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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 1: Understanding Fiction Literary Elements-- Characters, Setting, and Plot

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, page 133, Step 2, second­fourth paragraphs Digging Up Tyrannosaurus Rex by John Horner, A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon, and additional materials listed in Making Meaning Un caso grave de rayas by David Shannon or another nonfiction text Chart paper and marker ·

Standard

Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Big Idea

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

·

Intended Learning

· Students begin to recognize character, setting, and plot as fictional text elements to better understand text theme (what the story is mainly about).

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Show the front cover of Digging Up Tyrannosaurus Rex and remind students this book is a nonfiction text; that is, a text about real people, places, or events. Tell students they will learn about another type of literary text-- fiction. Fiction text tells stories that are imagined, not real.

Notes

50/4 Interactive Read-Aloud.

Teaching

Read aloud A Bad Case of Stripes. Follow Making Meaning, Step 2, page 133. Begin with the second paragraph and end with the "Things We Think Stories Have in Common" student-generated chart.

Active Engagement

Students "Think-Pair-Share," discussing common story elements. Students chart "Things We Think Stories Have in Common."

Link

Remind students to look for charted common story elements as they read independently. Students share fiction texts with their partners, looking specifically for attributes from the "Things We Think Stories Have in Common" chart. Chart additional comments from discussion.

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Lesson 1: Understanding Fiction Literary Elements--Characters, Setting, and Plot

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· · Have students "Think-Pair-Share" with one example of characters, setting, and plot from one of their independent reading books. Choose two or three pairs to share out their examples.

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Lesson 1: Understanding Fiction Literary Elements--Characters, Setting, and Plot

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 2: Recognizing Fiction Literary Elements--Character, Setting, and Plot I

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 3, Week 1, Day 1, pages 134-136, Steps 3, 5-6 Thunder Cake by Patricia Polacco and additional materials listed in Making Meaning El pollo de los domingos by Patricia Polacco "Things We Think Stories Have in Common" chart from Lesson 1 ·

Standard

Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Big Idea

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

·

Intended Learning

· Students begin to recognize character, setting, and plot as fictional text elements to better understand text theme.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Review "Things We Think Stories Have in Common" chart. If appropriate, add additional student comments.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 134, "ELL Vocabulary." 50/4 Interactive Read-Aloud

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, pages 134-136, Steps 3 and 5-6. After Step 3, read students Thunder Cake before continuing with Step 5.

Active Engagement

Students "Think-Pair-Share" and add character, setting, and plot to the "Things We Think Stories Have in Common" chart.

Link

Remind students to look for characters, setting, and plot story elements as they read independently.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

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Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Sharing/Closure

· · Have students "Think-Pair-Share" with one example of characters, setting, and plot from one of their independent reading books. Choose two or three pairs to share out their examples.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 2: Recognizing Fiction Literary Elements--Character, Setting, and Plot I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 3: Recognizing Fiction Literary Elements--Characters, Setting, and Plot II

Materials

· Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 3, Week 2, Day 1, pages150-152 ·

Standard

Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to recognize character, setting, and plot in fiction stories to help them understand text theme (what the story is mainly about). ·

Big Idea

Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Follow Making Meaning, page 150, Step 1.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 151, "ELL Vocabulary." 50/4 Interactive Read-Aloud

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, pages 151-152, Steps 3-5.

Active Engagement

Students "Think-Pair-Share" to activate personal prior experiences while listening to the read aloud.

Link

Encourage students to look for character, setting, and plot as they independently read books they chose, just as you did as a class during the Making Meaning read-aloud.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out examples of character, setting, and plot they found during independent reading.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson 3: Recognizing Fiction Literary Elements--Characters, Setting, and Plot II

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 4: Identifying Character Attributes-- Noticing Actions, Thoughts, Dialogue, and Appearance

Materials

· · · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 395-396 "Character Graphic Organizer" (see example at the end of lesson) Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco El pollo de los domingos by Patricia Polacco ·

Standard

Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Big Idea

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to identify character attributes--actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearance--and think about how character attributes help with understanding text theme.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students that characters are important literary elements, as they often make stories. Characters can be people, animals, and inanimate objects that appear in fiction texts.

Notes

50/11 Total Physical Response--Use this strategy to demonstrate actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearances and correlate with "Character Graphic Organizer" icons. On "Character Graphic Organizer," use icons representing actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearance.

Teaching

Tell students stories usually have more than one character. All stories need to have main characters or protagonists who overcome conflicts or have problems to solve. Understanding how characters act, their thoughts, dialogue, and appearances reveal a lot about how characters deal with conflicts or problems.

