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Daystar University

DAYSTAR UNIVERSITY 2003- 2007 Catalogue

(MAIN CAMPUS) ATHI RIVER CAMPUS LUKENYA HILLS P. O. BOX, 436 ATHI RIVER Phone: (045) 22360, 22601-3, Fax: 045 22420 NAIROBI CAMPUS VALLEY ROAD/NGONG ROAD P.O. BOX, 44400-00100 NAIROBI, KENYA Phone: (020) 2723002, 2723003, 2723004 Fax: 2728338

E-Mail: [email protected]

[email protected]

Read this Catalogue online

http://www.daystar.ac.ke http://www.daystarUS.org

2003-2007 Catalogue

DAYSTAR UNIVERSITY CATALOGUE

Daystar University reserves the right to amend any section of this Catalogue without prior notification. This Catalogue was produced by the Corporate Affairs Department. Photography, cover design: Bob Odhiambo, Moses Achoka Design and type setting: Anne Mbiruru, Gordon Mutugi Editor: Gordon Mutugi

Supervising Editors: Rosemary Ngige-Kinoti, Nkita Arao

"We have also a more sure word of prophesy; where unto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the daystar arise in your hearts (2 Peter 1:19 ­ KJV)."

It is inevitable that some changes in faculty, programmes, curriculum or policy will occur before the next Catalogue is published. You may visit our Websites: www.daystar.ac.ke or www.daystar US.org for Catalogue updates. The office of Admissions and Records is prepared, at all times, to answer queries and describe current regulations. On the Cover: Daystar University students at the Athi River campus.

2003-2007 Catalogue

Daystar University

TABLE OF CONTENTS

University Calendar ............................................................ Xiii-xxii Vice-Chancellor's Division.................................................... Finance Administration and Planning Division................................................................................. Student Development ........................................................... Administration Section......................................................... Academic Division . ............................................................. Faculty of Arts .................................................................... Faculty of Social Sciences................................................... Faculty of Science and Technology..................................... Postgraduate Studies ........................................................... University Council. ............................................................... Academic Staff. .................................................................... 17 29 23 28 64 174 304 336 396 399 1

2003-2007 Catalogue

University Calendar .............................................................. i-xxiv VICE-CHANCELLOR'S DIVISION................................. xxv Message from the Vice-Chancellor ................................. 1 Daystar in profile ............................................................ 6 The Mission of the University................................. 8 Philosophy and Objects of Daystar ........................ 8 The Community Covenant and Code of Conduct... 11 The Objects of the University ................................. 11 The Functions of the University ............................. 12 The Daystar University Campuses .......................... 13 Corprate Affairs Department.............................................. FINANCE ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING DIVISION............................................................................. Financial Information............................................... Campus Accommodation ....................................... Off-Campus Accommodation .................................. Refunds ................................................................... Students Financial Aid Office .................................. Administration Section........................................................ ACADEMIC DIVISION . ................................................... Student Development .......................................................... Campus Life ............................................................ Chaplaincy ............................................................... Daystar University Students Association ................ Doulos ..................................................................... Students' Counselling............ ................................. Students' Sports and Recreation Office ................... Academic Programmes ....................................................... Certificate Courses ................................................. Pre-University Programme...................................... Diploma Programme .............................................. 2003-2007 Catalogue 15

17 18 20 21 21 21 23 28 29 29 29 30 31 31 32 32 32 32 33

Daystar University

The Undergraduate Programme ............................. The Continuing Education Programme .................. The Postgraduate Programme ................................ Research, Publication and Consultancy. ................. Staff and Student Exchange Programme ................ Library services ...................................................... Computer Laboratories ........................................... Communication Studios ........................................ Goals of Daystar's Programmes ........................................ Common Academic Regulations ........................................ Admission to the Diploma and Undergraduate Programmes ........................................................... Direct Entry into the Undergraduate Programmes.. Admission on Transfer from Other Institutions....... Admission from Daystar University Diploma......... Exemptions ............................................................ Admission into the Diploma Programme............. Mature Age Entry ................................................... Undergraduate Programmes Regulations................ Course Load ........................................................... Student Assessment ............................................... Graduation Requirements ....................................... Double Majors ....................................................... Graduation Honors ................................................. Registration ............................................................ Registration Queries................................................ Discontinuation ....................................................... Class Attendance .................................................... Auditing of Courses ................................................ Course Numbering .................................................. Withdrawal ............................................................. Change of Academic Majors. ................................. Transcripts .............................................................. University Examinations ........................................ Academic Dishonesty ............................................. Late Assignments and Examinations ...................... Remarking of Examinations ................................... Deans' List ............................................................. 2003-2007 Catalogue

33 34 34 34 35 37 37 38 38 41 41 41 42 43 43 46 47 48 48 48 49 50 52 53 53 53 54 54 54 55 55 55 56 57 57 57 58

Additional Information ........................................... 58 General Education........................................................... 59 FACULTY OF ARTS .......................................................... Department of Biblical and Religious Studies ................. Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Bible ... .... Bible Minor. ............................................. Christian Ministries Minor. ...................... Peace and Conflict Transformation Minor.. Department of Communication ........................... .............. Diploma in Communication..................................... Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Communication........................................................ Print Media Concentration ...................... Electronic Media Concentration. ............. Advertising Media Concentration ............ Public Relations Concentration. ............... Communications Minor............................. Department of Humanities. ................................................ Diploma in Christian Music Communication..... .... Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Language and Literature.......................................................... English Minor ........................................... Bachelor of Education Degree with Concentrations in Arts or Science.................................................... Minor in Music........................................................ FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES................................. Department of Commerce.................................................... Diploma in Management........................... General Requirements in Commerce ..................... Required Courses in Accounting, Business Administration & Manangement and Marketing.... Major in Accounting................................. Accounting Minor....................... 2003-2007 Catalogue 64 65 65 68 69 70 90 90 103 105 1096 106 106 107 128 128 137 140 154 163 174 175 175 181 181 183 182

Daystar University

Major in Business Administration and Management.............................................. Business Administration and Management Minor Major in Marketing................................... Marketing Minor......................... Major in Management Information Systems (MIS)........................................... MIS Minor.................................. Bachelor of Science Degree Major in Economics.................................. Minor in Economics................... Department of Community Development......................... Diploma in Counselling................... ....................... Diploma in Development......... ............................. Bachelor of Arts Degree Major in Community Development ........ Community Development Minor Major in Psychology................................. Psychology Minor...................... Major in Social Work................................ Social Work Minor..................... FACULTY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY............. Department of Science......................................................... Mathematics Minor.................................................. Department of Computer Science...................................... Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science Pre-University Programme................................................. Admission Requirements........................... Admission to Undergraduate Degree programmes............................................... Financial Information and Academic Policies...................................................... Academic Probation.................................. Course Load ............................................. Examination.............................................. 2003-2007 Catalogue

185 187 188 189 191 194 196 199 243 243 251 260 263 264 266 267 270 304 305 307 316 316 328 328 328 329 329 329 329

DEPARTMENT OF POSTGRADUATE STUDIES............... Goals of the Postgraduate programme............................. Common Regulations.............. ...................................... Admission Requirements................................ Course Load.................................................... Probation and Discontinuation........................ Special Students.............................................. Student Assessment......................................... Incompletes..................................................... Graduation Requirement................................. Class Attendance............................................. Auditing of Courses........................................ Course Numbering.......................................... Adding or Dropping of courses....................... Withdrawal...................................................... Transcripts....................................................... University Examinations................................. Academic Dishonesty...................................... Time Limits for Degree Work......................... Late Assignments and Examinations............... Additional Information................................... Common Academic Regulations for Master of Arts..... Masters of Arts in Christian Ministries.......................... Masters of Arts Degree in Communication................... Masters of Arts in Counselling Psychology................... Masters of Business Administration ............................

336 337 337 337 339 339 339 339 340 341 341 341 341 342 342 342 342 343 343 343 344 345 347 349 351 355

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ....................................................... 396 DAYSTAR US.................... ....................................................... 397 MANAGEMENT BOARD........................................................ 398 ACADEMIC STAFF......... ........................................................ 399

2003-2007 Catalogue

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Daystar University

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2003-2007

2003-2007 Catalogue

ii

July 2003 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 August 2003 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 September 2003 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October 2003 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

November 2003 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 Su 2 9 16 23 30

December 2003 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

JULY ­DECEMBER 2003 Semester I

August 11­ 16 August 18

Days

Mon-Sat Monday

Activities

Orientation of new students Registration queries of returning students

August 19

Tuesday

Classes start at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Prayer day Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams External moderation of exams Departmental review of exams Mid Semester Recess Classes resume

September 4 September 15­ 26 Sept.29 ­ Oct.3 October 6-17 October 16-17 October 20-21 October 22

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Thur-Fri Mon-Tue Wednesday

2003-2007 Catalogue

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October 22

Daystar University

Days

Wednesday

Activities

Final day to submit exam drafts to Exam Office

October 22 ­November 21

Wed-Fri

Typing of Exams

October 29

Wednesday

Registration for January semester Proofreading and packaging of exams

November 17-28

Mon-Fri

December 1-2 December 3-17 December 17 Dec. 18 ­ Jan.11 2004

Mon-Tue Wed-Wed Wednesday Thur-Sun

Study Days Final Exams End of Semester Christmas Vacation

2003-2007 Catalogue

iv

January 2004 Mo Tu We Th 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29 Fr 2 9 16 23 30 Sa 3 10 17 24 31 Su 4 11 18 25 February 2004 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 March 2004 Mo Tu 1 2 8 9 15 16 22 23 29 30 We 3 10 17 24 31 Th 4 11 18 25 Fr 5 12 19 26 Sa 6 13 20 27 Su 7 14 21 28

April 2004 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 Su 4 11 18 25

May 2004 Mo Tu We 31 3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 Th Fr Sa 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29 Su 2 9 16 23 30

June 2004 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 30 31 Su 6 13 20 27

JANUARY-JUNE 2004 Dates

January 5-6

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Departmental moderation of grades Orientation of new students External moderation of Grades Registration queries of Returning students Meeting of External examiners with Departments and final day to Submit Grades. Classes start at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Entering of Exam Grades into Computer Faculty Moderation of Grades & Verification of Print-outs

January 7-10 January 8-11 January 12

Wed-Sat Thur-Sun Monday

January 12

Monday

January 13

Tuesday

January 12-15

Mon-Thur

January 16-19

Fri-Mon

2003-2007 Catalogue

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January 19

Daystar University

Days

Monday

Activities

Correction of print-outs and faculty moderation changes. Verification of corrections by Faculties Senate meeting for Approval of August Semester 2003 grades Day of Prayer

January 20

Tuesday

January 23

Friday

January 29

Thursday

February 2-13 February 16-20 Feb. 23­ Mar. 5 March 6

Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Friday

Setting of Exams Internal moderation of Exams External moderation of Exams Registration for Blocks & Aug. Semester 2004 Semester Recess Departments' Review of Exams Classes Resume Final day to submit exam drafts to Exams Office Typing of Exams Proof-reading and packaging Study Days End of Semester Exams End of Semester Departmental moderation of grades Final day to submit grades Entering of grades First block

March 8-9 March 8-9 March 10 March 10

Mon-Tue Mid Mon-Tue Wednesday Wednesday

March 11 ­April 9 March 29 ­ April 20 April 21-22 April 26 ­ May 7 May 7 May 17-18

Thur-Fri Mon-Tue Thur-Fri Mon-Fri Friday Mon-Tue

May 18 May 18-25 May 24 ­ June 25

Tuesday Tue-Tue Mon-Fri

2003-2007 Catalogue

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May 28

Days

Friday

Activities

Faculty Boards moderation of grades Correction of print outs and moderation changes Verification of the corrections Board of Examiners meeting Senate Rehearsal Graduation Second block

May 31

Monday

June 1 June 2 June 4 June 18 June 19 June 28­ July 30

Tuesday Wednesday Friday Friday Saturday Mon-Fri

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July 2004 Mo Tu We Th 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29 Fr Sa Su 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30 31 August 2004 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Daystar University

September September 2004 2004 Mo Tu We 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29 Th Fr 2 3 9 10 16 17 23 24 30 31 Sa 4 11 18 25 Su 5 12 19 26

October 2004 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

November 2004 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December December 2004 2004 Mo Tu We 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29 Th 2 9 16 23 30 Fr 3 10 17 24 31 Sa Su 4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

JULY - DECEMBER 2004 Dates

August 9-14 August 16

Days

Mon-Sat Monday

Activities

Orientation of new students Registration queries for returning students Classes start at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Prayer Day Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams External moderation of exams Mid-Semester recess Departmental review of exams Meeting of external examiners with departments and final day to submit exam drafts to exam

August 17

Tuesday

September 2 September 13-24 Sept. 27­Oct. 1 October 4-15 October 18-20 October 18-19 October 19 (Mid-day)

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Wed Mon-Tue Tuesday

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Oct. 19 ­ Nov. 19 October 21

Days

Tue-Fri Thursday

Activities

Office Typing of exams Classes resume at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Registration for January semester Proofreading and packaging of exams Study days End of semester exams End of semester Christmas vacation

November 1

Monday

November 15-26

Mon-Fri

November 29-30 December 1-17 December 17 Dec. 18 ­ Jan. 9

Mon-Tue Wed-Fri Friday Sat-Sun

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January 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 Su 2 9 16 23 30 February 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Daystar University

March 2005 Mo Tu 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29 We Th Fr Sa Su 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 16 1 18 19 20 23 24 25 26 27 30 31

April 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

May 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

June 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 Sa Su 4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

JANUARY - JUNE 2005 Dates

January 3-4

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Departmental moderation of grades External moderation of grades Orientation of new students Registration queries of returning students Meeting of external examiners with departments and final day to submit grades to exam office Classes start at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Entering of exam grades in computer.

January 5-8 January 5-8 January 10

Wed-Sat Wed-Sat Monday

January 10-14

Mon-Fri

January 11

Tuesday

January 10-14

Mon-Fri

2003-2007 Catalogue

x Dates

January 17-18

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Faculty moderation of grades & verification of print- outs Corrections of print-outs and faculty moderation changes Verification of corrections Faculty Boards of examiners meeting Prayer Day Senate meeting Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams Final day to submit the exams Typing of exams Mid-semester recess & Easter Classes resume at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Proofreading and packaging of exams Registration for blocks & August Semester Study days End of semester exams End of semester Departmental moderation of grades Final day to submit grades to Exam office Entering of grades

January 19

Wednesday

January 20 January 21

Thursday Friday

January 25 January 26 Jan. 31 ­Feb. 11 February 14-18 March 10 March 10 ­April 8 March 24-28 March 29

Tuesday Wednesday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Thursday Thur-Fri Thur-Mon Tuesday

March 29 ­ April 19

Tue-Tue

March 30

Wednesday

April 21-22 April 25 ­May 6 May 6 May 16-17

Thur-Fri Mon-Fri Friday Mon-Tue

May 19

Thursday

May 17-24

Tue-Tue

2003-2007 Catalogue

xi Dates

May 26

Daystar University

Days

Thursday

Activities

Faculty moderation of grades and verification of print-outs Correction of print-outs and faculty moderation on changes First block Verification of the corrections Faculty Boards of examiners meeting Senate meeting for approval of January semester grades Rehearsal Graduation Second Block

May 27

Friday

May 23 ­ June 24 May 30 June 1

Mon-Fri Monday Wednesday

June 3

Friday

June 17 June 18 June 27­ July 29

Friday Saturday Mon-Fri

2003-2007 Catalogue

xii

July 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 August 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 September 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 Su 2 9 16 23 30

November 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December 2005 Mo Tu We Th Fr 1 2 5 6 7 8 9 12 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 26 27 28 29 30 Sa Su 3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31

Dates

August 8-13 August 15

JULY-DECEMBER 2005 Days Activities

Mon-Sun Monday Orientation of new students Registration queries of returning students Classes start at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Prayer day Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams External moderation of exams Departmental review of exams (to ensure changes are understood & implemented) Final day to submit exam drafts to exam office

August 16

Tuesday

September 1 September 12-23 September 26-30 October 3-14 October 13-14

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Thur-Fri

October 17

Monday

2003-2007 Catalogue

xiii Dates

October 20-21 Oct. 18­Nov.18 October 24

Daystar University

Days

Thur-Fri Tue-Fri Monday

Activities

Mid-Semester recess Typing of exams Classes resme at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Registration for January 2006 semester Proofreading and packaging of exams Study days End of semester sxams University Council & Company meeting End of semester Christmas vacation

October 26

Wednesday

November 14-25

Mon-Fri

November 28-29 Nov.30 ­ Dec. 14 December 1-2

Mon-Tue Wed-Wed Thur-Fri

December 14 Dec. 15 ­ Jan. 15 2006

Wednesday Thur-Sun

2003-2007 Catalogue

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January 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 February 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 March 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

April 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 Su 2 9 16 23 30

May 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

June 2006 Mo Tu We Th 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29 Fr Sa Su 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30

JANUARY-JUNE 2006 Dates

January 9-10

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Departmental moderation of grades Orientation of new students External moderation of grades Registration queries of returning students Meeting of external examiners with departments and final day to submit grades to exam office Entering of exam grades in computer Classes start at 8:30a.m (Athi River), 5.30PM (Nairobi) Faculty Board

January 11-14 January 12-15 January 16

Wed-Sat Thur-Sun Monday

January 16

Monday

January 16-20

Mon-Fri

January 17

Tuesday

January 23-24

Mon-Tue

2003-2007 Catalogue

xv Dates

January 23-24

Daystar University

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Moderation of grades & verification of print-outs Corrections of print-outs and faculty moderation of changes Verification of corrections by faculties Senate meeting for approval of August 2005 grades. Prayer day Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams External moderation of exams Mid-semester recess Departments review exams Classes resume, 8.30 am Athi River, 5.30 p.m Nairobi. Final day to submit the exams Typing of exams Registration for blocks & August 2006 Proofreading and packaging of exams Easter

January 25

Wednesday

January 26(Midday)

Thursday

February 1

Wednesday

February 2 February 6-17 February 20-24 Feb. 27­ March 10 March 13-14 March 13-14 March 15

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Tue Mon-Tue Wednesday

March 15 March 16 ­ April 14 March 29

Wednesday Thur-Fri Wednesday

April 3-25

Mon-Tue

April 14-17 April 26 - 27 April 28 ­ May 12 May 12 May 22-23 Wed-Thur Fri-Fri Friday Mon-Tue

Study days End of semester exams End of semester Departmental moderation of

2003-2007 Catalogue

xvi Dates

May 24

Days

Wednesday

Activities

grades Final day to submit grades to exam office Entering of grades Faculty moderation of grades and verification of print-outs Correction of print-outs and faculty moderation on changes Verification of the corrections by faculties First block Senate meeting for approval of January semester grades. Rehearsals Graduation Second block

May 25 - 30 May 31 ­ June 2

Thur-Tue Wed-Fri

June 5

Monday

June 7

Wednesday

May 29 ­ June 30 June 9

Mon-Fri Friday

June 23 June 24 July 3 ­ August 4

Friday Saturday Mon-Fri

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July 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 Su 2 9 16 23 30 August 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Daystar University

September 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

November 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December 2006 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

JULY-DECEMBER 2006 Dates

August 14-19 August 21

Days

Mon-Sat Monday

Activities

Orientation of new students Registration queries of Returning students Classes start at 8:30A.M (Athi Rvier)5.30 PM (NBI) Prayer day Setting of exams Internal moderation External moderation Departmental review of moderated exams Mid-Semester recess

August 22

Tuesday

September 7 September18-29 October 2 - 6 October 9 - 20 October 19-23

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Thur-Mon

October 20-23

Fri-Mon

2003-2007 Catalogue

xviii Dates

October 24

Days

Tuesday

Activities

Classes start at 8:30A.M (Athi Rvier)5.30 PM (NBI) Final day to submit exam draft to exam office Typing of exams Registration for January2007 Proofreading and Packaging of exams Study days Final exams University Council Meeting & Company End of semester

October 24

Tuesday

Oct. 25 ­ Nov. 24 November 1 Nov. 26 ­ t Dec. 1

Wed-Fri Wednesday Mon-Fri

December 4 - 5 December 6-10 December 7-8

Mon-Tue Wed-Wed Thur-Fri

December 20

Wednesday

December 21 ­ January 14 2007

Thur-Sun

Christmas vacation

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January 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 February 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Daystar University

March 2007 Mo Tu We Th 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29 Fr Sa Su 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30 31

April 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

May 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 30 31 Su 6 13 20 27

June 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

JANUARY-JUNE 2007 Dates

January 8-9

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Departmental moderation of grades Orientation of new students External moderation of grades Registrations queries of returning students Meeting of external examiners with departments and final day to submit grades to exam office Entering of exam grades In computer Classes start at 8:30A.M (Athi Rvier)5.30 PM (NBI)

January 10-13 January 11 - 14 January 15

Wed-Sat Thur-Sun Monday

January 15

Monday

January 15-18

Mon-Thur

January 16

Tuesday

2003-2007 Catalogue

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January 19 - 22

Days

Fri-Mon

Activities

Faculty moderation of grades & verification of print-outs Correction of print-outs and faculty moderation changes. Verification of corrections by faculties Senate meeting for approval of August semester 2006 grades Prayer day Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams Mid-semester recess Departments' review of exams Classesresume at 8:30A.M (Athi Rvier)5.30 PM (NBI) Final day to submit exam Drafts to exams office Typing of exams Registration for blocks & August semester 2007 Proofreading and packaging Easter Study days End of semester exams End of semester

January 22

Monday

January 23

Tuesday

January 26

Wednesday

February 2 February 5 - 16 February 19 - 23 March 12 -13 March 12 -13 March 14

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Tue Mon-Tue Wednesday

March 14

Wednesday

March 15 ­ April 13 March 28

Thur-Fri Wednesday

April 2 - 24 April 6-9 April 25 - 26 April 27 ­ May 11 May 11

Mon-Tue Fri-Mon Wed-Thur Fri-Fri Friday

2003-2007 Catalogue

xxi Dates

May 21- 22

Daystar University

Days

Mon-Tue

Activities

Departmental moderation of grades Final day to submit grades to the exam office Entering of grades First block Faculty Boards moderation of grades Correction of print outs and moderation changes Verification of the corrections by faculties Senate Rehearsal Graduation Second block

May 23

Wednesday

May 22 - 29 May 28 ­ June 29 June 4

Wed-Tue Mon-Fri Monday

June 5

Tuesday

June 6

Wednesday

June 8 June 22 June 23 July 2 ­ August 3

Friday Friday Saturday Mon-Fri

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July 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 August 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 September 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 Su 2 9 16 23 30

October 2007 Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

November 2007

December 2007 Sa 1 8 15 22 29 Su 2 9 16 23 30

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su Mo Tu We Th Fr 1 2 3 4 31 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28

JULY- DECEMBER 2007 Dates

August 13-18 August 20

Days

Mon-Fri Monday

Activities

Orientation of new students Registration queries for returning students Classes start at 8:30A.M (Athi Rvier)5.30 PM (NBI) Prayer day Setting of exams Internal moderation of exams External moderation of exams Mid-semester recess Departmental review of exams Meeting of external examiners

August 21

Tuesday

September 6 September 17- 28 October 1 - 5

Thursday Mon-Fri Mon-Fri

October 8 - 19

Mon-Fri

October 22 - 23 October 22-23

Mon-Tue Mon-Tue

October23(Midday)

Wednesday

2003-2007 Catalogue

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xxiii Dates Days Activities

with departments and final day to submit exam drafts to exam office October 24 Wednesday Classes resume at 8:30A.M (Athi Rvier)5.30 PM (NBI) Typing of exams Registration for January 2008 Proofreading and packaging of exams Study days End of Semester exams University Council Meeting & Company End of semester Christmas Vacation Departmental moderation of grades External moderation of grades Orientation of new students Registration queries of returning students Classes start 8.30A.M Athi River, 5.30 Nairobi Campus. Meeting of external examiners with departments and final day to submit grades to exam office Entering of exam grades in computer. Faculty moderation of grades & verification of print- outs.

Oct. 24­ Nov. 23 November 7 November 19-23

Wed-Fri Wednesday Mon-Fri

December 3 - 4 December 5 - 19 December 6 - 7

Mon-Tue Wed-Wed Thur-Fri

December 19 Dec. 20 ­ Jan. 13 January 7 - 8

Wednesday Thur-Sun Mon-Tue

January 9 - 12 January 9-12 January 14

Wed-Sat Wed-Sat Monday

January 15

Tuesday

January 14

Monday

January 14 - 18

Mon-Fri

January 21 - 22

Mon-Tue

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January 23

Days

Wednesday

Activities

Corrections of print-outs and changes Verification of corrections Senate meeting

January 24 January 30

Thursday Wednesday

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VICECHANCELLOR'S DIVISON

Message From The Vice-chancellor

University Profile Corporate Affairs Department

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VICE-CHANCELLOR'S MESSAGE

"Remember the wonders God has done, His miracles and the judgments He promised" (I Chronicles 16:12). Forty years ago in 1964, Daystar was founded in Zimbabwe as Daystar Communications. In 1974 it relocated to Kenya. In 1984 the first undergraduate degree programme in Communication was launched and the organization changed its name to Daystar University College. In 1994 Daystar University College received the Charter from the Kenya Government and became an accredited university. It also changed its name to Daystar University. We are now in 2004 and the first Chancellor and the first Vice-Chancellor will both be retiring this year. It is therefore with deep gratitude to our loving Father in heaven that I write this message to the Daystar Community of scholar-believers and to our customers and supporters to urge them all to remember and celebrate the wonders God has done for us.

Prof. Stephen E. Talitwala B.Sc. Eng (Honours), Universityof East Africa (Nairobi); Ph.D., University of Leeds; M.I.E.K., M.U.I.P.E., R. Eng.

I will start by thanking God the Father and creator of the universe for the intricate and detailed plan He had for the establishment of an evangelical interdenominational Christian University in Africa even before many of us were born.

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Here are some of the exciting plans God had for Daystar University.

· He called Dr. and Mrs. D. K. Smith in 1952 to come to South Africa as missionaries. He then linked them with Dr. S. E. Motsoko Pheko. Together, they launched Daystar Communications in Zimbabwe to where Dr. Pheko had escaped as a refugee. · In 1974 Daystar Communications relocated to Kenya because

civil war had broken out in Zimbabwe. This was made possible by a gift of US$100,000 from one man of God. It is only God who could have motivated the donor to give such a large gift to Daystar Communications, a small-unknown institution in Africa

· In January 1978, God led the supporters and friends of Daystar Communications to a retreat at St. Julians, Limuru, Kenya where He clearly guided them to resolve to transform Daystar Communications into an evangelical interdenominational Christian University. They also resolved to launch the first undergraduate degree programme in 1984 and to raise US$21 million before the launch date.

God inspired the President of Messiah College, Grantham, Pennsylvania, USA, to take a sabbatical leave in order to search for an educational institution which could help Messiah College internationalize its programmes. Dr. Hostetter traveled to the Far East and came through India to Africa. He came to Nairobi then went to South Africa and to Zimbabwe. He was led by the Holy Spirit to choose to work with Daystar Communications. Messiah College became the elder brother to DaystarUniversity College and together we launched the first undergraduate degree in 1984.

·

·

God used Christian men and women within the Kenyan Government, Ministry of Education, to create the Commission for Higher Education (CHE) in 1985. Daystar University was accredited under CHE in 1994.

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· It was after the Council members prayed the prayer of Jabez, (I

Chronicles 4:9-10) on 8th July 1989 that our Father in heaven revealed to them the 300-acre property on Lukenya Hills near Athi River town through an advert on 13th July 1989.

· God touched many donors that did not know much about Daystar

University to donate funds for the development of the much-needed physical facilities. Some of the donors from Japan did not believe in Christ but they gave. Our library at the Athi River Campus was built from funds donated by Japanese. Yes, our God has been our provider, protector and redeemer. Our gratitude goes to all our faithful supporters in Europe, Japan, Kenya, North America and the rest of Africa. The vision of Daystar University has always been the development of Christian servant leaders for the expansion of God's Kingdom in the world with a special emphasis on Africa. We are indeed excited and grateful when we remember what God has done for us over the past 40 years. We are also grateful to God when we hear what our graduates are doing as they serve their customers in the countries where God has placed them. What touches us deeply is their commitment to hard work which is embedded with integrity and willingness to serve their people even when there are many risks. We are committed to continuing to serve the African continent by offering excellent academic programmes. In order to fulfill the vision God has given us, we are working towards being a strategy driven organization wherein we strive to achieve excellence in all the University academic and research programmes. Alongside expanding our academic and research programmes, the University will also continue to help the students to grow in their Christian faith and be involved in community development activities. Yes, the University will continue to develop committed Christian leaders: who are committed to a productive work ethic; who cannot be bought; whose word is their bond; who put character above wealth; 2003-2007 Catalogue

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who will be honest in small and great things alike; who will not compromise with wrong; who possess opinions and a will but are willing to learn new skills; who are larger than their vocations; whose ambitions are not confined to their own selfish desires; and who are not ashamed or afraid to stand for the truth when it is unpopular; and who are willing to lay down their lives for the gospel of Jesus Christ. Such leaders are what Africa needs, men and women willing to be thrown into the lions' dens, like the Biblical Daniel, for doing what is good and right for their communities. I challenge all the students of Daystar University to use their time at Daystar to acquire knowledge, skills and Christian attitudes and develop deep personal relationships with God. These skills will help them develop and transform Africa into the continent of the 21st Century.

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DAYSTAR IN PROFILE

Origins of Daystar University

The history of Daystar University is traced back to 1952 when a young missionary couple, Donald Kendall Smith and Faye Smith flew to South Africa from USA to join the Evangelical Teacher Training College in Natal. Don felt a need to respond to the demand for the development of study material for the Zulu and English speaking African students at Natal. In 1956, Don and Faye were commissioned by the Natal College to concentrate on Developing Literature. In 1958, he launched Our Africa, a monthly Christian magazine, for the purpose of communicating the gospel. Don trained a number of African staff, among them Motsoko Pheko, who eventually became the magazine's Managing Editor. Don wanted to get involved with the Africans, whom he had come to serve, but South Africa's suppression laws made this association difficult. For instance, Mr. Pheko was arrested in 1963 for associating with Smith, forcing the magazine to fold. Even after securing Pheko's release, it became increasingly difficult to operate under the apartheid system. Mr. Pheko escaped to Swaziland and a few months later, Don and Faye Smith moved to Rhodesia. Here, they responded to an invitation to begin a Christian publishing house in Bulawayo and so, Daystar Publications was launched at the end of 1964. Although Daystar publications was founded by Donald and Mrs. Faye Smith in Bulawayo, Motsoko Pheko remained part and parcel of the planning while in Swaziland. In deed, the name Daystar was Pheko's suggestion. During the next four years, Daystar ministry continued to grow. Mr. Pheko later moved to Zambia, in 1967, to avoid extradition to South Africa. Don remained with Daystar Communications in Zimbabwe, he incorporated it in the USA in the same year. This was in response to appeal for help in finding solutions to major problems in Christian communications. When civil war broke out in Zimbabwe, Daystar Communications moved its international headquarters to Nairobi, Kenya, at the beginning of 1974 where it had been incorporated as a non-profit

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7 company in 1973. In 1974, Daystar Communications acquired a 1.54 acre plot in downtown Nairobi and established a small campus. The ministry expanded very rapidly and the need for a larger campus was urgent. On September 19,1992 Daystar University College, as it was then called, relocated the pioneer class of 1st year student to the new Athi River campus. In 1976, the Afro-Asian Board of Directors was constituted in Nairobi and charged with the responsibility of ensuring that Daystar's ministry was effective and relevant to the felt needs of Africa and Asia. In 1979, the board appointed one of its directors, Prof. Stephen Talitwala, as the first African Executive Director to lead the institution. He took over from the founding director, Dr. D.K Smith. In 1982, the founding American board of directors of Daystar Communications handed over the total ministry to the Afro-Asian Board of Directors. Thus, Daystar became an autonomous African Christian institution. Prof. Stephen Talitwala has led the university over the past 20 years through a fast, tough and challenging growth period. Full time training programmes began in 1971, with the five week International Institute for Christian Communications( IICC). This course has been offered annually since then, with the exception of 1973 when Daystar was relocating from Zimbabwe to Kenya. In 1976, Daystar began to offer a two-year post high school diploma programme in Christian Communications. In 1978, a two-year M.A programme in Christian Communications and Christian Ministry was started in collaboration with Wheaton College, Illinois, USA. In April 1984 Daystar launched its four year BA degree programme in collaboration with Messiah College, Grantham, Pennsylvania, USA. In the same year on December 29, Daystar Communication changed its name to Daystar University College. In 1989 Daystar acquired a 300-acre property at Athi-River, 38 kilometers East of Nairobi and established a new Campus. On September 29, 1994 Daystar was granted a Charter by the Government of Kenya and became Daystar University. The university now offers the following programmes: 1. Undergraduate programmes leading to bachelors degrees in 2003-2007 Catalogue

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2.

3.

4. 5.

Arts, Commerce, Education and Science. These programmes require four years for full time students and 5 years for those on the continuing education programme. A two-year postgraduate programme leading to an MA degree in Christian Ministries, Communication or Counselling Psychology and an MBA in either Finance, Marketing, Human Resource Management or Strategic Management. A two-year diploma programme in either Communication, Management, Development, Counselling, or Christian Music Communication (Currently suspended). A training by extension programme offering a number of courses, both on and off campus, for Christian leaders. A research and consultancy services programme that works with the African Christian community to develop effective communication strategies in evangelism, church planting and discipleship, community development and leadership, and development.

The Mission of the University

The mission, philosophy, and objects of Daystar are stated in the University Charter as given here below.

1. The Mission of the University

The mission of the University shall be: a. to provide Christian-based higher education, training and research for the expansion of God's kingdom in the world, and especially Africa.

b. to provide broad biblically based education programmes that

will develop men and women to serve in a variety of supportive and leadership roles in the African church and society, and through the training and extension programmes, research and advisory services, to help equip the church to effectively serve the society in which it exists.

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2. The Philosophy of the University

The Daystar University's Christian philosophy of life and conduct, teaching, training and research, is founded on Christian principles and values based on the following Biblical Statement of faith and practice. As a community of people who follow Jesus Christ, we:

a. Affirm our belief in--

(i) the one-eternal God in the Trinity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, the Creator and Lord of the world, who governs all things according to the purpose of His will, calling out of the world a people for Himself and sending them back into the world to be His servants and witnesses for the extension of His kingdom, and the building of Christ's church for the glory of His name; (ii) the one Saviour, Jesus Christ Himself being the only God-man, who died for the sins of mankind and was raised from the dead according to the Scriptures; the only ransom for sinners and mediator between God and man; who is exalted above every other name as Saviour of the world, who offers the forgiveness of sins and the liberating gift of the Spirit to all who repent, believe and come to Him personally and so are reconciled to God; and those who reject Him repudiate the joy of salvation and condemn themselves to eternal separation from God; (iii) the Holy Spirit, sent by God the Father to bear witness to His Son, whose power and works among men lead to the conviction of sin, faith in Christ, new birth and Christian growth; and speaking through the Scriptures illumines the minds of God's people in every culture to perceive the truth and disclose to the whole church the wisdom God; (iv) the divine inspiration, truthfulness and authority of the Old and the New Testament Scriptures as the Word of God with power to accomplish His purpose of salvation; the Gospel of Good news for the whole world addressed to all mankind for God's revelation in Christ and the only infallible rule of faith and practice;

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(v) the return of Jesus Christ personally and visibly in power and glory to consummate His salvation and judgement; the interim period being filled with evangelism by the people of God, who eagerly wait for Christ's return, the coming of the new heaven and new earth in which righteousness will dwell and God will reign forever; and meanwhile His people rededicating themselves to the service of Christ and men in joyful submission to Christ's authority over the whole of life.

b.

Acknowledge the constant spiritual warfare with principalities and powers of evil which are seeking to overthrow the kingdom of God, and to frustrate the work of the church, and the need for Christians to be equipped with God's armour and to fight with spiritual weapons of truth and prayer, being watchful and discerning to safeguard the biblical gospel. Are committed to-- (i) the church as the community of God's people that is not identified with any particular culture, social or political system or human ideology; being the center of God's cosmic purpose and His appointed means of spreading the gospel to the world; and which needs to be closely united in fellowship, work, witness and functional cooperation for the furtherance of her mission, and for mutual encouragement and the sharing of resources and experience; (ii) Christian churches that are deeply rooted in Christ and closely related to their cultures, always testing and judging such cultures in accordance with Scripture's criteria for truth and righteousness, insisting on their moral absolutes and seeking to transform and enrich them for the glory of God; (iii) the freedom of thought and conscience to practice and propagate the gospel in accordance with the will of God, and to remain faithful to the gospel whatever the cost; (iv) the sharing in God's concern for justice and reconciliation throughout human society and for the liberation of man; evangelism and socio-economic/political involvement, without being afraid to denounce evil and injustice wherever they exist, 2003-2007 Catalogue

c.

11 being part of our Christian duty and the necessary expression of Christian doctrines of God and man, love for ones neighbor and obedience to Jesus Christ, to exhibit His kingdom and to spread its justice and righteousness in the world; (v) Christian education, training and research that are indigenous and developed by creative local initiatives according to Biblical standards of doctrine, discipleship, evangelism, nurture and service; to equip and encourage Christian leaders in church and society to provide Christian style of leadership and service.

3. The Community Covenant and Code of Conduct

The University's philosophy expressed in 2 above, forms the essence of the Community Covenant and the Code of Conduct which all members of the Daystar University community have to sign. Any member of the community-which includes all Council members, staff and students- who fails to conform to the Code of Conduct and the Community Covenant is subject to disciplinary action which may result in suspension or dismissal from the community.

4. The Objects of the University

The objects of the University shall be--

a. to provide resources for University education, training, discussion,

research and teaching within the context of Christian truth and commitment, spiritual sensitivity, and obedience to Christ.

b. to provide, with other Christians, academic leadership to the

Church in Africa so as to address through research, education and consultation, the economic, social and political problems of the African society and those challenges unique to the Church of Christ;

c. to provide adequate resources for quality university education,

training and research based on Biblical concepts and values which reflect the African cultural heritage;

d. to develop in students deeper faith in Jesus Christ and greater

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e. to guide students to understand and accept themselves, their individual needs and talents, and to develop their potential for a productive life and service; f. to provide students with a balanced educational programme that

helps them to develop and to broaden their perception of the inherent inter-relationship between their physical and spiritual needs, and to develop a holistic approach to life;

g. to equip students, to personally commit themselves to evangelism,

church planting and leadership;

h. to develop in students a deeper understanding of traditional and

modern Africa, and to equip them to effectively provide a Christian approach to socio-economic and political development of the African continent;

i. to play an effective role in the development and expansion of

Christian university education in Africa.

