Bill Roseburgh Seema Sircar Moira Smith Anne Thirkell Sebastian Tombs

Live Wire Productions Curriculum Support Officer, Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre Schools Liaison Officer, Montgomery Development Education Centre (MDEC) Curriculum Support Officer, Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre Home Energy Co-ordinator, Community Services, Aberdeen City Council Lecturer in Social Sciences, School of Education, University of Aberdeen Chief Executive Officer, Save Cash and Reduce Fuel (SCARF) Curriculum Support Officer, Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre Business Development Manager, Department of Trade and Industry Home Energy Team, Community Services, Aberdeen City Council Curriculum Support Officer, 10-18 Science, Summerhill Centre, Learning and Leisure Services, Aberdeen City Council Curriculum Support Officer, Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre, and Education Officer, Satrosphere Curriculum Support Officer, 5-14 Environmental Studies, Summerhill Centre, Learning and Leisure Services, Aberdeen City Council Chief Executive, Secretary and Treasurer, Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland (RIAS)

Front cover designed by Neil Saddler, Publicity and Promotions Department, Aberdeen City Council energy zone web page designed by David S. Hay, Principal Officer - Education ICT, Summerhill Centre, Learning and Leisure Services, Aberdeen City Council

iv)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

People, events and societies of significance in the past

Developing an understanding of distinctive features of life in the past and why certain societies, people and events are regarded as significant

A

(1) give examples of people and events in the past that are important to them in relation to their families, or in relation to their community (2) give examples of stories they have heard that give them information about the past, and describe what they have learned

B

(1) describe some features of life in the past for a chosen topic/period

C

(1) describe the diversity of lifestyles of people in the past, e.g. the life of a peasant as opposed to a landowner

(i) and (ii) discover lifestyles including uses of energy in home, work, employment and the sources of that energy

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

1)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

People, events and societies of significance in the past

Developing an understanding of distinctive features of life in the past and why certain societies, people and events are regarded as significant

D

(1) describe some features of societies, people and events from the past and suggest why they might be considered significant

E

(1) explain the motives or actions of people in particular historical situations (2) explain the values or attitudes that characterised various societies in the past (ii) the first flow of oil from the North Sea (3) explain why particular societies, people and events from the past are thought to be of significance

F

(1) apply knowledge and understanding of the motives or actions of people in particular historical situations, and / or the values and attitudes of particular societies in the past to reach conclusions on a given historical issue or question (i) activities based on the Chernobyl disaster and how the media (Soviet & Western) responded in the USSR - Global Environmental Education Programme, from the Montgomery Development Education Centre (MDEC) (i) Our Past is their Present from MDEC : - this resource looks at life for millions of rural / urban Scots in the past and helps pupils understand the links between Scotlands past and the present experience of the developing world e.g. industrialisation, child labour

(i) inventions and inventors of energy linked appliances and objects e.g. steam engine, motor car, light bulb

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

2)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

Change and continuity, cause and effect

Developing an understanding of change and continuity over time and of cause and effect in historical contexts

A

(1) give some examples of changes that have affected their own and other people's lives and the life of their community (before / after, past / present) (i) what new machines can you remember being brought into your house which are powered by electricity? (2) give some reasons why these changes took place (ii) why are these machines better than what you or others had before? (ii) discover what your grandparents used instead

B

(1) describe changes that have led to present circumstances in relation to their own lives, e.g. how homes, lighting, clothes have changed (i) find out about the different means of lighting houses in the past and present:- daylight - oil - coal gas - electricity (2) give reasons why these changes took place (ii) why has electric lighting been found to be the best? (3) give examples of continuity in relation to their own lives, e.g. everyday routines

C

(1) make a comparison between present and past lifestyles / circumstances / features. (What is different? What is the same?) (i) find out which forms of energy were used in schools 100 years ago and now, e.g. : - lighting : coal gas => electricity - heating : coal => oil - electricity now used to power equipment (e.g. computers, videos, tape recorders, calculators) (i) list some things in school which are still done by hand (2) give some reasons for differences, and for aspects of continuity (ii) why are new forms of energy now used in schools? (ii) why are some things still done by hand?

(i) & (ii) contact the Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre (AEEC) for information about the Victorian Artefacts unit

(i) link to energy : different forms and uses

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

3)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

Change and continuity, cause and effect

Developing an understanding of change and continuity over time and of cause and effect in historical contexts

D

(1) identify important features of a development that have changed over an extended period of time, e.g. transport, the role of women (i) make a timeline showing types of energy which, over an extended period, have powered : a. Land Transport - human power - horses - electricity (e.g. tramcars) - steam (railway trains, road lorries) - petroleum - gas b. Sea Transport - human power (e.g. canoes, man-powered craft) - sail - steam - petroleum (diesel) - gas turbine - nuclear power (2) explain in simple terms why these features were important and describe what effects they had on people's lives (ii) explain how these changes in transport propulsion have affected peoples lives e.g. : - travelling to work - holidays

E

(1) demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of the main features of a particular event / development / attitude with regard to change and continuity (2) give some reasons to explain why a specific historical event / action / development took place and what the specific consequences were (ii) investigate the increasing use of electricity in the home over the last century and the effect this has had on lifestyles e.g. : - cooking - cleaning - home entertainment - communications - more equal opportunities for women

F

(1) apply knowledge and understanding of the process of cause and effect to provide a detailed explanation as to why a particular development / event took place and give a balanced assessment as to the significance of its consequences (i) investigate how energy was harnessed in the Industrial Revolution and the ways in which ordinary people benefited and suffered from these developments; see also the MDEC resource Our Past Is Their Present

(i) and (ii) development of new sources of energy for doing work, transportation, heating, communication (i) and (ii) study the impact of the Industrial Revolution

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

4)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

Time and historical sequence

Developing an understanding of time and how events in the past relate to one another in a chronological sequence

A

(1) demonstrate an awareness of annual patterns and the sequence of events in their own and others' lives (2) know ways of describing and measuring time, e.g. night / day, seasons, months, yesterday / today / tomorrow

B

(1) using their age, make a simple timeline showing significant events in their lives (2) sequence a small number of pictures/objects from different periods in chronological order (3) use the word `century' correctly

C

(1) put a series of events with their dates in chronological order (i) timeline some significant inventions related to energy (2) use the words `decade' and `millennium' correctly

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

5)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

Time and historical sequence

Developing an understanding of time and how events in the past relate to one another in a chronological sequence

D

(1) explain the meaning of the terms `BC' and `AD' (2) place a number of events from a specific historical development on a timeline that crosses the BC / AD divide, e.g. the development of writing from early people to present day communication

E

(1) explain the relationship between specific dates and the relevant century (2) name and place significant historical periods in chronological order

F

(1) compare and contrast timelines from a significant historical period in different parts of the world

(i) research and prepare more detailed energy development timelines, i.e. : wood => coal => gas => oil

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

6)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

The nature of historical evidence

Developing an understanding of the variety of types of historical evidence and their relative significance

A

(1) talk about objects from their own past and say what they were used for and why they are important to them (2) describe what old photographs / films, etc., can tell them about people or places in the past (i) and (ii) discover lifestyles and related sources and uses of energy

B

(1) suggest some simple types of evidence that would tell them about a given person / event / development from the past.

C

(1) describe ways in which people remember and preserve the past, e.g. war memorials, and suggest reasons why they should do this (i) visit a museum (see Resource Providers section e.g. Grampian Transport Museum at Alford, Maritime Museum, Marischal Museum); investigate lifestyles, related sources and uses of energy

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

7)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in the past

The nature of historical evidence

Developing an understanding of the variety of types of historical evidence and their relative significance

D

(1) suggest a variety of sources of information about the past and what use they might be to someone studying a particular topic (2) explain the meaning of the term `heritage' and give some examples, e.g. castles, literature, etc.

E

(1) suggest ways in which society's awareness of its own past can affect its present and future development, e.g. devolution in Scotland, conflict / peace in Northern Ireland (i) study the impact on society of the Industrial Revolution

F

(1) describe how heritage and evidence can be used in both positive and negative ways, e.g. to promote social, economical or political ends

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

8)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people and place

The physical environment

Developing an understanding of physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere and surface : weather and climate, landscapes and physical processes.

A

(1) describe the main types of local weather, including seasonal change, and how it effects their own lives (i) link to homes, buildings, designs adopted, and the need for additional light and heat in certain seasons (i) investigate Live Wire Productions drama workshops : - Splish, Splash, Splosh on water - Flash, Crash, Splash on weather, climate and the rain cycle

B

(1) describe main weather elements and some effects on people's everyday lives (i) investigate Live Wire Productions drama workshop Flash, Crash, Splash on weather, climate and the rain cycle

C

(1) describe some main types of weather and climate in the world and ways in which people adapt to them, e.g. style of house, working outdoors (i) use an overseas country pack (a selection is available from MDEC) to compare and contrast lifestyles and energy use (i) energy linked to natural sources - Focus on Energy WWF - Green Technology investigations and designing activities - see also Exploring My World, Earth Alert Energy (i) investigate Live Wire Productions drama presentation Thunderstruck on weather, climate and electrical storms

(i) contrast hot and cold, and link to the need for buildings / environments to provide heat when cold outside, coolness when hot outside (i) investigate how energy is used (i) use pictures and information on homes around the world to stimulate discussion / research e.g. Homes Around the World pack from MDEC, Homes by Scotdec available from MDEC

(i) climate change : - if Scotland becomes - wetter - warmer - stormier what impact might there be on : - the way buildings are designed - patterns of energy use and consumption

(2) identify some significant nearby physical features, e.g. hill, stream

(2) identify and describe in simple terms major local physical features, e.g. river valley, mountain range, as appropriate (ii) should we build on floodplains or reclaimed estuarine lands?

(2) identify and describe the main types of physical features of the Scottish landscape, e.g. those found in the Highlands or Central Lowlands

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

9)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people and place

The physical environment

Developing an understanding of physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere and surface : weather and climate, landscapes and physical processes.

D

(1) describe how extremes of weather and climate can disastrously affect people and places (i) Extremes : - drought - cyclones in Bangladesh (see MDEC information packs on natural disasters (i) investigate Live Wire Productions drama presentation Thunderstruck on weather, climate and electrical storms

E

(1) describe and explain simply the main weather and climate patterns in Britain and the wider world, including extremes, and explain the effects on ways of life, e.g. the effects of arctic / desert climate on farming, transport, mining (i) investigate Live Wire Productions drama presentation Thunderstruck on weather, climate and electrical storms

F

(1) explain in detail global patterns of weather and climate and describe the effects on economic activity (i) role play exercise linked to climate change : - International Climate Change Conference from www.globalfootprints.org/teachers/ activities/transport/climate (i) Burning Shangrila (MDEC) development in Nepal linked to best energy use

(i) climate change : - if Scotland becomes - wetter - warmer - stormier what impact might there be on : - the way buildings are designed - patterns of energy use and consumption

(i) investigate possible links between increased energy use and extremes of climate; global warming and its effects (i) explore concepts of sustainable living and reducing energy usage - various packs on Education for Sustainable Development from MDEC (see Resource Providers)

(2) identify and describe a range of physical features found outwith Scotland

(2) describe some obvious physical features and the processes that formed them, e.g. the actions of running water, wind, waves, ice, earthquakes and volcanoes in forming coasts, rivers and their valleys, mountain areas (i) & (ii) hydropower linked to climate / mountains; wavepower; solarpower

(2) explain the processes, including the theory of plate tectonics, involved in the formation of major types of physical features found across the world

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

10)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people and place

The human environment

Developing an understanding of the patterns of human activity on the Earth's surface: settlement (including transport), ways of life.

A

(1) describe the main features of their local settlement, such as significant buildings, services, open space, transport (i) on a walk around their local school environment, children can learn to identify features related to the transmission of energy, e.g. street furniture such as metal covers for water and gas pipes (2) describe features of their daily routine (ii) children to think about and discuss their everyday activities at home and school which use energy, from moving themselves about, to switching on lights and keeping warm. (ii) how does this relate to the distribution and use of energy?

B

(1) describe the main features of transport and the built environment of their local settlement (i) be able to describe the features above in terms of energy consumption and conservation e.g. compare taxi, bus, car, cycling, walking. (2) compare and contrast their daily routine with children elsewhere and identify everyday links between Scotland and other countries, e.g. food we eat, schools (ii) compare and contrast daily routines of children in terms of energy use : - how much energy is used by a child in 24 hours in terms of: - washing - their breakfast - travelling to school - their lunch - compare their own routines with the experience of children from contrasting areas of Scotland and beyond (ii) MDEC provide a range of teaching packs linked to lifestyles of children overseas; also specific packs on transport overseas

C

(1) describe the main features of their own / a Scottish settlement and compare with others (2) describe contrasting ways of life and give reasons why they differ in different parts of the world (i), (ii) be able to talk about the above with a focus on the use and conservation of energy (ii) Family Life and the 5Rs (MDEC); slides, information and activities on life in Ghana and the UK linked to waste, energy use and recycling (ii) see Live Wire Productions pack The Ant Race - a 60 minute play acted by pupils (further details in Annex I)

(i) & (ii) contact the Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre (AEEC) for information about the Street Explorer unit

(i) & (ii) contact the Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre (AEEC) for information about the Traffic First? units

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

11)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people and place

The human environment

Developing an understanding of the patterns of human activity on the Earth's surface: settlement (including transport), ways of life.

