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Volume 6, Issue 9 Nov., 2006

Theme: Cub Scout Stars December: Cub Scout Stars Tigers ­ Ach 5G Elect. 1, 2, 4, 10 Wolf- Ach 3A, 3C, 10A, 11C Elect. 11B, 20E, 20F Bear ­ Ach 3F, 12D, 17A Elect. 1B, 1F PRE OPENING ACTIVITIES

Silly Sally By Baltimore Area Council This is a fun game to play with your Cubs as they arrive at the den meeting. You give them hints about things Silly Sally likes and things she doesn't like. There's a simple rule for figuring out what her likes and dislikes are. The object of the game is for the Cubs to figure out what that rule is. Here are some example hints: · Silly Sally likes doors but she hates windows. · Silly Sally likes butter but she hates margarine. · Silly Sally likes maroon but she hates red. · Silly Sally likes geese but she hates ducks. · Silly Sally likes jelly but she hates jam. · Silly Sally likes tennis but she hates badminton. · Silly Sally likes the Yankees but she hates the Orioles. · Silly Sally likes Mississippi but she hates Maryland. · Silly Sally likes glass but she hates plastic. · Silly Sally likes the piccolo but she hates the flute. Can you figure out the rule for what she likes and what she dislikes? ______________________

Welcome to www.CubRoundtable.com RT Newsletter Webelos activity badges Craftsman and Scientist Stars Puzzle K V T Y W T T I E W R S S C Q O D H E E N U W Y A T S K C N I M Y L L A T O T A U U W T C I A B L I I A S T P D E N W A U I V O W G H I E C M A E L V A N R W S T C R I N E U T R O N S T A R T G U I W A G T Q N Q E T O S I L F U S I O N S R W Q N A A D T G W Z G J M K E S U C N K M A R G A I D R H P K E T M E Z X H C M A O Y H U G N B F R A W D F O Y O T S S J C F S P U B C Z L B V Z W B E K R U Y J X E Y C D J L E S

WORDS FOR THE STAR PUZZLE BLACK HOLE NEUTRON START MAIN SEQUENCE HR DIAGRAM WHITE DWARF SUPERNOVA FUSION GIANT BLUE YELLOW SUPERGIANT NORTH STAR STARS GRAVITY STATIC

S F V A B L B S R A T S R E S

Answer to Silly Sally: (Silly Sally likes words with double

letters!)

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ANSWERS TO STAR PUZZLE

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Space Word Search By Baltimore Area Council

K Q C W E M N I F T M E F F K

V O N T N A E W U G A Z R S R

T D I C W E U A S W R X A P U

Y H M I A L T G I Z G H W U Y

W E Y A U V R T O G A C D B J

T E L B I A O Q N J I M F C X

T N L L V N N N S M D A O Z E

I U A I O R S Q R K R O Y L Y

E W T I W W T E W E H Y O B C

W Y O A G S A T Q S P H T V D

R A T S H T R O N U K U S Z J

S T A T I C T S A C E G S W L

S S U P E R G I A N T N J B E

C K U D C I U L D K M B C E S

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OPENING SPACE By the Last Frontier Council Stardate: Years from now. The Starfleet Oath: I pledge my allegiance to the banner fo the United Federation of packs, and to the unity of the Scouting Frontier for which it stands. I swear to obey the Prime Directive--Keep it Simple, Make it Fun. To protect the rights of all life forms and Cub Scouts that they should live long and prosper, and uphold the laws of the Federation, Starfleet Cub Leader Command and the pack; to safeguard the Federation from hostile forces to be a guardian of peace in the United Federation of packs, and to faithfully discharge my duties as an officer of Starfleet Cub Scout Leader Command. This I pledge upon my Starfleet Cub Leader Code of Honor. You are now part of a movement that is rich in tradition. This tradition can only survive and grow when it's volunteers are dedicated and trained. Your voyage began when you became a leader. By participating you can use the ideals and the values of Scouting to have a positive influence on the development of our future leaders. Today begins the voyage of a bright new ship --her mission no less timeless, inspiring and bold as the legendary ships.