Active Engagement

Model for students how to complete the "Character Graphic Organizer," using a character from Chicken Sunday. As you work on the organizer, invite students to complete it with you, gradually releasing more responsibility to students.

Link

During independent reading, students choose one character from their independent reading books and complete "Character Graphic Organizers."

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Independent and Small Group Time

· · · Students read independently from book bags. You might set a specified time for students to begin working on their graphic organizers. Confer with individual students and/or provide small group instruction.

Sharing/Closure

· Choose two or three students who proficiently completed "Character Graphic Organizers" to explain how the organizer deepened their understanding of characters and how it helped them better understand what they read.

Character Graphic Organizer

Character Name: Actions Thoughts Dialogue Appearance

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 5: Introducing Character Development--Character Change

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 3, Week 2, Day 2, pages 154-156, Steps 1-3 Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco My Very Own Room/Mi propio cuartito by Amada Irma Perez ·

Standard

Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Big Idea

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students are introduced to character development to recognize that characters often change during stories. Understanding character changes helps students understand text theme.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students the importance of noticing characters' actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearances to better understand stories.

Notes

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, pages 154-156, Steps 1-3.

Active Engagement

Students "Think-Pair-Share" to discuss who changes in the story and why.

Link

During independent reading, students mark passages showing character changes. On sticky notes, they write what they noticed about how characters changed and why. Model using sticky notes to mark character change passages.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· With partners, students discuss character noticings from their sticky notes.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 6: Exploring Character Change

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 3, Week 6, Day 1, page 204, first paragraph only, and page 205, "Notes for Day 3" only The Memory Coat by Elvira Woodruff and additional materials listed in Making Meaning My Very Own Room/Mi propio cuartito by Amada Irma Perez ·

Standard

Draw inferences using contextual clues.

Big Idea

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students continue to explore character change to recognize that conflicts often lead to changes in characters or how characters think. Understanding character changes helps them understand text theme.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students that characters often change as a result of things that happen to them. Lead a brief discussion, having students recall their sticky note character noticings from Lesson 5.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 204, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, page 205, "Notes for Day 3." If students do not have student books, make a transparency of the questions on page 205.

Active Engagement

Divide students into small collaborative learning groups of four or five. Small groups discuss the questions and share out answers.

Link

During independent reading, students mark passages showing character changes. On sticky notes, they write what they noticed about how characters changed and why. Model using sticky notes to mark character change passages.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Students share out their sticky note character change noticings.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 7: Digging Deeper Into Plot Conflict--Person Against Nature

Materials

· · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, page 396 Thunder Cake by Patricia Polacco Cuando Jessie cruzó el océano by Amy Hest and Teresa Mlawer or another Spanish text in which characters focus on conflict with nature to support the teaching point (ask teacher librarian for suggestions) "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart (see end of lesson) · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Big Ideas

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to explain one form of character change that involves conflict between main characters or protagonists and nature to help them understand text theme.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students conflicts or big problems often lead to changes in characers or how characters think. Often, authors write fiction stories so the plot-- what happens in the story--has one or more conflicts. Conflicts make stories interesting, so authors give their characters conflicts to deal with.

Notes

50/2 Visual Scaffolding--Use this strategy to scaffold vocabulary: nature, person, society, self. See Making Meaning, page 134, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Explain to students one type of conflict characters often experience is conflict with nature. Some conflicts with nature include thunderstorms, blizzards, hail, flooding, avalanches, wildfires, drought, tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, aging, and death. When characters undergo conflicts with nature, they may change their actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearances. Stories' themes may change as a result of changes characters undergo. Tell students to listen for a person against nature conflict as you reread Thunder Cake aloud to them.

Active Engagement

Students discuss conflicts they heard in the text. Introduce the "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart (see example at the end of lesson). Students participate in completing the first row, "Character Against Nature."

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to look for character

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

changes due to conflict.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out their findings from their reading.

Plot Conflict and Character Change

Type of Plot Conflict Character Against Nature Examples thunderstorms, blizzards, hail, flooding, avalanches, wildfires, droughts, tornadoes Book Character Change

Character Against Another Person

heroes against villains, arguments with friends or family, good character against evil character

Character Against Society

differences in culture, language, religion, race, gender

Character Against Self

making the right decision, choosing between right and wrong, overcoming fear

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 8: Digging Deeper Into Plot Conflict--Person Against Person

Materials

· · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 395-396 The Bat Boy and His Violin by Gavin Curtis Uncle Rain Cloud by Tony Johnson or My Very Own Room/Mi propio cuartito by Amada Irma Perez "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart from Lesson 7 · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

