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PIEDMONT COLLEGE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION PART-TIME FACULTY HANDBOOK 2008-09

Preparing Proactive Educators to Improve the Lives of Children

Piedmont College School of Education Part-Time Faculty Handbook Table of Contents

School of Education Contact List .................................................................. 3 A Brief History of Piedmont College..................................................6 College and SOE Missions...........................................................8 SOE Conceptual Framework.........................................................9 SOE Outcomes.......................................................................12 Professional Dispositions...........................................................15 Academic Integrity Policy..........................................................16 Attendance Policies..................................................................17 Grade Sheets..........................................................................18 Posting/Mailing Grades and Release of Student Information..................18 Office Hours.................................................................................................. 18 Parking Permits............................................................................................. 18 Copying......................................................................................................... 18 Course Evaluation Forms.............................................................................. 18 Payment Policy ............................................................................................. 18 Incomplete Grade Policy .............................................................................. 20 In-Progress Grade Policy............................................................22 Official Course Syllabi Manager System ..................................................... 24 User Services for Arrendale Library............................................................. 25 Performance Evaluation of Part-Time Instructors...............................28 School of Education Syllabus A...................................................29 School of Education Course Syllabus B...........................................39 Athens General Information..........................................................................42

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Piedmont College School of Education Contact List Who do I call about ...?

Academic Concerns: Charles Lucado, Early Childhood Education. (706) 778-8500 x 1231 Madge Kibler, Middle Grades Education (706) 778-8500 x 1202 Hilton Smith, Secondary Education (706) 778-8500 x 1297 Donna Andrews, Special Education (706) 778-8500 x 1256 Bob Cummings, Specialist Program (706) 778-8500 x 1265 Karl Michel, Art Education (706) 778-8500 x 1490 Lauren Ringwall, Music Education (706) 778-8500 x 1526 Bill Gabelhausen, Theatre Education (706)778-8500 x 1320 [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Advising, Admission to Teacher Ed. and Background Checks Libby Willis (706) 548-8505 x 8010 Assessment Margy Moremen (706) 548-8505 x 8011 & (706) 778-3000 x1300 Athens Main Campus (706) 548-8505 Athens Administrative Support Gay Neighbors (706) 548-8331 x 8331 Certification Margy Moremen (706) 548-8505 x 8011 & (706) 778-8500 x 1300 Certification Rules CLEP Exams Debra Taylor (706) 778-8500 x 1359 Cohorts Kathleen Anderson , Cohort Administrator (706) 548-2022

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] www.gapsc.com

[email protected]

[email protected]

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Cohort Coordinators Marilyn Berrong (706) 896-1681 Sandra Dickson (706) 778-8500 x 1400 James McGarity (706) 548-8505 Mike Moody (770) 653-0823 Counseling & Career Services Kel Lee Cutrell (706) 778-8500 x 1259 Desk Copies Athens ­ Gay Neighbors Demorest ­ Department Chairs Cohorts ­ Kathleen Anderson Fax Numbers Demorest Athens

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

706-776-0135 706-433-1750

Faculty Support and Student Services Kay Beavers (706) 778-8500 x 1500 Field Placements Kathy Bolt (706) 548-8505 x 8008 Financial Aid and Student Loans Kim Lovell, Dir. of Financial Aid (706) 778-8500 x 1191 Foxfire Partnership Hilton Smith (706) 778-8500 x 1297 Graduate Studies Sandra Dickson (706) 778-8500 x 1400 Jessica Bozeman (706) 778-8500 x 1497 Human Resources/Personnel Issues Wanda Payne (706) 778-8500 x 1108 Library Personnel Bob Glass (706) 778-8500 x 1612 SOE Personnel and Budget Lisa Brookshire (706) 778-8500 x 1248 SOE Website Coordinator Margy Moremen (706) 548-8505 x 8011

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

s[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

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Textbooks Barnes and Noble Bookstore (706) 776-0013 Technology Shahryar Heydari (706) 778-8500 x 1255 Jamie Caudill (706) 778-8500 x 1153 Technology Integration (Instructional) Randy Hollandsworth, Demorest Coordinator of Syllabus Manager website (706) 778-8500 x 1195 Doug Holschuh, Athens Online Learning Coordinator (706) 548-8505 x 8016 Transfer Credit Linda Wofford, Registrar

www.piedmont.bkstr.com

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(706) 778-8500 x 1161

[email protected]

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Piedmont College: A Brief History

In 1897, opening a college in the wilderness of northeast Georgia must have seemed to some like a prescription for failure. The area was accessible by few roads ­ mostly crude dirt strips with sapling trees. A narrow- gauge railroad did make a water stop in the frontier town of Demorest, but it was laden with passengers and freight bound for points further north. For a youthful band of entrepreneurs trying to forge a community of business, factories, and schools in Demorest, however, a college was just what they needed. Under the direction of a Methodist minister, the Rev. Charles C. Spence, they obtained a charter from the State of Georgia, organized a board of trustees, bought books, hired a faculty, and secured space for classes and dormitories. On the first Wednesday of September 1897, amid much fanfare and ceremony, the opening exercise for the J.S. Green Collegiate Institute were held in downtown Demorest, and the entire candidate body, from first grade to college juniors, marched up the hill from the square to begin their studies. What the detractors of the time failed to take into account was the thirst for knowledge that a small town like Demorest could harbor. As one early observer noted, the "candidates came in for miles around, some of them walking barefoot...The came from the high ridges and hidden coves; they came from the little corn patches, the log cabins and the moonshine stills." In its first year, the J.S. Green Collegiate Institute, (the name was changed to Piedmont College in 1903), enrolled 367 candidates, an astonishing number given the rural nature of the area and the scant population. Parents in some cases sacrificed their meager possessions to make certain that their children could attend. One mother reportedly sold her cook-stove, choosing to labor over an open fire, rather than have her son miss his chance at an education. Today, 100 years later, the candidates of Piedmont College arrive from all over the world, still carrying that same unquenchable thirst for education. Some are third, even fourth generation Piedmont candidates. Some are the first in their families to venture beyond high school. But all of them find at Piedmont College an experience much like that of the candidates who paraded up the hill in 1897 ­ a small college town where the faculty and candidate form a community with a rich academic tradition and where anyone with a desire for knowledge is welcome. GROWTH OF PIEDMONT By 1899, Piedmont was beset by financial difficulties. Enrollment was strong at just under 400 candidates, but the support the College founders had hoped for from the state's Methodist churches was not forthcoming. Strapped for funds after cashing in his own life insurance policy to support the College, Rev. Spence turned to the Congregationalist Churches for help. "I have gone as far as I can," Spence told a church representative. "I am getting deeper and deeper in debt. You Congregationalists need a college. Here is a good beginning." The Congregational Church had been founded by the Pilgrims in 1620 and already had a long history of supporting higher education. They had founded Harvard in 1636, Yale in 1701, and numerous other colleges across the U.S., but as yet they had no college in the South, and so in 1901, the American Missionary Board of the Congregational Church took Piedmont under its wing. While remaining an independent institution governed by its own board of trustees, Piedmont has enjoyed a close relationship with Congregationalist Church ever since. Candidates from across the U.S. and around the world who might otherwise never hear of Piedmont College are introduced through the Church, and this association has historically provided the College with a rich mix of candidates from many cultures and backgrounds. As Piedmont grew in the early part of this century, it began building a reputation as "the little college that could." Through two World Wars, the Depression and the turbulent 1960's, the College remained an oasis of learning. Whenever financial difficulties developed, the administration, faculty, candidates, alumni and friends who had grown up with the College were always there to step in to save the day. With their faithful and often

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extraordinary sacrifices, the campus slowly grew from a cluster of former homes to the beautiful 100-acre site that houses the College today. Because of its small size, Piedmont College, through most of its existence, also has developed a "David and Goliath" outlook on just about all matters academic and athletic. Athletic teams, noted nationally in the 1960's for their proclivity to lose, were nonetheless respected for the character of their coaches and player. And even with a faculty that could be numbered in the teens, Piedmont over the years produced more than its share of leaders in government, education, business and the arts. PIEDMONT TODAY With over 2000 candidates, Piedmont College is a classic, independent, church-related, liberal arts institution. Thanks to a substantial endowment, Piedmont is able to provide a high-quality education while charging the lowest tuition of all private colleges in the state. Piedmont's commitment to the liberal arts has not changed either. The College's core curriculum covers nearly half of the total credits required for a degree. This ensures that all candidates gain a broad competence in the liberal arts, regardless of their field of specialization. Fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Piedmont offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. The college is also accredited to award the Master of Arts (MA) in teaching (MAT) degree and began offering graduate classes in the fall of 1994. In the MAT program, candidates are able to earn a bachelor's degree in a range of fields then, with a minimum of one additional year of course work, earn a master's degree in education. The college has an excellent teacher preparation program, with extensive training available in early childhood, middle grades, secondary and special education. The small class size and the cohesiveness of the Piedmont community help candidates to develop their full potential and to acquire the skills needed for successful, professional careers. Piedmont College is becoming more national and international in scope. Currently, more than 20 states and 10 foreign countries are represented at Piedmont. Foreign candidates bring a diversity of backgrounds and beliefs to the campus and their presence allows all candidates to develop an appreciation and understanding of other cultures.

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PIEDMONT COLLEGE MISSION:

Inspired by the liberal arts tradition and a historical association with the Congregational Christian Churches, Piedmont College cultivates a diverse, challenging and caring intellectual environment to encourage academic success and spiritual development. To accomplish this mission, the college offers a number of major fields of study that are informed by the liberal arts, including specialized professional programs and selected graduate programs. Instructional opportunities are also provided at distant locations to meet candidate needs. Liberal arts is interpreted by the College to mean a program of study which develops · Competence in written and spoken communication, mathematics and technology, · An understanding of the arts, humanities and the social and natural sciences, · An understanding and appreciation of the diversity of peoples and cultures, · An ability to identify and use information to think critically and creatively, and · Competence in a major field of study.

School of Education Mission:

The theme of the School of Education is "Mastering the art of teaching: Preparing proactive educators to improve the lives of all children." The School of Education strives to prepare scholarly, reflective, proactive educators in a caring environment with challenging and meaningful learning experiences. These practitioners effectively educate their own students to become knowledgeable, inquisitive, and collaborative learners in diverse, democratic learning communities. Specific ideals under-gird our conceptual framework. We advocate the democratic ideals of: equal rights and opportunities; individual freedom and responsibility; responsibility for the greater good; respect for diversity; openness to possibilities; and open, informed discourse. We endorse the following processes as a means of striving for our democratic ideals: engaging in participatory decision-making; collaborating in teaching and learning; collecting information from all constituencies; examining options and projecting consequences; nurturing open discourse; providing for field experiences; assessing processes as well as products; modeling democratic ideals in the classroom; forming communities of learners; and constantly revising the curriculum to reflect new insights and understandings. Further, we endorse the development of a sense of personal integrity and of strong habits of mind (e.g., reflectiveness, persistence, clarity, accuracy, and responsiveness to feedback).