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A N N S E L O H K C A L B U O T U L P

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S I S E T D E R U E U N I E O X I X P

O T R I D S T A R T R E K A R V H Y V

X A L L E A S E L T F T O R S Y S O U

R T O A S T E R O I D S F V Y M E O S

E S B M J U P I T E R N U S S U C R Y

M E V E S R E V I N U M A R T I A N S

E C E X A N E E X S R O P A E K P M E

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Star Contest Gathering Activity For each of the terms listed write the correct word containing "STAR." 1. Sea Animal ______________________________ 2. Bird ___________________________________ 3. Heavenly body ___________________________ 4. Outstanding young actress _________________ 5. Used when washing clothes _________________ 6. A song _________________________________ 7. Right hand side of a boat ___________________ 8. Meaning to begin ________________________ 9. To go hungry ___________________________ 10. To surprise someone _____________________

Answers: 1. Starfish, 2. Starling, 3. Star, 4. Starlet, 5. Starch, 6. Stardust, 7. Starboard, 8. Start, 9. Starve, 10. Startle

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ANSWERS FOR THE STAR SEARCH PUZZLE

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the ceiling or a wall, showing the Big Dipper and North Star. Cubmaster: For thousands of years, men have known that the North Star is fixed. Shepherds knew it before the time of Christ, and seamen have used the North Star and other heavenly bodies to guide their ships to port ever since they first dared leave the sight of land. Even today, the stars are important in navigation for ships, jet planes and spaceships. Cub Scouts don't need the stars to find their way. But even so, we do have our own guiding stars to help us through life. There is your church, for instance. And your school. And Cub Scouting. In Cub Scouting, our navigational aids are the Promise and the Law of the Pack. They tell us how we should act and what we should do for ourselves and for others. The Promise and the Law of the Pack are just like the stars by which The seaman steers his ship, Tonight we honor _______ Cub Scouts who are navigating straight and true on the Cub Scout trail. With their parents' help, they have advanced a rank and have shown that they live by the Promise and Law. (Call advancing boys and parents forward and give badges to parents for presentation to their sons) Flight Through Space Advancement Ceremony PREPARATION: Ceremony board resembles chart of sun and planets with Boy Scout as sun and Cub ranks as planets. A small blue and yellow cardboard rocket should be make for each boy getting a badge and placed on or under his new rank. If a loop of masking tape is placed on the back of each rocket, rocket can be moved by the Cubmaster to new rank as parent is presented badge. CUBMASTER: Will the Den Chief please bring forward the Cub Scouts who are ready for advancement? (Pause and wait for boys to come forward.) Cub Scouts, we are happy to see you have taken another flight forward in our Cub Scout Galaxy. Please face your fellow Cub Scouts and the Den Chief will lead them in the rocket cheer. (Pause for rocket cheer.) Den Chief, will you bring the parents of these Cub Scouts forward? (Den Chief brings parents forward, placing each Cub between his parents.) These Cub Scouts have done a fine job in our pack. They are progressing through our Cub Scout

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X A L L E A S E L T F T O R S Y S O U

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Flag Opening By Baltimore Area Council Staging: Record player; record such as Star Wars, 2001--A Space Odyssey, etc.; American flag; spot- light (or flashlight) CUBMASTER: Will everyone please be seated. (Room is darkened, music starts - allow to play 23 minutes.) Let our flag be: illuminated. (Music lowered.) Just as we have saluted this flag for over 200 years, with the help of good citizens and good leadership, so shall we continue to salute. Cub Scouting is one means by which we can insure our future as a great nation so that in the year 2006 and beyond, we will all still be pledging our allegiance to this great emblem of our society. Please join me now in the Pledge of Allegiance. (All stand and pledge. On completion, turn on lights.)

Advancement Ceremonies

North Star Ceremony Equipment: Pinhole planetarium punched for the Big Dipper and North Star, flashlight. The lights are dimmed, Cubmaster beams the flashlight through the pinhole planetarium at

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Galaxy. This would not be possible if it were not for the interest and help of their parents. I'm proud of the parents in our pack. As I move your rocket forward in our galaxy, your parent will present you with your badge. (Cubmaster calls off names of Scouts as he moves rockets to appropriate ranks on ceremony board while parents present badges. Cubmaster congratulates boys and parents with Cub Scout handshake.) Skits The Professor and the Stars The interviewer can be a talk-show host or a news reporter. Professor Sayagain, a very unusual astronomer, can be dressed as an eccentric scientist and speak with a foreign dialect. Be creative. Interviewer: (Holds paper and pencil.) Good evening, Professor Sayagain. We feel very fortunate to be able to interview one of the world's greatest astronomers. For our first question, professor, do you think the moon is really inhabited? Professor: (oddly dressed and speak just as oddly) Inhabited? What's this word "inhabited"? Interviewer: I mean . . . do you think people live there? Professor: Why didn't you say so? Of course people live on the moon. (gesture) I talk with them every night. Interviewer: (amazed) You talk with moon-people every night? Through thousands of miles of space? But how is that possible? Professor: (Shrugs.) We talk VERY LOUD. Interviewer: (Sighs.) Professor, tell us-what is the most interesting thing you have ever seen through Your telescope? Professor: (Frowns in Puzzlement.) My what-ascope? Interviewer: (impatiently) Your telescope! Telescope! Professor: (brightly Oh, yes, that long thing. (Pretends to hold telescope to eye.) Well, the most interesting thing I've seen is the new comet named Susanna Smith. Interviewer: You've seen a new comet which you've named after an old girl friend? Professor: No, I've seen a new girl friend whom I've named after an old comet named Susanna Smith.