D

(1) describe how, and give some reasons why, settlements differ in character, size, number of people and function (i) link to origin of settlement and dependence on available energy source, means of transport - development (urban, rural, industrial) (2) for a developing and a developed area or country, describe main features of economic life and how they are changing, e.g. farming, industry, transport, cities

E

(1) give some reasons for the location of settlements and the main types of land use within them, e.g. industrial areas, shopping centres, residential areas (i) be able to think about the effect of the demand and supply of energy to settlements in the development of land use (2) for a developing and developed area or country, compare and contrast main features of lifestyle and population growth

F

(1) describe and explain some of the factors affecting urban growth and change (i) link to availability of affordable / accessible energy (2) explain some of the reasons for differences in economic and population growth at a global level

(ii) use Development Compass Rose from MDEC as a framework to help pupils question and explore all aspects of development linked to energy (ii) also Understanding Global Issues series, by MDEC (ii) explore the need for sustainable development

(ii) MDEC resources : - a range of resources on various parts of the developing world linked to farming, industry, transport, cities, and economic development

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

12)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people and place

Human­physical interactions

Developing an understanding of the interaction between people and the Earth's natural environment: land use, resources and change, environmental issues and sustainability.

A

(1) describe how land is used in and around the school / home (i) energy used in the process and its sources (2) discuss ways in which they can care for resources and their environment at home and in school. (ii) children to discuss things which can be done in their local environment to save energy, and create less pollution, by investigating how well they use and save energy in their classroom and by counting different kinds of transport on a nearby road (ii) chart their own use of different forms of transport (ii) how do children travel to and from school : bus, car, cycle, walk; discuss relative costs and energy use

B

(1) describe how people use land for work and leisure in the local area (i) power generation (2) give some ways in which everyday resources are conserved or recycled locally, e.g. collection of waste paper. (ii) children to find out how recycling is organized in Aberdeen. What is collected from your house and how often? Where can you go to recycle glass, paper, and plastic? How have bus companies and the Police made some of their vehicles more energy efficient and less polluting? (ii) energy conservation - greener buses - police cars running on LPG (liquid petroleum gas) (ii) personal / class surveys to assess levels of recycling : - What do you recycle?

C

(1) describe the main features of some common types of land use, e.g. farming, forestry, industrial estate (i) discuss the most common type of land use in the local area (2) describe ways in which resources in Scotland are conserved and recycled (ii) recycling plants for - paper - plant material for compost - glass (ii) energy resources : - power generation (water, wind, sun) - energy conservation (ii) use of Scottish timber in construction : - visit a construction companys factory to find out about timber frame manufacture; sources of timber; energy used in processes; how timber is used (ii) investigate renewable forms of energy : (see MDEC Resources) e.g. Focus on Energy; Green Technology (ii) using less non-renewable natural resources (e.g. fossil fuels) is protective of the environment, whereas usage of renewable natural resources (timber forestry) encourages the development of those natural resources (replanting) and can be good for the environment (forests are a habitat for plant and animal species) (ii) compare and contrast with overseas: - e.g. Ghana using Family Life and the 5Rs by MDEC - explore links to the level of energy used (ii) see World Wide Waste teaching pack from MDEC (ii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - Who Says its Rubbish - Cool It!

(ii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - Wheel of Science renewable energy - Who Says its Rubbish recycling (ii) also consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental musical The Toy Cupboard, or purchasing the music and script for children to perform.

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

13)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people and place

Human­physical interactions

Developing an understanding of the interaction between people and the Earth's natural environment: land use, resources and change, environmental issues and sustainability.

D

(1) for a selected land use change or industrial process, describe possible effects, good and bad, on the landscape / environment, e.g. tropical forest clearance, improvement of derelict land for leisure use (i) look at the possible effects of power generation on the landscape and environment : - coal / oil power stations - nuclear power plants - dams for hydro-electric - wind farms, onshore and offshore - solar energy (i) methods of energy transmission : - overhead power lines and pylons - gas pipelines - under-sea oil pipelines from offshore platforms (i) investigate case studies of the transmission of renewable energy resources e.g. : - Pitcaple Environmental Project (www.est.org.uk/schri/community/ viewproject.cfm?project_id=79) - Glens of Foudland Wind Farm - Aberdeen Bay Wind Farm (i) consider Live Wire Productions environmental drama Wheel of Science which covers renewable energy (2) describe some methods used and reasons for conserving major resources, e.g. fish, energy, forests. (ii) conserve fish stocks in NE Scotland: fishing quotas, net size, licensing regime, limited areas, size of Scottish fleet, impact of fleets from other countries (ii) well managed forests can be an ongoing source of energy (firewood, charcoal), whereas deforestation destroys the habitat of diverse species of plants, insects and animals (ii) methods of energy conservation, and usage of renewable sources: at home, in offices / factories / public buildings (ii) investigate Live Wire Productions environmental dramas : - The Powerhouse - Lights Out? - Cool It!

E

(1) for an economic development, e.g. new road, industry, retail park, describe the main social and environmental impact on the local area (i) highlight the impact on lives and the environment of supplying the necessary energy: - traffic - pollution - increase in population density - impact on Green Belt areas (2) describe and explain simply some ways of conserving landscapes, such as eroded coasts and mountain areas. (ii) Live Wire Productions resources (further details in Annex I) : - Wheel of Science a drama which covers environmental issues and renewable energy sources - outreach presentation and workshop Dr Paraffin Young (ii) use of groynes, sea walls, specific paths designed for country walks

F

(1) describe and explain the main factors influencing the patterns of land use, including change over time (2) for a large-scale leisure, service, commercial or resource development, describe and explain the main issues and conflicts and how these can be resolved (3) explain why conservation of natural resources is important both in a local and global context. (ii) / (iii) highlight local and global impacts of : - energy use / energy demand - means of generating or storing energy - means of transmitting or transporting energy - urgent need for renewable energy e.g. - forestry => firewood; - sugarcane / beet => power alcohol, green petrol (ii) & (iii) Live Wire Productions resources (further details in Annex I) : - consider staging Wheel of Science a drama which covers environmental issues and renewable energy sources

(i), (ii), (iii) explore concepts of sustainable development and the factors / aspects involved (a range of resources are available from MDEC) - explore local <=> global connections (i), (ii), (iii) follow an exercise considering The Future and link choices to sustainable development : - The Future booklet from the Exploring My World pack, by MDEC - Citizenship for the Future by WWF

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

14)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in society

People and needs in society

Developing an understanding of individual and social needs and the relationship to economic factors.

A

(1) describe their own physical and emotional needs (2) identify some of the ways that family, friends and school meet their needs (ii) investigate how energy helps to supply needs

B

(1) give examples of some needs of different groups of people, e.g. the elderly, homeless, disabled, etc. (2) identify ways in which money and resources in the home, school and in the community are shared to meet different needs (i) & (ii) link to energy audit and energy conservation measures - how can we help elderly people on small incomes meet energy costs? - why do some people feel the cold more?

C

(1) describe the difference between needs and wants (i) discuss the differences in house design and how they meet our needs and desires (i) differentiate between needs and wants : energy use around the house / school (2) suggest ways that individuals, families and communities help meet the needs of and care for others, e.g. health care providers, extended families, etc. (ii) discover how electricity, gas and fuel oil are distributed to homes (3) give examples of sources of personal and family income, and choices for spending (iii) how we make choices : - spend income on conservation measures e.g. insulation, low energy bulbs, fuel efficient boilers, in order to spend less on gas and electricity in the future - or spend on wants e.g. televisions, games machines, computers, extra power operated gadgets

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

15)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in society

People and needs in society

Developing an understanding of individual and social needs and the relationship to economic factors.

D

(1) explain that different groups and cultures have different needs, e.g. the elderly, the unemployed (i) see Live Wire Productions pack The Ant Race - a 60 minute play acted by pupils (further details in Annex I) (2) provide simple examples of the ways that supply and demand can affect price (ii) e.g. petrol prices directly related to news about oil supplies (3) describe in simple terms how some local services are financed, e.g. swimming pool, refuse collection (iii) consider the energy requirements of local services and how these are paid for

E

(1) describe and explain the ways in which contact with other cultures and the media have influenced perceptions of need (i) link with the rapid growth of consumer society / culture in the UK and the energy involved in goods production; compare with lifestyles in other cultures / countries (see MDEC resources) (i) creation of new needs : for exotic products (e.g. slate from China, Portugal and Spain; timber from Siberia) with energy implications of international trade and transportation (i) see Live Wire Productions pack The Ant Race - a 60 minute play acted by pupils (further details in Annex I) (2) identify the ways in which local/ national agencies and individual enterprise can help meet society's needs, e.g. by creating jobs, fund-raising, care of the elderly (3) give examples of revenue raising and expenditure that provide local and national services, e.g. libraries, transport

F

(1) explain some factors that account for differences in individual and national wealth (2) describe and give some of the reasons for debt ­ individual and international (i) & (ii) link to power and control of individuals and nations in terms of energy sources and supplies (3) identify the ways in which employment and trade decisions made by multinational companies can affect different groups and countries (ii) & (iii) investigate the information and resources on international trade and international debt from MDEC (ii) & (iii) use interactive role play games to experience how decisions affect groups and countries (see MDEC resources) : - e.g. computer industry, sports wear industry - discover conditions in the new industrial development of other countries

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

16)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in society

Rules, rights and responsibilities in society

Developing an understanding of individual and collective rights and responsibilities in a democratic society.

A

(1) participate in discussion leading to the creation of simple rules and why we need them, e.g. in playing a game or to protect themselves and others (i) rules for keeping safe within the home (especially linked to energy e.g. electricity, gas, open hearth fire) (i) rules for saving energy around the house (i) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama The Powerhouse (further details in Annex I)

B

(1) describe the ways in which rules are enforced in school and family life (i) discuss rules we have in our home (2) identify some of the rights and responsibilities they as children have, e.g. looking after a pet (ii) reduce energy use : - make sure lights are switched off - doors are closed to conserve heat in rooms (ii) see MDEC materials on : - eco-school development - energy waste / conservation (ii) do the school quiz on www.globalfootprints.org to measure your global footprint : - how much of the Earths resources we use and how to reduce this (ii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - The Powerhouse - Lights Out? (ii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions internet safety musical, Sids Online Safety Show and/or investigate the supporting Sids Online Safety Guide at www.bizzikid.co.uk (further details in Annex I)

C

(1) describe different rules that apply in different contexts, e.g. formal / informal, rules for personal safety, etc. (i) devise rules in and around the home for conserving energy (i) internet safety with Live Wire Productions (see Annex I) : - consider a staging of the musical, Sids Online Safety Show and/or investigate the supporting Sids Online Safety Guide at www.bizzikid.co.uk - also consider purchasing Its A Jungle Out There!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (2) suggest ways in which they can contribute to the care of others and respect their feelings/views (i) & (ii) discuss why we like to keep our homes in good condition, gardens neat and tidy (ii) why this is a good idea ?

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

17)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in society

Rules, rights and responsibilities in society

Developing an understanding of individual and collective rights and responsibilities in a democratic society.

D

(1) explain why laws are made in society, e.g. laws to deal with discrimination such as racism, sexism, etc (i) safety regulations linked to energy (i) see Live Wire Productions pack The Ant Race - a 60 minute play acted by pupils (further details in Annex I) (2) describe some of the ways in which society deals with and punishes crime, e.g. community service, fines (3) suggest some of the rights and responsibilities of a citizen in a democracy (iii) need for countries / individuals and global society to take on board sustainable development : - the Rio Summit in 1992 led to the formation of Local Agenda 21 initiatives == Local Agenda 21 Officer input == - how can schools / individuals play their part ? - Making it Happen (Agenda 21 and schools WWF) - Rescue Mission (Planet Earth, a childrens edition of Agenda 21 by Peace Child International) - Focus on Energy and other sustainability packs Note : all the above titles are available through MDEC

E

(1) describe some of the rights of young people and laws that affect them (i) see Live Wire Productions pack The Ant Race - a 60 minute play acted by pupils and encouraging good citizenship and anti-racism (further details in Annex I) (i) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions internet safety musical, Hello, Stranger! or consider purchasing the music and script for children to perform (2) describe some main factors in selected human rights issues

F

(1) compare the rights and responsibilities of citizens in Scotland and those of other societies (i) should there be a right to energy for all in Scotland ? (i) how would the right to fair distribution of energy use across the world relate to the distribution of responsibilities, (especially in nondemocratic societies) ?

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

18)

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in society

Conflict and decision making in society

Developing an understanding of conflict and decision-making processes including the influence of the media.

A

(1) identify the conflicting points of view of the participants in a disagreement within a familiar context, e.g. school or family.

B

(1) offer ways of reaching agreement within a conflict or disagreement in school or in the family (2) describe some choices or decisions they can make in their own lives. (ii) saving energy around the house : - switch off own bedroom lights - turn off hot water taps - turn off cold water taps too especially when cleaning teeth, (most drinking water is treated then piped under pressure) - close doors and windows - do not leave TV or computer on standby (ii) saving energy around the school : - suggest possible ways - discuss why it is good to save energy, and the benefits (ii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama Lights Out? (further details in Annex I) (ii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions internet safety musical, Sids Online Safety Show and/or investigate the supporting Sids Online Safety Guide at www.bizzikid.co.uk (further details in Annex I)

C

(1) describe ways people can participate in the decision- making process in various contexts ­ in school, work, community (i) school : - school council - eco-school committee - class activities linked to community concerns, activities, participation (i) internet safety with Live Wire Productions (see Annex I) : - consider a staging of the musical, Sids Online Safety Show and/or investigate the supporting Sids Online Safety Guide at www.bizzikid.co.uk; - also consider purchasing Its A Jungle Out There!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (2) identify the main features of an election at local and national level, e.g. voters, campaigning, candidates, ballot box, etc. (ii) carry out a mock election in class; make a manifesto featuring energy (ii) identify areas of concern : - energy waste - conservation - renewable energy sources, and present investigations into other forms of energy generation (ii) investigate case studies of renewable energy resources e.g. : - Pitcaple Environmental Project (www.est.org.uk/schri/community/ viewproject.cfm?project_id=79) - Glens of Foudland Wind Farm - Aberdeen Bay Wind Farm

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

19)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Social Subjects - Knowledge and understanding - people in society

Conflict and decision making in society

Developing an understanding of conflict and decision-making processes including the influence of the media.

