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CTE/FCAT CONNECTION

Child Development

Project 3

Child Abuse and Neglect

Course #: 8500310 Grades 9 - 12

1. PROJECT CONNECTION Teaching Components; Project Summary; Instructional Focus; Rigor/Relevance Framework/Project SPS 2. PREREADING CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect Powerpoint Presentation 3. VOCABULARY CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect 4. READING/WRITING CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect 5. RESEARCH CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect 6. PRESENTATION CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect 7. MATH CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect 8. STUDENT ENGAGEMENT CONNECTION Child Abuse and Neglect 9. CROSSWALKS Outcomes/SPS and FCAT/Essential Work Skills

www.career-connection.org

PROJECT CONNECTION

Title: Program Area: Course Title: Timeline for Use: Grade Level: Duration of Project: Submitted By: Lesson Summary

The students will create a PowerPoint presentation that defines child abuse and neglect and recognizes indicators and risks of abuse and neglect. The students will need computer Internet access and PowerPoint software to complete this project. The students will also plan a project to help stop abuse.

Child Abuse and Neglect Family and Consumer Sciences Education Child Development - 8500310 During Parenting Responsibilities Grades 9 - 12 6 - 10 Hours Cyndi Elliott

Instructional Focus

Lesson Topic: Language Arts Strand: Math Strand: Science Strand: Child Abuse and Neglect Reading, Writing, Speaking Number Sense, Concepts, and Operations Processes of Life

Rigor/Relevance Framework

K N O W L E D G E

T A X O N O M Y

Evaluation Synthesis Analysis Application Comprehension Awareness

6 5 4 3 2 1 1

C Assimilation

D Adaptation

A Acquisition

B Application

2 Apply in discipline

3 Apply across disciplines

4 Apply to real world predictable situations

5 Apply to real world unpredictable situations

Knowledge in one discipline

Child Development

Child Abuse & Neglect/Student Performance Standards Outcome # 01.0 IDENTIFY PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GROWTH AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Analyze areas of development including physical, social, emotional, moral and intellectual development and how they are interrelated.

8500310

Performance Task# 01.02

Outcome # 03.0

DESCRIBE PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT, CARE AND THE BIRTH PROCESS--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Recognize the significance of parent/child bonding and family adjustments to the newborn.

Performance Task# 03.09

Outcome # 04.0

DETERMINE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES WITH APPROPRIATE ACTIVITIES AND EXPECTATIONS FROM BIRTH TO SCHOOL AGE--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Analyze factors which contribute to the child's physical, social, emotional, moral and intellectual development.

Performance Task# 04.03

Outcome # 05.0

ASSESS THE FAMILY AND SOCIETY'S ROLE IN PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF CHILDREN--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Explain the importance of families and the role of nurturing on the development of the child.

Performance Task# 05.01

Performance Task# 05.02

Identify children's rights that are protected by local, state and federal laws and regulations.

Performance Task# 05.03 Performance Task# 05.04

Differentiate between the types of child abuse and neglect. State how the common physical and behavioral indicators of child abuse and neglect are detected and reported.

Performance Task# 05.05

Locate community support for children and families.

Outcome # 06.0

EXAMINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES RELATED TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Recognize emergency situations and plan appropriate responses.

Performance Task# 06.05

Outcome # 07.0

RELATE CURRENT TRENDS AND THE CONTRIBUTION OF TECHNOLOGY TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Explore diverse roles and responsibilities of the father and mother.

Performance Task# 07.02

Child Development

Child Abuse & Neglect/Student Performance Standards (continued) Outcome # 08.0

8500310

EXPLORE CAREERS RELATED TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Describe careers related to children.

Performance Task# 08.02

Outcome # 09.0

DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Identify roles and responsibilities of members of professional and youth organizations.

Performance Task# 09.03

Performance Task# 09.05

Demonstrate confidence in leadership roles and organizational responsibilities.

Performance Task# 09.06

Demonstrate commitment to achieve organizational goals.

Total SPS Addressed:

14

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

PREREADING CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant): Child Abuse and Neglect 3.09; 4.03; 5.01; 7.02 LA.A.1.4.1; LA.A.1.4.2; LA.A.1.4.3; LA.B.1.4.1; LA.B.2.4.1; LA.C.1.4.1; LA.C.1.4.2; LA.C.1.4.3; LA.E.2.4.6; LA.E.2.4.8; SC.G.1.4.1; SC.G.2.4.4 e09; e14; e25; e30; e32; e34; e40; e47; e49; e50; e52; e53; e57; e59; e60; e69; e70; e80; e94; s13 A ­ (Knowledge 1 / Application 1)

Instructions to Teacher: 1. Prepare for PowerPoint presentation or print Slides #1-21 as overheads. 2. Print student handout. 3. Have literature on child abuse available for the students to see. Extended learning opportunity: Students can read any literature about child abuse and neglect cases and share their experience with the class. Instructions to Students: 1. The students will assess their knowledge of child abuse and neglect. 2. The students will be able to discuss the significance of parent/child bonding. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: You can read to the students daily from one of the resources below. Assessment for Activity: Student notes on handout Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 30 minutes Materials Needed: Handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide Resources Needed: Child Abuse PowerPoint lecture presentation (slides 1-21) A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer Jeremy's Story by Mark and Julie Fiedelholtz published by Florida Children's Forum. 2001 Death from Child Abuse and No One Heard by Eve Krupinski

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Activity: Introduction: 1. Slide 1: We are going to take a close look at child abuse and neglect. To start, I would like you to take a moment and write your personal definition of abuse on your handout. a. Share personal definitions orally i. Are any based on feelings? ii. Do the definitions only address one type of abuse? What about neglect? 2. Slides 2-6: Unfortunately, heartbreaking, real-life stories of child abuse can be found in the news almost every day. The number of child abuse and neglect cases reported to childprotection agencies each year is more than 3 ¼ million. Because the consequences of abuse can be tragic, it is important to a. know what child abuse is, b. know the signs that a child is being abused, c. understand risk factors and effects of abuse, d. take appropriate action if abuse is suspected, and e. plan what each of us can do to prevent abuse from occurring. 3. Slides 7-21: Test your knowledge of child abuse. Show the slides. Have the students answer each question and then discuss the correct answer. The students can write their answers or raise their hands for the correct answer. 4. Fortunately, most people are not abusers. Only a small percentage of families ever experience abuse. 5. History of child abuse and neglect: the first effort to protect a child by legal intervention in America was in 1874: "Little Mary Ellen" was a nine-year-old who was indentured to Francis and Mary Connelly. She was whipped daily and stabbed with scissors while tied to a bed. Neighbors repeatedly reported the incidents to authorities, who considered it to be a private matter and did not interfere. Etta Wheeler, a concerned, caring woman did not relent in her struggle to rescue the child from her tormentors. She finally appealed to Henry Bergin, an official of the Society for the Preservation of Cruelty to Animals. He appealed to the court on the basis that the child was a member of the animal kingdom; she was entitled to "at least the same justice as the common cur." Mary Ellen was removed from the home and Mrs. Connelly was sentenced to a year in prison. The child was adopted by a new family and with the nurturing she received, began to thrive. Pictures of the girl, before and after her abuse, still hang in the offices of the New York SPCA, along with the scissors with which she was tortured. 6. To bring this closer to home, the rate of child abuse and neglect in Florida has been slowly declining since 1991. However, as of 1996, the incidence of child abuse and neglect was still twice as high as the violent crime rate for the general population. 7. There are several moving books of real-life abuse stories that you may enjoy reading. a. A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer b. Jeremy's Story by Mark and Julie Fiedelholtz c. Death from Child Abuse and No One Heard by Eve Krupinski Attachments: Handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide; Child Abuse PowerPoint presentation

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT STUDY GUIDE

Name: ______________________________________________________ Date: __________

Contrast: What is it not?

Personal Definition: Category :What is it? Types of abuse: Word

Child Abuse

Legal Definition:

Contrast: What is it not? Personal Definition: Category :What is it? Types of neglect:

Word

Neglect

Legal Definition:

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Who are the Abusers? What are Some Risk Factors for Child Abuse? Personal Environmental

What are Some Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect on a Child? Emotional

Social

Mental

Physical

What are Some Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect on Others? Families Caregivers Community

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development What is Failure to Thrive (FTT)?

What is Shaken Baby Syndrome?

How Do You Recognize Abuse or Neglect?

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Description Physical Indicators Behavioral Indicators Caregiver Indicators

Physical

Sexual

Emotional

Neglect

Child Abuse and Neglect

Child Abuse and Neglect · Know what child abuse is

Child Abuse and Neglect

· Recognize the signs g of abuse

Child Abuse and Neglect

· Understand risk factors and effects of abuse f b

Child Abuse and Neglect

· Take action to i report abuse

Child Abuse and Neglect

· Plan how to prevent abuse

Test Your Knowledge

· What is the single leading cause of death for children ages four and younger?

a) b) c) d) e) ) Drowning Motor vehicle accidents Child abuse and neglect Choking on Food Falls F ll

c) Child abuse and neglect followed b d f ll d by drowning. i

Test Your Knowledge

· Four children die as a result of child abuse in the home in the US each

a) b) c) d) Year Day Week Month

b) Day

Test Your Knowledge

· On average child abuse is reported average, somewhere in the US every

a) 10 seconds b) 20 minutes c) hour

a) 10 seconds: over 3 million every year ) d illi

Test Your Knowledge

· How many people report child abuse when faced with an actual situation?

a) 3 out of 4 b) 1 out of 2 c) 1 out of 3

c) 1 out of 3

Test Your Knowledge

· Strangers pose the greatest risk of sexual abuse to children.

a) True b) False

b) F l False: 75 t 95% are abused b people to b d by l that they know

Test Your Knowledge

· The child molester is a sexually frustrated person.

a) True b) False

b) False: 50% are married Expression married. problems, and the need for power and control are also issues.

Test Your Knowledge

· Child molesters prefer very young children.

a) True b) False

b) False: 14% select children under 5. ) 46% select ages 6-11. 33% select ages 12-15 12 15.

Test Your Knowledge

· The average age that child molesters first g g attack a child is when they (the attackers) are a) In their early 20s b) Middle-aged c) In their teens

c) In their t ) I th i teens: 70% before th age of b f the f thirty,often as early as 12

Test Your Knowledge

· Child abuse is usually a one-time one time occurrence.

a) True ) b) False

b) False: More often it is a pattern of behavior and the longer it continues, the more serious the consequences

Test Your Knowledge

· Children with disabilities are abused more frequently that children in the g general p public.

a) True b) False

a) True: 4 times the rate. Even if parents manage special needs of child there is child, still risk of maltreatment by other caregivers. caregivers

Test Your Knowledge

· Abusive parents hate their children children. a) True b) F l False

b) False: most love their children, but in times of crisis and stress, they strike out at what is closest.

Test Your Knowledge

· Child abuse victims come from families of minorities and the poor.

a) True ) b) False

b) False: Abuse cuts across all boundaries of economic level, race, ethnic heritage and religious beliefs.