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Interviewer: (Shakzhead) I see. Now then, I understand that you believe that a man on Mars has three ears. Isn't that rather strange? Professor: (Shrugs.) What's so strange? He has three eyes. Interviewer: Professor Sayagain, it is a proven fact that the earth circles the sun, yet I recently heard you say that the sun circles the earth. Professor: That is right. What is your question? Interviewer: But how can you say the sun circles the earth? Professor: Very simple. I say it like this: (Holds upfinger, speaks in monotone.) The- sun circles-theearth. (shrugs.) Very easy to say. Interviewer: I see. Tell us, professor, in what direction is planet X located? Professor: points upward) Up. Interviewer: (Shrugs.) Most astronomers work at night, but I understand you prefer day work. Why is that? Professor: Less stars, less work. Interviewer: Professor Sayagain, what first got you interested in astronomy? Professor: My mother. She told me to hitch my wagon to a star. Interviewer: By that she meant you should be ambitious, that you should strive for great things Professor: (sourly) Is that what she meant? Interviewer: (Takes a deep breath, shakes head.) Professor Sayagain, as a final question do you have any advice to give all those young people out there who might wish to become astronomers? Professor: (Holds up finger.) I have just one thing to tell them. Interviewer: And that is? Professor: (sternly) Don't go peeking around for Susanna Smith! (Walks away, wagging finger at audience.) Find your own comets! (Exits.) Star Gazing A scout walks to the center of the campfire looking up at the sky, keeping his head and neck very still. Soon he is joined by another scout and then another and so on. Each scout looks around and then begins to look toward the sky. The last scout enters and asked the scout next to him, "what are we looking at. He answers "I don't know." and then that scout asked the next until the question and get to the original scout. The original scout replies: "I don't know. I've got a stiff neck!"

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Applause Satellite Applause: Stand up and turn around in a circle with arms bent upwards at elbows. Open and close fingers while saying, "Gleep, gleep, gleep." Star Cheer: When someone needs to be recognized have the whole group yell, "Twinkle, twinkle little star, you're the best we've seen so far!" This can be followed with applause Telescope Cheer: Pretend to open and adjust a telescope. Point it toward the person being recognized and say, "Hey, look there's a really bright star!" Ice Cream Carton Space Helmet Invert a 3 gallon ice cream carton and Cut an opening for the face. Paint the helmet with a metallic paint. Decorate with spiraled pipe cleaners, bottle caps, ping pong balls, porn poms, nuts and bolts or other scraps. Spaceship Sailing Supplies: 10 small paper plates (7" or less), straws - paper or plastic, stapler and scissors, paint or crayons if you want colorful spaceships Assemble: Staple 5 pairs of paper plates together, faces in. Put staples all around the edges. Arrange the 5 pairs of plates in a cross shape or ring. Then staple the 5 pairs of plates to each other. Cut straws into two inch pieces. Staple the cut straws across the open spaces. (straws will make your space ship stronger) Make 1 space ship for each Cub Scout. With this craft you can also play a game! How to play: Stand in pairs at opposite ends of the playing area. Sail the space ship between you. How to score: A player gets 1 point each time he catches a spaceship.

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Space Shuttle Tie Slide Use balsa wood and carve a space shuttle 3" x ½". Paint white and print on side with magic marker the word `NASA". On the back attach a ring of Naugahyde. Atom Slide Materials: 1" Styrofoam ball 1- ¼" Red pom-pom 1- ¼" Yellow pom-pom 1- 4" Pipe cleaner 1- 12" Pipe cleaner Cut the 12" pipe cleaner in half Make an oval big enough to go around The 1" Styrofoam ball. Glue the ovals on the Ball at angles to each Other. Glue the red and yellow pom-poms on the ovals as shown in the illustration. Make a loop out of the 4" piece of pipe cleaner and glue the loop into the Back of the Styrofoam ball.