D

(1) describe simply how representatives are chosen and the types of work they do, e.g. local councillors, members of Scottish, British and European Parliaments (2) describe the ways in which the media can affect personal decision making. (ii) media influence on lifestyle and the desire for excess material goods and the implications for : - energy use - sustainable development - global footprint : see MDEC resources and www.globalfootprints.org

E

(1) identify the ways that citizens can participate in decision making through elections and pressure groups at local, national and international level (i) local school energy linked activities : - community Agenda 21 - waste saving - recycling (i) pupils identify, research and present a case study linked to their chosen energy-linked or sustainable development concern : - present to school / local council - discover national groups involved - write to MP / MSP (i) Get Global from MDEC is an excellent pack helping pupils develop the skills required for active citizenship; it enables them to choose issues, research and develop arguments, present the issues and take action (2) give examples of the ways in which local and national government make decisions that affect people's lives. (ii) building new roads => more traffic => higher fossil fuel demand => production of greenhouse gases => global warming (ii) how planning applications for new housing developments are processed through local and / or national government

F

(1) explain the ways in which campaigns, media and pressure group activities influence public opinion (i) appropriateness of new developments : - new nuclear power stations - siting of wind and wave farms - flooding valleys for hydro-electric schemes - Green Belt and National Park issues (who should be allowed to build what, and where?) - sustainable development issue groups (2) describe some of the main policies of political parties (ii) research and contact local MPs with concerns and questions on their policies regarding (i) above (3) describe ways of resolving selected national and international disputes (iii) Are any of the consultation processes by the Scottish Parliament linked to sustainable development ? (iii) international / global conferences / decision making bodies / treaties : - e.g. climate change , Kyoto Protocol

(ii) investigate case studies of renewable energy resources e.g. : - Pitcaple Environmental Project (www.est.org.uk/schri/community/viewproject.cfm?project_id=79) - Glens of Foudland Wind Farm - Aberdeen Bay Wind Farm

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

20)

Science - Knowledge and understanding - Earth and space

Materials from Earth

Developing an understanding of the materials available on our planet, and the links between properties and uses.

A

(1) recognise and name some common materials from living and non-living sources (i) read the story of The Three Little Pigs and discuss the properties of straw, wood and brick or stone, when building a house (i) the Changing Materials workshop at Satrosphere is an introduction to materials, their properties, and how we can change them (further details in Annex I (i) in and around the home e.g. wood, stone, granite, furnishing fabrics (2) give examples of uses of some materials based on simple properties (ii) in and around the home e.g. stone walls for strength, glass windows for light (3) give the main uses of water (iii) in and around the home, with emphasis on the need for conservation (iii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions musical Splish Splash Splosh (further details in Annex I)

B

(1) make observations of differences in the properties of common materials (i) discuss the properties of common building materials - slate, tile, wood, glass, concrete, brick, harling look at : - strength - durability - malleability - rigidity - texture - colour - opacity - insulation - heat storage - resistance to weathering compare : - granite & sandstone - man-made and natural materials (2) relate uses of everyday materials to properties (ii) discuss the differences between materials with respect to energy conservation (insulation, utilisation of sunshine, heat storage), where and how are they used and why : - investigate why materials have been chosen for specific functions e.g. slates for roofing; glass fibres for insulation; rubber for seals (3) explain why water conservation is important (i) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - The Powerhouse - Lights Out?

C

(1) describe the differences between solids, liquids and gases (i) experiments : - boil water and observe what happens - freeze water; note that water expands (i) consider Live Wire Productions outreach presentation and workshop Dr Paraffin Young (further details in Annex I) (2) give some everyday uses of solids, liquids and gases (ii) fuels (differentiate between renewable and non-renewable) : - wood, charcoal, coal, peat - oil, oil substitutes (e.g. alcohol, vegetable oils) - North Sea gas, bio-gas / methane (see also Where We Live and Energy Focus by MDEC) (i) & (ii) investigate the insulating properties of different substances and how they are used to keep warm or to keep cool (ii) collect pictures of everyday uses and make a display

Scottish Homes, a learning and teaching unit devised by AEEC, introduces pupils to the form and function of common building materials.

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

21)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Science - Knowledge and understanding - Earth and space

Materials from Earth

Developing an understanding of the materials available on our planet, and the links between properties and uses.

D

(1) describe the internal structure of the Earth (i) consider Live Wire Productions outreach presentation and workshop Dr Paraffin Young (further details in Annex I) (2) describe the processes that led to the formation of the three main types of rock (ii) discuss the magnitudes of energy required to change materials i.e. heat and pressure (3) give examples of useful materials that we obtain from the Earth's crust (iii) energy : - fossil fuels (i.e. oil, coal, gas, oilstone shale) - geothermal energy, hot springs - uranium (iii) the Aberdeen Maritime Museum hosts displays on the North Sea oil and gas industry, as well as shipbuilding, transport, fishing, and history of the harbour (iii) using natural / renewable energy sources, Green Technology 1 by MDEC provides designs, information, and practical experiments on energy production and conservation (iii) natural materials used in the building and furnishing of homes, and their properties with respect to energy conservation (e.g. silica => glass; stone, slate, wood) (4) describe how soils are formed (5) name the gases of the atmosphere and describe some of their uses (v) energy : - oxygen, necessary for combustion of fuels (v) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama Cool It! (further details in Annex I)

E

(1) describe the particulate nature of solids, liquids and gases and use this to explain their known properties (i) consider Live Wire Productions outreach presentation and workshop Dr Paraffin Young (further details in Annex I) (2) describe what is meant by an element (ii) see Live Wire Productions environmental drama Cool It! (further details in Annex I) (3) describe how physical properties of elements are used to classify them as metals or non-metals

F

(1) describe some features of the structure of the atom (2) describe some of the characteristic features of the periodic table (3) explain the water cycle using the particulate model

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

22)

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ Earth and space

Changing Materials

Developing an understanding of the ways in which materials can be changed.

A

(1) make observations of the ways in which some materials can be changed by processes such as squashing, bending, twisting and stretching. (i) discuss the energy inputs required in order to change shape

B

(1) describe how everyday materials can be changed by heating or cooling (i) be able to discuss in terms of energy exchange (2) give examples of everyday materials that dissolve in water (iii) salt : show how the varying concentration of salt in the Arctic Ocean creates the Gulf Stream current; could global warming switch the process off and stop the current of warm water coming to the British Isles? (3) give examples of common causes of water pollution (iii) how is grey water - water which has been used e.g. kitchen, bathroom (but not toilet) - best used? (iii) is heat energy a form of pollution, or is it a useful resource in the wrong place ?

C

(1) describe changes when materials are mixed (2) describe how solids of different sizes can be separated (3) distinguish between soluble and insoluble materials (iii) Try dissolving various materials in water (salt, sugar, chalk) and note what happens. (4) describe in simple terms the changes that occur when water is heated or cooled. (iv) Boil water and record what happens. Freeze water and discuss how it alters.

The Changing Materials workshop at Satrosphere is an introduction to materials, their properties, and how we can change them (further details in Annex I

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

23)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ Earth and space

Changing Materials

Developing an understanding of the ways in which materials can be changed.

D

(1) describe what happens when materials are burned (i) release of energy as heat; explore alternative sources to fossil fuels and differentiate between renewable and non-renewable energy sources : - burning rubbish - biomass (including wood) - discuss the processes applied to the energy source (e.g. charcoal) (2) explain how evaporation and filtration can be used in the separation of solids from liquids (ii) explain how much energy in kiloJoules is required to raise 1 litre of water by 1.0 °C, and then kiloJoules per litre required for evaporation (change state from liquid to gas) (3) describe the effect of burning fossil fuels (iii) what is released when burning : - coal (heat, sulphur, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, incomplete combustion => soot particles) - smokeless fuel - oil - gas - paraffin (water condensation) (iii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - The Powerhouse - Lights Out?

E

(1) give examples of simple chemical reactions, explaining them in terms of elements and compounds (iii) What emerges when burning : - wood (carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, smoke - carbon particles) - coal (sulphur) - smokeless fuel - oil - gas - paraffin (water condensation) (2) describe the effect of temperature on solubility (iii) compare how long it takes for sugar to dissolve in hot and cold water; find out if the temperature of the water affects the amount that can be dissolved (3) describe the use of pH to measure acidity (4) describe the process of neutralisation and give some everyday applications (5) describe what happens when metals react with oxygen, water and acids (v) metals with acids give exothermic reactions and heat is released; every chemical reaction involves an energy change (to or from the environment) (6) describe how metal elements can be extracted from compounds in the Earth's crust. (vi) energy is required to extract metals from ores (e.g. smelting, electrolysis)

F

(1) give examples of the ways in which the rates of chemical reactions can be changed (i) reaction rates approximately double for a 10.0 °C increase in ambient temperature (very approximately where catalysts or enzymes are involved, see below) : - implications of global warming on plants and ecosystems (i) catalysts (inorganic) and enzymes (organic / biological) can greatly reduce the energy required to complete a chemical reaction (2) distinguish between chemical and physical changes (ii) differentiate between physical and chemical processes and reactions in the production of energy from different sources (e.g. wood cellulose to CO2 and H2O) (3) give examples of chemical reactions using word equations.

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

24)

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ energy and forces

Properties and uses of energy

Developing an understanding of energy through the study of the properties and uses of heat, light, sound and electricity.

A

(1) give examples of sources of heat, light and sound (i) discuss electricity as a power source for heating, cooking and lighting (i) using their own senses: identify feelings and sources of heat, light and sound - compare outside and inside the classroom / home - be able to sort sources of heat, light and sound into natural and artificial (2) give examples of everyday uses of heat, light and sound (ii) how do we keep ourselves / houses / class warm? (ii) how does light enter home / school? - where is it lightest / darkest? (ii) identify loud and soft sounds what are favourite sounds and why? (ii) discuss everyday uses of heat, light and sound within the home (3) give examples of everyday appliances that use electricity (iii) make a list of household appliances that use electricity (iii) discuss the difference between mains electricity and battery power (4) identify some of the common dangers associated with use of electricity (iv) discuss the dangers associated with the use of electricity in the home Satrosphere resources : (iii) Toys Show / Workshop (iii) & (iv) Electricity Show

B

(1) identify the sun as the main source of heat and light (i) discuss ways in which solar energy could be used to heat and light a house : - feel heat from sunlight through a window; importance of orientation and window size (difference between east / west homes vs. north / south) - reflect light with mirrors (discuss dangers) (i) use buildings to help monitor rainfall, temperature gradients and light values over time (i) paint the playground in relation to the amount of sunshine that each part gets (i) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama Wheel of Science - renewable energy (further details in Annex I) (2) link light and sound to seeing and hearing (ii) where is it brightest / darkest in your home / school and why? (ii) where can you hear yourself sing best / worst in your home / school and why? (ii) - how does your eye see? - how does your ear hear? - how do sound and light travel? (ii) make a telephone (ii) link to Technology - Needs and how they are met Satrosphere resources : (ii) The Senses Show

C

(1) link light to shadow formation (i) how shadows affect the area in and around the home e.g. where is the best place to build a sun porch or conservatory? (i) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - The Powerhouse - Lights Out? (2) give examples of light being reflected from surfaces (ii) experiment with reflecting surfaces ­ mirrors, foil, reflective strips on safety jackets (ii) maximising daylight and / or low energy bulbs (3) link sound to sources of vibration (iii) make percussive / stringed instruments (iii) make flour (or equivalent) move by placing near a source of sound : - make standing waves on a resonating metal plate covered in sand or flour (iii) stopping sound travelling ­ where to put speakers so the sound doesnt travel too far (link to Technology - Needs and how they are met) (4) construct simple battery-operated circuits, identifying the main components (iv) various experiments e.g. wiring up a bell or buzzer; creating a switch (link to Technology) (5) classify materials as electrical conductors or insulators and describe how these are related to the safe use of electricity (v) electrical conductors or insulators within the home - conduct a simple energy audit Satrosphere resources : (i), (ii) & (iii) The Senses Show (iv) & (v) Electricity Show (iv) Electricity Workshop

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

25)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ energy and forces

Properties and uses of energy

Developing an understanding of energy through the study of the properties and uses of heat, light, sound and electricity.