Test Your Knowledge

· In child abuse cases, the child should always be removed from the home.

a) True ) b) False

b) False: a major goal of protective services is to keep the child in the home unless there is immediate danger or the parent is unresponsive to help help.

Test Your Knowledge

· Studies suggest that _____ of all abuse cases involve some degree of substance y p abuse by the child's parents.

a) 15 to 25% b) 25 to 50% c) 50 to 80%

c) 50 to 80%

Test Your Knowledge

· Which of the following actions can help stop abuse and neglect.

a) Helping a stressed out parent with stressed-out babysitting or making a family meal ) g g you b) Learning the signs of abuse so y can recognize them c) Reporting known or suspected abuse d) All of the above

d) All of the above

Child Abuse and Neglect

· Florida Statute 39.01(2) defines abuse as "any willful act or threatened act that results in any physical, mental, or sexual injury or harm that causes, or is likely to cause, the child's physical, mental, or emotional health to be significantly impaired."

Child Abuse and Neglect

· Florida Statute 39.01(2) defines abuse as "acts or omission of acts Corporal acts acts. discipline of a child by a parent or legal custodian for disciplinary purposes does not in itself constitute abuse when it does not result in harm to the child."

Types of Abuse

· Physical

Types of Abuse

· Sexual

Types of Abuse

· Emotional or Mental

Types of Abuse

· Neglect

Who Are the Abusers?

· Child abusers are usually ordinary people caught in situations that are beyond their control.

Who Are the Abusers?

PERSONAL RISK FACTORS · Abused/Neglected as a child · Stress, Life Crisis · Illness · Substance Abuse · Marital Problems · Lack of Parenting Knowledge/Skills

Who Are the Abusers?

ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS · Economic Burdens · Social Isolation · Cultural differences · Acceptance of Violence

Who Are the Abusers?

COMMON CHARACTERISTICS · Young adult ­ mid twenties without high school diploma · D Depressed ­ h diffi lt d has difficulty coping with stressful situations. · Living at or below poverty level · Has experienced violence first hand

Long Term Effects

EMOTIONAL · Fear, mistrust, guilt · Anger, hostility · Poor self-esteem · Anxiety, depression

Long Term Effects

SOCIAL · Difficulty developing close relationships · As adults, they may have difficulty holding jobs. · 1/3 are likely to become abusers. · Display inappropriate sexual behavior:

Females are 28 times likely to become involved i prostitution. i l d in tit ti

Long Term Effects

· 2/3 of abused and neglected children lean toward some type of substance abuse: · Smoking g · Overeating · Drug abuse

Long Term Effects

· Victims face additional difficulties during teenage years: · D li Delinquency i is 59% more likely · Pregnancy · Low academic success

Long Term Effects

MENTAL · Higher risk of developing g p g mental health disorders. · May have cognitive delays: g learning disabilities, ADD, ADHD

Long Term Effects

PHYSICAL · Bruises, broken bones, burns, b i d b brain damage · 18,000 are permanently , p y disabled each year: , , seizures, blindness, cerebral palsy. · Death for 1 500 in 2004 1,500

Long Term Effects

EFFECTS ON FAMILY

· Guilt, mistrust · Violent · Ineffective, non-supportive, poor role model

Long Term Effects

EFFECTS ON CAREGIVERS · Inability to deal with disruptive behavior. · Unskilled in dealing with psychological issues of child.

Long Term Effects

EFFECTS ON COMMUNITY

· 24 billion spent on the child welfare system · 69 billion spent on health care, human services and education

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

· FL Abuse Hotline

· Established in 1971 · Florida was one of the first as states in the nation to have a toll-free hotline · Receives reports of abuse or neglect 24/7 and immediately initiates an investigation anywhere in the state

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

· FL Abuse Hotline

1-800-96-ABUSE 1 800 96 ABUSE

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

MANDATED REPORTERS

· Any person, required by law to report child abuse/neglect, including but not limited to the following:

Physicians Nurses Hospital Personnel

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

MANDATED REPORTERS

· Any person, required by law to report child abuse/neglect, including but not limited to the following:

Medical Examiners

Residential or Institutional Workers

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

MANDATED REPORTERS

· Any person, required by law to report child abuse/neglect, including but not limited to the following:

Mental Health Professionals

Social Workers

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

MANDATED REPORTERS

· Any person, required by law to report child abuse/neglect, including but not limited to the following:

School Teachers and Other School Officials

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

MANDATED REPORTERS

· Any person, required by law to report child abuse/neglect, including but not limited to the following:

Child Caregivers Foster Care Workers

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

MANDATED REPORTERS

· Any person, required by law to report child abuse/neglect, including but not limited to the following:

Law Enforcement Officers

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

CONFIDENTIALITY

· Th name of the person The f th reporting child abuse or neglect shall not b released l t h ll t be l d without the written consent of the th person.

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

IMMUNITY

· Any person reporting in good faith any instance of child abuse shall be immune from any civil or criminal liability.

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

WHAT INFORMATION

· Who was involved?

Victim Witnesses Abuser · name date of birth or age name, age, race and gender, address, phone number · Parents and Siblings

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

WHAT INFORMATION

· What occurred? · Where? · When? · Why did it happened?

Reporting Abuse & Neglect

Preventing Abuse & Neglect

"The world is a dangerous place to li t live not because of the people tb f th l who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it." t --Albert Einstein

Preventing Abuse & Neglect

The goal of prevention is to intervene before abuse and neglect can occur. occur

Preventing Abuse & Neglect

STRATEGIES

· Educational programs that teach children personal safety skills. · Identification and support services and programs for high risk families. p g g

Preventing Abuse & Neglect

STRATEGIES

· Educational programs for parents on child development and safety. · Background checks for direct care providers. · P id i f Provide information on id tif i and ti identifying d reporting child abuse and neglect.

Preventing Abuse & Neglect

STRATEGIES

· Individuals can reach out to children and parents. p

Preventing Abuse & Neglect

Preventing Abuse & Neglect What can we do to raise the issue of child abuse and neglect?

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

VOCABULARY CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Child Abuse and Neglect 1.02; 3.09; 4.03; 5.01; 5.02; 5.03; 5.04; 5.05; 7.02 LA.A.1.4.1; LA.A.1.4.2; LA.A.1.4.3; LA.B.1.4.1; LA.B.2.4.1; LA.C.1.4.1; LA.C.1.4.2; LA.C.1.4.3; LA.E.2.4.6; LA.E.2.4.8; SC.F.1.4.6; SC.G.1.4.1; SC.G.2.4.4 e09; e14; e25; e30; e32; e34; e40; e47; e49; e50; e52; e53; e57; e59; e60; e69; e70; e80; e94; s13; s45 A ­ (Knowledge 2 / Application 2)

Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

Instructions to Teacher: 1. Prepare for PowerPoint presentation or print Slides # 22-40 as overheads. 2. Prepare the terms/definition cards for Vocabulary Match up: a. You can put each word and each definition on a separate card and then the students will move around to make pairs. The attached vocabulary list can be cut and pasted to the cards. Instructions to Students: 1. The students will define terms associated with child abuse and neglect. 2. The students will identify areas of development and how they are interrelated. 3. The students will describe factors that contribute to a child's development. 4. The students will be able to explain risk factors and effects of child abuse and neglect. 5. The students will analyze and respond to a Child Abuse and Neglect case. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: The "Bobby is Dead" article can be read aloud to the class or printed and read individually. Assessment for Activity: Vocabulary Match up answers Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 45 minutes Materials Needed: Article: "Bobby is Dead" Vocabulary Match up and answers Resources Needed: Child Abuse PowerPoint lecture presentation (slides 22-40) Handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide from Introduction Connection

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Activity: Introduction: 1. Pass out the vocabulary cards and have the students make matches. Discuss as they post their pairs onto the board. 2. Slides 22-27: Use the PowerPoint presentation to review the legal definition of abuse and neglect. a. Students will take notes on their handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide b. Compare their personal definition of abuse and neglect to the legal definition. 3. Read "Bobby is Dead" to the class and discuss. a. How could this couple have better prepared for marriage and having children? b. Is it normal for a mother to feel depressed and jittery after her baby is born? c. What is wrong with spanking a child that is three weeks old? d. This mother did seek help. Where? Why didn't the help work? e. What child abuse risk factors can you identify? f. Do you agree with the consequences of her actions? 4. Slide #28 The incidence of child abuse and neglect reflects an individual's personality and/or environmental variables. Usually more than one factor is in play. What are some risk factors that may lead to child abuse and neglect? View slides and ask the class to make a list of characteristics (traits) of abusive caregivers on their study guide: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide a. Personal: Slide 29 i. Stressed 1. life always seems to be in crisis ii. Abused or neglected as a child 1. Many abusive parents were consistently deprived of emotional support as children and were unable to depend on the adults in their lives for support, physical or emotional care or love 2. These adults have not learned how to ask for support 3. Emotional problems: Fear, frustration and anger are associated with these unmet needs and abusive parent do not know how to use effective ways to cope with anger, fear and frustration so they are more likely to act on impulse a. They are usually not aware how hard they strike a child 4. Results in poor self-image (low self-esteem) which leads to low expectations 5. However, this does not necessarily mean that an abused child will become abusive later in life iii. lack of parenting skills and knowledge about children 1. know very little about raising children 2. own parents were their role models 3. unrealistic expectations of children's developmental behavior a. expecting or demanding behavior that is beyond the child's years or abilities 4. unaware of child's development and needs iv. marital problems 1. frustration and anger from a non-nurturing marriage can displace to children 2. stepchildren v. illness 1. can create financial and emotional strain

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development 2. can create an inability to control one's life and lead to abuse and neglect 3. illness/medically needy children a. may provoke feeling of resentment vi. abuse of alcohol and other drugs 1. 50-80% 2. can lead to legal and financial troubles b. Environmental Slide 30 i. Economic burdens cause external family stresses 1. loss of employment or housing, debt, and limited financial resources ii. Social isolation 1. lack of friendship or support or death of a support person contributes to pressures on the family iii. Acceptance of violence in society 1. crime stats, media, print materials and movies iv. Cultural differences 1. what is acceptable in one society may be considered abuse in another 5. Slides # 31-40: Ask the class to brainstorm and list some possible mental, physical, or emotional effects of abuse on a child, family, caregiver and community. List on their study guide. Attachments: "Bobby is Dead" article, Vocabulary Match up and answers