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Games By Greater St. Louis Area Council Star Tracing Duplicate a number of double stars, the outer one being about 6 inches from point to point and the inner one an inch smaller. The object is to draw a third star between the lines of the inner and outer stars while shielding the stars from direct vision and using a mirror. Place mirror about 1" from point of star. This is a good gathering-time stunt. Constellations Have the Cub Scouts create new constellations from the stars in the night sky. Judge on most creative, silliest, etc. Solar Secrets Equipment Required: 6 to 12 egg cartons preferably painted black. Rope for the tug-of-war Divide the group into two teams. define the area of the game. Tell the groups that a spacecraft carrying advanced new technology has crashed in the area. Teams from two nations are searching the area to try to find the parts. The closest description of these parts is that they resemble egg cartons. There should be half the number of cartons as there are players or, the number of cartons should equal the number of players on one team. Send the teams out to search for them. When they get back, have a tugof-war to determine who will get all of the parts. Score 10 points for each carton found by a team and 50 points for the team that wins the tug-ofwar. Wormhole Kickball Equipment: Playing diamond, 1 playground ball Setup: Choose two teams, one beginning in the field and the other up to "bat." The game begins with the pitcher rolling the ball to a kicker. When the ball is kicked, the kicker runs around the bases, scoring a point for each base reached, as in Circle Kickball. Attempting to stop the base runner is where the action really begins. To do this, a player on the fielding team must retrieve the ball, while the rest of the players run over and stand behind him in a single file line with their feet spread apart, forming a long tunnel. When everyone on the

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team is lined up, the player with the ball sends it back through his legs and into the tunnel. Each player continues passing the ball ,back through the tunnel until it gets to the last person, who holds the ball in the air and yells "Stop!" At this point, the kicker is retired, and the next kicker comes up. An inning is over and the teams trade positions when everyone on one team has had a chance to kick. As in Circle Kickball, cumulative scoring is used, with each base that a player touches adding one point to his or her team's score.. Additional Suggestions: This active game requires considerable cooperation between the members of the fielding team, so it's a good idea to give both teams a little pre-game practice forming tunnels and passing balls through them. Star Dash This game is played by an even number of teams, each with about six players Teams are arranged like spokes of a wheel, with each team in file, facing the center, and opposite one other team. Each team numbers off, from front to back. All players are seated. Call one of three commands, followed by a number. The commands are: `Change!' - the players with the number called run across the space and sit in the spot vacated by their opposite number. `Across!' - the players run across the space, around behind the opposite team, and back to sit in their original position. `Around!' - the players called run counterclockwise around the circle of teams and back to their original position. You can call more than one number at a time, in which case both team members compete in the action. The first player or players to complete the action wins a point for his team. A player remains a member of his original team, even though he may be sitting with another team as a result of a change' call. Space Aliens Equipment Required: 3 or 4 tennis balls. This is similar to a popular electronic game. Divide the players into two teams. One team, the Invaders, lines up on one side of the hall. The invaders move by sidestepping along the wall until hey reach the wall. They then take one step forward and sidestep in the opposite direction. It is more fun if they make electronic noises as they move.

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The other team, the Defender, line up on the other wall. They are armed with one ball for every two defenders. They try to eliminate the invaders by rolling a ball and hitting them. (Invaders must keep moving at same pace, they cannot dodge the balls.) The one who rolls the ball can run forward when it hits an Invader or the wall and toss-it back to a defender who doesn't have a ball. Time to see how long it takes to eliminate all invaders. Reverse roles. The defenders with the shortest time would be the winner. Walk on the Moon `Astronauts' line up behind a starting line about 15 feet away from a turning 1ine. Each boy has two pieces of shirt cardboard (or other cardboard). On signal, each boy places his cardboard pieces on the floor, one in front of the other, and puts one foot on each. .To move toward the `moon', he picks up the rear cardboard, moves it in front of the other piece and then steps forward. In this way, players continue to move until one - the winner has reached the moon (turning line) and returned to earth (starting 1ine). Teams or individuals can perform this race. Astronauts can wear space helmets for effect. Crafts By Greater st. Louis Area Council

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onto green panel and paste tabs. Tie an "11" string to each of the four corners of a paper napkin. Put two strings through each hole in the panel and tie the four together. Now hold by top of napkin and let go!

