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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan

170 W. San Jose Avenue Claremont, California 91711 (909)398-0609

Table of Contents 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................................................1 2. Stakeholders..................................................................................................................................2 3. Curriculum....................................................................................................................................3 4. Professional Development.............................................................................................................20 5. Hardware, Software, Infrastructure, and Technical Support.....................................................34 6. Plan Budget ...................................................................................................................................40 7. Monitoring and Evaluation ..........................................................................................................43 8. Adult Literacy...............................................................................................................................45 9. Effective, Researched-Based Methods, Strategies, and Criteria.................................................46 Appendix C ­ Criteria for EETT Funded Technology Plans..........................................................52 Appendix I ­ Education Technology Plan Benchmark Review ......................................................59 Appendix J ­ Technology Plan Contact Information......................................................................62

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

1. Introduction 1a. District Description Claremont Unified School District is located near the foothills in Claremont, California about thirty-five miles from downtown Los Angeles. It serves a community that has an ethnically diverse population with slightly above average income and educational levels, a professional/technical oriented workforce, and attractive residential areas with light industry. The Claremont Colleges and the Claremont Graduate University are located in the District. Cal Poly Pomona, University of La Verne, and three community colleges are all close to Claremont. Many of their faculty and staff members live in the community. The community is also home to several large retirement centers. The primary employers are The Claremont Colleges, City of Claremont, and the Claremont Unified School District. The District has seven elementary schools, one orthopedically handicapped elementary school, one intermediate school, one community day school, one continuation high school and one comprehensive high school. In 2006-2007, the total District population was 6,847 with 3,250 elementary students, 1,138 intermediate students (7-8), 2,255 comprehensive high school students and 200 students in alternative schools. Eight of the twelve schools have API scores almost at or above 800. The diversity of the District is shown in the chart below. Ethnicity Percent Ethnicity Percent American Indian 0.4 Hispanic 28.4 Asian 10.4 African American 7.8 Pacific Islander 0.4 White 42.5 Filipino 1.5 Multiple Responses 8.6 English Learner 6.8 Socio-Economically 28.3 Disadvantaged Special Education 11.5 In the past ten years the white population has declined; the Hispanic population has increased; the Asian population has remained fairly steady; and the African American population has decreased slightly. The student to computer ratio varies at each site from 1:1 to 10:1. However, many of those computers are more than four or five years old. The District has increased its commitment to technology the last two years by increasing funding not only for computers, but also for other technology related equipment such as LCD projectors. In addition, the Claremont Education Foundation has donated a sizable amount of money for technology the last two years. 1b. Plan Duration This plan will be implemented over a 3 year period of time starting July 1, 2008 and ending June 30, 2011. The plan will be reviewed and updated yearly to reflect changing district goals and needs.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

2. Stakeholders The District formed a committee to develop the 2008-2011 District Technology Plan. The committee consisted of teachers, administrators, and classified staff from all school sites in the district. Elementary school teachers represented a variety of grade levels. Secondary school teachers represented all core subject areas and a computer survey course. Classified staff included a computer instructional assistant from an elementary school computer lab, a special education instructional assistant, and a District computer technology instructional assistant. Parents from both the elementary and secondary level as well as a student participated on the committee. The Directors of Technology and Educational Services served as co-chairs. The committee met several times in April, May and September. Between meetings information was shared and communication allowed by email and moodle server site. The committee discussed and provided input to the main goals and the professional development to support those goals. See the committee composition in the table below. Position High School Teacher Name Kandice Chua Natalie Dye Cheryl Fiello Jen Gomez Heather Lyn Erik Dahl Brian D'Ambrosia Donner Jason Remedios Dennis Simpson Frank Ramirez Kevin Ward Steve Boyd June Hilton Vanessa Mejia Bonnie Ciaglia Swati Gadgil Kara Evans Tom Kowalski Steven Llanusa Max Sneary Damon Rapp Judith Daley Site Claremont High School

Intermediate School Teacher Elementary School Teacher

Special Education Paraeducator Elementary Administrator Secondary Administrator Computer Education Teacher Instructional Technology Center Assistant Computer Instructional Assistant Parent Parent Parent/Board Member Student Director of Technology, cochair Executive Director of Educational Services, co-chair

El Roble Intermediate School Chaparral Elementary School Sycamore Elementary School Sumner Elementary School Condit Elementary School Danbury Elementary School Oakmont Elementary School San Antonio High School Claremont High School El Roble Intermediate School District Instructional Technology Center Condit Elementary School Sycamore Elementary School Vista Elementary School El Roble Intermediate School Claremont High School Claremont High School District Office District Office

Once a draft of the whole plan was completed, input was also solicited from school sites, at principals' meetings, parent faculty meetings, school site council meetings, the District Educational Technology Committee and from the Claremont Adult Education School. 2

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

3. Curriculum 3a. Description of teachers' and students' current access to technology tools both during the school day and outside of school hours. *Ratios include site administrator, teacher, and student computers. Total Instructional Total Student to Total 4 Years Old or Student to School Site Computers* Computer Ratio* Newer (4YON)* 4YON Ratio* Chaparral Condit Danbury Mountain View Oakmont Sumner Sycamore Vista del Valle El Roble Intermediate School Claremont High School San Antonio High School & Community Day School Entire District 157 176 52 85 74 122 115 82 245 418 4.0 3.4 0.96 5.2 4.4 4.7 3.2 3.8 4.7 5.4 97 122 38 52 46 58 88 57 122 225 6.5 5.0 1.3 8.4 7.1 10 4.2 5.4 9.3 10

142 1668

1.1 3.7

125 1006

1.4 6.2

Accessibility to hardware varies among schools in the district. Student to computer ratios for computers district wide 4 years old or newer (4YON) range from approximately 1:1 (continuation high school) to 10:1 (one elementary school and one high school). The overall 4YON student to computer ratio is 6:1. With respect to access to computer labs and media centers, four of the six elementary schools have computer labs, Claremont High School (CHS) has five stationary computer labs and seven small departmental laptop labs, San Antonio High School (SAHS) and Community Day School (CDS) each have one stationary computer lab, and El Roble Intermediate School (ER) has three stationary computer labs. All school sites have libraries with electronic card catalog and research capabilities. Most sites have a mixture of Mac and PCs, but some sites tend to be more heavily shifted toward one platform or the other. There is yet less access to peripherals such as digital cameras, camcorders, printers, etc. Currently, student access to computers and computer labs, before, during, and after school, at most schools is dependent upon teacher discretion. CHS provides access to the library computer lab before and after school and during lunch. The issue of equal access is not fully addressed by this situation. Accelerated learners, Special Education students, and English Language Learners have unspecified 3

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

access to technology throughout the school day. Special Education teachers possess assistive technologies for Special Needs students. Email accounts are available to all staff and faculty of CUSD. Computers are available to teachers in classrooms, staff lounges/workrooms, and/or media centers in order to access email. ConnectEd is a new phone-based, digital technology which allows district and site administration to communicate with faculty and parents about upcoming events and news or in the event of an emergency that may require immediate contact. Web based data analysis and student information database technologies, such as Data Director and Zangle, are used throughout the district to manage and track student performance, attendance, and progress and then communicate that data with parents and students. Site libraries employ textbook management software such as TBTracker and Alexandria. Currently, there is inconsistent use of selected software and programs across school sites, including Microsoft Office, Accelerated Reader, Accelerated Math, ALEKS, Riverdeep, Plato, MediaBlender, iLife Suite, and textbook publisher web companions. 3b. Description of the district's current use of hardware and software to support teaching and learning. According to the 2007 CTAP survey results, CUSD teachers predominantly scored themselves as intermediate (43%) in most basic skills. Areas of basic skills proficiency include general computer knowledge and word processing, while areas of need are in presentation software, database, and spreadsheet skills. Additionally, teachers overwhelmingly do not feel comfortable using technology in the classroom (only 6% scored themselves as proficient) and most (53%) are unable to manage and align technology resources within lesson content. Over 50% of all teachers are aware of their students' level of technology, but only occasionally design lessons that integrate technology. Teachers indicated personal use of technology prevails over classroom use. · Teachers' most common technology uses: o Managing student attendance o Managing student grades (7-12 only) o Communicating with colleagues, parents, and students via email and voicemail o Using peripherals, such as printers and scanners o Utilizing video based presentation (DVD, LCD, etc) o Gathering information for planning lessons o Accessing model lesson plans and best practices o Integrating Accelerated Reader/Math o Creating instructional materials (lessons, word processing, PowerPoint, etc) Teachers' least common technology uses: o Managing student grades (K-6 only) o Engaging students in authentic assessments o Creating multimedia and video (digital camera and video)

·

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

o Utilizing presentation software (PowerPoint) o Incorporating video conferencing o Creating and maintaining a school web site with class related information, such as assignments, grades, upcoming events, parental information, etc. o Accessing online student assessments · Students' most common technology uses: o Accelerated Reader (K-6 only) o Word processing o Internet research Students' least common technology uses: o Corresponding with experts o Creating reports, presentations, and projects o Graphically presenting information o Demonstrations and simulations o Multimedia and video creation o Solving problems or analyzing data o Communicating with peers

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3c. Summary of the district's curricular goals and academic content standards in various district and site comprehensive planning documents. · · · · · · CUSD Curriculum Goals: http://chs.cusd.claremont.edu/edu/curr-gls.html California Content Standards: http://chs.cusd.claremont.edu/edu/cde-stds.html CUSD English Language Arts and Science Essential Standards: http://chs.cusd.claremont.edu/edu/cusd-stds.html CUSD School Board of Education Goals: http://chs.cusd.claremont.edu/boa/goals.html Each CUSD Site Single Plan For Student Achievement: http://chs.cusd.claremont.edu National Education Technology Standards: http://cnets.iste.org/currstands/

3d. List of clear goals and a specific implementation plan for using technology to improve teaching and learning supporting the district curricular goals and academic content standards. In order to improve student performance, CUSD faculty, staff, and students will have access to curricular materials and resources that support the use of technology in teaching, learning, and instructional management, including developmentally appropriate technologies to help all students attain high academic achievement in federal, state, and local content standards.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Goal 1: All CUSD students will improve ELA and Math academic achievement. Benchmark Benchmark Objective Benchmark 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 1.1 By 2011, all schools will meet or exceed STAR Growth targets will Growth targets will Growth targets will ELA and math school wide be met be met be met and sub-group API growth targets. 1.2 By 2011, all students will meet graduation requirements, including 100% passing both portions of the CAHSEE. 1.3 By June 2011, all students will demonstrate proficiency of the CUSD Essential Standards, as 25% measured by individual site rubrics, school-based assessment, or potential district-level assessments. Goal 1 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Provide ongoing training for teachers to use data analysis and diagnostic tools, such as DataDirector, to identify target student groups that result in data-driven instruction and intervention plans. Decide which California Content Standards aligned, content-specific software (Accelerated Reader, ALEKS, etc...) will be used across the district. Identify CUSD essential standards for ELA, Math and Social Studies (Science is already completed). Continue to provide current and design new ELA and math remediation courses for grade 10-12 students that do not pass CAHSEE or grade 7-9 students that are not meeting essential standards in math and ELA. Develop and implement common and authentic assessments across sites Evaluate progress of student achievement annually. o 2009-2010 Use data analysis and diagnostic tools, such as DataDirector, to identify a target student group for intervention and enrichment. Align curriculum with CUSD completed essential standards. Assess success of ELA and math remediation courses and redesign curriculum as necessary. Evaluate progress of student achievement annually.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

o 2010-2011 Evaluate progress of student achievement annually. Align curriculum with CUSD completed essential standards. Goal 2: Create lifelong learners by promoting creativity, problem solving, critical thinking, analysis, and decision-making skills in all areas of teaching and learning. Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Objective 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 2.1 Shift focus away from traditional computer labs 10% of school to technologies directly sites integrated into the classroom and curriculum 2.2 Establish professional learning communities (PLCs) to implement significant and involved technology projects. 2.3 Establish collaborative student learning communities (LCs) for the mastery of content standards. 2.4 Provide authentic opportunities for all students to demonstrate content mastery using ubiquitous and emerging technologies. 2.5 Promote reflection and self-analysis of personal, professional, and academic growth, as measured by authentic assessments, journals, individual and site rubrics, and CST results. 10% of teachers implement significant technology projects.

25% of school sites 60% of school sites

25% of teachers implement significant technology projects.

60% of teachers implement significant technology projects.