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

BOBBY IS DEAD

Jennifer E. Dabney I am a child abuser. That is difficult enough to admit, even harder to accept. Even more incredible to me is that my son's life ended as result of a beating I gave him. Although this happened over 17 months ago, time has not eased my pain. Where did it all go wrong, or was it ever right? As a result of being emotionally and physically abused as a child, I grew up with many emotional handicaps. When I got married at 18, I thought I'd be "happy" for the first time in my life. But along with my problems, my husband had emotional problems, too. We were a breeding ground for disaster. Thirteen months after our marriage I gave birth to premature twins. Johnny weighed four pounds, Bobby three and one-half. Along with the low birth weight, Bobby had a congenital birth defect, and I blamed myself for both the premature birth and the defect. Almost immediately pressures began building up inside of me. The fist incident of child abuse occurred when I spanked Johnny--he was three weeks old. I was terrified and told my husband about it. But he had little understanding and told me that if I ever did that again he would take the boys and leave. When the public health nurse came to our home, I told her that I was afraid of hurting my children. She was of no help; she told me I just had the new-mother jitters. I controlled my frustrations for the next couple of months. Each day that I did not slap or yell at Johnny and Bobby became some sort of achievement for me. I tried to find help for my problems and went to a mental health center near our home. I was so full of fear of harming the babies. I was told that perhaps I should get a divorce, or get a full-time job so that I could get away from my children. That was not the answer and I never went back. Finally I gave up trying to get help because no one seemed to understand how I felt. The second serious incident of child abuse occurred when Johnny was three months old. I was overcome with frustration because he wouldn't stop crying. Almost before I knew it I had twisted his arm until it broke. I can't begin to describe how I felt at that moment. I took him to the doctor and as he was resetting the arm, he asked me for an explanation. I lied to him, and, although he was suspicious, he let me go. From then on things kept going downhill. I was overcome with guilt and the fear that I would end up taking my frustrations out on the kids. I tried temporary jobs to get away from them, but that did not ease the strain at all. Then when Johnny and Bobby got on my nerves, I tried leaving the house. Sometimes I stayed away from them for 20 minutes or more, trying to regain control of myself. Nothing helped, and soon, very few days went by that I didn't abuse them, either physically or emotionally. Another crisis entered the picture. My marriage was falling apart, and I did the only thing I knew I could do--get pregnant. My husband wanted me to have an abortion but I refused, saying that I didn't want to kill it. My husband got a part-time job. He was seldom home except to sleep. Life was hell. I began sleeping all day because I just couldn't cope anymore. The house was filthy, my children were filthy, and I couldn't find the strength to do anything about it.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development I was extremely depressed on the night of May 31, 1974. I had been crying for hours because I did not know what to do or where to go for help. My husband called at 10:30 p.m. and told me he wouldn't be home until 1:00 a.m. I became almost hysterical, pleading with him to come home. After the phone call, I became even more depressed. Around 11:30 p.m. I took Bobby out of the crib where he was sleeping. Because I had just awakened him, he did not respond to my attempts to love him, and he began crying. I tried to feed him and he spit it all over himself and me. Something in me seemed to snap and I began slapping his face--hard, crying all the time. When I regained some sort of control, I got some ice and tried to bring the swelling down; but it was too late. The bruises were very noticeable, and I was filled with fear. I tried to show him love, but he was terrified. Soon, I tried to feed him and again he spit it all over. I started to bang his head against the floor--all control gone. I knew what was going on but it was as if my mind were above it all, watching. I couldn't seem to stop. I don't know how many minutes passed. As I realized what I had done, I felt absolute horror. I tried to convince myself that Bobby was all right. He appeared to be stunned. I sat there on the floor rocking him, tears streaming down my face, trying to tell him I was sorry. After awhile, I took him into the bathroom to give him a bath because he was covered with cereal. I was filled with the fear that I would hurt him again; so I left him in the bathtub with the water running. I wasn't gone long when I realized he could drown and I rushed back. He was under the water and unconscious. Time stood still. I don't know how long it took me to revive him. I was almost hysterical, pleading for Bobby to live. After he regained consciousness, I called my husband and asked him to please come home. By the time he got home, I had convinced myself that Bobby was fine. I lied to my husband, saying that I had bruised Bobby's face when I tried to revive him from the bath water. He seemed to accept my explanation. By the next afternoon it was apparent that Bobby was not fine. I was standing beside his crib when that realization struck me. I grabbed him by the throat and began shaking him. He had lapsed into a coma from which he never recovered. At 6:30 p.m., June 1, 1974, Bobby was pronounced dead as the result of a blood clot on the brain. My husband was charged with felony child neglect and manslaughter; I was charged with murder, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse. The felony child neglect charge was reduced to a misdemeanor, and the manslaughter charge was dropped. In January 1975, a jury found me guilty of all three charges. On February 14, 1975, I was sentenced from five years to life to be served at the California Institution for Women. Recently, my maximum sentence was set at five years. I have served two years, and, with God's help, I am working on getting parole next year. When I am released, it is my goal to help other child abusers like me so that what happened to my family will not happen to theirs. Johnny and the baby son I had in jail are adopted now; and I know wherever they are they will have a beautiful life. I miss all my children very much, and I have come to realize just how precious life and children really are. I'm only sorry it had to take this experience to find out. If you feel you need help, get in touch with your local Parents Anonymous chapter. I am sharing my story in hopes that this will not happen to you or yours.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Vocabulary Match Up

Cut and paste the words and definitions onto separate cards.

Florida Abuse Hotline

Department of Children and Families

Child Protection Team

Failure to Thrive

Guardian Ad Litem

Emotional Neglect

Child

Physical Abuse

Immunity

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Neglect

Professional

Report

Verbal Abuse Confidentiality Child Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Any non-accidental injury, sexual battery, or injury to The reporter's name will not the intellectual or psychological capacity of a be released to anyone except those identified in the child by the parent, adult Florida Statutes. household member, or other person responsible for the child's welfare

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

A team of professionals Failure to provide support, including pediatricians, A condition that occurs acceptance, attention, nurses, psychologists, social during infancy and early warmth, supervision and workers, attorneys, and childhood. Weight drops normal living experiences other support staff below fifth percentile for for a child to the extent that established by the age. The infant's physical the child is impaired in his department which provides needs are met, but emotional ability to function within his a multi-disciplinary care (holding, hugging, normal range of approach to the diagnosis rocking, singing, touching, performance and behavior and treatment of the abused and loving) is absent. with due regard to his and neglected child and culture family

Any person under the age of 18 years

The agency mandated by Florida Law to conduct abuse investigations (DCF)

The Florida Abuse Hotline operates 24/7, toll free: 1-800-96ABUSE

Those persons who are legally obligated to report child abuse and/or neglect that include child care personnel

A responsible adult and trained volunteer who is appointed by the court to represent the best interests of the child in judicial proceedings

A form of emotional neglect that involves excessive yelling, shaming, belittling, and/or teasing of a child

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Exemption from civil or criminal charges resulting from reporting "in good faith"

Failure to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, health care or needed supervision

To notify DCF of suspected abuse and/or neglect

Sexual contact or interaction The mistreatment of a child between a child and an adult including shaking, beating, or older child. It may or may or burning by a parent, adult not involve physical contact household member or other (non-physical may mean indecent exposure). It may person responsible for the child's welfare which results or may not be violent (nonin injury or harm to the violent may mean fondling, touching sexual organs, sex child. Injury may be the result of a single episode or play). Violent abuse means forcible rape, sodomy and may occur repeatedly. oral sex.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

ANSWERS to Vocabulary Match up

Child Any person under the age of 18 years Child Abuse Any non-accidental injury, sexual battery, or injury to the intellectual or psychological capacity of a child by the parent, adult household member, or other person responsible for the child's welfare Child Protection Team A team of professionals including pediatricians, nurses, psychologists, social workers, attorneys, and other support staff established by the department which provides a multi-disciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of the abused and neglected child and family Confidentiality The reporter's name will not be released to anyone except those identified in the Florida Statutes. Department of Children and Families The agency mandated by Florida Law to conduct abuse investigations (DCF) Emotional Neglect Failure to provide support, acceptance, attention, warmth, supervision and normal living experiences for a child to the extent that the child is impaired in his ability to function within his normal range of performance and behavior with due regard to his culture Failure to Thrive A condition that occurs during infancy and early childhood. Weight drops below fifth percentile for age. The infant's physical needs are met, but emotional care (holding, hugging, rocking, singing, touching, and loving) is absent. Florida Abuse Hotline The Florida Abuse Hotline operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, toll free telephone number 800-9622873 Guardian Ad Litem A responsible adult and trained volunteer who is appointed by the court to represent the best interests of the child in judicial proceedings Immunity Exemption from civil or criminal charges resulting from reporting "in good faith" Neglect Failure to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, health care or needed supervision Physical Abuse The mistreatment of a child including shaking, beating or burning by a parent, adult household member or other person responsible for the child's welfare which results in injury or harm to the child. Injury may be the result of a single episode or may occur repeatedly.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Professional Those persons who are legally obligated to report child abuse and/or neglect that include child care personnel Report To notify Department of Children and Families of suspected child abuse and/or neglect Sexual Abuse Sexual contact or interaction between a child and an adult or older child. It may or may not involve physical contact. It may or may not be violent. Non-physical sexual abuse may mean indecent exposure. Non-violent abuse may mean fondling, touching sexual organs, sex play. Violent sexual abuse means forcible rape, sodomy, and oral sex. Verbal Abuse A form of emotional neglect that involves excessive yelling, shaming, belittling and/or teasing of a child

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

READING/WRITING CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant): Instructions to Teacher: 1. Students will need access to the Internet. Instructions to Students: 1. The students will analyze factors that influence a child's development. 2. The students will discuss and explain terms associated with child abuse and neglect. 3. The students will be able to identify risk factors and effects of child abuse and neglect. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: 1. You can download and print one article for use by the entire class. 2. You can research additional articles that are reading level appropriate for your students. 3. Students may research their own article from the Internet or use a current event from a newspaper. Assessment for Activity: Summary response Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 45 minutes Materials Needed: Handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Article Summary Resources Needed: Internet Activity: Introduction: 1. Have the students follow the directions on their handout: .Child Abuse and Neglect Article Summary to access the website: http://www.yesican.org and click on "Articles on Child Abuse." Students will choose an article to read and summarize using the graphic organizer provided. Attachments: Child Abuse and Neglect Article Summary Child Abuse and Neglect 4.03; 5.01; 5.02; 5.03; 5.04 LA.A.1.4.2; LA.A.1.4.4; LA.B.1.4.1; LA.B.2.4.1; LA.B.2.4.2; LA.B.2.4.3; LA.B.2.4.4; LA.B.2.4.6; SC.F.1.4.6; SC.G.1.4.1; SC.G.2.4.4 e03; e12; e14; e15; e22; e24; e34; e35; e40; e46; e50; e53; e60; e72; e94; s13; s45 A ­ (Knowledge 2 / Application 1)

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT ARTICLE SUMMARY

Name: _________________________________________________ Date: __________ Access the website: http://www.yesican.org and click on "Articles on Child Abuse." Choose an article to read and use this organizer to describe the main idea and specific supporting details. Abuse Article Title: ______________________________________________________

Main Idea

Key Words and Meanings

Important Points

Ah-ha's (Insights)

Unanswered Questions

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development In your own words, summarize what you read in the article using a 12-line response. Your response will be evaluated with the FCAT four-point rubric.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Four Point Rubric for Extended Response

4 points The response indicates that the student has a thorough understanding of the concept embodied in the task. The student has provided a response that is accurate, complete, and fulfills all the requirements of the task. Necessary support and/or examples are included and the information is clearly textbased. The response indicates that the student has an understanding of the concept embodied in the task. The student has provided a response that is accurate and fulfills all the requirements of the task, but the required support and/or details are not complete or clearly text-based. The response indicates that the student has a partial understanding of the concept embodied in the task. The student has provided a response that includes information that is essentially correct and text-based, but the information is too general or too simplistic. Some of the support and/or examples and requirements of the task may be incomplete or omitted. The response indicates that the student has very limited understanding of the concept embodied in the task. The response is incomplete, may exhibit many flaws, and may not address all requirements of the task. The response is inaccurate, confused, and/or irrelevant, or the student has failed to respond to the task.