5. The Functions of the University

The University shall have the following functions--

a. to provide resources for university education, training and research

and for the establishment of colleges, faculties, schools, departments, institutes, centres and such other institutions as the Council may determine;

b. to determine who may teach, what may be taught and how it may

be taught in the University;

c. to conduct research and encourage the conduct of research

which enlarges the province of human knowledge in general and increases the effectiveness of the church in particular;

d. to assist in the preservation, processing, transmission and

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e. to conduct examinations for, and grant degrees, diplomas, certificates, and other awards of the University; f. to provide a balanced programme and experiences for harmonious

and holistic development of students and staff;

g. to carry out any other functions as may be permitted and approved

by the Council.

The Daystar University Campuses

Daystar University operates two campuses, one in Nairobi and the other near Athi River town. The Athi River campus is the main campus.

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1. The Athi River Campus

Daystar University, Athi River campus, is situated on the edge of the Athi plains on the slopes of the Lukenya Hills, approximately 38 kilometres from the city of Nairobi and 12 kilometres from Mavoko Town (Athi River). The campus, which is on a 300 acre piece of land, is connected to the main Mombasa Road by a 5-kilometre allweather murram road. The campus is supplied with piped water from the EPZ water pipeline and the Nol Turesh water pipeline, supplemented by two water boreholes. The University provides accommodation to 800 students in the campus hostels. Meals are served in the University cafeteria. Recreation facilities include a soccer field, basketball and volleyball courts, and a recreation center for various indoor games and entertainment. Those who love walking and mountain climbing have unlimited space.

2. The Nairobi Campus

The Daystar University Nairobi Campus is conveniently located at Valley Road and Ngong Road, about two kilometres from the city centre, and is well served by public transport to and from all parts of Nairobi. The campus is near the Nairobi Hospital and Kenyatta National Hospital. The Campus borders the Nairobi Baptist Church and the Hurlingham shopping centre is also close by. On this campus, the University offers short courses, postgraduate and the evening undergraduate degree programmes.

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Corporate Affairs Department

The Corporate Affairs Department deals with managing relationship and image of the university. The department has three sections, namely, Public Relations, Business Development and Fundraising. Through the Public Relations section, the department assesses the mood, attitudes and perceptions of the University's publics and interprets them to the Management Board for action. The Corporate Affairs Manager facilitates regular meetings for leaders of various organizations to meet with the Vice-Chancellor. The department has developed healthy working relations with the media, with the aim of building and maintaining a positive image for the University and informing the public about Daystar University and its mission. Through a number of in-house publications, the department ensures that the public, internal and external, are kept informed of what is happening within and around the University. The weekly Infospot newsletter keeps the University community informed on the weekly happenings in and around the t w o campuses. T h e quarterly Output links the University with its external public like churches, parents, alumni, donors and many other supporters of Daystar University's ministry around the world. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Other publications of the University are the Catalogue, the Student Handbook, and the Luminator for alumni, besides smaller publications like brochures and calendars. Involvement, a student publication of Daystar University, is also published fortnightly through this department. Photography and promotional items are also a responsibility of the department. Business Development section deals with courses development on the basis of market survey and through strategic response to emerging market opportunities. The department also coordinates marketing, promotional and publicity activities. Through planned yearly schedules, the department participates in exhibitions and career symposiums.

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FINANCE ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING DIVISION

FINANCIAL INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION SECTION

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Daystar University

FINANCIAL INFORMATION Tuition Fees and Charges

Daystar University tuition and other charges are modest, especially when compared to the costs at other universities in Europe and North America offering similar programmes. The University keeps costs low through gifts from individuals, churches and other Christian organizations, which assist in the University's capital development. The tuition income is used to meet the annual operational budget. The typical fees charges for the 2004/05 academic year are given here below. They are subject to change without notice, and are based on two 17-week semesters in a year.

Fees for 2004/2005 Academic Year (in Kshs): First Year Charges (Paid Once)

i. ii. iii. iv. Application Fee Registration Fee Orientation Fee Caution Money (Refundable) Boarders 2,000 1,000 5,250 2,000 Dayscholars 2,000 1,000 3,000 1,000

Annual Charges (2 Semesters)

a. Tuition Fees

i. ii. iii. iv. v. Undergraduate Degree (32 Hrs) Postgraduate Degree (24 Hrs) Continuing Education (18)Hrs Diploma Programme (30 Hrs) Pre-University Programme (Flat fee for the programme) 164,000 183,000 164,000 138,750 164,000 164,000 183,000 164,000 138,750 164,000

b. Other Charges

i. Examination Fee ii. Computer Usage Fee iii. Students Activity Fee iv. Medical Insurance (Compulsory for Boarders and Foreign Students) v. Library Fee 2,500 6,000 1,000 14,000 4,000 2,500 6,000 1,000 14,000 4,000

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19 vi. Room & Board vii. Practicum/Senior Project 76,440 5,000 -- 5,000

(In addition to the normal tuition)

viiii. Room Charges in Self Catering Hostels (Very limited space)

28,000

--

c. Optional Charges

i. ii. iii. iv. v. Transport (Between Nairobi and Athi River campuses) Textbook Loan Programme Textbook Allowance Late Registration Fee Transcripts 7,000 1,000 20,000 300 300 34,400 1000 20,000 300 300

d. Short Courses Charges Per Week

i. Tuition ii. Room and Board 5,000 2,500

Charges Per Credit Hour The tuition charges per Credit Hour is Kshs 5,125 for full-time Undergraduate programmes; Kshs 5,815 for the Continuing Undergraduate programmes; Kshs 7,500 for Postgraduate programmes; and Kshs 4,625 for Diploma programmes. A credit hour constitutes 16 contact hours of class attendance per semester. Fees for auditing courses are charged at 50% of the tuition charges. These charges also apply for the June/August Blocks of the year 2003/2004 Exchange Rate The exchange rate fluctuates rapidly and the University will use daily conversion rates. As a guide, the exchange rates fluctuate between Kshs 76 and 80 to a U.S. dollar between 2003 and December 2004. Fees Payment All fees for each semester are payable in advance or before the date of registration by bankers cheque or postal money order. The University does not accept cash payments. Sponsors wishing to pay the fees by instalments must apply to the Finance Manager a 2003-2007 Catalogue

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month before the semester begins. The fee payment plan is available to returning students only after their second semester.

Allowances

Parents/sponsors are advised to remit living costs and other allowances for personal use directly to the students. Students from outside Kenya need to secure funds for their entire study period at Daystar before coming to Nairobi. This should include enough funds to pay for their return travel back to their countries at the end of the study period. They also have to provide cooking utensils and cutlery if they are in self catering units.

Campus Accommodation

Students living in the University hostels are expected to provide their own bedding (blankets, linens, bedcover, towels, pillowcases, etc.) as well as bath and laundry items. Students living in the rented University self-catering hostels are jointly responsible for the cleanliness of the entire facility and payments for water, electricity and gas usage.

Patience Ladies Hostel: A full-board hostel has TV Rooms, Study Rooms, Visitors' Lounge and provides meals at the University Dining Hall.

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Off-Campus Accommodation

Married students who wish to bring along their families are advised to locate off-campus accommodations before bringing their families to Nairobi. The cost of a one-bedroom apartment varies between Kshs. 4,000 and 12,000 per month, depending on location and the kind of house.

Refunds

In some cases for valid reasons acceptable to the University, a student who drops a course may be refunded 100% in the first week; 90% in the second week; and none thereafter. No refund is allowed for a block course unless a claim for such a refund is made before the commencement of the course. However, in cases of pressing personal emergencies or illnesses which require such a drop of course, the student may petition to the Faculty Board, through its chairman, for a refund. Each case will be determinied independently. Room and board charges are for the whole semester and no refund will be made for a student leaving the hostel after the semester has started.

Student Financial Aid Office

a. Work Study Programme

The University is keenly aware that there are many qualified deeply committed Christian students from poor families. It therefore deliberately raises scholarship funds for needy students. The University has set up a Work Study programme to which it contributes five percent (5%) of the tuition fees income every year. The University also raises funds from churches, foundations and individuals in order to help the many poor students. In January semester of the academic year, applications for Daystar Work Study scholarships are invited from needy students through the Student Financial Aid Office. Scholarship awards are given according to the following guidelines: (1) Daystar scholarships cover about two-thirds (2/3) of the annual tuition fees. The student must procure additional funding from family, friends, employer, church, or private sources. (2) A student receiving Daystar scholarship is required to work ten 2003-2007 Catalogue

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(10) hours every week on jobs assigned by the University. (3) Daystar scholarships are not available to first year students. Only in very exceptional cases will consideration be given to first year applicants. (4) The following conditions are used to determine scholarship awards: (a) assessed level of need; (b) depth of Christian commitment; (c) a clear Christian behavioural pattern; (d) a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5; (e) enrolment in a full-time study programme; (f) nearness to completion of course; (g) the spread of Christianity in home area.

(b) Other Scholarships and Awards

(i) Academic Merit Scholarship Every year Daystar offers an academic merit scholarship to the best student admitted to the undergraduate programme with the highest academic grade in KCSE. The scholarship covers tuition for four academic years if the student maintains a G.P.A of 3.00. (ii) Edith Locklin Berry Memorial Scholarship The Edith Locklin Berry Memorial Scholarship Fund was established by the Berry family to assist needy female graduate students. Edith Berry completed the M.A. degree and joined the faculty of Daystar shortly before she died in 1990. Applicants for the scholarship must: (1) be full time female student in the Masters programme or in the third year and above of the undergraduate programme; (2) be of godly character and able to articulate her personal relationship with Jesus Christ; (3) have proven financial need;

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23 (4) have achieved a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00; (5) have a clearly articulated concern to help other women in her home area by the application of her studies at Daystar. (iii) Book Award This is awarded to six returning students, two representing each intake group, who attain the highest cumulative GPA in an academic year. The award covers the textbook allowance for that academic year. It only applies to undergraduates. (iv) Non-Daystar Scholarships A number of students come to Daystar with their own scholarships. Such students are advised to report to the Students Accountant in the Finance Department. The students will be required to provide the Students Accountant with details of their scholarships through a commitment letter from their sponsors stating what the scholarship covers and the duration of the scholarship. Students with sponsors in the USA and Canada are advised to have their funds sent through the Daystar offices in these countries. Money from other parts of the world should be sent to the Daystar University account by direct bank transfer. This ensures that money is not lost in the international mail scam. The University does not recommend cheques being sent to Daystar by mail.

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ADMINISTRATION SECTION

The Administration Section provides institutional support services in the areas of food, health, transport, bookshop, security, and maintenance of the physical facilities of the University.

1. Bookshop Services

The University operates a bookshop on each campus. The bookstore provides stationery supplies, textbooks, photocopying and mail services. A student can buy textbooks either by paying cash or charging the pre-paid textbook allowance card. The textbook allowance can be paid together with other fees at the beginning of the semester and the student is issued with a card by the Finance Department. Each time a student buys a book, it is charged to the Textbook account. Lost textbook allowance cards must be reported immediately to the bookstore.

2. Campus Services

The campus services department offers services in office and classroom cleaning, security, grounds and utility maintenance, water and power provision, sewerage and general environment, postal services and telecommunications for the two campuses. Recently, a new PABX switch was installed and radio mast constructed by Telkom Kenya to provide a reliable telecommunications link with the outside world. The Nairobi campus has two telephone booths available for students' use. The numbers are 2721064 and 2727092. The Athi River campus has two telephone booths as well, situated at the Hope Centre. The numbers are 045 22268/22535. Students are advised to give correct postal address to avoid misplacement of mail. To avoid this, students should indicate their hostel of residence and have letters addressed to them at the appropriate address as given in this catalogue. Although the University provides security for both campuses, students are required to take care of their personal property. The Athi River Campus provides ample parking for staff and students with personal vehicles. However, those studying at the Valley Road Campus or who wish to leave their cars at Nairobi as they go to Athi River are 2003-2007 Catalogue

25 informed that parking at the Nairobi Campus is limited to staff and faculty only. Alternative parking is available at the Nairobi Baptist Church behind the Valley Road Campus.

3. Food Services

The Food Services Department caters for the total University community. Resident students are however a priority for the department. Such students who have paid the required fees receive meal cards from the Finance Department at the beginning of the semester. Non-resident students can buy semester meal cards for lunch and/or dinner. The department has canteens on both campuses selling snacks and soft drinks. These cater for dayscholars, staff and faculty who may not want to have a full lunch or dinner in the dining hall. More details on meal times are posted in the dining halls and canteens.

4. Health Services

Medical insurance for outpatient and inpatient medical cover is provided at a cost of Kshs 7,000 per year for the 2003/2004 academic year for boarding and non-Kenyan students. Kenyan dayscholars are covered only for outpatient treatment at our clinics at a cost of Kshs 2,500 per year. These charges are subject to change. Health charges are payable in full at the time of registration for the first semester each year. Cover continues for a full 12 months whether or not a person remains enrolled in classes. All students are required to pay for the medical insurance cover. Strategis Health, a private health care provider, runs a medical clinic at Athi River Campus and near Nairobi Campus and has a full time medical doctor and a number of full time clinical staff. There are strict regulations governing the operation of the clinics and making reimbursement claims from medical expenses. Students are advised to familiarize themselves with the regulations.

5. Computer Services

The Computer Services department gives user services to offices and computer laboratories. Over 200 computers are availabe for student use and internet access is availabe on both campuses. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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6. Transport Services

The University provides bus transport for both staff and students. Daystar University provides transport for all staff and faculty to and from the Athi River campus at scheduled times. The buses have strict departure times and all are required to adhere to the shuttle programme to avoid being left at the pick-up points. Dayscholars are transported by buses hired from a private transport firm. The buses follow three fixed routes and students are required to stick to their pick-up points along their routes in order to avoid overcrowding. Students are required to pay at the Finance Department at the beginning of the semester after which they are issued with a Bus Pass. The bus passes must always be produced when boarding the bus. Special organized groups like clubs and societies planning to make official trips are required to make prior arrangements with the Transport Office two weeks before the date of travel. Approval must be sought from the Dean of Students if the travel charges are to be charged to the club's account.

7. Human Resources

The Human Resource Department of Daystar University is involved in various functions, including recruitment, selection, placement/ deployment and induction of staff/faculty; Drawing schemes of service; Co-ordination of staff/faculty training and development; Labour and Industrial relation matters; Resolving staff/faculty grievances; Staff/Faculty appraisals; Compensation and reward management; Handling immigration matters; Managing staff welfare and benefits such as health, safety, medical, benevolence fund and remuneration; Negotiating for the organization in several areas like medical scheme, insurance policy, training and consultancy work; Managing the University Work Study programme.

8. Procurement Services

The University has a centralized purchasing system with the procurement Department coordinating all purchasing and supplies. For more details on procedures please see the Procurement Officer.

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Daystar University

Prof. Samuel Katia Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)

ACADEMIC DIVISON

Student Development Common Academic Regulations Faculty of Arts Faculty of Social Sciences Faculty of Science & Technology Post-Graduate Studies

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Student Development Department

Campus Life

The student co-curricular activities are coordinated through the Student Development Department. It is headed by the Dean of Students. Others include the Chaplain, Assistant Chaplains, the Sports and Recreation Officer, Student Counsellors and the Resident Tutors. The Department coordinates and facilitates all aspects of student life outside the classroom. The objective is that every student will "grow up in every way into Him who is the head, that is Christ" (Ephesians 4:15), physically, spiritually, socially, ethically, and vocationally. Student life at Daystar is designed to complement the academic learning, so as to produce Christian servant leaders who will make a difference at all levels of society.

1. Chaplaincy

a. Chapels Chapels are held twice a week on Tuesdays and

Students and Staff in Chapel at Athi River Campus

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Thursdays and attendance is required of both staff and students. It is an essential part of their regular weekly schedule and includes a variety of worship styles, musical programmes, Bible studies, speakers, and drama. Chapel is the one activity in which the entire community gathers together for worship and fellowship on a regular basis. All staff and students of Daystar University are individually expected to be members of a church in which they worship and fellowship regularly. As a vital part of spiritual growth, they are also encouraged to serve the Lord in an active way through the programmes of their respective churches. In addition, the Daystar Christian Fellowship (DCF) sends out numerous student ministry teams to reach out beyond the campus with evangelistic outreaches, ministry among street children, and many other ministry opportunities. In addition to the above, the University organises weekly spiritual activities as given here below: b. Small Groups The Chaplaincy from time to time organises small groups to which every staff and student is assigned. The small groups meet once a week for prayer and Bible study. The main goal of the small group meetings is to provide a forum for spiritual growth. c. Counselling The University Chaplain, the Assistant Chaplains, the Student Counsellors and other staff and faculty, are available to counsel students in such areas as adjustment to life at Daystar, spiritual development, resolving personal problems, and making major life decisions. In addition a large number of students have been trained as peer counsellors. As a Christian community, the Bible requires us to be our brother's keeper. Therefore, every member of the Daystar University Community is expected to be sensitive to the needs of others around them.

2. Daystar University Students Association (DUSA)

Daystar University Students Association (DUSA) is the recognised student organisation within the University. Every Daystar student is automatically a member of DUSA. The DUSA Executive Committee, which is responsible for running DUSA affairs, is 2003-2007 Catalogue

31 democratically elected by the student body during the month of April every year. DUSA has the following sub-committees: Academic Affairs, Social Welfare, Sports and Recreation, Clubs Associations, Daystar Christian Fellowship, International Students Association, Continuing Education and Postgraduate Committee. In addition, under the auspices of the DUSA, many student clubs and associations offer opportunities for involvement. The key link person for DUSA activities is the Dean of Students.

3. Doulos

Doulos is a servant leadership program at Daystar that derives its name from Mark 10:45 and 2Cor 4:5, which means slave or servant in Greek. The program strives to help Daystar achieve its mission of training servant leaders for Africa by using tools of adventure, service and community in displaying the love of Christ for all mankind.

4. Student Counselling

The student counselling office exists in part to advocate for special concerns for international students, raise and maintain international awareness within Daystar, and promote spiritual, social and career development among international students. The Office also oversees the Visas processing and Kenya Pupils Passes, assists in the orientation programmes and works closely with the International Students Association of Daystar University (ISADU).

5. Students Sports and Recreation Office

The Sports and Recreation Office coordinates intramural sports as well as team sports and games throughout the academic year. Existing sports and recreation activities include team sports, individual sports, board games and other outdoor activities. Daystar teams compete in the Kenya Universities Sports Association (KUSA), the Nairobi Fellowship of Theological Colleges (NFTC), Nairobi Basketball Association and in other organized institutional sports.

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Daystar University

ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES

The Academic programmes are offered under three faculties: the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Social Sciences, and the Faculty of Science and Technology, each headed by a Dean. The programmes offered are as follows;

1. Certificate Courses

Daystar University offers Certificate courses to equip Christian leaders and workers who are already in ministry and who require additional training in specialized areas of their work, but who are unable, for various reasons, to enroll in a degree programme. These Certificate courses are offered in five ministry areas, namely: Christian Ministries, Communication Arts, Christian Music Communication, Management, and Development. More detailed information can be found under the respective departments.

2. The Pre-University Programme

This one-year academic programme is meant for Christian high school leavers who have not obtained direct admission to the undergraduate degree programme. It is intended to prepare such students for university admission. However, no guarantee is given that students admitted to this programme will automatically be admitted to the undergraduate degree programmes unless they meet the minimum requirements of a cumulative GPA of 2.50.

3. Diploma Programme

The Diploma programme offers courses in five areas namely: a) Counselling b) Communication c) Management d) Development f) Music Communication The program is offered on a full-time basis lasting two years. Diploma programmes are offered in the Academic Division within the relevant departments. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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4) Undergraduate Programme

The undergraduate programme provides all students with a wide range of academic curricula carefully planned to supply adequate basic knowledge in the selected field. A major field of study is provided and the total programme will teach the student to analyse and synthesize information from different areas as a consequence of the planned coherence of the various disciplines. The undergraduate programme offers 13 majors. These can be taken either as full-time programmes, or as part-time through the Continuing Education programme, which offers classes in the evenings and on Saturdays. Undergraduate degrees offered are: (a) Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with majors in Biblical and Religious Studies, Communication, Community Development, English, Social Work, and Psychology. (b) Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com.) in Accounting, Marketing, Business Administration & Management and Management Information Systems (MIS). (c) Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) in Arts, Science or Social Science (d) Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree with major in Economics and Applied Computer Science. The University offers minors in most of the undergraduate courses listed above. In addition, it offers minors in Peace and Reconciliation, Christian Ministries, and Mathematics. In the near future, the University plans to launch majors in Law, Primary Education and Electronic Engineering.

5. The Continuing Education Programme

This is an undergraduate programme designed for people in full time employment who desire to pursue a university education while working. The programme offers classes in the evenings and on Saturdays. It also runs two 5-week session blocks during long 2003-2007 Catalogue

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holidays in June through August. The requirements for admission are similar to those for other undergraduate programmes as stated under `Common Academic Regulations' (See pp 42).

6. The Postgraduate Programme

The Master programme is geared towards assisting students in acquiring skills and understanding at an advanced (postgraduate) level in Communication theory, Communication Arts, Crosscultural studies and Christian Ministries, Business and Psychology; and toward training them to do research in these areas. The purpose of such study is to prepare students for high leadership responsibility in churches and other organizations. The programme offers four majors in: Communication, Christian Ministries, Masters Degree in Business Administration (MBA), and Counselling Psychology. (For more on Postgraduate programme, refer to pg. 336)

7. Research and Publication

The Daystar University Charter recognizes research as an integral part of the University's mission, objectives and functions. The University aims at providing Christian-based higher education, training and research for the expansion of God's kingdom in Africa and the world. The objectives of the Research and Publication Department is to upgrade the level of research with a view to strengthening the academic capacity of the University, create and strengthen research network among University departments, develop cooperation in research, training and activities with institutions of higher learning worldwide, develop literature on research methodology and research documentation and archives for the University, and encourage and coordinate research publications. Currently, the Department is involved in academic research among staff and students.

8. Staff and Student Exchange Programme

The office provides an in- depth orientation programme that exposes the exchange students to the history and culture of Kenya through excursions and visits with Kenyan families. Daystar

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35 University and the American Christian Consortium of Colleges have established a staff and student exchange programme. The thirteen American Christian universities/colleges that form the Consortium are united by a shared commitment to the liberal arts tradition and a common affirmation of faith. The exchange programme provides a variety of professional and academic exchange opportunities for both staff and students.

a. Staff Exchange Programme

Visiting professors and senior administrative staff from reputable universities in the USA and other parts of the world come to Daystar for varying periods of time. Such staff spend their leave teaching or doing research at Daystar. Senior administrative staff visit Daystar and spend time working alongside their counterparts in such areas as the Library or in the Office of Admissions and Records. These professionals bring into Daystar experiences that enrich and enhance our institutional programmes. As opportunities arise, both academic and senior administrative staff from Daystar go to institutions in other parts of the world for similar exposure in teaching, research, or other experiential engagements. The experiences gained by our staff are seen as a very important aspect of their professional development.

b. Students Exchange Programme

The Daystar student exchange programme is open to second and third year students. Fourth year students can only participate during their first semester of the final year. To qualify, students should be mature Christians with a GPA of 3.00 or above. They are also required to pay full tuition and boarding fees for a semester in Daystar, and be able to meet textbook and personal expenses may include a return air ticket from the US. Students on Work Study must raise fees in cash or have the credit equivalent to meet their full tuition and boarding fees. Students must check with their respective H.O.D to ensure that the courses they take in a US college are transferable to Daystar. All credits taken at the US institution will appear on the

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Daystar University

student's Daystar transcript as transfer credits, meaning they will not affect the GPA. Students are required to return to Daystar at the end of the specified semester of study in the US. While in the US, students are required to conduct themselves according to the Daystar Code of Conduct and abide by the regulations of the institution attended. On return, students are required to submit a written report of their experience while in the US. Applications are made to the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic), through the Programme Coordinator. Applications must be accompanied by a parent's, guardian's or sponsor's written approval and commitment to participate in the programme.

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Academic Services

9. Library and Resource Centre Services

The University has two libraries. One is located at the Nairobi Campus and the other is at the Athi River Campus. The Agape Library at Athi River will eventually hold 83,000 volumes and provide seating for 316 readers. Daystar's libraries hold a collection of books, professional journals, periodicals, newspapers, microfilms, CD ROMs, research reports, and learning packages in all relevant fields of study. The total stock of the Library system is over 65,000 volumes of books excluding bound volumes of periodicals. The Library includes a multi-media centre. Daystar staff and students also use public libraries in Nairobi and in other Christian and theological colleges within and near Nairobi.

10. Computer Laboratories

The Computer Department within the Academic Division operates eight computer laboratories in Athi River campus and Nairobi campus. The Nairobi campus computer laboratory caters for Continuing Education students and postgraduate students while 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Daystar University

the ones in Athi River campus are for undergraduate, preuniversity and diploma students. Athi-River campus has five computer labs in the basement of the ultra-modern Bible, Commerce and Communication (BCC) Centre. Both Campuses have Internet access.

11. Communication Studios

The Communication department operates a radio station, Shine FM 103.1, sound, video and television studio and a student newspaper, Involvement, so as to provide hands-on experience for students. The department also runs, in collaboration with the department of Humanities, a Language Laboratory, a Resource Centre and a Speech & Writing Centre, all of which add value to the learning process.

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GOALS OF DAYSTAR'S ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES

Characteristic of Daystar's programmes is a continual striving for excellence in all things. The nine goals of Daystar's academic programmes are as follows: a. Spiritual development is predicated on faith in and commitment to Jesus Christ. Full spiritual maturity is contingent upon a relationship to the Christian community and adoption of a dynamic world and life view. Such spiritual growth fosters a distinctive value system that covers the spectrum of individual and social experiences. These commitments call one to involvement in the world, in ways that affect wholeness in the self and others. These concerns find expression in Christian life-goals, in accountable stewardship of talents and resources, and in responsible care of the earth. b. Intellectual development begins with recognition of the importance and worth of mental activity. Intellectual growth is marked by an appreciation of clear and creative thinking and a capacity for theoretical thought. Intellectually developed people have a broad understanding of ideas in the world, an awareness of the contemporary situation and a deeper, more detailed knowledge of one specific area of thought. They are capable of making relationships between specific categories. Such people are curious, engage in continuing research and form thoughtful conclusions. c. While the years of university study are important in and of themselves, they must also provide preparation for later life. Career development involves the investigation of career options and development of a personal career plan. Staff members, along with other professionals in career development, provide such resources. The Daystar University curriculum prepares students to enter a career after graduation or to continue their education at post- graduate or professional levels. d. The learner is at the center of the education process. Ultimately, this process must promote personal development which in essence is the development of a mature and well-

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rounded individual who displays a healthy sense of relationship to creation and the Creator. e. Daystar's undergraduate programme is intended to offer to the increasing number of qualified secondary school leavers and mature Christians, a Christian alternative for higher education. Such an education will have a Christian foundation, a moral base and excellent quality, and is intended for Christians who will become leaders whether in church, government or industry. f. Daystar offers a programme that is broad based. g. Africa is a continent of many cultures and languages. It is therefore absolutely essential that students are encouraged to develop a deep understanding of traditional Africa and modern Africa if they are to play an effective role in the spiritual, social and economic transformation of the continent. Therefore, Daystar programmes are distinctly African in context. At the same time, they provide a platform from which a student can understand and relate to other cultures. h. The programme is practical and oriented to field experience in conditions very similar to those students will encounter at the conclusion of the degree programme. For that reason, courses are focused on clear application to the contemporary situation in Africa.

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COMMON ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

ADMISSION TO DAYSTAR UNIVERSITY

The University shall admit for study for degrees, diplomas, certificates or other awards of the University, such candidates as shall have been accepted by the Senate as being academically qualified, and who accept the University's Christian mission and philosophy as provided under Sections 4 to 7 of the Charter, without regard or preference to gender, ethnic origin, race or physical disability being imposed as a condition for admission. Other conditions for admission are given here below.

A. Admission to the Undergraduate Programme

I. Direct Entry into the Undergraduate Programmes

a. Minimum Entry Requirement The minimum entry requirement shall be an overall grade of C+ for candidates taking KCSE or two (2) Advanced Level Principal passes, or their equivalents for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a minimum entry requirement and meeting it may not automatically entitle a candidate admission to the University. b. Language Requirements Language of instruction at Daystar is English therefore; (i) Applicants with grade B- in KCSE or 500 marks/points on TOEFL (results not more than two years old), or at least Credit 6 under the old `O' Level system, or 60% with systems that use percentages or a principal pass at `A' level in English, will be exempted from taking the English pre-test. (ii) Applicants with English grades of C- to C+, in KCSE or 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Daystar University

Credits 7 and 8 under the old `O' Level system, or 50-59% from English speaking countries must take the English pre-test administered by the University. Those who do not pass the test will be required to take an English course for no credit for one semester. (iii) Applicants with English grades of D+ to E in KCSE or Credit 9 in the old `O' Level system, or less than 50% with any system that use percentages, will be required to take an English course for one semester on a pass or fail basis. They do not sit for the English pre-test. (iv) Applicants from non-English speaking countries (where English is not used as the medium of instruction), must include results of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) of not more than two years old, or the British examination (International English Language Test) or its equivalent. Acceptance score on the TOEFL test is 500. (v) Applicants from non-English speaking countries coming with lower scores will be required to take a preliminary course for no credit. They will spend the first semester studying English only, if the scores are significantly below 500. Candidates coming without the TOEFL score will be required to spend at least a semester studying English language only.

II. Admission to Undergraduate on Transfer from other Institutions

1. Daystar University will accept Grade C or better for relevant courses from recognized/accredited universities which offer bachelors level courses. 2. A student who transfers to Daystar University from another accredited institution must take a minimum of 33 credit hours at Daystar University. 3. A student must take a minimum of 17 credit hours in the major area of study at Daystar University. In addition, 50% of all 300 and 400 level major courses must be taken at Daystar University. 2003-2007 Catalogue

43 4. Daystar University will consider transfering credits which come from non-degree granting institutions but whose academic programmes are approved by the Senate, if the courses are equivalent to Daystar University's 100 level and only 100 level courses. Each request will be considered on an individual course basis. A comprehensive final examination may be given to the student before credit is granted. No grade will be assigned to these credits. The student will be charged a fee for sitting for the examination equivalent to the cost of one credit hour in case of challenging a course. (To challenge a course is to take an exam for a course which one feels has already completed the work but the university is not convinced that one should be exempted due to the low grade achieved in the course or at the level it was taken. Such exam is taken after paying for one credit hour and if the student achieves a grade of at least 50%, he/she gets exemption. )

III. Admission from Daystar Diploma Programme

1. Only those students with at least a GPA of 2.50 in the diploma programme will be considered.

B. Admission into the Diploma Programme I. Direct Entry into the Diploma Programmes

The minimum entry requirement is an overall grade of C (Plain) for candidates offering KSCE or Advanced Level Principal Pass or the equivalent for candidates coming from outside Kenya. This is, however, a minimum entry requirement and meeting it does not automatically entitle a candidate admission to the University.

II. Admission on Transfer from other Institutions

1. Daystar University will accept a grade of B (Plain) or better for relevant courses from accredited universities and colleges which offer diploma level courses. 2. A student who transfers to Daystar University from another recognized institution must take a minimum of 33 credit hours of the Diploma. In other words, a maximum of 27 credit hours with

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Daystar University

comparable course content can be accepted for transfer with the following restrictions:

C. Mature Age Entry

There shall be a mature age qualifying scheme for admission to the University, the conditions of which shall be: (i) Candidates must be 25 years of age on the 1st January of the year in which admission is sought. (ii) Candidates must provide evidence of their ability to cope with university level work e.g success in further education after high school.(Certificate courses are excluded)

D. Special Students

(A student is considered special if he/she is admissible to the programme but does not want to take the full programme. He/she is just interested in a few courses) Only persons who are eligible for admission into particular programmes can enroll as special students. Such students will be enrolled for a maximum of one academic year only. Students who wish to continue beyond this period must apply for admission into the regular programmes.

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EXEMPTIONS

Daystar University recognizes training that students have had prior to entering the university and exemptions may be offered for specific courses upon application. Students are advised to apply for exemptions in writing through the University Registrar upon admission. Transcripts and course syllabi or other relevant documents must be provided with the application.

A. Definitions

Exemption or transfer of credits: When a student is exempted from a course the credit hours for the exempted course will be counted toward the total hours for graduation. The exempted course will be counted as having fulfilled the relevant course requirement toward the degree. The requirements for exemption are specified within the relevant departments and for specific programs. Any grade assigned will not contribute to the GPA. Challenge: To challenge a course is to take an exam for a course which one feels has already completed the work but the university is not convinced that one should be exempted. Such exam is taken after paying for an equivallent of one credit hour and the student has passed the course.

B. General Guidelines for Exemptions

Transfer of credits for the undergraduate programme are granted on the following conditions. Transfer from a recognized diploma Transfer from a non-recognized institution Transfer from an accredited university Some "A" - level courses (When one gets

Principals A to D)

B- or better B or better C or better Principal Pass

Specific courses from the Daystar Diploma and Pre-university programmes that may qualify for exemption are listed within each department. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Transfered or exempted credits from a course may be allowed for 100 and 200 level courses. The student will be required to provide a transcript and course syllubus to the University Registrar. If the syllabus is equivalent in content to the course offered at Daystar univeristy, then the student may be be exempted. A student may apply to challenge 300 and 400 level courses under the following conditions: 1. The student has taken an equivalent course and achieved a grade of at least B-. 2. The student has provided the transcript and course syllabus to the University Registrar. If the syllabus is equivalent in content to the course offered at Daystar university the student may be allowed to challenge the course. If exemption is sought on the basis of work experience the student shall provide written evidence from the employer of having worked in the area that indicates their level of competence. If the student challenges the course and receives a grade of B- or better on the examination exemption will be granted. If the student has a working experience of at least a period of one year in the area of a practicum course, depending on the nature of the course, he/she may seek exemption. Transfer of credits will only be given to those students who did the course within the past ten years unless the student has been practicing in the specific field.

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DIPLOMA PROGRAMME REGULATIONS

All diploma students must take and pass the prescribed course work and the field project. The graduation requirement for each diploma programme is the completion of 60-65 credit hours under the following combinations: Credit Hours 15 33 - 50 27 6 12 60 - 65

Common Core Courses Required courses in the Major Courses Field Project Electives TOTAL

Some students may opt to take a double major combination. Graduation requirements for candidates taking double major will be as follows: A student must apply for the double major during his/her second or third semester and be approved by the respective department.

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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES REGULATIONS

a. Course Load

(i) The normal class load for undergraduate students is 16 to 18 credit hours or 5 to 6 courses per semester. With permission, students having a cumulative GPA of over 3.40 can take a load above 18 credits. The maximum load a student can take is 21 credit hours. Students in the Continuing Education Programme are allowed same load as (above) if they feel they can handle the load. (ii) A credit hour is equal to 16 contact hours per semester.

b. Student Assessment

(i) Continuous assessment shall be part of a student's assessment throughout his/her degree programme. Tests, assignments, projects, term papers, practical work, etc. will be included in the calculation of the student's final mark for a given course. (ii) In addition to the continuous assessment, a final examination shall be administered at the end of each semester in each course, and the marks will be added to the continuous assessment in accordance with the special departmental regulations. (iii) For each course the student is given a letter grade, which has the following significance: Marks 91 - 100 81 - 90 76 - 80 71 - 75 66 - 70 61 - 65 56 - 60 51 - 55 46 - 50 41 - 45 40 and below Letter Grade Per Credit A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D F Grade Points 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.0 Significance

Superior Average

Below Average Unacceptable for Credit

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49 (iv) All grades below D will carry no credit and will be calculated as zero grade point. (v) Students will be required to repeat failed courses. Repeated courses will receive whatever grade the student achieves. If the course failed twice is a general education course, the student is allowed to take a course in his/ her major concentration or minor in place of a failed general education course. (vi) A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 must be maintained to continue studies in good standing. (vii) A student's cumulative grade point average (Cum GPA on scale 4.00) is obtained by dividing the total number of semester credits attempted (those in which grade points may be earned) into the total number of grade points obtained where grade points are the products of the credit hours of the credits and the points associated with the letter grades. Credits transfered from other institutions do not carry grade points. Furthermore, some courses which are required but carry no credit or which are graded only on a simple "pass-fail" basis are not used in calculating the grade point average. (viii) All degree candidates must achieve a cumulative GPA in their major courses of at least 2.00 in addition to having a cumulative GPA of 2.00 in all courses.

c. Graduation Requirements

(i) All undergraduate students must take and pass all the prescribed General Education courses. The normal course combination would be: General Education Major Minor (if any) Free or General Electives (ii) Specific graduation requirements for each degree programme will be spelled out separately by each department. Minimum graduation requirements for candidates taking a single Major will be 129 credit hours for most majors.

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Daystar University

Double Majors A few students may opt to take a double major combination. Graduation requirements for candidates taking double majors will be as follows: Majors Credit hours Accounting Business Admin. & Man. 135 Accounting Marketing Business Admin. & Man. Marketing Bible Integrated Community Development Bible Communication Bible English Bible Psychology Bible Rural Development Communication Integrated Community Development Communication Psychology Integrated Community Development Psychology Communication Rural Development

141

135

166

156- 162

152

157

166

174- 180

163- 169 164

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51 Integrated Community Development Psychology English Communication English Integrated Community Development English Psychology English Rural Development Applied Computer Science Economics Education Teaching Subjects (2) 142

160 - 166

170

161

172

180

141 - 142

(iv) A total of 38 upper division (300, 400, 500 level) credits must be earned. (v) A full time single major student should be able to complete the course in four years of two semesters each (8 semesters). (vi) A student taking a double major may require up to 10 semesters to complete the course. (vii) Each course is given credits which indicate the number of hours in class per week for a 17 week semester. Each course is evaluated according to the number of credits assigned to it. To attain a degree, the student must have accumulated the number of credit hours indicated for the degree in the summary of one's academic programme spelled out by various departmental regulations.