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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

The work of the faculty of the School of Education over the past several years has resulted in a consensus that the proactive teacher takes responsibility for seeking solutions for problems through scholarly work and reflection and has a vision that is mindful of ways to improve schools and the lives of children. Our School of Education mission is focused on Mastering the Art of Teaching.' Preparing Proactive Educators' to Improve the Lives of Children. Supporting these beliefs, the School of Education at Piedmont College strives to prepare reflective, scholarly, proactive educators. These practitioners effectively educate their own students to become knowledgeable, inquisitive, and collaborative learners in diverse, democratic learning communities. Specific ideals undergird our conceptual framework. We advocate the democratic ideals of equal rights and opportunities; individual freedom and responsibility; responsibility for the greater good; respect for diversity; openness to possibilities; and open, informed discourse. The following quote by Carl Glickman (1998) provides an operational definition of the democratic classroom: Democratic learning in schools is a set of purposeful activities, always building toward increasing student activity, choice, participation, connection, and contribution. It always aims for students, individually and collectively, to take greater responsibility for their own learning. It is not a pedagogy of opening up the classroom doors and telling students to be free. The teacher has a responsibility to use his or her unique attributes--position, experience, age and wisdom--to guide students to the fundamental aim of learning to be free (p. 31). We endorse the following processes as a means of striving for our democratic ideals: engaging in participatory decision-making; collaborating in teaching and learning; collecting information from all constituencies; examining options and projecting consequences; nurturing open discourse; providing for field experiences; assessing processes as well as products; modeling democratic ideals in the classroom; forming communities of learners; and constantly revising the curriculum to reflect new insights and understandings. Further, we endorse the development of a sense of personal integrity and of strong habits of mind (e.g., reflection, persistence, clarity, accuracy, and responsiveness to feedback). Principles As a community of learners ourselves, we build our program on the following principles (drawn from the collected references and developed and adopted by consensus of all faculty in the School of Education), which we have linked to learner outcomes adapted from Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC, 1994) standards: 1. Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers create caring, nurturing environments in the contexts of democratic classrooms, schools, and communities (outcomes 1 and 10); Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers model the integration and application of content knowledge and incorporate the standards of appropriate specialty organizations and the Quality Core Curriculum (outcome 2); Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers exhibit the traits of life-long learners (outcome 9); Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers use their understanding of human development and learning to design and implement instruction (outcomes 3, 5, and 8); Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers understand and value diversity, and modify instruction accordingly to meet the needs of all learners (outcome 4); Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers use a variety of teaching and assessment strategies to facilitate learning for all students (outcomes 5 and 6); Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers use appropriate communication skills and technologies (outcomes 7 and 10);

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Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers critically evaluate educational policies and practices and continually seek to improve their own practices (outcome 9); and Reflective, scholarly, proactive teachers collaborate with other educators for the purposes of improving themselves, improving teaching practices, and stimulating educational research (outcome 10).

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In the process of revising and developing our conceptual framework, the faculty of the School of Education reviewed several different existing national performance standards. Written performance standards have become a widely adopted tool of teacher education reform. They "describe not programs and experiences that should be offered to candidates, but the knowledge, skills and dispositions that the candidates should acquire...through adaptation or adoption of widely accepted teacher standards developed by the National Board for Professional Teacher Standards, INTASC and many individual states" (Elliott, 1997). The School of Education decided that the INTASC standards were best suited to provide the basis for developing candidate learning outcomes to meet the goals of our mission. A review of these standards led us to decide to adapt them to meet our specific mission. The School of Education engaged in a process of examining our mission and guiding principles and incorporating adaptations that incorporated the role of a reflective, scholarly, proactive educator in creating a democratic classroom. Further, an evaluation of surveys of advanced certification candidates enrolled in our graduate programs found that although the INTASC standards were originally written for pre-service candidates, the majority of our graduate candidates indicated that they felt that they "needed to work on" many of the criteria described in these outcomes. For example, 30 of 220 respondents judged their skills at "no knowledge" or "limited knowledge" for statement 11, "I use technology to enhance my own professional growth and productivity and to support instruction in my classroom." Among other areas noted by respondents when asked what areas they would most like to work on during their master's program that are incorporated in the INTASC standards were: · · · · · Using a variety of assessments Learning how to better motivate students academically and personally Understanding different learning styles and how best to reach students of different styles Classroom management and discipline techniques Reading instruction Critical thinking and problem solving

Therefore, the adaptations made by the School of Education faculty to the INTASC standards made the candidate learning outcomes appropriate and applicable as a basis for all of our programs, with additional outcomes developed for advanced candidates, thereby providing a consistent, unified base for our conceptual framework.

Graduate MAT and MA Program Goals: The goal of the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and Master of Arts (MAT) programs at Piedmont College is to provide the graduate candidate knowledge in the social and educational development of students. Through an individualized program of study based on the candidate's undergraduate program, experience, and professional goals, the programs seek to: provide the candidate with the ability to communicate and teach effectively using an interdisciplinary knowledge base and understanding of multidimensional classrooms; use and facilitate critical thinking skills; enhance candidates' content knowledge, integrating it with instructional technology; enable candidates to interpret and assess educational research, and conduct their own classroombased research; and to provide experiences that enable candidates to assume roles as scholarly practitioners and develop their skills and abilities as professional teachers.

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MAT Program Goals: Through an individualized program of study based on the candidate's undergraduate program, experience, and professional goals, the MAT program seeks to: build the candidate's knowledge base and understanding of P-5 students' characteristics, knowledge, skills, experience, interest, approaches to learning, special needs, and cultural heritage; prepare candidates who have knowledge and understanding about multicultural and global issues and perspectives as well as to plan and implement instruction based on these perspectives; build the candidate's knowledge and understanding of content, pedagogy, record keeping and a wide variety of diagnostic and assessment techniques and strategies; develop the candidate's understanding and use of educational technology including the use of computer and other technologies in instruction, assessment, and productivity; build candidate's ability to create classroom environments that include: respect, rapport, a culture for learning, effective management of classroom procedures, appropriate management of student behavior, and efficient organization of physical space; inform candidates of resources available for teachers and students to support and enhance student learning; develop the candidate's repertoire of strategies for effective teaching; enable candidates to plan and implement instruction based on acquired knowledge of subject matter, students, and the community; provide candidates with concrete field experiences across grades P-5 that help them link theory and practice through observation and participation; develop the candidate's understanding and use of effective interactions with parents or guardians for supporting students learning and well-being; develop the candidate's ability to use research, research methods, and knowledge about issues and trends to conduct research on an educational topic of interest; help candidates grow and develop professionally toward becoming proactive, scholarly, reflective practitioners, and lifelong learners who improve the lives of children. MA Program Goals: Through an individualized program of study based on the candidate's undergraduate program, experience, and professional goals, the MA program seeks to: enable candidates to critique their planning and teaching strategies so they can more effectively plan instruction based on extended knowledge of subject matter, students, and the community; broaden the candidates' knowledge of developmentally appropriate content and resources needed for teaching and interacting with their students; expand the candidate's repertoire of strategies for effective teaching and communication with parents; enhance and expand the candidate's knowledge and understanding about multicultural and global issues and perspectives as well as ways to plan and implement instruction based on these perspectives; expand the candidate's understanding and use of educational technology including the use of computer and other technologies in instruction, assessment, and productivity; diversify field experiences for candidates to strengthen their understanding of the link between theory and practice; develop the candidate's ability to use research, research methods, and knowledge about issues and trends to improve practice in schools and classrooms; develop the candidate's ability to assume roles as leaders and mentors in the profession; establish procedures that candidates can use to continually keep up-to-date on changes in the field; help candidates become more independent in their professional development as scholarly, reflective, practitioners and lifelong learners who improve the lives of children; encourage candidates' involvement in professional activities and endeavors; encourage candidates to present at local, state, and national conferences.

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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION OUTCOMES: Core Candidate Learning Outcomes (CCLO) : The following ten outcomes, adapted from the 1994 INTASC standards (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) and updated Fall 2003, are addressed in all courses and are applicable to the undergraduate and graduate programs. 1) Learning Environment: The proactive teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation to create a caring, democratic learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, self regulation, and collaboration. The proactive teacher fosters the ideals of a democratic classroom by treating students fairly and justly, providing intellectual challenge, and supporting students as they pursue knowledge and understanding. 2) Subject Matter: The scholarly teacher understands and can model the central concepts, tools of inquiry, national standards, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students. 3) Student Learning: The reflective teacher understands how students develop and learn and provides well-managed learning opportunities that support students' intellectual, social, and personal growth. The teacher documents student achievements and contributes to systems of accountability designed to improve schooling. 4) Diversity: By understanding that all learners are products of their innate abilities, preferred learning styles, and cultural experiences, the democratic teacher modifies instruction and assessments to meet diverse needs of all students. 5) Instructional Strategies: The proactive teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage the development of all students' creative talents, critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. 6) Assessment Strategies: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher designs a variety of assessments including alternative assessment strategies, which (a) assess the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected in the subject, (b) offset the negative effects of high-stakes testing, and (c) encourage the continual intellectual, social, and personal growth of all students to become knowledgeable, inquisitive learners. 7) Communication and Technology: The proactive teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques and technologies to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. 8) Planning Instruction: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher plans and manages instruction based upon knowledge of content, pedagogy, students, the community, and curriculum goals. 9) Reflection and Professional Development: The scholarly teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions upon others, institutes research aimed at improving instruction, attends to the development of policies affecting education at the state and national levels, proactively seeks opportunities for the continual development of a personal pedagogy. 10) Collaboration and Relationships: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher communicates and collaborates with other educators, parents/families, agencies and the community through democratic processes to support student learning and well being. In addition to the ten core candidate learning outcomes across programs, each program includes additional outcomes that graduate candidates are expected to demonstrate. Early Childhood and Middle Grades Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): 11) Constructivist Practices: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher models and provides opportunities for constructivist practices. 12) Informed Teachers: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher is an informed professional. 13) Scholarly Work: The reflective, proactive teacher actively engages in scholarly work. 14) Action Research: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher participates in action research. Secondary Education Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): For both Initial and Advanced Certification Programs 11) Research: The teacher refines instructional practices informed by critical consideration of relevant research and by the application of action research as an ongoing aspect of practice. 12) Democratic Classroom: The teacher guides students toward involvement in activities that provide skills and dispositions to fulfill the roles of a citizen engaged in pursuing the ideals of democracy. 13) Philosophical Orientation: The teacher studies initiatives, patterns, trends and policies for their philosophical underpinnings as part of a continuing assessment of the efficacy of those underpinnings.