3 points

2 points

1 point 0 points

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

RESEARCH CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Child Abuse and Neglect 1.02; 3.09; 5.01; 5.02; 5.03; 5.04; 9.05; 9.06 LA.A.1.4.2; LA.A.2.4.1; LA.A.2.4.4; LA.A.2.4.8; LA.B.1.4.1; LA.B.1.4.2; LA.B.1.4.3; LA.B.2.4.1; LA.B.2.4.2; LA.B.2.4.3; LA.B.2.4.4; LA.C.1.4.3; LA.C.3.4.2; LA.C.3.4.4; SC.H.1.4.1; S.C.H.1.4.3; SC.H.1.4.7 e03; e10; e12; e14; e15; e22; e24; e27; e32; e34; e40; e50; e53; e54; e59; e69; e70; s13; s114 C ­ (Knowledge 5 / Application 2)

Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant):

Instructions to Teacher: 1. Students will need access to the Internet and to PowerPoint software. 2. Have a set of topic cards ready for each class. Extended learning opportunity: 1. Ask two pairs of students to research and create slides on Failure to Thrive (FTT) and Shaken Baby Syndrome. 2. Additional issues associated with Child Abuse and Neglect can be assigned. The site http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov has several suggestions like "Long Term Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect," or "Understanding the Effects of Maltreatment on Early Brain Development." Instructions to Students: 1. The students will discuss and explain terms associated with child abuse and neglect. 2. The students will be able to explain the importance of families and the role of nurturing on the development of the child. 3. The students will identify children's rights that are protected by law. 4. The students will be able to differentiate between the types of child abuse and neglect. 5. The students will be able to state how the common physical and behavioral indicators of child abuse and neglect are detected. 6. The students will research and create a PowerPoint presentation to share their research. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: 1. You can pick the groups and assign the jobs for the group. 2. You can provide some of the information (see attachment: "Indicators" from DCF) to provide them with accurate information for their slides if computer access is limited. 3. Class visuals can be made if PowerPoint or computer access is not easily available. 4. Research can be assigned individually as homework and then shared with the rest of the group. Assessment for Activity: Printout of slides created by group Abuse and Neglect Research/Presentation Instructions and Rubric Notes added to their handout Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 120 minutes

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Materials Needed: Handout: Physical and Behavioral Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect Abuse and Neglect Research/Presentation Instructions and Rubric Topic Cards Resources Needed: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide from Introduction Connection Internet sources listed on Instructions handout Activity: Introduction: 1. Divide the class into 4 groups (plus two small groups for FTT and Shaken Baby). Help the groups divide up the work to be done. Ask one member of each to chose a topic card and write the names/jobs of all group members on the back of the card. 2. They will follow directions on their handout: Abuse and Neglect Research to research their assigned topic. 3. The PowerPoint presentations can be viewed separately or put together into one presentation to be shown. A copy of each slide can be printed out and put together into a "Class Book." 4. Notes will be taken on student handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Study Guide 5. Presentations and participation are evaluated using the Abuse Research/Presentation Rubric. Attachments: Topic Cards, Abuse and Neglect Research/Presentation Instructions and Rubric, Physical and Behavioral Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect Research handout

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

TOPIC CARDS

Print onto cardstock and separate to assign topics for each group.

Physical Abuse Emotional or Mental Abuse Failure to Thrive (FTT)

Sexual Abuse

Neglect

Shaken Baby Syndrome

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Abuse and Neglect Research/Presentation Instructions

You will be working in a group. One member of the group should see the teacher for a topic card. The group will research, write and create a PowerPoint presentation for your topic. There are several jobs that need to be done: 1. Your group will need computers for research (each with one person to search and one to record information). Include where you found your information. 2. People to summarize information from the researchers and write down what should go on each slide of the presentation 3. One computer person to type the information into the PowerPoint presentation. 4. Someone else can search online for appropriate clipart, graphics or pictures for your presentation. 5. Decide who is going to present and answer questions for your presentation. Divide up the work for your group and write the names/jobs on the back of your Topic Card. Answer the following questions for your assigned topic: 1. Describe your topic. What actions / behaviors / appearances does it include? 2. What are indicators or signs that may signal the presence of abuse for the child? a. Behavioral indicators. b. Physical indicators. 3. What are caregiver characteristics that may indicate abuse or neglect? Internet Resources to start your search: http://www.preventchildabuse.org http://www.yesican.org http://www.childhelpusa.org http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov Create a PowerPoint presentation to share your information with the class. Group Work: Review and edit your PowerPoint presentation. When the group is satisfied, print a copy of each slide and turn in to the teacher. Presentation: You will select people to present your PowerPoint to the class and answer any questions. You also each need to complete the Rubric.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Abuse and Neglect Research/Presentation Rubric

Name:________________________

The Best (4-5 points) Information is accurate and complete Information is accurate and complete Includes listing both behavioral and physical indicators Includes 10 meaningful facts Information is written in your own words. Information is accurate and complete Includes 5 meaningful facts Information is written in your own words Uses at least 3 Internet sites Citations are correct Slides are visually appealing Graphics support the text Grammar and spelling are accurate 6. PowerPoint slides content Information on slides is well organized Slides answer all questions 7. Presentation of research to the class Information is easily understood Presenters showed an understanding of the topic content Presenters are easily heard Presenters answered questions completely Completes all tasks assigned Demonstrates leadership in keeping the group on task Satisfactory (3 points) Information is mostly accurate and complete Information is mostly accurate and complete Includes listing both behavioral and physical indicators Includes 6 meaningful facts Information is written in your own words Information is mostly accurate and complete Includes 3 meaningful facts Information is written in your own words Uses at least 2 Internet sites Citations are mostly correct Slides are somewhat interesting Graphics support the text Grammar and spelling are mostly accurate Information on slides is somewhat organized Slides answer most questions Information is mostly understood Presenters showed a partial understanding of the topic content Presenters are mostly heard Presenters answered questions completely Completes all tasks assigned Contributes to the work of the group Needs Improvement (0-2 points) Information is somewhat inaccurate or incomplete Information is somewhat inaccurate or incomplete Includes listing both behavioral and physical indicators Includes 4 meaningful facts Information is written in your own words Information is somewhat inaccurate or incomplete Includes 2 meaningful facts Information is written in your own words Uses at least 1 Internet site Citations are somewhat incomplete or inaccurate Slides are not appealing Needs improvement in layout and/or graphics to support the text Has mistakes in grammar and spelling Information on slides is not well organized Slides don't answer all questions Information is confusing Presenters showed limited understanding of the topic content Presenters are hard to hear Presenters answered questions completely Completes some of the task assigned Needs to be reminded to stay on task Total points: Your Score

1. Topic defined and examples given 2. Research on topic for question 3

3. Research on topic: question 4

4. Uses and includes citations for research 5. PowerPoint slides visual appeal

8. Individual contributions to the group

You scored ________ out a possible 40 points.

What is your grade? __________%

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development Write a statement justifying your score for this part of the rubric.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Physical and Behavioral Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect

TYPE

Physical Abuse

PHYSICAL INDICATORS Unexplained Bruises & Welts: · on face, lips, mouth · on torso, back, buttocks, thighs · in various stages of healing · reflecting shape of article used to inflict injury (extension cord, belt buckle, etc.) · on several different surface areas · regularly appear after absence, weekend or vacation Unexplained Burns: · cigar, cigarette burns, especially on soles, palms, back or buttocks · immersion burns (sock like, glove-like, doughnut shaped on buttocks or genitalia) · patterned like electric burner, iron, etc. · rope burns on arms, legs, neck or torso Unexplained Fractures (broken bones): · to skull, nose or face · in different stages of healing · multiple or spiral fractures Unexplained Lacerations Or Abrasions: · to mouth, lips, gums, eyes · to external genitalia · Consistent hunger, poor hygiene, inappropriate dress · Consistent lack of supervision, especially in dangerous activities over long periods of time · Unattended physical problems or medical needs (anemia, urinary tract infections, diarrhea, malnutrition) · Abandonment · Difficulty in walking / sitting · Torn, shredded, stained or bloody underclothing · Pain or itching in genital area · Bruises or bleeding in external genitalia, vaginal or anal areas, mouth or throat · Venereal disease, especially in pre-teens · Pregnancy

BEHAVIORAL INDICATORS · · · · · · · · Wary of adult contacts Apprehensive when other children cry Behavioral extremes Aggressiveness or withdrawal Frightened of parents Afraid to go home Reports injury by parents Shows anxiety about normal activities (napping, eating, etc.)

Physical Neglect

· · · · · · · · · · · ·

Begging, stealing food Extended stays at school (early arrival, late departure) Constant fatigue, listlessness or falling asleep in class Alcohol or drug abuse Delinquency (e.g. thefts) States there is no caretaker Unwilling to change for gym or participate in physical education class Withdrawal, fantasy or infantile behavior Bizarre, sophisticated, or unusual sexual behavior or knowledge Poor peer relationships Delinquency or runaway Reports sexual assault by caretaker

Sexual Abuse

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Physical and Behavioral Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect

TYPE

Emotional Neglect

· · ·

PHYSICAL INDICATORS Speech and language disorders Lags in physical development Failure-to-thrive

· · · · · · · ·

BEHAVIORAL INDICATORS Habit disorders (sucking, biting, rocking, etc.) Conduct disorders (antisocial, destructive, etc.) Neurotic traits (sleep disorders, inhibition of play) Psychoneurotic reactions (hysteria, obsession, compulsion, phobias) Behavior extremes (compliant / passive, aggressive / demanding) Overly adaptive behavior (inappropriate adult, inappropriate infant) Developmental lags (mental, emotional) Attempted suicide

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

PRESENTATION CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant): Child Abuse and Neglect 5.01; 5.02; 5.03; 5.04; 6.05; 8.02; 9.03; 9.05; 9.06 LA.B.2.4.1; LA.B.2.4.2; LA.B.2.4.3; LA.C.1.4.3; LA.C.3.4.2; LA.C.3.4.4 e10; e12; e14; e22; e32; e50 D ­ (Knowledge 5 / Application 4)