10% of students in 25% of students in 60% of students in LCs LCs LCs 10% of all lessons 20% of all lessons 30% of all lessons within CUSD within CUSD within CUSD

20% of students participating

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Goal 2 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Transition existing computer labs into Project-Learning Labs geared to supplement classroom technology use and curricular projects.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Implement a PLC of interested teachers across grade levels to pilot various classroom structures and technology tools, and meet regularly to discuss successes and challenges. Redesign the CUSD Educational Technology Committee as a PLC that examines, discusses, and makes recommendations on district technology integration. Through the PLC, provide assistance to interested teachers in the use and implementation of presentation hardware (LCD projectors), software (PowerPoint), and streaming sources. Develop a site technology plan at each site, as an integrated component of the school improvement plan, which describes their action steps for implementing the steps of the CUSD Master Educational Technology Plan. Evaluate current school site policies regarding student use and access to ubiquitous technologies. Evaluate and suggest policies regarding use of emerging technologies through the CUSD Educational Technology Committee. Establish infrastructure for student Moodle accounts, blogs, electronic portfolios, file storage, and other reflective tools. Establish technology partnerships between elementary and secondary sites. o 2009-2010 Convert remaining computer labs into direct classroom computers or Project Learning Labs. Broaden the Technology PLC to include more interested teachers, building on the successes and efforts of the prior year. Utilize early-adopters as teacher-to-teacher mentors. Provide teachers with ample server space to post course documents, calendars, forums, and activities. Pursue distance-learning possibilities at CHS, possibly through partnerships with Citrus Community College. Implement use of student reflective tools with a small student population Expand use of student blogs, Moodle, portfolios, etc. Utilize and expand technology partnerships between elementary and secondary sites to provide authentic opportunities for students to teach and learn. o 2010-2011 Provide more Professional Learning Community days focused on technology. Transition technology PLC from a support-group to a mentoring program. Coordinate community partnerships to provide authentic opportunities for our students. Provide tools for faculty, staff, and students to create webcasts. (pod/vod/photocasts) and multimedia presentations. Provide tools for students to communicate, publish, and critique written and oral presentations and findings. Evaluate and redesign student reflective tools.

3e. List of clear goals and a specific implementation plan as to how and when students will acquire technology and information literacy skills needed to succeed in the classroom and the workplace.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Goal 3: All students will demonstrate age appropriate technology use skills Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Objectives 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 (as percentages of participants) 3.1 All students will demonstrate a sound understanding of basic, age-appropriate, technology operations and concepts as defined in the National Education Technology Standards, including ethical and safety standards. 3.2 All students will learn about, locate, manipulate, and evaluate appropriate digital resources to enhance their understanding of course content. 3.3 Students will demonstrate appropriate use of technology and adhere to school site and CUSD acceptable use policies and applicable state and federal laws. 3.4 Students will demonstrate ageappropriate internet safety. 3.5 Students, staff, and faculty will be able to access, navigate, and manage data on school site or CUSD networks and servers. Goal 3 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Examine age-specific NETS standards and educate teachers on NETS standards, copyright vs. fair use laws, and internet safety issues. Use Technology Integration Teachers to demonstrate implementation of these standards related issues through direct curriculum integration. Increase teacher use and student exposure to technologies within the classroom. Review and rewrite CUSD Acceptable Technology Use Policy including appropriate legal and ethical standards (under school board review Fall 2008). Set up staff and faculty server file storage. Review and rewrite current secondary computer course curriculum to ultimately lead to specific certifications (advanced Microsoft Office productivity, web design, network management, graphic design, programming languages, AP Computer Science, advanced multimedia production/video editing, etc). Develop a component of the secondary computer course curriculum to address copyright and fair use guidelines, plagiarism, and acceptable peer-to-peer file sharing. Establish new career and technical education center. o 2009-2010 Implement new approved CUSD Acceptable Technology Use Policy. Begin teaching the concepts of copyright, plagiarism, and file sharing. Promote analysis and selection of previously introduced tools by teachers and students. Begin access to content on the network by faculty and staff. Begin supplying students with server file storage and train students to access content on the network in the refined computer education courses. Provide new secondary computer courses stated above. Implement safety and ethics component to general computer classes as stated above. Examine ways to fully utilize the new career and technical education center for technology training. o 2010-2011 Expand student server file storage across grades 7-12. Continue teaching the concepts of copyright, plagiarism, and file sharing. Goal 4: All students will demonstrate effective and age-appropriate communication skills to succeed in the global environment. Objectives Benchmark 6/2009 Benchmark 6/2010 Benchmark 6/2011 (as percentages of participants) 4.1 All students will demonstrate proficiency using technology productivity tools (word processing, PowerPoint, web design, etc) 4.2 All students will understand the global scope of learning as demonstrated with

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

emerging social networks and web 2.0 technologies. 4.3 All students will demonstrate age-appropriate academic use of asynchronous 1:1 communications, such as email. 4.4 All students will demonstrate age-appropriate academic use of synchronous 1:1 communications, such as chat, instant messaging, video conferencing, etc. Goal 4 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Introduce digital productivity and creativity tools to be used across the curriculum. Introduce "Web 2.0" technologies to teachers and begin implementing read/write web tools into classroom instruction. Ensure all teachers K-12 have email accounts and adequate access. Establish infrastructure for synchronous and asynchronous communication within the district and to experts outside the district. Develop specific curriculum on online privacy, cyber bullying, and online predators. Begin providing email for students grades 7-12. Begin teacher demonstration of appropriate email use with students grades K-6, including information on internet privacy. Begin providing teachers with Moodle courses that supplement classroom instruction. Begin providing student Moodle accounts for selected pilot courses. o 2009-2010 Expand the use of productivity and creativity tools at all grade levels. Present specific curriculum on online privacy, cyber bullying, and online predators to students receiving Moodle, email, and other "Web 2.0" access. Expand use of "Web 2.0" technologies. Expand student email grades 7-12. Expand number of Moodle courses and accounts across grades 7-12. Pilot Moodle in grades K-6. o 2010-2011 Host a multi-media CUSD festival for student-created projects. Continue to present specific curriculum on online privacy, cyber bullying, and online predators to students receiving Moodle, email, and other "Web 2.0" access.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Provide student email to all students grades 7-12. Consider expanding Moodle through grades K-6.

Goal 5: All students will demonstrate age appropriate information literacy skills in order to be an active participant in the global environment. Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Objectives 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 (as percentages of participants) 5.1 All students can accurately and efficiently search, locate, and 50% evaluate contentspecific digital information. 5.2 All students can then accurately and efficiently interact with and manage 25% abundant content-specific digital information. 5.3 All students will assess the validity of digital and web resources 10% using approved site or course specific criteria. 5.4 All students will synthesize information to demonstrate course and 50% grade-level content understanding. Goal 5 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Connect staff and faculty to a comprehensive digital library, possibly through affiliation with the Claremont Colleges, containing recent and reputable academic journals. Establish an internet research code of conduct as a portion of the revised CUSD Acceptable Use Policy, including references to copyright and plagiarism laws. Teachers will create internet search pages to guide students to curricular specific websites. Continue use of plagiarism-prevention tools, such as TurnItIn.com at CHS and expand use to El Roble and San Antonio High School. Integrate current digital information research skills into new computer course

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

curriculum. o 2009-2011 Maintain and update digital library and necessary institutional affiliations. Students will learn to create internet search pages to guide curricular specific studies. Use the CUSD Educational Technology Committee to establish a student and teacher guide for searching and evaluating online information sources. 3f. List of clear goals and a specific implementation plan for programs and methods of utilizing technology that ensures appropriate access to all students. Goal 6: All students will be provided equitable access to current and emerging technologies in the classroom and elsewhere within each site. Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Objectives 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 6.1 All students will have access to technology resources during the school day. 75% of students 90% of students 100% of students

6.2 Project Learning Labs after hours academic use will 50% of students be expanded, staffed, and sustained. 6.3 All teachers and students will have access to a district 10% of students network-based file storage platform to support classroom goals and objectives. 6.4 School sites will have a 20% of school 4:1 4YON (4 years or newer) sites computer to student ratio. 6.5 School sites will make 100% of school appropriate accommodations sites for all special populations. 6.6 All classrooms will be equipped with a set of minimum basic technology tools: AV/presentation equipment (LCD projector, receiver, speakers, DVD), printer, teacher computer, network access 6.7 School sites and

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

secondary academic checkout from departments will be equipped TOSAs with a set of minimum technology peripherals (9 digital cameras, 1 digital camcorder and accessories). 6.8 Classrooms will be provided adequate software and online subscription licenses to meet classroom curricular goals. 6.9 An entire site will be equipped for use with interactive whiteboards

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6.10 Sites will begin to be 5% of classrooms 10% of classrooms 15% of classrooms equipped with 21st century classroom technology tools: interactive whiteboards, document cameras, and student response systems Special populations will be provided additional access as indicated: · · · · All special education students will receive the same access to technology as regular education students and will additionally receive assistive technologies based upon IEP and 504 accommodation plans. All English Learners (ELs) will receive the same access to technology as regular education students and will additionally be provided assistive technologies in accordance with the CUSD EL program and single school plans at each site. All socio-economically disadvantaged students will receive the same access to technology as regular education students and will additionally be provided assistive technologies in accordance with the single school plan at each site. Honors/AP/AVID students will receive the same access to technology as regular education students and will additionally receive additional technology access based upon program needs and requirements.

Goal 6 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Provide a Project Learning Lab or laptop cart at each site for a full class to have to 2:1 student-to-computer access. Reduce 4YON student-to-computer ratio to at least 6:1. Examine each site's needs for extended hours for technology access and include specifics in site technology plan.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Begin providing teachers with data file storage and access to these files from any Internet connection. Begin equipping each traditional classroom with a set of minimum basic technology tools (defined above). Standardize all new computer purchases with Microsoft Office as the standard productivity tool. Equip selected classrooms with interactive whiteboards. Provide ALEKS and/or Cognitive Tutor licenses, or equivalent, for all SAHS students and identified at-risk students at CHS. Equip all new computer purchases with elementary site or secondary departmental specific software and licenses as determined in school site tech plans. For example, Accelerated Reader--grades K-6, Geometer's Sketch Pad--mathematics grades 7-11, iLife Suite--Macs grades K-12, Adobe Creative Suite--visual and performing arts grades 9-12, Final Cut Pro--visual and performing arts grades 912, etc. Develop a specialized math and ELA intervention-related software plan. o 2009-2010 Provide a Project Learning Lab or laptop cart at each site for a full class to have to 1:1 student-to-computer access. Reduce 4YON student-to-computer ratio to at least 5:1. Implement site-specific extended hours and staffing based upon site technology plans. Begin access to content on the network by faculty and staff. Begin providing grades 9-12 students with data file storage and virtual lockers and train students access to these files from any Internet connection. Enable faculty, staff, and students to produce digital portfolios, resumes, and personal statements documenting academic, physical, and personal growth. Continue equipping each traditional classroom with a set of minimum basic technology. Begin equipping standard and emerging peripherals and software appropriate to specific elementary site and secondary departmental needs. Standardize all remaining 4YON computers with Microsoft Office (those that do not already have it). Expand the number of interactive whiteboards in selected classrooms. o 2010-2011 Reduce 4YON student-to-computer ratio to at least 4:1. Sustain 4YON student-to-computer ratio with additional purchases each year. Expand student file server storage across grades 7-12. Begin providing grades 7-12 students with data file storage and access to these files from any Internet connection. Finish providing all teachers with data file storage and access to these files from any Internet connection. Equip each elementary site and secondary academic department with one upgraded cable/satellite television access and digital video recording capabilities to bring new content into the classroom. Equip all new computer purchases with elementary site or secondary departmental

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

specific software and licenses as determined in school site tech plans (Accelerated Reader--grades K-6, Geometer's Sketch Pad--mathematics grades 7-11, iLife Suite--Macs grades K-12, Adobe Creative Suite--visual and performing arts grades 9-12, Final Cut Pro--visual and performing arts grades 9-12, etc). Finish equipping each traditional classroom with a set of minimum basic technology tools. Expand the number of interactive whiteboards in the selected classrooms.

3g. List of clear goals and specific implementation plans to utilize technology to make student record keeping and assessment more efficient and supportive of teachers' efforts to meet individual student academic needs. Goal 7: CUSD will provide all teachers with technology that allows for consistent, effective, and simple student record keeping, assessment, and analysis. Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Objectives 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 7.1 Each teacher shall be designated an individual, networked computer for student record keeping, 85% of teachers assessment, lesson design, and classroom management. 7.2 All teachers will record, manage, and distribute student attendance information 100% of teachers using CUSD's designated student information system (Zangle). 7.3 All teachers will record, manage, and distribute student assignment and grade information using a data management system (Zangle)

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7.4 Teachers will disaggregate CST, CAHSEE, district reading benchmarks, and 30% of teachers individual course assessments using a data management system (Data Director) to identify target

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

content areas and student populations. 7.5 Teachers will use textbook adoption supplemental materials that will greatly support 50% of adopted the use of technology and materials assist them in creating and analyzing lessons and assessments. Goal 7 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Model and evaluate Zangle Gradebook, and/or DataDirector for use by elementary teachers to track academic progress. Require 85% of secondary teachers to maintain and publish grades in CUSD's designated student information system (Zangle Gradebook). Evaluate all adopted textbooks on technology integration. Train and support all new CUSD teachers on Zangle. o 2009-2010 Implement Zangle, Gradebook and/or DataDirector for use by elementary teachers to track academic progress. Require 95% of secondary teachers to maintain and publish grades in CUSD's designated student information system (Zangle Gradebook). o 2010-2011 Publish Zangle, Gradebook and/or DataDirector student information for elementary parent access. Require 100% of secondary teachers to maintain and publish grades in CUSD's designated student information system (Zangle Gradebook).