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d. Graduation Honours

Outstanding students are selected for graduation honours by a committee of the heads of academic departments based on the following scales: At least a 3.50 G.P.A Cum Laude (With Honours) At least a 3.70 G.P.A Magna Cum Laude (With High Honours) At least a 3.90 G.P.A Summa Cum Laude (With Highest Honours)

e. Registration

Registration for each semester is carried out for returning students during the previous semester. The date and time of registration is announced by the Registrar.

f.

Registration Queries

Students are expected to register in person on a day and time designated for a specific semester. A registration schedule is included in the University calendar in this Catalogue. A registration period of two weeks is permitted from the day continuing students arrive, for the students who are attending classes. However, during the June/August semester, registration is done in one week. A late registration fee of Kshs 300 will be charged after the day of registration queries. An additional Kshs 50 will be charged for each additional day late, till the last working day of the second week. That fee must be paid in cash by the student. Students are responsible for seeing that they complete their registration process for each semester, failure to which the student will receive no credit hours for the semester.

g. Academic Discontinuation

A student must maintain a cumulative grade point average (Cum GPA) of 2.00. However, a student is allowed a GPA of 1.90 for the first semester of the first year of study. A student is placed on academic probation at the conclusion of any semester in which his cumulative GPA falls below the required standard. A student will receive probation letters with regard to his perfomance for a period of 7 years. After that the student will be discontinued and will be inelligible for any degree program at Daystar. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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h) Class Attendance

It is assumed that students will make the most of the educational opportunities available to them by regularly and punctually attending all class sessions. Students who miss 25% or more of class sessions will receive an F grade. If a student must be absent from classes for sickness with medical report or bereavement, he/ she must fill absence-from-class forms which are obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.

i) Auditing of Courses (AU)

A student may audit any course in this catalogue, so long as his presence as an auditing student does not displace someone taking the course for credit. Enrolling for audit permits one to attend lectures and to participate in various class activities, though no academic credit is earned for the experience. The lecturer may mark assignments submitted by the auditing student but is not obligated to do so. Those not already admitted to the undergraduate programme can only audit courses if they satisfy the undergraduate admission requirements. A half of the normal fee for the course is paid for any course that is audited.

j) Course Numbering

I) Each course carries a three letter prefix and a three digit number. The letter prefix indicates the subject area in which the course is taught. NOTE: CHM indicates the course is a Christian Ministries course, while the number indicates the level at which the course is taught. Thus a 100 level course would be designated for first year students except for general courses. Some 500 level courses may appear for undergraduate programmes requiring a fifth year, or for courses limited to fourth or fifth year undergraduate students. Courses at 600 level are for post-graduate students only. II) It is possible for a student to enroll in a course numbered for his/ her own year of study or for one year advanced if he/she does not have enough load for his/her own level, but no undergraduate student may enroll in post-graduate courses to fulfill graduation requirements for the undergraduate degree programme. Likewise no Diploma student will enroll in undergraduate courses to fulfil graduation requirements for the diploma.

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k. Withdrawal

(i) If a student must, for some personal emergency, withdraw from a course after the deadline for routine changes has expired, he/she may do so only as long as two thirds (2/3) of the course has not passed, but the student's transcript will show his/her performance. Withdrawals will be noted on the student's transcript with `W' (Withdrawal for sickness or suspension) `WP' (Withdrawing Passing) or `WF' (Withdrawing Failing), depending on whether the student was passing or failing at the time of withdrawal. A penalty fee will be charged as indicated under `Refunds' on Page 13 of this Catalogue. (ii)After two-thirds (2/3) of the course has passed, the student may not withdraw from any course, unless there is a pressing personal emergency or illness which requires it. This must be approved by the respective Faculty Board.

l. Change of Academic Majors

Students who wish to change a major area of study must meet the minimum entry requirements for the new major as specified in the University Catalogue. Students from the Pre-University programme will be required to have attained equivalent grades for specific subject entry requirements of the new major. Applications for change of major must be submitted to the Registrar, with a copy to the Head of Department in which the student is registered, by February 28 during the first three academic years. The student must have completed a minimum 16 credit hours or 10 credit hours for students on the Continuing Education Programme. Applications must be signed by the Head of Department for the major the student is transfering from, and must be accompanied by a receipt for a non-refundable fee of Kshs 500. Approval of change of major will be communicated to the applicant by the Registrar by April 30th of the academic year the application was made, with copies to the two heads of the concerned departments. Likewise adding another major to the students' current programme will be charged at Ksh 500 per additional major.

l. Transcripts

All grades for course work must be recorded on the transcript and averaged into the grade point average. If a student fails a course 2003-2007 Catalogue

55 (that is gets an F grade) and retakes the course, the F grade will remain on the transcript but will not carry any value. The student will be given the grade received after re-taking the course. Other grades that a student may find in his/her transcript include: AU I F `Audit': The student attends class but no grade is given. `Incomplete': when the lack of a grade is not the fault of the student. Grade `F' is assigned when the student attempted all the work but did not achieve satisfactory marks, i.e., it is earned `F'. Failure due to attendance; the student did not attend 75% of the classes. Practicum The student missed the final exam due to sickness or bereavement. Thesis in progress. Withdrew (Sickness or suspension) Withdrew passing Withdrew failing The student attended class throughout but did not sit the final examinination for an unknown reason. The student did not sit for the final exam due to inability to pay fees. There is no record of the student's attendance

E R S T W WP WF X Y Z

All grade irregularities must be rectified within six weeks after the grades are released by senate except for January Semester grades when the counting of weeks will start at the start of August semester. The codes E, X,Y, and Z will revert to an F if no action is taken by the student or no explanation is forthcoming. S and R are treated as an incomplete until the results of the special examination or practicum are completed. The reversion of the special codes will occur six weeks after the date the grades are released. However, the counting of weeks will start in August for January Semester grades.

m. University Examinations

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required to carry their Student Exam cards and Identity cards to the examination room.

m. Academic Dishonesty

In the event of an alleged examination irregularity, the same shall be reported to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Academic Affairs, who will consult with the Vice- Chancellor and make an appropriate decision. Where the matter will require investigation, the Senate shall appoint a committee which shall investigate the alleged irregularity. Any person involved in the alleged irregularity shall be required to appear before this committee. The Chairman of the said committee shall then report the findings and recommendations of the committee to the Vice-Chancellor who, on behalf of the Senate, shall decide what further action may be necessary. Such action shall be reported to the Senate at its next meeting for ratification. Such disciplinary action taken shall be in accordance with the procedures and regulations established by the Senate.

n. Late Assignments and Examinations

Each academic staff is asked to state in the course outline his/her policy concerning acceptance of late assignments and examinations in the course. Normally, such work can be made up only for good reason (e.g. serious illness, death in the immediate family, etc.). IN NO CASE WILL EXAMINATIONS BE GIVEN EARLY. If circumstances warrant, they may be given late and the student may be charged a grade penalty and/or a late examination fee.

o. Remarking of Examinations

A student who is dissatisfied with a grade obtained in a particular examination may apply for remarking of the examination paper to the Head of the Department in which the course was offered. The application should be made not later than two weeks after the release of the examination grades by the Registrar's Office, except for the January semester when the appeal can be made within the first two weeks of the following August semester. This application should give a valid justification for the request. The Head of Department and members of Faculty of the Department will then review the case to see if remarking is warranted. If the request is approved, the applicant should present to the Head of Department a receipt for a 2003-2007 Catalogue

57 non-refundable remarking fee of Kshs 2000. An examiner other than the one who initially marked the script will remark the paper. The grade awarded after remarking of the paper will be final regardless of whether it is lower or the same as the first grade. The student may not request for a second remarking of the same script. The grade will be communicated to the student by the Registrar.

p. Deans' List

The Dean's List seeks to encourage academic excellence among students in the University. Students who obtain a GPA of 3.6 and above, based on at least 15 credit hours per semester, will be placed on the Dean's List. q. Daystar does not give supplementary exams

r. Additional Information

Further information on each programme or course is found in the complete filed syllabus in the Office of the Department Head.

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GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES

Diploma Core Courses and Undergraduate General Education courses are required for students and aim at developing in students those abilities and understandings which are common to a liberal arts education. The General Education programme aims at giving the students a broad knowledge of the world around them and a good foundation in Christian teaching. It aims at developing the three components of a human being: intellectual, spiritual and social.

DIPLOMA CORE COURSES

Intergrated Studies Bible and Theology Communication Skills Total Core Courses Required Credit Hours 6 8 1 15 Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 2 1

Common Core Courses

ICC 012 ICC 013 ICC 014 ICC 015 ICC 016 ICC 092 Communication and Culture I Communication and Culture II

Old Testament Introduction and Survey New Testament Introduction and Survey Introduction to Bible Doctrine Communication Skills

(COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR CORE COURSES) For ICC 012 and ICC 013, see course description under INS 111 and INS 112 respectively. For ICC 014, ICC 015 and ICC 016, see course description under BIL 111, BIL 112, BIL 212 respectively. For ICC 092, see course description under ICA 111. For ICS 010, see course description under ACS 101.

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Exemptions to the Undergraduate Programme

Core Course at Diploma ICS 010 ICC 012 ICC 013 ICC 014 ICC 015 ICC 016 ICC 092 Sub-total Equivalent General Education Course Exempted ACS 101 INS 111 INS 112 BIL 111 BIL 112 BIL 212 ICA 111 Hours

2 3 3 3 3 2 1 17

(For exemptions on major courses, please refer to sections on specific departments)

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UNDERGRADUATE GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES Student Assessment

Assessment will be based on continuous assessment and written examinations. Final marks in all courses in general education normally will be derived 70% from the final examination and 30% from continuous assessment items.

Requirements for Graduation

In order to graduate, all undergraduate students in the University must obtain 46-52 credit hours as follows: Credit Hours Integrated Studies 14 Bible and Theology 16 Science and Mathematics 10-11 Aesthetics 2 Language Skills 7 Physical Education 1 Economics (For non-Commerce Students) 2 TOTAL 46- 52

Integrated Studies

See INS 111 and 112 under Communication Department, and the rest under Bible Department Credit Hours INS 111 Communication and Culture I 3 INS 112 Communication and Culture II 3 INS 212 African Societies and Traditional Religion 2 INS 313 Historical Foundations of the Modern World 3 INS 412 Development of Modern Africa and Christian Values 3 TOTAL 14

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Bible and Theology

See course descriptions under Bible Department. Credit Hours BIL 111 Old Testament Introduction and Survey 3 BIL 112 New Testament Introduction and Survey 3 BIL 212 Introduction to Bible Doctrine 2 PHL 111 Introduction to Philosophy 3 POL 111 Introduction to Political Science 1 RET 320 Christianity and Islam in Africa 2 RET 321 Studying Theology in the African Context 2 TOTAL 16

Science and Mathematics

See course descriptions under Science Department. Credit Hours BIO 111 Biology 2 ENV 112 Environmental Science 2 MAT 102 Basic Mathematics (for non-commerce/ non-science students) or 2 MAT 111 Mathematics (for commerce students) 3 PHY 112 Physical Science (For Science students) 2 HPE 113 Health and Physical Fitness 1 ACS 101 Basic Computer Knowledge(Not for ACS students) 2 TOTAL 11 or 12

Aesthetics

See course descriptions under Communication and Humanities A Student must choose one of the following: Credit Hours ART 111 Art in Africa, or 2 MUS111 Music in Africa or 2 LIT 111 Appreciation of Literature 2

Language Skills

See course descriptions under the Department of Humanities Credit Hours ENG 098 Basic English 0 (3) ENG 111 Advanced Reading 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

62 ENG 112 ICA 111 TOTAL Advanced Writing Study Skills and Critical Thinking

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3 1 7

Commerce

See Course description under Commerce Department

Credit Hours ECO 111 Introduction to Economics (for non- commerce students) 2

Total General Education Requirements

52

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Faculty of Arts

Biblical and Religious Studies Communication Humanities

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DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

I. Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Bible

Rationale

The growing number of Christians in Africa has outpaced the leadership capacity in Churches and Christian Organizations. The Bible major exists to meet that need by providing training, primarily in biblical studies, for those involved in Christian ministry, for those preparing for further training at the masters level, for those preparing to teach Christian Religious Education, in secondary schools, and for those preparing for work outside of professional Christian ministry but who desire a firm biblical background. The programme also requires studies in church history, world religions, and ethics so that students may think intelligently about their faith in the context of its history, the religious world around it, and its application to contemporary issues. Specifically, the goals of the major are: 1. To equip students for involvement in full-time Christian ministry. 2. To give students, who plan to work with non-Christian organizations, a strong biblical background. 3. To enable students to supplement other majors with a strong biblical studies background. 4. To prepare students for further study in seminary or other types of graduate schools. This degree may serve as a terminal programme. 5. To prepare students to teach Christian Religious Education in secondary schools.

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Admission Requirements

The department has no special requirements for entry other than the University's common entry requirements.

Student Assessment

a. Final marks for all courses in this department, except Senior Paper/Project, Independent Study, and CHM 507 Christian Ministries Practicum, will be derived 70% from marks on the final exam and 30% from marks on continuous assessment items. b. Marks for Senior Paper and Independent Study will be derived 90% from the final examination/paper and 10% from continuous assessment items. c. Marks for CHM 507 Christian Ministries Practicum and Senior Project will be derived 60% from written assignments related to the project/practicum and 40% from final assessment by an onsite supervisor approved by the Department and the student's teaching staff advisor at the University.

Requirements for Graduation

A Biblical and Religious Studies major student must complete 48 hours within the major. These hours (in addition to required credits in general education, the minor, and general electives) must be completed according to the following schedule: Credit Hours 52 48 30 18 18-22 11-7 129

General Education Bible courses Required Courses Electives Minor Free Electives TOTAL

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Bible Major Requirements

Required Courses 30 Credit Hours BIL 332 Major Hebrew Prophets 3 BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels 3 BIL 432 Pentateuch 3 BIL 443 Romans 3 BIL 597 Senior Paper/Project 3 ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics 3 RET 231 Comparative World Religions 3 RET 333 History of Christianity up to 1500 C.E. 3 RET 334 History of Christianity from 1500 C.E. 3 COM 223 Public Speaking 3 Six (6) Credit Hours from the following: BIL 213 Wisdom Literature BIL 216 General Epistles BIL 217 Apocalyptic Literature BIL 312 Hermeneutics BIL 340 Gospel of John BIL 408 Topics in Biblical Studies GRE 341 Introduction to New Testament Greek GRE 342 New Testament Greek GRE 441 New Testament Greek Exegesis

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Nine (9) Credit Hours from departmental offerings of courses not used to fulfill the above requirements. In addition to those courses listed in the preceeding section the following may also be used to fulfill this requirement: BIL 496 CHM 325 ETH 408 ETH 496 RET 317 RET 408 RET 496 Independent Study in Biblical Studies Christian Social Ethics Topics in Christian Ethics Independent Study in Ethics History of Christian Expansion Topics in Religious Thought Independent Study in Religious Thought 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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A student majoring in Bible must have a minor course of study in a different study area. A full time student with a single major in Bible should be able to complete this course in four years of two semesters each.

II. Minor in Bible

Rationale

The Bible minor exists to provide introductory training, primarily in Biblical studies, for those involved in Christian ministry and for those preparing for work outside of professional Christian ministry but who desire a firm biblical background. Courses in BIL make up the core of the minor, but students may take other courses in the department in order to fulfill the elective requirements.

Admission and Student Assessment

Regulations for Admission and Students' Assessment are the same as those for the Bible major.

Bible Minor Requirements for Graduation

A Bible minor student must complete 18 credit hours determined in the following manner: Required Courses 12 Elective Courses 6 TOTAL 18 Required Courses BIL 332 Hebrew Prophets BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels BIL 432 Pentateuch BIL 443 Romans Credit Hours 3 3 3 3

The remaining 6 credit hours will be filled from BIL, RET, ETH courses offered by the department or CHM 325.

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III. Christian Ministries Minor

Rationale

The Christian Ministries minor seeks to provide students with an introductory understanding of the ministry needs and opportunities confronting the church today. In addition, the programme provides opportunity for assessment of individual gifts and abilities for ministry as well as introductory training for lay ministry in the church.

Requirements for Graduation

A Christian Ministries minor must complete 19 credits determined in the following manner: Required courses Elective courses TOTAL Required Courses CHM 221 Introduction to Christian Ministries CHM 323 Evangelism and Church Growth CHM 324 Discipleship and Group Bible Study Methods Electives CHM 222 CHM 223 CHM 321 CHM 322 CHM 325 CHM 326 CHM 334 CHM 408 CHM 411 CHM 421 CHM 422 CHM 507 10 9 19 Credit Hours 4 3 3

(Choose 3) Credit Hours Management in Christian Organizations 3 Introduction to Counselling 3 Theology of Missions 3 Worship in Africa 3 Christian Social Ethics 3 Homiletics 3 Curriculum Design and Instruction 3 Topics in Christian Ministry 3 Church Music 3 Christianity and Islam 3 Christian Ministry in the Urban Setting 3 Practicum in Christian Ministries 3

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IV. Peace and Conflict Transformation Minor

Rationale

The Peace and Conflict Transformation minor will use an interdisciplinary approach to conflict resolution and peacemaking. The purpose of this course of study will be to integrate theory and technique from the behavioural sciences with theological, moral and relational values of Christian discipleship in community. To this end, the Peace and Conflict Transformation minor will place emphasis on salvation, integrity and healing while addressing intrapersonal, interpersonal, intragroup and intergroup conflicts. The course is intended to train individuals who can work to bring about transformations which serve the cause of peace and reconciliation in a variety of settings, both public and private, such as community development, local churches, denominations, businesses, governmental and non-governmental organizations. Specifically, the goals of the minor are: 1. To help the student understand peace and conflict transformation as an integral part of the Judeo-Christian tradition from both pacifist and non-pacifist positions; 2. to provide the student with both the theory and practice of conflict transformation at the macro and micro levels; 3. to enable the student to understand the history of war and peace in the Old and New Testaments; 4. to enable the student to understand the various historical Christian attitudes towards war and peace; 5. to enable the student to understand the root causes of conflict in a community and society; 6. to enable the student to gain personal skills useful in peacemaking and conflict transformation.

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Requirements for Graduation

A student must complete 21 credit hours determined as follows: Required Courses Elective Courses TOTAL 18 3 21

Required Courses Credit Hours SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 3 ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics 3 PEA 221 Political and Economic Sources of Conflict 3 BIL 280 War and Peace in the Bible 3 PEA 324 Communication, Conflict and Transformation 3 PEA 360 Christian Attitudes Toward War, Peace and Revolution 3 Elective Courses (3 credit hours from the following) CHM 223 Introduction to Counselling COM 322 Persuasion CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics PEA 388 Peace and Justice: The Church's Ministry in the World PEA 408 Topics in Peace and Conflict Transfomation PEA 411 Contemporary Conflicts in Africa PEA 507 Practicum in Peace and Conflict Transformation

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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Course Descriptions

BIL 111 Old Testament Introduction and Survey 3 Credits

The importance of the study of the Old Testament and its authority for the Christian life; The divisions of the Old Testament; A survey of Old Testament history and the indispensable role it plays in understanding the Old Testament; Selected issues of ancient Israel's culture; The background, content, purposes, and important themes of each Old Testament book; Key Old Testament theological themes.

BIL 112 New Testament Introduction and Survey 3 Credits

The history of the Jewish people from the time of Ezra until the end of the New Testament period, how this history shapes Judaism during the first century C. E., and how the New Testament church understood Jesus Christ as the fulfillment of the hopes and longings of that Judaism and its Scriptures; Geography of Palestine as well as the northern and eastern Mediterranean during the first century C. E., and its significance for understanding the New Testament; Introduction and summary of each New Testament book, including its purpose and key themes; a survey of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ; A survey of the life and ministry of Paul, including an overview of the spread of the church outside the boundaries of Palestine; An introduction to important factors of the cultural background of the New Testament. Pre-requisite: BIL 111,

BIL 212 Introduction to Bible Doctrine

2 Credits

The course will cover the following areas/doctrines: The doctrine of Scripture; The doctrine of God; The doctrine of Christ; The doctrine of the Holy Spirit; The doctrine of man; The doctrine of the church. Pre-requisites: BIL 111, BIL 112.

BIL 213 Wisdom Literature

3 Credits

General introduction and definitions of major terms and concepts for the study of Wisdom Literature; The authorship, historical background, content, purpose, of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Song of

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73 Solomon, Ecclesiastes, and Lamentations; Characteristics of Hebrew poetry; The history of interpretation of this literature, including its setting and function in ancient Israel; Principles for interpreting this literature, including applicational principles for each of the books studied.

BIL 216 General Epistles

3 Credits

For each letter studied, the course will cover the following material: Principles of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the contents of the letter will comprise the major content of the course; Major Greco-Roman epistolary and rhetorical features reflected in the letter and their significance for determining a letter's purpose and message; Major scholarly proposals regarding the purpose and structure of each letter, and an evaluation of each; Major features of first century Judaism which shape the ideological context of both the writer of the letter and the early church, and the influence of this context on the key theological themes in the letter.

BIL 217 Apocalyptic Literature

3 Credits

Principles of exegesis for apocalyptic literature and their application to the content of such literature found in the Bible will comprise the major content of the course; Scholarly discussion of: the origin, rise, and demise of apocalyptic literature; The definition of apocalypse, apocalyptic eschatology, apocalypticism, and apocalyptic imagery; Possible social settings, functions, and purposes of apocalyptic literature; The historical setting, major themes, purpose and function of the biblical apocalyptic writings; The history of the interpretation of biblical apocalyptic writings, with particular emphasis on contemporary interpretations and an evaluation of the same.

BIL 280 War and Peace in the Bible

3 Credits

A historical survey of the biblical themes of war, "shalom"/peace, servanthood, love of the enemy, justice, righteousness; Old Testatament language and thought about war and shalom; The underlying theology of Israel's war stories; War stories as confessions of faith in Yahweh and Yahweh's universal rule; The relationship between shalom of the Old Testament and peace of the New Testament. Jesus' teaching on non-violence.

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BIL 312 Hermeneutics

3 Credits

Issues of semantics including presuppositions pools, denotative and connotative meaning, sense and referent, and meaning and significance; Author-centered, text-centered, and reader-centered theories of meaning; Old Testament and New Testament history, with emphasis on selected issues which offer insight for the understanding of the biblical writings. For the Old Testament, such issues broadly include the entry into the land, the rise and disintegration of the monarchy, and the exile and return. For the New Testament, such issues broadly include the Maccabean revolt, Roman rule of Palestine, sects within first century Judaism in Palestine, and the challenge of Hellenism to Jewish selfunderstanding; The history of biblical interpretation with special attention given to historical-critical methodology, including its historical/philosophical origins, its primary methodologies, and the problems, opportunities, and challenges it presents to the interpreter. Special attention will be given to the influence of historical-critical methodology upon selected African scholars.

BIL 332 Hebrew Prophets

3 Credits

The history of Israel and the Ancient Near East during the prophetic period with specific attention to important individuals and events relevant for understanding individual prophets; The various theories regarding the origin, function, self-understanding of prophecy in ancient Israel as well as its cessation in the post-exilic period; The various forms of prophetic speech and their possible functions within Israel; Methodology for interpreting prophetic literature; The overall structure and content, especially theological themes, of each book chosen for study.

BIL 340 Gospel of John

3 Credits

Principles of exegesis applied to the content of the Gospel of John ll comprise the majority of the content of the course; The history of interpretation of the Fourth Gospel, including various interpretative methodologies and proposals for the historical/ideological setting of its origin; Major themes and structural features in the gospel; The comparison of John with the Synoptic Gospels; Application of the message of the Fourth Gospel to contemporary life.

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BIL 342 Synoptic Gospels

3 Credits

The historical and ideological setting in which Jesus' life and ministry takes place and from which early Christianity (and its "gospel" writing) emerges; The history of interpretation of the synoptics and the "life of Jesus", including major methodologies and assumptions which guided these interpretations; Major theological themes (especially the "kingdom of God"), important structural features, and distinctives of each gospel; The relevance of the Synoptic gospels' witness to Jesus Christ for contemporary issues.

BIL 408 Topics in Biblical Studies

3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate for the subject matter covered. Pre-requisite: Three credits of BIL at 300 level.

BIL 432 Pentateuch

3 Credits

The Pentateuch as the foundation for understanding the rest of the Bible; Exegetical work in each of the books of the Pentateuch; The details of the content, structure, and purpose of each book; Major biblical themes found in these writings; The significance and application of these books for today. Pre-requisite: Three credits in O.T. at 300 level.

BIL 443 Romans

3 Credits

Principles of exegesis for epistolary literature applied to the content of Romans will comprise the major content of the course; Major epistolary features of first century Greco-Roman letters reflected in Romans and their significance for determining the letter's purpose; Common Greco-Roman rhetorical methods found in Romans and their significance for interpreting selected passages in the book; Major scholarly proposals regarding the letter's purpose and structure; Major theological themes found in the letter; Major features of first century Judaism which shape the ideological context of Paul and the early Christian movement. Pre-requisite: Three credits in N.T. at 300 level.

BIL 496 Independent Study in Bible

3 Credits

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BIL 597 Senior Paper/Project

3 Credits

A. For Senior Projects, the following apply: Each project will have a written component consisting of the following: A 15-page minimum research paper on the area of ministry chosen for the Project. The paper must conform to the standards of Turabian 5th edition and be written in good English. This paper must be completed by the end of the fifth week of the semester. On the basis of the research paper plus the initial exposure to the Project ministry, the student will develop written goals for the Project. This is to be submitted along with the 15-page research paper. The project will involve a weekly reflection assignment. This may be in the form of a journal. The student will write an evaluation at the end of the project, evaluating the experience in the light of the goals established early in the semester. The student is required to meet weekly with the departmental supervisor. B. For Senior Paper, the following will apply: A research paper of no less than 30 pages. The paper must conform to the standards of Turabian 5th edition and be written in good English. The student must meet with the departmental advisor weekly.

CHM 221 Introduction to Christian Ministries 4 Credits

The biblical foundations for the manifestation and ministry of the church; The scope of Christian education (its definition and objectives); The biblical basis for Christian education; The historical development of Christian education; The theological and philosophical bases of Christian education; The psychological bases for Christian education; The sociological bases of Christian education; Principles of curriculum development; Methods and media in Christian education; Christian education of children, youth and adults; The organizational structure of Christian education; Educational administration and supervision; Professional church leadership in Christian education; Teacher and leadership training; Problems in the educational ministry of the African church; Contemporary perspectives in Christian education; Parachurch vocations in Christian education. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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CHM 222 Management in Christian Organizations 3 Credits

The history of management; Definition of basic concepts in management and the management process; A Christian philosophy of management; Functions of management: planning, organizing, rationing, evaluating, and controlling; Leadership: approaches and theories of leadership, leadership styles, and leadership in Christian organizations; Decision-making: processes and common errors; Authority and power: definition of terms, a biblical perspective, sources of authority, and delegation; Personnel administration: concepts of personnel management and job analysis (including job description, job specification, disciplinary procedures, staff development, job evaluation, salary administration, etc.); Bookkeeping and accounting: an introduction.

CHM 223 Introduction to Counselling

3 Credits

Basic concepts in the theology of man, including creation in God's image, the Fall and its consequences, redemption, and Christian maturity; Theories of personality development; Evaluation of theories of personality development from Scripture; Crabb's model of counselling-- cultural adaptation and application; Counselling issues in the local church, including substance abuse, depression, stress and burnout, polygamy, marital problems, demonisation, and family issues; Practice counselling in dyads and triads with discussion; Support systems available locally for referral; Counselling ethics, including confidentiality, privileged information, transference, contracts, and the Mental Health Act 1989.

CHM 321 Theology of Missions

3 Credits

O.T. Theology of missions; N.T. Theology of missions; Theologies of missions as practiced in church history; Contemporary theologies of missions; Theology of missions as primarily "evangelism"; Theology of missions as primarily "fulfillment"; Theology of missions as "mutual assistance of local churches"; A theology of mission for African churches reaching to other churches.

CHM 322 Worship in Africa

3 Credits

Introduction to worship, what worship is, importance of worship, nature of worship; Worship in African indigenous cultures, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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characteristics, acts, intermediaries, occasions, places; Worship in African Western oriented churches; Worship in the Bible: Among Jews, among Christians; Worship in Church history: Western history, African history; Making Christian worship more meaningful in contemporary Africa: Context, theology, types, elements, occasions, rituals and symbols.

CHM 323 Evangelism and Church Growth

3 Credits

Definition and meaning of the terms `evangelism' and `church growth'; Theological considerations of evangelism and church growth; The urgency of evangelism; The message of evangelism; Motives for evangelism; Personal evangelism; Principles of building up the church; How the local church can be God's effective agent in evangelism; Worship and evangelism; The Holy Spirit in evangelism; Consideration of a new model for Christian witnessing; Communicating the Gospel to resistant, secular people; Dynamics of church growth in the local church; Administering for church growth; Evaluation of church growth strategies; How to get the local church growing again.

CHM 324 Discipleship and Group Bible Study Methods 3 Credits

Definition and meaning of the term discipleship; The disciple's role in the world; Four phases in Jesus' discipling strategy; Defining the process of discipling; Jesus' strategy applied to a local church structure; Definition and examination of the quality of "reciprocal living"; Suggestions to develop a disciple-making philosophy in the local church; Principles of dynamic Bible study; The devotional method of Bible study; The chapter summary method of Bible study; The character quality method of Bible study; The thematic method of Bible study; The topical method of Bible study; The book survey method of Bible study; The biographical method of Bible study; The word study method of Bible study.

CHM 325 Christian Social Ethics

3 Credits

Addresses pertinent moral issues confronting Christians in African societies by applying ethical principles found in scripture and in African cultures; Issues such as gender discrimination, female circumcision, wife inheritance, polygamy, monogamy, rites of passage, AIDS, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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CHM 326 Homiletics

3 Credits

A theology of preaching: preaching in the Bible, preaching in the history of the church, preaching in the modern world; The role of preaching in the weekly life of the Christian leader; Basic speech principles: vocal processes, volume, grammar, figures of speech, sermon length, gestures, audience; Methods of presentation: manuscript, memorization, impromptu, extemporaneous, outline, without notes; Mechanics of preparation: importance of preparation, sources for materials/ideas, planning, methods, files, illustrations, choosing a text, pretesting; Types of sermons: topical, topical textual, textual expository; Components of a sermon: Introduction, body, illustrations, application, conclusion; Contexts of a sermon: pastoral, didactic, evangelistic.

CHM 334 Curriculum Design and Instruction 3 Credits

Definition of curriculum, curriculum design, goals, objectives and related concepts; Aims of church education; Schools of philosophical thought; Psychological bases for curriculum decisions; Domains of learning; Organizing subject content; Lesson planning; Selecting learning experiences; Assessment and evaluation; Curriculum unit development.

CHM 408 Topics in Christian Ministries

3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate for the subject matter covered. Pre-requisite: CHM 221.

CHM 411 Church Music

3 Credits

Introduction to course, logical fallacies, the infinite variety of music, meaning in music; Philosophies of music ministry, foundations in worship, textual considerations, matching of texts and tunes; Worship models, service planning continuums in worship, hymns, congregational singing; Choir ministry, historical overview of church music, psychological considerations in worship; Music for 2003-2007 Catalogue

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evangelism, the Engel scale, history of witness music; Popular music styles, the secular/sacred debate, music for discipleship; History and issues in African church music, summary.

CHM 421 Christianity and Islam

3 Credits

Historical overview of Muslim-Christian relations, Historical models of Muslim-Christian relations; Causes of conflicts between the two faith communities: Theological, practical, cultural, historical; Christian approaches to Muslims: new alternatives; Theological difficulties in Muslim-Christian relations; The role of the Christian leader in MuslimChristian relations; The role of national and regional Christian organizations in Muslim-Christian relations. Pre-requisite: RET 320.

CHM 422 Christian Ministry in the Urban Setting 3 Credits

Biblical foundations: Old Testament lessons-- Jonah, Jeremiah, Nehemiah; New Testament lessons-- Barnabas, Paul; The nature of urbanization in Africa: its growth and expansion, its patterns, implications for ministry; A case study-- Nairobi: the context of the church, an overview of the churches, denominations, locations, attendance, characteristics of attendees, leaders, church activity, church growth; The task: the need for new models; The poor of the City: housing, stratification, possessions, nutrition, employment, economics, social dynamics, self-perception and class perception; Tools for evaluating ministry: Evaluative research, research instruments, field methodologies; Models of Ministry: evangelism and mission models, church-planting models--Western mission, African evangelical, African independent; Church edification models: discipling, groups, Western patterns, church worship models, service models.

CHM 507 Practicum in Christian Ministries 3 Credits

Preparation for proposal; Practicum journal: each student is asked to maintain a journal including weekly entries regarding the practicum experiences. The journal should include tasks performed, meetings attended and insights gained. The journal should be presented to the practicum supervisor on a weekly basis; Selected readings: students will submit, at mid-semester, a list of ten articles or books relating directly to their practicum area; Visitation of the site: 2003-2007 Catalogue

81 practicum supervisor will visit students' practicum site from time to time for the purpose of observation and meeting with on-site supervisor; Term paper: At the end of the term each student will submit a summary term paper which should encompass an overview of the practicum experience as well as a weaving in of selected readings. The readings can be used to point up consistencies between theory and practice or suggest areas of expanded/new ministries. Pre-requisites: CHM 221, CHM 223, CHM 324.

ETH 201 Introduction to Ethics

3 Credits

Introduction to ethical language; Introduction to religious ethical systems; Introduction to secular ethics; Introduction to Christian ethics.

ETH 408 Topics in Christian Ethics

3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate for the subject matter covered. Pre-requisite: ETH 201.

ETH 496 Independent Study in Ethics

3 Credits

The content for each study will vary depending upon the topics chosen. A student must have written approval from the department in order to enroll. Pre-requisite: ETH 201.

GRE 341 Introduction to New Testament Greek 3 Credits

The course will cover basic introductory elements of New Testament Greek including alphabet; present and imperfect tenses of regular and -ew eimi verbs,including the verb eimi; noun cases; first and second noun declensions; the definite article; the use of adjectives and demonstratives; Basic vocabulary.

GRE 342 New Testament Greek

3 Credits

With regard to the verb, the course will cover: the present and imperfect middle and passive, the present imperative and infinitive, the uses of the infinitive, the future active, the future and aorist of liquid verbs, and the active and middle First and Second aorist; With regard to the noun, the course will cover: the relationship of noun

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case and time, third declension nouns, and the use of prepositions with specific cases; With regard to pronouns the course will cover: the relative, personal, reflexive, possessive, interrogative, and indefinite pronouns; In addition, the course will introduce forms of questions, the uses of the conjunction/particle oti, and the use of the verbs dunamai and ginomai; The course will also cover basic vocabulary. Pre-requisite: GRE 341.

GRE 441 New Testament Greek Exegesis 3 Credits

Adjectives and pronouns of the first and third declensions, comparative adjectives, the formation of adverbs, the perfect and pluperfect tenses, aorist and future passives, participles, the genitive absolute, the subjunctive mood, and types of conditional sentences; Sight reading and prepared reading of selected passages in the Greek New Testament; Basic tools of Greek exegesis including: William Arndt and Wilbur Gingrich; A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and other Early Christian Literature. University of Chicago Press, 1957 - Harold Moulton; The Analytical Greek Lexicon, Revised Edition, Zondervan, 1978- Nigel Turner; A Grammar of New Testament Greek Vol. 3 T & T Clark, 1976- H. E. Dana and Julius Mantey; A Manual Grammar of the Greek New Testament, Macmillan, 1927; Basic principles of exegesis including: the need for and principles of textual criticism, diagramming sentences, principles of word study, and grammatical study. Pre-requisite: GRE 342.

PEA 324 Communication, Transformation

Conflict and 3 Credits

The nature and theory of social conflict; Conflict styles; The role of communication in conflicts; Conflict intervention; Conflict assessment; Power in interpersonal conflict; Mediation process and reconciliation. Pre-requisite: ICA 211.

PEA 221 Political and Economic Sources of Conflict 3 Credits

The definition and limitations of politics; How political philosophy, empirical and behavioural political science, Christian faith and ethics

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83 all inform our understanding of politics; Underlying principles of market economics; The role of capital in the market system; Free market and distributive justice in market economies; Christian approaches to wealth; Introduction to the economic and political issues facing Africa in the 21st Century. Pre-requisites: SOC 111, ETH 201.

PEA 360 Church Attitudes Toward War, Peace and Revolution 3 Credits

A historical survey of the various ways of perceiving God's will concerning war in Christian thought; Comparison and contrast between Pacifism and Just War thinking; Discipleship and Pacifism in the early church; The emergence of the Christian Just War theory (Augustine); Establishing the Just War tradition (Aquinas); Reformation interpretation of the Just War theory (Luther and Calvin); Pacifism as a witness for the Kingdom of God (Humanist, Anabaptist, and Quaker); Approaches of liberation theologies.

PEA 388 Peace and Justice: The Church's Ministry in the World 3 Credits

Theology of ministry, evangelism, salvation, spiritual powers, justice and peacemaking; Strategies for integrating ministry, evangelism, peacemaking, and conciliation. Pre-requisites: BIL 280, PEA 360.

PEA 408 Topics Transformation

in

Peace

and

Conflict 3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate for the subject matter covered.

PEA 411 Contemporary Conflict in Africa 3 Credits

Indepth analysis of the sources of contemporary conflicts on the African continent; Analysis and evaluation of strategies of peacemaking employed in the recent past and currently in Africa; Development of strategies for peacemaking in contemporary African conflict. Pre-requisites: SOC 111, ETH 201, PEA 221, BIL 280, COM 324, PEA 360. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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PEA 507 Practicum Transformation

in Peace and Conflict 3 Credits

Preparation for proposal; Practicum journal: each student is asked to maintain a journal including weekly entries regarding the practicum experiences. The journal should include tasks performed, meetings attended and insights gained. The journal should be presented to the practicum supervisor on a weekly basis; Selected readings: students will submit, at mid-term, a list of ten articles or books relating directly to their practicum area; Visitation of the site: practicum supervisor will visit student's practicum site from time to time for the purpose of observation and meeting with on-site supervisor; Term paper: at the end of the term each student will submit a summary term paper which should encompass an overview of the practicum experience as well as an integration of selected readings. The readings can be used to point out consistencies between theory and practice or suggest areas of expanded/new ministries.

RET 231 Comparative World Religions

3 Credits

Definition of religion; The variety of religions and their followers in Africa; The concept of God in various religious view-points; Basic beliefs of various religions compared; Basic beliefs of various religions contrasted; Basic practices of various religions contrasted; How to approach the study of religion; A Christian perspective on other world religions; The effects science and secularism have on world religions.