·

Big Ideas

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to explain one form of character change that involves conflict between main characters or protagonists and another person or antagonist to help them understand text theme.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students conflicts or big problems often lead to changes in characers or how characters think. In Thunder Cake, you discussed how conflict with nature can cause character changes that affect a story's theme. Today students learn about another type of conflict.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 171, "ELL Note." See Making Meaning, page 172, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Explain to students another type of conflict characters often experience is conflict with another person. Some types of person against person conflicts include heroes against villains, arguments with friends or family, or good characters against evil characters. When characters undergo conflicts with another person, they may change their actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearances. Stories' themes may change as a result of changes characters undergo. Ask students to listen for person against person conflict as you read aloud The Bat Boy and His Violin.

Active Engagement

Students discuss conflicts they heard in the text. Revisit the "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart. Students participate in completing the second row, "Character Against Another Person."

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to look for character

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

changes due to conflict.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out their findings from their reading.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 9: Digging Deeper Into Plot Conflict--Person Against Society

Materials

· · · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, page 396 The Memory Coat by Elvira Woodruff Uncle Rain Cloud by Tony Johnson "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart from Lessons 7-8 · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

Big Ideas

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to explain one type of character change that involves conflict between main characters or protagonists and one or more aspects of society to help them understand text theme.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students conflicts or big problems often lead to changes in characers or how characters think. In The Bat Boy and His Violin, you discussed how conflict with another person can cause character changes that affect a story's theme. Today students learn about another type of conflict.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 204, "ELL Vocabulary." Use a world map to point out Russia. Invite students, particularly English language learners, to locate their places of origin on the map.

Teaching

Explain to students one type of conflict characters often experience is conflict with elements of society. Some types of person against society conflicts include differences in culture, language, religion, politics, race, gender, and economics. When characters undergo conflicts with elements of society, they may change their actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearances. Stories' themes may change as a result of changes characters undergo. Ask students to listen for person against society conflicts as you read aloud The Memory Coat.

Active Engagement

Students discuss conflicts they heard in the text. Revisit the "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart. Students participate in completing the third row, "Character Against Society."

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to look for character

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

changes due to conflict.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out their findings from their reading.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 10: Digging Deeper Into Plot Conflict--Person Against Self

Materials

· · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, page 396 Mirette on the High Wire by Emily Arnold McCully Juan Verdades: The Man Who Couldn't Tell A Lie by Joe Hayes or My Very Own Room/Mi propio cuartito by Amada Irma Perez "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart from Lessons 7-9 · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Identify characters, setting, plot, problem, and solution.

·

Big Ideas

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to explain one type of character change that involves conflict between main characters and their inner selves to help them understand text theme.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students conflicts or big problems often lead to changes in characers or how characters think. In The Memory Coat, you discussed how conflicts with elements of society can cause character changes that affect a story's theme. Today students learn about one final type of conflict.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 166, "ELL Vocabulary." Use the world map from Lesson 9 to point out France. Encourage reluctant English language learners to point out or talk about their places of origin.

Teaching

Explain to students the fourth type of conflict characters often experience is conflicts with themselves. Some types of internal conflicts include deciding what to do in given situations, making the right decisions, choosing between right and wrong, overcoming fear, or overcoming difficult situations. When characters undergo internal conflicts, they may change their actions, thoughts, dialogue, and appearances. Stories' themes may change as a result of changes characters undergo. Tell students to listen for characters' internal conflicts as you read aloud Mirette On The High Wire.

Active Engagement

Students discuss conflicts they heard in the text. Revisit the "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart. Students participate in completing the fourth row, "Character Against Self."

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to look for character

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

changes due to conflict.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out their understanding of the "Plot Conflict and Character Change" chart. Encourage students to explain how and why understanding character change helps them understand stories' themes.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 11: Using "Stop and Ask Questions" Strategy to Make Sense of Fiction Text

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 3, Week 4, Day 1, pages 170-173, Steps 2-3 The Bat Boy and His Violin by Gavin Curtis Juan Verdades: The Man Who Couldn't Tell A Lie by Joe Hayes or Tales of a Gambling Grandmother/Memorias de una abuela apostadora by Dayal Kaur Khalsa ·

Standards

Use a full range of strategies to comprehend a variety of texts, such as nonfiction, rhymes, poems, and stories. Identify supporting details and main idea. Draw inferences using contextual clues.