D

(1) distinguish between heat and temperature (2) describe in simple terms how lenses work (3) give examples of simple applications of lenses (4) use the term `pitch' and `volume' to describe sound (iv) discuss the difference between pitch and volume : - test ways of altering the pitch of a sound and volume of a sound - pitch : elastic bands, blowing over bottles of water - volume : using amplifiers, hands, tubes (5) construct a series circuit following diagrams using conventional symbols (6) describe the effect of changing the number of components in a series circuit Satrosphere resources : (v) & (vi) Electricity Show and Electricity Workshop

E

(1) describe the differences between the flow of heat by conduction and convection (i) investigate heating methods within the home (i) keeping in heat / ventilation - use of windows, flues, vents and fans - importance of convection (warm air rises, often to the bedrooms) - where does all the hot air and warm water go? (usually out of the window or down the drain) use of heat exchangers / pumps - "Wall to Wall Design by MDEC illustrates house design for best possible energy use in The UK and Kenya - Green Technology 1 (also from MDEC) has lots of experiments on energy conservation, generation, and insulation using wind, water and solar sources (2) give examples of everyday uses of good and poor conductors of heat (ii) investigate good and poor conductors of heat in and around the home : link to Technology - Needs and how they are met (3) explain the effect of a prism on white light (4) describe what happens when light passes through different materials (5) explain what happens when sound passes through different materials (6) construct a parallel circuit following diagrams (7) use the terms `voltage', `current' and `resistance' in the context of simple circuits (vii) use the correct terminology during discussions about simple circuits in the home

F

(1) describe how energy is transferred by radiation (2) explain the effect of colour filters on white light (3) describe the relationship between pitch and frequency and loudness and amplitude (4) describe the structure and function of an electromagnet (5) analyse the functions of everyday electronic systems in terms of input and output conditions (v) everyday electronic systems : - homes, school, office, transport (6) using pre-fabricated sub-systems, construct simple electronic systems to solve given problems

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

26)

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ energy and forces

Conversion and transfer of energy

Developing an understanding of energy conversion in practical everyday contexts.

A

B

(1) give examples of being `energetic' (2) link the intake of food to the movement of their body (i) & (ii) consider Live Wire Productions outreach presentation and workshop Where Has My Breakfast Gone? (further details in Annex I)

C

(1) give examples of energy being converted from one form to another (i) generation of electricity : - hydro power - solar power - heat energy - photovoltaic cells (expensive) - wind power - tidal and wave power - fossil fuels (oil, North Sea gas) - nuclear power (2) describe the energy conversions in the components of an electrical circuit (ii) look at the use of electricity in the home and the kind of electricity used in the home (240V AC); discuss how electrical energy is distributed to our homes consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : (i) Wheel of Science renewable energy (i) & (ii) The Powerhouse (i) & (ii) Lights Out?

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

27)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ energy and forces

Conversion and transfer of energy

Developing an understanding of energy conversion in practical everyday contexts.

D

(1) give some examples of energy conversions involved in the generation of electricity (i) generation of electricity : - hydro power - solar power - heat energy - photovoltaic cells (expensive) - wind power - tidal and wave power - fossil fuels (oil, North Sea gas) - nuclear power (i) what are the advantages and risks associated with dependence on fossil fuels (North Sea gas, coal) relative to renewable (e.g. hydro-electric, wind turbines) (2) describe how electrical energy is distributed to our homes (3) name some energy resources (iii) give examples of their uses in and around the home : - gas (piped, calor / butane) - electricity - domestic heating oil - solid fuel (anthracite) - paraffin / kerosene - solar (iii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental dramas (further details in Annex I) : - Wheel of Science renewable energy - The Powerhouse - Lights Out? (iii) discuss the measures taken to conserve energy in the home

E

(1) describe some examples of the interconversion of potential and kinetic energy (i) consider the energy requirements (from all sources) in the manufacture of everyday items : - e.g. use the energy audit example for a bag of crisps in Where We Live (MDEC) (2) give some examples of chemical energy changes (3) explain the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy resources (iii) see Focus on Energy by MDEC: - energy production from different sources (iii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama Wheel of Science or Cool it! (further details in Annex I)

F

(1) distinguish between gravitational potential and chemical potential energy

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

28)

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ energy and forces

Forces and their effects

Developing an understanding of forces and how they can explain familiar phenomena and practices

A

(1) give examples of pushing and pulling, floating and sinking. Satrosphere resources : (i) Forces Show (i) Forces Workshop

B

(1) describe the effect that a push or pull can have on the direction, speed or shape of an object Satrosphere resources : (i) Forces Show (2) give examples of magnets in everyday use (3) describe the interaction of magnets in terms of the forces of attraction and repulsion.

C

(1) give some examples of friction (2) explain friction in simple terms (3) describe air resistance in terms of friction. Satrosphere resources : (i), (ii) & (iii) Forces Show (i) & (ii) Forces Workshop

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

29)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Science - Knowledge and understanding ­ energy and forces

Forces and their effects

Developing an understanding of forces and how they can explain familiar phenomena and practices

D

(1) give examples of streamlining and explain how this lowers resistance (2) describe the relationship between the Earth's gravity and the weight of an object. Satrosphere resources : (i) & (ii) Forces Show

E

(1) describe the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces Satrosphere resources : (i) Forces Show (2) explain how gravity on other planets and the Moon affects the weight of an object.

F

(1) distinguish between mass and weight (2) name the newton as the unit of force and explain its relationships to mass (3) describe the relationship between force, area and pressure.

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

30)

Science - Knowledge and understanding - living things and the Variety and characteristic features processes of life

Developing an understanding of the characteristic features of the main groups of plants and animals, including humans and microorganisms. The principles of genetics are also considered.

A

(1) recognise similarities and differences between themselves and others (2) sort living things into broad groups according to easily observable characteristics

B

(1) give some of the more obvious distinguishing features of the major invertebrate groups (2) name some common members of the invertebrate groups

C

(1) give some of the more obvious distinguishing features of the five vertebrate groups (2) name some common members of the vertebrate groups (3) name some common animals and plants using simple keys

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31)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Science - Knowledge and understanding - living things and the Variety and characteristic features processes of life

Developing an understanding of the characteristic features of the main groups of plants and animals, including humans and microorganisms. The principles of genetics are also considered.

D

(1) give the main distinguishing features of the major groups of flowering and nonflowering plants

E

(1) give the main distinguishing features of microorganisms (2) create and use keys to identify living things (3) give examples of inherited and environmental causes of variation

F

(1) describe the harmful and beneficial effect of microorganisms (i) discuss dust mites in housing : - modern central heating creates the right conditions (warm and humid) for mites to live in carpets and soft furnishings, with implications for asthma - these and other organisms can significantly influence our health; how houses are built and the microclimates they create can have a direct influence on our health (2) outline the principles of modern biotechnology and explain its significance now and for the future (ii) bio-fuels (green petrol, power alcohol, alcogas, gasohol) produced from industrial fermentation processes (3) explain the role of chromosomes and genes in inheritance

(general) discover : - how fossil fuels were formed - how wood is a major source of energy in other parts of the world - other sources of energy; plants and animals => biogas and methane

(general) human responsibilities to the natural world, especially the consequences of : - the way we choose to use energy - the amount we use

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

32)

Technology - Knowledge and understanding - technology

Needs and how they are met

Developing understanding about needs of people and the environment, ways in which technology can satisfy these and consequences of actions proposed and taken.

A

(1) talk about some everyday needs and the things that are made to meet these (i) introduce the idea of shelter; what keeps you warm / dry ? (i) everyday needs in and around the home

B

(1) describe how some everyday needs are met by familiar and new products (i) look at roofs to keep rain / snow out and keep the heat in; discuss the materials used (i) design a new home (groups work on different rooms) that meets everyday needs (i) design a dream house : - ramps to assist disabled people enter buildings more easily (should ramps be necessary in a well designed building ?) - electrically operated lifts to help elderly people climb stairs - flashing lights within the home for deaf people - specially adapted bathrooms and kitchens - link with Science - energy and forces - Properties and uses of energy (i) should the able-bodied in offices be encouraged to gain healthy exercise by using stairs instead of using the energy-intensive lifts ? (i) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama The Powerhouse (further details in Annex I)

C

(1) suggest how people's needs differ, giving examples of how designing and making helps particular groups in their communities and further afield (i) discuss the needs of different people in the community e.g. the elderly, disabled, and how the design of the home can help (2) give examples from the past of how some specific needs have been met in different ways (ii) investigate different roof types in the local area and research different roofing materials used in the past (ii) learn about environmental design by making first hand drawings directly from the environment: - using a view finder investigate the design of a variety of homes in the local area - discuss special features and investigate improvements using pupils design / style preferences - pupils can build up a database of architectural features, designs, historical detail - investigate how houses have developed in relation to changing needs - investigate how design has reflected these needs; facilitates different uses; utilises new materials or processes (3) suggest ways in which people can meet needs of other living things and the environment (iii) Technology - Who Needs It? explores the effect of technology on lifestyles and the environment (available through MDEC) (iii) through gardens : plants, shelter, bird feeders (iii) waste management (iii) energy management : link with Science - energy and forces - Properties and uses of energy

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

33)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Technology - Knowledge and understanding - technology

Needs and how they are met

Developing understanding about needs of people and the environment, ways in which technology can satisfy these and consequences of actions proposed and taken.

D

(1) suggest how designing and making meets a variety of needs in their own and other cultures, past, present, and in thinking about the future (i) discuss the role of architects (i) needs today - designing a housing development to meet specific needs : - look at house design, style, and make comparisons - look at the layout of developments using maps - make a comparison between : suburban / city centre; rural / urban; coastal / inland - how do these utilise the sun, protect from wind, create interesting spaces - link with Science - energy and forces - Properties and uses of energy (2) describe how effective designing and making takes account of how well products work, their overall attractiveness and cost (ii) look at new housing developments and discuss how effective they are, taking account of how well they work, attractiveness and cost; discuss designing houses for individuals with special needs, utilising scale plans (ii) look at the environmental aspects and sustainability of uPVC products: how uPVC is made; methods of disposal

E

(1) explain how designing and making meets needs, and influences lifestyles, in groups and societies, past, present and future (i) make a comparative study of house design in other Aberdeens around the world; investigate similarities and differences (i) discuss geographical factors, compare coastal / inland towns, look at how climate affects the design of houses (2) describe products in terms of health and safety, how they work, look, and what they cost (ii) look at the technological development of houses through time - e.g. traditional structures such as wattle and daub - link with Science - energy and forces - Properties and uses of energy (3) describe how technological and economic change can result in new needs to be met (4) explain how technological activity can affect the needs of people and the environment

F

(1) explain the effectiveness in meeting needs of the made and built environment with regard to health and safety, function, aesthetics and economics (2) explain how different perceptions of `needs' and `lifestyle' can result in conflict that might be caused or resolved by technological activity (ii) link with Science - energy and forces - Properties and uses of energy e.g. electronics (ii) discuss which forms of technology are appropriate to different countries and needs, and to global long term sustainability (see also the following from MDEC) : - Changing Technology explores the issues and challenges of technology in todays world - Wall to Wall Design has information and practical design activities on sustainable housing design in the UK and Kenya - Live Well, Live Wisely deals with appropriate and sustainable technology

(3) suggest ways in which choice is influenced by development of new products and processes, and by advertising (iii) the development of uPVC windows and doors : - look at how advertising influences choice - look at how people change / improve the exterior of their homes, and how they are influenced by the types of products available (plastic doors / windows / conservatories) (iii) internet safety with Live Wire Productions (see Annex I) : - consider a staging of the musical, Sids Online Safety Show and/or investigate the supporting Sids Online Safety Guide at www.bizzikid.co.uk; - also consider purchasing Its A Jungle Out There!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (4) describe how technological activity can affect the needs of people and the environment (iv) electronic gadgetry for outside and inside the home

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

34)

Technology - Knowledge and understanding - technology

Resources and how they are managed

Developing understanding about a range and differing types of resources, ways in which they can be managed and consequences of actions proposed and taken.

A

(1) name some familiar products, say what they are for and what they are made from (i) name some common building materials (i) look at the roofs of different houses and discuss their purpose and the materials used for construction - focus on energy (2) talk about how materials can be used or changed for specific purposes (ii) talk about how different building materials can be used to build a home (ii) build a model home using different junk materials (plasticine, wooden blocks, clay); - how much energy did the pupils use to build with different materials ? - what other aids were used i.e. glue, tape, papier mâché ? (3) talk about their surroundings and suggest improvements (iii) consider changes which pupils would like to make to their homes e.g. lighter, warmer (iii) stimulate discussion with pictures of homes from across the world (available from MDEC) (4) show awareness of the need to conserve the materials that they use (iv) junk models of houses : - ask pupils to think what to do with the junk they did not need for their models

B

(1) show that items may consist of one material only, or of combinations (i) investigate the materials used to make bricks (a relatively new material compared to stone and timber) (i) investigate how concrete and / or lime mortar is formed (2) give examples of familiar materials and where they come from (ii) look at building materials and discuss where they come from (ii) introduce real building materials and name them (ii) investigate properties of building materials and link with function (ii) look at wall bonds ­ for strength, patterns, solid shapes / flat shapes (Quadro building materials) (3) show that tools and materials can be used to turn an idea into a solution (iii) show how to use different tools and materials to make a model home (4) describe how resources could be saved by reducing waste and reusing materials wherever possible (iv) recycling granite (iv) how pupils families / school deal with waste materials in the home or school (iv) Family Life and the 5Rs (available through MDEC) has information and slides (iv) consider either a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental musical, The Toy Cupboard, or purchasing the music and script for children to perform (further details in Annex I)

C

(1) classify materials and make distinctions between what is natural and what is `made' (i) classify building materials and find out what is natural and what is man-made; (lime mortar uses natural materials, but the chemical change is carefully co-ordinated) (i) natural and man-made materials in housing comparisons: texture, weight, suitability; look for contrasts in the local environment - colour, shape, building design, old, new, natural / man-made materials (2) give some examples of how materials are changed in making products (ii) concrete constituents to make tiles (ii) slates : where do they come from? how are they split and fixed ? (3) demonstrate that materials, tools and people are resources necessary to make things (iii) why constituents of materials have been chosen (the properties of these) (iii) look at the work of builders and the materials and tools they require to build a house for construction (iii) look at how materials are chosen to suit their purpose e.g. slate (iii) investigate the role of : the architect; the builder; the joiner; the plumber; and the respective items of equipment needed to do their job (4) describe some benefits of reducing waste and recycling and reusing some familiar material resources (iv) any examples of this : - in gardens / recycling - with granite / reusing (iv) see World Wide Waste pack and also Family Life and the 5Rs (both available from MDEC) (iv) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama Wheel of Science (further details in Annex I)

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

35)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Technology - Knowledge and understanding - technology

Resources and how they are managed

Developing understanding about a range and differing types of resources, ways in which they can be managed and consequences of actions proposed and taken.