Instructions to Teacher: 1. Prepare for PowerPoint presentation or print Slides #41-53 as overheads. Extended learning opportunity: 1. An abuse counselor can be asked to join the class so the students can give the reports to him/her. Instructions to Students: 1. The students will be able to describe children's rights that are protected by law. 2. The students will be able to differentiate between the types of child abuse and neglect. 3. The students will be able to identify indicators of child abuse and neglect. 4. The students will be able to examine how child abuse and neglect is reported. 5. The students will create a scenario in which a child is abused or neglected. 6. The students will be able to role-play how to report abuse and neglect. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: 1. The students can bring in articles of child abuse cases and use them to write their scenarios. 2. The report can be recorded on the Florida DCF Fax Transmittal Form. Assessment for Activity: Completed Fax Transmittal Form, Group Participation Rubric Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 60 minutes Materials Needed: Handout: Florida DCF Fax Transmittal Form Group Participation Rubric Resources Needed: Child Abuse PowerPoint presentation Activity: 1. We have discussed the different indicators of child maltreatment that can be observed though the behavior and the physical appearance of a child. These same observations could be the key elements needed to develop a report for suspected cased of child abuse and neglect. Usually there will be a number of signs indicative of child mistreatment. Careful observation of persistent physical and emotional problems exhibited by the child should alert you to possible child abuse and neglect. 2. What do you do if you suspect child abuse or neglect? Call to report your suspicions. Remember that a report of suspected maltreatment is not an accusation; it is a report of indicators. If you suspect abuse, reporting it can protect the child and get help for the family.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development a. Make a report: FL numbers Slides #41-42 i. Telephone: 1-800-96-Abuse (1-800-962-2873) ii. Fax: 1-800-914-0004 iii. Voice mail message: 1-800-770-0953 (be careful to leave complete information) b. Childhelp USA: National Child Abuse Hotline is 1-800-4-A-CHILD. They will also give you information about where or how to file a report. 3. Who can report suspected abuse/neglect? a. Mandated reporters (groups of people who are legally required to report suspicions of child abuse). i. Who are mandated reporters in FL? Slides #43-48 1. Professionals such as teachers, doctors and nurses, adult or childcare providers, social workers, law enforcement officers, EMT b. Any concerned person can and should report suspected child abuse. A report is not an accusations; it is an expression of concern and a request for an investigation or evaluation of a child's situation. 4. How is the reporter protected? Your suspicion is enough to make a report. You are not required to provide proof. If you are not sure what you are seeing is abuse, always call and ask. Investigators will make the determination of whether abuse or neglect has occurred. a. Slide # 49 Confidentiality: The names of reporters are not given out to families reported by child abuse or neglect. You may request to make your report anonymously, but your report may be considered more credible and more helpful if you give your name. i. FL statute 39.202 states that the name of the person reporting child abuse or neglect shall not be released to any person other than employees of child protective services, the central abuse registry and tracking system, or the appropriate state attorney without the written consent of the person. b. Slide # 50 Immunity: good faith law to protect people from prosecution or liability. i. Fl statute 39.203 states that any person, official or institution participating in good faith (honest belief) shall be immune from any civil or criminal liability, which might otherwise result by reason of such action. 5. What kind of information do you need to report Child Abuse/Neglect? Try to have as much information as possible written down before you call so you don't forget anything that you want to share with the intake worker. When calling to report child abuse you will be asked for specific information (if known). Do not delay in calling even if you do not have all the necessary information. Information the caller should have ready include: Slides #51-52 a. Child's name and location i. Date of birth ii. Race/sex iii. Phone number/address iv. Other siblings v. Social security number of child vi. Name of school and grade b. Abuser's name and relationship to the child i. Race/sex ii. Date of birth iii. Location iv. Work address/phone/directions v. Home address/phone/directions c. A description of what you have seen or heard regarding the abuse or neglect i. The name of any other people having knowledge of the abuse

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development ii. What happened (indictors) iii. How did it happen (if physical abuse, was it done by hand or other tool) iv. Where did it occur? v. When did it occur? vi. Why did it happen? vii. Is there danger/risk for the investigator? d. Your name and phone number/address. i. Relationship to victim 6. What happens when you make a report? Abuse Hotline Counselors are required to identify themselves by giving their first name and their identification number. You may want to record this information along with the date and time of the call. They will inform you whether the information meets the statutory requirements for a report and whether an investigation will be initiated. They will also provide you with information on available services. Slide #53 7. Divide the class into groups and role-play how to report child abuse or neglect. a. First have each group create a scenario where a child is abused or neglected. b. Have the group write the information that will be included in their abuse or neglect report. c. Someone will play the role of a reporter and the teacher (or someone from another group) will be the abuse counselor that takes his or her report and determines whether or not an investigation will be initiated. Attachments: Group Participation Rubric, Florida Department of Children & Families Fax Transmittal Form

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Group Participation Rubric

Names of Group Members:

The table below shows an evaluation of the efforts of your group. It indicates what levels you have passed and what levels you can try to reach on future group projects. Circle one box in each row that best describes your group's efforts. Teamwork: Passive membership. Failed to identify what tasks needed to be completed. Leadership: No effective leadership Argumentative membership. Unable to designate who should complete each task. Group fragmented by several members seeking leadership roles Independent membership. All tasks completed individually. Helpful membership. Completed individual tasks and then assisted others Cooperative membership. Worked together to complete all tasks.

Sought leadership from outside group

One member assumed primary leadership role for the group

Leadership responsibilities shared by several group members

Goal Achievement: Did not attempt Were unable to to achieve goal achieve goal

Achieved goal with outside assistance

Achieved assigned goal

Achieved goal using added material to enhance total effort.

Members cited for excellent contributions to group's efforts are

Members cited for failing to contribute to group's efforts are

Fax Transmittal Form To Report Abuse/Abandonment/Neglect/Exploitation*

Fax Number: 1-800-914-0004

Reporter Information (required for professionally mandated reporters of child abuse, abandonment and/or neglect; F.S. Chap.39)

Today's Date: _______________ Your Last Name:__________________________________________ Your First Name:______________________________________________ M.I.: ______________________

)___________________ Phone #: ( )_____________________

Your Occupation:________________________ Your Agency:___________________________ Fax #: (

Address: Street #_______ Street:_______________________ City:____________________ Zip Code:___________ County:______________ State:____________

Do you want a response verifying receipt of this fax? Yes No

Address where the victim is currently located:

Home Telephone Number: ________________________ Work Telephone Number: __________________

Street #:_______Street: _____________________________City:______________________________ Zip Code:_________ County:___________ State: ________

if the victim is an adult, describe disability and how he/she is impaired in the ability

Victim(s) ­ (if the victim is a child, please list other children in the home;

First Name DOB SEX

to care for or protect self in the "description of Incident section")

Last Name

RACE

SSN

Is this person a victim?

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

DOB SEX RACE SSN

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No

RELATIONSHIP**

Person(s) responsible for alleged abuse, abandonment, neglect or exploitation

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

NAME

(1) (2) (3)

Description Of Incident

Please include what happened, when and where incident occurred, frequency of occurrence, description of injuries/threat of harm.

What happened?

When did the incident occur? Where did the incident occur? Description of injuries/threat of harm: Description of disability & how victim is impaired in the ability to care for or protect self

FOR ADULT VICTIMS ONLY:

Who else might be aware of the abuse/abandonment/neglect/exploitation of the victim?

Relationship to the victim Address Home Phone Work Phone

Name

*Please read instructions in the Information Packet for Professionally Mandated Reporters **Relationship of Person(s) responsible for alleged abuse, abandonment, neglect or exploitation to the victim

----------------

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

The Department of Children & Families is committed to working in partnership with local communities to ensure safety, well-being and self-sufficiency for the people we serve.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Transmittal of this form to the Florida Abuse Hotline is one reporting option. You may also call the Hotline voice mail at 1-800-770-0953 and leave a report. However, the preferred option for the Department of Children and Families is for you to call 1-800-96-ABUSE, and talk to a Hotline counselor. This third option must be used in all cases of abuse, abandonment and/or neglect that involve emergency or critical situations. The information in this fax will be assessed to see if it meets the legal criteria as a report for investigation. It is extremely important that all information be completed. Add extra pages if this format is too limited in the space provided for response. Your fax cannot be properly assessed for a report without the requested information. A means to locate the victim is required. By law (Chapters 39, Florida Statutes), your identity as the reporter will be protected. It is important to have your telephone number in case additional information is needed to process your fax. Also, identify others who might be aware of the abuse/abandonment/neglect of the victim. Please type or print legibly. Indicate if you want a faxed response from the Hotline verifying receipt of this fax. If you are unable to use this fax form, send a report that includes the following information: 1. concise description of the abuse, neglect and/or exploitation; 2. concise description of injuries/threat of injuries and date of occurrence; 3. the name of the victim(s), alleged perpetrator(s) and witnesses, and their birth dates, full addresses, telephone and social security numbers; 4. your name and means to contact (required for professional reporters of child abuse and/or neglect); and 5. how frequently does the abuse, abandonment and/or neglect occur and when was the last known incident (prior to this incident). Please do not send copies of medical case notes, case files, arrest reports, etc. It takes longer to process these documents and this delays service to other victims and customers.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL FAX REPORTING

The Florida Abuse Hotline has prepared the following information for professionally mandated reporters to assist in making reports of child abuse, abandonment and neglect. When sending a fax to the Florida Abuse Hotline, please consider the following: · · Please use our form. If you cannot use our form, please send a concise description of the situation. Please include the following information: · victim and perpetrator names · reporter name (required for professional reporters of child abuse/neglect) · full addresses for report subjects, including a numbered street address, apartment or lot number, city and zip code · telephone numbers, including area code · dates of birth · Social Security numbers · a brief description of the abuse, abandonment or neglect, including physical, mental or sexual injuries · names and phone numbers and/or addresses of witnesses and important others · the relationship of the perpetrator to the victim. Please print or write in a legible manner. Type, if possible. Please do not use profession specific language, i.e. "fx" for fracture. Please do not send copies of medical notes, case files, arrest reports, etc. Always phone in information concerning emergency or critical situations. The time frame involved in processing a fax may be longer than the time used in processing a phone call, which may delay assistance to victims.

· · · ·

We realize that your time is valuable, and the staff at the Florida Abuse Hotline are committed to making the reporting process as convenient as possible.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

MATH CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant): Instructions to Teacher: 1. Students will need access to calculators. Instructions to Students: 1. The students will discuss and explain terms associated with child abuse and neglect. 2. The students will be able to explain how children's rights are protected by law. 3. The students will be able to describe the different types of child abuse and neglect. 4. The students will be able to interpret statistics on child abuse and neglect. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: 1. The work can be done as a class. Assessment for Activity: See Answer Key. There are 11 problems worth 2 points each. Work must be shown. Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 30 minutes Materials Needed: Handout: Child Abuse and Neglect Statistics and Answer Key Calculators Resources Needed: Activity: 1. Distribute the handouts. 2. Have the class work on the problems individually. 3. Exchange papers and correct them in class. Discuss the content of the questions as well as the math. Attachments: Child Abuse and Neglect Statistics handout and Answer Key Child Abuse and Neglect 5.02; 5.04 LA.A.1.4.2; MA.A.1.4.1; MA.A.1.4.2; MA.A.1.4.3; MA.A.1.4.4; MA.A.2.4.2; MA.A.3.4.1; MA.A.3.4.3; MA.E.1.4.1 e50; e53; m01; m05; m19; m24; m36; m42; m44; m60; m61; m62; m65; m68 A ­ (Knowledge 3 / Application 2)

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Child Abuse and Neglect Statistics

Name: Period: Please show your work as well as your answer for the following questions: 1. In the year 2004, Child Protective Service (CPS) agencies investigated 3,353,000 reports of abuse and neglect throughout the United States. This is a slight increase from the previous year. Professionals (teachers, law enforcement officers, social service workers, and physicians) made 56 percent of the reports. How many reports did professionals make?