Star Gazer

1. Cover the outside of the cardboard tube with the crepe paper and decorate with the stars of your own designs. 2. Draw around the tube on a piece of black mat stock or construction paper. 3. Draw another circle 1/2" larger. 4. Pin prick a "Constellation" within the smaller circle. 5. Fit over end of tube by lapping slashed edges and securing with Scotch Tape. 6. Make several of these caps and pin prick each with a different constellation. Peering through the open end of the tube reveals twinkling wonders of the night sky. Capsule with Parachute Cut the green panel from construction paper and paste B to B. Cut out the green capsule and the white panel. Paste where indicated. Roll and paste A to A. Slip capsule

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Model Rocket Make these model rockets and see whose can go the farthest or the highest. Materials: Soft plastic bottle 2 Plastic straws (one narrower than the other) Modeling clay Small paper triangles Glue 1. Make a hole in the cap of the bottle and push the smaller straw through. Seal the joint with modeling clay or glue. This makes the launch pad. 2. Then make the rocket. 'Cut about 4 inches off the larger straw. Decorate one end with paper triangles; make the "nose" for the other end with modeling clay. 3. Slide the rocket over the launch pad. Squeeze the plastic bottle firmly and watch the compressed air in the bottle push the rocket into the air. Flying Star by Baltimore Area Council Directions: 1. Draw a star on a paper plate. The star can have 5 or 6 points, but each point must touch the edge of the plate. The star does not have to be perfect. 2. Cut out the star. Then trace the star onto 3 more plates. Cut out all the Stars. 3. Tape or staple all 4 stars into one fat star. Then poke a hole in the middle with the point of your scissors. 4. Poke the plastic straw through the hole. 5. Decorate it! To fly it, fling it! Starry Lantern Pierce a disposable aluminum foil pan with tiny holes and add a glowing candle and you'll really light up a room. What You Need: Paper Pencil Ruler Aluminum foil pan Scissors Old newspapers Hammer Nail Large can Brass fasteners Aluminum foil muffin cup Candle 1. First, draw a design for the lantern's holes on a piece of 6- by 8-inch paper. Keep the design simple. Drawing a constellation would be a good idea, but of course you could draw the outline of shapes like flowers, leaves, fish, snowflakes-or monster faces.

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2. Then with scissors cut a 6- by 8-inch rectangle from the bottom of the pan. Place your design on top of the aluminum rectangle and place both design and foil on top of a thick pile of newspapers. 3. With a hammer and nail, gently punch holes along the lines of your design. Don't hammer too hard! You want small holes with some space between them. If the holes are too close together, they will join together into one big hole. 4. When you have finished punching your design, make a hole in each comer of the rectangle. Shape the lantern by wrapping it around a large can, like a can of beans or coffee. Once the foil is rounded, remove it from the can and overlap the short ends so that the holes in the two ends meet. Insert a brass paper fastener through each pair of holes, being sure to go through both layers of foil. To secure, open the prongs on the inside of the foil. 5. To make a candle holder, place a candle 2½ to 3 inches long (shorter than the lantern) in a disposable aluminum cupcake or muffin cup. To keep the candle upright use modeling clay, or light the candle and drip some wax into the center of the muffin cup, Blow out the candle, then place it in the melted wax and hold it there for a minute. As the wax hardens, it will hold the candle in place. 6. Place the lantern over the candle. When you light the candle, your design will shine. Zooming Comet You don't have to wait to see a comet in the sky, you can make one instead! Equipment: Balloons Paper or Foam cups Directions: 1. Cut the cup so that it is about 2 W high. Then make "v" cuts on the edge of the cup about 2" deep to make points on the cup's side. 2. Cut a small hole in the center of the bottom of the cup large enough to hold the end of the balloon. 3. To fly your comet, blow up a balloon and insert the neck through the hole in the cup's bottom. Let go of the balloon and watch it SOAR! Telescope Souvenir After viewing stars through a real telescope the Cubs may like to make a pretend one, or make it in anticipation of looking through an actual telescope. 4 long cardboard tubes (like those that holiday