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14) Integrity: The teacher pursues her/his professional practices with a strong sense of mission beyond keeping a job, and with a keen sense of ethical integrity. 15) Philosophical Pragmatism: The teacher maintains an intellectual spiral in which practices are improved by conceptual refinements, which are in turn refined by assessing the results of implementations over time. For Advanced Certification Programs 16) Modeling and Mentoring: The teacher both models best practices and accepts responsibility to mentor new and veteran teachers. 17) Professional Discourse: The teacher participates actively in the professional discourses related to the field of certification--at the school and in regional and national venues. 18) Proactive Involvement: The teacher takes advantage of opportunities to influence the school toward curricula, instructional practices, policies and professional climate which result in students acquiring more durable knowledge and skills and in-depth understanding, as well as positive dispositions toward learning.

Special Education Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): Based on the Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC) professional standards for teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders: 11) Teacher candidates will understand the field as an evolving and changing discipline based on philosophies, evidenced-based principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and historical points of view, and human issues that have historically influenced and continue to influence the field of special education and the education and treatment of individuals with exceptional needs both in school and society. (Foundations) 12) Teacher candidates understand how exceptional conditions can interact with the domains of human development and they use this knowledge to respond to the varying abilities and behaviors of individuals with emotional learning needs. (Development and Characteristics of Learners) 13) Teacher candidates are active and resourceful in seeing to understand how primary language, culture, and familial backgrounds interact with the individual's exceptional condition to impact the individual's exceptional condition to impact the individual's academic and social abilities, attitudes, values, interests, and career options. (Individual Learning Differences) 14) Teacher candidates possess a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize instruction for individuals with emotional learning needs. Special educators select, adapt, and use these instruction strategies to promote challenging learning results in general and special curricula and to appropriately modify learning environments for students with E/BD. (Instructional Strategies) 15) Teacher candidates actively create learning environments for students with emotional learning needs that foster cultural understanding, safety, and emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and active engagement of these students. (Learning Environments and Social Interactions) 16) Teacher candidates understand typical and atypical language development and the ways in which exceptional conditions can interact with an individual's experience with and the use of language. Teacher candidates use individualized strategies to enhance language development and teach communication skills to individuals with emotional learning needs. (Language) 17) Teacher candidates develop long-range individualized instructional plans anchored in both general and special curricula. Individualized instructional plans emphasize explicit modeling an efficient guided practice to assure acquisition and fluency though maintenance and generalization. (Instructional Planning) 18) Teacher candidates use multiple types of assessment information for a variety of educational decisions. The results of assessments are used to help identify exceptional learning needs and to develop and implement individualized instruction programs, as well as to adjust instruction in response to ongoing learning progress. (Assessment) 19) Teacher candidates are guided by the profession's ethical and professional practice standards, actively plan and engaging in activities that foster their professional growth and keep them current with evidence-based best practices. (Professional and Ethical Practice) 20) Teacher candidates routinely and effectively collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways. Special educators promote and advocate the learning and well being of individuals with emotional learning needs across a wide range of settings and a range of different learning experiences; facilitating the successful transitions of students with emotional learning needs across settings and services. (Collaboration)

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Music Education Program Outcomes (GCLO): 11) Repertory and History: The teacher candidate is a scholarly musician who is familiar with, through performance and academic studies, music of diverse cultural sources, historical periods, and media. 12) Technology: The teacher candidate is knowledgeable of the capabilities of technology as they relate to music composition, performance, analysis, teaching, and research. 13) Performance: The knowledgeable teacher candidate has demonstrated the ability to perform, improvise, and compose in at least one applied music area and keyboard, and has experience throughout the program with ensembles that are varied in size and nature. 14) Teacher Preparation: The knowledgeable and reflective teacher candidate has a mastery of the fundamental elements of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, form, and style) and music history, and is able to teach these elements at the appropriate level, P-12, to a diverse community of learners in a democratic classroom.

Education Specialist Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): 11) Specialist Candidates will demonstrate proactive knowledge of techniques that bring about positive change in schools, schooling and practices. 12) Specialist Candidates will be use assessment of characteristics and needs of student learners. 13) Specialist Candidates (through reflection) will conduct self-assessment. 14) Specialist Candidates will reflect and improve on student learning. 15) Specialist Candidates will model, develop, and deliver content expertise. 16) Specialist Candidates will generate and use proactive and scholarly research to improve schooling. 17) Specialist Candidates will create learning communities. 18) Specialist Candidates will provide leadership for creating democratic learning. 19) Specialist Candidates will contribute to professional growth of their profession. 20) Specialist Candidates will demonstrate ethical dimensions of teaching. ******************************************************************************* Dispositions for All Candidates: In addition to the common core learning outcomes and graduate candidate learning outcomes, all candidates are expected to be familiar with the dispositions expected of professionals. Their work with students, families, and communities reflects the following dispositions as defined by the School of Education faculty: Scholarly: Inquiring; creative; seeks solutions; thinks critically about theory and method; keeps current in discipline (conferences, journals, classes); pursues lifelong learning. Reflective: Bases daily decisions on in depth reflection, done frequently and honestly; considers many possibilities for problem solutions; stays open to constructive criticism. Proactive: Anticipates problems in management; anticipates problems and difficulties in instruction; addresses pertinent issues of school and community to support student learning; encourages students' critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity; plans for important student learning; fosters visionary thinking and action; promotes mindful leadership to improve schools. Democratic: Facilitator; views others as capable to deal with problems and able to make decisions; promotes equitable treatment for all students; has high expectations for all students; seeks best interest of students they serve; open-minded; able to view other perspectives; accommodates individual differences; culturally sensitive in areas of communications, learning, assessment, and cultural norms; collaborates well with others; works for the good of the community.

Responsible: Patience, professional temperament; aims to be the best he/she can be; good work ethic; punctual; recognizes when their own dispositions may need to be adjusted and are able to develop plans to do so.

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Piedmont College School of Education

Student Notification: Excessive Absences and/or Professional Dispositions Name_________________________________________ Date___________________ Course Title____________________________________________________________ A. I am concerned that your absences from the course listed above have reached the critical point and your grade is in serious jeopardy. Your status is checked below:

( ) This is your official warning concerning excessive absences/tardies in class. If you are absent/tardy_____ more times, you will be asked to drop the course or receive an "F" at the end of the semester. Specifics:____________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________ ___ ( ) You have taken the maximum allowable absences. Any additional absence will result in your being asked to drop the course or receive a grade of "F" at the end of the semester. Any additional absence will result in your grade being lowered a letter grade as specified on the course syllabus.

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B. I am concerned about the following areas of professionalism or dispositions appropriate for teacher educators and defined by the School of Education on the back of this form.

( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

Scholarly disposition:________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Reflective disposition:_______________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Democratic disposition: ______________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Proactive disposition:________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Responsible disposition:______________________________________________

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C. Any conduct that is a serious breech of the PSC Code of Ethics must be reported immediately to the Dean of the School Education. Please see me immediately to discuss this notification and develop a plan for improvement. Plan for Improvement: _________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________ Professor's Signature _____________________________________ Student's Signature Copy to: Dean; Department Chair; Advisor ________________________ Date ________________________ Date ______Documents Attached

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Academic Integrity Policy

The Academic Integrity Policy may be found on the Piedmont College web page at www.piedmont.edu/handbook/academic_integrity.html Academic Integrity Administrative Procedures 1. The accuser will provide to the Vice President for Academic Affairs a signed statement fully describing the act of academic dishonesty, naming persons involved and witnesses, and listing all physical evidence. All physical evidence is to be secured, if possible, by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will provide the accused with written notification of the accusation of academic dishonesty, the identity of the accuser, and the procedures for resolving the case. The accused may request that the Vice President for Academic Affairs adjudicate the case based on the evidence presented, taking into consideration any recommendations of the instructor responsible for the academic exercise in which the act of academic dishonesty is alleged to have occurred. The accused may request that the Vice President for Academic Affairs adjudicate the case after conducting a hearing where the accuser and the accused may present evidence and written statements, as well as call and question witnesses. The accused may request a hearing before the Academic Integrity Committee or the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The committee will make decisions by simple majority vote, relying on circumstantial evidence and assessment of credibility in making decisions. If a hearing before the Committee is requested, the accused will have: a. b. c. a reasonable amount of time to prepare for the hearing; opportunity to examine evidence; The privilege of being accompanied and advised at the hearing by one member of the campus community. (The accuser also may be accompanied and advised at the hearing by one member of the campus community); Opportunity to question the accuser and witnesses who appear at the hearing; Opportunity to examine the signed statements of the accuser and witnesses who may or may not appear at the hearing; and Opportunity to present evidence and call witnesses relevant to the case.

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d. e. f.

The Academic Integrity Committee will submit to the Vice President for Academic Affairs written reports of the hearing with all statements and evidence. In its reports, the Committee will recommend to the Vice President for Academic Affairs a finding of guilt or innocence and any penalties it recommends be imposed. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will provide the accused with written notification of the Committee's recommendations and a written response to those recommendations. 6. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will make the final judgment of guilt or innocence and of penalties and will provide the accused written notification of the disposition of the case.

7. A student may appeal the decision of the Vice President for Academic Affairs to the Office of the President.

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ATTENDANCE POLICIES

We have two policies, one for undergraduate students and one for graduate students. Information about the attendance policy should be clearly written on each syllabus. · UNDERGRADUATE ATTENDANCE POLICY Follow the School of Education policy as it is currently written: "All absences for participation in recognized school events (e.g., athletics, drama, field trips) will count against the teacher's announced absence policy. The number of absences an individual teacher may permit in a class, therefore, will not be in addition to the excused absences." Attendance, timeliness, and participation are required and part of your grade. The School of Education policy states that more than the allotted number of absences for any reason will result in failure of the course. The allotted number of excused absences is as follows: · Day classes meeting three times a week for entire semester: 6 absences · Day classes meeting two times a week for entire semester: 4 absences · All eight-week classes: 1 absence · Evening classes meeting for entire semester: 3 absences · Courses operating under a different format (4 week, online, etc.) determined by the professor of the course. · Add: The course professor, following a written appeal by the student, must approve any extenuating circumstances or exceptions to this policy.

·

GRADUATE ATTENDANCE POLICY Your attendance policy must be on the course syllabus and approved by the Department Chair or the Dean. It must meet the following criteria: · Clearly stated · Limits on number of absences and consequences for absences · What constitutes an excused absence · Reflect nature and pedagogy of the course · Have a disclaimer for extenuating circumstances

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CROSS-LISTED COURSES All cross-listed courses must follow undergraduate policy Must adhere to instructional guidelines Address withdrawals and incompletes on all syllabi.

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Grade Sheets You will receive a grade sheet from the Registrar's office. Grades are to be turned in 48 hours following the final exam for the course. Instructions with specific due date will be with grade sheets.