RET 317 History of Christian Expansion 3 Credits

Beginnings of the spread of Christianity 4 B.C - 30 A.D.; Judaism and the spread of Christianity 30 A.D - 48 A.D.; Greek-Romanism and spread of Christianity 48 - 100 A.D.; Persecutions and spread of Christianity 100 - 313 A.D.; Imperialism and spread of Christianity 313 A.D - 476 A.D.; Medievalism and spread of Christianity 1453 1517 A.D.; Protestanism and spread of Christianity 1517 - 1648 A.D.; Revivalism and spread of Christianity 1648 - 1793 A.D.; Societies and Christianity 1793 - 1914 A.D.; Wars and spread of Christianity 1914 - 1945 A.D.; Contemporaries and spread of Christianity 1990s; Challenges facing the spreading of Christianity in the1990s; Unfinished task in spreading of Christianity in the 1990s.

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RET 320 Christianity and Islam in Africa 2 Credits

Beginnings of Christianity in Africa; Versions of African Christianity: Coptic, Orthodox, Missionary, Colonial, Independent; Impact of Christianity on African cultures; Facilitators of the spread of Christianity in Africa and barriers to the spread of Christianity in Africa; Validity of Christianity as a religion for Africans; Challenges facing Christianity in Africa: religious pluralism, politics; Historical survey of the rise and early spread of Islam; The life, teachings and role of Muhammad; Survey of Islamic beliefs and practices; Survey of the historical development of Islam in Africa; The dynamics of contact between Islam and African primal religions; Survey of the varieties of Islam in Africa; Survey of historical models of contact between Christianity and Islam; Current issues relating to contact between Christianity and Islam.

RET 321 Studying Theology in the African Context 2 Credits

The nature and impact of various components that come between a person and that person's knowledge of God; The challenge and variation of theology in Africa; The impact of various components on our knowledge of God: culture, world view, interpretation of revelation, the place of religion, our understanding of the Bible, the gospel and the church, the nature of Christian leadership, our view of the task itself, and the ultimate theology adhered to. Pre-requisites: BIL 111, BIL 112, BIL 212, INS 211.

RET 333 History of Christianity up to 1500 3 Credits

Introduction to the study of Church History: what is Church History, major schools of interpretation, why study Church History, the organization of the study of Church History; Background to the Church: political, economic, religious, social; The five crises of the Early Church: leadership, the Gentile question, heresy, persecutions, organization; Persecutions to 313 A.D; The Church in Egypt and North Africa; Apologists, Church Fathers; Monasticism and the papacy; Heresy: its rise, consequences and effects on the Church; Church-State Relations: Church and Empire, Constantine, Byzantine Emperors, Goths; Christian Missions and the Crusades; The Medieval Church. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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RET 334 History of Christianity: After 1500 3 Credits

Introduction to the study of Church History: what is Church History, major schools of interpretation, why study Church History, the organization of the study of Church History; Backgrounds to the Reformation; The Medieval Church: ripe for reform; The Reformation: Issues and Thinkers; The Reformation: social and political events and institutions; The Reformation and Christian Mission; The Counter Reformation; The Church and the new world; Revivals of the 18th and 19th centuries; The Church and Rationalism; The Church and Colonialism; The Church in Nationalist Africa.

RET 408 Topics in Religious Thought

3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate for the subject matter covered. Pre-requisite: Three credits of RET at 300 level.

RET 496 Independent Study in Religious Thought 3 Credits

The content for each study will vary depending upon the topics chosen. The student must have written approval from the Department in order to enroll. Pre-requisite: Three credits of RET at the 300 level.

INS 212 African Traditional Societies from Earliest Times up to 1800 2 Credits

The early pre-history of man; Historical geography of Africa; North and Eastern Africa from earliest times to 1000AD; Earliest human societies in Africa; The Nile Valley civilization; The languages of Africa; The empires of Western Sudan; Expansion of Bantu speaking cultures; Southern African societies; Central African societies; the Arab and European impact on traditional African societies. Prerequisites: INS 111, INS 112.

INS 313 Historical Foundations of the Modern World 3 Credits

Meanings of terms: history and civilization; The rise or early human societies ­ agriculture, metal working, wiring and urban life; Early 2003-2007 Catalogue

87 civilizations- Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, Greece and Rome; The early civilizations in the America- Incas, Maya and Aztec; The Renaissance and Reformation; The Early European exploration; European imperialism in the Americas; Asia, Europe and the Middle East; The world wars; The cold war, The rise of Super powers; The fall of the Soviet Bloc; The New World Order; The changing role of the United Nations; Issues facing the modern world and a Christian response to them. Pre-requisites: INS 111, INS 112, INS 212.

INS 412 Development of Modern Africa and Christian Values 3 Credits

Meaning of terms: development; underdevelopment; Christian values and modern Africa; the coming of Europeans to Africa- explorers, traders and missionaries after 1800; the abolition of the slave trade and its impact; The scramble for and partition of Africa and African reactions; European colonial rule in Africa: colonial administrative systems, colonial economies and impacts; the rise of nationalism, decolonization; European cultural values imposed on African; Development of Western education, science and technology and their impact on Africa; the role of government and the church in development at social, political and economic levels; Economic crises in Africa and the influence of the IMF and the World Bank; The AU and its role in African affairs; Issues facing modern Africa- military coups, civil wars, challenges facing the youth and families, poverty, democratization and African leadership and Christian response to them. Pre-requisite: INS 111, INS 112, INS 212, INS 311

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SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME BIBLE MAJOR

1ST YEAR

Semester I

PHL 111 3 INS 111 3 BIL 111 3 ICA 111 1 ART/LIT/ MUS 111 2 MAT 102 2 ENG 111or 098 3 -- 17 ==

Semester II

ECO 111 POL 111 INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 111 or 112 HPE 113 PHY 112 BIO 111 2 1 3 3 3 1 2 2 ---- 17 ==

2ND YEAR

Semester I

INS 212 2 ACS 101 2 ENV 112 2 COM 223 3 BIL 212 2 BIL Electives 3 MINOR 3 ---- 17 ==

Semester II

ETH 201 BIL 332 RET 231 BIL Electives MINOR 3 3 3 3 3

---- 15 ==

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3RD YEAR Semester I INS 313 3 RET 320 2 RET 333 3 BILElectives 3 MINOR 3 FREE ELEC. 3 ---- 17 === Semester II RET 334 3 BIL 342 3 RET 321 2 BIL ELECTIVES 3 FREE ELEC. 6 ---- 17 ===

4TH YEAR Semester I INS 412 3 BIL 432 3 BIL 443 3 BIL Electives 3 MINOR 3 ---- 15 ==

Semester II BIL 597 Free Electives MINOR BIL Electives 3 6 3 3 ---- 15 ===

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Department of Communication

Diploma in Communication

Rationale

The purpose of the diploma in Communication is to offer accredited and specialized training in the areas of print and electronic media communication and to provide a broadened understanding of principles and concepts of effective communication. The programme is designed for media professionals and/or those responsible for planning and maintaining effective communication amongst their constituents. In addition to the general communication courses, the learner may specialize in either print or electronic media and will be trained to apply these skills to improve his or her service to the church and community. The department prepares students to serve in various church and community settings to assess communication needs, develop strategies to achieve communication goals, prepare audience-centered communication programmes and products, and work with others to create understanding among various publics.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet the general admission requirements for the Diploma programme of Daystar University. In addition, applicants for a Diploma in Communication must possess a minimum of grade B- (minus) in English in KCSE, or 500 marks on TOEFL not more than five years old, or at least Credit 6 under the old `O' Level system, or 60% with systems that use percentages, or Principle Pass at `A' Level in English.

Student Assessment

The Diploma in Communication programme places emphasis on the development and improvement of communication skills. Letter grades are given for each course on the basis of continuous assessment and the final examination. The continuous assessment will constitute 70% of the total mark given, whereas the final exam will constitute 30% of the total mark. 2003-2007 Catalogue

91 In addition, each student will be required to complete a final project. Final project marks are derived 80% from the final paper and 20% from periodical reporting.

Requirements for Graduation

To graduate with a Diploma in Communication, a student must meet the following criteria of course requirements and credit hour combinations Credit Hours Common Core Courses 15 Communication Courses 50 Required Courses 44 Concentration 6 TOTAL 65 Required Courses in Communication Credit Hours ICS 010 Introduction to Computers 2 ENG 098 Remedial English (0)3 ICO 016 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 ICO 018 Interpersonal and Group Communication 3 ICO 022 Introduction to Communication Ethics, Law and Human Rights 3 ICO 026 Introduction to Public Relations and Fundraisings 3 ICO 031 Writing and Editing skills 3 ICO 032 Introduction to Graphic Design and Desktop Publishing 3 ICO 033 Introduction to Media Management 2 ICO 034 Writing & Reporting for Print Media 3 ICO 036 Introduction to Research Methods 1 ICO 049 Introduction to Photography and Photojournalism 3 ICO 056 Communication by Radio 3 ICO 060 Script writing for the Electronic Media I 3 ICO 061 Introduction to Video Production 3 ICO 094 Keyboarding 0(3) ICO 097 Video or Audio or Print (Projects) 2 ICO 100 TOTAL Communication Field study 4 44

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Concentration

Print Media (Take any 6 hrs from the following) ICO 013 Special Topics in Communication ICO 035 Writing for Children ICO 041 Book Publishing ICO 047 Magazine Editing and Production Electronic Media (Take any 6 hrs from the following) ICO 013 Special Topics in Communication ICO 050 Visual Communication (Electronic and Print) ICO 063 Script Writing for Electronic Media II ICO 064 Video Production and Editing

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

Exemptions to the Undergraduate Programme

(For exemptions on Core Courses, please refer to page 59) Required Diploma Courses ICO 094 ICO 031 & ICO 034 ICO 060 & ICO 063 ICO 061 & ICO 064 ICO 097 & ICO 100 Sub Total Hours TOTAL Equivalent Undergraduate Course exempted COM 099 COM 247 COM 263 COM 466 COM 507 Hours

(0) 3 3 3 4 13 30

Note that when two courses are combined, the average grade of the two courses must be a grade of at least B-. Students may apply to challenge COM 224 and COM 225 on the basis of having achieved a grade of C+ in ICO 018. They may also 2003-2007 Catalogue

93 challenge COM 241 and COM 261 on the basis of having achieved a grade of C+ in ICO 016. To be exempted from any of these four courses the student must achieve a grade of B- or better on the examination. Students holding an earlier Daystar University Diploma may be granted exemptions for the following courses. Diploma Course ICO 011 ICO 012 ICO 014 ICO 031 & ICO 046 ICO 051 ICO 061 & ICO 013 ICO 099 TOTAL Undergraduate Course COM 225 2 COM 223 3 COM 224 2 COM 247 3 COM 261 3 COM 466 3 COM 507 4 20

Daystar University Diploma holders may challenge COM 263, COM 344, COM 342 and COM 361.

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Course Descriptions

ICO 013 Special Topics in Communication (Print or Electronic) 3 Credits

Students may, with relevant approval and availability of faculty, study specific areas of Communication and Media which are not in the regular diploma curriculum. The content will vary with specific course offerings. Topics may include News reporting and writing; Fiction writing; Broadcast drama; Newsletter production; Communication research and design.

ICO 016 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 Credits

The course aims at introducing students to the structures and functions of the communication media; creation, distribution, and exhibition of mass media content; legal and ethical considerations. It includes all forms of mass communication-newspapers, magazines, radio, television, book publishing, public relations, advertising, photojournalism and computer mediated communication. It will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, rights and responsibilities of each medium, as well as media career opportunities.

ICO 018 Interpersonal and Group Communication 3 Credits

The course explores self as communicator, attraction, friendships, self disclosure, competence, trust, power and signification; it also examines organizational systems, group types, structure, group thought, group decision making, roles, leadership, action and conflict resolution.

ICO 022 Communication Ethics, Law and Human Rights 3 Credits

Introduction to the ethical questions involved in interpersonal, public and mediated communication to enable the student to articulate a Christian ethic of communication. Topics include: Definition of ethics; Ethical bases; Christian communication ethics; sedition. It explores laws related journalism and communication such as copy rights laws, 2003-2007 Catalogue

95 sedition and defamation. It further exposes students to human rights related to communication and the role played by media in protecting them.

ICO 026 Public Relations and Fundraising 3 Credits

Introduction to the design and management of public relations for Christian organizations. Topics will include public relations theory and practice; Examining public relations environment; Internal and external publics and communication strategies; Producing PR materials; Fundraising and donor relations.

ICO 031 Writing and Editing Skills

3 Credits

Use of words i.e. nouns, adjectives etc; sentence construction, punctuation, conventions, paragraphs, transitions; Writing a narrative, descriptive, personal experience, interviews and personal profile; How-to-do-it and devotional articles; The editing process and symbols.

ICO 032 Introduction to Graphic Design and Desktop Publishing 3 Credits

Introduction to the principles of graphic design with emphasis on magazine page layout and practices in desktop publishing. Topics will include the following: Principles of design and layout; Introduction to typography; Layout materials and techniques; Using photographs and illustrations; The typesetting process; Use of colors; Magazine design and introductory skills; Using a Desktop publishing computer package. Pre-requisite ICS 010

ICO 033 Introduction to Media Management

The course explores the basic management principles and their application to the media. It will discuss different management theories and how they affect worker moral and production. Case studies will be introduced to help students deal with ethical work dilemmas. It will also discuss history, theory and practice of management, media ownership patterns, characteristics of organizations, media newsroom organizations, leadership styles in media, staff management, budgeting, management of finances, advertising and distribution.

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ICO 034 Writing and Reporting for the Print Media 3 Credits

The course is designed to teach students the principles of reporting and and writing for newspapers and magazines. Students will also learn how to write and prepare publishable copy on deadline. The course will examine definitions of news and various structures of new stories and other journalistic forms.

ICO 035 Writing for Children

3 Credits

Introduction to the specialized nature of writing for young audiences. Will involve a study of child development; Child and society in Africa; The child as a special audience; Process of writing for children; Choosing themes; Plot development; Characterization; Dialogue and conflict; Principles of writing: words and tools, proper use of language, emotion in the story; Publishing children's stories. Pre-requisite: ICO 031.

ICO 036 Introduction to Communication Research Methods 1 Credit

The course is aimed at introducing studens to basic concepts and process of communication. It wll expose students to the techniques of using interviews, content analysis, questionnaires, and panel discussions (focus groups) to collect data, how to analyze data and prepare research report.

ICO 038 Introduction to Media Management 3 Credits

The course deals with basic managemnt principles and their applictions to the media. The course will discuss different management theories and how they affect worker morale and production. Case studies will be introduced to help students to deal with ethical dilemmas in management. Among the topics to be discussed are: history, theory and practice of management, media ownership patters, characteristics of organisations, organisations of media newsroom, the communication structures in media organizations, financial management, advertising and distribution.

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ICO O41 Book Publishing

3 Credits

An introduction to the editorial, management and commercial aspects of book publishing. Topics will include major categories of publishing: Structure and functions of book trade; Editorial department and roles of the book editor; The acquisition and processing of manuscripts; The editing process; Elements of book design; Book production; Book costing; Marketing and distribution. Pre-requisite: ICO 031.

ICO 047 Magazine Editing and Production 3 Credits

Introduction to the principles and procedures of magazine publishing. Topics will include: The print media industry; Introduction to magazine publishing; Types of magazines; Editorial concepts; Editorial formula; Production planning; Financing the magazine; Magazine editing skills; Costing; Magazine production process. Pre-requisite: ICO 031.

ICO 049 Photography and Photojournalism 3 Credits

Introduction to the basic knowledge and skills necessary to effectively produce photographs as a service to Christian communications. Topics include operational functions of a 35mm SLR camera; Communication properties of light and types of film; Types and functions of lenses and filters; Composition and special effects; Photojournalism; Basic dark-room procedures for black & white film and print processing; Ethics and etiquette in photography. The course will also cover digital photography and computer assisted image processing as well as the use of photographs to write a story.

ICO 050 Visual Communication

3 Credits

Introduction to the selection, production and use of appropriate visual aids. Topics will include: definition of terms; role of visual aid in communication; drawing materials and basic skills; types of visual aids; effective use and production of paper pictures; sequence pictures; chalkboard; posters and charts; display boards; adhesive aids; demonstrations; tours and visits; exhibits; models; drama; slides; overhead projectors; the multimedia approach; the evaluation of visual aids.

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ICO 056 Communication by Radio

3 Credits

The basic principles, approaches and practical skills necessary for planning, producing and evaluating programmes for radio broadcast. Topics will include: Cross-cultural and aural-oral communication theory; Understanding the role and function of a producer; The audience; Alternative programme formats: devotional, documentaries, news, interviews, features, magazine, music; Planning for production research; Preparing an outline; Specifying objectives and target audience; Basic script writing and layout; Interviewing; Music and radio; Exposure to basic studio equipment and production techniques; Evaluation of programmes and followup techniques. Pre-requisite: ICO 051.

ICO 061 Introduction Video Production

3 Credits

Introduction to the principles and skills of video production. Provides exposure to basic video equipment and production techniques. Topics include: Overview of video as a medium of Christian communication; Video camera; basic camera; Shots and frames; Pictorial composition; Use of llights; Pre-production planning: audience issues, goals; scheduling; Writing a treatment and scene script; Logging; Production: crew functions; location scouting and post production( audio, editing); Legal issues; Evaluation. Prerequisites: ICO 016, ICO 062.

ICO 062 Scripting for Video Production 3 Credits

The writing of effecting video scripts for various programme formats and audiences; Overview of communication principles and basic technology underlying the production of an audio and video signal; The writing challenges; The mechanics and language of script writing; Writing non-dramatic material: commercials, public service announcements, interviews, talks, documentary, magazine, educational, news, music and special events; Writing dramatic material: drama, plot, characterization and comedy; Ethics and evaluation of scripts. Pre-requisite: ICO 061.

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ICO 063 Video Production and Editing

3 Credits

This is an advanced course in video production designed to refine the practical skills acquired by the student in the course ICO 061. It focuses on the aesthetic aspects of video production in regards to the feature film and similar genres. The course lays emphasis on the pre-production, production, and post production processes, and seeks to develop the group dynamics of the production team. Special emphasis is laid on producing, directing camera, lighting, sound management, editing, and the job market. Pre-requisites ICO 061 and ICO 062.

ICO 064 Scripting for Electronic Media

3 Credits

Designed to help the student acquire advanced skills in scripting for the dramatic formats. Emphasis is on the story, story treatment, synopsis, plot, characterisation and internal logic in story development, scripting a feature film script, serials and series comedy. Prerequisite ICO 062.

COM 094 Keyboarding

0(3) Credits

Familiarization with a keyboard, posture/ position; homekeys; right hand and left shift key, E, h, g, u , r, v, t, o, keys; xqz, comma keys; margin and tabs; numeros and symbols; centering; columns; letters, memos and reports; using data files: opening a file, writing data from a file; introduction to word processing; care of equipment.

ICO 097 Project

2 Credits

This course will provide the student an opportunity to use the training to formulate and carry out a projet in a specific area of interest. The work should be of acceptable quality. The scope and nature of the project will be determined by the student in consultation with a lecturer.

ICO 100 Communication Field Project/Practicum 4 Credits

This practicum enables the student to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom to a practical communication ministry situation that is related to the concentration taken. Content will be 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Daystar University

based on assigned tasks related to course work as proposed and agreed upon by the student, the faculty and where applicable, the employer. A minimum of 7 weeks (280 clock hours) or a communication product or research project and an accompanying paper of at least 25 pages typed in double spacing will be required. Students should do their Field Project /Practicum during the last semester of study as stipulated by the study programme. Prerequisite: Complete 56 credits and GPA of at least 2.00 be maintained.

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SUGGESTED TWO YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME

1ST YEAR Semester I ICC 012 3 ICC 031 3 ICC 092 1 ENG 098 (0)3 ICO 016 3 ICO 018 3 ICS 010 2 TOTAL 15(18) Semester II ICC 011B 3 ICO 034 3 ICO 061 3 ECO 062 3 ICO 093 (0)3 ICC 051 3 15(18)

Block I ICO 022 ICO 033 ICO 036 TOTAL

3 2 1 6

Block II ICO 026 ICO 049

3 3 6

2ND YEAR Semester I Electronic Print ICO 031 ICO 031 ICO 032 ICO 032 ICO 056 ICO 056 ICC 016 ICC 016 Electives (6) Electives 3 3 3 2 (6) 17 ICO 097 ICO 099 2 4 6 Semester II

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Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Communication

Rationale

The Communication major curriculum is designed to equip the student with foundational knowledge of concepts and practice of communication which would enable graduates of the programme to effectively serve the church and society in a variety of roles. The curriculum emphasizes, without being limited to, communication through the mass media as well as interpersonal and group communication. Students are presented with a menu of courses which could lead to careers in electronic media (radio, television, film etc), print media (newspapers, magazines, book publishing), advertising or public relations. In selecting their courses, students are encouraged to choose courses that lead to an in-depth study and expertise in one of the four areas of concentration. The student is also trained to apply the acquired skills in business, church, government and a variety of other vocational settings. Specifically, the goals of the Communication major are: 1. To give the student a foundational and biblically-derived understanding of theory and practice in communication study at interpersonal, group, intercultural and mass communication levels; 2. To provide the student with a menu of courses which leads to a guided focus and in-depth study of at least one area of communication; 3. To prepare the student to apply communication principles and skills in church, business, government and social settings; 4. To prepare the student to assist others in various church and community settings to recognize and apply the principles and concepts of effective communication to address peculiar problems be they individual, communal, institutional or organizational; and 5. To prepare the student for further study in communication.

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Admission Requirements

Applicants for a major in communication must possess a pass in Mathematics, and a minimum grade of B (plain) in English in KCSE, or its equivalent. Applicants with a B- will be admitted on condition that they take a remedial course ENG 214. Applicants with no proficiency in typing will be required to take a course in keyboarding for which no academic credit will be given for the final exam.

Student Assessment

All final course grades for courses offered by the department are computed as follows with minor variations, depending on the type of course: 1. Marks for courses that are concerned only with skill development (like COM 099) depend entirely on the final examination. Exemption from COM 099 can be given to students who can produce a certificate in keyboarding from a reputable examining body and have attained a speed of at least 25 wpm. 2. Marks for courses that involve both conceptual understanding and acquisition of skills are derived 70% from final examination and 30% from continuous assessment. 3. Marks for Independent Study and Senior Projects are derived 90% from the final paper and 10% from continuous assessment. 4. For Field Study, grading is based 60% on field report and 40% on field evaluation.

Requirements for Graduation

To graduate with a major in Communication, a student must meet the following criteria of course requirements and credit hour combination from various disciplines: Credit Hours 52 56- 62 32

General Education Communication Courses Required Courses in Communication

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104 Concentration courses Minor/ electives TOTAL Required Courses Com 099 Keyboarding Com 223 Public Speaking Com 224 Small Group Communication Com 225 Interpersonal Communication Com 241 Introduction to Print Media Com 261 Introduction to Electronic Media Com 302 Communication Statistics Com 321 Communication Research & Design Com 323 Communication Systems of Africa Com 419 Communication Ethics & Law Com 421 Strategies of Communication Com 497 Senior Project or Com 507 Practicum Com 496 Independent Study TOTAL

Daystar University

24-30 21-15 129 Credit Hours 0(3) 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 32

Concentration Courses in Communication

Each student will choose, with his instructor's advice, a more narrowed area of communication in which to concentrate additional studies. These areas are Print Media, Electronic Media, Advertising, and Public Relations. Print Media Required Courses Credit Hours Com 247 News Writing & Reporting 3 Com 342 Magazine Writing 3 Com 344 Photography 3 Com 348 Feature Writing 3 Com 445 Editing Skills 3 Com 459 Electronic Publishing & Design 3 Com 470 Management in Print 3 Choose one from the following: Com 408 B Business and Economic Journalism 3 Com 408 C Issues Reporting (Environmental Health) 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

105 Com 408 D Com 408 E Publishing Photojournalism 3 3 Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3

Electronic Media Required Courses Com 263 Broadcast Writing Com 361 Audio Production Com 364 Writing for the Screen Com 466 Video Production Com 467 Broadcast Journalism Com 471 Broadcast Management Choose two courses from the following: Com 365 Broadcast Drama Com 408 Advanced Audio Production Com 465 Broadcast Programming Com468 Broadcast Presentations Com 408 F Introduction to TV Production and directing

3 3 3 3 3

Public Relations Required Courses Credit Hours Com 243 Writing for Business 3 Com 247 News Writing & Reporting 3 Com 263 Broadcast Writing 3 Com 322 Persuasion 3 Com 426 Public Relations 3 Com 427 PR Writing 3 Com 445 Editing Skills 3 Com 459 Electronic Publishing & Design 3 Com 473 Management and Research in PR 3 Choose one of the Following: Com 342 Magazine Writing Com 344 Photography Com 361 Audio Production Com 466 Video Production Com 348 Feature Writing

3 3 3 3 3

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Advertising Required Courses Credit Hours Com 263 Writing for Broadcast 3 Com 322 Persuasion 3 Com 344 Photography 3 Com 346 Creative Graphics Arts 3 Com 448 Advertising 3 Com 449 Adverting Copy Writing 3 Com 459 Electronic Publishing & Design 3 Com 472 Management in Advertising 3 ·

Minor in Communication

Students with a minor in Communication must fulfill the following requirements: Credit Hours Required Courses in Communication 6 Elective Courses in Communication 12 Total Required for Minor 18

Required Courses

COM 241 COM 261 Introduction to Print Communication Introduction to Electronic Media

Credit Hours 3 3

Students wishing to a minor in a particular specialization in Communication should choose as follows: Print Media COM 247 COM 342 COM 445 COM 459 Electronic Media COM 263 COM 361 COM 466 COM 467 Credit Hours 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

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107 Public Relations COM 243 COM 247 COM 426 COM 459 Advertising COM 322 COM 346 COM 448 COM 459 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

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Course Descriptions

ART 111 Art in Africa 2 Credits

A survey of art in traditional and contemporary African societies including the seven main aspects of material culture in Africa as a whole; Form/content appreciation­ factors that affect an appreciation of art; Social cultural studies­a definition of culture and society and how these relate to African art; Architectural art forms of African societies.

COM 099 Keyboarding

0(3) Credits

An introduction to keyboarding, covering familiarization with the computer; Care and basic maintenance of the computer, posture and position; Introduction to homerow keys; Mastering of the standard keyboard using touch typing; Speed development; Setting and layout of documents such as letters, memos, manuscripts, tables; Wordprocessing skills including saving, centering, bolding, editing, formating; Use of such tools as grammar check, spell check, thesaurus; The numeric keyboard; The use and care of floppy disks; Printing.

COM 223 Public Speaking

3 Credits

An introduction to theory and skills in public speaking. Topics include: Listening; Research; Topic choice and message content; Message organization; Delivery: Verbal and non-verbal;Speaking to inform; Speaking to persuade; Language and style; Visual aids; Audience adaptation; Ceremonial speaking; Presentation and critique of speeches.

COM 224 Small Group Communication

2 Credits

An examination of various facets of communication in small groups including the nature and types of groups; Communication patterns; Interpersonal dynamics of groups; Preparation and participation in group interactions; Group formation and development; Social dynamics of groups; Analysing group discussion; Group leadership; Groups in the Bible; Small groups in the local church.

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COM 225 Interpersonal Communication

2 Credits

An introduction to and overview of the interpersonal communication process. The course offers listening, interviewing, communication climate, self-disclosure, perception, language, non-verbal communication, friendship/relationships, interpersonal conflicts, emotions, gender and communication.

COM 241 Introduction to Print Media

3 Credits

An overview of print media covering basic definitions, concepts and history including communicator's responsibilities and qualities; The communicator and the public/public opinion; Development of books; Invention and spread of the printing press; Characteristics and types of books; Newspapers; the first medium for the mass society; Development of newspapers in the United States and Europe; Focus on African Newspapers: Kenya, East Africa, North Africa, Southern Africa and Central Africa; Newspapers: terms, organisation, context, and issues-- society responsibilities, privacy versus the right to know, libel; Magazines: voices for many interests; New technologies in print media, Introduction to writing for newspapers and magazines. Prerequisites: INS 111, INS 112, ENG 111, ENG 112.

COM 243 Writing for Business

3 Credits

An examination of principles of written and oral communication in business settings; Business writing skills in letters, memos and reports; Employment and interviewing skills in the job search, application and job interviewing among others. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

COM 247 News Reporting and Writing

3 Credits

An introduction to the concept and nature of news reporting and writing including qualities and desirable qualifications of a news reporter; Characteristics and determinants of news; Organization and management of newspaper establishments; Elements of good news story writing: (a) The inverted pyramid pattern; (b) The five "Ws" and the "H"; The craft of interviewing for an effective news story; quotes and attribution; Searches for information, for news story; News sources; Writing obituaries, news releases; Covering speeches, news conferences and meetings; Reporting accidents, fires and disasters; Beat reporting: the law courts, crime, legislature/ 2003-2007 Catalogue

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110 parliament; Business and consumer news reporting; Sports news writing; Investigative reporting and ethical issues in news story writing; online news text. The selection, editing and use of pictures in newspapers. Pre-requisites: COM 099, COM 241.

COM 261 Introduction to Electronic Media 3 Credits

A course which introduces students to the history, characteristics, concepts related to electronic media; Characteristics/roles and scope of radio; Television, film, satellite, video cassette, video disc, computer, teletext, videotext, CD-ROM; Electromagnetic spectrum; Modern studios; Evolution and revolution in recording technology, sound recordings; An overview of programme processes from camera to TV set, from microphone to radio set as well as programme formats. Pre-requisites: INS 111, INS 112, ENG 111, ENG 112.

COM 263 Writing for Broadcast

3 Credits

An introduction to writing for the broadcast media which covers basic elements of Radio and Television script formats; Building the newscast; Writing for talk shows; Broadcast feature structure; Documentary programmes; Radio and television commercials. Prerequisites: COM 261, COM 099.

COM 302 Statistics for Communication Research 3 Credits

A basic course in the use of statistics in communication research, including functions of statistics; Graphic presentations; Measures of central tendency; Measures of spread; Normal distribution; Probability and sampling; Hypothesis testing; Confidence intervals; Chi-square tests and analysis of variance; Regression and correlation; Non-parametric statistics analysis. Pre-requisite: MAT 102.

COM 321 Communication Research

3 Credits

A course designed to develop student understanding of the process of communication research including; Elements of research: dependent and independent variables; Sampling techniques; content analysis, laboratory research and experimental design, survey research; Field experiments; Focus groups; Observation research; Statistics in research; Hypothesis formulation and testing; Applied 2003-2007 Catalogue

111 communication research: electronic media, print media; PR; Data analysis techniques; Uses of computers in mass media research; Ethical issues in research; Financial considerations. Pre-requisites: COM 302, INS 111, INS 112.

COM 322 Persuasion

3 Credits

An exploration of the historical, classical and modern foundations of persuasion theory including persuasion as a special case of communication effects, Persuasive ethics; Attitudes and beliefs; Prediction of response; Group influence; Influence of the message source; Message; Variables in persuasion; Non-verbal codes; Message structure and appeals; Communication channels; Interpersonal persuasion; Negotiation; Persuasion in small groups; Persuasion in formal organizations; Social action. Pre-requisites: ENG 112, INS 111, INS 112.

COM 323 Communication Systems in Africa 3 Credits

A survey of problems, promises, and features of transition from traditional to modern communication systems in Africa. The course examines the interactive influence of Africa's socio-economic, technological, and political conditions on the development and form of communication systems on the continent; Dependancy theory; Problems in communication training and practice in Africa; Communication policies in Africa; Democratization of public communication as well as Africa's role in a changing world of globalization. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, INS 111, INS 112, POL 111.

COM 342 Writing for Magazines

3 Credits

A writing course focused on developing writing skills appropriate for magazines including the First person narrative article; How-to-do-it article; The interview article; The personality profile article; The general expository article; editorial writing; The critical review; Magazine analysis. Pre-requisites: COM 241, COM 247.

COM 344 Photography

3 Credits

A basic introduction to photography covering operational functions of a 35mm SLR camera, the digital camera and principles of the 2003-2007 Catalogue

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photographic process; The photographic darkroom with hands-on experience in basic darkroom procedures for black-and-white film development and printing; Different films and their characteristics; Press photography; Portraits; Events; Picture composition; Freelance Photography; Practical photography and its various uses: Freelance photography, Photo essay; Social and cultural uses of photography; Legal and ethical issues in photographic communication; Photo editing and legal access to photographic objects for public communication; Students are required to bring their own manual camera.

COM 346 Creative Graphic Arts

3 Credits

Introduction to graphic design as the visual communication of print media including typography, Uses of photographs and illustrations; Effective use of white space, color publication layout and techniques; Magazine design: Graphic design in advertising; packaging; Print production process; Computer graphics: Exhibition and display. Prerequisite: COM 344.

COM 348 Feature Writing

3 Credits

A course involving a theoretical and applied study of the featue as a writing genre in journalism. Examines the significance and place of the feature article for contemporary print media establishment with a significant portion of the course devoted to the practice of feature writing. Pre-requisites: COM 241.

COM 364 Writing for the Screen

3 Credits

A theoretical and practical examination of writing for the visual media; The screen language; Professional script format; Developing the story treatment: plot, theme, characterization, dialogue, sound/music, setting, scenes; Writing a television documentary; Writing television news; Writing editorial commentaries; The storyboard; Putting it together: introduction to production. Pre-requisites: COM 261, COM 263.

COM 365 Broadcast Drama

3 Credits

A theoretical and applied study of drama in the electronic media including drama as a story form, characteristics of drama; The writer and sound; Inventing a plot; Characterization; Theme; Dialogue; 2003-2007 Catalogue

113 Conflict; Script design; Script plan; How to write a radio play-point of departure; Drama production tools; African playwrights; Types of drama; Evaluation of a radio play; Adaptation from existing materials; Production by the group. Pre-requisites: COM 261, COM 361.

COM 408 Special Topics in Communication 3 Credits

Although topics offered under this course number will vary depending on faculty availability and student need, regular topics will include, without being limited, to the following: Business and economics journalism; Social issues reporting; publishing; Photojournalism; Advanced audio production; Advanced video production; Visual communication; Introduction to television production and directing. Prerequisites vary.

COM 415 Advanced Consultation

Writing

and

Speech 3 Credits

A limited enrollment course which trains selected student in advanced wiring and speaking pedagogy as well as consultation methodology. Course contents included English grammar and syntax; Academic, scientific, journalistic and business writing; Punctuation and speaking; Bibliographic and reference formats; the five cannons of rhetoric. Pre-requisites: Instructor's permission required to enroll.

COM 419 Communication Ethics and Law

3 Credits

An examination of ethics and law in the various areas of the field of communication including interpersonal speech journalism, broadcasting, photojournalism, public relations, advertising and entertainment. Students are introduced to the major theories of ethics and examine related case studies. Students are introduced to the laws and statutes that govern media such as: truth-telling, right to privacy, confidentiality of source, conflict of interest, social justice, defamation, freedom of expression, copyright laws, contempt of court, treason and sedition.

COM 421 Strategies of Christian Communication 3 Credits

An exploration of the different definitions of communication and the 2003-2007 Catalogue

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impact of these definitions on the approach to communication situations including the biblical foundation for communication; Different elements of communication: the communicator, the audience, the channel, the message, feedback, noise, and the environment of communication; An in depth analysis of the characteristics of mass media; The process of setting goals of communication; Analysis of the different strategies for communication; Training in anticipating outcomes of communication situations; Laying strategies for communication situations; Implementing the strategies of communication; evaluating the outcome of communication situations.

COM 426 Public Relations

3 Credits

Definition of the theory and practice of PR as a profession in the modern organizational context including the social context of PR and its growing importance in the African and global setting today; The organizational context of PR and its role in organizational management; Public Relations strategy and management; The role of PR in communicating an organization's purpose and goals; Identifying key publics-- internal and external-- and strategising for effective communications with these publics; Setting goals and objectives and planning for public relations; The role of research and evaluation in public relations; PR tactics (Part I): dealing with the media; PR tactics (Part II): communications strategies for crisis situations; PR tactics (Part III): fund raising and donor relations; PR tactics (Part IV): written communications; PR tactics (Part V): oral communications; PR as practiced in Christian ministries, NGOs, governments, corporations, and other enterprises; PR ethics. Prerequisites: COM 241, COM 243, COM 247, COM 223.

COM 445 Editing Skills

3 Credits

A course designed to develop student editing abilities through considering the definition of editor, functions of editor, the editing process, editing symbols, writing leads, language skills, writing headlines; Handling wire service news; Editing and the law; Type; Newspaper layout; Photo cropping, scaling; Caption writing; Magazine editing; Textbook editing; Children's books editing; Practical work in editing and layout, computer assisted editing and layout. Pre-requisites: COM 241, COM 247.

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COM 448 Advertising

3 Credits

An exploration into the history and theory of advertising. The course considers the marketing function of advertising; Types of advertising and the advertising media: radio, television, newspapers, magazines, informal advertising media; Advertising as communication; The advertising agency-- its history and roles; Advertising design: layout, typography, art and photography; Advertising campaigns; Public Relations advertising, Institutional advertising; International advertising; Research in advertising; Measuring effectiveness of advertising; Gender and other issues in advertising: portrayal of women, ethics. Pre-requisites: COM 099, COM 322, COM 344, COM 346.

COM449 Advertising Copy Writing

3 Credits

A study of the language of advertising including writing campaigns, headlines, taglines, body copy for direct mail pieces, booklets, folders, newspaper ads. Includes examination of the use of various typefaces and application of this knowledge to advertising procedures. Prerequisites: COM 448.

COM 459 Electronic Publishing and Design 3 Credits

A practical study of theory and techniques in the develoment of camera-ready, laser-printed, computer presentations and website distribution material by the use of micro computers. Content includes layout and design principles including use of texts, colour, pictures and graphics in producing various publications; The course uses various electronic and/or desktop publishing and website design software; Students are exposed to producing materials related to their area of specialization. Learning can be applied to both Macintosh and Windows platforms. Prerequisites: COM 099, ACS 101, COM 445, 427 ( PR), COM 448 (Advertising).