D

(1) give examples of a range of materials

E

(1) give examples of a range of materials,

F

(1) consider a range of materials and

(i) Wall to Wall Design (available from MDEC) has information and practical design activities on sustainable housing designs appropriate to differing conditions in Kenya and the UK (i) list a range of building materials from the huge variety which are used to build houses around the world (2) show how the availability and properties of materials affect their use (ii) discuss the use of locally-sourced granite to build houses, and its properties as a building material (ii) discuss the use of different building materials to build homes around the world and investigate their availability and properties e.g. straw, clay, wood (3) demonstrate that materials, including those used to communicate graphically, tools, people and energy are resources necessary to make things (iii) investigate all the materials, tools, people and energy required to build a house (4) describe some benefits of reducing waste, recycling and reusing materials and resources (iv) investigate why it is desirable to reduce, recycle and reuse resources (iv) see World Wide Waste pack (available from MDEC) (iv) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama Wheel of Science or Cool it! (further details in Annex I) their sources, properties and applications (i) investigate building materials and find out about their different properties and where they come from (2) describe how resources, including graphic media, tools, people and energy are used in the development of the made environment (ii) look at resources, tools, people and energy used in the development of the made environment (3) describe how energy conservation is affected by the use of material resources (iii) investigate the best building materials for energy conservation; investigate the energy efficiency of building materials with respect to the sunshine, winds and temperatures encountered in Scotland (iii) energy is only one aspect of sustainability : discuss healthy choices of materials (e.g. not treated with toxic chemicals or likely to exude vapours with consequences for those with asthma) (iii) consider a staging of Live Wire Productions environmental drama The Powerhouse or Lights Out? (further details in Annex I) justify their suitability for purpose (i) which materials are most suitable for energy conservation ? (i) from a given range of prescribed criteria devise ways of determining the most suitable for a particular building purpose (2) explain how resources are used in the development of the made environment (ii) visit a building site and observe the use of resources to build houses (ii) investigate repair and maintenance works in addition to new build, especially for pre-1918 dwellings (ii) investigate the criteria used to decide on the materials used for building houses (3) give examples of the interplay between the use of materials, the environment and finance (iii) use the framework contained in the Development Compass Rose pack (available from MDEC) for discovering issues linking natural, social, economic, and power / influence factors

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

36)

Technology - Knowledge and understanding - technology

Processes and how they are applied

Developing understanding about techniques and procedures that can be applied to make or control items and consequences of actions proposed and taken.

A

(1) talk about how familiar items, including those that they make themselves, are through a sequence of steps. (i) pupils talk about how they made a junk model of a house

B

(1) talk about how people affect their surroundings by choosing to make and change things (i) look for examples of how people make changes to their houses with reference to energy conservation (2) give examples of how familiar tools and equipment might be used to make things (3) give examples of sequences through which some familiar products are made

C

(1) show how people affect their surroundings by choosing to make or change things e.g. transport solutions, energy conservation (i) adapting a house to suit the needs of the family; compare with photographs of the original building (2) give examples of ways in which tools and equipment can be used to create solutions to practical problems (ii) discuss ways in which tools and equipment are used to build a house; look at building techniques used e.g. brick laying : - use of a spirit level - importance of a damp course - structure and strength (ii) handsaws (various) vs. electric table saws, especially rotating types for multiple functions (ii) different sorts of hammers and mallets for different materials (e.g. tent peg vs. masonry nail) (3) describe how resources, generally, are gathered, worked on and changed, packaged, distributed, sold and used in various ways as familiar products (iii) energy processes to produce and transport food to our tables, e.g. energy audit of : - a pack of crisps (Where We Live an MDEC resource) - BLT sandwich (bacon, lettuce & tomato), a learning and teaching unit from Scotlands Global Footprint (see Annex I - WWF) (4) talk about how what they do in their own problem-solving tasks relates to the world outside school.

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37)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Technology - Knowledge and understanding - technology

Processes and how they are applied

Developing understanding about techniques and procedures that can be applied to make or control items and consequences of actions proposed and taken.

D

(1) give examples of familiar processes that work by controlled sequences of events (2) describe ways in which tools and equipment can be used to create solutions to practical problems (3) describe a general sequence of events through which products are made, used and disposed of (iii) describe the sequence of events through which a house is built (iii) investigate ways in which energy is transferred to : - make and sell a pair of shoes - a bar of soap - a cotton t-shirt (4) give examples of simple energy stories that relate products to how they are made (iii) / (iv) energy processes to produce and transport food to our tables, e.g. energy audit of : - a pack of crisps (Where We Live an MDEC resource) - BLT sandwich (bacon, lettuce & tomato), a learning and teaching unit from Scotlands Global Footprint (see Annex I - WWF) (5) describe ways in which ideas are generated and communicated

E

(1) describe familiar processes that work by controlled sequences of events, including some that are automated (2) demonstrate techniques and procedures used to communicate and make solutions to practical problems (3) describe a wide range of techniques and procedures involved in production, marketing, use and beyond (4) describe how tools, equipment and procedures in their own problem-solving tasks relate to those in the world outside school (5) describe energy transfer as a feature of processes

F

(1) describe a range of processes and control devices, including some used in commercial production (2) demonstrate techniques and procedures used to communicate and make solutions to practical problems, including some used in commercial production (3) explain processes involved in market research, production, quality control and life-cycle of products, in their own work and in commerce (4) describe relationships between techniques and procedures that they use in their own problem-solving tasks and those used in commercial production (5) explain energy input and output in terms of efficiency of the process, economics and conservation of resources (v) Burning Shangrila (from MDEC) : best energy solutions for rural Nepal (6) explain ways in which ideas are generated and communicated in their own work and in commerce

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

38)

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Using materials, techniques and skills

Investigating and exploring sound

A

B

(1) For all levels A - F : explore and experiment with a wide variety of sound sources

C

(2) investigate sound using voices, instruments and everyday objects, recognising differences and contrasts between musical sounds and noise (ii) select contrasting everyday objects like spoons, elastic bands, cardboard tubes, and musical instruments. Why do they make different sounds? Sort into different sound categories.

(2) Explore sound quality and become familiar with the ways in which sounds are made and produced

(2) Experiment with different combinations and qualities of sound to represent contrasting moods and effects

(ii) Select contrasting everyday objects like spoons, elastic bands and cardboard tubes and musical instruments. Why do they make different sounds? How does sound travel from the musical instrument to your ear? Find words to describe their different qualities of sound in terms of contrasting moods and effects, and sort them into musical categories. (ii) Satrosphere resources : The Sound Show - explores sounds as vibration, and how sound travels; includes pitch, volume, amplification, hearing and novel instruments (see also Annex I)

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

39)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Using materials, techniques and skills

Investigating and exploring sound

D

E

(1) For all levels A - F : explore and experiment with a wide variety of sound sources

F

(2) Experiment and explore melodic, harmonic and rhythmic patterns and contrasts with a view to using combinations of sounds in inventions. (ii) By using voices and instruments, experiment with creating melodic, harmonic and rhythmic patterns. Investigate the relationship between the length of string /tube/key and the pitch of a note. How is sound travelling?

(2) For levels E - F : Explore electronic and acoustic effects and simple harmony with a view to combining these with melody or rhythm in inventions Link to Art and Design (3) investigate in depth the expressive potential of one or two instruments or voice, where `best' performing skills have been developed (4) investigate the creative potential of a range of compositional techniques

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

40)

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Using materials, techniques and skills

Using the voice

A

B

C

(1) For all levels A - F : sing a wide repertoire of songs representing a variety of styles in which the language is comprehensible and appealing to the age group (2) demonstrate some control in pitch and rhythm. (ii), (iii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a piece of music which has different types of sound, e.g. plucking, buzzing, hooting and banging Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated (3) show ability to memorise simple songs containing repetitive melodic and rhythmic patterns (2) show a greater ability to sing in tune with others (ii) consider purchasing The Toy Cupboard, an environmental musical for children to perform (further details from Live Wire Productions; see Annex I) (3) fit words in with the melody where this is obvious (ii) & (iii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a piece of music which has some of the sound qualities which you identified above. Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated. (4) control rhythm, speed and leaps in melody. (2) sing along together confidently in unison, with some awareness of dynamics, phrasing and expression (ii) consider purchasing Its A Jungle Out There!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (further details from Live Wire Productions; see Annex I) (3) sustain a simple harmonic part (ii) & (iii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a sound picture using the contrasting sounds which you have just identified. Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated.

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

41)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Using materials, techniques and skills

Using the voice

D

E

F

(1) For all levels A - F : sing a wide repertoire of songs representing a variety of styles in which the language is comprehensible and appealing to the age group (2) Sing together confidently, in unison and straightforward harmony, producing good vocal tone and clear pronunciation, and demonstrating awareness of dynamics, phrasing and expression (ii) consider purchasing Its A Jungle Out There!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (further details from Live Wire Productions; see Annex I) Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Make a graph to represent the change in pitch as you shorten a plucked elastic band or blow over the tops of bottles filled with different amounts of water. (2) Sing in unison and in harmony with an appropriate vocal technique and a sense of interpretation, sustaining enjoyment of singing during the transitionary period when the voice changes (ii) consider purchasing Hello, Stranger!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (further details from Live Wire Productions; see Annex I) (ii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a sound picture using the contrasting sounds which you have just identified. Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated. (2) sing with increased sensitivity and confidence (ii) consider purchasing Hello, Stranger!, an internet safety musical for children to perform (further details from Live Wire Productions; see Annex I) (3) develop repertoire for solo singing and for singing in small or larger groups

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

42)

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Using materials, techniques and skills

Using instruments

A

B

C

(1) For all levels A - F : individually and in groups, play a range of pitched and non-pitched instruments, applying a variety of appropriate techniques (2) demonstrate abilities in such basic playing techniques as shaking and tapping, keeping the beat while music is played and repeating simple rhythm patterns (ii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a piece of music which has different types of sound, e.g. plucking, buzzing, hooting and banging Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated. (2) play simple melodic and rhythm parts, showing some control over speed and volume, and respond to simple signals of direction in performance (ii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a piece of music which has some of the sound qualities which you identified above. Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated. (2) display two­handed co-ordination in playing straightforward melodies and rhythms, sometimes using a form of written notation, paying attention to expression and contrasts in the music (ii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a sound picture using the contrasting sounds which you have just identified. Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated.

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

43)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Using materials, techniques and skills

Using instruments

D

E

F

(1) For all levels A - F : individually and in groups, play a range of pitched and non-pitched instruments, applying a variety of appropriate techniques (2) play confidently and expressively, sustaining more challenging melodies and rhythms on a range of instruments, sometimes using a form of written notation Link to Mathematics and Information Handling Make a graph to represent the change in pitch as you shorten a plucked elastic band or blow over the tops of bottles filled with different amounts of water. (2) demonstrate increased musicianship and technical abilities whilst playing a widening range of instruments, such as recorder, keyboard, xylophone, guitar, etc.. (ii) Use your new knowledge about the objects which you have investigated to create and play a sound picture using the contrasting sounds which you have just identified. Link to Art and Design. Create your own musical instrument to demonstrate the sounds you have investigated. (2) play with increased sensitivity and confidence whilst acquiring and developing skills on one or two instruments which have been selected for study, in depth, by the pupil

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

44)

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Expressing feelings, ideas, thoughts and solutions

Creating and designing

A

B

C

(1) For all levels A - F : invent music individually and in groups, displaying imagination and initiative and using knowledge of sound and structures gained through investigations and explorations (2) select appropriate sound sources and combine and link sounds to convey effect in a short invention (ii) listen to the sound of electric crackling (2) create simple sound pictures, conveying an imaginative response to a stimulus and demonstrating an awareness of contrasts in music (3) devise graphic symbols to represent the music (2) create sound pictures which convey mood and atmosphere, displaying imagination and some awareness of structure (3) devise a simplified form of notation to represent inventions visually

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

45)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Music

Expressing feelings, ideas, thoughts and solutions

Creating and designing

D

E

F

(1) For all levels A - F : invent music individually and in groups, displaying imagination and initiative and using knowledge of sound and structures gained through investigations and explorations (2) invent music which incorporates simple melodic, harmonic and rhythmic features and shows imagination, some awareness of structures and contrasts and the ability to select appropriate sound sources (3) represent inventions visually in a simplified form of notation (2) invent music which uses more complex musical devices and stimuli, shows imagination, some awareness of structure, and incorporates instruments which the pupils are learning to play (3) lead others in playing inventions (2) make practical use of the concepts related to performing and listening activities to devise inventions, which show good structural planning and employ the skills and techniques which pupils are acquiring on an instrument or voice (3) combine various musical elements with acoustic and electronic sources in producing new inventions (4) where possible use technology, e.g. audio/video recordings, computer software, multi-track recorders, as a means of recording and refining inventions (5) represent inventions in a variety of ways, including appropriate notation which can be read and used by others

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

46)

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Art & Design

Expressing feelings, ideas, thoughts and solutions

Creating and designing

A

(1) produce two and three dimensional images expressing personal ideas and feelings (2) use given materials with some evidence of planning to solve a simple problem or task in modelling or constructing ACTIVITY - LINK TO MUSIC (ii) design and make a simple sound maker; either a plucker or shaker.