Posting or Mailing Grades and Release of Student Information Releasing grades to any unauthorized person is a violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The Registrar's office will not give out individual grades to students until all grades have been recorded. The Registrar's office mails students' grades at the end of each semester within one week of the last final examination. Faculty may mail grades to students who provide stamped pre-addressed envelopes or may post grades if a process is used which meets FERPA privacy requirements (e.g., PIN). Grades matched with social security numbers are considered personally identifiable and therefore must not be posted for public view. Faculty may not release grades to other institutions. Students requesting an early release of a grade should be directed to the Registrar.

Office Hours Part time faculty need to be available to students on a regular basis. Please include in your syllabus a statement of how and when students may contact and meet you. Parking Permits Parking permits are required for part-time faculty. Please contact the Director at the Athens Center or Dick Martin, Campus Police, at the Demorest campus. Copying For assistance with copying, etc. contact with administrative assistant on either campus. Please allow sufficient time (24 hours for most jobs) to process your request. Course Evaluation Forms Course evaluation forms must be completed on all courses. If you have not received these forms by the last week of class, please contact the administrative assistant on either campus. When completed they should be returned to the administrative assistants.

A. Payroll Checks. Part-time faculty is compensated upon submission of final grades for eight-week classes. The Business Office will mail payroll checks after confirmation has been received from the Registrar's Office that grades have been submitted. Please be sure to the Business Office of any changes.

Payment Policy The State of Georgia requires all payroll forms due five days from date of hire. These forms include: Part-time Employee Data Form; Part-time Employee Application; W-4 Form; G-4 Form and I-9 Form. Also, a current VITA and an official transcript from each college attended must be on file with the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Paychecks will be held until all information is received. 18

Note: Paychecks will be withheld from an instructor who has not supplied all employment documentation until such required documentation is received. B. Sexual Harassment. Federal law provides that it shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice for any employer, because of the sex of any person, to discharge without cause, to refuse to hire, or otherwise discriminate against any person with respect to any matter directly or indirectly related to employment or academic standing. Harassment of an employee on the basis of sex violates this federal law. Sexual harassment of employees or candidates in Piedmont College is prohibited and shall subject the offender to dismissal or other sanctions after compliance with procedural due process requirements. Definition: Unwelcome sexual advance, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitutes harassment when: 1. submission to such conduct is made explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic standing; or 2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for employment or academic decisions affecting on individual; or 3. such conduct unreasonably interferes with an individual's work or academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment. Piedmont College is committed to providing a learning and working environment conducive to effective learning and effective discharge of work-related duties and responsibilities. Employees are expected to act professionally in their respective work settings. Candidates are expected to respect the rights of other candidates and all member of the College community. The college environment must be free of discrimination and harassment of any kind, especially that of a sexual nature. Any allegations of sexual harassment will be thoroughly investigated. Sexual harassment is totally unacceptable, and determination that such harassment has occurred will result in prompt and firm disciplinary action, which may include immediate dismissal. As professional educators, all faculty members have responsibilities to all candidates in various roles including professor, advisor, sponsor, and mentor. Because of this educational responsibility, faculty must ensure that their relationships with candidates remain clearly and exclusively professional. Any action or relationship which may tend to compromise a faculty member's impartiality or objectivity toward a candidate should be avoided. An inherent inequality of power, prestige, and authority exists between faculty and candidates; therefore, some personal relationships that on the surface seem to be fully consensual may, in fact, be shaped by the faculty member's position of influence and thus should be avoided. Faculty should take care to avoid not only impropriety or conflict of interest, but also the appearance thereof. While applying to relationships with all candidates, this policy is especially important with regard to candidates with whom the faculty member has, or is likely to have, direct contact such as in class, in a candidate organization, or as a reference.

C. Facilities. Classrooms are arranged by the Department Chair or Coordinator through the Registrars office in Demorest or Administrative Services in Athens. D. Course Scheduling. The Dept. Chair or designee schedules courses and assigns faculty Class meeting times and dates cannot be changed with out prior approval by the Dept. Chair.. 19

Piedmont College School of Education Incomplete Grade Policy

There has been an increasing trend of assigning a grade of "I" (Incomplete) in circumstances that do not follow the policy as written in the college catalog* and on the application form. Incomplete grade assignment is appropriate only when a substantial amount of work for the course has been completed. A request for an Incomplete is not appropriate until after the official date for withdrawal without academic penalty has passed. Please follow these guidelines when assigning a grade of incomplete because of illness or extenuating circumstances: 1. 2. In the case of illness, the instructor should request verification. "Extenuating circumstances" refers to situations like a death in the immediate family, a seriously ill child, call to active military duty, or similar events. It does not mean that the student did not meet deadlines, had a work conflict, could not get the work done or took a vacation during the final exam, etc. When in doubt, consult with your department chair or the dean before making a decision. If a student is ill and has missed more than the last 3 classes for an 8-week class or more than the last third of other classes, the student should apply for a medical withdrawal. The Piedmont College catalog states "when prolonged illness results in extended class absences, a student may request permission in writing from the Registrar to withdraw from one or more courses. A grade of "W" will be given for medical withdrawals." Withdrawals based on circumstances other than illness will be assigned a grade of "W" or "WF" based on the determination of the Academic Vice-President. Procedures for requesting an "I" grade: · The student is expected to initiate the request for an "I" grade, completing all the items in the student section of the form (incomplete forms will be returned) · If the student is unable to initiate the request, the instructor may do so by completing all sections and writing "by phone" or "by email" for the student's signature (incomplete forms will be returned) · If the instructor approves the request, it should be forwarded to the Dean of Education no later than the last day of classes for that semester · The Dean makes the final determination if the request is granted and will forward approved requests to the Registrar. Requests not approved will be returned to the instructor who will then assign an appropriate grade. The Dean will notify the student on the status of the approval and, if granted, provide information concerning how to complete the work and the consequences for not doing so by the stated deadline. *For reasons such as illness or other extenuating circumstances, a student may receive an incomplete (I) upon the approval of the course instructor and the dean of the appropriate school. Application forms may be obtained from the registrar's office. Failure to remove the "I" by the end of the next semester enrolled at Piedmont College will result in an "F". For 20

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students who do not return to Piedmont, the "I" must be removed within a calendar year or it is changed to an "F". (Piedmont College Catalog, p. 52)

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In-Progress Grade Policy

A grade of "IP" (in progress) may be used in a limited number of courses approved by the Dean of Education, for a candidate who initiates coursework which cannot be completed during the semester because of circumstances such as a delay in collecting research data, a need for extended work in student teaching, apprenticeships, capstones. The procedures for using the IP grade are: · The student is expected to initiate the request for an "I" grade, completing all the items in the student section of the form (incomplete forms will be returned) · If the student is unable to initiate the request, the instructor may do so by completing all sections and writing "by phone" or "by email" for the student's signature (incomplete forms will be returned) · If the instructor approves the request, it should be forwarded to the Dean of Education no later than the last day of classes for that semester · The Dean makes the final determination if the request is granted and will forward approved requests to the Registrar. Requests not approved will be returned to the instructor who will then assign an appropriate grade. The Dean will notify the student on the status of the approval and, if granted, provide information concerning how to complete the work and the consequences for not doing so by the stated deadline. Courses approved for In-Progress grades: Research courses: An In-Progress grade in research may be awarded in cases when the researcher is unable to complete the research as a result of delays beyond the control of the researcher. · EDUC 699 Methods and Interpretation of Educational Research · EDSE 698 Action Research (in Educational Research for Secondary Education) · SPED 699 Single Subject Research (Special Education) Capstones: In-Progress grades may be appropriate in individual cases when the prospective presenter and capstone course instructor agree that the presenter should continue development of the capstone into the next semester. · EDEC 788 Capstone/Exhibition (Early Childhood) · EDSE 788 Capstone/Exhibition (Secondary Education) · SPED 780 Portfolio Presentation (Special Education) · EDMG 788 Capstone/Exhibition (Middle Grades) Teaching experience: When a candidate's student teaching, Practicum, apprenticeship, or internship is extended by the college. · EDEC 742 Student Teaching (Early Childhood) · EDEC 745 Internship (Early Childhood) · EDSE 743 Apprenticeship (Secondary) · EDSE 745 Internship (Secondary) · EDSE 740 Practicum in Instructional Proficiency · EDS 820 Advanced Research I: Quantitative and Qualitative Methods · EDS 821 Advanced Research II: Design and Applications · EDS 822 Advanced Research III: Assessing and Presenting · SPED 742 Special Education Student Teaching I · SPED 743 Special Education Student Teaching II · SPED 744 Special Education Internship I (EBD) · SPED 745 Special Education Internship II (EBD)

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Courses with Pass/Fail Grades Early Childhood EDEC 499 Student Teaching EDUC 599 Graduate Orientation EDEC 742 Student Teaching (K-5) EDEC 744 Internship I EDEC 745 Internship II Middle Grades EDMG 499 Student Teaching Secondary Education EDSE 366 Secondary Practicum EDSE 740 Secondary Education Practicum EDSE 742 Apprentice Teaching EDSE 743 Apprentice Teaching EDSE 744 Secondary Education Internship I EDSE 745 Secondary Education Internship II EDSE 788 Secondary Education Capstone Special Education SPED 444 Internship I SPED 445 Internship II SPED 499 Student Teaching SPED 740 Practicum (E/BD) SPED 741 Practicum (SED & Autism) SPED 742 Student Teaching (E/BD) SPED 743 Student Teaching (SED & Autism) SPED 744 Internship I SPED 745 Internship II SPED 780 Capstone

NOTE: Part-time faculty teaching these courses: Please follow grade policy.

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Official Course Syllabi Online Manager System (Official textbook and course outcome information)

The syllabi for the School of Education are managed via a system of assigned course managers. The assigned faculty managers are responsible for keeping the course information and textbooks current for each course in all programs. These syllabi are located on the Piedmont College website and may be accessed by anyone. The purpose of having these online is to share information about the courses with the Piedmont community. *There are two required components for any course taught at Piedmont, these are the course outcomes that link to our conceptual framework, and the officially adopted textbook for each course. To find these syllabi go to the Internet and enter: http://www.piedmont.edu/educ1/faculty.html You will find all courses under the assigned faculty links. If you have any problems please contact the School of Education at 706-778-3000 x1500.