2. In the year 2004, 906,000 children were victims of substantiated or indicated child abuse and neglect (Florida's rate is higher than the national average). a. "Substantiated" means that an allegation of maltreatment was confirmed according to the level of evidence required by state law. b. "Indicated" means that the evidence is credible (offering reasonable grounds for suspecting that maltreatment occurred or that there is a risk of future maltreatment). What percentage of reported child abuse and neglect was confirmed in the year 2004?

3. According to data from the Children's Bureau, the most common type of maltreatment is neglect (61%), followed by physical abuse (19%), sexual abuse (10%), emotional maltreatment (5%) and medical neglect (3%). Create and label a pie graph using these figures.

Hint: The circle represents 100%. There are 8 divisions in the circle to help you draw in the lines that you will need to represent the data. in the problem above.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development 4. Based on data from the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect, about 1,500 children died from child abuse and neglect in 2004. Of these fatalities, 44% were under the age of 1 79% were under the age of 4. Ages 4-7 accounted for 10% Ages 8-11 were 5% Ages 12-17 were 6% What percentage of children died between the ages of 1 to 3 years?

How many children died in each age group? Under age 1 Ages 1 ­ 3 Ages 4 ­ 7 Ages 8 ­ 11 Ages 12 - 17 Why do you think there are so many more infants than older children dying from child abuse and neglect?

5. Who do you think abuses and neglects children? In 2004, 60 percent of the perpetrators were female with an average age of 31, and 40 percent were male with an average age of 34. A parent was the abuser for approximately 78% of the children. Neglect and abuse by mom alone accounts for about 41%, abuse by both parents is about 17%, and neglect by non-parent perpetrators (daycare providers, foster parents, residential facility staff) was about 18%. About 4% is undetermined. What percentage of fathers abused their children?

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Child Abuse and Neglect Statistics

ANSWER KEY

The students should show their work as well as their answers. Each answer is worth 2 points for a total of 22 points in this assignment. 1. In the year 2004, Child Protective Service (CPS) agencies investigated 3,353,000 reports of abuse and neglect throughout the United States. This is a slight increase from the previous year. Professionals (teachers, law enforcement officers, social service workers, and physicians) made 56 percent of the reports. How many reports did professionals make? 3,353,000 x .56 = 1,878 1,878

2. In the year 2004, 906,000 children were victims of substantiated or indicated child abuse and neglect (Florida's rate is higher than the national average). a. "Substantiated" means that an allegation of maltreatment was confirmed according to the level of evidence required by state law. b. "Indicated" means that there is credible (offering reasonable grounds for suspecting that maltreatment occurred or that there is a risk of future maltreatment). What percentage of reported child abuse and neglect was confirmed in the year 2004? 906,000 / 3,353,000 = 27 27%

3. According to data from the Children's Bureau, the most common type of maltreatment is neglect (61%), followed by physical abuse (19%), sexual abuse (10%), emotional maltreatment (5%) and medical neglect (3%). Create and label a pie graph using these figures.

Hint: The circle represents 100%. There are 8 divisions in the circle to help you draw in the lines that you will need to represent the data. in the problem above.

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development 4. Based on data from the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect, about 1,500 children died from child abuse and neglect in 2004. Of these fatalities, 44% were under the age of 1 79% were under the age of 4. Ages 4-7 accounted for 10% Ages 8-11 were 5% Ages 12-17 were 6% What percentage of children died between the ages of 1 to 3 years? 79 ­ 44 = 35 35% How many children died in each age group? 1,500 x .44 = 660 Under age 1 1,500 x .35 = 525 Ages 1 ­ 3 1,500 x .10 = 150 Ages 4 ­ 7 1,500 x .5 = 75 Ages 8 ­ 11 1,500 x .6 = 90 Ages 12 - 17 Why do you think there are so many more infants than older children dying from child abuse and neglect? 90 75 150 660 525

Looking for complete sentences that contain information about a child's dependency, small size, inability to communicate, and defend himself.

5. Who do you think abuses and neglects children? In 2004, 60 percent of the perpetrators were female with an average age of 31, and 40 percent were male with an average age of 34. A parent was the abuser for approximately 78% of the children. Neglect and abuse by mom alone accounts for about 41%, abuse by both parents is about 17%, and neglect by non-parent perpetrators (daycare providers, foster parents, residential facility staff) was about 18%. About 4% is undetermined. What percentage of fathers abused their children? 20% 78 ­ 41 ­ 17 = 20 total parents ­ mom ­ both = dad

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT CONNECTION

Title: Performance Tasks: Sunshine State Standards (LA, MA, and SC): Essential Skills (e, m, and s): Rigor and Relevance (quadrant): Child Abuse and Neglect 4.03; 5.01; 5.02; 5.05; 6.05; 8.02; 9.03 LA.A.2.4.4; LA.A.2.4.6; LA.A.2.4.8; LA.B.2.4.3; LA.C.1.4.3; LA.C.3.4.2; LA.C.3.4.4; SC.H.1.4.1; S.C.H.1.4.3; SC.H.1.4.7 e03; e10; e22; e32; e50; e59; e69; e70; s13; s114 D ­ (Knowledge 5 / Application 4)

Instructions to Teacher: 1. Prepare for PowerPoint presentation or print Slides #54-60 as overheads. 2. Time will vary with the project chosen by the class. Extended learning opportunity: 1. There are many opportunities for independent work for individuals or small groups. Instructions to Students: 1. The students will be able to identify ways to prevent child abuse and neglect. 2. The students will be able to locate community support for children and families. 3. The students will work together to create a project that raises the issue of abused or neglected children. Instructions for Learning Styles Modifications: 1. Pick a project to match your students' abilities. 2. Invite community people into the classroom to share their work with children and families. Assessment for Activity: Individual Participation Rubric Approximate Length of Time for Activity: 30 minutes plus project time, which will vary Materials Needed: Handout: Individual Participation Rubric Resources Needed: Child Abuse PowerPoint lecture presentation (slides 54-60) Activity: 1. A child may be helpless--you are not. You can report suspected abuse or neglect and make a difference in a child and family's lives. We hear a lot more about the problem of child abuse than we do about the solutions. There are many things that we can do to help prevent child abuse and neglect before it ever happens. Even little things can make a difference in the life of a child. Slides #54-55 2. Slides # 56-58 View each strategy and have the students brainstorm ways that they could help children and families. Have the students list their ideas for each on chart paper and post in the room. Some possible suggestions are listed below. Add to the list using their suggestions. a. Slide #56 Educational programs that teach children personal safety skills i. Design a lesson that teaches personal safety ("stranger danger" for example)

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development ii. Make a list of "rules" for parents to teach children to keep them safe b. Slide # 56 Support services and programs for families i. Research and make a list of local community services that help children and families so they know where to go for job training, education, health care, mental health... c. Slide #57 Parent education on child safety and development i. Make a calendar of positive activities that parents can do with their children ii. Make a list of ways to reduce stress d. Slide #57 Background checks for child care providers i. Research state statutes that require background checks ii. Invite a speaker to come in and discuss how background checks are done e. Slide #57 Information on identifying and reporting child abuse and neglect i. Create a brochure/flyer of risk factors or warning signs in children's behaviors ii. Raise awareness of child abuse and neglect by promoting a "blue ribbon" campaign on campus f. Slide #58 Individuals reaching out to children and families i. Be a friend to a parent--offer to baby-sit or run errands ii. Be a friend to a child--remember their name, smile when you talk to them, ask them about their day. Show them you care. iii. Give used clothing, toys and furniture for use by another family. This can help relieve the stress of financial burdens. iv. Volunteer your time for programs in the community that support children and families (abused and battered women and children shelters, parent support groups or day care centers) 3. The class can choose to address one strategy and create a project to help prevent child abuse. 4. Assessment can be based on individual participation. Attachments: Individual Participation Rubric

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Individual Participation Rubric

Name: The rating scale below shows an evaluation of your class participation. It indicates what levels you have passed and what levels you can continue to try to reach. TOTAL Attentiveness: _____/50

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Completely inattentive

Seldom attentive

Somewhat attentive

Usually attentive

Extremely attentive

Contribution to Discussion:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Frequently contributes to class discussion

Never contributes to class discussion

Rarely contributes to class discussion

Occasionally contributes to class discussion

Regularly contributes to class discussion

Interaction with Peers:

1

Often distracts others

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Respected by peers for ability

Shows little interaction with others

Follows leadership of other students

Sometimes assumes leadership role

Response to Teacher:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Often offers new ideas without prompting

Unable to respond when called on

Often unable to support or justify answers when called on

Supports answers based on class information but seldom offers new ideas

Able to offer new ideas with prompting

Goal Achievement:

1

Did not attempt goal

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Achieved using added materials to enhance total effort

Were unable Achieved goal to achieve with outside goal assistance

Achieved assigned goal

Comments: ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

CROSSWALKS

Child Development

Outcome # 01.0 IDENTIFY PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN GROWTH AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Analyze areas of development including physical, social, emotional, moral and intellectual development and how they are interrelated. Essential Work Skills

e03 Gather information from a variety of sources, including electronic sources, and summarize, analyze, and evaluate its use for a report.

8500310

Performance Task# 01.02

SSS Strand: Reading

LA.A 2.4.4 H Locates, gathers, analyzes, and evaluates written information for a variety of purposes, including research projects, real-world tasks, and self-improvement.

SSS Strand: Writing

LA.B 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate prewriting strategies, such as brainstorming, graphic organizers, and outlines.

Essential Work Skills

e34 Use ideas from journals, class discussion and literary criticism to write a paper that expresses a personal opinion, sustains a controlling idea, or uses specific evidence from literary texts to support an opinion. Use writing as a tool for learning in formats such as learning logs, laboratory reports, note-taking, journals and portfolios. Gather information from a variety of sources, including electronic sources, and summarize, analyze, and evaluate its use for a report.

e40

LA.B 2.4.1

L

Writes text, notes, outlines, comments, and observations that demonstrate comprehension and synthesis of content, processes, and experiences from a variety of media.

e03

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 1.4.1 H Associates verbal names, written word names, and standard numerals with integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers.

Essential Work Skills

m19 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Understand the concepts recurrence relations and how they are applicable to such things as compound interest and annuity. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Know the standard form of a complex number is expressed as a + bi where a and b are real numbers, and represent graphically on the complex plane where the horizontal axis is the real axis and the vertical axis is the imaginary axis. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

m60

m61

MA.A 1.4.2 MA.A 1.4.3

H H

Understands the relative size of integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, and real numbers. Understands concrete and symbolic representations of real and complex numbers in real-world situations.

m19 m19 m60

m65

MA.A 1.4.4

H

Understands that numbers can be represented in a variety of equivalent forms, including integers, fractions, decimals, percents, scientific notation, exponents, radicals, absolute value, and logarithms. Understands and uses the basic concepts of limits and infinity.

m19

MA.A 2.4.1

L

m48

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 1 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

MA.A 2.4.2 MA.A 2.4.3 H L Understands and uses the real number system. Understands the structure of the complex number system. m19 m60 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Know the standard form of a complex number is expressed as a + bi where a and b are real numbers, and represent graphically on the complex plane where the horizontal axis is the real axis and the vertical axis is the imaginary axis. Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

m65

MA.A 5.4.1

M

Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems.

m48

SSS Strand: Measurement

MA.B 1.4.1 H Uses concrete and graphic models to derive formulas for finding perimeter, area, surface area, circumference, and volume of two- and three- dimensional shapes, including rectangular solids, cylinders, cones, and pyramids.