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3h. List of clear goals and a specific implementation plan to utilize technology to make teachers and administrators more accessible to parents. Goal 8: CUSD teachers and administrators will be easily accessible to parents via technology. Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Objectives 6/2009 6/2010 6/2011 8.1 The district website will be revamped for In-progress ease-of-use and quality of information. 8.2 School site websites 100% of schools Completed 50% of schools 17 Review for effectiveness 100% of schools

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

will be revamped for in-progress ease-of-use and quality of information.

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8.3 The current use of online student attendance and assignment 100% of 75% of classrooms 85% of classrooms publication (Zangle classrooms ParentConnect) will be expanded. 8.4 Teachers will develop and use classroom websites and/or learning 10% of all teachers 40% of all teachers 65% of all teachers management systems such as Moodle. 8.5 All teachers will consistently and regularly 85% of teachers use email and voicemail. 8.6 Teachers and administrators will communicate timely reminders and critical 100% in-use information to parents via phone without Internet connections (Connect Ed, voicemail, etc). Goal 8 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Select and highly train a district webmaster to revamp CUSD's website. Publish all staff and faculty email and phone extensions in each site office and on the new CUSD website. Promote all teachers using Zangle to publish information to parents. Begin providing a small pilot group of teachers with Moodle courses. Encourage teachers to begin to communicate timely reminders and critical information to parents via email. Superintendent and site principals use Connect Ed to communicate with district/school families. Investigate teacher access to Connect Ed to communicate class specific, timely reminders and critical information to parents. o 2009-2010 Coordinate webmaster and site principals to redesign school site websites. Require all teachers using Zangle to publish information to parents. Expand teacher Moodle use as class websites. 18 100% of teachers 100% of teachers

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100% in-use

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Use Connect Ed by district and site administrators to communicate with district/school families. Establish parent and faculty email list-serves. o 2010-2011 District webmaster to evaluate efficacy of CUSD website. Evaluate use of tools by parents. Superintendent and site principals use Connect Ed to communicate with district/school families. 3i. List of benchmarks and a timeline for implementing planned strategies and activities. Note: Benchmarks and timelines appear throughout Objectives and Implementation Plans previously described. 3j. Description of the process that will be used to monitor whether the strategies and methodologies utilizing technology are being implemented according to the benchmarks and timeline. · The Director of Technology and Executive Director of Educational Services are responsible for monitoring progress in accomplishing the Educational Technology Plan's goals and objectives, and for assuring that the specified strategies and methodologies in the plan are applied. Major support will be provided by the CUSD Technology Integration Teachers (Teachers on Special Assignment) and site principals. Student achievement will be measured against CST, CAHSEE, CELDT, and site-specific assessment results. This data will be disaggregated to provide specific results for student groups that include, but are not limited to, special education, EL, economically disadvantaged, and ethnic groups. Reestablish the CUSD Educational Technology Committee and redefine the role of the committee to locate, evaluate, and recommend appropriate technologies for use in the district. Site administration shall examine elementary standards-based report cards and secondary passing grades along with AYP proficiency levels for each site and at the district level. EETT grant participants will be monitored by site administrators to determine if the equipment and training provided is enhancing student learning. As a yearly cycle, the Educational Technology Plan will be discussed, critiqued, evaluated, and rewritten to address changes in technology, funding, progress, and school cultures. The yearly plan evaluation cycle shall include: o Fall--The Director of Technology and Technology Integration Teachers will educate sites about plan changes and train faculty and staff. The committee will identify strengths and weaknesses in technology curriculum integration and provide recommendations for program advancement or revision. o Winter--The committee shall discuss successful and unsuccessful technology integration at each site and asses the completion of each stage of the Educational Technology Plan. o Spring--The committee will revise and modify the plan based upon input and events throughout the year. o Summer-The Technology Integration Specialists will finalize updates and revisions to the plan for implementation in the following Fall term

· · · · ·

19

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

4. Professional Development 4a. Summary of the teachers' and administrators' current technology skills and needs for professional development. The CTAP survey, completed by teachers and administrators every spring, gives valuable insight into CUSD's current technology skills and needs. According to the 2007 CTAP survey, only 16% of teachers and administrators consider themselves proficient in general computer knowledge and skills. · · Strongest general computer knowledge and skills (>40% Proficient): o Word processing (47%) Weakest general computer knowledge and skills (<40% Proficient): o Internet skills (20%) o Email skills (27%) o Presentation software skills (22%) o Spreadsheet software skills (10%) o Database software skills (10%)

Only 15% teachers use technology in the classroom at a proficient level. Alarmingly, 60% are at a beginning level. · · Strongest `technology in the classroom' skills (>20% Proficient): o Record management with technology (22%) o Online collaboration via email (22%) Weakest `technology in the classroom' skills (<20% Proficient): o Management and alignment of technological resources with lesson content (7%) o Knowledge of student level of technology use and academic accomplishment (8%) o Knowledge of research and best practices in technology in education (8%) o Communication through technology generated printed media (16%) o Evaluation and selection of technological resources (7%) o Knowledge of school and district educational technological resources policies (19%) o Use of educational technological resources to address student learning needs (8%) o Evaluation and selection educational software (4%) o Use of electronic research tools and assessment of data gathered (8%) o Knowledge of state and federal laws for uses of computer-based technologies (11%) o Knowledge of computer and network security and shared resource management (12%) o Knowledge of Acceptable Use Policies, safety, and health issues (18%)

59% of teachers are beginning to use technology to support student learning; 8% are proficient. · · Strongest `supporting student learning' skills (>10% Proficient): o Use of data to assess and communicate student learning (12%) Weakest `supporting student learning' skills (<10% Proficient): o Communication using a variety of electronic media (6%)

20

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

o o o o o o o o o

Communication with other professionals (5%) Alignment of technology enhanced lessons with curriculum (6%) Use of available technological resources (9%) Development of information literacy skills (9%) Development of problem-solving skills (5%) Creation of technology-enhanced learning opportunities (9%) Creation of effective learning environments (8%) Evaluation of technology use and quality of student products (4%) Evaluation, monitoring, and adjustment of technology enhanced instruction (3%)

Teachers and administrators largely use technology for housekeeping and administrative tasks and do not extend the use of technology into the curriculum. Teachers are in great need of professional development that increases basic technology skills and utilizes the technology that is already available in the classroom. Additionally, there is a great need for that professional development to be provided onsite and directly integrated into the workplace. Teachers must be prepared to empower students with the advantages and necessary experiences embedded in educational technologies. The role of professional development to aid and support teachers in this effort is essential and must be ongoing. Teachers must incorporate new strategies to fully utilize their changing learning environments, which will include modern technologies that may be unfamiliar to many teachers. Many of the coming changes to traditional learning environments are listed in the table below: Traditional Learning Environment Teacher-centered instruction Single-sense stimulation Single-path progression Single media Isolated work Information delivery Passive learning Factual, knowledge-based learning Reactive response Isolated, artificial context New Learning Environment Student-centered learning Multisensory stimulation Multi-path progression Multimedia Collaborative work Information exchange Active/exploratory/inquiry-based learning Critical thinking and informed decisionmaking Proactive/planned action Authentic, real-world context

National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers , ISTE 2002, p.5

4b. List of clear goals and a specific implementation plan for providing professional development opportunities based on the needs assessment and the Curriculum Component goals, benchmarks, and timeline.

21

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Goal 9: All CUSD faculty and will be proficient in general computer knowledge and skills. Objective Benchmark 6/2009 Benchmark 6/2010 Benchmark 6/2011 (Percentage of (Percentage of (Percentage of teachers and teachers and teachers and administrators) administrators) administrators) 9.1 Teachers and administrators will be trained in MS Office (Word, Excel, and Powerpoint). 9.2 Teachers and administrators will shift email communication to using Entourage, Outlook, and/or an exchange server as the district standard. 9.3 CUSD will support teachers' and administrators' use of the Firefox web browser. 9.4 Teachers and administrators will be trained to troubleshoot basic technology problems and issues. 9.5 Teachers will learn to use network servers to store/share professional, student, and multimedia files. 9.6 Teachers and administrators will score proficient in all components of the CTAP General Computer Knowledge and Skills survey, including copyright laws. 25% 50% 75%

5%

50%

100%

40%

75%

100%

5%

25%

50%

5%

25%

75%

25%

45%

65%

22

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

9.7 Classified staff will 5% of Classified staff be included in general computer skills and knowledge training. Goal 9 Implementation Plan: ·

25% of Classified staff 50% of Classified staff

Grades K-12 o 2008-2009 Explore the possibility of offering CTAP level one and two courses within CUSD or at least closer to CUSD. Explore the possibility of CUSD teachers participating in basic skills trainings at the Pomona USD training facility on Indian Hill Boulevard. Encourage, through CTAP or a partnership with PUSD, PLC members to take basic computer skills training if they have not completed CTAP basic skills training, or do not have adequate basic skills. Identify a small, select set of skills from the CTAP survey to target. Design professional development courses that target these select areas. Adopt a single productivity standard (MS Office) and web browser (Firefox) to support throughout the district. Provide training sessions on each of the following applications at least once a year at each site: MS Word, MS PowerPoint, MS Outlook/Entourage, and Firefox. Provide copyright information at the annual troubleshooting session. Provide general technology troubleshooting sessions at each site at least once a year. Use Technology Integration Teachers to facilitate CTAP survey completion. o 2009-2010 Begin to provide network access training at each site. Add MS Excel to MS Office training. Focus on MS Outlook/Entourage training (with new staff and faculty email system). Expand 2008-2009 training sessions to twice per year at each site. Review progress on the selected CTAP target areas and select one new target in each area if progress is satisfactory. o 2010-2011 Examine the effectiveness of the training sessions and provide recommend revisions. Continue extensive professional development on the new email system and network access.

Goal 10: CUSD teachers will integrate technology into the classroom. Objective Benchmark 6/2009 Benchmark 6/2010 Benchmark 6/2011 10.1 All CUSD 100% of Teachers and 100% of Teachers and 100% of Teachers and teachers and Administrators Administrators Administrators administrators will be

23

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

informed of new acceptable use policies. changes, including any internet safety and ethics changes. 10.2 Teachers will be trained to use 5% of Teachers synchronous digital communication such as video conferencing, instant messaging, chat rooms, and the like, as well as being trained in internet safety and privacy practices. 10.3 All teachers will 10% of Teachers learn to accurately and efficiently interact with and manage abundant, content specific, digital information, while following `fair use' guidelines. 10.4 Teachers will be supported in their regular use of basic presentation tools (LCD projectors, DVD, printers, audio projection, etc) PLC teachers & sites/departments as requested 10% of Teachers 25% of Teachers

25% of Teachers

75% of Teachers

PLC begin to mentor other teachers & sites/departments as requested

All schools have a network of technology mentors

10.5 Teachers will be Establish the 20% of teachers supported in the Professional Learning participating in the curricular use and Community (PLC) PLC management of technology peripherals (digital cameras and camcorders, scanners, interactive whiteboards, and other site-determined equipment). 10.6 Teachers will be 5% of Teachers 15% of Teachers

30% of teachers participating in the PLC

50% of Teachers

24

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

provided opportunities to learn multimedia applications in an effort to support curricular goals. 10.7 CUSD will TOSAs trained provide inservices/training for any adopted, online subscriptions (Accelerated Reader, Accelerated Math, Geometers' Sketchpad, etc) 10.8 CUSD will 50% of Teachers provide inservices/training for any all adopted student data management systems (Zangle and Data Director). 10.9 Teachers will be trained to use digital textbook adoption materials 25% of Teachers All relevant sites/departments All new teachers trained

65% of Teachers

85% of Teachers

60% of Teachers

100% of Teachers

10.10 Teachers and 20% of teachers and administrators will administrators score proficient in all components of the CTAP Using Technology in the Classroom survey. Goal 10 Implementation Plan: ·

35% of teachers and administrators

50% of teachers and administrators

Grades K-12: o 2008-2009 Contact will be made by Technology Integration Teachers with all teachers interested in technology integration. Establish two (K-6, 7-12) technology professional learning communities (PLCs). Inform teachers and administrators of any newly adopted changes in the CUSD acceptable use policy. Train secondary teachers to use Turnitin.com. Provide personalized, one-on-one presentation tool (LCD projectors, audio projection, etc) training to those teachers that request support. 25