Arrendale Library

Homepage: http://library.piedmont.edu/ Email: [email protected] Telephone: 706-776-0111 or 800-277-7020 x1111 FAX: 706/776-2811 24

All students enrolled at Piedmont College as well as all faculty members have full library privileges at the Arrendale Library in Demorest and at the Resource Center in Piedmont College's Athens Center. These privileges include book borrowing, reference assistance, interlibrary loan, computer lab use, and other usual library services. Students should regard Arrendale Library as the primary source of library support for their studies. Regular semester Arrendale Library hours are Monday ­ Thursday, 7:45 AM ­ 11:00 PM, Friday, 7:45 AM ­ 4:00 PM, Saturday, 10:00 AM ­ 4 PM, and Sunday, 2:00 PM ­ 10:00 PM. Athens Resource Center hours vary. All of the services described below can be accessed through the Library's web site, http://library.piedmont.edu. Reference Assistance

Reference assistance is available by e-mail or by telephone from the Reference Department of Arrendale Library. We will provide direct answers when possible; however, some situations require that we refer you to sources for you to consult. The e-mail address of the Arrendale Library Reference Department is [email protected] We are unable to answer longer or more detailed research questions electronically. Use the numbers listed above to receive telephone reference assistance.

Electronic Resources

Access to the Arrendale Library collection of subscription databases including GALILEO is available from our Electronic Library Resources Page, http://library.piedmont.edu/elec-res/elec-res.html. Best results have been obtained using Internet Explorer 6 and Adobe Acrobat 5. Some resources require entry of your last name followed by the last 4 digits of your college identification at the EZProxy prompt. EZProxy authenticates you as a member of the Piedmont community to our database providers. If needed, current database passwords are available by calling the library or from the User Names and Passwords link on the Services and Resources page of the Library's web site. A sampling of available databases with education content includes: o ERIC - The Educational Resource Information Center, is a national information system supported by the U.S. Department of Education, the National Library of Education, and the Office of Educational Research and Improvement. ERIC provides full text of more than 2,200 digests along with references for additional information and citations and abstracts from over 1000 educational and education-related journals. ERIC documents (ED numbers), that are part of our EDRS E*Subscribe subscription, may be retrieved using the "Full Text from EDRS" link if you have been authenticated by EZProxy. The print and online journal lists on the library web site may be used to locate ERIC journal articles (EJ numbers). If you are unable to retrieve an ERIC document or a journal article online, please submit a Document Delivery Request using the Mayflower library catalog. Education Full Text ­ This H. W. Wilson database covers the following subjects: Adult Education, Arts, Athletics, Comparative Education, Competency-based Education, Computers in Education, Continuing Education, Educational Technology, Elementary Education, Government Funding, Higher Education, Instructional Media, Language Arts, Library Science, Literacy Standards, Multicultural/Ethnic Education, Parent-Teacher Relations, Prayer in Public Schools, Preschool Education, Religious Education, School Administration, Science and Mathematics, Secondary Education, Special Education, Student Counseling, Teacher Education, Teacher Evaluation, Teaching Methods, Vocational Education. Check the "Full text" and "Peer reviewed" boxes to limit your search to complete journal articles contained in the database. Academic Search Premier - Academic Search Premier and other EBSCO databases contain many full text, peer reviewed articles on a variety of Education topics. Use the "Choose Databases" tab to select and search several EBSCO databases at once. Check

o

o

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the "Full text" and "Peer reviewed" boxes to limit your search to complete journal articles contained in the database. o Research Library ­ This Proquest database contains some full text on education topics. Check the "Full text" and "Peer reviewed" boxes to limit your search to complete journal articles contained in the database. Note the "Date Range" pull down menu. Searches must be run for each date range to obtain full results. CQ Researcher - Explores a single "hot" issue in the news in depth each week. Topics range from social and teen issues to environment, health, education and science and technology. LexisNexis ­ Provides a collection of databases. The News database contains articles from newspapers, magazines, and newsletters as well as TV and radio transcripts. This is a very large database, so narrowing your search is essential. Use the pull down menus on the "Guided News Search" page to retrieve pertinent articles or transcripts. The Legal Research database contains Legal Literature and Case Law as well as Codes & Regulations.

o

o

A sampling of available general reference databases includes: o o o o o AccessScience--the online version of the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology Oxford Reference Online--100 language and subject dictionaries and reference works LION (Literature Online)--a full-text and secondary source database on English and American literature Oxford English Dictionary Online--an online version of the classic English language dictionary Mental Measurements Yearbook--full-text information about and reviews of all Englishlanguage standardized tests as included in the printed Mental Measurements Yearbooks.

Access to the MAYFLOWER, the Library's Catalog Any student who has access to a computer which is connected to the Internet may access Arrendale Library's catalog, the MAYFLOWER, using the Library's homepage. The catalog contains records for all of the Library's holdings including its books, videos, periodicals and ebooks. A unique feature of MAYFLOWER is that you may renew materials online in order to avoid overdue fines. This feature is available through the My Account box at the top of the page. Print and Online Journals

Members of the Piedmont College community have access to thousands of journals, magazines, and newspapers. Some are available in print at Arrendale Library; many more are available online. Lists of print holdings and electronically accessible periodicals are available from the Library's home page. Select the Journal Lists Print/Electronic link for access to these lists. Most, but not all, online journals are accessed through the Library's participation in the GALILEO project.

Document Delivery

Document Delivery is a service provided by the Arrendale Library whereby items are retrieved and delivered to you. Forms for journal or book requests are available in the MAYFLOWER through the Document Delivery link. Students should provide a full and precise citation for the use by the Document Delivery staff. Complete contact information, including mailing information, phone numbers, and an e-mail address is necessary. Only requests with all of the required information can be accepted. Material Owned by Arrendale Library

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The Library will photocopy and mail articles from journals listed in the MAYFLOWER or in the Print Journals Holdings List to you upon request. We will also check-out and send books to you via UPS Ground. Note that all circulation policies apply, including overdue fines and recalls. You will be responsible for returning the book(s) (by mail or in person) by the due date. Remember, you may renew materials online in the MAYFLOWER in order to avoid overdue fines. Questions? Contact the a permanent staff member at 706/7760111 or at [email protected] Material Not Owned by Arrendale Library

Students who need access to material which is not owned by Arrendale Library and which is not available in GALILEO may obtain the material through Document Delivery. When a request for material not available in our library is received, the Library will initiate the Interlibrary Loan (ILL) process to obtain such material from another library.

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS The classroom performance of, and the meeting of professional responsibility of, part time instructors will be evaluated. A. Classroom Performance. Performance will be evaluated using a variety of methods, which may include, but not limited to the following: Course evaluations Observations by the Dept Chair or Coordinator 27

Course materials (syllabus, reading lists, handouts, assignments, etc.) Measures of candidates learning when available. The proper procedure for administering course evaluations is as follows: Faculty member receives course evaluation packet from the administrator that contains the course evaluation forms and an addressed, stamped envelope. Candidates need to provide #2 pencils. A volunteer candidate should be in charge of administering, collecting, and mailing the forms back to the College. The faculty member must leave the room during the evaluation process. The candidates administering the evaluation should also participate in the evaluation while overseeing the process. The volunteer should then collect the evaluation forms and seal them in the provided envelope. The volunteer will then deliver the completed forms to the administrative assistants at either campus. The faculty member will receive a transcribed and tabulated copy of the course evaluations. The Chair and the Dean of the School of Education will also receive a transcribed and tabulated copy of the evaluations. The Chair and the Dean of the School of Education will jointly assess the quality of instruction at the conclusion of each term. B. Professional Responsibility. Professional responsibility includes, but is not limited to, such matters as attendance, appropriate attire, punctuality, and adherence to procedure.

PIEDMONT COLLEGE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Mastering the art of teaching: Preparing proactive educators to improve the lives of all children

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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION SYLLABUS A

I. TEXT REQUIRED FOR ALL COURSES: American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, D. C.: Author. Also recommended: American Psychological Association. (2005). Concise rules of APA Style. Washington, D. C: Author. Perrin, R. (2007). Pocket guide to APA style. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. II. PIEDMONT COLLEGE MISSION: Piedmont College educates students to become successful and responsible citizens through rigorous academic instruction in the liberal arts and professional disciplines. Learning opportunities are provided through undergraduate and graduate programs offered at various locations. The institution emphasizes high ethical standards and respect for diversity. School of Education Mission: The theme of the School of Education is "Mastering the art of teaching: Preparing proactive educators to improve the lives of all children." The School of Education strives to prepare scholarly, reflective, proactive educators in a caring environment with challenging and meaningful learning experiences. These practitioners effectively educate their own students to become knowledgeable, inquisitive, and collaborative learners in diverse, democratic learning communities. Specific ideals under-gird our conceptual framework. We advocate the democratic ideals of: equal rights and opportunities; individual freedom and responsibility; responsibility for the greater good; respect for diversity; openness to possibilities; and open, informed discourse. We endorse the following processes as a means of striving for our democratic ideals: engaging in participatory decision-making; collaborating in teaching and learning; collecting information from all constituencies; examining options and projecting consequences; nurturing open discourse; providing for field experiences; assessing processes as well as products; modeling democratic ideals in the classroom; forming communities of learners; and constantly revising the curriculum to reflect new insights and understandings. Further, we endorse the development of a sense of personal integrity and of strong habits of mind (e.g., reflectiveness, persistence, clarity, accuracy, and responsiveness to feedback).

Graduate MAT and MA Program Goals: The goal of the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and Master of Arts (MAT) programs at Piedmont College is to provide the graduate candidate knowledge in the social and educational development of students. Through an individualized program of study based on the candidate's undergraduate program, experience, and professional goals, the programs seek to: provide the candidate with the ability to communicate and teach effectively using an interdisciplinary knowledge base and understanding of multidimensional classrooms; use and facilitate critical thinking skills; enhance candidates' content knowledge, integrating it with instructional technology; enable candidates to interpret and assess educational research, and conduct their own classroombased research; and to provide experiences that enable candidates to assume roles as scholarly practitioners and develop their skills and abilities as professional teachers.