· ·

Intended Learning

· Student learn to apply the "Stop and Ask Questions" reading strategy to better understand supporting details and main idea of fiction text. ·

Big Idea

Use contextual clues to make predictions and draw conclusions.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students conflicts or big problems often lead to changes in characters or how characters think or act. Understanding character conflict is important to understanding details and main ideas of texts. The "Stop and Ask Questions" reading strategy students learned as they read nonfiction is also a powerful strategy to use when reading fiction. When we stop and ask questions, we stop to think about what we read and what questions we may have about the upcoming text.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 171, "ELL Note." See Making Meaning, page 172, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, pages 170-173, Steps 2-3.

Active Engagement

Students respond in writing to questions posed during the read aloud of The Bat Boy and His Violin. Students discuss each answer before moving to the next question.

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to practice the "Stop and Ask Questions" strategy.

Independent and Small Group Time

· Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

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Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out their experiences of stopping and asking questions, paying attention to how this strategy helped them understand texts.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 12: Predicting to Build Meaning

Materials

· · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, page 315 The Old Woman Who Named Things by Cynthia Rylant Juan Verdades: The Man Who Couldn't Tell A Lie by Joe Hayes or Tales of a Gambling Grandmother/Memorias de una abuela apostadora by Dayal Kaur Khalsa "The Old Woman Who Named Things Prediction Chart" (see end of lesson) ·

Standards

Use a full range of strategies to comprehend a variety of texts, such as nonfiction, rhymes, poems, and stories. Draw inferences using contextual clues.

·

·

Big Ideas

· Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to predict before and during reading fiction texts to enable them to continuously build meaning and access background information.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students thinking before and during their reading is an important strategy to help them understand what they read. When you read, you predict. Prediction is based on what you read and your own background experiences and knowledge.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 13, "ELL Vocabulary." Take a picture walk by briefly discussing what's happening using the book's illustrations. Think aloud on pages that lend themselves to predictions.

Teaching

Tell students when they predict as they read, they are active readers, which means they dive into reading and put their minds to work. It is like swimming. Readers who do not actively read are back-floating on the water's surface. When readers actively read, they can dive deep into the water and experience a whole new world. Predicting is the dive-- going deeper and deeper into reading to discover new ideas or thinking. Explain that as you read The Old Woman Who Named Things, students should practice being active readers. Tell them you will stop several times so they can think about what is happening and make predictions.

Active Engagement

Students actively listen during the read aloud of The Old Woman Who Named Things, while completing "The Old Woman Who Named Things

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Prediction Chart." Students discuss their predictions and why they predicted what they did.

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to actively read, predicting before, during, and after as they read.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out their understanding of how predicting helped them better understand their reading.

The Old Woman Who Named Things Prediction Chart

Where is this going? Page 8: "`Hmmm,' she said." What is likely to happen next?

Page 14: "She would just keep telling it to go home."

Page 17: "The old woman felt even sadder."

Page 24: "`My dog's name is Lucky,' she told the dogcatcher."

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 13: Building Awareness of Inferences I

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 4, Week 1, Day 1, pages 211-213, Steps 3 and 5 Hurricane by David Weisner Juan Verdades: The Man Who Couldn't Tell A Lie by Joe Hayes or Tales of a Gambling Grandmother/Memorias de una abuela apostadora by Dayal Kaur Khalsa · ·

Standards

Draw inferences using contextual clues. Make predictions and draw conclusions.

Big Ideas

· · Use contextual clues to make predictions and draw conclusions. Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to apply the "Stop and Ask Questions" strategy to help them use inferring as active readers to deepen their understanding.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students the "Stop and Ask Questions" strategy helps them before, during, and after they actively read to go deeper into their understanding of texts. Also, remind students that predicting is having ideas of what may happen but reading further to locate possible answers.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 212, "ELL Vocabulary." Take a picture walk by briefly discussing what's happening using the book's illustrations. Think aloud on pages that lend themselves to inferences. Explicitly model making several inferences while showing illustrations and pointing to characters, setting, and actions.

Teaching

Build students' background knowledge by explicitly teaching inferences; that is, figuring out things for yourself using text evidence and background knowledge. Inferences differ from predictions because predictions are resolved by reading texts. Inferences are assumptions made using text evidence and background knowledge, but are not explicitly stated in texts. Read aloud Hurricane. Follow Making Meaning, pages 211-213, Steps 3 and 5.

Active Engagement

Students participate in answering questions posed during the read aloud, practicing the "Stop and Ask Questions" strategy. During this discussion, students begin to notice and verbally highlight inferences made from the text.