COM 465 Broadcast Programming

3 Credits

An introduction to broadcast programming strategies and practices. The course focuses on audience research, promotion and marketing, programme selection, scheduling and elevation. Pre-requisite: COM 263 2003-2007 Catalogue

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COM 466 Video Production

3 Credits

An examination of and training in the tools of video production; The camera; Camera shots, angles, movements; Picture composition; Lighting; Scripting; Television studio and control centre; Electronic editing; Post-production work; Practical work. Pre-requisites: COM 261, COM 263.

COM 467 Broadcast Journalism

3 Credits

An advanced exploration of the essentials of broadcast news writing, reporting, and production. The course emphasizes skills in copy writing, good grammar, techniques of field reporting, interviewing and news editing for radio and TV news. The course also examines the ethical/professional dimension of broadcast journalism from a Christian perspective. Pre-requisites: COM 263, COM 361, COM 466.

COM 468 Broadcast Presentation

3 Credits

An introduction to the art, discipline, and business of radio and television presentation skills. The course gives the student both a theoretical and practical experience in performing for broadcast. Pre-requisites: COM 263, COM 361, COM 466.

COM 470 Management in Print

3 Credits

An overview of the principles and theories of print media management; The philosophy of print media organization; Management structures and management of dailies; Weeklies and monthlies; Approaches to circulation and readership; Management principles;Functions of a manager; Management of personnel; Sales and advertising; Management of finances and budgeting; Technical management and corporate culture; Ethics in management as well as a Chriatian view of management. Pre-requisite: COM 445

COM 471 Management in Electonic Media

3 Credits

An exploration of the principles and theories of broadcast management; The philosophy of broadcast station management; Station structure; Management of audience; Programmes, human resources, technical, sales and advertising; Management of finances. Explores the ethics and Christian world view of management. Prerequisites: COM 341, COM 466. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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COM 472 Management in Advertising

3 Credits

A course which provides an understanding of management functions in the advertising industry as well as practical applications of organizational planning. Topics include creative directorship; Account supervision; Agency/client relations; Personnel management theories; Management of finances; Theories of leadership and a Christian world view of management. Pre-requisites: COM 448.

COM 473 Management in Public Relations

3 Credits

A course that involves the exploration of the principles and theories of management as they relate to public relations. It examines management skills in crisis situations, media, events, personnel, accounts, reports, fundraising budgeting, strategic planning, networking, and integrated marketing communication; Explores a Christian World View of Management. The course will also expose students to research in PR. Pre-requisites: COM 426.

COM 496 Independent Study

3 Credits

Student's choice of topic. Specific sub-topics will be worked out with the faculty advisor.

COM 507 Communication Field Study

4 Credits

An assigned task for which student's course work has prepared him/ her, and to which student, faculty, and employer agree; Minimum of seven (7) weeks of full- time work with the employer (270 clock hours); Assignment must require competence in areas relevant to the student's course of study and which will stimulate growth in those areas of competence; The student may not enrol in other courses while undertaking field study. Under special circumstances to be determined in consultation with the head of department, a student may replace COM 507 with a Senior Project COM 597. For example, when a student has a cumulative GPA of less than 2.5. Pre-requisite: Completion of Third Year and all relevant courses in concentration area.

COM 597 Senior Project

3 Credits

A 3-4 page proposal containing enough information about the project, for the advisor to advise. The components are: (a) Objectives of study (b) Methods of study (c) Preliminary outline of study (d) 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Expected results of study (e) Tentative bibliography; The writing of the paper which will be reviewed weekly. This will be divided into: (a) Review of research (b) Statement of problem (c) Statement of method (d) Presentation of research data (e) Interpretation of findings (f) Conclusions and recommendations. Pre-requisite: COM 321.

INS 111 Communication and Culture 1 3 Credits

Definition of major terms in anthropology such as cultural relativism, culture stress, ethnocentrism, cultural traits and complexes; Selected models of culture such as those propounded by Smith, Grunlan and Mayers, Kato, etc; Stages of culture shock or stress as identified by various theorists; Twenty three principles of communication as articulated by Donald Smith with amplification from Condon and Yousef, Samavar and Porter, Mcluhan, Schramm, Gudykunst and Kim, Zajonc, Mortenson, Katz, Festinger, Osgood, Maslow, Rokeach and others; Selected communication models including those by Shramm, Shannon, Westley and Maclean, Osgood, and Hesselgrave; Introductory information on setting goals for effective communication; The effects of context, feedback, source, and receptor's experience on effective communication.

INS112 Communication and culture II 3 Credits

Meaning of anthropological concepts of societal values, norms and roles; Anthropological perspective on technology and economy; Anthropological insights into religion; Social structures and their relationship to effective communication; Non verbal communication across cultures; Mass communication theories as propounded by Mcluhan, Innis, Hesselgrave, Lazarsfeld, Merton and others; Definition of basic terms in mass communication theory such as gatekeeping, two-step flow etc; Introductory communication theory regarding persuasion and change. Pre-requisite: INS 111.

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SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME

ELECTRONIC MEDIA CONCENTRATION (Radio & Video) ST 1 YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 111 ICA 111 ENV 112 MAT 102 ART/ LIT/ MUS 111 3 3 3 1 2 2 2 ---- 16 ====

Semester II INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 112 PHY 112 BIO 111 HPE 113 ACS 101 3 3 3 2 2 1 2 ---- 16 ===

ND 2 YEAR Semester I

Semester II COM 224 COM 225 COM 241 COM 263 Minor or Electives 2 2 3 3 6 ------16 ------

ECO 111 INS 212 PHL 111 BIL 212 COM 261 POL 111

2 2 3 2 3 1 -------13 -------

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120 RD 3 YEAR Semester I INS 313 RET 320 COM 302 COM 223 COM 361 COM 364 3 2 3 3 3 3 ------ 17 ====

Daystar University

Semester II RET 321 COM 466 COM 323 COM 321 Minor or Electives ---- 2 3 3 3 6 17 ===

June/August Block COM 507 4

TH 4 YEAR Semester I COM 467 COM 468/465 INS 412 Elective or Minor Semester II COM 419 COM 421 COM 471 Minor or Elective

3 3 3 6 ------ 15 ====

3 3 3 6 ---- 15 ===

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SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME

PRINT MEDIA CONCENTRATION ST 1 YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 111 ICA 111 ENV 112 ACS 101 ART/ LIT/ MUS 111 3 3 3 1 2 2 2 ------ 16 ====

Semester II INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 112 PHY 112 HPE 113 COM 099 MAT 102 3 3 3 2 1 0 (3) 2 ---- 14(17) ===

ND 2 YEAR Semester I BIO 111 ECO 111 INS 212 PHL 111 BIL 212 POL 111 COM 241 Semester II COM 223 3 COM 225 2 COM 261 3 COM 247 3 Minor or Elec 6

2 2 2 3 2 1 3 ------ 15 ====

----17 ===

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122 3 RD YEAR

Daystar University

Semester I INS 313 RET 320 COM 302 COM 224 COM 342 COM 344 3 2 3 2 3 3 ---- 16 ====

Semester II RET 321 2 COM 321 3 COM 323 3 COM 348 3 COM 445 3 Minor/ Electives 3 ---- 17 ===

June/August Block COM 507 4

4

TH

YEAR Semester II 3 3 3 6 ------ 15 ==== COM 470 3 COM 421 3 INS 412 3 Minor/ Electives 6 ------ 15 ===

Semester I COM 419 COM 459 COM 408 Minor or Elective

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PUBLIC RELATIONS CONCENTRATION ST 1 YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 111 ACS 101 ENV 112 ICA 111 COM 099 3 3 3 2 2 1 (0) 3 ------ 14 (17) ====

Semester II INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 112 PHL 111 POL 111 HPE 113 MAT 102 ECO 111 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 ---- 18 ===

ND 2 YEAR Semester I COM 225 COM 224 ART/LIT/MUS 111 COM 241 PHY 112 COM 261 BIL 212

2 2 2 3 2 3 2 ------ 16 ====

Semester II COM 223 3 RET 320 2 COM 243 3 COM 263 3 INS 212 2 COM 323 3 BIO 111 2 ----18 ===

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RD 3 YEAR Semester I INS 313 COM 247 COM 302 COM 322 COM 227 Minor or Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 ------ 18 ==== Semester II RET 321 COM 426 COM 346 COM 344 COM 445 Minor or Electives 2 3 3 3 3 3 ---- 17 ===

June/August Block COM 507 TH 4 YEAR 4

Semester I

Semester II INS 412 COM 419 COM 421 COM 473 Elective Minor/Elective 3 3 3 3 3 3 ----18 ===

COM 459 COM 408 Minor/Electives

3 3 9

------ 15 ==== 2003-2007 Catalogue

125 ADVERTISING CONCENTRATION

ST 1 YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 111 ICA 111 ACS 101 BIO 111 HPE 113 ART/ LIT/ MUS 111 3 3 3 1 2 2 1 2 ------ 17 ====

Semester II INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 112 PHL 111 COM 099 MAT 102 3 3 3 3 (0) 3 2

---- 14(17) ===

2

ND

YEAR

1 2 2 2 2 2 3 ------ 14 ==== Semester II COM 224 2 COM 225 2 COM 241 3 COM 263 3 COM 323 3 COM 302 3 ----16 ===

Semester I POL 111 PHY 112 ECO 111 BIL 212 ENV 112 INS 212 COM 261

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3

RD

YEAR

Semester II 3 2 3 3 3 3 ------ 17 COM 323 3 COM 344 3 COM 448 3 Minor or Electives 9

Semester I INS 313 RET 320 COM 223 COM 321 COM 322 COM 346

---- 18

==== June/August Block COM 507 TH 4 YEAR 4

===

Semester I RET 321 COM 449 COM 459 Minor/Electives 2 4 3 9 ------ 18 ====

Semester II INS 412 3 COM 421 3 COM 472 3 COM 419 3 Minor/ Electives 3 ---- 15 ===

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Department of Humanities

Diploma in Christian Music Communication

Rationale

Music is a key form of communication which can profitably be used to promote Christian faith and conduct. On the other hand, traditionally, music is studied in terms of its aesthetic and artistic forms, not from the perspective of its being a vehicle of communicaion. There is, therefore, the need for specialized training in the areas of musical skills as a pplied to a broadened understanding of Christian Communication for ministry. Thus, the diploma in Christian Music Communication focuses on equipping Christian workers for evangelism, spiritual formation and worship-church ministry that is relevant to the needs of contemporary Africa.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements for admission to Daystar University, the applicant for the Diploma in Christian Music Communication must demonstrate a high aptitude for applied music by enrolling and passing the Christian Ministry Music course with a minimum grade of B- (Minus).

Student Assessment

The diploma in Christian Music Communication is based on the development and improvement of practical musical skills. Thus, a letter grade will be given for each course on the basis of continuous assessment and a final exam grade. The continuous assessment will constitute 70% of the total mark given whereas the final examination will constitute 30% of the total mark.

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Requirement for Graduation

Core courses Required courses Concentration Field Project Electives TOTAL Credit hours 15 33 27 6 12 60

Required Courses Credit Hours IMU 011 Christian Communication through Music 3 IMU 021 Basic Music Theory 3 IMU 022 Basic Music Theory II 3 IMU 023 Composing New songs for the Church 3 IMU 031 Foundations in African Church Music 3 IMU 041 Choral Conducting and Choir Ministries 3 IMU 051 Basic Instrumentsl Skills I 3 IMU 061 Leading Worship 3 IMU 099 Field Project in Christian Music Communication 6 Electiv e Courses Credit Hours IMU 032 African Songs and Drama in the Church 3 IMU 052 Basic Instrumental Skills II 3 IMU 062 Music and the Media 3 IMU 065 Music Cassette Production and Distribution 3 IMU 071 Teaching Music 3 IMU 072 Special Topics in Music 3 IMU 091 Special Topics in Special Music Communication 3

Students may also take courses from other departments as electives.

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Recommended electives from other departments

ICO 011 IMD 031 ICM 061 ICM 062 IMG 055 Interpersonal Communication 3 Introduction to Community Development 3 Understanding the Old Testament 3 Understanding the New Testament 3 Evangelizing Oral Societies 3

NOTE: Some courses will be housed and taught by specific departments. Your HOD will advise.

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Course Descriptions

IMU 011 Communication Through Music 3 Credits

Course introduction; What is music; The roles and function of music in biblical cultures; Communication principles applied to music; Using the twelve signal systems as a guide to developing effective worship services and communication events; Ethnomusicology: definitions, derections, and problems as they relate to the Christian communicator; The study of song texts in shaping people's working theology and maturity in christian faith; Issues in organology; Basic analysis of varying musical systems; History of the misuse in world missions; Case studies of culturally appropriate music employed in Christian ministry; Strategies: urban, town, and rural settings. Prerequisite: None.

IMU 021 Basic Music Theory I

3 Credits

Feeling for the main pulse; Performing various rhythm patterns; Singing various intervals; Diction of intervals, patterns, and melodies; Singing the pentatonic and major scales; Sight singing from staff and tonic sol-fa notations; Knowledge and use of Kodaly's sol-fa hand signs; Understanding the grand dtaff, note names, ledger lines, note and rest values, accidentals, key and time signatures; Major scales in all keys; Intervals up to one octave; Primary triads with inversions; Analysis of simple four part harmony in major keys using Roman numerals or popular chord symbols; Performance directions. Pre-requisite: Christian Music Minisrty or Entrance Exam.

IMU 022 Basic Music Theory II

3 Credits

Sight singing in four parts from hymn books; Sight singing in minor keys; Identification and singing of intervals up to one octave; Identification by ear of the natural, harmonic and melodic scales; Identifying and noting modern Western ryths based on African rootsrock, pop, rythm and blues, jazz and notating rythms found in East Africa; Performance directions; Composing 4-bar rhythms, 8-bar melodies, and setting words to rhythms; Minor and Chromatic scales; Introduction to compound intervals; Irregular time signatures and beat divisions,; sol-fa rhythm and notation for four part harmony; Voices in score; Harmonic analysis; Introduction to cadences and 2003-2007 Catalogue

131 voice leading; How to harmonize a melody; common chord progressions; Basic principles in choral arranging in Western and Eastern styles. Pre-requisite: IMU 021.

IMU 023 Composing Songs

3 Credits

Writing appropriate song texts; Identifying needed song texts; The relationship of language to melody and rhythm; Four -part harmonic patterns; Identification and analysis of various melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structures for composition; Composing in various song forms-choruses, hymns, choral works, varying call-and-response forms, and African -based songs, Building songs on spoken words; Composing with instrumental resources; Working with traditional and/ or naturally gifted musicians. Pre-requisite: ImU 021, IMU 022.

IMU 031 Foundation in African Chruch Music 3 Credits

A panorama of African Music; Roles and functions of music in African societies; Sources and origins of African music; Musicians; Introduction to organology; Instrument construction and playing techniques; Issues in performance ensembles; vocal music and their forms; Song texts and Worldview; Dance and dance drama; Musical acculturation; Music of urban centeres and village settings; Historical factors for African music in the church; Determining culturally appropriate music for the church; Issues in musical contexualization; Strategies for using African music in the church for worhip, evangelism and discipleship. Pre-requisite: None.

IMU 032 African Songs and Drama

3 Credits

Creating and composing African style Christian songs; Writing in African story telling style with accompanying songs; Developing and using drama in worship services and evangelism; Crating and producing Christian dance drama; Introducing African songs into the church; Developing composers for Christian Music Communication; Planning special occasion services ( e.g. Easter and Christmas); New ways of using oral art forms in Christian ministries. Pre-requisite: None.

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IMU 041 Choral Conducting and Choir Ministries 3 Credits

Maintaining meter, rhythm and tempo; Controlling dynamics; English singing diction; Choral voice training; Phrasing and melody singing; Choral intonation; Historic style and performance practice; Planning and conducting the rehearsal; Conducting motions and techniques; Choir competitions; Composing and performing African choral works; Techniques for arranging choral music; Spiritual development in church choir; The role of the choir in worship services; Guidelines for organizing choir. Pre-requisites: IMU 021, IMU 022

IMU 051 Basic Instumental Skills I

3 Credits

Introduction to maintaing instruments; Introduction to the guitar; Playing techniques for the guiter; Three basic chord progressions; Three basic strumming and picking styles for guitar; the role of the guitar in ministry; Worship and evangelism; Introduction to the keyboard; Keyboard playing techniques; Three basic chord progressions; Working with set rythms and instrumental sounds; The role of the keyboard ministry, worship and evangelism. Prerequisite:IMU 021.

IMU 052 Basic Instrumental Skills II

3 Credits

The content will vary depending on the instruments chosen and the students previous study of the instrument. Students will train to perform from staff notation as well to play " by ear" ( using aural skills with no notation to read). Good techniques, musicianship, musical expression, musical interpretation and development of a repertoire will be the main focus. Pre-requisite: IMU 051.

IMU 061 Leading Worship

3 Credits

Definition of worship; Biblical patterns of worhip; Music in worship; Liturgical, Baptist and Pentecostal worship in Africa; Patterns for personal worship; Biblical teaching on corporate worship; Congregational worship;Team leadership in worship; Practical guide to leading worship. Pre-requisite: None.

IMU 062 Music and the Media

3 Credits

Small and big media; Mini communication and music; Employigng

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133 music mass communication products; Music and drama; The song in story telling; Music cassette ministries; Music on radio; Primary and secondary music for television, video, and film; Developing dance drama; Using foreign music; Integrating folk media with extnding media; Communication principles for selecting music for any medium; Composing music for various media. Pre-requisite: None.

IMU 065 Music Cassette Production and Distribution 3 Credits

The cassette at work; the moility of music cassettes,; Research and strategies for cassette project; The distribution system; Knowing your audience's musical tastes; Selecting musical styles; Music cassettes for Christians; Music cassettes for none- christians; Music cassettes for oral communiation; Programming music cassettes for evangelism; Production facilities; Purchasing equipment; Management in Christian music cassette ministry. Pre-requisites: None.

IMU 071 Teaching Music

3 Credits

Principles for managing the learning environment; Writing schemes of work; Writing record of work; Writing lesson plans; Defining goals and objectives; Organizing the music classroom; \Concept development through a series of lessons; Teaching vocal production; Teaching a song at age levels; Teaching song composition; Utilizing beginning instruments for musical performance development; Training in listening skills; Principles for developing reading staff notation and sightsinging abilities; Using visual aids; Historical overview of music education methods appropriate for the African context; The Kodaly and Orff methods of music education; Creating a musical resource and materials collection. Pre-requisite: IMU 021.

IMU 091 Special Topics in Christian Music Communication 3 Credits

Students may, with relevant approaval and availability of faculty, study specific areas of Christian Music Communication which are not in the regular diploma curriculum. The content will vary with specific course offerings. Topics may include the Study and Performance of African Instruments; Ethnomusicology; and Contemporary African church music, among others. Pre-requisites: Departmental approval. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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IMU 099 Field Project in Christian Music Communication 6 Credits

Assigned tasks related to the course work done ad agreed upon by the student, the assigned faculty, and where applicable, the employer. A minimum of 10 weeks ( 400 clock hours) or a music product and an accompanying paper of at least 30 pages typed in double spacing will be required. Students should begin their Field Project during the June/July Block period between the 1st and 2nd year of study, registering in the August Semester of the 2nd year. Pre-requisite: 1st year of studies for the Christian Music Communication, ICC 011, ICC 092.

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SUGGESTED TWO YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME

1ST YEAR Semester I Common Core 3 ICC 011 A 3 IMU 031 3 IMU 021 3 IMU 051 3 IMU 011 or TOTAL 15 Semester II Common Core Courses ICC 011 B IMU 022 IMU 052 IMU 032

3 3 3 3 3

15

2ND YEAR Semester I Common core courses 3 IMU 023 3 IMU 061 3 IMU 041 3 IMU 099 6 Elective 3 TOTAL 18

Semeste II Common core Courses IMU 011 or IMU 031 IMU 071 Elective

3 3 3 3

12

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I. Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in English Language and Literature

Rationale

English plays a significant role in Kenya as one of the two official languages and a medium of instruction in educational institutions. It is used as a medium of communication orally and in written forms in both public and private sectors. Graduates in English can pursue a variety of vocations, including teaching, writing, editing, journalism and such related fields as civil service, the Christian ministry and business. Courses in Language and Literature seek: 1. to acquaint students with both historical and current developments in literature and language; 2. to help students develop skills of literary criticism. 3. to help students improve in their receptive and productive abilities; 4. to promote human values as seen from a Christian perspective; and 5. to give students a scientific insight into the structural, psychological and sociological properties of human language in general and the English language in particular.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements by the University, a student taking the Language and Literature major must have a minimum grade of B- in English at KCSE or Credit 4 under the `0' Level system , or 66% with systems that use percentages, or a Principal Pass at `A' Level. In addition, the student must have used English as the medium of instruction at secondary school.

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Student Assessment

Course grades in this department will be derived as follows: 1. For conceptual courses (e.g. ENG 111 and ENG 210), 70% will come from the final examinations and 30% from continuous assessment items. 2. For courses that include a significant skill component (e.g. ENG 112, ENG 314), 70% will come from the project and 30% from continuous assessment items.

Requirements for Graduation

1. The student must do 30 credit hours of the required courses. 2. In addition to required courses : a. The student must take nine (9) credits from the Language electives and nine (9) credits from the Literature electives. b. Those not intending to teach must have a minor course of study in a different area. To complete the minimum number of credit hours required for graduation (129), those not intending to teach will choose free electives from any course in the University as long as they have the required pre-requisites. The number of credit hours will depend on the minor taken. Those doing English and Education major will be required to do ENG 320 and ENG 325.

English Major (non-teaching) General Education English Minor Free Electives TOTAL

Credit Hours 52 54 18-22 1-5 129

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English Major Requirements

Required Courses: ENG 210 History and Development of the English Language ENG 211 African Literature ENG 212 The Phonology of English ENG 213 Theory of Literature ENG 214 English Structure and Usage ENG 215 Oral Literature ENG 314 Creative Writing ENG 315 Major Trends in World Literature ENG 327 Modern African Poetry ENG 411 Stylistics and Literary Criticism ENG 416 Advanced English syntax ENG 597 Senior Project TOTAL

Credit Hours

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 36

English Electives

Credit Hours a. Language (All students must choose three (3) courses, but Education students must include ENG 320): ENG 317 Psycholinguistics 3 ENG 320 Second Language Learning 3 ENG 408 Special Topics 3 ENG 413 Discourse Analysis 3 ENG 414 Sociolinguistics 3 ENG 496 Independent Study 3 b. Literature (All students must choose three (3) courses, but Education students must include ENG 325): ENG 229 Introduction to Dramatic Art ENG 323 East African Literature ENG 324 European Drama ENG 325 Shakespeare ENG 326 Survey of English Literature ENG 343 Fiction Writing ENG 408 Special Topics ENG 412 African-American and Caribbean Literature ENG 421 The English Novel ENG 496 Independent Study TOTAL 2003-2007 Catalogue

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

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II. English Minor

Rationale

The course is designed to prepare Education majors to teach English language and literature in secondary schools in and outside Kenya. The student will be given an opportunity to study language and literature both for self-improvement and for enabling him/her to teach all aspects of language and literature in schools. Specifically, the goals of the minor are to: 1. acquaint the student with both historical and current developments in literature and language; 2. help the student improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills; 3. help the student develop skills of literary criticism; and 4. promote human values as seen from a Christian perspective.

Admission Requirements

Requirements for admission are as in the major.

Student Assessment

All course grades for the English minor will be derived in the same way as for the major.

Requirements for Graduation

To graduate with a minor in English, the student must have accumulated 18 credit hours in English as follows:

Credit Hours

Required Courses Electives (3 in English language and 3 in Literature in English) TOTAL 12 6 18

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English Minor Requirements

ENG 210 ENG 211 ENG 215 ENG 212 ENG 214 Credit Hours History and Development of the English Language 3 African Literature or 3 Oral Literature 3 The Phonology of English 3 English Structure and Usage 3

Electives I-- Language (Student must choose one)

ENG 314 ENG 320 ENG 413 ENG 414 ENG 496 Creative Writing Second Language Learning Discourse Analysis Sociolinguistics Independent Study (in Language) Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3

Electives II --Literature (Student must choose one)

ENG 315 ENG 323 ENG 326 ENG 411 ENG 412 ENG 496 Credit Hours Survey of World Literature 3 East African Literature 3 Survey of English Literature 3 Stylistic and Literary Criticism 3 African-American and Caribbean Literature 3 Independent Study in Literature 3

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Course Descriptions

ENG 096 Basic English 0(9) Credits

This is a non-credit course that covers one semester at the beginning of the academic year. It is intended for those students who come to Daystar from educational backgrounds where English is not the medium of instruction. The only criterion for exemption is a TOEFL score of at least 500 computer based points less than two years old. Such students are introduced to the basic English skills which will enable them to do other English courses as well as all other courses taught in English at the University. The course focuses on oral skills, grammar, intensive and extensive reading and various writing tasks. It helps students to get intensive practice in using the English language.

ENG 098 Remedial English

0(3) Credits

Listening comprehension; Reading comprehension involving extracts depicting different styles of writing; Grammar, comprising parts of speech and their functions: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections; Tenses; Modal auxiliaries; Vocabulary: common roots, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms; Figures of speech: similes, metaphors, personification, hyperbole, euphemism, onomatopoeia, proverbs; Sentence structure and punctuation; Creative writing, including official letter writing, report writing, minute writing, writing of memos and notices, essays of different types; Literature­ analysis of given texts.

ENG 111 Advanced Reading

3 Credits

A variety of listening passages given regularly; Faster reading skills: establishing reading goals, dealing with bad reading habits, developing vocabulary, previewing, scanning and search reading, noting relationships; Various comprehension passages that help the student to appreciate varieties of written English: formal, informal, literary, journalistic, etc; Verbal expressions: defining; Facts and opinions; Transcoding; Judging interpretations; Summarizing skills; Connotations; Book reviewing techniques; Analysis of given texts in terms of plot, themes, characterization, style, etc.

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ENG 112 Advanced Writing

3 Credits

Introduction to the research paper process; Using the library and other sources of information; Pre-writing and thesis statement; Outlining­purpose and method; Quotations; Footnotes and endnotes; Tables, illustrations, numbering systems; Bibliography; Sentence structure: sentence types and fragments­comma splices, fused sentences, unbalanced sentences; Punctuation: the period, capitalization, quotation marks, underlining, comma, semicolon, colon, apostrophe; Spelling; Paragraph writing: Topic sentence, assertions and supports; deductive, inductive, combination paragraphs; Methods of paragraph development; Types of writing: expository, descriptive, argumentative, narrative; Research paper project. Pre-requisite: ENG 111.

ENG 210 History and Development of the English Language 3 Credits

The origin of English; Old English; Celtic and Christian influence on English; Invasions and their influence (The Danes and the Normans); Latin and Greek influence on the grammar and vocabulary of English; Sound change from the Early Modern English period to the present; Standardization of English: Expansion of English; English today. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 211 African Literature

3 Credits

Study of the major concerns of African writers during the colonial and post- colonial periods. These will include anti-colonial literature, cultural conflicts in different parts of Africa, struggle for independence, disillusionment, apartheid, current social and political themes; Textual analysis of short stories, novels, plays and poems from leading writers in Eastern, Western, Southern and Northern Africa. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 212 The Phonology of English

3 Credits

Organs of speech; Articulation of English vowels (including diphthongs), and consonants; Phonemic analysis and transcription; Stress, rhythm and intonation; Strong and weak forms and how they occur in spoken English; Relation between English sound and the spelling systems; American and British English; Rhoticity; Varieties of spoken English; The choices of a formal standard of 2003-2007 Catalogue

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ENG 213 Theory of Literature

3 Credits

General Introduction to theory of Literature; definition of literature; theory, critic and criticism. Functions of Literature with special focus on: Plato (427-347) and Aristotle (384-322B.C), Dante Alghieri (12651321) Alexander Pope (688-1744), William Wordsworth (1770-1850), Henry James (1843-1916); Reader response criticism, new criticism; structuralism,realism;romanticism;maxisim, feminisim;deconstruction; cultural poetics and post-colonialism. Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG112.

ENG 214 English Structure and Usage

3 Credits

Traditional school of grammar; Principle elements of sentence structure; Common sentence patterns; Parts of speech; Phrases: their sub-classes and internal structure; Clauses: their sub-classes and internal structure; Morphological categories of number, person, gender, tense and mood; Practice exercises. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 215 Oral Literature

3 Credits

Definition and general characteristics of oral literature; Oral poetry: praise, pleasure, survival, relationships, gods and ancestors, protest and satire; Oral narratives: content and form; Proverbs: form, style and content; Riddles: style and content; field techniques and methods. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 229 Introduction to Dramatic Art

3 Credits

The history and development of drama:Greek, Medieval, Renaissance, Elizabethan, Western and African; Essentials of drama: (a) Characterization, conflict, plot, performance, meaning (b) Forms: tragedy, comedy, ritual; Variety of drama: play, musical, dance-drama; Script writing and development: raw material, organizational language; Acting and movement: techniques of acting, use of senses and body, relaxation and concentration; Improvization: the idea, characterization development of the plot and acting; Production skills: casting, rehearsals, production team, stage management, directing; 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Voice and speech in drama: production of sounds, variety of speeches, oral interpretation; Design of costumes and make-up in drama: planning a production, role of costumes and reasons for make-up; Sound and lighting effects. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, 112.

ENG 314 Creative Writing

3 Credits

A study of the basic elements of fiction writing: plot, theme, setting, atmosphere, characterization, conflict, dialogue, suspense, flashbacks, story beginnings, story endings, climax; A critical analysis of these techniques in selected stories from different writers; Individual writing of short stories of a given length; Elements of drama; A study of these elements of drama in short, one-act plays; Students' individual writing of short, one-act plays; Elements of poetry; A comparative study of different poems to appreciate how the different techniques have been employed; Individual writing of poems as guided. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.

ENG 315 Major Trends in World Literature 3 Credits

Samples from Greek literature; Samples from European literature; Samples from Russian literature; Samples from Afro-American literature; Samples from Indian literature. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.

ENG 317 Psycholinguistics

3 Credits

Introduction to the area of study, nature and limitations of available evidence; Child language development; Nativism versus Behaviourism; Development stages; Chomsky's premises; Syntactic approaches to child language development; Pivot grammar; Telegraphic speech; Semantic approaches; Case grammar; Holophrases; Functional and interactional approaches; Ontogenetic and philogenetic development; Lexical development; Caretaker speech; Comparability of first and second language development; Animal language and attempts to teach human language to animals; Language and the brain; Evidence for laterisation and localisation; Insights and evidence from speech disorders, surgery and autopsy; Language and the mind; Memory storage and retrieval; Encoding and decoding language. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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ENG 320 Second Language Learning

3 Credits

The concept of a second language; The audio-lingual approach; Direct association principle; Learning by immersion; The translation approach; Theories of learning vocabulary and grammar; First and subsequent language inference; Variability; Learning and communication strategies. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 210.

ENG 323 East African Literature

3 Credits

The concept of East African literature. Poetry: examples; Jared Angira, Everett Standa, Amateshe, Luvai, Kassam from Kenya; Okot p'Bitek, Kalungi Kabuye, Richard Ntiru, Laban Erapu from Uganda; Noah Ndosi , Richard S. Malaba, Eric Ng'maryo, Bahadur Tejani from Tanzania. Drama: Francis Imbuga from Kenya, John Ruganda from Uganda, Hussein from Tanzania. Prose: Ngugi wa Thiong'o from Kenya, Taban Lo Liyong from Uganda, Eric Ng'maryo from Tanzania. These may be changed from time to time to include new authors. Prerequisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 324 European Drama

3 Credits

A historical survey of European drama ; Major thematic concerns of chosen European dramatists; Such themes as love, nature versus the supernatural, class struggle and the implications will be studied; Playwrights like Shakespeare, Marlowe, Henrik, Ibsen, Homer, Chekov, etc. will be studied; Changes in European drama through time e.g. the shift from gods to man and nature as influencing man's character. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 325 Shakespeare

3 Credits

The course will deal with chosen plays and poems by Shakespeare. These will be chosen from four categories namely: comedies, histories, tragedies and poems. Life and times of Shakespeare comedies such as "The Comedy of Errors", "Much ado About Nothing", "A Midsummer Night's Dream"; Histories such as "King Richard the Second", "King Henry the Fifth", "King John", "King Richard the Third"; Tragedies such as " Romeo and Juliet", "Julius Caesar", "Macbeth", "Othello" and "Hamlet"; Poems such as "Sonnets", "A Lover's Complaint", "Venus and Adonis", "The 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Passionate Pilgrim". Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 326 Survey of English Literature

3 Credits

Early English literature (from antiquity to the 15th Century); 15th 18th Century English literature; 19th - 20th Century English literature; Major movements in English literature (a) Romanticism (b) Realism (c) Socialism. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112.

ENG 327 Modern African Poetry

3 Credits

The study will focus on the rise of modern African poetry, its origin and growth; Major features of African poetry-- case studies, e.g. p'Bitek and the cultural revolutions; A study of poetry from different regions, i.e. poets from North, South, West, East and Central Africa. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.

ENG 343 Fiction Writing

3 Credits

Plot structure; characterization; theme; viewpoint; dialogue; suspense and suprise; flashbacks and transitions; beginnings and endings; emotions and conflicts; setting; language style; The short story and the novel. Pre-requisites: COM 241, COM 247, ENG 112, ENG 213.

ENG 408 Special Topics in Language and Literature 3 Credits

The course will be offered when students wish to study areas in language or literature which are not in the Daystar curriculum. The course is intended to enrich what students have studied in Language and Literature. The topic chosen may not have the same content as any required course or an already chosen elective in any department at Daystar. The course will be taught when there is faculty with interest and expertise in that area and a complete course outline approved by the Faculty Board is availed to the student. Examples of proposed areas of study include the English verb phrase; Error analysis; The noun phrase; North American literature; African drama; Drama in education; Women in African literature; Women writers; Generative phonology; Transformational syntax and pragmatics. Contents of the course may change from semester to semester. Pre-requisites: All 200 level courses. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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ENG 411 Stylistics and Literary Criticism

3 Credits

General introduction to the concepts of style and stylistics, language and criticism; An overview of literary criticism beginning with clasical times to the present; Literature and language use: inflections, word formation, fore-grounding, lexico-semantic choices in literary style,syntax; Literature and style. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.

ENG 412 African-American and Caribbean Literature 3 Credits

Introduction I: Landmarks in African-American Literature. Introduction II: Landmarks in Caribbean Literature; African-American, Caribbean literature and history. Major thematic concerns of the author in the Caribbean and African-American regions; Perspective, style and innovation in literary art from the two regions. Pre-requisites: All ENG 200 and 300 level courses.

ENG 413 Discourse Analysis

3 Credits

The meaning of discourse in the study of language; The domain and objectives of discourse analysis: functions of language; Spoken and written discourse; The role of context in interpretation; Discourse topic; Cohesion; Coherence; Analysis of discourse. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.

ENG 414 Socio Linguistics

3 Credits

The meaning and domain of socio-linguistics in the study of language; The linguistic principles and methods involved in the study of geographical, social and stylistic variations within languages; Language and human interactions; Bilingualism, multilingualism; Pidgins and creoles, lingua franca; Speech communities; Idiolect, dialect, languages in contact (transfer, code switching and language shift); Language and culture and how they affect modes of thinking; Language choice and language planning; Policy with regard to education, administration, commerce; Language registers; Language situation in Kenya and the roles of former colonial languages, indigenous languages in Kenya and the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa. Pre-requisites: All ENG 200 and 300 level courses.

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ENG 416 Advanced Grammar

3 Credits

Introduction to the study of syntax; traditional approaches to syntax; structural approach to syntax; basic English syntax; the simple sentence; the verb phrase; noun, pronoun and the basic noun phrase; adjectives and adverbs; the verb; adjuncts, disjuncts, conjuncts; sentence connection; complex sentence; focus, theme and emphasis. Pre-requisites: All 200 and 300 level courses.

ENG 421 The English Novel

3 Credits

The rise of the novel: Contribution of philosophers such as Descartes, John Locke, Thomas Reid, etc.; The rise of the reading republic, social change, e.g. effects of the industrial revolution movements that have affected the English novel: Realism, Romanticism, Naturalism, Surrealism, Formalism, Art for Arts sake, Social Darwinism, etc. Points of view and the narrative modes of the English novel: First person, Omniscient narrator and other aspects of the novel; Critical examination of novels by chosen English Novelists, e.g. Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Dickens, Austen, D.H. Lawrence, Conrad, E.M. Forster, James Joyce etc.; The place of modern theory in the English novel; Deconstruction, Feminism, New Historicism, Psycho-analysis, etc.

ENG 496 Independent Study

3 Credits

This will depend on the area of study that the student wants to explore. Students are free to choose study areas from either Language or Literature, as long as they do not have the same content as a required course or a chosen elective. Examples: Study of a particular author in prose, drama or poetry; Study of a particular theme from different authors; A comparative study of style in specific texts; A comparative study of the effects of the sound system of a specific first language on speakers of English as a second language; Gender issues in literature or language; A comparative study of sentence patterns between a specific language and English; Error analysis; Aspect and mood; Textual analysis with special reference to school textbooks; Oral literature-- a Comparative Study. Pre-requisites: ENG 111, ENG 112, ENG 214.

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ENG 597 Senior Project

3 Credits

The course enables students to apply what they have learned in their major fields of study through a written research paper. A student's topic must meet departmental approval. The student will submit a 3-4 page proposal stating: the problem, objectives of study, method of study, preliminary outline of study, expected results, tentative bibliography. The final paper will be typed and should contain: statement of the problem, objectives of study, literature review, methods, presentation of the research findings, analysis of the findings, conclusions and recommendations. The writing of the paper will be reviewed every week. Pre-requisite: 33 credit hours in Language and Literature.

FRE 111 Beginning French I

3 Credits

Introduction­ includes how to greet people and introduce oneself in French, different kinds of professions; French phonetics; Numbers and French alphabet; Days of the week, months of the year and telling time; French regular verbs; Forming simple sentences in present tense; Negation using the words Ne -- Pas; Interrogation; Articles, both definite and indefinite plurals; Presentation - voici, voila, il ya ....; Demonstrative and possessive adjectives; Pronouns; Tenses; Irregular verbs and verbs of other categories; French expressions, polite and impolite language; Reading aloud of texts and making conversation on different topics such as ordering a meal in a restaurant, looking for a house to rent.