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MAT Program Goals: Through an individualized program of study based on the candidate's undergraduate program, experience, and professional goals, the MAT program seeks to: build the candidate's knowledge base and understanding of P-5 students' characteristics, knowledge, skills, experience, interest, approaches to learning, special needs, and cultural heritage; prepare candidates who have knowledge and understanding about multicultural and global issues and perspectives as well as to plan and implement instruction based on these perspectives; build the candidate's knowledge and understanding of content, pedagogy, record keeping and a wide variety of diagnostic and assessment techniques and strategies; develop the candidate's understanding and use of educational technology including the use of computer and other technologies in instruction, assessment, and productivity; build candidate's ability to create classroom environments that include: respect, rapport, a culture for learning, effective management of classroom procedures, appropriate management of student behavior, and efficient organization of physical space; inform candidates of resources available for teachers and students to support and enhance student learning; develop the candidate's repertoire of strategies for effective teaching; enable candidates to plan and implement instruction based on acquired knowledge of subject matter, students, and the community; provide candidates with concrete field experiences across grades P-5 that help them link theory and practice through observation and participation; develop the candidate's understanding and use of effective interactions with parents or guardians for supporting students learning and well-being; develop the candidate's ability to use research, research methods, and knowledge about issues and trends to conduct research on an educational topic of interest; help candidates grow and develop professionally toward becoming proactive, scholarly, reflective practitioners, and lifelong learners who improve the lives of children. MA Program Goals: Through an individualized program of study based on the candidate's undergraduate program, experience, and professional goals, the MA program seeks to: enable candidates to critique their planning and teaching strategies so they can more effectively plan instruction based on extended knowledge of subject matter, students, and the community; broaden the candidates' knowledge of developmentally appropriate content and resources needed for teaching and interacting with their students; expand the candidate's repertoire of strategies for effective teaching and communication with parents; enhance and expand the candidate's knowledge and understanding about multicultural and global issues and perspectives as well as ways to plan and implement instruction based on these perspectives; expand the candidate's understanding and use of educational technology including the use of computer and other technologies in instruction, assessment, and productivity; diversify field experiences for candidates to strengthen their understanding of the link between theory and practice; develop the candidate's ability to use research, research methods, and knowledge about issues and trends to improve practice in schools and classrooms; develop the candidate's ability to assume roles as leaders and mentors in the profession; establish procedures that candidates can use to continually keep up-to-date on changes in the field; help candidates become more independent in their professional development as scholarly, reflective, practitioners and lifelong learners who improve the lives of children; encourage candidates' involvement in professional activities and endeavors; encourage candidates to present at local, state, and national conferences. III. COURSE DESCRIPTION AND PURPOSE: See Course Syllabus B ­ III.

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IV.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION OUTCOMES: Core Candidate Learning Outcomes (CCLO) : The following ten outcomes, adapted from the 1994 INTASC standards (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) and updated Fall 2003, are addressed in all courses and are applicable to the undergraduate and graduate programs. 1) Learning Environment: The proactive teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation to create a caring, democratic learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, self regulation, and collaboration. The proactive teacher fosters the ideals of a democratic classroom by treating students fairly and justly, providing intellectual challenge, and supporting students as they pursue knowledge and understanding. 2) Subject Matter: The scholarly teacher understands and can model the central concepts, tools of inquiry, national standards, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students. 3) Student Learning: The reflective teacher understands how students develop and learn and provides well-managed learning opportunities that support students' intellectual, social, and personal growth. The teacher documents student achievements and contributes to systems of accountability designed to improve schooling. 4) Diversity: By understanding that all learners are products of their innate abilities, preferred learning styles, and cultural experiences, the democratic teacher modifies instruction and assessments to meet diverse needs of all students. 5) Instructional Strategies: The proactive teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage the development of all students' creative talents, critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. 6) Assessment Strategies: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher designs a variety of assessments including alternative assessment strategies, which (a) assess the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected in the subject, (b) offset the negative effects of high-stakes testing, and (c) encourage the continual intellectual, social, and personal growth of all students to become knowledgeable, inquisitive learners. 7) Communication and Technology: The proactive teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques and technologies to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. 8) Planning Instruction: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher plans and manages instruction based upon knowledge of content, pedagogy, students, the community, and curriculum goals. 9) Reflection and Professional Development: The scholarly teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions upon others, institutes research aimed at improving instruction, attends to the development of policies affecting education at the state and national levels, proactively seeks opportunities for the continual development of a personal pedagogy. 10) Collaboration and Relationships: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher communicates and collaborates with other educators, parents/families, agencies and the community through democratic processes to support student learning and well being. In addition to the ten core candidate learning outcomes across programs, each program includes additional outcomes that graduate candidates are expected to demonstrate. Early Childhood and Middle Grades Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): 11) Constructivist Practices: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher models and provides opportunities for constructivist practices. 12) Informed Teachers: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher is an informed professional. 13) Scholarly Work: The reflective, proactive teacher actively engages in scholarly work. 14) Action Research: The scholarly, reflective, proactive teacher participates in action research. Secondary Education Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): For both Initial and Advanced Certification Programs 11) Research: The teacher refines instructional practices informed by critical consideration of relevant research and by the application of action research as an ongoing aspect of practice. 12) Democratic Classroom: The teacher guides students toward involvement in activities that provide skills and dispositions to fulfill the roles of a citizen engaged in pursuing the ideals of democracy. 13) Philosophical Orientation: The teacher studies initiatives, patterns, trends and policies for their philosophical underpinnings as part of a continuing assessment of the efficacy of those underpinnings.

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14) Integrity: The teacher pursues her/his professional practices with a strong sense of mission beyond keeping a job, and with a keen sense of ethical integrity. 15) Philosophical Pragmatism: The teacher maintains an intellectual spiral in which practices are improved by conceptual refinements, which are in turn refined by assessing the results of implementations over time. For Advanced Certification Programs 16) Modeling and Mentoring: The teacher both models best practices and accepts responsibility to mentor new and veteran teachers. 17) Professional Discourse: The teacher participates actively in the professional discourses related to the field of certification--at the school and in regional and national venues. 18) Proactive Involvement: The teacher takes advantage of opportunities to influence the school toward curricula, instructional practices, policies and professional climate which result in students acquiring more durable knowledge and skills and in-depth understanding, as well as positive dispositions toward learning. Special Education Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): Based on the Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC) professional standards for teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders: 16) Teacher candidates will understand the field as an evolving and changing discipline based on philosophies, evidenced-based principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and historical points of view, and human issues that have historically influenced and continue to influence the field of special education and the education and treatment of individuals with exceptional needs both in school and society. (Foundations) 17) Teacher candidates understand how exceptional conditions can interact with the domains of human development and they use this knowledge to respond to the varying abilities and behaviors of individuals with emotional learning needs. (Development and Characteristics of Learners) 18) Teacher candidates are active and resourceful in seeing to understand how primary language, culture, and familial backgrounds interact with the individual's exceptional condition to impact the individual's exceptional condition to impact the individual's academic and social abilities, attitudes, values, interests, and career options. (Individual Learning Differences) 19) Teacher candidates possess a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize instruction for individuals with emotional learning needs. Special educators select, adapt, and use these instruction strategies to promote challenging learning results in general and special curricula and to appropriately modify learning environments for students with E/BD. (Instructional Strategies) 20) Teacher candidates actively create learning environments for students with emotional learning needs that foster cultural understanding, safety, and emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and active engagement of these students. (Learning Environments and Social Interactions) 16) Teacher candidates understand typical and atypical language development and the ways in which exceptional conditions can interact with an individual's experience with and the use of language. Teacher candidates use individualized strategies to enhance language development and teach communication skills to individuals with emotional learning needs. (Language) 17) Teacher candidates develop long-range individualized instructional plans anchored in both general and special curricula. Individualized instructional plans emphasize explicit modeling an efficient guided practice to assure acquisition and fluency though maintenance and generalization. (Instructional Planning) 18) Teacher candidates use multiple types of assessment information for a variety of educational decisions. The results of assessments are used to help identify exceptional learning needs and to develop and implement individualized instruction programs, as well as to adjust instruction in response to ongoing learning progress. (Assessment) 19) Teacher candidates are guided by the profession's ethical and professional practice standards, actively plan and engaging in activities that foster their professional growth and keep them current with evidence-based best practices. (Professional and Ethical Practice) 20) Teacher candidates routinely and effectively collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways. Special educators promote and advocate the learning and well being of individuals with emotional learning needs across a wide range of settings and a range of different learning experiences; facilitating the successful transitions of students with emotional learning needs across settings and services. (Collaboration) Music Education Program Outcomes (GCLO):

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11) Repertory and History: The teacher candidate is a scholarly musician who is familiar with, through performance and academic studies, music of diverse cultural sources, historical periods, and media. 12) Technology: The teacher candidate is knowledgeable of the capabilities of technology as they relate to music composition, performance, analysis, teaching, and research. 15) Performance: The knowledgeable teacher candidate has demonstrated the ability to perform, improvise, and compose in at least one applied music area and keyboard, and has experience throughout the program with ensembles that are varied in size and nature. 16) Teacher Preparation: The knowledgeable and reflective teacher candidate has a mastery of the fundamental elements of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, form, and style) and music history, and is able to teach these elements at the appropriate level, P-12, to a diverse community of learners in a democratic classroom.

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Education Specialist Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes (GCLO): 20) Specialist Candidates will demonstrate proactive knowledge of techniques that bring about positive change in schools, schooling and practices. 21) Specialist Candidates will be use assessment of characteristics and needs of student learners. 22) Specialist Candidates (through reflection) will conduct self-assessment. 23) Specialist Candidates will reflect and improve on student learning. 24) Specialist Candidates will model, develop, and deliver content expertise. 25) Specialist Candidates will generate and use proactive and scholarly research to improve schooling. 26) Specialist Candidates will create learning communities.

27) Specialist Candidates will provide leadership for creating democratic learning.

28) Specialist Candidates will contribute to professional growth of their profession. 20) Specialist Candidates will demonstrate ethical dimensions of teaching. ******************************************************************************* Dispositions for All Candidates: In addition to the common core learning outcomes and graduate candidate learning outcomes, all candidates are expected to be familiar with the dispositions expected of professionals. Their work with students, families, and communities reflects the following dispositions as defined by the School of Education faculty: Scholarly: Inquiring; creative; seeks solutions; thinks critically about theory and method; keeps current in discipline (conferences, journals, classes); pursues lifelong learning. Reflective: Bases daily decisions on in depth reflection, done frequently and honestly; considers many possibilities for problem solutions; stays open to constructive criticism. Proactive: Anticipates problems in management; anticipates problems and difficulties in instruction; addresses pertinent issues of school and community to support student learning; encourages students' critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity; plans for important student learning; fosters visionary thinking and action; promotes mindful leadership to improve schools. Democratic: Facilitator; views others as capable to deal with problems and able to make decisions; promotes equitable treatment for all students; has high expectations for all students; seeks best interest of students they serve; open-minded; able to view other perspectives; accommodates individual differences; culturally sensitive in areas of communications, learning, assessment, and cultural norms; collaborates well with others; works for the good of the community. Responsible: Patience, professional temperament; aims to be the best he/she can be; good work ethic; punctual; recognizes when their own dispositions may need to be adjusted and are able to develop plans to do so. V. COURSE OUTCOMES: See Course Syllabus B ­ V.

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VI.