B

(1) create paintings, models and constructions from imagination and observation (2) solve problems or tasks by selecting and organising two- and threedimensional materials from a given range ACTIVITY - LINK TO MUSIC (ii) design and make a musical instrument which will produce a specific kind of sound e.g. hoot, buzz, bang, twang.... (ii) listen to the sound of : - the wind in telephone wires - wind around gutters or gables during a storm

C

(1) produce images which show some understanding of the visual elements and their use, e.g. in drawing, painting, modelling and constructing (2) show an ability to plan ahead, select organise and control materials in order to solve a specific problem or task ACTIVITY - LINK TO MUSIC (ii) carefully select materials to make musical instruments which could demonstrate contrasting moods and effects in a sound poem

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

47)

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Expressive Arts ­ Knowledge and understanding ­ Art & Design

Expressing feelings, ideas, thoughts and solutions

Creating and designing

D

(1) produce images which show further understanding of the qualities of visual elements and their use, e.g. in drawing, painting, modelling and constructing (2) suggest by drawing, visual presentation, simple models, at least one possible solution to a design problem (3) produce a solution to a design problem ACTIVITY - LINK TO MUSIC (iii) carefully select materials which could be made into musical instruments and could demonstrate contrasting moods and effects in a sound poem ACTIVITY - LINK TO ENERGY AND FORCES (iii) see Wall to Wall Design sustainable housing design activities from MDEC

E

(1) Demonstrate understanding of the use of visual elements in a wide range of activities, e.g. drawing, painting, sketching, constructing, still or video photography (2) evaluate ideas in response to a design brief (3) select the most appropriate one and produce a prototype ACTIVITY - LINK TO MUSIC (iii) carefully select materials which could be made into musical instruments which can play more than one note

F

(1) Demonstrate the ability to make a personal response to concepts such as imagination and fantasy through the use of visual elements (2) demonstrate the ability to tackle a simple design problem / brief by working systematically through a basic design process, using a variety of media, e.g. investigating a reference source; developing at least two ideas; determining a possible solution; constructing / creating a solution; evaluating the outcome

Curriculum Resources and Information Service (CRIS) has a range of resources to support these topics at all levels

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

48)

Annex I

LIVE WIRE PRODUCTIONS

Resources for Energy - Organisations

ABERDEEN MARITIME MUSEUM

Shiprow, Aberdeen, AB11 5BY Tel: 01224 337700 Main Tel: 01224 337710 Assistant Keeper (Education) Fax: 01224 213066 Email: [email protected] Website: www.aagm.co.uk Resources: The Maritime Museum hosts displays on the North Sea oil and gas industry, as well as shipbuilding, fishing, and history of the harbour. The museum caters for school visits on a range of topics including Oil, Victorians at Sea, The Desperate Journey, Transport, Fishing, and The Story of Aberdeen. Younger visitors can discover the museum through a range of quiz sheets, and special events and workshops are held throughout the year.

9 Heathfield Park, Newtonhill, Stonehaven, Kincardineshire, AB39 3RZ Tel: 01569 730002 Fax: 01569 731841 Email: [email protected] Website: www.livewireproductions.org.uk Live Wire Productions seeks to improve an understanding of basic scientific principles as a prerequisite to change in attitudes through drama. The Professional Team An experienced team of fully trained actors, teachers, facilitators and presenters use the full range of the dramatic arts in conjunction with original and captivating scripts researched, written and produced in consultation with professionals from the public, private and voluntary sector. The Company Repertoire Twenty five original productions have been developed by the company to date and cover a wide range of subjects covering Health Improvement, Citizenship and Environmental themes. Based in Aberdeen, the UK Theatre in Education company was established in 1994 and has worked in Dorset, Kent, Carlisle, and extensively throughout Scotland in schools, the work place, in community centres and at Science and Arts festivals. The LiveWire Environmental Programme Quintet Part I : The Powerhouse P4 - S2 home energy conservation: a 30 minute interactive drama about saving energy in the home Part II : Cool it ! P5 - S2 global warming explained: a 40-50 minute programme covering the effects of pollutants, erosion of the ozone layer, deforestation, and greenhouse gases on global temperatures and weather patterns Part III : Who says it's Rubbish P1 - P5 waste and recycling: 25-30 minutes; informs young people about the impact their lifestyles have on the environment and to promote consideration of the disposal of materials with reference to the 3R's (Reducing, Re-using and Recycling) Part IV : Lights Out ? P6 - S2 school energy conservation: a 20-25 minute drama that raises awareness of energy consumption, inefficiencies in the classroom, and ways that energy can be conserved Part V : The Wheel of Science P1 - P7 energy and conservation: uses a game show format to introduce and revise topics studied in class; tailored to the age of the children and can be run for all primary classes grouped within their year group; lasts up to a maximum of a class period

CURRICULUM RESOURCES AND INFORMATION SERVICE (CRIS)

Aberdeen City Council Summerhill Centre Stronsay Drive Aberdeen AB15 6JA Tel: 01224 346114 Fax: 01224 346116 Email: [email protected]

Resources: CRIS stocks a wide range of resources, to support both the curriculum and the staff development needs of teachers. These resources include books, videos, CDRoms, wall charts, artefacts, games, science packs and cassettes to include all areas of the curriculum, including local and global environmental studies issues. CRIS lends resources free of charge to all Aberdeen City Council teachers and secondary school Library Resource Centre Co-ordinators, and a subscription service is available for other borrowers. CRIS staff can provide themed displays and resource lists for events in schools. As all items are accessible by keyword and age range, searches of current resources can be printed out on request.

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The 3R's Game Show

Thunderstruck P4 - P7 a 40 minute drama presentation on Weather, Climate and electrical storms Flash, Crash, Splash P2 - P4 a 50 minute drama workshop about Weather and Climate, covering the rain cycle, clouds and storms; features songs, dance and games OTHER LIVE WIRE RESOURCES Paraffin Young P6 - P7 a living history character; covers science, energy and the Victorians, also fuels and hydrocarbons The Ant Race P4 - P7 a 60 minute play acted by pupils and encouraging Good Citizenship and Anti-racism Sid's Online Safety Show P4 - P7 an interactive Internet Safety guide - an online musical production at www.bizzikid.co.uk; supported by Sid's Online Safety Guide and a Classroom Activity Pack It's A Jungle Out There! P4 - P7 an Internet Safety musical for children to perform: includes script, lyrics, sheet music, CD recording with vocals and separate backing track 50)

MONTGOMERY DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION CENTRE (MDEC)

120 Rosemount Place, Aberdeen, AB25 2YW Tel 01224 620111 Email: [email protected] Website: www.montgomerydec.co.uk

Resources: The Montgomery Development Education Centre in Aberdeen stocks a wide range of teaching resources including teaching packs, photograph sets, country information, videos, games, stories etc. which introduce all aspects of the global dimension and global issues. Resources are curriculum linked - knowledge and understanding, skills, values and developing informed attitudes - and also help develop global citizenship. The resources include packs with a specific focus on energy, also packs introducing life overseas which include energy aspects and packs exploring the issues linked to our global consumption of energy. Reference has been made in the guide text to recommended resources, available from the Montgomery Centre, relating to specific curricular attainment targets and strands. All resources may be borrowed free of charge for use by teachers and in the classroom. If you wish to purchase any of the resources, the Montgomery Centre can advise on price and suppliers' contact details. As well as the more specific packs listed below, the Montgomery Development Education Centre also stocks lots of Overseas Country Teaching Packs which include information on energy use. These teaching packs - many supported by excellent colour photopacks - feature life in developing countries. Pupils investigating energy use in the home could use one of these to compare and contrast energy sources and use in another country e.g. African countries, India, South America. Please contact the Montgomery Centre to discuss and be advised of the pack best suited to your need. Focus on Energy WWF Level C-E (F) WWF, Panda House, Weyside Park, Godalming, Surrey, GU7 lXR. Teachers' Guide / photo pack / activity sheets / website links. This excellent resource aims to build children's understanding of energy production, usage and the related issues, and to help them explore solutions. It covers: energy sources and energy flow / transfer, how we use energy, impacts of energy use, alternative approaches for a sustainable future. 51)

Earth Alert Energy WWF/Wayland Levels C-B Attractive book for teachers and pupils including information and activities on the range of sources of energy, how we use energy, the environmental consequences e.g. global warming, the need to reduce our usage in the developed nations and develop renewable sources. Exploring My World WWF Levels C-B Primary Resource Pack offering advice and guidance for teachers wishing to help their pupils to understand their world through scientific investigation. Separate booklets with teachers' notes and class activities and worksheets on Exploring Energy, Weather, The Earth, Air/Pollution, The Future. Green Technology 1 Level C-F (Energy and Forces, Using the Design Process) Green Teacher Resources Co-operative Ltd., Swn y Mor, Pen yr Angor, Aberystwyth SY23 1BJ A teacher-friendly resource book containing excellent mini-projects on energy: conservation of and investigations into renewable forms - wind, water and solar. Supply information on all materials required. Where We Live WWF / Birmingham DEC Birmingham DEC Levels C/D-F 998 Bristol Road, Selly Oak, Birmingham, B29 6LE. Exploring local-global environment links : This resource brings together a range of issues including lots on energy in order to build up a positive awareness of our global environment and the need for sustainable development. Lots of information, activities and ideas for taking action e.g. discover the energy audit of a bag of crisps, the environmental and human costs of different electricity production methods. World Wide Waste Level C-E Warwickshire World Studies Centre, Manor Hall, Sandy Lane, Leamington Spa, CV32 6RD. All aspects of usage and waste of materials including facts, figures, information, worksheets and a full section on energy - average energy use in different areas of the world, waste of energy, efficient homes and the greenhouse effect. Family Life and the 5Rs Level C-B Milton Keynes World Development Education Centre / Centre for the Development of People, Ghana Milton Keynes World Development Education Centre, Stantonbury Campus, Milton Keynes, MKl4 6BN Waste and the 5Rs including reflection on the influence of the Consumer Society in the West and Ghana.

Eco School WWF Teachers, management staff and pupils level C and upwards Research and planning guide for schools that want to become more user-friendly, conservation-conscious and aesthetically pleasing. Teachers' notes and lots of pupil activities. Technology - who needs it? Level C and upwards Scottish Development Education Centre / SCIAF Scotdec, The Courtyard Rooms, Simon Laurie House, Holyrood Road, Edinburgh, EH8 8AQ. A classroom activity pack taking a global approach to technology. It considers technological activities in "real" situations and encourages pupils to explore the effect of technology on lifestyles and the environment. Educating for Sustainability Levels C-B TIDE Birmingham Development Education, 998 Bristol Road, Selly Oak, Birmingham, B29 6LE. Resource pack written by practising teachers combining sustainable development themes e.g. climate change, waste management with educational case studies and lively classroom activities. Includes detailed information from the Gambia. `Making it happen - Agenda 21 and schools' WWF Teachers' and pupils' Level C and upwards Provides a background to the importance of Agenda 21 and focuses on ways in which schools can engage with the process locally. Lots of activity ideas and approaches to explore environmental and developmental issues and how pupils can influence change and the effects their choices will have. Rescue Mission - Planet Earth A Children's Edition on Agenda 21 Peace Child International / Kingfisher Books Teachers' and pupils' Level C/D and upwards The document Agenda 21 - a blueprint for saving Planet Earth in the 21st century - was produced by the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit held in 1992. This children's edition is produced by children for children and aims to inform and inspire them to join the rescue mission. Lessons in Sustainability Levels C-E/F TIDE / Birmingham DEC This resource shares ideas from West Midlands teachers for teaching about sustainable development issues in response to the Johannesburg World Summit. It profiles a range of practical activities, drawing on their classroom practice, supported by a wealth of photocopiable stimulus sheets and useful internet links.