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gift wrapping paper comes on) nut cup large plastic bottle cap needle and string small dowel tape black spray paint (optional) 1. For the body of the telescope, use a long cardboard tube. At one end of the tube make an eye piece from a nut cup and plastic bottle cap. 2. To make the eyepiece, cut a hole the size of a nickel in the bottom of the nut cup; insert in end of cardboard tube. Punch a l/8" hole in a large plastic bottle cap, about 1½" high. Place the plastic cap in the nut cup. 3. For the tripod, use three long cardboard tubes for the legs. Cut one end of each at an angle. Place angled ends together and tape firmly together, wrapping several times with the tape. 4. Using a needle and string, go through all tubes about 7" down from the taped ends. Tie string ends together. 5. Insert and glue a small dowel in the top of the tripod, punching a hole if necessary. To attach the telescope, punch a hole the size of the dowel in the center of the tube and slip it onto the dowel, allowing the telescope to turn freely. The telescope may be painted if desired Closing Ceremony By Baltimore Area Council This month you may run the Space Derby. The following poem can be a reminder that winners and loser are really the same, no one is better than another. No Difference Small as a Peanut, Red, Black or Orange Big as a Giant, Yellow or White, We're All The Same Size We All Look The Same, When We Turn Off The Light When We Turn Off The Light. Rich as a Sultan, So Maybe The Way Poor as a Mite, To Make Everything Right We're All Worth The Same, Is For God to Just Reach Out When We Turn Off The Light. And Turn Off The Light ! A Star to Guide Our Boys Cubmaster: (scout's name) , do you see the stars in the sky? That is the constellation Big Dipper and the big star is the North Star. For many years man has used these stars as a guide to show them the way as they traveled. As you join Cub Scouts you are starting a trip. You will experience adventures and excitement, meet new friends and learn new skills. However, as you begin this trip you need a "North Star" to guide you. The "North Star" is Akela . . . Akela can be your parents, your den leader, even

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I your Cubmaster. It is our responsibility to help you along the way. Cubmaster: Parents, I ask you, will you accept the responsibility to be `Akela', to your son and help guide him along the Cub Scouting trail? Parents: Yes Cubmaster: I thank all of you for you willingness and promise that I will do all I can to help your sons and the future of our country. Thank you and good night. Aim for the stars The words "Aim for the Stars" has an important meaning to Cub Scouts. Think of Thomas Edison who tried and failed hundreds of times before he perfected the electric light bulb. He never quit trying. A Cub Scout who tries to do his best and keeps trying, is preparing himself for greater responsibilities. Webelos Activity Pin Craftsman By Baltimore Area Council Tool Tie Slides (Each different slide uses 1/2" PVC pipe for the slide part) Hammer -- Use a 1 1/2" piece of wood for the handle. Shape the head from fast drying clay or salt dough. Paint the head silver and the handle brown. Glue to a piece of leather or PVC pipe. Saw -- Cut the saw blade from a piece of aluminum can. Use pinking shears to make serrated edge. Cut two 1" squares of wood for the handle. Glue them together with the saw blade inserted between. Draw the outline of the handle on the wood. Experienced whittier may wish to cut away the excess wood. But it looks nice if filled in with markers. Add PVC pipe to back. Screwdriver ­ Make a screwdriver from dowel. Use a thicker piece of dowel for the handle. Use sandpaper to shape the blade. Paint handle red or yellow and shaft silver. Attach to the PVC pipe. Contests Nail Driving - Give each boy a hammer and five nails and a piece of log 4 inches in diameter and about 6 inches high. On the word go, they are to nail all five nails completely into the piece of log. First one finished is the winner.

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Board Sawing Contest - This is the same as the nail driving contest. Give each boy a small hand saw, pencil, ruler, and a 2" x 4" board (any length). On the word go, each boy is to mark and saw his board in half. The first one finished is the winner. NOTE: Judge the contests on skill and speed. Drive the nails straight, and measure the boards correctly. Also supply safety goggles for each boy whenever they are actually working with the tools. Webelos Activity Pin Scientist Games Bottle Target: Webelos take turns seeing how many toothpicks they can land in a milk bottle which is placed on the floor an arm's length away. Players drop the toothpicks one at a time. They may lean forward, but can't move their feet. Atomic Chart: Make up flash cards with the symbols of the atomic table on one side and the element word on the other side. Mix them up, forward and backwards. Play in pairs or compete as teams. Teams can be one person answering at a time, or a group effort. Who are the best "Scientists"? Hot Air Balloon Power: Divide scouts into 2 or more teams, each player is given a balloon which he blows up and holds by the neck until his turn. A raceway is defined for each team and a Ping-Pong ball is then placed at the beginning of each raceway. Team players take turns letting air escape from their balloons, blowing a Ping-Pong ball down the raceway. The winner is the team that blows the ball the furthest down their raceway. Tent Flattening Trick