COURSE POLICIES & PROCEDURES: 1. Class Attendance & Participation: Attendance, timeliness, and participation are required and part of your grade. The School of Education policy states that more than the allotted number of absences for any reason will result in failure of the course. The maximum allotted number of absences is as follows: Undergraduate: o Day classes meeting three times a week for entire semester: 6 absences o Day classes meeting two times a week for entire semester: 4 absences o All eight week classes: 1 absence o Evening classes meeting for entire semester: 3 absences o Courses operating under a different format (4 week, online, etc.) determined by the professor of the course o All absences for participation in recognized school events (e.g., athletics, drama, field trips) will count against the announced absence policy. o A request for consideration of an exception to this policy must be submitted in writing to the Dean. Graduate: o Attendance policy is at the discretion of the professor of the course. The policy will be approved by the department chair and printed in Part B of your course syllabus. INCLEMENT WEATHER ­ In general, classes are dismissed or cancelled (day and/or night classes) when conditions in and around Demorest become such that the main streets and college parking lots become too dangerous on which to drive. Candidates who live outside the Demorest area for which road conditions are too difficult to proceed should stay at home. Candidates who miss class should consult their instructors for assignments and make-up work. Dismissed or cancelled classes must be made up during semester breaks, the first available Saturday, or an agreed upon make-up by class members and the professor. When classes are dismissed, the following radio/TV stations will be informed of the action taken: Station WCON (99.3 FM) ­ Cornelia; WMJE (102.9 FM) ­ Clarkesville/Gainesville; WNEG (6.30 AM) ­ Toccoa; WAGA TV ­ Fox 5, Atlanta; WNEG TV Ch. 32; and WXIA TV ­ 11 Alive. PARTICIPATION - Active participation means: prepare for classes by reading the text and/or other assigned readings; attend all classes for duration of allotted class time; take active part and contribute significantly during class discussions and activities; be attentive and respectful of peers and the professor during the discussions, dialogue, and presentations; submit all assignments on time. 2. Written Work: Use APA style (5th ed.). All papers for the course are to be typed using size 12 print and one of the following fonts: Bookman, Times New Roman, Geneva, or similar font. Papers should be double-spaced, error-free, and grammatically correct (including punctuation, spelling, capitalization, etc.). Make good use of writing references such as dictionaries, writing handbooks, and computer spelling and grammar checks. Quality is important! Work submitted should reflect professional, scholarly, graduate level work. Your writings and reflections will be assessed according to the depth, breadth, clarity, and accuracy they convey. Be sure to keep a duplicate copy of all submitted work for your own records. It is also wise to periodically save your work on the hard drive as well as the disk.

3. Academic Integrity: By accepting admission to Piedmont College, each candidate makes a commitment to understand, support, and abide by the "Academic Integrity Policy" without compromise or exception (See the Piedmont College Catalog and the Student Handbook for details of the policy). This class will be

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conducted in strict observance of the policy. The College imposes strict penalties for academic dishonesty (cheating, fabrication, facilitating academic dishonesty, and plagiarism) as defined in the Catalog and Handbook. Some suggestions for helping you abide by the policy include: All work submitted must be your original work created in and for this course. Cite and reference work properly using the current APA guidelines. o Cite all quotes or paraphrased material. It is better to over cite than not give credit to the author of a work or source that you are using in your paper or project. Any time you use the exact words of researcher, author, or source, you must place the words in quotation marks when your quote is less than 40 words. If more than 40 words, place the quote in an indented block omitting quotation marks. (See the APA Manual for specific guidelines). You must also give credit to an author or source when you paraphrase. When referring to information from your course text, be sure you cite and reference the source and/or authors. Follow the protocol in the current APA manual for citing and referencing all electronic sources. Double dipping is not permitted. For example: o You may not use an assignment created in one course to meet the requirements in another. o Visiting a classroom for one field experience may not be used to meet a field experience requirement for another course. 4. Special Considerations: Piedmont College makes every effort to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations to students with disabilities. Accommodations must be coordinated through the Office of Counseling and Career Services by contacting the director at 1-800-2777020 ext. 1259 or by email ­ [email protected] Students are responsible for providing accurate and current documentation of their disability and for making a written request to the Director of Counseling and Career Services before receiving accommodations. Students with special needs (disabilities, problems, or any other factors that may affect their performance or that require special instructional strategies) should also make these needs known to the professor/instructor during the first class session. Cell Phone Usage: Cell phones should not be used during class time. Use only prior to the beginning of class or during break. If you need to be contacted due to a crisis, critical, or emergency situation, you should leave your phone on vibrate and respond appropriately and professionally. Notify the professor in advance when possible. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS, DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNMENTS, FIELD EXPERIENCES: 1. Instructional Methods: (Also see Course Syllabus B ­ VII). Classes in the School of Education operate as a democratic classroom. Candidates engage in shared decision making and in taking responsibility for making the classroom the best it can be. Interactive discussions and problem solving are emphasized where all ideas and contributions are explored and respected. Various approaches are utilized by the candidates and professor including but not limited to: lecture, demonstrations, observations, class discussions, small group discussions, cooperative group work, field observations, use of educational technology, student presentations, readings, writings, listening, questioning, and formative and summative evaluations. 2. Description of Assignments: See Course Syllabus B ­ VII. 3. Field Experiences (Initial and Advanced Certification Tracks): See Course Syllabus B ­ VII.

5.

VII.

VIII.

RESOURCES: (Make sure this section includes up-to-date information) 1. Bibliography: See Course Syllabus B ­ VIII 2. Relevant Web Sites: Below and See Course Syllabus B ­ VIII Piedmont College's Web Page: www.piedmont.edu Library: http://library.piedmont.edu Galileo: http://www.galileo.usg.edu/ Bookstore: http://www.piedmont.bkstore.com/ Georgia Professional Standards Commission: www.gapsc.com

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Georgia Department of Education: http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ Georgia Performance Standards: http://www.georgiastandards.org US Department of Education: http://www.ed.gov/ Education World: http://www.education-world.com/ Internet Public Library: http://www.ipl.org/ Educational Software Institute: http://www.edsoft.com/ National Council of Teachers of English: http://www.ncte.org Center for Research on Education, Diversity and Excellence (CREDE): http://www.crede.ucsc.edu Center on English Learning and Achievement (CELA): http://cela.albany.edu Better Teaching: Tips and Techniques to Improve Student Learning: http://www.teacher-institute.com University of GA website: www.uga.edu Georgia Framework for Teaching and Georgia Systemic Teacher Education Program (GSTEP): www.teachersbridge.org 3. GACE Information: All candidates seeking initial certification in the state of Georgia must pass the GACE Basic Skills Test in order to be admitted to Teacher Education. Students may exempt this requirement by providing either SAT, ACT, GRE, CBEST, CLAST, or FTCE scores which meet the following criteria: SAT: minimum required score ­ 1000 (with no minimum verbal score or math score required) The combined score is obtained by adding the verbal and the math scores. Candidates must take both the verbal and the math sections of the test. ACT: minimum score ­ 43 (with no minimum English score or math score required) The composite score is obtained by adding the verbal and quantitative scores. Candidates must take both the English and the math sections of the test. GRE: 1030 minimum score (with no minimum verbal score or quantitative score required) The composite score is obtained by adding the verbal and quantitative scores. Candidates must take both the verbal and quantitative sections of the test. CBEST: Passing Scores indicated on score report ­ Used in California and Oregon http://www.ctc.ca.gov/profserv/examinfo/cbest.html CLAST: Passing Scores indicated on report ­ Used in Florida http://www.firn.edu/doe/sas/clast/clstpscr.htm FTCE: General Knowledge ­ Passing Scores indicated on score report ­ Used in Florida http://www.cefe.usf.edu/TestDescGK.aspx Teacher candidates who are seeking initial certification must also pass the GACE test in the appropriate content area in order to be recommended for certification. Candidates who are currently certified and are adding a new field must also pass the appropriate content exam. Information the GACE Tests may be found at http://www.gace.nesinc.com/. 4. Admission to Teacher Education Admission to Piedmont College does not guarantee Admission to Teacher Education. Additionally, continuation and completion of all programs is contingent upon demonstration of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Piedmont College reserves the right to withdraw a candidate from a program for failure to meet the outcomes of the program as stated in the School of Education Conceptual Framework and Candidate Program Learning Outcomes. Undergraduate candidates need to apply for formal Admission to Teacher Education between 30 and 60 semester hours of course work, even if all criteria are not met. MAT candidates need to apply during their first semester or at the beginning of their second semester. A formal interview is conducted based on the candidate's self assessment of dispositions. Applications are available from and should be submitted to the administrative assistant in L112 (Demorest) or the main office in Athens. 5. Application for Certification Upon completion of all program and graduation requirements it is the candidate's responsibility to initiate the application for certification process by completing the forms and following the

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procedures listed on the Piedmont College Website for Certification Information found at http://cyrus.piedmont.edu/users/mmoremen/index.htm. If you have questions or have difficulty accessing the website you may contact Margy Moremen at [email protected] or call 706-433-1759 x8011 or 706-778-8500 x1300. IX. COURSE ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION: See Course Syllabus B ­ IX. TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE See Course Syllabus B ­ X.

X.

COURSE SYLLABUS B Note: The School of Education Syllabus A is only one part of your syllabus. Your professor will provide you with Course Syllabus B for each course. Course Syllabus B contains information such as: the instructor's office hours and ways to contact her or him, time and location of the course, basic course information as well as a course description and purpose, the required and recommended text(s) and supplementary readings, course outcomes (each Course Syllabus B will also include Core Candidate Learning Outcomes and Graduate Candidate Learning Outcomes emphasized and related to course objectives), course policies and procedures, a description of assignments, field experience requirements, a bibliography, other relevant websites, course assessments and evaluation, a tentative course schedule, and any other information pertinent to the course.

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PIEDMONT COLLEGE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Mastering the art of teaching: Preparing proactive educators to improve the lives of all children.

COURSE SYLLABUS B EDUC (or appropriate prefix; include course number and title) INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION: Name: Office Location: Phone Numbers: E-mail: Fax Number: Office Hours: (minimum of 5 posted hours per week) Campus Security: TIME AND PLACE CAMPUS: Dates: Time: Place:

SEMESTER:

YEAR:

COURSE INFORMATION: Prerequisites/Corequisites: Credit: Period: Note: If a course is cross-listed between programs (EDEC/MG 331), please provide a separate syllabus for each field with appropriate outcomes and assignments (in other words, one syllabus for EDEC 331, one for EDMG 331 with differentiation). If a course is crosslisted graduate/undergraduate (for example, EDUC 355/655), a separate syllabus for each level must be provided and differentiation made between assignments and outcomes. Graduate syllabi must also differentiate assignments and outcomes for candidates working on initial certification and those working on advanced certification. I. TEXT AND SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS (In addition to information provided on School of Education Syllabus A ­ I).

(List the required and any optional texts here.) Note: All required texts for a course must come from the approved list of texts for the course. When in doubt, contact the syllabus manager, the department chair, or the dean of the School of Education for information on approved texts.

Supplemental readings will be required as needed throughout the course. These readings will include research, professional documents, and personal reading. Also, copying some materials to share with the class may be required. 39

II.

PIEDMONT COLLEGE MISSION; SCHOOL OF EDUCATION MISSION; & GRADUATE MAT AND MA PROGRAM GOALS (See School of Education Syllabus A ­ II) III. COURSE DESCRIPTION AND PURPOSE: (Write a description and purpose of the course here. Include the Piedmont College Catalog description and an expanded purpose statement, a statement describing the general content of the course, and a rationale statement about why the course is important. Each syllabus must reflect a multicultural perspective that prepares candidates to be teachers of all students. References to a multicultural/global perspective should be included in references and reading lists. Each syllabus must also address the use of technology applicable to the particular content or methodology of the course.