FRE 112 Beginning French II

3 Credits

The preposition `a' and the article; Questions with `quel', `quelle(s)'; Imperative­positive and negative; Verbs­ simple present; Indirect interrogation; Pronominal verbs; Adjectives; Tenses (futur proche, passe compose); The pronoun `moi' with imperative; Interrogation using `qui'; Reciprocal verbs; Answering using the words `parce que'; Expression of quantity; The past tense with `etre' as auxiliary; The past tense of auxiliary verbs; Construction of sentences using the infinitive; The past tense using `il y a'. Pre-requisite: FRE 111.

ICA

111 Study Skills

1 Credit

Strategies and techniques for effective learning and Communication, Critical thinking, time management, taking exams 2003-2007 Catalogue

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KIS 111

Beginning Kiswahili I

3 Credits

Introduction: A short introduction to the Kiswahili language; The language situation­ geographically and historically; Dialects and related languages; Greetings; Morphology: Vowels and consonants; The syllable; Sentence formation; Verb forms­ infinitive, imperatives and plurals; The Noun Classes: Introduction to noun classes. `MWa' class: its pronominal concords, prefixes; possessives and demonstrative agreements; Adjectives: types and their pronominal concords; Other noun classes and their agreements will be dealt with as above. Diminutive and Augmentative forms; The Phrase Structure: Noun Phrases, verb phrases and prepositional phrases; Adverbs: Adverbial concepts and prefixes `Pa' - Definite, `Ku'indefinite, etc; Complex structures with `amba', `ingine' `-enye', `ndi' and `si'; Conclusion: Miscellaneous notes/and drills. Pre-requisite: KIS 111.

KIS 112

Beginning Kiswahili II

3 Credits

Introduction: To discuss and revise the work covered in KIS 111, to establish a systematic grammatical structure base for KIS 112; Verb Forms; Reciprocal, prepositional, passive, etc; Negative tenses­ prefixes, present and past; The `Ja' tense; The `Ki' tense­ conditional and present participle; The `Ka' verb tense; Subjunctive; The Relatives: `Amba' and Infixes, general relative, manner and time; Adjectives: compound adjectives, comparison of adjectives,­'-ote', -oenye, etc; Prepositions and Conjunctions-- coordinating conjunctions, subordinating; Adverbs­ Adverbial concepts, prefixes `Ku', `Pa', `Mu', adverbial concepts and phrases; Nouns; Noun formation from verbs; Nouns-- Diminutives, augmentatives and collectives; Conclusion: general revision.

LIT

111 Literature

2 Credits

Introduction to Literature, different genres and concept of literature, Different themes addressing a variety of contemporary issues, e.g Love, Human Suffering, Culture conflict, Racism, Religion and gender issues. Satisfaction of students to the University and relevance of these issues.

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SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME

ENGLISH MAJOR

ST 1 YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 098 or 111 MAT 102 ICA 111 ENV 112 PHL 111 3 3 3 2 1 2 3 ------ 17 ====

Semester II POL 111 1 BIL 112 3 ENG 112 3 PHY 112 2 HPE 113 1 INS 112 3 FREE ELECTIVES 3 ------ 16 ====

ND 2 YEAR Semester I ECO 111 INS 212 ENG 211 ELECTIVES LIT/MUS/ART 111 ENG 210 2 2 3 3 2 3 ------ 15 =====

Semester II ENG 215 BIL 212 BIO 111 ENG 212 ENG 214 ENG Electives 3 2 2 3 3 3 ------ 16 ====

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3

RD

YEAR Semester II 2 2 3 3 3 3 ------ 16 ====

Semester I ACS 101 RET 320 INS 313 ENG 314 ENG 315 ENG ELECTIVES

RET 321 ENG 327 ENG 411 ENG Electives FREE Electives

2 3 3 6 3 ----17 ===

TH 4 YEAR Semester I ENG 597 INS 412 FREE Electives 3 3 9 ------ 15 ==== Semester II ENG Electives 6 FREE Electives 12 ------ 18 ====

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III. Bachelor of Education Degree with Concentration in Arts or Science

Rationale

The purpose of the Bachelor of Education degree is to train students to teach in secondary schools, colleges and other Christian institutions in Kenya and the world at large. The programme will prepare the students to integrate the Christian faith with the teaching profession. This will enable them to influence society with positive moral and spiritual values. The training will also prepare them for chaplaincy and counselling positions in the institutions. Besides, the student will be developed for future functioning in educational administration, research and development in society. There is a growing need for the preparation of teachers who will be ready to assume chaplaincy duties in secondary schools and colleges. This major aims at meeting this need. Christian private secondary schools also need teachers with the sort of training that Daystar provides; training that gives a Christian perspective to all learning. There is a need for people with training in education and with a well developed Christian world view who can help local churches design and execute their Christian education ministries. Specifically, the goals of the major are to: 1.Train students to teach in secondary schools and Christian institutions in Kenya and the world at large; 2. prepare teachers who are well equipped in teaching Christian Religious Education, Business Education, Accounting, Music and English; 3. prepare teachers who are well equipped to influence society with positive moral and spiritual values; and 4. develop students for future educational administration, research and development.

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Admission Requirements

Students must meet the general admission requirements of the university undergraduate programme plus any special requirements that apply to their teaching subjects.

Student Assessment

Final course grades in this department will be derived as follows: 1. Marks for Teaching Practice will be derived 60% from field observation, and 40% from student's and school's reports. 2. Marks for Micro Teaching, Educational Media and Teaching Methods will be derived 30% from final examination and 70% from continuous assessment items. 3. Marks for all other courses will be based 70% from final examination and 30% from continuous assessment items.

Requirements for Graduation

General Education Education Credit Hours 52 48

Teaching subjects major:

Bible and Business Administration and Management or English or Economics or Music TOTAL 30 30 30 30 30 160

Education Major Requirements

All students are required to take two major teaching subjects besides the education major. This will require a student to spend about fourand-a-half academic years (nine semesters).

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Educational Foundations

EDU 111 EDU 112 EDU 214 EDU 323

Credit Hours History of Education 2 Philosophy of Education 2 Sociology of Education and Contemporary Issues 3 Comparative Education 3

Educational Psychology

EDU 213 EDU 220 EDU 221 EDU 322 Education for Exceptional Children Introduction to Educational Psychology Growth and Development Educational Tests and Measurements Credit Hours 1 3 3 3

Educational Administration and Curriculum Development

EDU 225 EDU 431 Credit Hours Curriculum Development 3 Educational Planning and Administration 3

Educational Communication Technology

EDU 223 EDU 227 EDU 344 EDU 343* EDU 507 Credit Hours General Teaching Methods 3 Micro Teaching 2 Educational Media 3 Subject Methods (Bible or Business Education or Music or English or Economics) 3 Teaching Practice 6

* Must take the course for each teaching subject

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Course Descriptions

EDU 111 History of Education 2 Credits

Why study history of education; Education among the ancient Greeks and Romans; Education among the classical Hebrews and early Christians; Examination of selected European and American educational thinkers (Dewey, Aquinas, Rousseau, Froebel, and Montessori); Rise of the universities and education during the Renaissance; Saracenic/Islamic view of education; Education in Kenya: pre-colonial era; Western education in Kenya and African response; Education in Kenya after independence; Education commissions in Kenya, 1908-1981.

EDU 112 Philosophy of Education

2 Credits

Definition of philosophy, philosophy as a field of study; Purpose of educational philosophy, problems of philosophy of education; Traditional philosophies of education; Historical background-- Greek philosophers: Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Sophists, and their impact on education today; Philosophy of Education in Africa; Definition and values of education; Education as a process-- purpose of education; Education as a process-- equality, right and opportunity; Contemporary theories of schooling: humanism, behaviourism, new progressivism and essentialism; Modern philosophies of education; Educational philosophy and methods, the teacher-- nature of teaching, administration of teaching; National objectives of education in Kenya; Examination.

EDU 213 Education of Exceptional Children 1 Credit

Meaning and definition of exceptional children; Historical background of special education, history of special education before and after independent Kenya; Types of exceptional children: characteristics, causes and definition; Early intervention, assessment (emphasis on district assessment centers in Kenya), screening, referrals and remediation; Needs and services of handicapped children; Education policy, barrier free, rights of handicapped children and youth, and rehabilitation; Advocate and pressure groups for exceptional children; Families of handicapped children and youth. Pre-requisites: EDU 222 , EDU 213 and EDU 222 to run concurrently. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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EDU 214 Sociology of Education and Contemporary Issues 3 Credits

Introduction: meaning of sociology, definition of society; origin and development; Branches of sociology; Relation of sociology to other social sciences; Theories and methods of sociology; Family social position: socio-economic status, race, religion, social system, family structure and interrelations; Effects of sex on abilities, personality traits, motivation comparisons, and socialization; Individual abilities: I.Q.-- its origin, cognitive style, creativity and testing consequences; The school as a social system: principal, teachers, special service personnel, the students; Classroom role structure, student/teacher roles, teacher structure, relationship; The effectiveness of the school: characteristics of students, school size, social context, equality of educational opportunity; School environment: school board, government role in education, centralised vs. decentralised school system and policy, effects of external examination; Cross-cultural comparison of societies and schools: relations of societies and schools, work ideologies, moral instruction, vocational training, cross cultural difference in achievement; Some issues in education today: social problems-- marital and family, adolescents, juvenile delinquents; Educational problems-- religious conflicts, poverty, inequality, unemployment; Population problems-- birth rate, health; Minority groups-- class conflict.

EDU 220 Introduction to Educational Psychology 3 Credits

Introduction: definition of educational psychology, historical background, and importance of educational psychology in learning; Learning Process: behavioural theories of learning and application: Pavlov, information processing and memory; Types of learning: concept learning, active learning, meaningful learning, vicarious learning, observational learning, discovery learning, free-recall learning, paired associate learning; Instruction: organizing instruction, individual differences, accommodating, motivation, classroom management and control-- contiguous group; Ethical issues in classroom motivation: reinforcement, rewards and punishment, instructional objectives and Bloom's taxonomy; Emotions: aggression, defense mechanism, stress, conflicts and frustrations; Cognitive development: Piaget's theory of cognitive development, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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individual differences, I.Q. ability grouping, reading ability; Evaluation: formative and summative, effect on student evaluation, pros and cons of report forms, tests and their uses; Attitude: attitude formation and attitude change; Social class: ethnicity and gender, cultural difference, social class, race and ethnicity, culturally diverse classrooms, multicultural society and education, gender difference and school, gender difference and ability, and avoiding gender bias in classroom; Collective behaviour: crowds, crowd types, crowds and functions, crowds and violence.

EDU 221 Growth and Development

3 Credits

An introduction to developmental theories: definition of development and growth, meaning of change, principles of development and a history of child development; Theories of human development: cognitive-- Piaget, humanistic-- Maslow, behaviouristic-- Waston, psycho-analytic-- Freud, Psycho-social-- Eric Erickson; Pre-natal development: conception to birth, factors affecting prenatal development, childbirth-- African approach: beliefs and taboos, Western approach: the neo-nates: characteristics of neo-nates, development of neo-nates, motor development, perception, breastfeeding, health; Traditional child-rearing practices: birth ceremonies, naming ceremonies, demands and needs of childhood, family and cultural influence, nature and nurture influences, impact of abuse, neglect and rejection; Traditional aspects of ceremonies; Functions of children in African community; The infancy stage: physical growth, social and emotional development, attachment, language acquisition; The Pre-school child: motor development, personality development, social development, learning and play; The school-age child: social, motor, and emotional development, cognitive, perceptual and personality development, family and school environment influence on learning, language development; Adolescence and adult stage: physical development and change, impact on adolescent, moral development, emotions in adolescents and adults, personality development, challenges and problems of adolescents, peer pressure, models, delinquency, family, society, school and adolescents. Pre-requisites: EDU 220, EDU 213.

]

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EDU 223 General Teaching Methods

3 Credits

The concept of Education; Agencies of Education; Types of Education; Goals and objectives of Education; The teaching/learning process; The general principles of teaching; Systems approach to classroom teaching; Selected methods of teaching e.g. lecture, discussion project, field trip, debate; Planning for instruction: the syllabus, scheme of work, lesson plan, record of work; Communication in the classroom; Evaluation and measurement of learning outcomes.

EDU 225 Curriculum Development

3 Credits

Definition of curriculum, curriculum design, goals, objectives; Aims of education; Theories of curriculum development; Psychological bases for curriculum decisions; Curriculum designs; Patterns of curriculum designs; Domains of learning; Organizing subject content; Selecting learning experiences; Assessment and evaluation; Curriculum unit development.

EDU 227 Micro Teaching

2 Credits

This is a demonstration course in which students will synthesize what has already been learned in other education courses. Content will consist mainly of assigned teaching units and their evaluation. Pre-requisite: EDU 223.

EDU 323 Comparative Education

3 Credits

The purpose of education; The aim of schools; Schools and the community; History and methodology of the discipline of comparative education; The major contrasting educational systems; Education in Britain-- goals, objectives, structure; Education in U.S.A. and Canada; Education in Russia; Education in Japan; Education in India; Education in France; Education in Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria. Prerequisites: EDU 111, EDU 112, EDU 220.

EDU 322 Testing and Measurement

3 Credits

Role of testing and measurements; Norm and criterion referenced tests; Scales of measurement; Taxonomy of educational objectives; Writing objective test items; Writing test items and essay questions; Test construction and interpretation, reliability, validity and statistics; Evaluation; Attitude and behaviour measurement. Pre-req: EDU 220. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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EDU 343 Subject Methods (Major Teaching Subject) 3 Credits

Organization and planning; Techniques of teaching the subject; Planning for instructional objectives, lesson plans, scheme of work, record of work, marking scheme; Learning aids; Demonstrations in a simulated classroom; Evaluation of demonstrations. Pre-requisites: EDU 223, EDU 341.

EDU 344 Educational Media

3 Credit

This is a skill oriented course. Students will demonstrate skills in selecting, preparing, improvising, collecting, and storing learning and instructional materials. Non-projected media: chalkboard; Graphic materials: charts, posters; Display boards: flannel, pegboards, felt boards; Models: textbooks, magazines, newspaper, duplication of materials; Projected media: overhead projector, slides and film strip projector, motion film projector; Photographic: still pictures, slides; Audio-visual media: visual media, tape recording, educational radio broadcasting, television and video. Pre-requisites: EDU 223.EDU 220.

EDU 431 Educational Administration and Planning 3 Credits

Definition and meaning of major terms and concepts such as educational administration, educational planning, leadership management, and economics of education; Selected theories that influence educational administration such as Maslow's hierarchy of needs, McGregor's theory X and Y, Herzberg's theory of motivation; Bureaucracy etc.; Components of the educational administrative process; Administrative and leadership styles; Institutional administration and leadership; Educational supervision and inspection; Educational administration in the Kenyan context: Ministry of Education, KIE, inspectorate, field administration; Educational planning process; Major approaches in educational planning; Methodologies of educational planning; Issues of efficiency and equity in education; Education and unemployment; Population, education and national development; Consumption and investment as applied in economics of education; Financing of education-- cost sharing. Pre-requisite: EDU 225. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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EDU 507 Teaching Practice

6 Credits

The student will participate in the usual teaching duties in a school-- teaching, examining, marking, etc. Pre-requisites: Successful evaluation of progress in course work and EDU 223, EDU 227, EDU 322, EDU 341 and EDU 342.

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IV. Minor in Music

Rationale

The Music minor programme is designed to help students to acquire knowledge and skills in music as well as promote the application of these skills in the communication and contextualization of the gospel in Africa. Many churches and schools in Africa lack qualified and trained musicians. The program therefore seeks to equip students with musical skills and understanding which will enable them to, carry out their roles effectively. The specific goals of a music minor programme are: 1. To produce qualified Christian musicians (choir directors for school and church music festivals, worship leaders and ministers of music) capable of using music effectively to communicate the gospel of Jesus Christ in the African Christian Church. 2. to widen students' understanding of an international range of musical cultures, equip them with a foundational grasp of the History of Music of different cultural procedures and the role of music in contemporary society. 3. to provide students with opportunities for developing their individual abilities in music through practical training. 4. to equip students with advanced skills in aural and written theory, harmony and composition as well as reading and writing music in staff and solfa notations. 5. to enhance students' general musicianship through choir training and conducting, composition and adjudication. 6. to prepare students for further education in music. 7. to equip students with the necessary skills for effective music teaching in schools and teacher training institutions. 8. to enable students to contribute to the National Consciousness of their cultural heritage through participation in musical events and research. 2003-2007 Catalogue

163 Admission Requirements Applicants must fulfil entry requirements that apply to the admission of all Daystar undergraduate students. In addition, they must have obtained at least a grade C+ in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) or its equivalent in Music. Student Assessment a. All quizzes, assignments, projects, tests, term papers, practical work and the final examination will be included in the calculation of the student's final grade for a given course. b. All grades below D will carry no credit and will be calculated aszero grade point and automatically carry an F rating. c. The student is allowed to repeat failed courses only twice. If the failed course is a required course, the student will be discontinued from the programme. d. A cumulative grade point average (G.P.A) of at least 2.00 must be maintained in all courses. e. Course grades for this major are derived from the continuous assessment items and from the final examination as guided by the following two categories. First Category-- 100%Continuous Assessment, 0% Final Exam. Courses under this category are purely practical in orientation. Students are continuously graded on contact hour basis. The final grade constitutes an average of all the grades attained throughout the course. The following course falls under this category: MUS 113 Introduction to Choral singing

Second Category -- 70% Continuous Assessment, 30% Final Exam. Courses under this category combine both knowledge and skills in Music. Students are required to apply the knowledge acquired by

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giving elaborate musical performances applicable to each area of study. The final grade consists of an average of written Continuous Assessments, Mid-term Examination, Performances and the Final Examination marks. The following courses fall under this category: MUS 111 MUS 112 MUS 211 MUS 213 I MUS 213 II MUS 215 MUS 216 MUS 315 MUS 313 MUS 215 MUS 321 MUS 411 MUS 412 MUS 314 MUS 496 MUS 408 Music in Africa Music Literacy in Theory and Practice I Music Literacy in Theory and Practice II Instrumental Instruction I Instrumental Instruction II Music Technology and Media Music Production and Documentation The Performing Arts Advanced Music Literacy in Theory and Practice Communication through Music Music Composition Church Music Ethnomusicological Survey of World Music Music Teaching Independent Study in Music Special topics in Music

Grading for this course will depend on the area of study selected. For certain kinds of topics, the first category of grading will be applied while for others, the second category will be applicable. Requirements for Graduation Required Courses Electives TOTAL 2003-2007 Catalogue Credit Hours 22 22

165 MUS 112 MUS 113 MUS 211 MUS 213 I MUS 213 II MUS 315 MUS 312 MUS 321 MUS 411 MUS 412 TOTAL Music Liteacy in theory Introduction to Choral Singing Music Literacy in Theory II Instrumental Instruction I Instrumental Instruction II The Performing Arts Conducting Music Composition Church Music Ethnomusicological Survey of World Music 3 1 3 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 22

Electives in Music Credit Hours MUS 215 Music Technology and Media 3 MUS 216 Music Production and Documentary 3 MUS 313 Advanced Music Literacy in Theory 3 MUS 314 Teaching Music 3 MUS 408 Special topics in Music 3 MUS 496 Independent Study in Music 3 Students who demonstrate by standardized examination a prior mastery of the content of a course will not be asked to take the course again, but will instead substitute an equal number of hours in elective music courses

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Course Descriptions

MUS 111 Music in Africa 2 Credits

Definition and meaning of major terms and concepts such as ethnomusicology, musical culture, musical syncretism and musical acculturation; Role of music in the African societies; Characteristics of African music; Study, functions and categorization of African musical instruments; African vocal music and style (including African popular music); African dances and dance dramas; Process of musical acculturation in Africa; Characteristics of contemporary African music; Approaches in ethnomusicology; History of church music in Africa; Characteristics of African church music; Approaching innovations in church music and worship in Africa.

MUS 112 Music Literacy in Theory and Practice I 3 Credits

Understanding the grand staff, note names, leger lines, note values and rests, accidentals, key and time signatures, major scales in all keys in treble and bass clefs, introduction to minor scales, intervals up to one octave, primary triads with their inversions and basic performance directions; sight singing of melodies in both pentatonic and diatonic major minor scales; aural dictation of both melody and rhyhtm and melody, up to 4 bars using semiobreves, minims, crotchets, quavers and semi quavers; composing simple melodies and rhythms up to 8 bars; knowledge and use of kodaly's sol-fa hand signs; analysis of simple four part harmony in major keys using Roman numerals or popular chord symbols.

MUS 113 Introduction to Choral Singing

1 Credit

Vocal exercises with attention to proper posture and breathing to develop good vocal technique; Rehearsal of selected songs as a choir; Performances of well rehearsed/learned songs in Daystar chapel services or outside.

MUS 211 Music Literacy in Theory and Practice II 3 Credits

Sight singing melodies in major and minor keys in treble and bass clefs, identifying and singing of intervals up to one octave, aural 2003-2007 Catalogue

167 identificaiton of harmonic and melodic forms of minor scales, chromatic scale and major/ minor triads; clapping and aural recognition of simple and compound time rhythms with syncopation using semi-breve, minim, crotchet, quaver, semi-quaver, in original and dotted dots, demisemiquavers, double sharps and flats; composing 4 bar rhythms, 8 bar melodies and composing rhythms to word; review of major scales, minor and chromatic scales, compound intervals; irregular time-signatures and beat divisions, sol-fa, rythm and notation, especially for four part harmony; Alto and tenor clefs, transposing between the two ; voices in score, analysis of chords in four part harmony- Roman numeral and popular chord analysis; augmented and diminished triads, dominant sevenths, cadences, voice, leading and part writing; Choral arranging in African and Western styles; ornaments.

MUS 213 I & II Instrumental Instruction

1 Credit

The content will vary depending on the instrument chosen, and the student's entry level/experience with the instrument. Emphasis is placed on correct execution and technique, as well as musical expression. The course is designed so that each student can acquire meaningful musical growth from her/his entry level. The course is designed so that a student goes through two consecutive semesters with one instrument of study. This is to ensure reasonable exposure to an instrument before changing from one to another. The proficiency requirements also form a guideline for non-music students taking the course. All students will be required to pass a proficiency examination. A pass in proficiency is a graduation requirement. The proficiency requirements are as follows: 1. Any major scale -2 octaves both hands ascending and descending. 2. Two contrasting ear pieces. 3. One prepared piece. 4. A four part -rythm. Students coming with prior experience of the instrument under study will be expected to advance progressively from their entry level. Their proficiency will be at a higher level to match the progress envisaged. The course is designed so that each student can acquire meaningful musical growth from her/his entry level. Each student is expected to go through two consecutive semesters of the chosen instrument leading to the proficiency examination. The course can be repeated

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twice or thrice for the credit on the same instrument or a different instrument. Pre-requisite: MUS 112.

MUS 215 Music Technology and Media

3 Credits

Composing and selecting music to enhance media communication through television, radio, film, audio, and video recordings; computer music soft ware, cassettes, discs, staff/solfa notaion in software, composition, sight reading with appropriate feedback. Employing music in mass communication products-sound effects, pacing, cueing, stimulus variation; Primary and secondary music for television, film video and radio; developing traditional folk meida forms like dance, drama and integrating it with extending media; communication principles for selecting music forany medium; using foreign music media.

MUS 216 Music Production and Documentation 3 Credits

Processes used in the production and distribution of Video/audio cassettes and disks, production ethics, safeguarding from piracy,; mobility of music cassettes, research and strategies for christian music cassettes; organising a casette project; selecting musical styles for a target group or purposes like oral communication, evangelism, worship and discipleship, computer soft ware music and solfa notations; braille music soft ware; purchasing equipment, managemnet in Christian music cassette ministry.

MUS 315 The Performing Arts

2 Credits

Basic concepts and meanings-arts, oral , literature, dance/song, drama, music, poetry; African arts in fusion; western concept of the arts, related disciplines, music as an art and its function-Rules of music performance in different cultures and sub-cultures-African, European, American and Oriental; analysis of selected musical performances, appreciation of varieties of arts expressed through music-African, European, American and Oriental; A summary of the art music and the forces that have affected its historical development from the middle ages to the present age; The influence of Western Art on African and Oriental music; Contemporary music and its artistic forms- European, African, American, and Oriental; Creating and performing Christian dance drama in African style for the church. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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MUS 312 Conducting

2 Credits

During this course, students are taken from rudimentary levels of conducting expertise to the point where they are able to competently conduct a song of intermediate conducting difficulty. Class sessions will primarily consist of conducting practice. While the emphasis is on practice in conducting technique, related areas of importance to the choral conductor will be discussed. Topics in addition to conducting techniques include: Physiology of breathing, diaphragmatic breathing, the role of the conductor, rationale for church choirs, the role of the choir in the church and school; Accompaniment, elementary diction, marking a score, advantages of various musical styles, e.g. Western and African, choir competitions; Techniques of choral arrangers, composing for choirs, rehearsal techniques, performance considerations, basic seating arrangements. Pre-requisite: MUS 217.

MUS 313 Advanced Music Literacy and Theory 3 Credits

Rhythmic and melodic dictation (African and Western styles); Interval recognition- harmonic form up to two octaves; Alto and Tenor clefs; Diminished sevenths and Neopolitan sixths; Realizing Figured Bass for keyboards and for voices; Composing Figured Bass to a given melody; Part-writing and chorale harmonization; Melodic composition and harmonization (African and Western styles); Secondary Seventh and their inversions in major and minor keys; Suspensions, modulations; Composing within a given harmonic framework (African and Western styles), counterpoint; Analysis of rhythmic structure and of phrasing (African and Western music). Pre-requisite: MUS 098.

MUS 314 Teaching Music

3 Credits

Teaching method applicable to music, strategies and techniques; Music and Education/ communication; The basic principles and methods of teaching music; the music syllabus for schools; Scheme of work and lesson plans and records of work in music; Music course objectives for teaching Music, motivation and class room climate, concept development in teaching; Selection and organisation of music content; Teaching various aspects of music-vocal production, a new song, teaching song composition, accompaniment of song, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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listening skills, principles for developing reading staff notation and sight singing abilities; use of teaching aids in music; Music education, methods appropriate for Africa; Kodaly, Sizuki and orff methods of music eduation; Organising music programmes-competition, festivals; requisites of a Christian music teacher; Creating a musical resource and material collection; music and communication.

MUS 321 Music Composition

3 Credits

Aural training techniques of composition incorporating motif, phrase, cadence, augmentation, diminution, ornamentation, modulation, partwriting for voices and keyboard; Composing in the style of hymns, chorales, traditional melodies from Africa and other parts of the world, composing vocal descants to a given melody, composing vocal/ instrumental music and applying African multi-part harmonic style in vocal composition; Principles and application of music ethics. Prerequisite: MUS 311.

MUS 408 Special Topics in Music

3 Credits

Topics will be offered depending on student's interest and availability of faculty. Course content will vary depending on the nature of the topic. Course may be repeated for credit when topic is different. Pre-requisites will be determined by the nature of the topic offered. The department will provide advice in all classes.

MUS 411 Church Music

3 Credits

Introduction to course, logical fallacies, the infinite variety of music, meaning in music; Philosophies of music ministry, foundations in worship, textual considerations, matching of texts and tunes; Worship models, service planning, continuums in worship, hymns, congregational singing; Choir ministry, historical overview of church music, psychological considerations in worship; Music for evangelism, the Engel scale, history of witness music; Popular music styles, the secular/sacred debate, music for discipleship; History and issues in African church music, directions for the 21st Century, summary. Pre-requisite: MUS 111.

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MUS 412 Ethnomusicological Survey of World Music 3 Credits

Introduction to course, connections between the New and Old Worlds; Music philosophies of China; The nature of ethnomusicology, relationship of ethnomusicology to the social sciences and the arts, history and approaches from ethnomusicology, field methods in ethnomusicology (including sound recording and reproduction techniques, notation and transcription), participant observation, acoustics; American Indians; Overview of African music: selected African cultures and their use of music, African music in Diaspora; Music of the Middle East: music of India, music of Indonesia; Forces of world musical acculturation, summary. Pre-requisite: MUS 217, MUS 411.

MUS 496 Independent Study in Music

3 Credits

Topics will vary according to student interest and the availability of faculty. Topics are generally more advanced in nature than those covered in class setting. Such topics include orchestral music, hisrory of western Art Music, contexualisation of worship music in the African church, the music industry.

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Faculty of Social Sciences

Commerce Community Development

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Department of Commerce

The Department of Commerce offers a Diploma in Management, Bachelor of Commerce degree with majors in Accounting, Business Administration and Management, Marketing, Management Information Systems besides a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics. The Bachelor of Commerce degree and diploma in management programme aim at enabling the student to integrate knowledge and skills acquired in various fields of commerce with the right relationship with God and people. Its objective is to produce a well rounded person, a worthy citizen of the nation and the world at large, ready to face challenges and contribute fully to the development of the society and community they live in.

Diploma in Management

Rationale The Diploma in management was established to train on-the ­job leaders who do management work in churches, church related ministries and para-church organizations. Such leaders may be first time entrants into a post ­secondary education programme or they may already have a first degree. What all have in common is the desire to build on their past training and experience. The courses offered in this programme are designed to build management skills. The concentration in management develops students to work with and through other people to accomplish Management goals and disciple their own workers. The concentration in management builds related Ministries that are focused on meeting human needs in community based ministry.

Requirements for graduation

Common core courses Management courses Free Electives Total

Credit hours

15 33 12 60

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Required courses (33 credit hours) ICC 022 Basic Functions of Management 3 IMD 014 Fundamental of Leadership 3 IMD 021 Basic Principles and Practices of Administration 3 IMD 033 Foundation of Community Development 3 IMD 051 Communication for Development 3 MNG 099 Field project/ Practicum in Management or Development 6 MNG 023 Advanced Management (organization Dev't) MNG 024 Advanced Management ( boards &committees) MNG 025 Personnel Management MNG 044 Project Management Free electives MNG 043 IMD 052 IMD 053 MNG 041 ICO 011 ICO 014 ICM 051 ICM 021 IMU 011 12 credit hours Small Scales enterprise Supervision and On-the-job Training Training of Trainers Special Topics Management Interpersonal Communication Group Dynamics Introduction to Counseling Evangelism and Discipleship Communication Through Music

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

NOTE: some courses will be taught and housed by specific departments. Your HOD will advise.

Exemptions to the Bachelor of Commerce Degree

Required Courses Equivalent Required Course Hours

IMD 013, IMD 022, IMD 023 & IMD 024 BUS 211 IMD 041 BUS 328 Total Hours exempted

3 3 6

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Course Descriptions

MNG 023 Advanced Management 1 3 credits

Assessing organizinal effectiveness; life cycles of organization and their renewal; options for Organizational structure, including biblical models and example; coordination of different organizational Units for the achievement of common goals; sharing and moving personnel among organization units; Management and identification of informal agency structure; determining span of control and applying Scalar principles; to fit social cultures. Pre-requisites: ICC 021

MNG 024 Advanced Management II

3 credits

Emphasis is on the work of boards and committees as policy making bodies; guidelines for selection of board and committee members; chartering new groups or agencies and developing or revising constitutions and by-laws; procedures for making and enforcing policy; how to organize and head different and head problem solving are examined. Pre- requisites: ICC 021, IMD 023 plus three years experience in management or instructor's approval.

MNG 025 Personnel Management

3 credits

Interview skills for personnel selection, task clarification, discipline, grievance, discharge; orientation of New workers; conducting formal performance, appraisal, interviews, and planning for personnel Development; Employing and placing staff according to competency; Employee relations and working with Volunteers; living unions or collective groups; wage and salary administration; keeping personnel Records ; class size limited to 15 participates. Pre-requisites: ICC 021

MNG 041 Special Topics in Management and Development 1-3 credits

The content will vary with specific courses. Topics may include, but are not limited to: trainers; low cost housing; AIDS prevention.

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MNG 099 Field Project / Practicum in Management 6 credits

Supervised field experience. Professional practice opportunities; selected readings; written project reports.

IMD 043 Small Scale Enterprise

3 credits

Review of all aspects of starting of a small business; Analysis of management practices; Biblical principles of stewardship; small enterprise development; buying selling; planning for the enterprise; book keeping and costing ;marketing, pricing and small scale for profit enterprises; loan schemes; institutional support and policy implications; insurance.

IMD 044 Project Management

3 credits

The course deals with both church sponsored development project and other special projects within church related agencies; topics for study include: conducting needs analysis and doing feasibility studies and constraint analysis; developing project proposals and report writing ; facilitation of community Participation for project success; principles and practices for formative and summative evaluation; methods and tools for project control; communicating and maintaining relations with donors. Prerequisites: IMD 031, IMD 051, plus field or church experience in project management.

(Please refer to page 255 for more IMD course descriptions)

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Bachelor of Commerce

General Requirements for Bachelor of Commerce:

(Major in Accounting, Business Administration & Management and Marketing) Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Bachelor of Commerce must fulfil entry requirements that apply to all Daystar undergraduate students, ie. an overall grade of C+ in KCSE or equivalent. In addition they must have obtained at least a Grade C (plain) or its equivalent in KCSE or its equivalent in Mathematics.

Student Assessment

Grading will be based on continuous assessment and written examinations. Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance, continuous assessment such as assignment, groupwork and quizzes, project work and a final examination. The relative weight of each of these assessment will be specified in the course syllabi. Practicum marks will be based 60% on field reports and 40% on field evaluations. Independent Study marks will be based 60% on final examination/ paper and 40% on continuous assessment tests.

Exemptions

Exemption from certain courses may also be granted based on work done in professional courses from recognized (accredited) institutions such as CPA, ACCA, CFA, CIMA, CIPS, etc. and Diplomas in areas of Business Management, Marketing, Sales, Accounting, Finance, etc. Exemption will only be granted for completed parts, levels or diplomas. No exemptions will be granted for partial completion. Exemptions will not be granted for foundational stages such as 2003-2007 Catalogue

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technician courses, KATEC, certificate level work, etc. Only professional stages of the examination will serve as a basis for exemption.

Required Courses in Accounting, Business Administration & Management and Marketing Major

Credit Hours ACC 111 ACC 112 BUS 211 BUS 213 BUS 309 BUS 314 BUS 321 BUS 323 BUS 413 MIS 211 ECO 211 ECO 212 MAK 212 MAT 112 STA 211 STA 212 TOTAL Financial Accounting Managerial Accounting Organization and Management Business Research Methods Business Finance Financial Management Business Law I Business Ethics Strategic Management and Business Policy Management Information Systems Principles of Economics (Micro) Principles of Economics (Macro) Marketing Principles Mathematics for Economics & Management Business Statistics I Business Statistics II 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 48

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I. Bachelor of Commerce Degree with Major in Accounting

Rationale

The purpose of the Accounting major programme is to prepare persons who are serving or intend to serve as accountants in public and private sector organizations, to handle their duties efficiently and with confidence. The programme is designed to produce dependable, reliable, dedicated and efficient executives and entrepreneurs capable of performing accounting duties the way such duties should be performed, with undoubted honesty. Specifically, the goals of the major are: 1. to develop in the student an understanding of the major areas of accounting, economics, quantitative methods, management information systems, computer applications, statistics, marketing, costing, auditing and business law; 2. to prepare the student to apply the principles learned in the performance of accounting duties, upon completion of the course, and to apply Christian principles of integrity, dependability and honesty in the performance of such duties; 3. to enable the student to be in a position to take up any other alternative job, such as the job of auditor, treasurer, tax assessor, supplies officer, teacher of business subjects or development coordinator in a church or a public or private sector organization; 4. to prepare the student to be of service to voluntary organizations such as churches and welfare organizations in the field of accounting in his/her spare time; and 5. to prepare interested, capable students for post-graduate studies in business.

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Requirements for Graduation with a Major in Accounting

To graduate with a major in Accounting, one must fulfill the following course requirements: Credit Hours General Education 51 Required :Commerce Courses 48 :Accounting Major 21 69 General Electives 9 TOTAL 129

Required Courses in Accounting Major

ACC ACC ACC ACC ACC ACC ACC 311 312 313 314 315 411 412 Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Intermediate Accounting III Cost Accounting Taxation Advanced Accounting Auditing

Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

TOTAL

Minor in Accounting

Requirement for Graduation with a minor in Accounting ACC 111 ACC 112 ACC 311 ACC 312 ACC 314 ACC 315 TOTAL Financial Accounting Managerial Accounting Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Cost Accounting Taxation Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

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183 Students in the Department of Commerce who do a minor in Accounting will be required to substitute ACC 111 and ACC 112 with two electives, one of which must be from required Accounting major courses.

II. Bachelor of Commerce Degree with Major in Business Administration and Management

Rationale

The programme is broadly based and aims at developing the students into mature people who have the right relationship with God and the people around them, men and women who know themselves and who can use their talents and opportunities available in the environment to serve mankind. They will see the need to aim high and will want to improve their standards of performance, and their lives. Thus, while aiming at being executives in management, accounting and other professional fields, they will be prepared through studying such subjects as theology, communication and natural science, to have a world view based on Christian principles and values. The courses will enable them to understand the African cultural heritage and will develop in them valuable attributes such as industry, diligence, dependability, integrity and faithfulness. Specifically, the goals of the major are: 1. to encourage the student to consider a business profession or career as a worthy means of serving God, country and self; 2. to challenge the student to practise Christian principles of integrity and honesty in the church and market place as an expression of his/ her Christian commitment; 3. to prepare and equip the student to practise his vocation as a Christian business person in church, para-church organizations, government, and private business; 4. to develop in the student a foundational understanding of the major areas of business administration and management, in accounting, management informatioin systems, computer applications, economics, statistics, management, marketing, human resource 2003-2007 Catalogue

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5. to provide the student with the necessary basic skills, knowledge, and methods for the successful practice of a business vocation; and 6. to prepare the interested, capable student for post-graduate studies in business.