By Heart of America

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Swing Ping Pong Ball Material needed: A Ping Pong ball Adhesive tape 1 foot of thread or string Faucet Fix the string to the Ping Pong ball with tape. Turn on the water to form a steady stream. While holding onto the string, flip the ball into the water from a few inches away. Not only will the ball stay in the stream of water with the string at an angle, but you can draw the ball up the stream almost to the faucet. What happens: the water, streaming around one side of the ball, exerts less pressure than the air which surrounds the other side. Even though you can feel the resistance of the water as you draw the ball upwards, the air pressure is still stronger, as the experiment proves. Another easy way to demonstrate Bernoulli's principle is to tape a thread to each of two ping pong balls and suspend them from the ceiling about 6" apart. using a soda straw, blow between the suspended balls, and watch them move closer together. No matter how hard you blow, they never fly apart. The balls move together because of the lowest pressure generated on the curved surfaces. Bottle and Flame Experiment Materials needed: A candle A candlestick 2 bottles (one with rounded sides and one with square sides - metal or cardboard containers can be used instead of bottles) Light the candle and place the round bottle in front of it. Blow hard against the bottle and the candle will go out. Place the square bottle in front of the relit candle and blow hard. The candle will remain lighted. What happens: With the round bottle, the air current flows around the bottle and puts out the flame. With the square bottle, the air currents are dispersed. Using different shaped bottles, and two ping pong balls on strings, place on opposite sides of the bottle so that they are close, but not touching. Blowing against the bottle at right angles to the balls, one ball will come closer to the bottle and the other one will move away. The shape of the bottle will determine the way the balls move due to the ease with which the air currents move around the bottle. This is the principle that supports airplanes. PASCAL'S LAW The Balloon Experiment Materials Needed: 2-Liter Coke bottle Vinegar Balloon Baking Soda Place about 1/2 cup baking soda in the coke bottle. Pour

Fold a 5" x 8" piece of paper into a pup tent shape and place it on a table. Now blow through the tent. Does it blow away? No? Why not? The moving air steam through the tent brings down the air pressure. The greater pressure above the tent pushes it down and prevents any horizontal movement.

Volume 6, Issue 9

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MAKE YOUR OWN CHEMISTRY SET You don't need to buy a set to have fun with chemistry. You and your den can do lots of great experiments with simple household products. Basic Supplies Chemicals: Vinegar, baking soda, baking powder, red cabbage, laundry detergent, white glue, lemon juice, yeast, hydrogen peroxide, food coloring, dish detergent. Equipment: Clear plastic cups, Zip-Loc type plastic bags, droppers, straws, measuring spoons, small thermometer, coffee filters, protective wear for eyes and hands Sample Experiments Foam and Fizz Here's an experiment that will allow you to pretend to be a mad scientist. Put about ½ teaspoon of baking soda in a narrow glass. Add 1 tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice, and stand back! The mixture will fizz up and come bubbling out of the glass. This happens because vinegar and lemon juice are acids and baking soda is a kind of chemical called a base. Acids are sour-tasting chemicals. Besides lemon juice and vinegar, green apples, grapefruit, tea and yogurt contain acids. Your stomach produces an acid that helps digest food. Bases are bitter-tasting chemicals that often have a slippery feel. Soap is made from a base. Egg whites and ammonia are bases. So is your blood. Acids and bases are like chemical opposites. When they combine, they react to produce a gas, which is what makes the fizzy bubbles. WEB SITES These sites are current as of 10-30-06 Basic Sky Guides