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to actively read using the "Stop and Ask Questions" strategy in an effort to make inferences about their independent reading books.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 13: Building Awareness of Inferences I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out inferences they made from their independent reading texts and tell how these inferences helped them understand main ideas of their reading.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 14: Building Awareness of Inferences II

Materials

· · Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 4, Week 1, Day 2, pages 216-219, Steps 2, 4-5 Hurricane by David Weisner Juan Verdades: The Man Who Couldn't Tell A Lie by Joe Hayes or Tales of a Gambling Grandmother/Memorias de una abuela apostadora by Dayal Kaur Khalsa Transparency of page 18 from Hurricane · ·

Standards

Draw inferences using contextual clues. Make predictions and draw conclusions.

Big Ideas

· · Use contextual clues to make predictions and draw conclusions. Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts.

·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to make inferences to deepen their understanding of story details and main idea.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students that predicting is having ideas of what may happen but reading further to locate possible answers. Inferring is taking information from text and connecting to background knowledge, because the text does not give the answer.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 212, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, pages 216-219, Steps 2 and 4-5. If students do not have student books, make a copy for each student and a transparency of page 18 of Hurricane.

Active Engagement

Students participate in the activity in Making Meaning, page 217, Step 5.

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to actively read, looking for details to help them infer.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Ask two or three students to share out text clues or text details that helped them make inferences.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 15: Inferring to Build Meaning I

Materials

· · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 317-319 Sami and the Time of the Troubles by Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliand Isabel Allende: Recuerdos para un cuento/Isabel Allende: Memories for a Story by Raquel Benatar, Patricia Petersen, and Fernando Molinari "Inference Chart" graphic organizer (see end of lesson) ·

Standards

Use a full range of strategies to comprehend a variety of texts, such as nonfiction, rhymes, poems, and stories. Draw inferences using contextual clues. Make predictions and draw conclusions.

· ·

·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to identify implied meaning from texts to generate inferences explaining how and/or why characters behave ways they do and create sensory images related to character, setting, and plot. · ·

Big Ideas

Use contextual clues to make predictions and draw conclusions. Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students inferences are things you figure out for yourself using text evidence and background knowledge. To figure out what authors are saying, we look for text clues and text details and think about what we know.

Notes

Day 1 of a two-day lesson. See Making Meaning, page 230, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Students participate in a "silent" picture walk. Silently show the book cover and continue to page 16, "She makes us wait until we hear the usual noises of the street before she lets us leave the basement." Following the silent picture walk, students write two or three noticings on sticky notes and place on chart paper to revisit later. Conduct a read aloud to page 16, allowing time for illustrations and story to "sink in."

Active Engagement

Students "Turn and Talk" to partners about their thoughts and feelings

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Lesson 15: Inferring to Build Meaning I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

about the story so far. Students complete "Inference Chart" graphic organizers (see example at the end of this lesson).

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to actively read, using details from texts to make inferences about main ideas in their independent reading books.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· · · · Refer to the sticky note noticings chart. Discuss their noticings and what actually occurred in the read aloud. Ask students to infer what will happen during the rest of the story. Chart their responses.

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Lesson 15: Inferring to Build Meaning I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Inference Chart

Text (write page number here) (text taken directly from book: quote, detail, setting, or event) What I Infer (take information from text and connect it to what I already know)

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 16: Inferring to Build Meaning II

Materials

· · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 317-319 Sami and the Time of the Troubles by Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliand Tomas y la senora de la biblioteca by Pat Mora "Inference Chart" graphic organizer from Lesson 15 ·

Standards

Use a full range of strategies to comprehend a variety of texts, such as nonfiction, rhymes, poems, and stories. Draw inferences using contextual clues. Make predictions and draw conclusions.

· ·

·

Intended Learning

· Students understand implied meanings from texts to generate inferences explaining how and/or why characters behave ways they do, as well as create sensory images related to character, setting, and plot to become active readers. · ·

Big Ideas

Use contextual clues to make predictions and draw conclusions. Use knowledge of narrative structure, including character, setting, plot, problem or conflict, and solution, to support comprehension, make predicttions, and understand texts. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students inferences are things you figure out for yourself using text evidence and background knowledge. To figure out what authors are saying, we look for text clues and text details and think about what we know. Today, we continue to go beyond literal meanings, which is what is directly said in texts, to search for inferences, which are implied meanings from texts. Review the "Inference Chart" graphic organizer.

Notes

Day 2 of a two-day lesson. See Making Meaning, page 230, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Students participate in a "silent" picture walk. Silently show the entire book. Read aloud from page 16 to the end, allowing time for illustrations and story to "sink in."

Active Engagement

Students "Turn and Talk" to partners about their thoughts and feelings about the story. Students complete "Inference Chart" graphic organizers.