Requirements for Graduation

Business Administration Major Students with a major in Business Administration must fulfill the following course requirements: Credit Hours General Education 51 Required :Commerce Courses 48 :Electives 15 63 General Electives 15 TOTAL 129

Business Electives ( Choose 5)

BUS 111 BUS 313 BUS 318 BUS 319 BUS 320 BUS 322 BUS 324 BUS 326 BUS 328 BUS 329 BUS 330 BUS 340 BUS 415 BUS 416 BUS 417 BUS 496 BUS 520

Credit Hours Business Studies 3 Human Resources Management 3 Organizational Behaviour 3 Insurance Practice 3 Career Development 3 Business Law II 3 Investment 3 Industrial Psychology 3 Small Business Management 3 Labour Relations and Labour Law 3 Conflict Management 3 Cooperative Management 3 Project Planning and Management 3 Special Topics in Business and Management 3 Entrepreneurship and Leadership 3 Independent Study 3 Business Practicum 4

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185 BUS 597 ECO 308 ECO 310 ECO 311 ECO 312 ECO 313 MAK 315 MAK 316 MAK 317 MAT 211 TOTAL Senior Project International Economics Economic Theory (Macro) Money and Banking African Economic Problems Economic Development Consumer Behaviour Advertising Marketing Research Operations Research 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15

Minor in Business Administration and Management

Requirements for Graduation with a Minor in Business Administration and Management Students with a minor in Business Administration and Management must fulfill the following requirements: Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

ACC 111 BUS 211 BUS 313 ECO 211 MAK 212 BUS 309 TOTAL

Financial Accounting Organization and Management Human Resources Management Principles of Economics (Micro) Marketing Principles Business Finance

Students doing majors in the Department of Commerce cannot do a minor in Business Administration and Management except for Economics major students who will be required to suubstitute ACC 111, BUS 309 & ECO 211 with electives from the required Business major courses.

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III. Bachelor of Commerce Degree with Major in Marketing

Rationale

The Marketing major is a broad-based internationally oriented programme which is intended to provide managerial orientation to marketing in a complex, rapidly changing global environment. The programme is designed to develop well rounded marketing executives with a sound working knowledge of activities involved in developing marketing programmes and strategy to achieve competitive advantages both locally and internationally. A wide selection of topics in related disciplines gives the student excellent tools and a firm ground in the technicalities of marketing management. The treatment of various sectors of the market and conceptual analytical tools are studied to enhance understanding of the management of markets. The global and ethical dimensions of the marketing decisions are emphasized. The course rendering, analysis of markets, planning research and projects synthesize the many components of the marketing major programme. Specifically, the goals of the major are: 1. to encourage the student to consider a marketing profession or career as a worthy means of serving God, country and self; 2. to challenge the student to practise Christian principles of integrity and honesty in serving customers as an expression of Christian commitment; 3. to prepare students to practise their vocations as Christian business persons in church, para-church organizations, or government and private businesses; 4. to develop in students a foundational understanding of the major areas of marketing, accounting, economics, management information systems, statistics, management, human resource management, business law; and 5. to provide students with the necessary basic skills, knowledge,

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187 and methods for success in the marketing effort.

Requirements for Graduation

Marketing Major Students with major in Marketing must fulfill the following course requirements: Credit Hours General Education 51 Required :Commerce Courses 48 :Marketing Courses 21 69 Free or General Electives 9 TOTAL 129

Required Courses in Marketing

MAK 315 MAK 316 MAK 317 MAK 418 MAK 420 MAK 421 MAK 422 Consumer Behaviour Advertising Marketing Research Marketing Management and strategy Sales Management International Marketing International Business Management Strategy 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21

Marketing Electives

BUS 498 BUS 520 MAK 331 MAK 333 MAK 335 MAK 336 MAK 338 MAK 416 MAK 419 MAK 492 TOTAL Senior Project Business Practicum Financial Aspects of Marketing Agricultural Marketing Marketing Communication Marketing of Services Export Marketing Special Topics in Marketing Industrial Marketing Independent Study in Marketing

Credit Hours

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12

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Minor in Marketing

Requirement for graduation with a minor in Marketing Credits Hours MAK 212 Marketing Principles 3 MAK 315 Consumer Behaviour 3 MAK 316 Advertising 3 MAK 317 Marketing Research 3 MAK 421 International Marketing 3 MAK 422 International Business Management 3 TOTAL 18 Students in the Department of Commerce doing a minor in Marketing will be required to substitute MAK 212 with a Marketing elective. Students doing a major in Business Administration and Management and wish to do a minor in Marketing should note that MAK 315, MAK 316, and MAK 317 will count as courses for the minor. They will therefore be required to do 15 hours of Business electives which should not include MAK 315, MAK 316 and MAK 317.

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IV. Bachelor of Commerce Degree with Major in Management Information Systems (MIS)

Rationale

As years go by, the world is becoming more and more into an electronic global village. This poses many challenges like privacy, confidentiality, availability, and integrity of information held in individual/ organizational database. This calls for both individual and organizations to keep abreast with the current information technology for effective protection and efficient production by optimizing the technology. There is a dire need of people who are well literate in the usage of computers to assist in the production of data and information that will go along way in helping managers to make good decisions. Therefore, this program will seek to address this shortage/gap. Goals The Management Information Systems (MIS) major is designed to prepare students to be servant leaders in a business environment or other organization to develop and implement information systems for business management and: a) to create an in-depth understanding of performing a needs analysis and the design development, and implementation of information systems in a business environment including data base management; b) to prepare the student to have a broad general understanding of the latest computer technology as it is applied to information systems within the organization, including networking and programming; c) to provide the student with a solid base in business administration, management, strategic planning, forecasting, and policy formulation; d) to develop in the student a foundational understanding of business administration process such as accounting , human resource management, marketing , inventory control, capacity planning and 2003-2007 Catalogue

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material requirement planning and how these can be integrated into an information system; e) to challenge the student to practise being a responsible citizen who will apply Christian principles of morality, integrity, honesty and ethics in his or her profession as an expression of his or her Christian commitment; f) to prepare the student to enter an advanced degree program in information systems or other post graduate program. g) To prepare and equip the student to practice their vocation as a Christian business person in church, para-church organizations, government and private business.

Admission requirements

Applicants must fulfill entry requirements that apply to admission of all Daystar University undergraduate students. i.e. an overall grade of C+ in KCSE or its equivalent. In addition they must have obtained at least a grade of C (plain) in the KCSE or its equivalent in Mathematics.

Student assessment

Grading will be based on continuous assessment and written examinations. Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance, continuous assessment such as assignments, group work, quizzes, project work and final examination. The relative weight of each of these assessment will be specified in the course syllabi. Practicum marks will be based 60% on field reports and 40% on field evaluations. Independent study marks will be based 60% on final examination / paper and 40% on continuous assessment tests. Requirement for graduation Students pursuing this Major must fulfil the following requirements:

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191 Courses ACS MIS Required Courses Electives in MIS Mathematics and Statistic Business General Education Total Credits Hours 32 15 9 12 24 46 138

Required Courses in Management Information Systems Major Credit Hours ACC111 Financial Accounting 3 ACS 101 Basic Computer Skills 2 ACS 111 Introduction to Programming 3 ACS 112 Introduction to Object Oriented Programming 3 ACS 211 Algorithms and Data Computer 3 ACS 221 Organization and Design 3 ACS 231 Operating Systems 3 ACS 302 Software Engineering 3 ACS 351 Computer Network 3 ACS 352 LAN Design and installation 3 ACS 361 Introduction to Database Systems 3 ACS 431 Computer Security 3 BUS 211 Organisation & Management 3 BUS 213 Research Methods 3 BUS 313 Human Resource Management 3 BUS 309 Business Finance 3 BUS 418 Project Management 3 ECO 211 Principles of Economics (Micro) 3 MAK 212 Marketing Principles 3 MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics & Management 3 MIS 211 Management Information Systems 3 MIS 281 Systems Analysis & Design Methods I 3 MIS 282 Systems Analysis & Design Methods II 3 MIS 311 Information Systems Management 3 MIS 400 Information Systems Project 3 STA 211 Business Statistics 3 STA 212 Business Statistics II 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

192 Electives ACC 112 ACS 411 ACS 451 ACS 462 BUS 321 BUS 328 BUS 417 MAT 211 MIS 408 MIS 413 MIS 451

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(choose 3) 9 credits Management Accounting 3 Developing Distributed Applications 3 Data Communication Security & Network Controls 3 Data & Data base Administration 3 Business Law I 3 Small Business Management 3 entrepeneurship and Leadership 3 Operations Research 3 Special Topics in Management Information Systems 3 Introduction to Electronics Commerce 3 Designing and Building Web Sites 3

Minor in Management Information Systems

Requirements for graduation with a minor in Management Information System Credit Hours ACS 111 Introduction to Programming 3 ACS 221 Computer Organization and Design 3 MIS 211 Management Information Systems 3 MIS 281 System Analysis and Design Methods I 3 MIS 282 System Analysis and Design Method s II 3 MIS 400 Information Systems Project 3 MIS Minor 3 Elective Total 21 Management Information Systems minor Elective Credit Hours ACS 211 Algorithms and Data structures 3 ACS 231 Operating Systems 3 ACS 351 Computer Networks 3 ACS 361 Introduction to Database Systems 3 ACS 431 Computer Systems Security 3 MIS 413 Introduction to Electronic Commerce 3 MIS 451 Designing and Building Web Sites 3 Total 21 2003-2007 Catalogue

193 Commerce and Economics major students will be required to choose an additional subject from the MIS minor electives to substitute for MIS 211 already done in the major. Students doing a major in Applied Computer Science (ACS) cannot do a minor in MIS.

V. Bachelor of Science Degree with Major in Economics

Rationale

The Economics Major is a broad based internationally oriented programme designed to provide the student with sound knowledge of economic disciplines and adequate tools for the understanding of economic variables, necessary for effective decision making in a rapidly changing global economic environment. The programme is also designed to equip the student with adequate knowledge and skills in related disciplines. This will enhance its application in problem solving in public, private and non-profit making organizations, as well as in academic fields. It emphasizes interrelationships with other disciplines and utilization of techniques that can be applied in the allocation of the scarce resources available to mankind, in an effort to create a better world to live in. In development, the expertise of economists is in great demand, especially as regards economic planning and development programmes. A wide selection of topics provides the student with a firm ground and excellent tools to work with in dealing with technicalities of economic management. Research and conceptual analytical methods are studied to sharpen the student's knowledge in the real economic environment. Global and multi-disciplinary approaches to problem solving are emphasized. The carefully selected topics, such as analysis of economic variables, planning, research, project evaluation and design, synthesize the many components of the economics major programme. Specifically, the goals of the Economics major are: 1. to stimulate the student to consider a career in economics as a 2003-2007 Catalogue

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worthy cause of serving God, country and mankind as a whole. 2. to challenge the student to practise the Christian principles of integrity and honesty in performing his/her duties as an expression of Christian commitment to the community and the nation as a whole. 3. to equip the student with core knowledge of economics and related disciplines such as business management, accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, business law, business ethics, and human resource management. 4. to introduce the student to contemporary economic thought and economic trends in an effort to control or eliminate hunger, disease, ignorance and other human deprivations. 5. to provide the student with an adequate foundational base to proceed to graduate courses in the field of economics, management, finance and research. 6. to prepare the student to become a well grounded future executive in economic's multi-disciplinary field, ready to assume career responsibilities in the management of public and private institutions. 7. to equip the student with necessary tools for economic analysis, policy formulation, problem identification and problem solving. Admission Requirements Applicants must fulfill entry requirements that apply to admissions of all Daystar undergraduate students, i.e an overall grade of C+(plus) in KCSE or its equivalent. In addition, they must have obtained at least a grade C (Plain) in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education, or its equivalent, in Mathematics. They must also have passed in the English language with at least a C (plain) grade or its equivalent.

Student Assessment

Grading will be based on continuous assessment and written examinations. Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance, continuous assessment such as

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195 assignment, groupwork and quizzes, project work and a final examination. The relative weight of each of these assessment will be specified in the course syllabi. Practicum marks will be based 60% on field reports and 40% on field evaluations. Independent Study marks will be based 60% on final examination/ paper and 40% on continuous assessment tests.

Requirements for Graduation

Economics Major Students with Major in Economics must fulfill the following course requirements: Credit Hours General Education 51 Required Economics Major Courses 66 Economics Electives 6 General Electives 6 TOTAL 129 Required Economics Major Courses Credit Hours ACC 111 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 112 Management Accounting 3 BUS 112 Business from a Christian Perspective 3 BUS 213 Research Methods 3 BUS 309 Business Finance 3 BUS 321 Business Law I 3 BUS 323 Business Ethics 3 MIS 211 Management Information Systems 3 ECO 211 Principles of Economics (Micro) 3 ECO 212 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 ECO 308 International Economics 3 ECO 309 Economic Theory (Micro) 3 ECO 310 Economic Theory (Macro) 3 ECO 311 Money and Banking 3 ECO 313 Economic Development 3 ECO 314 Economics of Population 3 ECO 316 Introduction to Econometrics 3 ECO 411 Public Finance 3

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196 ECO 412 MAT 112 STA 211 STA 212 TOTAL

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Economic Planning Techniques & Structural Adjustment Mathematics for Economics & Management Business Statistics I Business Statistics II

3 3 3 3 66

Economics Electives

BUS 319 BUS 324 BUS 314 BUS 413 BUS 415 BUS 431 ECO 312 ECO 317 ECO 318 ECO 319 ECO 322 ECO 408 ECO 413 ECO 415 ECO 416 ECO 417 ECO 418 ECO 419 ECO 520 ECO 597 TOTAL

Credit Hours Insurance Practice 3 Investment 3 Financial Management 3 Strategic Management and Business Policy 3 Project Planning and Management 3 International Trade 3 African Economic Problems 3 Comparative Economic Systems Environmental and Resource Economics 3 Economics of Industry 3 Economics of Labour 3 Special Topics 3 Economics of Tourism 3 Economics of Poverty & Income Distribution 3 Gender & Economic Development 3 Economics of Rural Development 3 Advanced Micro-Economics 3 Advanced Macro-Economics 3 Economics Practicum 4 Senior Project 3 12

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Minor in Economics

a. Economics Minor for Non-Commerce students

Requirement for graduation with a Minor in Economics for Non-Commerce students Credit Hours ECO 211 Principles of Economics (Micro) 3 ECO 212 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics & Management 3 STA 211 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 313 Economic Development 3 One Economics elective 3 TOTAL 18 Students exempted from any of the above courses will be required to substitute exempted courses with courses from the Economics minor for Commerce major students (see [b] below). Students from non-commerce majors who do an Economics minor will not be required to do ECO 111. The student will, however, be expected to substitute ECO 111 with any other 3 hour course in Economics.

b. Economics minor for Commerce students

Requirement for graduation with a minor in Economics for Commerce Major Students ECO 309 ECO 310 ECO 311 ECO 313 ECO 411 ECO 412 TOTAL Economic Theory (Micro) Economic Theory (Macro) Money and Banking Economic Development Public Finance Economic Planning Techniques & Structural Adjustment 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

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Students in the Department of Commerce doing a major in Business Administration and Management and who wish to do a minor in Economics should note that ECO 310, ECO 311 and ECO 313 under the Business electives will count as courses for the minor. They will therefore be required to do 15 hours of business electives excluding ECO 310, ECO 311 and ECO 313.

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Course Descriptions in Commerce Department

ACC 111 Financial Accounting 3 Credits

Need for accounting and accounting information, parties who need accounting information; Terminologies in accounting; Generally accepted accounting principles; Principles and concepts in writing up accounts; Double entry book keeping; The accounting equation; The golden rule for accounting; The day books; The journal proper; The ledger accounts of sole proprietors; Balancing up the ledger; The two-column and three-column cash books, cash discounts; The petty cash book; The trial balance; Errors in accounts, suspense accounts, correction of errors; The trading, profit and loss and manufacturing accounts; The balance sheet; Presentation of fixed assets, current assets and liabilities; Year end adjustments; Prepayments and accruals; Reserves and provisions; Capital expenditure and revenue expenditure; Bank reconcilliation statement.

ACC 112 Management Accounting

3 Credits

Purpose of mangerial accounting: difference between financial accounting, cost accounting and management accounting; Role and functions of management accountant; Cost volume profit analysis: break even analysis multiple products; Managerial costing Vs Absorption costing statements; Application of marginal costing in analyzing make or buy decisions, sell or process further decisions, add or drop decisions, pricing standard products, pricing special orders, chosing product mix; Capital expenditure decisions: NPV, IRR, ARR, Payback Period Method; Profitability index; Inventory Control: cost of holding stock re-order planning ( stock levels & EOQ); Budgeting and budgetary control: cash budget, flexible budget, master budget, administrative budgets and functional budgets; Responsibility accounting. Pre-requisite: ACC 111.

ACC 311 Intermediate Accounting I

3 Credits

Accounting theory, accounting standards, the universality of accounting; Company accounts, published accounts-- legal requirements; Balance sheet and profit and loss account; Movement

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of fixed assets; Cash flow statements; Financial analysis-- ratios; Adjustments in accounts, accruals, bad debts, provision for bad debts; Deferred revenue expenditure; Prior year changes; Accounting for depreciation; Control accounts; Self balancing ledgers; Receipts and payments accounts; Income and expenditure accounts. Prerequisite: ACC 111.

ACC 312 Intermediate Accounting II

3 Credits

Bills of exchange; Consignment accounts; Issues of shares and debentures; Share premium accounts; Over-subscription; Forfeiture of shares; Accounting for banks; Partnership accounts; Deed of partnership; Legal provisions; Appropriation accounts; Goodwill-- definition; How goodwill arises; Accounting standard of goodwill; When goodwill may be recorded in accounts; Negative goodwill; Writing off goodwill; Introduction of new partners, retirement of a partner; Dissolution of partnership; Conversion of a partnership to a limited company; Investment accounts; Purchase of shares; Purchase of debentures; Income tax in accounts; Royalty accounts; Hire purchase accounts; Installment payments; Share valuation; Shareholders ratios; Returnable containers. Pre-requisite: ACC 311.

ACC 313 Intermediate Accounting III

3 Credits

Valuation of tangible assets; IAS 16; Revaluation; Estimated Useful life (EUL) extension; Change in the depreciation method; Long term contracts: percentage of work completed; completed contract method; Stock-IAS 2; Valuation of intangible assets; IAS 38; Good will- IAS 22; Research and Development Expenditure-IAS; Leases IAS 17; Deparmental accounts; Branch accounts; Business combinations: absorption amalgamation; Reconstruction: internal (capital re-organisation), esternal; Bankruptcy and receivership. Prerequisite: ACC 312.

ACC 314 Cost Accounting

3 Credits

Introduction to cost accounting: Definitions, Cost accounting concepts, difference between cost, financial and management accounting; Elements of cost: materials, labour and over heads; Job costing; Process costing; Contract costing; Standard costing,; Cost volume profit analysis; Budgeting; Transfer pricing. Pre-requisites: ACC 111, ACC 112. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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ACC 315 Taxation

3 Credits

Theory of taxation; Income chargeable to tax; Ascertainment of total income liable to tax; Deductions and allowances; Tax reliefs; Returns, notices and assessments; Back duty; Tax planning for individuals; Value Added Tax and other taxes; Current developments in taxation in Kenya. Pre-requisite: ACC 111.

ACC 408 Special Topics in Accounting and Finance 3 Credits

As faculty are available and as student demand is apparent, special topics in finance and accounting will be offered as separate courses in a classroom setting and may be repeated for credit if topics are different. For example : personal finances of non-profit organizations; Public finances and national accounting; Fund raising and donor funding, etc.

ACC 411 Advanced Accounting

3 Credits

Consolidated accounts: horizontal and vertical groups, complex groups, associate companies and subsidiaries, acquisition and mergers, foreign exchange; IAS 7: cash flow statement; Inflation accounting: current purchasing power (CPP), current cost accounting (CCA); Value added statements; Earnings per share: basic EPS, Diluted EPS; Taxation in accounts: current tax, deterred tax; Accounting for VAT; revision of accounting concepts and principles. Pre-requisite: ACC 312; Co-requisite: ACC 313 ( i.e ACC 312& ACC 313 can be taken simultaneously.)

ACC 412 Auditing

3 Credits

The nature of auditing: difference between auditing and accountancy, internal audit, and external audit; Duties of public accountants; Objects of auditing: why audit accounts; Internal control and internal check, internal control questionnaire; Starting on a new audit; The audit programme; Audit notes, audit file; Continuous and periodic audit; Vouching and test checking; Audit of cash transactions, accuracy of the cash book; Bank statements and bank reconciliation; Vouching the cash book: receipts and payments; Audit of purchases and sales: purchase ledgers and paybooks, sales returns, goods on sale or return; Goods on sale or return; Audit of the assets, bills receivables; Stock taking; Plant register; The general ledger; 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Valuation of intangible assets; Stock valuation; Reserves and provisions; Statutory books; Requirements of the Companies Act; The balance sheet and the profit and loss account; Dividends; Legal position of an auditor. Pre-requisite: ACC 311.

BUS 111 Business Studies

3 Credits

Definition of commerce, commercial goods and services, production nature of buying and selling, aids to trade occupation; Domestic and foreign commercial activities, direct and indirect production, location of industry, specialization; Types of business organizations, sole proprietors and partnerships; Incorporated and non-corporated companies, legal limitation, mode of operation, the `legal' person; Government, municipal, community cooperatives and interest organizations, women, youth, humanitarian and community ventures; Complex business organizations, mergers, joint ventures, franchise holders, manufacture under licence; Channels of distribution, producers, stockists, wholesalers, middlemen, retailers, warehousing, indenters, manufacturers representatives, commission agents, physical distribution, clearing and forwarding; How businesses buy and pay for goods and services, social responsibility of businesses to the community; Banks and banking in commerce, financing the business, short-term and long-term financing; Financial institutions, credit societies, hire-purchase institutions, statutory and marketing boards, motive and mode of operation; Stock market, capital market organization, public quoted stock companies; Service organizations, insurance companies; Transport and communication in commerce, modes of transport and communication, effect on commercial activity of the nation; International trade barriers, concept of export processing zones (EPZ); Problems of international trade, economic unions, preferential trade tariffs, co-operations and trade agreements, case of African countries.

BUS 112 Business from a Christian Perspective 3 Credits

Introduction: Business from a Christian perspective, personal goals and business; Understanding the Biblical principles of business; God's intention and our response to work; Obligation and right management as means of doing justice; Christian concept of leadership and use of power; Self control, accountability, motivation 2003-2007 Catalogue

203 and manipulation, human selfishness; Moral responsibility of business, social control; Biblical principles of stewardship, justice and wealth; Morality in business transactions; Biblical truth in world of change, secularism, moral decadence, corruption, the Biblical role modelling in business.

BUS 211 Organization and Management

3 Credits

Definition and nature of management; Management principles: Unity of command, scalar principle, unity of direction, management and managers; Management-- a profession, a commitment; Efficient and effective managers; Dimensions of management; The development of management and organization theory; Planning and decision making: organizational goals, strategy and strategic planning, developing and implementing plans, managerial decision making: steps in decision making, quantitative techniques for decision making, management by objectives; The organizing process: concept and approaches of organization theory, designing structures, span of control, departmentation, delegation, accountability, centralization and decentralization, organization charts, line and staff authority; Staffing: its nature and purpose, manager and organization development; Leading and directing, motivation, leadership, communication and the personnel factor; Coordination; The essence of management; The controlling process: steps in control, effective control, resistance to controlling and strategic perspectives of controlling; Management and society, ethical issues in management, social responsibility.

BUS 213 Research Methods

3 Credits

Introduction: meaning and purpose of research, basic and applied research, research and scientific methodology, overview of the research process; selection and definition of the research problem; importance and scope of literature review; developing the conceptual framework; research designs: basic designs,exploratory research, descriptive research, casual research, secondary designs, case studies, surveys, experiments; developing a research plan or proposal; sample design: population of interest, sample and census studies, sample units, sample size, sample selection; data collection: secondary data, primary data, construction of data collection instruments e.g observation forms and questionnaires, measurement 2003-2007 Catalogue

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scales, attitude measurement, attribute measurement, multidimensional scaling, communicating with respondents and fieldwork, procedures and management; data analysis and interpretation: preliminary steps, summarizing techniques, measuring differences, discriminate analysis, cluster analysis; issue in research: validity, reliability, objectivity; research report. Pre-requisites: STA 211 and STA 212.

BUS 309 Business Finance

3 Credits

Sources of finance; share capital: ordinary share capital, preference share capital; debit finance: term loans, bonds and debentures; other sources of finance: bills of exchange, trade credit, debtors factoring, lease finance and hire purchase, venture capital etc; decapital and money market: money market- operations of banks in Kenya, financial instruments in money markets; capital markets- the stock market and the operations of CMA, specialized financial institutions, the central bank; financial analysis (ratios): liquidity ratios, turnover ratios, profitability ratios, gearing ratios, investment ratios; capital budgeting, NPV, IRR, PI, PBP and DPBP, ARR; cost of capital: components cost of capital, weighted average cost of capital, marginal average cost of capital: dividend policy and theories; working capital management: management of cash, management of debtors, management of inventories e.g Economic Order Quantity (EOQ). Pre-requisites ACC 111 and ECO 211.

BUS 313 Human Resources Management

3 Credits

Meaning and definition of human resources management and its functions, reasons for the growth of human resources management; Manpower planning/human resource planning, meaning, need for manpower planning; Job analysis: job description, job specification, person specification and their preparation, job evaluation; Procurement: recruitment, selection, placement and induction; Development: training, executive development, planning and administering the programme; Promotion: transfers, layoff, demotion and discharge; Morale and motivation; Compensation: salary and wages, their administration, incentives and other fringe benefits; Performance appraisal; Grievance handling and disciplinary procedures; Workers participation in management; Health and safety of workers; Industrial laws and workers' rights; Industrial conflict resolution. Pre-requisite: BUS 211. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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BUS 314 Financial Management

3 Credits

Capital budgeting: revision of investment appraisal techniques covered in BF, Risk analysis in capital budgeting, capital rationing, complex capital budgeting situations e.g replacement of an asset; Valuation models; valuation of bonds and shares, yield to maturity; Cost of capital: weighted average cost of capital, marginal average cost of capital. CAPM: Introduction to portfolio theory: systematic risk and unsystematic risk, CAPM, security market line, arbitrage pricing theory; Capital structure theories: net income approach, net operating income approach, traditional view of middle group, MM theories; Foreign exchange: determination of foreign exchange i.e purchasing power parity and interst parity, foreign exchanfe risk, hedging against foreign exchange e.g use of options, futures or fowards, swaps; Introductory managemnt. Pre-requisites: ACC 111, MAT 112, ECO 211, ECO 212, BUS 309.

BUS 318 Organizational Behaviour

3 Credits

Introduction to organizational behaviour: the subject, history, nature and scope of organizational behaviour; Individual behaviour: personality development and characteristics, stress, perception, motivation learning; Interpersonal and group behaviour, dynamics and influence: Groups, interactive behaviour and conflict, communication, power and politics leadership; Organizational structure and behaviour: Classical organization structures, modern organizations structures, behavioural aspects of decision making; Adapting organizations to changing conditions: managing change, organization development. Pre-requisite: BUS 211 .

BUS 319 Insurance Practice

3 Credits

Introduction: Risk-- definition of the concept of risk, types, measurement and hazards of risk; Risk management: objectives and process; Insurance: definition, history, mechanism, role and principles; Types of insurance; Mathematics of insurance; Insurance administration; Reinsurance: definition, purpose, methods and types of reinsurance; Government regulation of insurance: structure and registration; The Christian faith and insurance.

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BUS 320 Career Development

3 Credits

Introduction to the study of career development; Environment for career development; Home environment, school and organization environment; Means of career development, education, training and experience; Model of career stage; Employment problems in Kenya; Career planning; The labour market; Training and development in organizations; International careers.

BUS 321 Business Law I

3 Credits

Nature and meaning of law; Sources of law in East Africa and law of persons; The legal systems in East Africa; Law of contract; Tort law; Law of agency; Relations of the East Africa business organizations to the economic systems: sole trader, partnership, company, corporation; Negotiable instruments; Hire purchase; Banking law; Insurance law; Sale of goods.

BUS 322 Business Law II

3 Credits

Company law; The provisions of the Companies Act relating to the following: nature of registered company, registration/incorporation, certificate of incorporation, effect of registration, types of companies; Company formation: promotion and floatation, prospectus or statement in lieu, contents and registration of memorandum and article of association; Membership: members, qualifications and cessation of membership, lifting of the corporate veil; Share capital: classes of shares, variation of class rights, alteration of capital (reduction), transfer and transmission, certificates and warrants, calls, lieu, forfeiture and surrender; Borrowing powers: mortgages and debentures; Company management and powers: directors ­ appointment, share qualification, vacation of office, remuneration powers and duties, election etc; Company Secretary ­ duties and responsibilities, appointment, re-election and removal; Managing Director; Meeting: statutory meetings, annual general meeting, extraordinary meetings, class meetings, general procedure, voting, rights, resolutions; Dividends: capitalization of profits; Winding up: members and creditors voluntary winding up, powers and duties of liquidators and receivers; Arrangements and reconstruction: elementary knowledge of amalgamations (mergers) and reconstruction. Pre-requisites: BUS 321 2003-2007 Catalogue

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BUS 323 Business Ethics

3 Credits

Definition and significance of the major terms; Honesty in business and fair competition; Justice and love at the work place; Justice to shareholders; Justice to customers; Justice to the public; Business and international morality; Morality in advertising; Work ethics, time for leisure; Virtues and values; A Christian worker in the business world.

BUS 324 Investment

3 Credits

Overview of basic investment concepts identifying methods and techniques for analysing investment opportunities with emphasis placed on common stock investments. Consider both traditional (descriptive) techniques and modern portfolio theory (quantitative techniques). Pre-requisite: STA 211, ECO 211, ECO 212, BUS 314 or 309.

BUS 326 Industrial Psychology

3 Credits

Nature, scope and significance of industrial psychology; The development of industrial psychology in developed and developing countries; Emergency of industrial society; Urbanization; The factory system; Factory as a social organization; Attitude to work; Why people work; The effects of work; Workers' analysis; Work environment; Formal and informal organizations; Quality of work life; Work curve. Pre-requisite: BUS 211.

BUS 328 Small Business Management

3 Credits

Introduction; Starting a business; Management functions; Biblical principles of stewardship; Small enterprise development; Bookkeeping and costing; Marketing, pricing and credit; Risks of small scale enterprises; Loan schemes and insurance; Institutional support and policy implication; Attitude and performance.

BUS 329 Labour Relations and Labour Law 3 Credits

Definition, meaning and nature of labour relations and law; Historical development of industrial law; basis of Kenya's labour laws; The role of the government, employer and employee; Individual relations; Principles of negotiation; The role of trade unions; Collective bargaining agreement (CBA); Trade disputes; Employment Act-- 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Chapter 226, Wages Act-- Chapter 229, Industrial Training Act-- Chapter 237, Workman's Compensation Act-- Chapter 236, Factories Act-- Chapter 514; The law of master and servant; Control of essential services.

BUS 330 Conflict Management

3 Credits

Definition; Nature and source of conflict; Individual and group conflict; Role conflict; Group dynamics; Rumors and gossip: why they occur, management of (grape-vine) communication; Concepts and processes involved in the interface among individual groups and organizations; Leadership; Power and conflict; The conflict process; Consequences of conflict; Functional and dysfunctional conflict; Effects of conflict at work place; Managing conflict; Stress detection and control; Managing change; Motivation, enrichment and job satisfaction. Pre-requisite: BUS 318.

BUS 340 Cooperative Management

3 Credits

Cooperative management; Cooperatives and members' participation; The government and cooperatives; Application of commercial knowledge in cooperatives; Office administration; Cooperative banking and finance; Store-keeping; Cooperative transport management; Cooperative production and marketing.

BUS 413 Strategic Management and Business Policy 3 Credits

The scope of business policy; The corporate plan and the strategic plan; The external environment; The chief executive as organization builder; The need for setting up a conglomerate; The company and society; Governing of the company; Major corporate policies; Dividend policy; Marketing policies; Personnel policies; The company and its suppliers; Problems of the chief executive in a developing country; Social audit; The successful chief executive; Strategy formulation, implementation and strategy evaluation. Pre-requisite: BUS 211, BUS 314, BUS 321.

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BUS 415 Project Planning and Management 3 Credits

Introduction: Definitions; Identification of investment opportunities; Market and demand analysis; Technical analysis; Financial analysis; Financial and economic appraisal of projects; Institutional analysis; Preparation of feasibility reports; The Christian work ethic.

BUS 416 Special Topics in Business and Management 3 Credits

Course content will vary. The instructor will define the content for each course. Examples of subjects which may be covered are: Industrial psychology; Consumerism; The Green Movement and marketing; Consumer laws; Employee motivation; Marketing for non-profit organizations; Marketing of agricultural products and the role of marketing boards especially in selected African countries (Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania and others), Procurement and other management areas.

BUS 417 Entrepreneurship and Leadership 3 Credits

The entrepreneur; Selecting a business venture-- elements of an opportunity; Elements of the marketing plan; Marketing purpose of a firm; Assessing customers' needs; Portfolio segment management for establishing competitive advantage; Elements of the business plan; Sustainable competitive advantage; Sales plan; Production plan; Financial plan; Presentation of the business plan (oral and written). Pre-requisite: BUS 314.

BUS 418 Project Management

3 Credits

Project Management power: projects, projects everywhere, the process that works, The rules of the project game, You? A project Manager? The project initiation Phase: understanding Projects that are worth doing, scooping out the goals for a project, Understanding risks and constraints, Building a project team. The project Planning Phase: the breakdown of tasks: What really needs to be done? The network diagram: A MAP for the project, getting who and what you need, Project start to finish, The implementation Phase: Getting started on the right track, Leadership and the project manager, Form of Project organization, Operating guidelines, making the 2003-2007 Catalogue

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communications count. The controlling Phase: Monitoring and control, Conflicts: Resolving and benefiting, Changes, common project problems. Termination Phase: Project smooth conclusion, The final evaluation. Software for all projects.

BUS 431 International Trade

3 Credits

Introduction: Meaning of term international trade, forces in international trade environment, importance of international trade, advantages and disadvantages of international trade, problems of international trade; International trade and foreign investment: direction of trade, major trading partners and foreign investment; Theories of international trade, barriers to international trade, arguments for and against protection; Exporting: how to enter foreign markets, types of markets, procedure and documentation and prices in international trade payments; Importing: procedure, documentation payments and restricting imports; International organizations relevant to international trade: examples, World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), International Finance Corporation (IFC), International Development Association (IDA), World Trade Organization (incorporating GATT); International monetary system and balance of payments: the gold standard, balance of payments, equilibrium and disequilibrium experiments in floating money markets and foreign exchange; Government involvement in international trade: functions of customs and excise department, government aids to exports, commodity markets and international cooperation. Pre-requisite: ECO 211, ECO 212.

BUS 492 Independent Study Administration and Management

in

Business 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to explore specialized and innovative topics in Business Administration and Management through directed study. The student concerned will choose a topic and will discuss it with the lecturer responsible for the subject. The lecturer will study the student's proposal and make suggestions to ensure that sufficient ground will be covered. The lecturer will then give the student a list of textbooks, newspapers and magazines to read. He will set questions for the student and discuss his answers with him not less than once a week. May be repeated for credit. Pre-requisite: Permission of Instructor. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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BUS 498 Senior Project

4 Credits

The student will get involved with one or two companies in order to come out with a creative idea that may be of use to one or more of them. The student chooses, with the help of a lecturer, a specialised and creative topic he/she would like to explore. The lecturer must be specialised on that area of study, so as to give all guidance necessary to enable the student to write a report for grading. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

BUS 520 Business Practicum

4 Credits

The student will be expected to do an assigned task in an employing business organization, which agrees with the employer's need and the student's training. As part of the assignment, the student will be expected to examine and report on the relative effectiveness of the business functions to which he is assigned and of his performance of his assigned functions. Specific reading will be assigned that relates to the nature of the student's task. The assignment will take seven (7) weeks or 270 hours. Pre-requisite: Permission of Instructor.

ECO 211 Principles of Economics (Micro)

3 Credits

Introduction: meaning, nature and scope of micro-economics; The methodology of micro economics and its basic concepts; Economic goals and problems; The central economic issues-- scarcity and choice; Economic systems; Demand, supply and prices; Basic consumer theory of demand, utility, indifference curve analysis; Supply and demand: individual and market demand; market equilibrium; Elasticity; Cost structures in the short run and in the long run; Total, average, and marginal costs; Law of variable professions, increasing and decreasing returns; The theory of the firm; Objectives of the firm, types of business units; The demand and supply of the factors of production; Land, labour, capital and entrepreneurship; The balance between factors of production and development; Market structures: price and output determination under conditions of perfect competition, imperfect competition-- monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly; Profit maximization and elementary equilibrium analysis; Pricing of productive factors; Wage determination and trade unions; Welfare economics and micro economics policy issues; Case for free market, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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government intervention; Aims and objectives of government policy. Pre-requisite: ECO 111 ( For non Commerce Major students and those doing a minor in Business Adminstration).