Essential Work Skills

m13 Compute the perimeter and area of two-dimensional figures.

m17 MA.B 1.4.2 H Uses concrete and graphic models to derive formulas for finding rate, distance, time, angle measures and arc lengths. m14 m30

Compute the volume of three-dimensional figures (solids). Understand the angle relationships in triangles (i.e., acute, obtuse, right, interior, and exterior). Know how to measure circle quantities (e.g., area, angle formed by two secants, circumference, length of segments, etc.) Find the solution of proportions with monomial and binomial terms (e.g., x/(x-2) = 6/5, therefore, x = 12). Use the technique of dimensional analysis to convert units of measure (e.g., convert km/hr to m/min) including drawing to scale and applying ratios. Understand and use various techniques for estimating, making and converting measure; and using these to perform dimensional analysis.

MA.B 1.4.3 MA.B 3.4.1

H H

Relates the concepts of measurement to similarity and proportionality in real-world situations. Solves real-world and mathematical problems involving estimates of measurements, including length, time, weight/mass, temperature, money, perimeter, area, and volume, and estimates the effects of measurement errors on calculations.

m52 m33

SSS Strand: Data Analysis and Probability

MA.E 2.4.1 H Determines probabilities using counting procedures, tables, tree diagrams, and formulas for permutations and combinations.

Essential Work Skills

m25 Determine the probability of single and compound events using the basic premise that the probability of an event is equal to the number of ways it can occur divided by the total number of outcomes. Know how to determine combinations (i.e., the various grouping a set may be arranged in without regard to order). Use the Counting Principle to determine the probability of events occurring jointly (e.g., if one activity can occur in any of m ways and another in any one of n ways, then the total number of ways both activities can occur is mn). Know how to determine permutation (i.e., arrangements of a set where order matters). Determine the probability of single and compound events using the basic premise that the probability of an event is equal to the number of ways it can occur divided by the total number of outcomes.

m43

m56

m66a MA.E 2.4.2 H Determines the probability for simple and compound events as well as independent and dependent events. m25

SSS Strand: Processes of Life

Essential Work Skills

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 2 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

SC.F 1.4.1 H Knows that the body processes involve specific biochemical reactions governed by biochemical principles. s42 Understand the chemical reactions involved in cell functions (e.g., food molecules taken into cells are broken down to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules). Identify and understand the structure and parts that comprise the systems (i.e., cardiovascular, nervous, lymphatic, muscular, etc.) and regions (i.e., head and neck, upper limb, thorax, abdominopelvic, back, and lower limb) of the human body. Understand the chemical reactions involved in cell functions (e.g., food molecules taken into cells are broken down to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules). Understand the chemical reactions involved in cell functions (e.g., food molecules taken into cells are broken down to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules). Understand the chemical reactions involved in cell functions (e.g., food molecules taken into cells are broken down to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules). Understand nerve regulation - the nervous system and related disorders such as cerebral palsy, meningitis, and polio; and chemical regulation - the endocrine system, hormones and related disorders such as goiter and diabetes. Understand nerve regulation - the nervous system and related disorders such as cerebral palsy, meningitis, and polio; and chemical regulation - the endocrine system, hormones and related disorders such as goiter and diabetes. Understand the chemical reactions involved in cell functions (e.g., food molecules taken into cells are broken down to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules). Understand that sexual reproduction involves the union of special sex cells that are usually produced by two separate parents with half of the genes coming from each parent allowing for a high degree of genetic diversity. Most plants and animals use sexual reproduction. Understand that asexual reproduction involves the production of offspring from a single parent organism with all the genes coming from that parent. Asexual reproduction occurs with unicellular organisms and some plants.

SC.F 1.4.2

H

Knows that body structures are uniquely designed and adapted for their function.

s02

SC.F 1.4.3

H

Knows that membranes are sites for chemical synthesis and essential energy conversions.

s42

SC.F 1.4.4

M

Understands that biological systems obey the same laws of conservation as physical systems.

s42

SC.F 1.4.5

H

Knows that complex interactions among the different kinds of molecules in the cell cause distinct cycles of activity governed by proteins.

s42

SC.F 1.4.6

M

Knows that separate parts of the body communicate with each other using electrical and/or chemical signals.

s45

SC.F 1.4.7

M

Knows that organisms respond to internal and external stimuli.

s45

SC.F 1.4.8

M

Knows that cell behavior can be affected by molecules from other parts of the organism or even from other organisms.

s42

SC.F 2.4.1

M

Understands the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproduction and knows the different genetic advantages and disadvantages of asexual and sexual reproduction.

s14

s63

Outcome # 03.0

DESCRIBE PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT, CARE AND THE BIRTH PROCESS--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Recognize the significance of parent/child bonding and family adjustments to the newborn. Essential Work Skills

Page 3 of 15

Performance Task# 03.09 SSS Strand: Reading

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

LA.A 1.4.3 L Refines vocabulary for interpersonal, academic, and workplace situations, including figurative, idiomatic, and technical meanings. e09 Know how to decipher unfamiliar words using such strategies as context cues, word structure analysis, letter-sound relationships, and word histories. Understand the nature and purpose of and be able to word process a variety of formats including essays, business letters, memos, instructions, policy statements, technical proposals, user manuals, lab reports, etc. Read for main idea first and then read for detail. Use ideas from journals, class discussion and literary criticism to write a paper that expresses a personal opinion, sustains a controlling idea, or uses specific evidence from literary texts to support an opinion. Apply the information gathered from technical texts in real-life situations. Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials. Relate situations, events, and characters in a reading selection to personal experience. Evaluate the way an author uses language and text characteristics such as plot, setting, theme, character, point of view, genre etc. to evoke a response in a reader. Use response journals to jot down ideas from reading literary texts.

e30

e49 LA.A 1.4.4 L Applies a variety of response strategies, including rereading, note taking, summarizing, outlining, writing a formal report, and relating what is read to his or her own experiences and feelings. e34

e35 e53 e60 e72

e94

Outcome # 04.0

DETERMINE DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES WITH APPROPRIATE ACTIVITIES AND EXPECTATIONS FROM BIRTH TO SCHOOL AGE--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Analyze factors which contribute to the child's physical, social, emotional, moral and intellectual development. Essential Work Skills

e50 Understand and use a variety of organizational formats such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, inductive/deductive, most important to least important, and least important to most important. Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials.

Performance Task# 04.03

SSS Strand: Reading

LA.A 1.4.2 H Selects and uses strategies to understand words and text, and to make and confirm inferences from what is read, including interpreting diagrams, graphs, and statistical illustrations.

e53

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 2.4.2 MA.A 4.4.1 H H Understands and uses the real number system. Uses estimation strategies in complex situations to predict results and to check the reasonableness of results.

Essential Work Skills

m19 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. No Essential Work Skill

SSS Strand: Measurement

Essential Work Skills

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 4 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

MA.B 2.4.1 H Selects and uses direct (measured) or indirect (not measured) methods of measurement as appropriate. m33 Use the technique of dimensional analysis to convert units of measure (e.g., convert km/hr to m/min) including drawing to scale and applying ratios. Understand and use various techniques for estimating, making and converting measure; and using these to perform dimensional analysis. Use the process of integration (i.e., anti-derivatives) to determine areas, volumes, and distances. Understand the concepts of right triangle trigonometry and solve right triangles using basic trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, tangent). Use the technique of dimensional analysis to convert units of measure (e.g., convert km/hr to m/min) including drawing to scale and applying ratios. Understand and use various techniques for estimating, making and converting measure; and using these to perform dimensional analysis.

m50 m57

MA.B 2.4.2

H

Solves real-world problems involving rated measures (miles per hour, feet per second).

m33

Outcome # 05.0

ASSESS THE FAMILY AND SOCIETY'S ROLE IN PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF CHILDREN--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Explain the importance of families and the role of nurturing on the development of the child. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

Performance Task# 05.01

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

Essential Work Skills

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 5 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

MA.A 5.4.1 M Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems. m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

Performance Task# 05.02

Identify children's rights that are protected by local, state and federal laws and regulations. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 5.4.1 M Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems.

Essential Work Skills

m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

Performance Task# 05.03

Differentiate between the types of child abuse and neglect. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Page 6 of 15

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

LA.C 1.4.3 L Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others. e32 Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

e59

e69

e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 5.4.1 M Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems.

Essential Work Skills

m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

Performance Task# 05.04

State how the common physical and behavioral indicators of child abuse and neglect are detected and reported. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 5.4.1 M Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems.

Essential Work Skills

m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

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Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Performance Task# 05.05 Locate community support for children and families. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 5.4.1 M Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems.

Essential Work Skills

m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

Outcome # 06.0

EXAMINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES RELATED TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Recognize emergency situations and plan appropriate responses. Essential Work Skills

e52 Preview textbooks for informational text to anticipate content.

Performance Task# 06.05 SSS Strand: Reading

LA.A 1.4.1 L

Selects and uses prereading strategies that are appropriate to the text, such as discussion, making predictions, brainstorming, generating questions, and previewing, to anticipate content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection.

e80 LA.A 1.4.2 H Selects and uses strategies to understand words and text, and to make and confirm inferences from what is read, including interpreting diagrams, graphs, and statistical illustrations. e50

Understand ways an author uses language and test characteristics to aid comprehension. Understand and use a variety of organizational formats such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, inductive/deductive, most important to least important, and least important to most important. Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials.

e53

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

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Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

LA.A 1.4.4 L Applies a variety of response strategies, including rereading, note taking, summarizing, outlining, writing a formal report, and relating what is read to his or her own experiences and feelings. e34 Use ideas from journals, class discussion and literary criticism to write a paper that expresses a personal opinion, sustains a controlling idea, or uses specific evidence from literary texts to support an opinion. Apply the information gathered from technical texts in real-life situations. Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials. Relate situations, events, and characters in a reading selection to personal experience. Evaluate the way an author uses language and text characteristics such as plot, setting, theme, character, point of view, genre etc. to evoke a response in a reader. Use response journals to jot down ideas from reading literary texts. Discriminate important ideas from unimportant ideas while reading. Summarize, synthesize and organize information while reading. Apply, extend, and expand on information while reading.

e35 e53 e60 e72

e94 LA.A 2.4.1 H Determines the main idea and identifies relevant details, methods of development, and their effectiveness in a variety of types of written material. e15

e24 e46

SSS Strand: Measurement

MA.B 1.4.3 MA.B 2.4.1 H H Relates the concepts of measurement to similarity and proportionality in real-world situations. Selects and uses direct (measured) or indirect (not measured) methods of measurement as appropriate.