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Provide personalized, one-on-one multimedia (video production, podcasting, etc) training to those teachers that request support. Provide personalized, small group training to those teachers requesting support on district-adopted online subscriptions (Accelerated Reader, etc)Provide personalized, small group training to those teachers using Data Director. Develop a protocol/procedure for elementary school teachers to use Zangle and/or Data Director to manage student data beyond the scope of CST scores. Provide personalized, small group training at each site during each grading term to all new teachers in grades 7-12 using Zangle Gradebook. Begin a monthly 'Tech Tips' newsletter to be designed by the Technology Integration Teachers and distributed via email. o 2009-2010 Contact will be made by Technology Integration Teachers with all teachers interested in technology integration . Expand the technology PLC to actively incorporate participants. Begin training teachers and administrators on Moodle. Train El Roble teachers to use Turnitin.com. Provide training sessions on presentation tools (LCD projectors, audio projection, etc) at least once a year at each site. Provide training sessions on multimedia (video production, podcasting, etc) at least once a year at each site. Provide personalized, small group training to all teachers using district-adopted online subscriptions and new versions (Accelerated Reader, etc)Provide a 'digital literacy' professional development course. Provide personalized, small group Data Director training to all CUSD teachers. Expand Gradebook training to include refresher course or critical upgrades to all teachers in grades 7-12Migrate 'Tech Tips' and other tools to a Moodle site or other site. o 2010-2011 Contact will be made by Technology Integration Teachers with all teachers interested in technology integration. Examine the effectiveness of the training sessions and provide recommend revisions. Continue extensive professional development on classroom data management tools (Zangle, Data Director, etc). Goal 11: CUSD teachers will use technology to support student learning. Objective Benchmark 6/2009 Benchmark 6/2010 Benchmark 6/2011 11.1 CUSD will Establish PLC establish and maintain a Technology PLC to support a cohort of teachers excited to lead the district in bringing educational technology to students. 20% of teachers participating in the PLC 30% of teachers participating in the PLC

26

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

11.2 Computer lab paraprofessionals and teachers will work together to connect project learning lab activities with class curriculum. 11.3 Teachers will be trained in web 2.0 technologies and resources. 11.4 Secondary teachers will be supported in their use of learning management systems (Moodle) 11.5 Teachers will be exposed to new and emerging educational technologies

Establish connections between teachers and computer lab aides

Redefine roles between teachers and computer lab aides

Maintain partnerships between teachers and computer lab aides

Training courses established

5% of teachers participate in courses

15% of teachers participate in courses

Training courses established

5% of teachers participate in courses

15% of teachers participate in courses

5% of teachers participate in district courses or local conferences

10% of teachers participate in district courses or local conferences 25% of teachers and administrators

20% of teachers participate in district courses or local conferences 40% of teachers and administrators

11.6 Teachers and 10% of teachers and administrators will administrators score proficient in all components of the CTAP Using Technology to Support Student Learning survey. Goal 11 Implementation Plan: ·

Grades K-12: o 2008-2009 Contact will be made by Technology Integration Teachers with all teachers interested in technology integration. Technology Integration Teachers will maintain contact with project learning lab paraprofessionals to monitor levels of technology integration into class curriculum. Establish two (K-6, 7-12) technology professional learning communities (PLCs). Provide personalized, small group web 2.0 (blogs, wikis, chats, etc) training to those teachers that request support. Include internet safety, privacy, and file transfer rules in said training. Provide training and support to secondary teachers interested in piloting Moodle as an integrated component of their classes. Research new technologies to be considered for future integration activities. 27

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Explore the possibility of offering CTAP level one and two courses within CUSD or at least closer to CUSD. Explore the possibility of CUSD teachers participating in basic skills trainings at the Pomona USD training facility on Indian Hill Boulevard. Encourage, through CTAP or a partnership with PUSD, PLC members to take basic computer skills training if they have not completed CTAP basic skills training, or do not have adequate basic skills. o 2009-2010 Expand the technology PLC to actively incorporate participants as technology mentors. Meet new district teachers and inform them about the Technology PLC and invite participation. Coordinate activities for integrating technology into class curriculum with project learning lab paraprofessionals. Continue to provide personalized, small group web 2.0 (blogs, wikis, chats, etc) training to those teachers that request support. Provide training and support to secondary and upper teachers interested in implementing Moodle as an integrated component of their classes. Technology Integration Teachers will receive training on new technologies and software to be piloted by PLC teachers. Support PLC teachers in their piloting of new technologies to be considered for future school/district wide integration activities. Attend conferences and seminars on emerging educational technologies. Provide access to basic skills training to teachers not yet proficient on the EdTech Profile through CTAP or partnerships with other districts. o 2010-2011 Continue PLC activities and member recruitment. Continue to model technology integration lessons in various curricular areas and demonstrate how to use Project Learning Labs as requested by teachers or site administrators. Meet new district teachers and inform them about the Technology PLC and invite participation. Coordinate activities for integrating new technology into class curriculum with project learning lab paraprofessionals. Continue to provide personalized, small group web 2.0 (blogs, wikis, chats, etc) training to those teachers that request support. Provide training and support to secondary and upper teachers interested in implementing Moodle as an integrated component of their classes. Provide training and support for PLC teachers to implement any previously piloted and approved technologies. Continue to provide TOSA training on new technologies and software to be piloted by PLC teachers. Support PLC teachers in their piloting of new technologies to be considered for future school/district wide integration activities. Attend conferences and seminars on emerging educational technologies. Provide access to basic skills training to teachers not yet proficient on the EdTech

28

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Profile through CTAP or partnerships with other districts. Goal 12: CUSD will provide all teachers and administrators with relevant and scaffolded professional development that is directly embedded in the workplace with flexible scheduling. Objective 12.1 CUSD will be committed to flexible training options, such as before/after school, Saturdays, summer academies, prep-time, inclass modeling, sub release, and online courses Benchmark 6/2009 Benchmark 6/2010 Benchmark 6/2011

Begin developing 5% of teachers 15% of teachers courses; Assign participate in courses participate in courses Technology Integration Teachers

12.2 Except where 50% of professional otherwise inappropriate, development offered professional development on-site will be on-site and embedded into the site culture and curriculum 12.3 Teachers will be encouraged to attend CTAP courses in their areas of interest or need. 5% of teachers participate in CTAP courses

75% of professional 100% of professional development offered development offered on-site on-site

15% of teachers 25% of teachers participate in CTAP participate in CTAP courses courses 1 FTE total 2 FTE total

12.4 Teachers on Special 1 FTE total Assignment (Technology Integration Teachers) will provide on-site and district training, modeling, coaching, and support for faculties and individual teachers. 12.5 A Site/Department Program funding and technology resource leader structure established (TRL) program will be developed, as part of the technology PLC, for "just in time" training. 12.6 On-site technology At least one on-site courses will be offered by training at each site TOSA and other district offered by the TOSAs trainers. 12.8 Classified staff will 2% of classified staff

1 TRL at each site

Expand number of TRLs at secondary sites

Expand TOSA offered courses and begin TRL offered courses

TRLs will expand course offerings

5% of classified staff 10% of classified 29

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

be included in all participation professional development opportunities 12.9 All teachers and 90% of teachers and administrators will take administrators the annual CTAP EdTech Profile Survey. Professional Development Infrastructure Model:

participation

staff participation

95% of teachers and 100% of teachers administrators and administrators

Director of Educational Services Director of Technology

Teachers on Special Assignment

All Faculty and Staff

Predominant Technology Users

Site Technology Resource Leaders

Technology Professional Learning Community Goal 12 Implementation Plan: · Grades K-12: o 2008-2009 Summer technology courses will be taught by experienced teachers, paraprofessionals, and TOSAs, in a variety of basic and more advanced technology tools. Certificated and Classified attendees will be paid a stipend. TOSAs will model technology integration lessons in various curricular areas and demonstrate how to use Project Learning Labs at various sites after school in Project Learning Labs, and/or in individual classrooms with students present. Teachers will be informed of availability and location of CTAP Courses, and encourage their participation. TOSAs will be trained in all district adopted software, or online curriculum tools. TOSAs will search for funding and establish a structure for incorporating. Technology Resource Leaders (TRLs) in a variety of professional development activities. TOSAs will support all teachers and administrators in taking the annual CTAP 30

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

EdTech Profile Survey. Paraprofessionals may be included in supporting their site faculty in completing this survey as well. Cohorts of teachers will be supported to attend technology conferences and share out ideas gathered at those conferences. Teacher visitations to inter and intra district classrooms will be supported. All training courses will be leveled (classes for beginners, intermediate, and advanced users). BTSA partnerships will be explored. o 2009-2010 Summer technology courses will be taught by TRLs, paraprofessionals, and TOSAs, in a variety of basic and more advanced technology tools. Certificated and Classified attendees will be paid a stipend. TOSAs will model technology integration lessons in various curricular areas and demonstrate how to use Project Learning Labs at various sites after school in Project Learning Labs, and/or in individual classrooms with students present. The technology PLC will be expanded to actively incorporate participants as TRLs. TOSAs will identify PLC members who are interested in being TRLs for their respective sites. TOSAs will offer training in all district-adopted software, or online curriculum tools at school sites. TRLs will be trained as trainers. TOSAs will support all teachers and administrators in taking the annual CTAP EdTech Profile Survey. Paraprofessionals and TRLs may be included in supporting their site faculty in completing this survey. Individual growth plans for all teachers will be established. Compensation/incentives, such as sub-rate pay, hourly pay, lump sum pay, certificate of completion, professional growth hours, conference admissions, etc. will be explored. o 2010-2011 Compensation/incentives, such as sub-rate pay, hourly pay, lump sum pay, certificate of completion, professional growth hours, conference admissions, etc will be provided. Summer technology courses will be taught by TRLs, paraprofessionals, and TOSAs, in a variety of basic and more advanced technology tools. Certificated and Classified attendees will be paid a stipend. TOSAs will model technology integration lessons in various curricular areas and demonstrate how to use Project Learning Labs at various sites after school in Project Learning Labs, and/or in individual classrooms with students present. PLC participants will be incorporated as TRLs while recruiting TRLs from the PLC as needed, or interested. TOSAs will offer training in all district-adopted software, or online curriculum tools at school sites. TRLs may provide some of this training. TOSAs will support all teachers and administrators in taking the annual CTAP EdTech Profile Survey. Paraprofessionals and TRLs may be included in supporting their site faculty in completing this survey.

31

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

4c. List of benchmarks and a timeline for implementing planned strategies and activities. Note: Benchmarks and timelines appear throughout Goals, Objectives, and Implementation Plans previously described. 4d. Description of the process that will be used to monitor whether the professional development goals are being met and whether the planned professional development activities are being implemented in accordance with the benchmarks and timeline. · · The Director of Educational Services and Director of Technology will monitor the progress of the professional development goals and objectives. They will define and direct the roles and responsibilities of the Teachers on Special Assignment. Site principals will be responsible for managing the site Technology Resource Leaders who will receive support, training, and coordination from the Teachers on Special Assignment. They will also coordinate and measure training of integration strategies and best practices for teachers and administrators and ensure site Technology Resource Leaders provide just in time training and curriculum support. Site administration will monitor and measure teacher technology integration via lesson plans, observations, and student work. Site principals will then formulate and communicate teacher needs with the Teachers on Special Assignment approximately once a month. Teacher and administrator growth and proficiency will be measured by the annual completion of the CTAP self-assessment. The Director of Technology and Teachers on Special Assignment will facilitate, monitor, and analyze CTAP results for future planning. Information Services Coordinator will coordinate and measure training certificated and classified staff on Zangle and Data Director. Teachers on Special Assignment will help facilitate and execute training. End User Analyst will coordinate, provide, and measure training of classified staff. The District Educational Technology Committee will examine current technology professional development and provide suggestions to the Director of Technology and Teachers on Special Assignment. Technology Support Services staff will discuss professional development needs and progress at each weekly staff meeting. All professional development course participants will complete course evaluations and will be surveyed on their increased and effective use of technology to support curriculum. Teachers and administrators may be surveyed quarterly for the Teachers on Special Assignment to ensure adequate support and follow-up. The Instructional Technology Assistant will update the professional development schedule, publicize professional development courses, and coordinate professional development course evaluations. The effect of professional development on student learning will be measured by positive changes in student performance, grade-level content mastery, STAR results, authentic assessment, information literacy, behavior, and attitudes. Each year, the professional development component of the CUSD Master Educational Technology Plan will be revised and evaluated. A summary of progress toward the completion of goals and objectives will be completed by the Director of Technology and Teachers on

· · · · · · · · · · ·

32

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Special Assignment and submitted to the Director of Educational Services, Superintendant, and School Board, if requested.