Learning today with tomorrow in mind Level C-F Sustainable Development Education Teachers in Development Education TIDE / Birmingham DEC This pack shares practical ideas from Birmingham schools for supporting children's engagement in "meeting the needs of today and of future generations" - activities and frameworks supported by three full colour posters designed to raise questions and for interactive use in class. Citizenship for the Future - A Practical Classroom Guide WWF Teachers' Guide and activities for Level D - F A teachers' handbook providing introductory chapters on Citizenship and Futures Education, lots of classroom activities on thinking about, envisioning, choosing and planning a Sustainable Future. Activities linked to appropriate technology, energy production / issues and sustainable development. A World of Investigations Level C - B Birmingham DEC Offers an innovative approach to investigating science using photographs. It uses excellent photos from across the world, most illustrating / linked to energy and its usage, to help pupils develop skills in generating questions, planning investigations and evaluating the outcomes. Very effective approach linked to real contexts. Atlas of Earthcare Level D-F Young Gaia / Oxfam Class reference book An excellent illustrated guide to looking after our planet. Section on energy and elements which also explains and offers solutions for problems e.g. the greenhouse effect and the ozone holes. The GAIA Atlas of Planet Management Level D-F Pan Books Teacher and pupil information and reference "For today's caretakers of tomorrow's world." A mass of available environmental data and information describing our present global situation and the options for tomorrow. Sections linked to all aspects of energy, sources and production, problems and possible solutions. Wall to Wall Design Level D- F ITDG Publishing, 103-105 Southampton Row, London, WC1B 4HL. Looking at sustainable housing projects in Kenya and the UK, this pack shows how people are designing homes to meet present and future needs. Fact sheets and activities designed to get pupils thinking, talking, designing and making. 52)

Get Global Level D - F Action Aid, CAFOD, Christian Aid, Oxfam, Save the Children (also available in PDF format on these agency websites). An excellent teacher's guide providing a structure for pupils to move from thinking about important issues to research and then planning and participating in action. A range of innovative and participatory activities promote a skills-based approach rather than content and so can be used for a range of issues. Live Well, Live Wisely Level E, F and above Intermediate Technology, 103-105 Southampton Row, London, WC1B 4HH. An accessible and lively way of bringing issues of sustainable and appropriate technology to life in the classroom. Contains teachers' notes, case studies, activities and tasks with chapters on transport and solar power. Changing Technology Level E-F and above Teachers in Development Education TIDE / Birmingham DEC. Provides a range of activities for exploring issues and challenges thrown up by technology and its development in today's world - e.g windfarms, solar cookers, power production, electric cars. Sustainable Energy as part of a Curriculum for Sustainable Development Teachers' Guide Level E/F WWF School Case Studies Series Teachers' plan for energy study for early secondary including home survey and audit and suggested future changes. Dealing with Disasters Oxfam Levels B - F c/o BEBC Distribution P0 Box 1496, Parkstone, Poole, Dorset, BH12 3YD. Teaching about disasters and development. Excellent classroom resource for use when considering or investigating the effect of climate change e.g. famine, floods. Thinking about Disasters Levels E - F Christian Aid, 41 George IV Bridge, Edinburgh, EH1 1EL. Video and teaching pack about all aspects of disasters. Links to global warming effects. Development Compass Rose Teacher and levels E/F TIDE / Birmingham DEC Introducing a simple yet powerful idea of using the pattern of a directional compass as a framework for asking questions about/exploring different development 53)

situations / issues e.g. energy. Can be used as topic planning tool or the structure for an enquiry session using photos for older pupils. Burning Shangrila WWF Levels E/F This resource focuses on energy issues in Nepal linked to exploring the best solution for making bricks, fuel for cooking and heating, electricity for villages - microhydro supplies, larger hydro systems. Designed for use within Maths, Science and English. Understanding Global Issues Teacher reference Level E / F Understanding Global Issues Ltd., The Runnings, Cheltenham, GL5 1 9PQ A series of booklets crammed with information, challenges, maps and charts. Editions on: Global Warming, Climate Change, Beyond Petroleum, Solar Energy, The Motor Car Preparing for the 2lst Century, Air Travel, The Energy Dilemma, The Battle for Oil. Global Perspectives in Science Level F and above Fiona Scott VSO, (available from Scotdec). Chapters on Biofuels, the Power of the Sun and solar cells and clockwork radios. USSR - Global Environmental Education Programme WWF Level F Includes a section on the Chernobyl disaster and media coverage - Soviet and Western.

SATROSPHERE

The Tramsheds, 179 Constitution Street, Aberdeen, AB24 5TU Tel: 01224 640340 Fax: 01224 622211 Email: [email protected] Website: www.satrosphere.net SHOWS AT SATROSPHERE 30 minute themed shows, linked to the 5-14 National Guidelines Materials Nursery - P3 Goldilocks lends a hand to explain the properties of materials, and to discuss their suitability - would you choose the seat of sponge, or nails? The Bubble Show Nursery - P3 Unbelievably popular with our audiences, The Bubble Show gives a great introduction to science. What makes a bubble, bubble colours, and a bubble big enough to stand in!

Senses Nursery - P4 Investigate your senses and find out their limits with optical illusions, taste tests. smells and wet tuning forks. Day and Night P1 - P3 The movements of the earth; sun and moon; stars; phases of the moon; sundials and glow-worms. Forces P1 - P7 Discover the gravity of forces in our most magnetic show, that's guaranteed to cause friction with the audience! Levers, balance and Newton's Third Law are also covered. P6/7 also see pulleys, pneumatics and gears demonstrated. Sound P2 - P7 Exploring sounds as a vibration, and how sound travels. Pitch, volume, amplification, hearing, and novel instruments are all included in our noisiest show. Colour and Light P3 - P7 Light and shadows, sight and light. Primary colours, rainbows, filters and 3D pictures. Electricity P4 - P7 Current and static electricity, energy resources and types of production, batteries, solar power and a great demonstration of nuclear reactions*. *(Uranium not included.) Water P4 - P7 We all need it, but what is it? Melting and evaporation are demonstrated using the audience. Weather, and the formation of a cloud. Wonders of the Night Sky P4 - P7 Building a scale model of the solar system using only seeds and a cabbage? Why the sky is blue; phases of the moon; stars; and the dark side of the moon. The Body Show P4 - P7 Delve into the biology of the body... literally! Our dummy donates his organs to explain the digestive system, circulation and skin. The Coolest Show on Earth P6 - S2 Take your pupils to -196°C - not many schools have dry ice or liquid nitrogen to use! Classic Science P6 - S2 A collection of the best science demonstrations! Illustrating important scientific subjects such as thermal expansion, convection, electrical conduction and combustion - in an eye-catching way!

WORKSHOPS AT SATROSPHERE 45 minute workshops, linked to the 5--14 National Guidelines. Toy Technology Nursery - P2

What materials do we use to make toys? How do they work, and what makes them move? Children explore toys and the science behind them. Changing Materials (60 mins) P3 - P5 An introduction to materials around us, their properties, and how we can change them. Electricity P4 - P7 Build a circuit with a bulb, switch and buzzer, and compete in the Buggy Challenge. Bridge Building P4 - P7 Build mini-bridges of different designs from kits, learn about structure, tension and compression. Forces P4 - P7 Friction, pulleys and levers are explored in this challenging workshop Don River Valley P4 - P7 Rivers, and the way they help form the landscape, using the Don as on example.

SCARF (Save Cash and Reduce Fuel)

Efficiency Advice Centre Freepost AB622 1 Cotton Street Aberdeen, AB11 3ZQ Tel: FREEPHONE 0800 512012 Tel: 01224 213005 Fax: 01224 213650 Email: [email protected] Website: www.scarf.org.uk

Energy Efficiency Education Project SCARF's Energy Efficiency Advice Centre has teamed up with Scottish Power to deliver this project in Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Moray, Angus, Dundee and Perth & Kinross. ScottishPower, as part of their Energy Efficiency Commitment, funds the project. The project provides participating schools with an Energy Efficiency Resource pack, developed by the Centre for Sustainable Energy, and energy efficiency presentations for classes. The presentation is an integral part of the project and must be booked in advance. 54)

The project aims to: · Encourage pupils to think about energy, where it comes from and how it is used in the home. · Raise awareness of energy efficiency and related environmental and social issues. · Provide children with the knowledge and understanding necessary to encourage the implementation of energy efficiency measures in their homes. The project has been designed with the intention of promoting awareness of energy conservation issues, and encouraging behaviour, which brings about energy conservation through activities, which cover particular areas of 5-14 Environmental Studies. It is hoped that as a result of the project: · Pupils develop informed and positive attitudes to energy use and adopt behaviour, which brings about energy savings. · Adults in the household become aware of the ways in which energy savings can be made, both through practical measures such as draught proofing and insulation and good energy housekeeping measures such as closing doors, switching off lights. The resource pack has been devised with close adherence to 5-14 Environmental Studies Curriculum Guidelines and is intended to be fully comprehensive, encompassing the aims of 5-14 Environmental Studies. The activities have also been devised to offer a crosscurricular approach.. To register your interest in the Project and to apply for the free Energy Efficiency Education Resource Pack please contact: Michelle at SCARF Energy Efficiency Advice Centre Tel: 01224 213005, Email: [email protected], or write to SCARF at 1 Cotton Street, Aberdeen, AB11 5EE.

WORLD WILDLIFE FUND (WWF)

Betsy King, Project Manager, WWF Scotland, 8 The Square, Aberfeldy, Perthshire, PH15 2DD Tel: 01887 820449 Fax: 01887 829453 Email [email protected] Website: www.wwf.org.uk/scotland Scotland's Global Footprint - for further information: WWF Scotland, Elizabeth Leighton, Senior Policy Officer Tel: 01887 820449 Email: [email protected] The North East: Sibylle Frey, North East Global Footprint Project Coordinator Tel: 01224 523913 Email: [email protected] The North Lanarkshire Partnership: Amie Fulton, North Lanarkshire Global Footprint Project Coordinator Tel: 01698 302 584 Email: [email protected] WWF Scotland is currently developing a three year Scotland's Global Footprint Project with local authorities in the North East (Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire) and North Lanarkshire. The Project aims to transform the way people live and work in these local authority areas in order to reduce their environmental impact. As part of the overall partnership project the Scotland's Global Footprint Education Project will explore the ways in which schools can examine, measure and reduce their impact on the environment locally and globally. The project will produce, in collaboration with schools in the participating local authorities, an interactive software tool, teaching materials and training which will provide an interactive method for both upper primary and secondary schools (S1/S2) throughout Scotland to calculate their footprint at a whole-school level. The software, materials and associated training will go beyond Footprint calculation to help schools to develop strategies for reducing their school's Footprint. The materials will then be shared with schools in all Scottish local authorities.

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Ecological Footprint is a measure of the mark that we leave on the natural world that sustains us, measured as the area of land required to provide the energy and resources consumed and to assimilate the waste produced by any community. The measure can then be used to find solutions that will reduce our impact on the planet. The project is being developed in conjunction with Eco Schools, an international initiative designed to encourage whole school action for the environment. The materials will support Education for Citizenship and the Eco Schools programme and show clear relevance to several Scottish curriculum areas/modes (e.g. language, mathematics, ICT, social and environmental studies, scientific studies, technology). The North East The collection of local data for the NE Global Footprint project has been completed. Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire decided to do the footprint project jointly so it could look at policies and practices which could be adopted jointly to achieve the biggest reduction for least cost. For example, the majority of commuters in the area use their cars. Both councils would like to see a real shift to more sustainable options such as Park and Ride, bus, train, walk and cycle or car share in the North East. Aberdeen City Council has instructed that the Ecological Footprint shall be used to assess all their major projects as soon as possible. Pilot schools will be offered the following support to enable them to participate: · Funding to assist with staff release to enable one staff member from the school to attend the two training days. · Professional development events supported by Ecological Footprint consultants. · Help in making links with other pilot schools through the Project Manager, networking and a website. WWF Scotland's Ecological Footprint Education Project is supported by the Scottish Executive, Scottish Power, Scottish Natural Heritage, Scottish Environment Protection Agency and Eco Schools Scotland.

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Annex II

Resources for Energy -

Web Sites

www.aagm.co.uk Aberdeen Maritime Museum (see Annex I) www.acblack.com A & C Black (publisher - see Annex III) www.bbcschoolshop.com BBC Primary Catalogue (see Annex III) www.bizzikid.co.uk includes Internet Safety (see Annex I - Live Wire Prodns) www.thecarbontrust.co.uk Schools Resource Pack : designed to help schools manage energy use by identifying energy saving opportunities and giving practical help on how to take advantage of the available savings. www.cat.org.uk The Centre for Alternative Technology www.channel4.com/learningshop Channel 4 resources (see Annex III) www.coolkidsforacoolclimate.com about the Kyoto Protocol and climate change www.create.org.uk follow "schools" to reach teachers' zone and kids' zone www.cse.org.uk Centre for Sustainable Energy : follow the link to Education and Training to `Our Energy Matters', resources for schools www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/schools a government site on global warming for young people and teachers www.eco-schools.org.uk Eco Schools is a programme for promoting environmental awareness in a way that links to many curriculum subjects, including citizenship, personal, social and health education (PSHE) and education for sustainable development. www.energy-efficiency.org.uk The Scottish Energy Efficiency Office (a government body) www.est.org.uk/schools Energy Saving Trust - link to Energy Certification for Schools programme www.est.org.uk/schri/community/ viewproject.cfm?project_id=79 information about the Pitcaple Environmental Project 57)

www.globalfootprints.org resources for teaching about the Global Footprint Project with quiz, and role playing exercise; (see also www.scotlandsfootprint.org below) www.hodderwayland.co.uk Hodder Wayland (publisher - see Annex III) www.livewireproductions.org.uk Live Wire Productions - drama (see Annex I) www.LTScotland.com Learning and Teaching Scotland : a public body sponsored by the Scottish Executive Education Department to help review, assess and support developments in learning and education, including the use of information and communications technology (ICT). www.montgomerydec.co.uk Montgomery Development Education Centre MDEC (see Annex I) www.northlan.gov.uk North Lanarkshire Council Education Department www.nea.org.uk National Energy Action : develops and promotes energy efficiency services to tackle the heating and insulation problems of low-income households www.satrosphere.net Satrosphere (see Annex I) www.scarf.org.uk Save Cash and Reduce Fuel (See Annex I) www.scholastic.co.uk Scholastic (publisher - see Annex III) www.scotlandsfootprint.org WWF Scotland's Global Footprint Education Project (see Annex I - WWF) www.scottish-southern.co.uk/safetyenvironment/ Scottish and Southern Energy plc : Education.asp an interactive website for 7-11 years which teaches children about using electricity safely; energy efficiency; how electricity is made and gets to our homes; and the history of electricity www.usbornebooksathome.co.uk Usborne Pocket Science Books (publisher - see Annex III) www.wwf.org.uk/scotland World Wildlife Fund (see Annex I)