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Lesson 16: Inferring to Build Meaning II

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Link

During independent reading, encourage students to actively read by generating their own "Inference Chart" graphic organizers (or give them blank copies to fill in) about books from their independent book bags.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Two or three students share out their "Inference Chart" graphic organizers.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 17: Responding to Literature--Fantasy Fiction I

Materials

· Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 280-284 (for possible high-level student literature responses), pages 289-291 (analyzing and criticizing literature), and pages 292­294 (Figure 17-6: "Questions to Support Comprehension of Fiction) The Dragon Takes a Wife by Walter Dean Meyers Tomas y la senora de la biblioteca by Pat Mora Variety of teacher-selected fantasy fiction texts · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

· ·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to validate their responses to fantasy fiction using literary elements of character, setting, and plot to increase their analytical thinking. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students active readers use their background knowledge and texts to better understand what they read. We talked about inferring and practiced taking specific text from a book and making connections between what we know and what the author tells us.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 142, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Tell students that when reading fantasy fiction, we need to continue to actively read by making inferences, forming opinions, and making predictions. One strategy that helps us go deeper into fantasy fiction is asking questions about characters, setting, and plot. For example: o o o Characters--Who is the most interesting character and why? Setting--Could the setting be a real place that exists in our time? Plot--What is the high point of the story?

Before reading aloud The Dragon Takes a Wife, read the "blurb" on the back cover. Using this information, students generate three questions: one pertaining to character, one focusing on setting, and one on plot. Chart their questions and remind students to listen for answers in the story.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 17: Responding to Literature--Fantasy Fiction I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Active Engagement

Following the read aloud of The Dragon Takes a Wife, students "Think-PairShare" their answers to their charted questions.

Link

During independent reading, students think of more questions about characters, settings, and plots they could ask themselves when they need more clarification of what they read. Students write at least two questions about characters, settings, and plots from their independent reading books on sticky notes.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· · Four or five students share out their sticky note questions. Following the share out, ask them to add their sticky notes to the chart.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 17: Responding to Literature--Fantasy Fiction I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 18: Responding to Literature--Fantasy Fiction II

Materials

· · · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 394-399 The Dragon Takes a Wife by Walter Dean Meyers A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon Tomas y la senora de la biblioteca by Pat Mora and Un caso grave de rayas by David Shannon Variety of teacher-selected fantasy fiction texts · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to compare and contrast fantasy fiction characters, settings, and plots to enhance their comprehension. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students fantasy is fiction containing unrealistic yet believable elements. Remind them they looked at characters, setting, and plot in The Dragon Takes a Wife. Today they reread A Bad Case of Stripes and reconsider these elements.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 142, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Tell students active fantasy fiction readers need to determine characters, settings, and plots to understand realistic details woven into the fantasy so stories seem believable. Today they reread A Bad Case of Stripes, paying close attention to the following questions. o o o Characters--Who is the most interesting character and why? Setting--Could the setting be a real place that exists in our time? Plot--What is happening in the story that is causing a problem and what is the effect of this problem?

Reread A Bad Case of Stripes aloud to students.

Active Engagement

Review a Venn diagram graphic organizer, stressing that it is used to

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

compare and contrast different ideas of things in a book. As a whole group activity, complete a Venn diagram graphic organizer comparing and contrasting the books, The Dragon Takes a Wife and A Bad Case of Stripes. Ask students to provide specific details from the texts that involve characters, settings, and plots. Appendix 18 of Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 has a Venn diagram example.

Link

During independent reading, students draw Venn diagram graphic organizers in their reading response notebooks and use their organizers to compare two fiction books they are reading.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Two or three students share out their Venn diagram graphic organizers, stressing how their diagrams helped them better understand texts.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 19: Responding to Literature--Realistic Fiction

Materials

· · · Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 394-399 Peppe the Lamp Lighter by Elisa Bartone and Ted Lewin Home At Last by Susan Middleton Elya Variety of teacher-selected historical and realistic fiction texts · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to deepen their understanding of fiction by identifying elements of realistic fiction to locate main ideas and supporting details. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students they have learned about fantasy fiction and it is important to understand main ideas and supporting details to understand stories' themes. Today we learn about another type of fiction: realistic fiction.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 297, "ELL Vocabulary." See Making Meaning, page 306, "ELL Note."