33

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

5. Hardware, Software, Infrastructure, and Technical Support 5a. Description of existing hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support that is currently used in the district. · Hardware The district is non-standardized on their computing platform and consist of both Windows (2000 and XP) and Mac (OS 9 and X). The type of classroom computer is determined by the teacher/school site and there is no central management of the desktop configurations. Most computers still run the software originally installed at time of purchase. All new desktop computers are installed using a standardized build and contain the following district purchased software: Operating system (Mac OS X 10.4 or Windows XP SP2) Sophos anti-virus/anti-spyware protection Microsoft Office (2003 for Windows or 2004 for Mac) Note: Refer to section 3a for total number of computers at sites. Every site has either a computing lab or a mobile laptop cart that is utilized throughout the day. At this time, the majority of the labs/carts do not support 1:1 computing. As the labs/carts are used fairly regularly, they tend to have the most recently technology at that site. Classrooms have a variety of other types of hardware determined by the site. Recently, about 35% of the district's classrooms were equipped with LCD projectors and sites without mounted projector have them available for checkout at their site. Also, a number of sites still have mounted TVs in the classrooms but have adapted them to be used with teachers' computers. Within the last year, Claremont High School (CHS) purchased three Promethean interactive whiteboards. The whiteboards are used in math, English, foreign language and social science subject areas. · Infrastructure o MAN/LAN Every school site has network connectivity running to every classroom. District-wide the majority of classrooms have eight Cat5 network jacks installed with 4 jacks activated. All switching equipment located at sites is Cisco based. Workgroup (unmanaged) hubs/switches are also used to provide additional network connectivity within the classroom. There is no organized wireless access available at any site. Sites having laptop carts contain a wireless access point that only supports the laptops assigned to that cart and laptops are statically assigned to that cart. Other wireless access points exist but are not centrally managed. The district currently maintains a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) built using Verizon TLS fiber services running at a speed from 10Mbps to 1000Mbps. The MAN extends to all district sites as well as to the district upstream Internet provider, the Claremont Colleges. Site Chaparral Condit 10 10 Speed (Mbps)

34

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Danbury Mountain View Oakmont Sumner Sycamore Vista del Valle El Roble Intermediate School Claremont High School San Antonio High School & Community Day School Alternate Education Center District Office Claremont Colleges

100 (shared with Sumner) 10 10 100 (shared with Danbury) 10 10 100 1000 10 100 100 100

All networking equipment is from Cisco and includes the following: Routers: 7200, 3600, 2600 series Switches: 4500, 3700, 3600, 3500, 2900 series Firewall: PIX 520 All Internet traffic is routed through Claremont High School where it passes through a PIX firewall before going to the Claremont Colleges. All web traffic is scanned by the district's CIPA compliant proxy server running Secure Computing's Smartfilter, Bess edition. o Server The majority of the districts 25 centralized servers are more than 5 years old. A large portion of the 25 are desktop computers pressed into service as a server. Early in 2007, a server refresh was started that included virtualizing the majority of the 25 servers onto 4 new servers and included the installation of a storage area network (SAN). This should be sufficient to supply centralized server resources for the duration of the plan. The following are centralized services supported by these servers: Student information system, Zangle E-mail (staff and some student) Website access Instructional course delivery system, Moodle Domain authentication File storage (administrative only) Document archival system All school sites have local file and print servers that are available to students and staff. Again, the majority of these servers are desktop computers pressed into service as a server and aren't centrally managed. During the summer of 2007, a server refresh project was started and is scheduled to complete during the duration of this plan. The new servers will supply file, print and domain authentication services. At this time only Claremont High School, El Roble Intermediate and Vista Elementary have had new servers deployed to their sites.

35

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

o Physical Plant Due to the completion of a recent modernization project, all school sites have sufficient environmental and electrical system to support the technology goals of this plan. Standard maintenance should only be required for the duration of this plan. · Electronic Learning Resources School sites have a variety of electronic learning resources that have been site determined with a number of different packages at sites that all do the same thing. There is currently no centralized support for these resources. Sites use a variety of software packages and have been purchased on an as needed basis. The following is a small list of software used at sites: Accelerated Reader/Math, Geometer's Sketch Pad, Apple's iLife Suite, Adobe Creative Suite, Final Cut Pro, Media Blender, Microsoft Office, Appleworks, ComicLife, Plato, GarageBand, and ALEKS. Most sites also have a number of technology accessories. These would be items such as digital cameras, digital camcorders, document cameras and student response systems. This type of technology normally resides in the computer labs at site and is checked out to teachers as needed. · Technical Support Technology Support Services (TSS) department currently consists of a Director, a Coordinator of Information Systems, a Network Analyst, a User Support Analyst, two Desktop Support Technicians (one dedicated the Claremont High School) and one part time clerical support person. The department also has two part time TOSAs (1 FTE total) for classroom technology integration. TSS uses a trouble ticket tracking system, Current Solutions, as the primary means of reporting support issues. Once tickets have been submitted, they are assigned by the Director to the appropriate support person. Title Director Information Systems Coordinator Network Analyst User Support Analyst Desktop Support Technician Support function assigned via ticketing system Network, phone and server support Student information database, reports Network and server support Desktop support for district office, database report support User desktop issues at all school sites

All new computers purchased within the last year have a three year on-site warranty but the district has a considerable number of computers before then with only a one year warranty. Also, almost 40% of the districts computers are over 4 years old and require considerable time to repair when they fail. Of the three end user support positions, only the two desktop technicians directly support the school sites with one of them being dedicated to the two high schools. For the technician at the high schools, there is a computer to technician ratio of 560:1. For the technician at the other school sites, the ratio is 1108:1.

36

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

The two part-time TOSAs are split between the primary and secondary levels. They provide training and assistance to teachers in the integration of technology in the classroom. The district feels that it is essential to have teachers training teachers in the proper use of instructional technology. 5b. List hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support that of needed to implement the Curricular and Professional Development sections of this plan. Goal 13: CUSD will provide the technical resources to support the Curriculum and Professional Development sections of this plan. Hardware: Objective

By June 2011, 4:1 provide 4YON computer to student ratio at all sites Provide a project lab or laptop cart that supports 1:1 computing at all sites Purchase and mount LCD projectors in all classrooms (includes sound system) Provide networked classroom printers Purchase one scanner per site for use with Data Director

Purchase and install interactive whiteboards for an entire site

Goal in Plan 6.4

Responsible Entity Principals, DOT

Current Needed

20082009 458

20092010 456

20102011 456

1006

1370

6.4

Principals, DOT

285

130

30

50

50

6.6

Principals, DOT

94

174

58

58

58

6.6 6.1

Principals, DOT Principals, DOT Principals, DOT Principals, DOT

123 0

145 11

48 11

48 --

49 --

6.9 6.10

0 3

35 265

10 13

10 13

11 13

Purchase and install 21st century technology in classrooms Infrastructure: Objective

Purchase and install file server for all sites Add network switches

Goal in Plan 3.5, 6.3, 9.5 6

Responsible Entity DOT, Network Analyst DOT,

Current

Needed

20082009 3

20092010 4

20102011 4

3

11

105

42

12

15

15

37

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

to activate all network jacks in classrooms Install wireless access points at all school sites Purchase and install servers capable of supporting Moodle district-wide Increase MAN bandwidth to new data center to 1000Mbit

6

4.2, 4.3, 8.4 6

Network Analyst DOT, Network Analyst DOT, Network Analyst DOT

0

85

20

(50% of secondary schools)

20

(100% of secondary schools)

20

(45% of elementary schools)

1

2

2

--

--

100Mbit

1000Mbit

100%

100%

100%

Electronic Learning Resources: Objective Goals in Plan Evaluate and purchase 6.8 video streaming service Install student email 4 system Move staff and faculty over to Exchange server 4

Responsible Entity DOT DOT, Network Analyst DOT, Network Analyst, Desktop Technicians DOT, Network Analyst, TOSAs DOT, Desktop Technicians

Current Needed

20082009 100% 25%

(Secondary Students)

20092010 100% 75%

(Secondary Students)

20102011 100% 100%

(Secondary Students)

1 school 100% site None 100%

18 users

600 users

40%

(240 users)

80%

(240 users)

100%

(120 users)

Provide student access to online course delivery system (Moodle) Determine/support all site/departmental software Technical Support: Objective

4.2, 4.3, 8.4 6

5%

100%

30%

60%

100%

TBD

1700

Survey sites 100%

50%

100%

Hire analyst to maintain website and provide database reporting Reduce technician to computer ratio to 400:1 Add 1 FTE TOSA position for technology

Goal in Plan 8.1, 8.2 6 12.4

Responsible Entity DOT

Current Needed

20082009 +1

(fill position)

20092010 1

(maintain position)

20102011 1

(maintain position)

0

1

DOT DOT, Exec. Dir. For Ed 38

2 1 FTE

2 2 FTE

+1

(fill position)

+1

(fill position)

2

(maintain positions)

1 FTE

1 FTE

2 FTE

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

integration

Note: DOT=Director of Technology

Services

5c. List of clear annual benchmarks for obtaining the hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support required to support the other plan components as identified in section 5b. Note: Benchmarks and timelines appear in section 5b for obtaining and implementing hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support. 5d. Describe the process that will be used to monitor the annual benchmarks including roles and responsibilities. Note: Section 5b contains a list of responsible entities for hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support. · · · The Director of Technology is responsible for implementation of all technical support contained within the plan. The directory will also assure that annual benchmarks are met. The Director of Technology will annually work with the responsible entity listed to determine that the plan is still meeting the needs of the district. The Directory of Technology will meet monthly with the district's Educational Technology Committee to get feedback on site needs and/or problems.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

6. Plan Budget 6a. List established and potential funding sources and cost saving present and future. · Established and potential funding sources Claremont Unified School District is committed to providing technology as a tool to increase student achievement. Funding has been establish at both the district and site level to promote technology use as well as the district actively seeks out funding opportunities from outside the district. Established Funding Sources District General Funds Site General Funds Categorical Funds Block Grants EETT, Formula E-Rate Microsoft K12 Voucher Microsoft State Voucher Claremont Educational Foundation (CEF) Parent-Faculty Association (PFA) Perkins (High school) ROP Donations Potential/Additional Funding Sources Site General Funds School Improvement Program (SIP) Bond Measure Funding EETT, Competitive and Formula E-Rate Claremont Educational Foundation (CEF) Grants (Public and Private) Parent-Faculty Association (PFA) ROP Perkins (High school) Donations

· Cost Savings The district is actively pursuing ways to reduce technology costs and sees a number of potential cost savings avenues. The possibility of doing large, bulk hardware purchasing and taking advantage of district-wide software licensing agreements are areas that have not been taken advantage of previously. Software inventories are currently being done at all sites to try to establish district baseline software packages for both platforms so that larger, more cost effective software purchasing can be accomplished. Also this year the district started purchasing refurbished computers with 3 year warranties that are a third the price of a new computer. This has had a major impact on putting more technology into students' hands at a reduced cost. 6b. Estimate annual implementation costs for the term of the plan. The following chart breaks down estimate costs associated with any needed hardware, infrastructure upgrades and electronic learning resources. Item Hardware Desktop/laptops for students, staff and labs LCD projectors (mounted) Networked classroom printers Interactive whiteboards (Goal 6.9) 21st Century Technology (Goal 6.10) Hardware Total 2008-2009 $634,400 $145,000 $29,000 $50,000 $91,000 $949,400 2009-2010 $657,800 $145,000 $29,000 $50,000 $91,000 $972,800 2010-2011 $657,800 $145,000 $29,000 $55,000 $91,000 $977,800

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Infrastructure Internet Access (Claremont Colleges) Verizon TLS (Network-MAN) Telco Charges (Non-network) Access Layer Switches Wireless Access Points File/printer servers Moodle servers Email filter (Postini) Infrastructure Total Electronic Learning Resources & Administrative Software Zangle (Student Information System) DataDirector Video streaming (United Streaming) Staff and Student Email Licensing Connect-Ed Site/departmental specific software for instruction (est. $100/computer) Technology peripherals (digital cameras, camcorders and accessories) ELR&Admin Software Total Professional Development/Technology Integration Staffing costs(subs, extra duty, stipends) Training Costs (conferences, speakers, outside training, vendor applications) Professional Development Total Technical Support Technology Support Services (TSS) classified staff (with benefits) TOSAs (tech integration in the classroom) Technical Support Total Plan Total