IV. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION OUTCOMES (See School of Education Syllabus A ­ IV) (Candidate Learning Outcomes by Program and Dispositions for All Candidates) V. COURSE OUTCOMES : Upon successful completion of this course, the candidate will be able to: (List the course outcomes here. The outcomes should reflect a research base and the Conceptual Framework of the School of Education. They also should be in keeping with expectations and standards of appropriate learned societies, i. e. IRA, NCTM, NCTE, etc.) Note: Each course outcome should be correlated to the appropropriate CCLO and GCLO found in School of Education Syllabus A - IV. COURSE POLICIES & PROCEDURES: (In addition to information provided on School of Education Syllabus A ­ VI). 1. Class Attendance & Participation (Check SOE guidelines in Faculty Handbook and select appropriate guidelines specific to this course) SAMPLE: Attendance, timeliness, and participation are required and part of your grade. The School of Education policy states that more than the allotted number of excused absences for any reason will result in failure of the course. The allotted number of absences for this course is one. Tardiness or leaving class early will also be considered a partial absence reflected in your grade. Only those absences due to emergencies, illness, or extenuating circumstances can be made up. It is your responsibility to inform me in writing how you make up the work. Your writing should include a statement about why you were absent and a detailed quality description of the process you undertook to make up the work as well as a comprehensive summary of the content that was covered in class. Be sure to include a cover page. If work is not made up, the highest grade a candidate can receive for the course is a B. Any candidate who misses more than one class will be asked to drop the course or will receive an F at the end of the semester. However, if makeup work is approved by the professor and satisfactorily completed, a passing grade is still possible. Also understand that reading a classmate's notes cannot easily duplicate many of the experiences of the course. 40

VI.

2. Written Work (Include any guidelines specific to this course that are in addition to those in the School of Education Syllabus A - VI). SAMPLE: Each assignment should have a cover page with your name, course number and name, assignment, and date clearly typed on the front. 3. Academic Integrity 4. Special Considerations 5. Cell Phone Usage

(See School of Education Syllabus A ­ VI)

VII. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS, DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNMENTS, AND FIELD EXPERIENCES: 1. Instructional Methods: See School of Education Syllabus A ­ VII. (Add any methods unique to this course that are not presented on syllabus A.) 2. Description of Assignments: Readings from the assigned texts will be one focus for discussions, writings, and group activities. Please read the assigned readings before coming to class in order to facilitate quality discussions. Think about how the readings relate or could relate to your classroom teaching experiences. Also keep in mind that you are responsible for the reading assignments even if we do not go over them in class. SAMPLE: All work for the course is to be in on time, or handed in on an agreed upon future date. Work submitted late will automatically lose 15 points per class meeting unless prearranged by the professor and candidate. To meet the deadline, assignments may be mailed (post marked by the due date), sent electronically on or before the due date, or delivered by a peer at the class meeting. Make-up tests will be considered if a reason for missing the original test is justified. Completion of all assignments is required for a passing grade in the course. If at any time you are unclear about assignments or expectations, please contact me for clarification. Other assignments or activities may be required as deemed necessary to assure the mastery of the course objectives as stated. Assignments to Be Completed for This Course: (Describe the assignments that candidates must complete in the course. Include weights if applicable. Also differentiate assignments for initial and advanced certification candidates when appropriate.) 4. Field Experiences (Initial and Advanced Ceritification Tracks): Different county and city school systems require that specific field experience procedures and forms be used for placement of candidates in their schools. Also, certain field experience placement forms may be required by your college professor. Make sure you are using the appropriate placement request form(s) for the field experiences in this course. SAMPLE: Each candidate is responsible for arranging and documenting his/her field experiences at an appropriate grade level according to the guidelines of the Early Childhood Education (ECE) program. Keep in mind that ECE Majors are required to work in grades P-K, 1-3, and 4-5. When selecting field experinces, be sure you are getting a good representation from each of the grade level areas in diverse settings for 41

documentation of field experiences. Initial certification candidates need to document a minimum of five hours for this course. Advanced certification candidates need to document a minimum of two hours for this course. Candidates adding a new field need to document a minimum of three hours. (List and describe the field experiences that are required for the course. If applicable, include how the assignment will be weighted. Differentiate between initial and advanced certification tasks.) VIII. RESOURCES: (Make sure this section includes up-to-date information) 1. Bibliography: (List resources related to the course content. Include references easily recognizable as pertaining to the conceptual framework, and to multicultural and global perspectives.) 2. Relevant Web Sites: See School of Education Syllabus A ­ VIII (Add any additional relevant websites specific to this course) 3. GACE Information: (See School of Education Syllabus A ­ 4. Admission to Teacher Education VIII) 5. Application for Certification IX. COURSE ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION: (Describe the criteria used for grading in this course.) TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE Date Topics and Assignments (Outline the class session meeting dates, topics to be covered, assignments for the next class session, and due dates of assignments.)

X.

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Athens Campus General Information

Overview: The primary instructional facility is the Commons, and is divided into three wings: Commons East, Commons West, and the Meeting House. The majority of classes are held in Commons East and West. A faculty lounge and vending is located in Commons East. The first floor of Commons West has our Student Center and dining services, "Café on Prince." Our second building, Lane Hall, located on Milledge Avenue, houses our graphic design program, two computer labs, classrooms, and the library. Barnes and Noble bookstore is located behind The Commons in the former Mitchell House. Campus Hours of Operation: The Athens Campus main office is open from 8:00 AM until 8:00 PM, Monday through Thursday, and from 8:00 AM until 5:00 PM on Fridays. Please refer to the student handbook and catalog for the inclement weather policy. Both are available at the PC website. Please check the academic calendar, located on the PC website, for holidays and other special events that could alter normal hours of operation. Classroom Facilities & Equipment: The Athens Campus has 3 computer labs. In addition, there is a 13-seat open lab available in Commons 204 West for use by students and staff. Most classrooms are equipped with overhead projectors and TV/VCR/DVD combinations. Some classrooms have boxlights and computers. Please coordinate, in advance, your technology needs with Gay Neighbors, (706) 548-8331. Adjunct faculty needing office space/time should contact their department head. Scheduling: Classrooms and labs are scheduled each semester based on enrollment, technology needs, etc. Classroom assignments are subject to change. Assignments will be posted in the foyer of The Commons prior to the first class meeting. Day classes and Monday-Thursday evening classes will be held in The Commons East and/or West (595 Prince Avenue), and Friday evening and Saturday classes will be scheduled in Lane Hall, 468 North Milledge Avenue. One exception will be Graphic Design classes, which will be held on the second floor of Lane Hall. Please contact Gay Neighbors, Athens Campus Administrative Assistant, at (706) 548-8331, if you need to schedule make-up classes, evening meetings, or other events. Canceling/Rescheduling Classes: If you need to cancel a class, please contact the Dean of your respective school as soon as possible and make alternate arrangements for the class. After contacting your Dean, notify Gay Neighbors of the cancellation and/or alternate arrangements, including make-up classes required. Technology: Faculty, whose classes are scheduled to meet in the computer labs, must obtain a key to the lab from main office personnel prior to each class meeting. To obtain access to wireless internet services in the Student Center and Lane Hall Library, students and faculty should take their laptops and Piedmont identification to the main Library desk in Lane Hall, 468 N. Milledge Avenue. We have new technology in our computer labs and the no food or drink policy will be enforced. Please report any technology issues to your department head, who will complete a PC Athens Work Order. The work order system may be accessed at http://www.piedmont.edu/it/help.

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Policies & Procedures: Piedmont College does not permit children to accompany students to classes. No food or drink is allowed in computer labs. Piedmont College Athens is a smoke-free campus. Problems regarding facilities (i.e., temperature, restrooms, etc.) should be reported to your department head, who will then complete a PC Athens Work Order. The work order system may be accessed at http://www.piedmont.edu/it/help. Faculty Services: The following services are available to full-time and adjunct faculty: · · Copiers ­ Copiers are located in Commons 206 East and Commons 202 West. All copy needs are the responsibility of each faculty and/or adjunct faculty instructor. Fax ­ A fax machine is available in the main office. Please see Kammy Leathers or Emily Cotterell for assistance. The fax machine number is (706) 433-1750. If you elect to receive a fax in our main office, it will be placed in your mailbox. Mailboxes ­ Mailboxes are located in Commons 206 East. All full-time faculty will be issued a key to this room. Adjunct instructors will be issued a key at the beginning of the semester to be returned at the end of the semester, with grades. Lounges ­ Faculty lounges are located in Commons 206 East and in Room 5 of Lane Hall at 468 N. Milledge Ave.

·

·

Library: · The Athens Campus Library of Piedmont College has a 4,100 square foot space on the first floor of Lane Hall, located at 468 N. Milledge Avenue. · The Library has a reading room, a collection of about 7,000 volumes, and a wireless network. Students, faculty and staff have access to all expected library services such as reserves and document delivery. · Library hours, beginning Thursday, August 9, 2007, will be: Monday ­ Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday · · · 8 AM ­ 9 PM 8 AM ­ 5 PM CLOSED 1 PM ­ 6 PM

The Library's website is http://library.piedmont.edu/ and serves as a portal to all electronic resources. The Ask a Librarian! service is available from links on the Library's homepage. Call 706-433-0908 for assistance from Athens staff or 706-776-0111 for assistance from Demorest staff, especially for assistance with UGA borrowing privileges and with remote access to electronic resources.

Student Services: Please refer questions regarding tuition payments, financial aid, and admissions to Lynn Miller, Administrative Coordinator located in Ellard Hall, (706) 5486189. Or you may contact the respective department at the Demorest Campus, (706) 7783000. Food Services and Vending : "The Café on Prince" is open Monday through Thursday, 11:00 AM until 8:00 PM, and Fridays, 11:00 AM until 2:00 PM. All Piedmont College 44

personnel will receive a 10% discount. Vending machines are located on the first floors of Commons East and at Lane Hall. Security: The Office of Campus Safety is located in the Recreation Complex. (706) 4331789. Terry Strickland serves as Director of Security for the Athens Campus. Bookstore: The Piedmont College Bookstore, operated by Barnes & Noble, is located in the courtyard behind The Commons. Hours of operation will be posted around campus. Contact numbers for the bookstore are (706) 433-1753, or 1-866-718-3194. Faculty and Staff Parking: Parking for faculty and staff is located adjacent to the Recreation Complex on the corner of Hill Street and Harris Street. Please park in designated faculty and staff parking only. Administration: The Office of the Vice President is located in Ellard Hall, (706) 548-6189.

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