Teaching and Active Engagement

Tell students realistic fiction are stories about things that did not actually happen; authors used their imagination to write the stories. Realistic fiction is interesting because the stories could happen in real life. Since realistic fiction could happen in real life, this type of fiction must be believable. Many problems or conflicts characters face are also problems readers experience, such as difficulties with friends, family problems, racial issues, being handicapped, or death of pets or loved ones. Read the "blurb" on the back cover of Peppe the Lamp Lighter. Ask students to discuss times when they disappointed people close to them and how they solved those problems or conflicts. Following the read aloud, ask students to "Turn and Talk," discussing important ideas in the story. Share out these ideas and chart them.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 19: Responding to Literature--Realistic Fiction

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Link

During independent reading, students read realistic fiction books from their book bags, looking specifically for main characters' problems or conflicts in the stories. In their reading response notebooks, students write reflections correlating main characters' problems or conflicts with things that have occurred in their lives or to people they know.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· · Three or four students share out their reflections from their reading response notebooks. Remind students their reflections state the main or important ideas from their reading or personal lives.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 20: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details--Historical Fiction I

Materials

· Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 394-399 In My Own Backyard/En mi propio jardín by Judi Kurijan Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 2, Unit 6, Week 3, Day 3, pages 395-396, Step 2 · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to locate main ideas and supporting details in historical fiction to deepen their understanding of fiction. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students they have learned about fantasy and realistic fiction and another genre of fiction is called historical fiction. Remember, when reading fiction text, we always need to think of main ideas and supporting details to understand what we read.

Notes

Day 1 of a two-day lesson. See Making Meaning, page 391, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching and Active Engagement

Tell students active historical fiction readers need to know this type of fiction is set in the past, often with make-believe characters but true information about historical events. Sometimes real historical people and events are written into the stories. Read the "blurb" on the back cover of In My Own Backyard. Ask students to tell you why this book is historical fiction; such as, it is a time travel adventure based on historical details. Before reading the book, tell students this book's main character is someone living in the 21st century who uses his imagination to think about all the history that may have happened in his backyard. Follow Making Meaning, pages 395-396, Step 2.

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

After students respond to the quote from page 22, read page 24 aloud to them, stopping at the bottom of the page. Tell students you will finish reading the book during the next lesson.

Link

During independent reading, students mark main ideas in their reading using sticky notes.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Two or three students share out their sticky notes and explain how thinking about main ideas helped them understand themes of texts they read today.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 20: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details--Historical Fiction I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 21: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details--Historical Fiction II

Materials

· Source lesson: Guiding Readers and Writers­Grades 3-6 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell, pages 394-399 In My Own Backyard/En mi propio jardín by Judi Kurijan Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 6, Week 3, Day 3, pages 395-396, Step 2; last two "Class Comprehensions Assessment" questions, page 396; Step 3 and first paragraph of Step 4, page 397 · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to locate main ideas and supporting details in historical fiction to deepen their understanding of fiction. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students we used a historical fiction book, In My Own Backyard, to help us identify main ideas. Today we talk about differences between main ideas and supporting details and how both help us understand stories.

Notes

Day 2 of a two-day lesson. See Making Meaning, page 391, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching and Active Engagement

Read aloud from page 25 to the end of In My Own Backyard. Follow Making Meaning, pages 395-397, Steps 2-3. Ask the last two "Class Comprehensions Assessment" questions from Step 2 on page 396. Complete Step 3 on page 397 and the first paragraph of Step 4 on page 397.

Link

During independent reading, students revisit their sticky notes from Lesson 20 that mark main ideas in their independent reading books. They should reread those passages and determine if sections they marked are main ideas or supporting details.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 21: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details--Historical Fiction II

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· · Two or three students share out their sticky notes and explain how they made any necessary changes from the previous lesson. Stress that students talk about how identifying main ideas and supporting details helps them understand stories.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 21: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details--Historical Fiction II

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 22: Exploring Summaries I

Materials

· · In My Own Backyard/En mi propio jardín by Judi Kurijan Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 6, Week3, Day 4, pages 400-402, Steps 3-4 "Important Ideas in My Own Backyard" chart created in Lesson 20 · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

Intended Learning

· Students learn to identify important and supporting ideas in text and use them to develop reading summaries.

Big Ideas

· Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students that when we read, we need to think about main ideas and supporting details, so we can make connections and understand what books are about. We will use the "Important Ideas in My Own Backyard" chart to write a summary.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 391, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, pages 400-402, Steps 3-4.

Active Engagement

Students "Think-Pair-Share" as the class develops a summary of In My Own Backyard.