$3,000 $220,273 $3581 $30,000 $30,000 $18,000 $10,000 $4,600 $319,454

$3,000 $220,273 $3581 $37,500 $30,000 $24,000 $0 $4,600 $322,954

$3,000 $220,273 $3581 $37,500 $30,000 $24,000 $0 $4,600 $322,954

$43,500 $26,800 $30,800 $7000 $25,100 $0 $12,500 $145,700

$43,500 $26,800 $30,800 $0 $25,100 $85,000 $15,000 $226,200

$43,500 $26,800 $30,800 $0 $25,100 $85,000 $30,000 $241,200

$10,000 $25,000 $35,000

$10,000 $25,000 $35,000

$10,000 $25,000 $35,000

$672,000 $80,000 $752,000 $2,201,554

$722,000 $80,000 $802,000 $2,358,954

$722,000 $160,000 $882,000 $2,458,954

6c. Describe the district's replacement policy for obsolete equipment. The district currently uses all computers until they fail or until current software technology will no longer run on the computer. New desktop computer purchases will be done on an ongoing basis to maintain the 4YON student to computer ratio. This will ensure that new technology is in student's hands in a timely manner while not discarding older but still useful computing resources.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Infrastructure equipment is used until one of the following conditions applies: · The equipment fails and it is cost prohibitive to repair. · The equipment performance capabilities fall below a point that it is useful any more. · The ongoing maintenance is more than the cost of a new piece of equipment with a warranty. In this case, the piece of equipment could be pulled and used as a spare in case of an equipment failure. 6d. Describe the process that will be used to monitor Educational Technology funding, implementation costs and new funding opportunities and to adjust budgets as necessary. School sites are allocated technology funding as part of their General Funds and are under the control of that site. The Director of Technology will ensure that site based funding is spent to reflect the goals of this document or the sites own technology plan. The Director of Technology will also work with sites to identify technology needs that fall outside normal budgeting and provide input to the Assistant Superintendent for Business Services and the Director of Accounting for the next years budget. Infrastructure technology spending will be monitored by the Director of Technology. Budgeting for technology will be done by the Director of Technology with input from sites based off their needs as well as keeping within the requirements of this plan. Any funding needs outside the normal budget allocation will be taken to the Assistant Superintendent for Business Services and the Director of Accounting to be addressed in the next year's budget.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

7. Monitoring and Evaluation 7a. Evaluation Process The District has a standing Educational Technology Committee that meets on a monthly basis. The committee members include teachers, administrators, and staff from each site as well as parents. This committee also provided input to the Plan. They, along with the Executive Director of Educational Services and the Director of Technology who are committee members, will be responsible for the ongoing evaluation of the progress of the District Technology Plan. The Plan will be changed accordingly to address any deficiencies. The committee will engage in the following activities to monitor and evaluate the Plan annually. Responsibility for the plan monitoring and evaluation will be with the Executive Director of Educational Services, Director of Technology, and Technology Integration Teachers on Special Assignment, as listed in table below. 7b. Evaluation Schedule The following evaluative activities will take place annually: · Review the number and age of the District computers through the Current Solution software database. · Review the attendance at technology-related workshops in the district through workshop sign-in sheets or calendared meetings. · Review technology-related conference attendance through the Current Solutions software database. · Review the increased use of technology integrated into curriculum through a teacher survey in the spring of each year. · Review the results of the EdTechProfile to determine the technology skills needs of teachers and administrators. · Monitor the increase in percent of proficient or above students in English language arts and mathematics as measured by the District's Adequate Yearly Progress results. · Monitor the timelines and benchmarks though the use of an overall timeline for technology improvement. · Approve of a report to the Board of Education on the annual Plan progress. Section Curriculum Review Schedule September 2009, 2010, 2011 *unless noted above Responsible Position Director of Technology, Executive Director of Educational Services, and Technology Integration Teachers Executive Director of Educational Services, and Technology Integration Teachers Director of Technology Director of Technology and Executive Director of Educational Services

Professional Development

September 2009, 2010, 2011 *unless noted above September 2009, 2010, 2011 June 2009, 2010, 2011

Hardware/Software/Infrastructure Budget

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

7c. Sharing the Results The Technology Integration Teachers, Executive Director of Educational Services, and the Director of Technology will prepare a monitoring and evaluation report based upon the goals, objectives, and benchmarks of each component. This report will be shared at the first Educational Technology Committee Meeting of each respective school year. The Committee will review the report and make necessary recommendations. The Executive Director of Educational Services and Director of Technology will share the report, and any recommendations with the site administrators, the Superintendent, Board of Education and other district personnel.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

8. Adult Literacy The Claremont Adult School is the main provider of adult literacy in the District. It offers a variety of programs and classes to the community. The classes are held at the Alternative Education Center, at school sites, and at community locations around the city. Classes such as English as a Second Language, Basic Skills in Reading, Language, Math, and Keyboarding, High School Diploma, General Equivalency Diploma (GED) Preparation, Computer, Parent Education, Parent Child Communication, Citizenship, and Older Adult classes were offered. The District collaborates and supports adult literacy in a variety of ways. · The Community Based Education Tutor (CBET) Program is offered at the Claremont Adult School. This adult literacy program supported by state funding provides a class for the parents of English Learner students in the District. Classes are held on school sites with parents recruited by school personnel. The class teaches parents how to tutor their own children or how to volunteer in District classrooms to assist English Learner students. · English as a Second Language classes promote collaboration between schools within the District and the Adult School to support services for the parents of our English Learners. · The High School Diploma program and GED Preparation program classes also support adult literacy. These two programs collaborate with counselors and administrators from the District's comprehensive and continuation high schools to provide continuing education for students who are not successful at either of the two high school settings. · All of the Claremont Adult School's technology needs are supported by the District Technology department's technicians and infrastructure. · Claremont High School is a satellite campus for Citrus Community College which provides a variety of courses onsite including basic reading and composition.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

9. Effective, Researched-Based Methods, Strategies, and Criteria 9a. Summarize the relevant research and describe how it supports the plan's curricular and professional development goals. The Claremont Unified School District has actively sought out current research, expert advice, and promising local and national technology implementation models for instruction, technology integration, and technology management. The District's basic technology integration model follows a three year, scaffolded plan aimed at improving student learning, supporting teachers' in their integration strategies, and improving student and teacher technology proficiencies. Many references are directly embedded in the document; additional research is cited here. · Bereiter, C. and Scardamalia, M. (1993). Surpassing Ourselves, An Inquiry Into the Nature and Implication of Expertise. Illinois. Open Court Publishing Company. Summary: Drawing upon research in cognitive psychology, Bereiter and Scardamalia show that expertise is something other than training, experience, knowledge, or formal qualifications. Many individuals acquire all these traits without ever becoming experts, while some beginners, even schoolchildren, already approach problems in an expert-like fashion. Expertise is a process of progressive problem-solving in which people continuously reformulate problems at new and more complex levels thereby surpassing themselves. Bereiter and Scardamalia claim many of our present institutions, especially the schools, penalize expertise instead of cultivating it. Implications: Much of the professional development research focuses on empowering teachers within professional learning communities. TOSAs and other experts will support teachers in building their technology expertise using models unscathed by institutionalized education. In alignment with this book, teachers will improve their own progressive problem-solving skills in order to build expertise and transition themselves into teacher-leaders. CEO Forum. (June, 2001). The CEO Forum, School Technology and Readiness Report: Key Building Blocks for Student Achievement in the 21st Century. http://www.ceoforum.org/downloads/report4.pdf Summary: This report concludes that effective uses of technology will improve student achievement and 21st century skills (digital age literacy, inventive thinking, effective communication, high productivity). Improvement is based upon five elements: alignment to curricular standards, assessments that measures all standards and educational objectives, accountability based on data-driven continuous improvement strategies, equitable access for all students, and the need for more analysis and research. Implications: Consistent with this report, CUSD will provide data-driven instructional decisions using tools, such as DataDirector and Zangle, adopt supplemental digital content aligned to the California Content Standards, provide content-specific software throughout the district, and ensure equitable access, especially to high-risk and special-needs populations as identified in section 3. Cuban, L. (2001). Oversold and Underused, Computers in the Classroom. President and Fellows of Harvard College. Summary: Cuban argues that when teachers are not given a say in how the technology might reshape schools, computers are merely souped-up typewriters and classrooms continue to run much as they did a generation ago. In his studies of early childhood, high school, and university classrooms in Silicon Valley, Larry Cuban found that students and teachers use the new technologies far less in the classroom than they do at home, and that teachers who use

·

·

46

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

·

·

·

computers for instruction do so infrequently and unimaginatively. Cuban concludes that more attention must be paid to the civic and social goals of schooling, goals that make the question of how many computers are in classrooms trivial. Implications: CUSD will focus on integrating sound learning theory and pedagogy using technology rather than haphazardly introducing technology. Educators will be trained to sufficiently understand the technology themselves, believe it will enhance learning, and have the power to shape their own curricula. Teachers must first focus on expected outcomes and pedagogy rather than on the technology itself. Dufour, R., and Eaker, R. (1998). Professional Learning Communities at Work. Bloomington. National Education Service. Summary: Dufour and Eaker provide specifics about transforming schools into results-oriented professional learning communities by describing the best practices from schools nationwide in the areas of curriculum development, teacher preparation, school leadership, professional development programs, school-parent partnerships, and assessment practices. Implications: CUSD is providing professional development that links the critical best practices identified by Dufour and Eaker. It is critically important to the success of this plan that teachers are engaged in a professional learning community focused on technology. While immersion in the community will certainly vary from individual to individual, opportunities to improve one's skills, access, and integration must be ensured. Edwards, C., Gandini, L., and Forman, G. (1998). The Hundred Languages of Children, The Reggio Emilia Approach--Advanced Reflections. Ablex Publishing Corporation. Summary: Educators in Reggio Emilia, Italy have evolved a distinctive innovative approach that supports children's well-being and fosters their intellectual development through a systematic focus on symbolic representation. Young children are encouraged to explore their environment and express themselves through many "languages," or modes of expression, including words, movement, drawing, painting, sculpture, shadow play, collage, and music. The book provides implications for North American applications. Implications: Reggio Emilia provides CUSD with insight into assessing and documenting student achievement without norm-referenced or standardized testing. Teachers can focus on authentic assessment and focus on how to communicate those findings with parents and the community. This book also helps CUSD rethink access and special-needs issues in a nontraditional way. Gladwell, M. (2004). The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. Back Bay Books. Summary: Gladwell looks at how major changes in our society can happen suddenly and unexpectedly until they reach a tipping point--the point of critical mass. Ideas, behavior, messages, and products, he argues, often spread like outbreaks of infectious disease. By identifying the particular personality types of those who are natural pollinators of new ideas and trends, people can create phenomenon and wide-spread change. "Most of all, [The Tipping Point] is a road map to change, with a profoundly hopeful message--that one imaginative person applying a well-placed lever can move the world." Implications: The basis of the CUSD TOSAs and other related positions are to act as evangelists that will help spread technology integration throughout the district. By identifying the personality traits and qualities in teachers that help great ideas spread, CUSD can quickly expand its technology integration. CUSD is currently yearning for that 'tipping point' that will move technology into the mainstream of everyday learning.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

·

·

·

·

Hampel, T., Selke, H., & Vitt, S. (n.d.). Deployment of Simple User-Centered Collaborative Technologies in Educational Institutions--Experiences and Requirements. Abstract: In our modern society with its variety of learning and work processes, collaborative structuring of knowledge plays an important role. With new and growing phenomena in mind, such as the user-centered wiki systems, this paper looks at the various ways of organizing collaboration in virtual knowledge spaces. As part of a novel teaching concept­embedded in a system for cooperative knowledge organization­spatial structuring of knowledge forms an essential part of teaching and learning. Based on the evaluation results of this concept, the paper focuses on collaborative writing methods and the requirements of tools used with special consideration of wikis. It then goes on to describe the concrete realization of a fusion of semantic-spatial structuring techniques and collaborative writing considering as example the integration of wiki techniques into virtual knowledge spaces. Implications: CUSD has designed curriculum consistent with the recommendations made in this document. Section 3, Goal 2 addresses collaborative and creative student projects, including the establishment of collaborative student learning communities. Additionally, Goal 4 speaks to the implementation of collaborative, web-based tools for teacher-teacher, teacher-student, and student-student communication and collaboration. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. New York, Cambridge University Press. Summary: Lave and Wenger push forward the notion of situated learning--that learning is fundamentally a social process based upon apprenticeship and expertise. The authors maintain that learning viewed as situated activity has as its central defining characteristic a process they call legitimate peripheral participation. Learners participate in communities of practice, spiraling inward from novices toward full participation as experts within a social community. Legitimate peripheral participation provides a way to speak about crucial relations between newcomers and oldtimers and about their activities, identities, artifacts, knowledge and practice. Implications: This book serves as the primary support for this plan. Learning is truly a social process based upon spiraling levels of participation. CUSDs aim is to engage teachers and students into communities of practice that help individuals mature professionally and personally. With our scaffolded professional development plan, CUSD will transition technology novices into experts that can then serve as master teachers to others. Littky, D. (2004) The Big Picture: Education is Everyone's Business. Virgina: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Summary: Littky provides a model for school reform that focuses on the purpose of education, what kind of people we want students to be, and what skills they need to live fulfilled and productive lives. Implications: Although CUSD can not easily change the physical size of schools, it can provide smaller communities within Moodle and classrooms that are consistent with Littky's model. Students will also be provided the technology to pursue creative personal passions (podcasting, digital portfolios, digital resumes, video production, software and hardware certifications, vocational training, etc.). Marzano, R., Pickering, D., and Pollock, J. (2001). Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies For Increasing Student Achievement. Virgina: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Summary: Marzano et al. draw from hundreds studies of classroom management and instruction to identify nine essential instructional strategies and impact on student engagement