Http://www.space.com/spacewatch/061027_night_s ky.Html

about 1/4 cup of vinegar into the balloon. Fit the top of the balloon over the top of the bottle, and flip the balloon so that the vinegar goes into the bottle. The gas formed from the mixture will blow the balloon up so that it will stand upright on the bottle and begin to expand. This is caused by a chemical reaction. The baking soda and vinegar produce CO2 which pushes equally in all directions. The balloon, which can expand with pressure, will do so. INERTIA Inertia is the tendency of a thing at rest to remain at rest and a thing in motion to continue in the same straight line. Balancing Stick: Which End is Up? Materials needed: One ½" wooden dowel, approximately 3 feet long Fist size lump of clay Place a lump of clay (about the size of your fist) 8" from the end of the dowel. Wrap it around the dowel. Balance the dowel on the tip of your finger, putting your finger under the end that's near the clay. Now, turn the dowel over and balance it with the clay on the top. Notice that the stick is easier to balance when the clay is near the top. Why? The dowel rotates more slowly when the mass is at the top, allowing you more time to adjust and maintain balance. When the mass is at the bottom, the stick has less rotational inertia and tips more quickly. The farther away the mass is located from the axis of rotation (such as in your hand), the greater the rotational inertia and the slower the stick turns. An object with a large mass is said to have a great deal of inertia. Just as it is hard to change the motion of an object that has a large inertia, it is hard to change the rotational motion of an object with a large rotational inertia. Here is a way to feel the change in inertia. Grab the end of the dowel that's near the clay. Hold the dowel vertically and rapidly move the dowel back and forth with the same motion you would use to cast a fishing line. Next, turn the dowel upside down and hold it at the end that is the farthest from the clay. Repeat the casting motion. Notice that it is much harder to move the dowel rapidly when the clay is near the top. The mass of the stick has not changed, but the distribution of the mass of the stick with respect to your hand has changed. The rotational inertia depends on the distribution of the mass of the stick.

* Full Moon Fever * Astrophotography 101 * Sky Calendar & Moon Phases * 10 Steps to Rewarding Stargazing * Understanding the Ecliptic and the Zodiac * False Dawn: All about the Zodiacal Light * Reading Weather in the Sun, Moon and Stars * How and Why the Night Sky Changes with the Seasons

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News & Features Space Trivia http://www.space.com/php/trivia/ Lots of Featured Astronomy Stories http://www.space.com/astronomy/ Kids area for Star gazing Http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/games/angleme asurement/anglemeasurement.html Http://www.stargazing.net/ Http://www.stargazing.net/astropc/ Http://www.stargazingforeveryone.com/ Boy and Girl Scout Programs Http://www.jackstargazer.com/ Http://www.skymaps.com/downloads.html Http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/star _gazing_06.html Http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/skytellers/p olaris/activities/star_gazing.shtml Http://stardate.org/nightsky/weekly.php Http://www.sciencecenterct.org/Gengras/geng rasastronomy-stargazing.htm Http://www.kidsastronomy.com/ Http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/ StarChild.html Http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/ Http://skytonight.com/observing/objects/doubl estars/ Http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/~kaler/sow/star_intr o.html Http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellatio ns/ Http://meteorites.lpl.arizona.edu/

Here is the definitive guide to bottle rocket design and theory. It was written by an Australian experimenter named Brad Calvin. Besides bottle rockets, he's also interested in designing carts his dog can pull on the local hiking trails. Http://bradcalv.customer.netspace.net.au/wrbook.htm Bottle Rocket Simulator http://www.et.byu.edu/~wheeler/benchtop/sim.php This caluclator allows you to enter the parameters of your rocket and predict the flight characteristics it will display. It even shows a predicted plot of the trajectory. How Bottle Rockets Work This site is from Physics Central and explains the theory behind how the rockets we're making actually work. Make a Film Cannister Rocket From the Jet Propulsion Labs at NASA, this site explains how to make a rocket from a film cannister that uses fizzy gas as its propellant. Rocket Parts and What They Do http://www-istp.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Srocket.htm Learn about modifications you might make to the parts of your rocket from the AstroCAmp bottle rocket project. Principle of the Rocket From NASA, this site explains rocket propulsion from the standpoint of conservation of momentum. Beginner's Guide to Rockets http://exploration.grc.nasa.gov/education/rocket/b gmr.html This page from NASA includes descriptions of several types of rockets, links to explanations about the physics of rocket flight and rocket terminology, as well as flight simulation applets. Mr. Hayhurst's Quick and Easy Bottle Rocket http://www.lnhs.org/hayhurst/rockets/ Just as the name says, this site offers a quick and easy design for making a bottle rocket from two two liter soda pop bottles. Bottle Rocket Launcher Plans http://www.soe.ucsc.edu/~karplus/abe/sodabottle-rocket.pdf This page explains how to make your own bottle rocket launcher from PVC pipe and a few odds and ends. Http://members.aol.com/StanDCmr/rocket.html 2-Liter Plastic Pop Bottle Rocket Launcher Variation of demonstration at Philmont Training Center, 1992 This design by Stan Pope, a Volunteer Scouter for W.D. Boyce Council, Peoria, IL

Till next month!!!!

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