Annex III

Resources for Energy A & C BLACK

Catalogues

www.acblack.com Toybox science 5 yrs plus key concepts in physical science, with practical activities, includes · electricity · gears · levers · wind-ups

Pod's Mission year 4 Video in CGI format, teacher's notes and pupil activities including weekly game, on range of science topics including: · keeping warm · friction · circuits and conductors

CHANNEL 4

4Learning, Resources for Primary Schools www.channel4.com/learningshop Stage Two Science 7-11 yrs Action Forces: video, (3x15mins), teacher's guide with follow-up activities and science card set on forces Main themes · motion and forces · demonstrates how things speed up, slow down and change direction · pushing and pulling 4 Learning Inspiration, Resources Levels E - F www.channel4.com/learningshop Scientific Eye 11 - 14 yrs Physical Processes 2: 4x 20 minute videos and teacher's notes including: · solar system · air forces · electricity · static electricity Physical Processes 3: 5x 20 minute video and teacher's notes including: · temperature and heat · electricity for the future · light and reflection · magnetism · machines and moments Scientific Eye 4SATS 13 - 14 yrs 3x 30 minute videos and teacher's notes including: · materials and their properties · physical processes Science Bank 14 - 16 yrs SG/NQs Videos 3x 15 minutes and teacher's notes including · waves · electromagnetic spectrum · electricity and magnetism Science Bank 3 : 14 - 16 yrs SG /NQs 2 x 15 minute videos and teacher's notes · circuits · heat 58)

BBC PRIMARY CATALOGUE

(catalogue includes a DVD of extracts from the BBC programmes) www.bbcschoolshop.com Science Clips Key Stages 1, 2a and 2b 5 - 7, 7 - 9 & 9 - 11 yrs 10 minute clips form BBC education archive on range of topics, available in DVD or video format, teachers' book and 12 full colour A2 posters, including: Key Stage 1 · pushes and pulls · forces and movement · light and dark · sound and hearing · electricity Key Stage 2a · circuits and conductors · keeping warm · friction · light and shadow Key Stage 2b · changing circuits · balanced and unbalanced forces Cats' Eyes 5 - 7 yrs Video plus pack, fact finder books, teacher's notes, on range of science topics, including: · forces and weather · electricity, light and sound The Experimenter 7 - 9 yrs Video plus pack, fact finder books, teacher's notes, on range of science topics, including: · forces and energy Science Zone 9 - 11 yrs Video plus pack, fact finder books, teacher's notes on range of science topics, including: · forces, electricity and magnetism · light and sound, the Earth and beyond

Science in Focus 14 - 16 yrs SG/NQs Physical Processes 2: 4x 20 minute videos including: · electric city · electromagnetism Physical Processes 3: 3 x 20 minute videos including · energy keeping warm · keeping cold

Save the Planet Claire Llewellyn 7 yrs plus Children's reference books with ideas for practical activities: · save energy · Let's recycle · fight pollution The Earth Strikes Back 8 yrs plus Pamela Grant and Arthur Haswell Children's reference book which includes action points for children to debate and take action, including: · air and energy

CHRYSALIS

Belitha Press, Big Fish, David Bennett Books, Learning World, Pavillion Children's Books Start Science Sally Hewitt 7 yrs plus Series of 4 reference books for children with ideas for practical activities, including: · Earth and space · forces and motion Science Around Us Sally Hewitt 6 yrs plus Series of 4 reference books for children with ideas for practical activities, including: · energy · push and pull · using machines · light and dark · sound Science Quest Robert Sneddon 10 yrs plus Children's science reference book, including · energy Discover Science Kim Taylor 8 yrs plus Children's reference based on the building blocks of scientific knowledge, including: · action · flight · light · structure · cold · heat · water · pattern Start up Science Jack Challoner 6 yrs plus Children's reference books with ideas for practical activities, including: · fast and slow · hot and cold · light and dark · push and pull · loud and quiet 59)

HEINEMANN

My World of Science P1 - P3 Children's basic science reference books, including: · forces and motion · materials · magnets · water Using Electricity (Pack A) · light and dark · sound and hearing · colour · hot and cold Science All Around Me P3 - P5 Children's science reference books with ideas for practical activities, including: · forces · electricity · materials · light and sound Very Useful Machines P1 - P3 Children's reference book with annotated photographs, including: · levers · pulleys · screws · wheels · ramps What Do...Do? Introduces scientific principles including: · levers · pulleys and gears · springs P4 - P7

How it works P4 - P7 Children's reference book with practical and thought provoking science activities, including · levers

Essential Energy S1 - S2 Children's reference books with a focus on energy, production, use and conservation, including: · nuclear energy · energy from fossil fuels · energy alternative · energy transfer Energy for life P6 - S2 Differentiated text partner to Essential Energy, has the same photographs and illustrations and a simplified text. Green files P6 - S2 Children's reference book which explains the potential dangers facing the world, including: · future power Smart Science P6 - S2 Children's science reference series including ideas for practical activities, including: · energy · materials · forces · Earth and beyond

Simple Science Level A,B 4 pupil information books including practical activities · levers · pulleys · slopes · wheels and cogs 21st Century Debates Level D,E Series of pupil reference books looking at the impact humans have on the planet, including: · energy · climate change · air pollution Science Projects Level D,E Introduction to science concepts based on direct experience with ideas for practical activities, including: · forces and motion · electricity Science World Focus on scientific principles, including · The science of a light bulb Level C,D

FRANKLIN WATTS

How? What? Why? 5 - 8 yrs Introduction to science, written with controlled reading levels and glossary, including: · Why does a battery make it go? Science Experiments 8 - 12 yrs Reference books for children with ideas for practical activities, including: · electricity · forces · light · sound · water · simple machines · magnets Science World 9 - 12 yrs Children's introduction to the principles of science, including: · electricity and magnetism · heat and energy · light and lasers · sound and music Straightforward Science 8 - 14 yrs Children's science reference book suitable for readers with special needs, including: electricity · forces and movement 60)

HODDER WAYLAND

www.hodderwayland.co.uk Little Bees Level A,B colourful dual-level pupil information books with glossary, including: · And everyone shouted `Pull!' A first look at forces and motion · Which switch is which? A first look at electricity · Rise and shine : A first look at light Energy Forever? Ian Graham Level D, E pupil reference book, covering main sources of energy, what they are, how energy is harnessed and impact on the environment, including: · fossil fuels · geothermal & bio-energy · nuclear power · solar power · water power · wind power Looking at energy Polly Goodman As above, uses the same illustrations but has a shorter differentiated text. First Technology Level A,B question led text with practical activities including: · energy and machines

Science Factory 8 - 12 yrs Introduction to practical science, carefully planned projects and experiments with step by step instructions, including: · electricity · forces and simple machines · sound and music · light and sight Where Does it Come from? Where Does it Go? 7 - 9 / 6 - 14yrs Children's reference book about electricity It's Science Sally Hewitt 5 - 10 yrs Looks at science in the context of everyday life, including: · forces around us · hearing sounds · hot and cold

USBORNE

www.usbornebooksathome.co.uk Pocket Science, S Meredith Children's reference books, including Where Does Electricity Come From? Internet ­Linked Library of Science 5 yrs plus 9 yrs plus

Titles include: · Light, Sound and Electricity, K Rodgers and P Clarke · Energy, Forces and Motion, A Smith

SCHOLASTIC

www.scholastic.co.uk Science Packs Ways into Science Pack A 5 - 7yrs 4 pupil activity books based on daily life experience, introduces basic scientific principles, including: · electricity · light and dark · magnets · sound Simple Machines 5 - 7yrs 4 pupil resource books at appropriate language level, including · levers · pulleys · slopes · wheels and axles Where does it come from? Where does it go? 7-9yrs 4 pupil activity books, introduces different services and utilities, including: · electricity · rubbish · post · water Science Experiments 9 - 11yrs 4 pupil activity books, each experiment has clear step by step instructions, including: Pack A · electricity · light · sound Pack B · forces · magnets, simple machines 61)

Annex IV

Resources for Energy - Cross-Curricular Planning : Level A

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Annex IV

Resources for Energy - Cross-Curricular Planning : Level B/C

Annex IV

Upper Stages : Level D/E

Energy Around Us - Senses / Houses and Homes

Social Subjects - People and place - Human-physical interactions: 1. Look at the possible effects of energy generation on the landscape / environment. 2. Compare fossil fuels, nuclear, hydro-power, wind, solar, and the impact of pylons and cabling, large wind farms.

Technology - Needs and how they are met : 1. Look at house designs - compare a 19th century house with a 21st century design. (Focus on heating, lighting, ventilation, sound proofing.) a) Which is more energy efficient? b) Why?

Science - Energy and forces - Properties and uses of energy : 1. Investigate ways in which homes are heated e.g. central heating, gas fires, electric heaters, solar energy, and sort into conducted, convected and radiated heat. 2. Investigate good and poor conductors of heat in and around the home. 3. Discuss the difference between pitch and volume and illustrate by testing ways of altering both pitch and volume of sound. 4. By using voices, instruments and everyday objects, experiment with creating melodic, harmonic and rhythmic patterns. [Link to Music] a) Investigate the relationship between the length of string or tube and the pitch of sound. b) Why do different materials make different sounds? c) How does the sound travel to your ear? d) Find words to describe the different qualities of sound in terms of contrasting mood and effects. e) Sort into musical categories. f) Use your new knowledge to create sound pictures and find ways of notating your compositions. [Link to Mathematics / Information Handling]

Science - Energy and forces - Conversion and transfer of energy : 1. Look at how energy is converted to generate electricity from the following sources : · fossil fuels · wind · solar · water · nuclear 2. Find out about electricity and demonstrate how it is distributed to our homes. 3. Carry out an energy audit in your own home. 4. Discuss ways in which energy could be conserved.

Technology - Processes and how they are applied : Focus : How energy is transformed from raw materials a finished product a shop a consumer 1. a) Investigate how energy is used to produce everyday items e.g. a pair of shoes, a bar of soap, a cotton T shirt. b) Create an energy story for them.

Science - Earth and space - Materials from Earth : 1. Find out how natural materials are used to make our homes more energy efficient.

Technology - Resources and how they are managed : 1. Investigate building materials from around the world - how energy efficient are they? 2. Discuss how reducing, recycling and reusing resources saves energy. 3. Investigate the ways in which energy is used to get food to our tables. a) Find out which means are the most efficient or practical. b) Why? 4. Be able to show knowledge of the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy sources.

Expressive Arts - Art and Design - Creating and designing : 1. Create your own musical instruments.

Resources for Energy - Cross-Curricular Planning : Level D/E

Social Subjects - People in society - Rules, rights and responsibilities in society : 1. a) Work out a set of rules for conserving energy at home / school. b) Discuss why this is a good idea. 2. Work towards setting-up an Eco-School committee.

Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre

© Aberdeen City Council 2005

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Health Education:

Physical: Creating and presenting Emotional: Collecting and analysing Searching and researching Developing informed attitudes Social: Controlling and modelling Using the technology Communicating and collaborating

Term: _________ Stage: _________ Class Teacher: __________________

ICT:

Religious and Moral Education:

Annex IV

Christianity

Other World Religions

Personal Search

Language Arts:

Science: Earth and space they are met people and place they are managed people in society the processes of life designing and making they are applied Music: living things and Processes and how energy and forces Resources and how Drama: Technology: Needs and how Art and Design:

Environmental Studies:

Expressive Arts:

Listening:

Social Subjects: people in the past

Talking:

Skills:

investigating: Preparing for tasks Carrying out tasks Reviewing and reporting on tasks designing and making: PE:

Reading:

enquiry:

Writing:

Mathematics:

Resources for Energy - Cross-Curriculum Planning

Problem solving and enquiry

Information handling

Planning a Cross-Curricular Study

Topic:

Number, money and measurement

Shape, position and movement

Annex IV

Term: _________ Stage: _________ Class Teacher: __________________

Resources for Energy - Cross-Curriculum Planning

Planning a Cross-Curricular Study

Topic:

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energy zone

Energy Education in the 5-14 Curriculum Ideas for Learning and Teaching

energy zone is a comprehensive guide to energy education containing ideas for learning and teaching linked to the 5-14 curriculum. Details of educational materials are provided along with resource providers offering experiences for pupils. ©Aberdeen City Council May 2005 Devised : Allan Paterson, Elizabeth Curtis, Nicola S. Pirie, Moira Smith & Ruth Legdon with contributions from local resource providers and educators Front Cover : Neil Saddler of the Publicity and Promotions Unit of Aberdeen City Council Layout : John Sullivan Aberdeen Environmental Education Centre Top Floor Skene Square School 61 Skene Square Aberdeen AB25 2UN Tel: Fax: Email: Web: 01224 640864 01224 639626 [email protected] / [email protected] www.aeec.org.uk

The Energy Capital of Europe

ENZO/020900/200503s2v22

Information

EnergyZone_s2v22.indd

72 pages

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