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

·

·

·

and achievement: identifying similarities and differences, summarizing and note taking, reinforcing effort and providing recognition, homework and practice, nonlinguistic representations, cooperative learning, setting objectives and providing feedback, generating and testing hypotheses, and questions, cues, and advance organizers. Implications: Each year, for the next three years, CUSD will be focusing professional development on three identified Marzano strategies. Programs such as Inspiration, ALEKS, Accelerated Reader, Accelerated Math, Geometers SketchPad, PLATO, and United Streaming will provide technological support for these strategies. McNiff, J., Lomax, P., and Whitehead, J. (2003). You and Your Action Research Project. Second Ed. New York. RoutledgeFalmer Coghlan, D., Brannick. (2005). Doing Action Research in Your Own Organization. Second Ed. London. Sage Publications. Summary: Both books examine the underlying principals of action research, both within the individual and within a large organization. Action researchers are given tools to identify problems in education, examine probable causes, research applications, monitor and document action, deal with data, make claims to knowledge, validate those claims, and publish the research. Detailed coverage of both theory and methods in action research, including the role of the researcher and the politics and ethics of research, further support the researcher. Implications: As part of the CUSD one-on-one technology professional development, teachers will participate in small-scale action research in which they will identify a problem in the classroom, research possible causes to that problem, apply a technology, analyze the effectiveness of that technology, apply a new or refined treatment, and present their findings. In this capacity, teachers will be engaged in research-based professional development and will also focus on critical self-reflection and analysis using blogs, wikis, and on-line journals. Murphy, M. and Valdez, C. (2005). Ravaging Resistance: A Model for Building Rapport in a Collaborative Learning Classroom. Radical Pedagogy. Abstract: The new catch phrase in education is "collaborative learning." Yet, despite substantial research suggesting the benefits of adopting collaborative learning, educators and students often abandon collaboration because of the overwhelming resistance to collaboration. Resistance can be overcome by focusing on the oft-ignored rapport-building phase in the implementation of collaborative learning techniques in educational settings. "The Resistance Breaking Process" (RBP) provides a conceptual framework for overcoming resistance to collaboration in the classroom. Implications: By using the RBP, CUSD educators and support staff can work on building the necessary environment for the intensive collaboration required to make the other components of this plan a success. Technology tools such as blogs, Moodle, chats, and other digital collaborative tools will support this endeavor. Sandholtz, J. H., Ringstaff, C., and Dwyer, D. C. (1997). Teaching With Technology: Creating student-centered Classrooms. New York. Teachers College Press. Summary: This study reports on a 10-year research study of the Apple Classroom of Tomorrow school sites. The five-phase model (entry, adoption, adaptation, appropriation, and invention) describes a necessary a shift from traditional instruction to constructivism in which teachers become expert technology users, leading to new levels of confidence and willingness to experiment with instruction. Implications: The entire focus of the CUSD Master Educational Technology Plan is to provide teachers and students with technologies and strategies that foster constructivist life-long

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

·

·

·

·

learning. The tools and strategies discussed in Section 3 fit well into the constructivist pedagogy and place technology directly into students' hands where they can be creators and owners of their learning. Smith, F. (1998). The Book of Learning and Forgetting. New York. Teachers College Press. Summary: Smith explains how schools and educational authorities systematically obstruct the powerful inherent learning abilities of children, creating handicaps that often persist through life. Formalized education conditions students to superficially learn and promptly forget and falsely asserts that learning is work (used to justify the external control of teacher's and students through excessive regulation and massive testing). Smith further asserts that true learning is a social process that can occur naturally and continually through collaborative activities. Such opportunities are corrupted in institutionalized education. Implications: This books helps CUSD think outside of the traditional educational system and question why we do the things we are doing. Rather than focusing on Smith's "Better Get Used to It" (BGUTI) idea, CUSD is looking to use technologies, in accordance with the other research, that provides authentic, student-centered opportunities identified in Sections 3 and 4. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of Practice--Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge University Press. Summary: Wenger presents a theory of learning that suggests that all learners engage in social practices in informal 'communities of practice." These communities of practice do not occur as individualized processes or as formal institutions. Instead, they engage practitioners in shared enterprises over time and transform community, social practice, meaning, and identity, resulting in learning as a process of social participation. Implications: As discussed in previous research, teachers and administrators will be engaged in communities of practice that will help them transition to higher levels of expertise thereby transforming their personal technology identities. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Virginia. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Summary: Wiggins and McTighe present the backwards design model in which educators first focus on what students should know, understand, and be able to do. Next, educators must determine acceptable evidence of such understanding and then plan learning experiences and instruction around those results. By focusing on the big ideas first, students and educators are better able to understand and demonstrate understanding in six unique facets: explanation, interpretation, application, perspective, empathy, and self-knowledge. Implications: In accordance with this research, CUSD must first focus on student learning goals--not technology goals. The backwards design model will force teachers to identify essential "big ideas," and then design lessons to meet those objectives. Only then will technology fit into the lesson design successfully. Thomas, Lajeane (2000). National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS): Connecting Curriculum and Technology. International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). Summary: The goal of this work is to guide PreK-12 educators and education leaders in recognizing and addressing the essential conditions for effective use of technology to improve learning. Implications: The national standards outlined in this document will support the district in its effort to provide contiguous, consistent set of technological skills to be taught in K-12 classrooms.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

9b. Describe the district's plans to use technology to extend or supplement the district's curriculum with rigorous academic courses and curricula, including distance-learning technologies. The implementation of this plan will see Claremont Unified School District through a transformation in the way technology is used and integrated at all educational levels. Computer labs will be converted to project learning labs to be used for extending classroom learning opportunities with rich technological resources, as well as equipping the classes themselves with the technological tools to bridge the gap between lab and classroom learning. Students will also be taught to use, then given the tools necessary for them to participate in self-assessment of their work, fully engaging them in their own learning. These are but two of the fundamental changes that this educational technology plan will use to supplement the already rigorous curriculum presented in CUSD classrooms. Along with the planned in-class changes, we will see a genesis of new learning opportunities for the secondary students of Claremont. Students will be asked to engage in web based communication, journaling, and other distance learning activities to extend the scope of their middle and high school classes. Teachers will begin adding these learning opportunities with Moodle, giving students access to their class, classmates, and coursework, outside of the school environment. Finally, new courses in web design, advanced computer science, technology based visual and performing arts, and advanced office software classes will be developed for students at both the middle and high school. A new career and technical education center will be researched and developed during the three years of this plan. Technology training will be one major focus of this center, but the specific courses will be determined by the need and desires of the CUSD community through a ³stakeholder rich² committee process. The committee will look at all options, including distance learning courses, to include in this exciting project.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Appendix C Criteria for EETT Funded Technology Plans

In order to be approved, a technology plan needs to have "Adequately Addressed" each of the following criteria: · · · 1. For corresponding EETT Requirements, see the EETT Technology Plan Requirement (Appendix D). If the technology plan is revised, insert the Education Technology Plan Benchmark Review Form (Appendix I) in the technology plan. Include this form (Appendix C) with "Page in District Plan" completed at the end of your technology plan.

PLAN DURATION CRITERION Page in District Plan The plan should guide the district's 1 use of education technology for the next three to five years. (For new plan, can include technology plan development in the first year).

Example of Adequately Addressed

Example of Not Adequately Addressed The plan is less than three years or more than five years in length. Plan duration is 200811.

The technology plan describes the districts use of education technology for the next three to five years. (For new plan, description of technology plan development in the first year is acceptable). Specific start and end dates are recorded (7/1/08 to 6/30/11).

STAKEHOLDERS CRITERION Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 7 and 11 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Addressed District Plan Description of how a variety of The planning team consisted of 2 stakeholders from within the school representatives who will implement the plan. district and the community-at-large If a variety of stakeholders did not assist with participated in the planning process. the development of the plan, a description of why they were not involved is included.

2.

Not Adequately Addressed Little evidence is included that shows that the district actively sought participation from a variety of stakeholders.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

3.

CURRICULUM COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 1, 2, 3, 8, 10, and 12 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Addressed Example of Not Adequately District Addressed Plan a. Description of teachers' and 3-4 The plan describes the technology The plan explains technology students' current access to access available in the classrooms, access in terms of a student-totechnology tools both during the library/media centers, or labs for all computer ratio, but does not explain school day and outside of school students and teachers. where access is available, who has hours. access, and when various students and teachers can use the technology. b. Description of the district's The plan cites district policy 4-5 The plan describes the typical current use of hardware and frequency and type of use regarding use of technology, but software to support teaching (technology skills/information provides no information about its and learning. literacy/integrated into the actual use. curriculum). c. Summary of the district's The plan summarizes the district's The plan does not summarize 5 curricular goals that are curricular goals that are supported by district curricular goals. supported by this tech plan. the plan and referenced in district document(s). d. List of clear goals, measurable The plan suggests how technology 5-8 The plan delineates clear goals, objectives, annual benchmarks, measurable objectives, annual will be used, but is not specific and an implementation plan for benchmarks, and a clear enough to know what action needs using technology to improve implementation plan for using to be taken to accomplish the goals. teaching and learning by technology to support the district's supporting the district curriculum goals and academic curricular goals. content standards to improve learning. e. List of clear goals, measurable The plan suggests how students 8-13 The plan delineates clear goal(s), objectives, annual benchmarks, measurable objective(s), annual will acquire technology skills, but and an implementation plan benchmarks, and an implementation is not specific enough to determine detailing how and when plan detailing how and when what action needs to be taken to students will acquire the students will acquire technology accomplish the goals. technology skills and skills and information literacy skills. information literacy skills needed to succeed in the classroom and the workplace.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Page in District Plan f. List of goals and an implementation plan that describe how the district will address the appropriate and ethical use of information technology in the classroom so that students can distinguish lawful from unlawful uses of copyrighted works, including the following topics: the concept and purpose of both copyright and fair use; distinguishing lawful from unlawful downloading and peer-to-peer file sharing; and avoiding plagiarism (AB 307: Optional in 2007-08, required July 1, 2008). List of goals and an implementation plan that describe how the district will address Internet safety, including how to protect online privacy and avoid online predators. (AB 307: Optional in 2007-08, required July 1, 2008) Description of or goals about the district policy or practices that ensure equitable technology access for all students.

Example of Adequately Addressed The plan describes or delineates clear goals outlining how students will learn about the concept, purpose, and significance of the ethical use of information technology including copyright, fair use, plagiarism and the implications of illegal file sharing and/or downloading (as stated in AB 307).

Example of Not Adequately Addressed The plan suggests that students will be educated in the ethical use of the Internet, but is not specific enough to determine what actions will be taken to accomplish the goals.

9-13, 22-24, 27-28

g.

11-13, 23-24, 27-28

The plan describes or delineates clear goals outlining how students will be educated about Internet safety (as stated in AB 307).

The plan suggests Internet safety education but is not specific enough to determine what actions will be taken to accomplish the goals. The plan does not describe policies or goals that result in equitable technology access for all students.

h.

13-16

i.

j.

List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan to use technology to make student record keeping and assessment more efficient and supportive of teachers' efforts to meet individual student academic needs. List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan to use technology to improve two-way communication between home and school. Describe the process that will be used to monitor the Curricular Component (Section 3d-3j) goals, objectives, benchmarks and planned implementation activities including roles and responsibilities.

16-17

The plan describes the policy or delineates clear goals and measurable objectives about the policy or practices that ensure equitable technology access for all students. The policy or practices clearly support accomplishing the plan's goals. The plan delineates clear goal(s), measurable objective(s), annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for using technology to support the district's student record-keeping and assessment efforts.

The plan suggests how technology will be used, but is not specific enough to know what action needs to be taken to accomplish the goals.

17-19

The plan delineates clear goal(s), measurable objective(s), annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for using technology to improve two-way communication between home and school. The monitoring process, roles, and responsibilities are described in sufficient detail.