Essential Work Skills

m52 m33 Find the solution of proportions with monomial and binomial terms (e.g., x/(x-2) = 6/5, therefore, x = 12). Use the technique of dimensional analysis to convert units of measure (e.g., convert km/hr to m/min) including drawing to scale and applying ratios. Understand and use various techniques for estimating, making and converting measure; and using these to perform dimensional analysis. Use the process of integration (i.e., anti-derivatives) to determine areas, volumes, and distances. Understand the concepts of right triangle trigonometry and solve right triangles using basic trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, tangent).

m50 m57

SSS Strand: Data Analysis and Probability

MA.E 1.4.1 H Interprets data that has been collected, organized, and displayed in charts, tables, and plots.

Essential Work Skills

m05 Understand the best procedures for statistical data collection, organization, and display including making estimates and predictions and drawing inferences. Understand the characteristics of measures of dispersion (i.e., range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation). Understand the concepts and applications of quartiles (i.e., distributing groups into four equal frequencies) and percentiles (i. e., distributing individuals into one hundred groups of equal frequency).

m36

m42

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 9 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

Outcome # 07.0 RELATE CURRENT TRENDS AND THE CONTRIBUTION OF TECHNOLOGY TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Explore diverse roles and responsibilities of the father and mother. Essential Work Skills

e50 Understand and use a variety of organizational formats such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, inductive/deductive, most important to least important, and least important to most important. Apply personal or objective criteria for evaluating informational, persuasive and literary materials. Discriminate important ideas from unimportant ideas while reading. Summarize, synthesize and organize information while reading. Apply, extend, and expand on information while reading.

Performance Task# 07.02 SSS Strand: Reading

LA.A 1.4.2 H

Selects and uses strategies to understand words and text, and to make and confirm inferences from what is read, including interpreting diagrams, graphs, and statistical illustrations.

e53 LA.A 2.4.1 H Determines the main idea and identifies relevant details, methods of development, and their effectiveness in a variety of types of written material. e15

e24 e46

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 5.4.1 M Applies special number relationships such as sequences and series to real-world problems.

Essential Work Skills

m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences).

SSS Strand: Algebraic Thinking

MA.D 2.4.1 H Represents real-world problem situations using finite graphs, matrices, sequences, series, and recursive relations.

Essential Work Skills

m48 Understand the concepts and apply the uses of functions and limits (i.e., conduct limiting processes using functions to investigate infinite series and sequences). Understand the concepts and uses of matrices in modeling (i.e., finite graphs (structures) can be represented geometrically and interpreted algebraically in the form of a matrix). Understand the concepts recurrence relations and how they are applicable to such things as compound interest and annuity. Understand the characteristics and uses of finite sequence and series (e.g., it allows a systematic and useful means of quantifying things). Know how to find the graphic solution of systems of linear equations (e.g., find the point(s) common to a quadratic-linear pair). Solve and graphically sketch problems involving two variables that exhibit direct and indirect variation. Know how to find the graphic solution of systems of linear inequalities (e.g., graph the solution set or region of the coordinate plane common to both inequalities).

m51

m61

m72

MA.D 2.4.2

H

Uses systems of equations and inequalities to solve real-world problems graphically, algebraically, and with matrices.

m71

m81 m82

SSS Strand: The Nature of Science

Essential Work Skills

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 10 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

SC.H 3.4.2 H Knows that technological problems often create a demand for new scientific knowledge and that new technologies make it possible for scientists to extend their research in a way that advances science. s116 (Not Ranked) Understand the impact upon society and the environment of scientific and technological discoveries and the contributions of scientists. Understand how society may accept or reject scientific discoveries based upon need or refusal to change. (Not Ranked) Understand the impact upon society and the environment of scientific and technological discoveries and the contributions of scientists. Understand how society may accept or reject scientific discoveries based upon need or refusal to change.

SC.H 3.4.5

H

Knows that the value of a technology may differ for different people and at different times.

s116

Outcome # 08.0

EXPLORE CAREERS RELATED TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Describe careers related to children. Essential Work Skills

e03 Gather information from a variety of sources, including electronic sources, and summarize, analyze, and evaluate its use for a report. Draft a report that engages an audience and is concise, clear, well organized, accurate, and informative. Understand and produce a variety of informative formats such as business letters, memos, reports, news articles, brochures, proposals and critiques. Understand and use a variety of organizational formats such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, inductive/deductive, most important to least important, and least important to most important. Gather information from a variety of sources, including electronic sources, and summarize, analyze, and evaluate its use for a report.

Performance Task# 08.02 SSS Strand: Writing

LA.B 2.4.1 L

Writes text, notes, outlines, comments, and observations that demonstrate comprehension and synthesis of content, processes, and experiences from a variety of media. Organizes information using appropriate systems.

LA.B 2.4.2

L

e12

LA.B 2.4.3

L

Writes fluently for a variety of occasions, audiences, and purposes, making appropriate choices regarding style, tone, level of detail, and organization.

e22

e50

LA.B 2.4.4

L

Selects and uses a variety of electronic media, such as the Internet, information services, and desktop publishing software programs, to create, revise, retrieve, and verify information.

e03

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 4.4.1 H Uses estimation strategies in complex situations to predict results and to check the reasonableness of results.

Essential Work Skills

No Essential Work Skill

Outcome # 09.0

DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS--THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

Identify roles and responsibilities of members of professional and youth organizations. Essential Work Skills

Performance Task# 09.03

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 11 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations. e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70 LA.C 1.4.4 L Identifies bias, prejudice, or propaganda in oral messages. e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 1.4.1 H Associates verbal names, written word names, and standard numerals with integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers.

Essential Work Skills

m19 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Understand the concepts recurrence relations and how they are applicable to such things as compound interest and annuity. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Know the standard form of a complex number is expressed as a + bi where a and b are real numbers, and represent graphically on the complex plane where the horizontal axis is the real axis and the vertical axis is the imaginary axis. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers.

m60

m61

MA.A 1.4.3

H

Understands concrete and symbolic representations of real and complex numbers in real-world situations.

m19 m60

m65

MA.A 1.4.4

H

Understands that numbers can be represented in a variety of equivalent forms, including integers, fractions, decimals, percents, scientific notation, exponents, radicals, absolute value, and logarithms.

m19

SSS Strand: Data Analysis and Probability

MA.E 3.4.1 H Designs and performs real-world statistical experiments that involve more than one variable, then analyzes results and reports findings.

Essential Work Skills

m05 Understand the best procedures for statistical data collection, organization, and display including making estimates and predictions and drawing inferences. Understand the characteristics of measures of dispersion (i.e., range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation). Page 12 of 15

MA.E 3.4.2

H

Explains the limitations of using statistical techniques and data in making inferences and valid arguments.

m36

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

m42 Understand the concepts and applications of quartiles (i.e., distributing groups into four equal frequencies) and percentiles (i. e., distributing individuals into one hundred groups of equal frequency).

Performance Task# 09.05

Demonstrate confidence in leadership roles and organizational responsibilities. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70 LA.C 1.4.4 L Identifies bias, prejudice, or propaganda in oral messages. e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 1.4.1 H Associates verbal names, written word names, and standard numerals with integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers.

Essential Work Skills

m19 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Understand the concepts recurrence relations and how they are applicable to such things as compound interest and annuity. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Know the standard form of a complex number is expressed as a + bi where a and b are real numbers, and represent graphically on the complex plane where the horizontal axis is the real axis and the vertical axis is the imaginary axis.

m60

m61

MA.A 1.4.3

H

Understands concrete and symbolic representations of real and complex numbers in real-world situations.

m19 m60

m65

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 13 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

MA.A 1.4.4 H Understands that numbers can be represented in a variety of equivalent forms, including integers, fractions, decimals, percents, scientific notation, exponents, radicals, absolute value, and logarithms. m19 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers.

SSS Strand: Data Analysis and Probability

MA.E 3.4.1 H Designs and performs real-world statistical experiments that involve more than one variable, then analyzes results and reports findings.

Essential Work Skills

m05 Understand the best procedures for statistical data collection, organization, and display including making estimates and predictions and drawing inferences. Understand the characteristics of measures of dispersion (i.e., range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation). Understand the concepts and applications of quartiles (i.e., distributing groups into four equal frequencies) and percentiles (i. e., distributing individuals into one hundred groups of equal frequency).

MA.E 3.4.2

H

Explains the limitations of using statistical techniques and data in making inferences and valid arguments.

m36

m42

Performance Task# 09.06

Demonstrate commitment to achieve organizational goals. Essential Work Skills

e25 Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen, comprehend and summarize essential information from a variety of sources such as speeches, plays, commercials on radio and television, and political debates. Listen for enjoyment to narratives of personal experiences, stories, drama, performances, lectures, and readings. Make informed judgments about the content, organization, and delivery of spoken communication. Respond orally to fellow student's opinions during presentations by asking questions, asking for clarification, agreeing and /or disagreeing courteously. Participate in a one-on-one conference by relating essential information, asking questions on the topic, and using language to clarify information. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values. Analyze and evaluate a speaker's statements of opinion, personal preference and values.

SSS Strand: Listening, Viewing and Speaking

LA.C 1.4.1 L Selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in careerrelated situations. Describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary nonfiction, and informational presentations.

LA.C 1.4.2

L

e25

e47

LA.C 1.4.3

L

Uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

e32

e59

e69

e70 LA.C 1.4.4 L Identifies bias, prejudice, or propaganda in oral messages. e70

SSS Strand: Number Sense, Concepts and Operations

MA.A 1.4.1 H Associates verbal names, written word names, and standard numerals with integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers.

Essential Work Skills

m19 Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand.

m60

Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Page 14 of 15

Family & Consumer Sciences Education/Child Development

m61 Understand the concepts recurrence relations and how they are applicable to such things as compound interest and annuity. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers. Understand the concept of the imaginary unit, i, and know how to simplify square roots involving a negative radicand. Know the standard form of a complex number is expressed as a + bi where a and b are real numbers, and represent graphically on the complex plane where the horizontal axis is the real axis and the vertical axis is the imaginary axis. Understand the definitions and properties of rational and irrational numbers.

MA.A 1.4.3

H

Understands concrete and symbolic representations of real and complex numbers in real-world situations.

m19 m60

m65

MA.A 1.4.4

H

Understands that numbers can be represented in a variety of equivalent forms, including integers, fractions, decimals, percents, scientific notation, exponents, radicals, absolute value, and logarithms.

m19

SSS Strand: Data Analysis and Probability

MA.E 3.4.1 H Designs and performs real-world statistical experiments that involve more than one variable, then analyzes results and reports findings.

Essential Work Skills

m05 Understand the best procedures for statistical data collection, organization, and display including making estimates and predictions and drawing inferences. Understand the characteristics of measures of dispersion (i.e., range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation). Understand the concepts and applications of quartiles (i.e., distributing groups into four equal frequencies) and percentiles (i. e., distributing individuals into one hundred groups of equal frequency).

MA.E 3.4.2

H

Explains the limitations of using statistical techniques and data in making inferences and valid arguments.

m36

m42

Total Number of Student Performance Standards being addressed in this project

14

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