Link

During independent reading, students mark one important idea and one supporting detail from their reading using sticky notes.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 22: Exploring Summaries I

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Three or four students share out their sticky notes explaining how thinking about important ideas and supporting details helped them understand their texts' themes.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 23: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details I

Materials

· Home Place by Crescent Dragonwagon Isabel Allende: Recuerdos para un cuento/Isabel Allende: Memories for a Story by Raquel Benatar, Patricia Petersen, and Fernando Molinari Two-column "Main Ideas and Supporting Details" graphic organizer (see end of lesson) Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 6, Week 4, pages 406-407, "Notes for Day 1" · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

· ·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to locate main ideas and supporting details in historical fiction to deepen their understanding of fiction. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students they need to actively read and think about their reading, which means looking for main ideas and supporting details in what they read. Today we look at another fiction story, Home Place. As you listen to the story, think about its main ideas and how they help you understand the book.

Notes

Day 1 of a two-day lesson. See Making Meaning, page 406, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching and Active Engagement

Follow Making Meaning, pages 406-407, "Notes for Day 1."

Link

During independent reading, have students write in their response notebooks two-column notes on main ideas and supporting details from their reading (see example at the end of the lesson).

Independent and Small Group Time

· Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

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·

Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Three or four students share out their "Main Ideas and Supporting Details" graphic organizers and how thinking about their reading helped them understand what they read.

Main Ideas

Supporting Details

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 24: Identifying Main Ideas and Supporting Details II

Materials

· Home Place by Crescent Dragonwagon Isabel Allende: Recuerdos para un cuento/Isabel Allende: Memories for a Story by Raquel Benatar, Patricia Petersen, and Fernando Molinari Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 2, Unit 6, Week 4, page 407, "Teacher Note" only Two-column "Main Ideas and Supporting Details" graphic organizer from Lesson 23 · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

· ·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to locate main ideas and supporting details in historical fiction to deepen their understanding of fiction. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Remind students that identifying main ideas and supporting details is necessary for summarizing text. We need to learn to summarize what we read to remember important information and tell it to others. Today we identify main ideas and supporting details from Home Place, so we can write a summary in Lesson 25.

Notes

Day 2 of a two-day lesson. See Making Meaning, page 406, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Do a brief picture walk with students to review the story. Include the important ideas from Making Meaning, page 407, "Teacher Note."

Active Engagement

With students, develop an "Important Ideas from Home Place" chart, just like the one you created for In My Own Backyard. Have students "Turn and Talk" about the story's main ideas and supporting details to help them understand its main ideas.

Link

During independent reading, students continue to work on their two-column

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

"Main Ideas and Supporting Details" graphic organizers.

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Three or four students share out their "Main Ideas and Supporting Details" graphic organizers from their reading response notebooks.

Reading Workshop

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Lesson 25: Exploring Summaries II

Materials

· Home Place by Crescent Dragonwagon Isabel Allende: Recuerdos para un cuento/Isabel Allende: Memories for a Story by Raquel Benatar, Patricia Petersen, and Fernando Molinari "Important Ideas in Home Place" chart from Lesson 24 Making Meaning, Grade 4, Volume 1, Unit 6, Week 4, page 408, "Notes for Day 3" only · · · ·

Standards

Identify supporting details and main idea. Determine author's purpose. Make predictions and draw conclusions. Read and respond to a variety of literature, folk tales, legends, myths, fiction, rhymes, poems, and nonfiction.

· ·

Intended Learning

· Students learn to identify important and supporting ideas in texts and use them to develop reading summaries. ·

Big Ideas

Read and respond to literature as a way to explore similarities and differences among stories, authors, and perspectives. Use knowledge of literary techniques and terminology to better understand texts.

·

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Review the "Important Ideas in Home Place" chart with students. Remind them they need to learn to pick out what's important in stories so they can tell others about the stories or summarize them.

Notes

See Making Meaning, page 406, "ELL Vocabulary."

Teaching

Follow Making Meaning, page 408, "Notes for Day 3" (the model for this lesson is Week 3, Day 4, pages 401-402).

Active Engagement

Students "Think-Pair-Share" as the class develops a summary of Home Place.

Link

During independent reading, students choose one book from their book bags, write three or four important ideas and details from these stories and write brief summary of their texts.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 25: Exploring Summaries II

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Lesson Plan

Grade 4: Unit 5: Fiction Reading and Narrative Writing

Independent and Small Group Time

· · Students read independently from book bags and/or classroom library. Confer with individual students, keeping ongoing records of performance and goals in their reading assessment notebooks or provide small group instruction such as guided reading, literature circles, or extra support for mini-lesson strategies.

Sharing/Closure

· Students "Turn and Talk" about their summaries to see if their partners can understand the stories' themes from the written summaries.

Reading Workshop

Lesson 25: Exploring Summaries II

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Information

Overarching Question

48 pages

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