The plan suggests how technology will be used, but is not specific enough to know what action needs to be taken to accomplish the goals. The monitoring process either is absent, or lacks detail regarding procedures, roles, and responsibilities.

k.

19

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

4.

a.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 5 and 12 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Addressed District Plan Summary of the teachers' The plan provides a clear summary of 20-21 and administrators' current the teachers' and administrators' current technology proficiency and technology proficiency and integration integration skills and needs skills and needs for professional for professional development. The findings are development. summarized in the plan by discrete skills that include CTC Standard 9 and 16 proficiencies.

Example of Not Adequately Addressed Description of current level of staff expertise is too general or relates only to a limited segment of the district's teachers and administrators in the focus areas or does not relate to the focus areas, i.e., only the fourth grade teachers when grades four to eight are the focus grade levels. The plan speaks only generally of professional development and is not specific enough to ensure that teachers and administrators will have the necessary training to implement the Curriculum Component.

b.

c.

List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for providing professional development opportunities based on district needs assessment data (4a) and the Curriculum Component objectives (sections 3d through 3j) of the plan. Describe the process that will be used to monitor the Professional Development (Section 4b) goals, objectives, benchmarks and planned implementation activities including roles and responsibilities.

21-31

The plan delineates clear goal(s), measurable objective(s), annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for providing teachers and administrators with sustained, ongoing professional development necessary to reach the Curriculum Component objectives (sections 3d through 3j) of the plan.

32-33

The monitoring process, roles, and responsibilities are described in sufficient detail.

The monitoring process either is absent, or lacks detail regarding who is responsible and what is expected.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

5.

INFRASTRUCTURE, HARDWARE, TECHNICAL SUPPORT, AND SOFTWARE COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 6 and 12 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Example of Not Adequately District Addressed Addressed Plan a. Describe the existing The inventory of equipment is so 34-37 The plan clearly summarizes the hardware, Internet access, existing technology hardware, general that it is difficult to electronic learning resources, electronic learning resources, determine what must be acquired and technical support already networking and telecommunication to implement the Curriculum and in the district that will be infrastructure, and technical Professional Development used to support the support to support the Components. The summary of Curriculum and Professional implementation of the Curriculum current technical support is Development Components and Professional Development missing or lacks sufficient detail. (sections 3 & 4) of the plan. Components. b. Describe the technology 37-39 The plan provides a clear summary The plan includes a description or hardware, electronic learning and list of the technology list of hardware, infrastructure, resources, networking and hardware, electronic learning and other technology necessary to telecommunications resources, networking and implement the plan, but there infrastructure, physical plant telecommunications infrastructure, doesn't seem to be any real modifications, and technical physical plant modifications, and relationship between the activities support needed by the technical support the district will in the Curriculum and district's teachers, students, need to support the implementation Professional Development and administrators to support of the district's Curriculum and Components and the listed the activities in the Professional Development equipment. Future technical Curriculum and Professional Components. support needs have not been Development Components of addressed or do not relate to the the plan. needs of the Curriculum and Professional Development Components. c. List of clear annual The annual benchmarks are The annual benchmarks are either 39 benchmarks for obtaining the specific and realistic. Teachers and absent or so vague that it would hardware, infrastructure, administrators implementing the be difficult to determine what learning resources and plan can easily discern what needs needs to be acquired or technical support required to to be acquired or repurposed, by repurposed, by whom, and when. support the other plan whom, and when. components as identified in section 5b. d. Describe the process that will The monitoring process, roles, and The monitoring process either is 39 be used to monitor the annual responsibilities are described in absent, or lacks detail regarding benchmarks including roles sufficient detail. who is responsible and what is and responsibilities. expected.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

6.

FUNDING AND BUDGET COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 7 & 13, (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Addressed District Plan a. List established and The plan clearly describes resources that 40 potential funding sources. are available or could be obtained to implement the plan. b. Estimate annual 40-41 Cost estimates are reasonable and address implementation costs for the the total cost of ownership, including the term of the plan. costs to implement the curricular, professional development, infrastructure, hardware, technical support, and electronic learning resource needs identified in the plan. c. Describe the district's 41-42 Plan recognizes that equipment will need replacement policy for to be replaced and outlines a realistic obsolete equipment. replacement plan that will support the Curriculum and Professional Development Components. d. Describe the process that The monitoring process, roles, and 42 will be used to monitor Ed responsibilities are described in sufficient Tech funding, detail. implementation costs and new funding opportunities and to adjust budgets as necessary.

Example of Not Adequately Addressed Resources to implement the plan are not clearly identified. Cost estimates are unrealistic, lacking, or are not sufficiently detailed to determine if the total cost of ownership is addressed.

Replacement policy is either missing or vague. It is not clear that the replacement policy could be implemented. The monitoring process either is absent, or lacks detail regarding who is responsible and what is expected.

7.

MONITORING AND EVALUATION COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 11 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately District Addressed Plan a. Describe the process for The plan describes the process for 43 evaluating the plan's overall evaluation using the goals and progress and impact on benchmarks of each component as teaching and learning. the indicators of success.

Example of Not Adequately Addressed No provision for an evaluation is included in the plan. How success is determined is not defined. The evaluation is defined, but the process to conduct the evaluation is missing. The evaluation timeline is not included or indicates an expectation of unrealistic results that does not support the continued implementation of the plan. The plan does not provide a process for using the monitoring and evaluation results to improve the plan and/or disseminate the findings.

b.

Schedule for evaluating the effect of plan implementation.

43

Evaluation timeline is specific and realistic.

c.

Describe the process and frequency of communicating evaluation results to tech plan stakeholders.

44

The plan describes the process and frequency of communicating evaluation results to tech plan stakeholders.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

8.

EFFECTIVE COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES WITH ADULT LITERACY PROVIDERS TO MAXIMIZE THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY CRITERION Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 11 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Addressed Example of Not District Adequately Addressed Plan a. If the district has identified The plan explains how the program will There is no evidence that 45 adult literacy providers, be developed in collaboration with adult the plan has been, or will describe how the program literacy providers. Planning included or be developed in will be developed in will include consideration of collaborative collaboration with adult collaboration with them. (If strategies and other funding resources to literacy service providers, no adult literacy providers maximize the use of technology. If no to maximize the use of are indicated, describe the adult literacy providers are indicated, the technology. process used to identify adult plan describes the process used to identify literacy providers or adult literacy providers or potential future potential future outreach outreach efforts. efforts.) EFFECTIVE, RESEARCHED-BASED METHODS, STRATEGIES, AND CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 4 and 9 (Appendix D). Page in Example of Adequately Addressed District Plan a. Summarize the relevant 46-50 The plan describes the relevant research research and describe how it behind the plan's design for strategies supports the plan's and/or methods selected. curricular and professional development goals. b. Describe the district's plans The plan describes the process the district 51 to use technology to extend or will use to extend or supplement the supplement the district's district's curriculum with rigorous curriculum with rigorous academic courses and curricula, including academic courses and distance learning opportunities curricula, including distance(particularly in areas that would not learning technologies. otherwise have access to such courses or curricula due to geographical distances or insufficient resources).

9.

Not Adequately Addressed The description of the research behind the plan's design for strategies and/or methods selected is unclear or missing. There is no plan to use technology to extend or supplement the district's curriculum offerings.

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Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Appendix I Education Technology Plan Benchmark Review For the grant period ending June 30, 2008 CDS # 19-64394 District Name: Claremont Unified School District The No Child Left Behind Act requires each Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) grant recipient to measure the performance of their educational technology implementation plan. To adhere to these requirements, describe the progress towards the goals and benchmarks in your technology plan as specified below. The information provided will enable the technology plan reviewer better to evaluate the revised technology plan and will serve as a basis should the district be selected for a random EETT review. Include this completed document in your revised technology plan and send the signed hard copy to your regional California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) office or the California Department of Education (CDE). 1. Describe your district's progress in meeting the goals and specific implementation plan for using technology to improve teaching and learning as described in Section 3.d., Curriculum Component Criteria, of the EETT technology plan criteria described in Appendix C. (Provide descriptive narrative in 1-3 paragraphs) Goal: The integration of technology into the curriculum will help our students improve their academic achievement in core areas (language arts and mathematics). In the Claremont Unified School District Technology Plan for 2003 ­ 2008, a benchmark was set to increase student academic achievement in English language arts and mathematics by five percent during the five years of the Plan. The federal accountability data for Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is based on California Standards Tests (CSTs) and the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). District results are shown in the table below. Year Subject Percent Proficient

2003 English language arts 54.3 2007 63.0 Percent Change 8.7 2003 Mathematics 55.3 2007 62.1 Percent Change 6.8 Though the percent of change over the four year time period met the five year benchmark set in the 2003-2008 District Technology Plan, it is not clear that integration of technology into curriculum was responsible for that increase. The Plan listed four implementation activities to improve the integration of technology into curriculum in order to improve student achievement. The activities focused on professional development for the integration of technology into a standards-based curriculum and for the review of student work. During

59

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

the time frame of the plan, District teachers have had many professional development opportunities. Each year the District offered after-school classes specifically on technology skill improvement and technology integration for teachers during the fall, winter, and spring. The District utilized professional development days, weekly early release days, reverse minimum days, curricular committees, and teacher release time to align core curriculum to state content standards, to provide articulation between and across the K-12 grade levels and to provide technology skills and best practices. During this time period teachers were trained to take attendance online and to utilize a District gradebook. Teacher pioneers utilized a variety of technology strategies in their classrooms. Two of the ten workshops offered at the District Professional Development Day on August 31, 2007 focused on technology integration strategies to enhance the curriculum at the elementary level and the secondary level. They were the most popular of the workshops that day. Though some schools, grade levels and departments have reviewed student work, it is not yet the culture of the District to review student work on a regular basis, but the review of data for decision-making purposes is gaining momentum.

2. Describe your district's progress in meeting the goals and specific implementation plan for providing professional development opportunities based on the needs assessment and the Curriculum Component goals, benchmarks and timeline as described in Section 4.b., Professional Development Component Criteria, of the EETT technology plan criteria described in Appendix C. (Provide descriptive narrative in 1-3 paragraphs) Goal: Staff will become familiar on a regular basis with new and emerging technologies that will assist them in meeting the stated curriculum goals and objectives. The latest CTAP2 Assessment results indicate that only 16% of teachers and administrators consider themselves proficient or better on general computer knowledge and skills. The assessment indicates that additional professional development is needed in the areas of internet use, email, presentation and spreadsheet skills. During the duration of the Plan, the District met the benchmarks to offer specific technology related classes for teachers after school hours. Most of the classes reflected the EdTechProfile assessment needs, but only a small percentage of teachers attended. Teachers were paid a stipend for teaching and/or participating in the classes. Most of the classes were based on the Apple computer platform, though almost half of the computers in the district are a PC based platform. Some teachers attended technology related conferences such as the CUE conference and sessions at subject related conferences that addressed technology. The District has initiated computer-based on-line attendance for the entire district and an on-line grading system for all secondary schools. Professional development on the implementation of the on-line system was conducted for all teachers and continues for new teachers each year. All parents have computer access to demographic and attendance data on their children from home. All secondary parents and students have computer access to class assignments and grades. All District staff have email addresses and most use them to communicate with the district and with parents and students. All administrators and some key teachers at each site have been trained on a new data management and decision-making software, Data Director. Within the last eight years, nearly one third of the District teaching staff has retired or turned over. Therefore a higher percentage of the teaching staff has participated in new teacher preparation programs

60

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

and the Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment (BTSA) program which integrates the latest in technology into curriculum. Because of this turnover and the newer textbook adoptions which incorporate technology related resources into teacher ancillary materials, at least half of the teaching staff utilizes Power Point presentations, Internet resource websites and item test banks. However, the EdTechProfile assessments indicate that more staff development is needed to assist teachers in more proficient and in-depth use of those skills. Technology purchases have not kept up with the latest in the industry advances but have become a new focus this year.

The applicant certifies that the information described above is accurate as of the date of this document. Should the applicant be selected for a random EETT review, the information stated above will be supported by adequate documentation. As the duly authorized representative of the applicant, I hereby certify that the applicant will comply with the above certifications. Judith Daley PRINTED NAME OF AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE Executive Director of Educational Services TITLE OF AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE

SIGNATURE

DATE

61

Claremont Unified School District Educational Technology Plan 2008-2011

Appendix J Technology Plan Contact Information County & District Code: 19-64394 LEA Name: Claremont Unified School District Salutation: Ms. First Name: Judith Last Name: Daley Job Title: Executive Director of Educational Services Address: 170 San Jose Ave. City: Claremont Zip Code: 91711 Telephone: (909)398-0609 Ext: 70201 Email: [email protected] 1st Backup Name: Damon Rapp 1st Backup Email: [email protected] 2nd Backup Name: David Cash 2nd Backup Email: [email protected]

62

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