EC0 212 Principles of Economics (Macro) 3 Credits

Definition and meaning of major terms; National incomes and national output; Determination of national output; Inflation and national growth; Economic growth and population; Economics of environment and energy problems; Environmental policy and economics of public choice; Money and banking; The banking system; International trade and trade policy; Economic problems of poverty; Markets for capital and natural resources; Integrated view of monetary and fiscal policies; International economics; National debt; Donor aid and economy. Prerequisite: ECO 211

ECO 308 International Economics

3 Credits

Introduction: Meaning and definition; Nature and scope; The classical theory of comparative advantage, including Adam Smith, Ricardo; Application to developing countries; Herbeler's theory of opportunity cost. Terms of trade; The modern theory of factor endowments i.e. Heckscher-Ohlin Theory (H.O.); Its superiority over the classical theory; International trade and economic growth; Terms of trade; Gains from trade; Commercial policy: free trade vs. protection, tariffs, import quotas; Exchange control and custom union; Case for integration in Africa; Balance of payments: meaning and components; Balance of payment policy; Foreign exchange rate and policy; International economic relations and organizations: i..e., foreign aid, multinationals and economic development; International Monetary Fund (I.M.F.), The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (I.B.R.D.) and international liquidity; World Trade Organization (W.T.O.). Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 309 Economic Theory (Micro)

3 Credits

Introductory definition, scope and nature of economics, microeconomics; Consumer theory; Cardinal utility theory; Ordinal utility theory; Utility maximization, a mathematical treatise; Derivation of consumers' demand for commodities; Income and substitution effects; Consumer surplus; Application of ordinal utility analysis; Theory of Production; The firm profit-maximization assumption; The 2003-2007 Catalogue

213 law of diminishing marginal productivity; Returns to scale; Specific production functions; Concepts for costs and revenue; Market Structures; Definition of a market; Perfect competition; Monopoly; Monopolistic competition and oligopoly markets; Input/Factor Market Structure; Price and employment of factors in competitive factor and product market; Price and employment of factor inputs in competitive input markets and monopolistic product markets; Bilateral monopoly. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 310 Economic Theory (Macro)

3 Credits

The analysis of the Behaviour of Economic aggregates; National Accounting; Consumption: Keynes and Post-Keynesian theories of consumption (including Absolute, Relative, Permanent Income Hypothesis, and Life Cycle Hypothesis); Investment: interest rates and Acceleration Principle. the Production Function and the supply and demand for labour; Price levels and goods markets; Money market demand for and supply of money including major theories; General macro-economic models: Classical model; Keynesian Theory of income, employment and the price level and including the multiplier IS-LM analysis; Inflation and cycles; Macro-economic policy. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 311 Money and Banking

3 Credits

Why study money, baking and the financial system; An overview of the financial system; What is money? Interest rates; Behavior of interest rates; The banking firm and the management of financial institutions (introduce students to the twin concepts of asymmetrical information: adverse selection and moral hazards in financial markets) ; Banking industry: structure and competition including the organization of the industry; the economic analysis of banking regulations i.e Central banking theory; Monetary policy; The conduct of monetary policy: targets and goals; Aggregate demand and supply analysis; Money and inflation. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 312 African Economic Problems

3 Credits

Introduction: The African economic and development issues/ problems; The meaning of development and underdevelopment; Characteristics of African economies; Obstacles to Africa's economic 2003-2007 Catalogue

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development; African Development History before, during and after colonialism; Democratization and Governance, Civil wars and Political disturbances, and Natural disasters; Population issue and its effects on development; Economic management issues related to effective relations vs Universalistic relations; Economic crisis in Africa today; The West and Africa's Economic Development; Donor agencies; role of World Bank; IMF and other International donor agencies; Debt crisis in Africa; Future development in Africa, Regionalization and trade arrangements, East African Economic Integration, PTA - COMESA, ECOWAS, the MEGHREB, the Mediterranean Rim of Africa, the New Economic Order, Strategic approach to development priorities in Africa. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212,

ECO 313 Economic Development

3 Credits

The meaning of development e.g. measuring development; Difference between growth and development; The main characteristics of developing countries; Dimensions of poverty; Concept of basic needs approach; Trade off between growth and distributions; Measuring poverty; Theories of economic development: classical theories, dependency and counter-revolution; Mobilization of domestic resources for development; Savings; Cooperative; Industrialization as a development strategy; The role of agriculture in economic development; Human resources in development; Population growth and development; Population control, education and training; Health; Mobilization of foreign resources for development: with particular emphasis on aid, foreign direct investment; Trade and economic development; Regional economic cooperation; Development planning: rationale for planning; Planning process and basic models: micro and macro planning. Prerequisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 314 Economics of Population

3 Credits

History of population growth and economic development; Structural changes in population in the process of economic development; A study of population theories; Malthus and neo-malthusians; Theory of optimum population; Demographic transition theory; Economic theories of population growth e.g. Leibenstein's Minimum Effort Theory; Economic theory of child bearing and family formation e.g. factors affecting fertility, factors affecting population settlement; 2003-2007 Catalogue

215 Urbanization and migration; Labour supply; Economically active population, dependency and participation; Occupational and industrial compositon of work-force; Structural changes with economic development; Employment, unemployment, manpower planning e.g. definition measurement and politics; Inter-relation of population change and economic development; Population and food supply; Population growth and capital formation; Choice of techniques and development of agriculture with special reference to developing countries; Need for a population policy; Kenya's population policy; Evaluation of family planning programmes. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 316 Introduction to Econometrics

3 Credits

Introduction: Definition of econometrics; Processes of econometric analysis; Econometric models; Correlation; Regression; Two variable linear regression models; Multivariable linear regression model; Evaluation of the statistical rehabilitation of the model; Non-linear relationships, estimates and regression analysis of variance; Problems of econometrics; Regression by matrix algebra; Simultaneous equation models. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309, ECO 310, STA 211, MAT 112 or Permission of Instructor.

ECO 317 Comparative Economic Systems

3 Credits

Goals of an economic system; Growth, income distribution, employment, efficiency, justice peace, freedom and community wellbeing; Capitalistic and socialistic economies including the Marxian interpretation; Feminist model, the green model, Soviet model, Chinese model; Mixed economies; Selective aspects; Market socialist economies; Centrally planned economies; Other topics include: Permanent employment systems in Japan, Industrial democracy in Sweden, Indicative planning in France, Workers selfmanagement in the former Yugoslavia, Economic reforms in Hungary, Resource allocation in the former Soviet Union; Centralization and decentralization of the economy; Model for understanding transnational capitalism and new international order; The permanent arms economy; The political economic question, ownership of factors of production; Whether democracy promotes growth or vice versa; African model, African Socialism, Planning in mixed economic systems; East African recent reforms in political and economic 2003-2007 Catalogue

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spheres with special emphasis on Kenya. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309, ECO 310, STA 211 or Permission of Instructor.

ECO 318 Environmental and Resource Economics 3 Credits

Definition of major concepts relating to environment, population and pollution abatement externalities and environment public choice; Emissions and pollution; Methods of pollution concept of optimum pollution; Pollution control measures; Social cost of pollution; Estimating the cost and benefits of pollution control; Negative externalities, efficient pollution control; Pollution abatement policies; Regulation, command and control, emission charges, pollution tax permits, excise duty on manufacture of pollutants, tax rebates, recent EPA policies, lobby groups; Coping with negative externalities; Wood stoves improvement, appropriate technology on renewable resources, rehabilitation and recycling; Political reality of environmental economics; Economics of exhaustible resources; Markets for depletable natural resources; Renewable resources, property rights and laws; Interest groups and economics of environment; World environmentalism, the Green movements, public awareness, consumer education and environmental matters mobilizing public awareness on economic changes of pollution use of dangerous chemicals and application in Agriculture and livestock. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, STA 211, MAT 112 or Permission of Instructor.

ECO 319 Economics of Industry

3 Credits

Introduction: Firms, objectives and industrial structure, conduct and performance approach; Cost conditions and pricing behaviour; Market structure and concentration including product differentiation, monopolies and barriers to entry; Role of advertising in individual growth; Vertical integration and diversification; Invention, innovation and diffusion; Industrial location; State or Private Control; Deindustrialization; Public Policy and Industrial Structure in Kenya and the East African Co operation Region. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

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ECO 321 Economics of Agriculture

3 Credits

Production Analysis: nature and scope of agriculture; Demand for agriculture; Marketing farm products; Agricultural prices fluctuation, objectives and methods of price stabilization; The farm firm; Profit vs. satisfaction; Maximization principles of production; Resourceproduct relationship; Factors of farm production and the determination of their efficiency and return; Risk and uncertainty in agriculture; Agricultural Development Policy in Kenya: characteristics of Kenya's rural economy, obstacles to Kenya's agricultural development, structural, institutional and technological; Kenya's agricultural development policy and strategy pre and post 1963-- Problem of land size e.g. land reforms, problems of labour and wages and working conditions, price fluctuation and stabilization; Agricultural credit and finance; Adequacy and need; Institutional structure of rural credit e.g. cooperatives and commercial banks. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, MAT 112.

ECO 322 Economics of Labour

3 Credits

The theory of labour: labour market, labour productivity, personnel management, labour as a factor of production; Equilibrium allocation of time of work: marginal analysis, income and substitution effect of wage changes, backward (kinked) labour supply curves; Market demand for supply of labour: market supply of labour services, population effects on wages; Wage differentials: reasons for wage differentials, compensating wage differential; Motivating workers: personnel management, signing, screening and recruitment of personnel, personnel development; The economics of labour unions, organizational problems of labour unions, economic theories of labour, labour unions in developed countries of Europe and America, labour unions in less developed countries (LDCS), labour union movement in Kenya, labour shopstewards and membership, labour union and productivity; Collective bargaining and employment: impact of unions on wages; Monopoly of labour,Marginal input cost for monopsony firms, monopsony power; Bilateral Monopoly: effects of labour unions on wages and employment in dealing with monopsony; Conflict between labour unions and modern technology, place of computers, robots, electronic impact, competition and future of labour unions. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309.

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ECO 411 Public Finance

3 Credits

Introduction: classical economics and public finance, the scope of public finance, public vs. private sector; Major functions of budgetory policy: structures of the budget, the allocation function i.e. Theory of social goods, distribution function and stabilization function; Principles of taxation: characteristics of a "good" tax structure,equity rules e.g. ability-to-pay principle, benefit principle; Taxation for development, taxable capacity, direct taxation, indirect taxation, taxation and trade, taxation and agriculture, urban finance, comparison and evaluation of different taxes; Taxation and tax policy in East Africa, Kenya's tax structure; Public expenditure: government expenditure, structure and national income, budgetary principles, expenditure shifting and incidence, cost-benefit analysis; Public debt; Structure of public finance in Kenya; Fiscal policy in Kenya. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, MAT 112.

ECO 412 Economics of Planning and Techniques and Structural Adjustment 3 Credits

Introduction: The planning process and types of planning; Reasons for development planning; The meaning of Structural Adjustment Programme; Project Appraisal: Project planning; Cost-benefit analysis; Discounted present value; Input-output analysis; Linear programming; Private benefits and social costs; Importance of planning: private, social, environmental, etc; The cause and economic basis of Structural Adjustment Programme; Structural Adjustment Programmes and development economics of third world countries particularly the less developed countries (LDCs); Economic role of the industrialized countries of the North (DCs); IMF and World Bank in SAPs; The nature of adjustment programmes: The expenditure reducing policies; Expenditure switching policies; Institutional adjustment policies; Currency reforms; Balance of payment and current account of the nations concerned; Funding programmes: Characteristics of funding programmes; Growth stabilization; Distributive implications; Monitoring the SAPs process. Prerequisites: ECO 211& ECO 212.

ECO 413 Economics of Tourism

3 Credits

Tourism as an invisible industry; Introduction and the dynamics of the industry; Tourism as a national asset and liability; Cost benefit 2003-2007 Catalogue

219 analysis of the tourism industry; National and international influences on tourism industry: political influences; Revenue; Tarrifs and taxes; The effects of macro-economics policies on tourism; Effects of exchange rate on fluctuations; Supply and demand economies with regard to tourism: tourism products, the pricing of tourism products; Tourism investment: Financing tourism; Investment policies in the tourism sector-- Investment incentives; Kenya tourism strategy; Marketing; The competitiveness of Kenya as a tourist destination in comparison with other countries in the region; Role of multinational corporations in tourism. Pre-requisites: All lower level courses including ECO 412.

ECO 414 Economics of Poverty and Income Distribution 3 Credits

Definition of poverty and economic inequality; Distribution curves, income entitlement approach; Indicators of poverty, Lorenz Curve; Factors determining distribution of income: human capital, vicious cycle of poverty, theories of poverty, dynamics of input markets and income distribution; Technology and productivity change; Personal distributions of income in developed countries and developing countries including Kenya; The role of the government in income distributions, taxation, development of social capital, health care, social Welfare (NSSF, Pensions, Provident Funds, old age & child welfare programmes); Fighting poverty and human deprivation; The new economic order; South/North divide; Poverty gap. ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309, ECO 411.

ECO 415 Gender and Economic Development 3 Credits

Basic concepts of division of labour by gender, time allocation, gender oppression and subjection; Basic models: feminist, technological and welfare models; The new household economics: intra-household relationships, cooperation and conflict; Feminization of poverty; Rights of women, property ownership, and the girl child; Bridging the gender inequality gap, gender policies, eradicating gender underprivileges; Role of United Nations bodies in fostering gender sensitivity and equitable income distribution. ECO 211, ECO 212.

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ECO 417 Economics of Rural Development 3 Credits

The nature of rural development (definition of peasant societies); Measurement and dynamics of rural poverty; Operational strategies for rural development; Policies and programmes for rural development; Rural population and rural poverty in developing countries, impact of Agricultural development; Migration and its effects on rural development; Population, landlessness and rural development; Nutrition levels in rural areas and effects in productivity; Government and non-government intervention in rural development; Education levels and rural development; Resource distribution acquired human capital, breaking the vicious cycle of rural poverty; Informal sector development in rural areas; The new home economics, farm size, and technical change; the green movement of rural development. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212.

ECO 418 Advanced Micro-Economics

3 Credits

Introduction: A brief overview of micro-economic analysis, basic concepts and techniques of micro-economic theory; Partial equilibrium analysis of markets: Marshallian supply-demand synthesis; Neoclassical theories of consumption and production including uncertainty i.e. choice under uncertainty; Optimal risk sharing and implicit contracts; Input/output and linear programming analysis; Further treatment of perfect and imperfect competition: perfect competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly, oligopoly, duopoly; General equilibrium and welfare theory: general equilibrium and macro-economic equilibrium, equilibrium is exchange and production, criteria of social welfare, maximization of social welfare; Game theory: players, objectives, payoffs and strategies, normal form representation of a game, N-player game theory, prisoner/s dilemma, Nash equilibrium, introduction to simultaneous-move games. Pre-quisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 309, MAT 112.

ECO 419 Advanced Macro-Economics

3 Credits

Introduction: Basic concepts of macro-economic theory, varieties of macro-economic theory; Keynesian Model of Income Determination in a Closed Economy: Keynes Vs. Classical economists; Extension of the Keynesian Model of Income Determination in an Open

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221 Economy: the foreign trade multiplier and changes in the level of income; Critique and relevance of Keynesian system; Supply-side macro-economics: the aggregate supply function: Keynesian and Classical; Rational expectations; Trade (real business) cycles: phases of a Trade Cycle; Theories of trade cycle; Theories of growth: Harold's growth model, Domar's growth model, the link between Harrold's and Domar's models (Harrold-Domar model), Neoclassical growth theories. Pre-requisites: ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 310, MAT 112.

ECO 520 Economics Practicum

4 Credits

The student will be placed with any agency (Governmental or nongovernmental), involved in Business developmental work. The student will be expected to examine and report on the relative effectiveness of the organization, functions to which he/she is assigned, performance of the duties assigned to him/her, report on strengths, weakness, opportunities of the organization and make any recommendation.

ECO 597 Senior Project

4 Credits

The student will choose a research topic of his/her choice and be supervised by a lecturer specialized in that area. At the end of the study, the student will compile the findings and present the written report for grading.

MAK 212 Marketing Principles

3 Credits

Marketing: the marketing concept; the role of marketing in an organization and within the economy and the concept of marketing mix; Integration of Christian faith and marketing and the new marketing challenges; marketing opportunity analysis: environmental analyses, opportunity identification, market segmentation, market information systems; consumer markets and consumer buyer behavior; business markets and business buyer behavior. Product decisions: definitions, classifications, product lifecycle, consumer adoption process, product development and management, packaging, branding and labeling decisions; price decisions: price setting, objectives and approaches and pricing policy; promotion decisions: tools for promotion; distribution decisions: channel

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decision, types of middlemen and distribution systems; managing marketing efforts: building customer relationships through satisfaction, value and quality; creating competitive advantages: competitor analysis and competitive marketing strategies; Marketing management: plan components and development, profitability; Extending marketing: the global market place i.e international marketing, marketing, marketing services, organizations, person, places and ideas, non-profit marketing; Agricultural marketing: special problems, role of cooperative societies and marketing boards; Marketing of services: characteristics of services, problems in service marketing and role of service marketing; Industrial marketing; How it is different from fast moving consumer goods (FMCG); Non-profit oriented marketing: aims and objectives, classifications and expectations of the consumers; Marketing and society: social responsibility and marketing ethics; Course review: careers in marketing and marketing problems in developing countries. (It is strongly recommended that this course is taken in the 2nd Year of study)

MAK 315 Consumer Behaviour

3 Credits

Introduction: diversity of consumer behaviour; What is consumer behaviour; Consumer research; Market Segmentation: bases for segmentation, criteria for effective targeting of market segments; Consumer needs and motivation; Dynamic nature of motivation types and systems of needs; Personality and consumer behaviour: theories of personality, personality and understanding consumer diversity; Self and self images; Consumer perception: what is perception?, the dynamics of perception, consumer imagery; Consumer learning and involvement: what is learning?, behavioural learning theories, cognitive learning theory; Brand loyalty and brand equity; Consumer attitude formation and change; Communication and persuasion: components of communication, the communication process, designing persuasive communication: Group dynamics and consumer reference groups: what is a group; applications of reference group concept; The family: what is a family; functions of the family, family decision making, the family life cycle; Social class and consumer behaviour: what is culture; characteristics of culture, sub-culture; Aspects of consumer behaviour: what is sub-culture; Personal influence and opinion leadership process; Dynamics of

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223 the leadership process and measurement of opinion. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 316 Advertising

3 Credits

Introduction: What makes great advertising players; Advertising and society; Ethics and regulation; Advertising; The marketing mix; Advertising agencies; How agencies are organized; Consumer audience; Strategy and planning: the advertising plan, creative plan and copy strategy, psychology of advertising, how brand image works; Media planning: media operation, setting objectives, developing strategies, media selection, procedures, staging a media plan, print media, broadcast media, media buying functions, special skills expert knowledge on media opportunities; Creative side of advertising: creative concept, execution and effective creativity; Creating print advertisements: writing for print, print production; Creating broadcast advertising: mastering television commercials, the television environment, the nature of commercials, planning and producing commercials; Sales promotions: defining sales promotions, the size of sales promotion, the future of sales promotion; Public Relations: the challenge of public relations, comparing public relations and advertising, international advertising, the global perspective, organization of international advertising agencies. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 317 Marketing Research

3 Credits

Introduction to the course: definition of marketing research, process and problem formulation, the Christian faith and marketing research; Problem definition; Identification of information needs and formulating specific projects; Research designs: types of research design, nature and functions of design; Data collection: secondary data; Data collection: primary data; Levels of measurements, validity and reliability; Processing and analysing data; Writing report. Prerequisite: MAK 212, BUS 213.

MAK 331 Financial Aspects of Marketing 3 Credits

The emphasis here is on the need for financial literacy amongst marketing practitioners. An analysis of the financial concepts and their relevance to marketing, basic computations, interpretations and 2003-2007 Catalogue

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application of financial principles to issues concerning the marketing mix elements (product, price, promotion and place). Pre-requisite: ACC 111, MAK 212.

MAK 333 Agricultural Marketing

3 Credits

Particular features and problems in agricultural marketing in developing countries; The importance of supplies, prices and profits in farming and the food sector; National policies for food and agriculture; Production, storage, processing, pricing and distribution of food and farm products; Making the best use of the resources to satisfy consumers' needs against a background of technical progress, innovation and the influence of culture. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 335 Marketing Communication

3 Credits

The marketing communications mix; The structure of the marketing communications business; The environmental framework of marketing communciations practice; The media of marketing communication and management; Planning and control for marketing communications; Appointment, briefing and evaluation of external agencies that contribute to the execution of marketing communication strategy. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 336 Marketing of Services

3 Credits

Course content enables students to acquire expertise in applying marketing techniques in the service sector in preparation for roles and functions in the service industry in developing countries. Topics include definition of service, competition in services, service marketing, product policy, developing of new services, process element of service marketing mix, pricing in service marketing, promotion of services, the distribution of services, physical evidence in services, marketing in service organizations. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 338 Export Marketing

3 Credits

Problems of product, price, communication and distribution policies with special reference to the exporting of semi-processed industrial and consumer goods from developing economies to other developing countries and to developed countries. An analysis is made of export promotion strategies, export financing, export documentation and 2003-2007 Catalogue

225 the concept of export processing zones (EPZ). The role of regional groupings and international organizations like PTA, COMESA, GATT, UNCTAD etc is also examined. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 418 Marketing Management and Strategy 3 Credits

The dynamic arena of business; Viewing change as an opportunity; Factors impeding customer satisfaction; Finding competitive advantage; Product/service innovation; The impact of innovation; Marketing planning analysis: analyzing competition, product strategy, promotion strategy, pricing strategies. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 419 Business Marketing

3 Credits

Definition of industrial products; Classification and identification of industrial products; Consumer and industrial products; Raw materials, manufactured products, intermediate products and accessories; Individual product decisions relating to industrial products; Capital items, plant and equipment; Industrial supplies and services; Special attention on marketing of industrial products; Safety and handling of industrial products; Transportation and packaging of industrial products; Individual product features, design and branding; The Green Movement and environmental concerns on production, consumption, handling and disposal of industrial products; Pollution abatement and control, disposal of toxic products; Danger to natural resources; The great debate on industrial development. Prerequisite: MAK 212.

MAK 420 Sales Management

3 Credits

Definition: Historical development of selling concept; Difference between selling and marketing; The role of the sales manager; Sales territory, circuit district; Determination of sales district; Sales personnel; Training of sales personnel; National and international types of selling: wholesale, retail, industrial, service selling; Positioning of sales outlets; Wholesale and retail locations; Retail shopping areas; Evaluating new locations, growth areas of retailers and wholesalers; Managing human resources in the sales management; Staffing the sales office/stores; Direction; Sales force motivating; Morale building; Leadership qualities of a sales manager; Sales merchandise and central sources of merchandise; The 2003-2007 Catalogue

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merchandise mix; Merchandise management and inventory control; Sales promotion; Forecasting sales; Translating sales objectives; Projected sales; Sales research; Inventory methods; Pricing the merchandise; Legal consideration; Store services; Managing services in retailing; Managing customer credit; Personal selling and advertising; Choosing the media; Sales display; The environment of sales management; Customer services; Demographic factors; Sales management and customer organizations; the Green Movement in selling; The future of sales management. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MAK 421 International Marketing

3 Credits

Objective: To gain greater insight into the process of management at the international level and to understand the role of the international marketing manager in overseeing international operations. The importance of exports to a developing country; The global approach; Comparative analysis of world markets; World marketing infrastructures and intra-community trade activities; The international marketing planning and control; International market research, marketing planning and control; International and multinational marketing strategy; Exporting and international trade regulations. Pre-requisites: MAK 212.

MAK 422 International Management

3 Credits

The process of management at the international level and to understand the role of the international business manager in overseeing international operations. Contents: The international business environment; Alternative foreign involvement strategies (exporting, licensing, franchising direct investment); International competition; Relations between multi-national firms and host nations; International transfer of technology; position of developing countries in the international trade. Pre-requisite: MAK 212.

MIS 211 Management Information Systems 3 Credits

Information systems revolution; transforming business and management; the strategic role of information systems; information systems; organization and management; ethical and social impact of information systems; computers and information processing; information systems software; managing data resources; 2003-2007 Catalogue

227 telecommunications and networks; the internet: electronic commerce and electronic business; redesigning an organization with information systems; approaches to systems-building; managing knowledge; enhancing management decision making; information systems security and control; managing international information systems. Pre-requisites: ACS 101

MIS 281

System Analysis & Design Methods I 3 Credits

The system development environment. System development process models. E.g. waterfall, spiral, and structured system analysis and development methodology (SSADM): systems study and requirement specifications, managing an information systems project, identifying and selecting systems development projects, initiating and planning system development projects, determining systems requirements. System design: process modeling, logic modeling, conceptual data modeling. Selecting the best alternative design strategy. Prerequisite MIS 211

MIS 282 Systems Analysis & Design Methods II 3 Credits

Logical design: Designing forms and reports, designing the interfaces and dialogues, designing databases: logical data modeling. Physical design: designing physical files and databases, designing the internals: program and process design, designing distributed systems. Implementation strategies: object oriented analysis and design, rapid application development. System implementation and maintenance. Pre-requisite MIS 281

MIS 311 Information Systems Management 3 credits

This course is a follow up of the Management Information Systems and is geared to equipping tyhe students with the concept of information systems planning and management.

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MIS 400 Information system project

3 Credits

System evaluation, system support. Project management. Group dynamics. Conflict resolution. Project reporting.

MIS 408 Special Topics in Management Information Systems 3 Credits

Topics offered under this course number will vary depending on faculty availability and interest and student need. These topics will allow students to go into greater depth in areas of special interest. Regular topics will include, without being limited to , to the following:

MIS 408 A Internet /Intranet Application Development

3 Credits

Inter-networking applications and development with a focus on the internet and corporate intranets. Topics include electronic data interchange; electronic commerce (EC); information access; application development technologies and techniques. Special emphasis is placed on planing, security, privacy, ethics and management as related to developing a Website in a business. Impact of the internet on the discipline's of business, including information produces and distribution channels, internet focused marketing, operational transformation, formation of electronic markets and digital economy. Fundamentals enabling technologies, including World Wide Web, browsers, search engines, portals and internet service providers, HTML and web development tools, and Website metering tools. Designing principals of EC applications in business process contexts. Skills for simple WebPages development, WebPages development with embedded spreadsheets and data base functionality. Soft ware to be used may include HTML ( including frames, tables, forms, image maps), Microsoft's Front Page, VB Script and JavaScript.

MIS 408 B Multimedia Programming

3 Credits

Introduction to concepts of multimedia. It coves applications, tools, and design of multi media systems. Students will be expected to develop a multi media system or systems. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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MIS 408 C Data and Database Administration 3 Credits

This course explores the planning and management of corporate data, information and knowledge resource. Topics include data and database administrator, strategic data planning, information resource management, data quality, data security, global information architecture; advanced data manipulation languages, comprehensive DBMS facilities and object ­oriented DBMS; analysis and data mining tools; deploying and managing databases in a distributed environment. Data integrity and privacy. Technologies include Oracle database server and Oracle enterprise (OEM) graphical DBA interface.

MIS 413 Introduction TO Electronic Commerce 3 Credits

Business models and market. Effective content for electronic commerce. Marketing for electronic commerce. Electronic commerce security. Transaction security and payment technology. Business to business electronic commerce. The outlook for ECommerce.

MIS 451 Designing and Building Web Sites 3 Credits

Web fundamentals. Client/server architecture. Page design. Content design. Site design. Intranet design. Web browsers. Accessibility for users with disabilities. International (Global) use of the internet and E-Commerce. The trend and future of the internet. Simplicity in web design. HTML and ASP programming. Introduction to JAVA language. Writing JAVA applets. Pre-requisites ACS 211

STA 211 Business Statistics I

3 Credits

Introduction: Meaning of statistics, role of statistics in decision making process; Sampling: statistical inquiry, samples and proportion, reasons for sampling, sampling methods; Data collection: sources of business data, methods of collecting data, design of questionnaire; Organizing and summarizing data; Tabular and graphical representation, frequency, distribution and its measures of location, charts and diagram; Measures of central tendency; Measures of 2003-2007 Catalogue

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variation or dispersion: range, average, deviation, variance, standard deviation, relative measures, coefficient of varian, Lorenz curves and their significance; Linear regression and correlation; Index numbers; Introduction to probability. Pre-requisite: MAT 111.

STA 212 Business Statistics II

3 Credits

Probability and sampling distribution: theory of probability, Binomial, Normal Distribution; Sampling distribution; Mean and proportions; Statistical inference; Estimation and hypothesis testing; Chi-square distribution; Test for independence; Goodness of fit test; Analysis of variance; Non-parametric tests; Mann-Whitney U rank test, Kruskal -Wallis rank test; Time series analysis,forecasting. Pre-requisite: STA 211.

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SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME ACCOUNTING MAJOR 1 ST YEAR Semester I INS 111 ENG 111/098 BIL 111 ICA 111 MAT 111 ACC 111 ACS 101 3 3 3 1 3 3 2 --18

Semester II INS 112 ENG 111/112 BIL 112 PHY 112 ACC 112 BIO 111 HPE 113 3 3 3 2 3 2 1 --17

2ND YEAR Semester I BUS 211 BIL 212 INS 212 STA 211 ECO 211 MIS 211 ART/LIT/ MUS 111 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 --18

Semester II ENV 112 MAK 212 PHL 111 MAT 112 STA 212 ECO 212 2 3 3 3 3 3

--17

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3RD YEAR Semester I BUS 213 ACC 311 BUS 309 BUS 321 ACC 314 RET 320 POL 111 Semester II RET 321 INS 313 ACC 312 ACC 315 BUS 314 BUS 323

3 3 3 3 3 2 1 ----18

2 3 3 3 3 3 ----17

4 TH YEAR Semester I BUS 413 ACC 313 INS 412 Free Electives

3 3 3 6 ---15

Semester II ACC 411 3 ACC 412 3 Free Electives 3 ---9

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT MAJOR

1ST YEAR Semester I BIL 111 ICA 111 ENG 111/098 INS 111 ACC 111 MAT 111 ACS 101 Semester II BIL 112 ENG 111/112 INS 112 ACC 112 PHY 112 BIO 111 HPE 113

3 1 3 3 3 3 2 ----18

3 3 3 3 2 2 1 ----17

2ND YEAR Semester I MIS 211 INS 212 ECO 211 STA 211 BUS 211 BIL 212 ART/LIT /MUS 111 Semester II ECO 212 STA 212 MAT 112 MAK 212 ENV 112 PHL 111

3 2 3 3 3 2 2 ----18

3 3 3 3 2 3

-----17

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3RD YEAR Semester I BUS 213 RET 320 BUS 309 POL 111 Electives BUS 321 Semester II INS 313 3 BUS Electives 3 BUS 323 3 BUS 314 3 RET 321 2 General Electives 3 -----17

3 2 3 1 6 3 -----18

4TH YEAR Semester I INS 412 BUS 413 Electives Free Electives Semester II General Electives 6

3 3 6 6 ------18

------6

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ECONOMICS MAJOR

1 ST YEAR Semester I ENG 111/098 INS 111 BIL 111 ICA 111 MAT 111 ACC 111 ACS 101 Semester II ENG 112/111 INS 112 BIL 112 PHY 112 ACC 112 BIO 111 HPE 113

3 3 3 1 3 3 2 ---18

3 3 3 2 3 2 1 ---17

2ND YEAR Semester I BUS 112 INS 212 MIS 211 BIL 212 STA 211 ECO 211 ART/LIT /MUS 111 Semester II PHL 111 ENV 112 MAT 112 STA 212 ECO 212 BUS 321

3 2 3 2 3 3 2 ----18

3 2 3 3 3 3

----17

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3RD YEAR Semester I ECO 308 ECO 309 RET 320 ECO 310 BUS 213 BUS 309 POL 111 Semester II ECO 311 RET 321 ECO 313 ECO 314 ECO 316 INS 313

3 3 2 3 3 3 1 ----18

3 2 3 3 3 3 ----17

4TH YEAR Semester I BUS 323 INS 412 ECO Electives ECO 411 Semester II ECO 412 3 General Electives 6

3 3 6 3 ---15

----9

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MARKETING MAJOR

1ST YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 098/111 ICA 111 ACC 111 MAT 111 ACS 101

3 3 3 1 3 3 2 -----18

Semester II INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 112/111 ACC 112 BIO 111 PHY 112 HPE 113

3 3 3 3 2 2 1 ----17

2ND YEAR Semester I INS 212 BIL 212 MIS 211 ECO 211 STA 211 BUS 211 ART/LIT /MUS 111

2 2 3 3 3 3 2 ---18

Semester II PHL 111 ENV 112 MAK 212 ECO 212 STA 212 BUS 321

3 2 3 3 3 3

----17

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3RD YEAR Semester I BUS 309 RET 320 BUS 213 POL 111 INS 313 MAK 315 MAT 112 3 2 3 1 3 3 3 ---18

Semester II RET 321 BUS 314 MAK 316 MAK 317 BUS 323 Elective 2 3 3 3 3 3 ---17

4TH YEAR Semester I INS 412 BUS 413 MAK 418 MAK 421 Elective 3 3 3 3 3 ----15

Semester II MAK 422 Gen Electives MAK 420 3 6 3

------12

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MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1st year Semester I ACS 101 ACS 111 ACC 111 BIL 111 INS 111 ICA 111 ENG 111 Semester II ACS 112 MIS 211 MAT 111 BIL 112 INS 112 ENG 112

2 3 3 3 3 1 3 18

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

2ND Year

SemesterII BUS 211 ACS 211 MIS 281 STA 211 PHY 112 BIO 111 HPE 113

3 3 3 3 2 2 1 17

SemesterII ACS 221 MIS 282 STA 212 MAK 212 BUS 213 ENV 112

3 3 3 3 3 2 17

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3RD YEAR

Semeste 1 BUS 313 ACS 231 ACS 351 ECO 211 MAT 112 PHL 111

3 3 3 3 3 3

Semester II ACS 302 ACS 352 ACS 361 BUS 309 ART/LIT/ MUS 111 INS 212 POL 111

3 3 3 3 2 2 1 17

18

4TH YEAR

Semester 1 MIS 400 ACS 431 Elective BIL 212 RET 320 INS 313

3 3 3 2 2 3 16

Semester II MIS Elective MIS Elective MIS 311 BUS 418 RET 321 INS 412

3 3 3 3 2 3 17

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Department of Community Development and Psychology

Diploma in Counselling

Rationale

Many people are facing problems caused by the complexity of modern life and breakdown of the traditional ways of life. At the same time we realize that many people have not heard the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In response to these needs, the Department of Community Development offers diploma certificate in Counseling. The course aims at producing church workers interested in counseling at the Diploma level. Students will graduate with a diploma in Counseling and will enable our counseling students to be recognized by Kenyan Association of Professional Counselors. Admission Requirements Applicants must meet the general admission requirements for the Diploma programme of Daystar University. Student Assessment The Diploma in Counseling emphasizes the development of skills. A letter grade will be given for each course on the basis of continuous assessment and a final examination, graded as follows: Continuous assessment - 70% Final examination - 30% Field Project (practicum) will be graded separately with 20% being assigned to periodical reporting and 80% to field project evaluation. (Discussions are taking place with Kenyatta National Hospital to see if it can agree to be a practicum site for our counselling students. When this happens, the mode of practicum and course offering may necessitate change to accommodate the change from the present format of students looking for their practical sites and also taking place in the long vacation). 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Requirements for Graduation

Common Core Courses Counselling Required Courses Practicum Electives Total Required Courses ICM 056 Introduction to Psychology ICM 060 Human Growth and Development ICM 057 Personality Development ICM 063 Introduction to Social Psychology or ICM 081 Introduction to Sociology ICM 051 Principles and Practice of Counselling ICM 053 Marriage and Family Counselling ICM 059 Loss and Bereavement Counselling ICM 065 HIV/AIDS Counselling ICM 066 Personal and Professional Development for Counsellors ICM 099 Field Project/ Practicum Free Electives ICM 054 ICM 058 ICM 063 ICM 067 ICM 071 ICM 081 ICM 021 ICM 061 ICM 062 ICO 011 ICO 014 ICO 021 IMD 014 Credit Hours 15 33 6 6 60

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

Counselling with Young People Abnormal Psychology Introduction to Social Psychology Spiritual Growth and Development Substance Abuse Introduction to Sociology Evangelism and Disciples Understanding the old Testament Urban Mission Strategy Interpretation Communication Group Dynamics Communication Ethics Fundamentals of Leadership

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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Exemptions to the Undergraduate Programme Psychology Major

Diploma Course ICM 056 ICM 057 ICM 058 ICM 060 ICM 099 Sub-total hours Equivalent Required Course PSY 111 PSY 212 PSY 214 PSY 211 PSY 508 3 3 3 3 6 18

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Courses Descriptions

ICM 051 Principles and Practices of Counselling 3 credits

This course will cover meanings and definitions; structure and process; the counsellor and counselee; counselling. Crisis intervention and case studies. Prerequisites: ICM 058

ICM 053 Marriage and Family Counselling

3 credits

The course deals with the problems and conflicts within marriage and family set up: systems, sex, and love, family planning, raising and disciplining children amongst others; Biblical basis of marriage; Counselling techniques and behavioral methods of tacking marriage and family problems and conflicts; conflict resolution; premarital Counseling: building healthy relationships, choosing a marriage partner, courtship, wedding and honeymoon, sexual problems e.g gender roles and discrimination, prostitution, child labour. Case studies. Prerequisites: ICM 051.

ICM 054 Counselling with Young People

3 Credits

This course will cover the understanding of young people in general; understanding their problems; the challenges they face; issues concerning family relationships; peer pressure and delinquency. Prerequisites: ICM 060, ICM 057,ICM 051, ICM 051.

ICM 056 Introduction to Psychology

3 Credits

Definition and the history of psychological aspects pf human development such as learning, cognition, memory, motivation and emotions and consciousness.

ICM 057 Personality Development

3 credits

An overview of personality theories represented by the major schools such as analytic or dynamic, humanities, cognitive, existential and behavioral; personality disorders; case studies.

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ICM 058 Abnormal Psychology

3 credits

A study of the nature, causes and intervention of a wide variety of mental disorders such as personality disorders, anxiety , mood stress and adjustment, schizophrenia, disassociate and effective disorders; case studies. Pre-requisites: ICM 056,ICM 060, ICM 057, ICM 063, ICM 081.

ICM 059 Loss and Grief Counseling

3credits

Biblical view of suffering and human pain; including divine omnipotence and goodness, human wickedness and the fall of man; the loss of life; the meaning of grief: effects and factors influencing; the grief process, problems in grieving and recovery; recovering from other forms of losses; counseling in grief. Pre-requisite: ICM 051.

ICM 060 Human Growth and Development

3 credits

The course will cover all aspects of growth and development from conception to grief. This will include physical and mental growth touching areas of learning, emotions, and behavour.

ICM 061 Understanding the Old Testament

3 credits

old testament history, geography and culture; literally genres; ways of understanding the content of various books of the old testament; major divisions of old testament; old testament interpretations; major themes in the old testament.

ICM 062 Understanding the New Testament 3 credits

History of the inter-testamental period; first century Judaism; fulfillment of scripture; summary of contents and themes of each New Testament book; a survey of the life and history of Jesus Christ; Growth and expansion of the Early Church in Acts; history , geography and cultural background of the new testament; survey and ministry of Paul; new testament interpretation; key themes in the new testament.

ICM 063 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 Credits

The course will cover the definition of social psychology; building blocks of social life- what makes humans unique: socialization;

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organization of the self- the world as you think it is, the world as you feel it is, who am I? Organization of personal relationshipscommunication, social changes, social interdependence; complex group interaction setting- group structure and processes, social networks.

ICM 064 Christian Setting

3 credits

This course will cover the concepts of the Biblical and Christian counseling; the presuppositions and principles- meaning of life, hope, prayer, reconciliation; the Christian counsellor; practice and process ­ language of counselling; language of emotions, sin, confession, forgiveness, love; effective Biblical change-conversion, salvation, spirituality the Christian personality; the art of pastoral conversation; Biblical case histories. pre-requisites; ICM 051, ICM 057, ICM 063

ICM 065 HIV/AIDS and Crisis Counselling

3 credits

The course is intended to bring awareness of the pandemic nature of the diseases and also develop skills that are necessary for dealing skills that are necessary for dealing with victims of HIV/AIDS; it will cover HIV/AIDS overview; human sexuality; methods of management; cultural beliefs and practices; socio-economic development; Biblical and theological issues; ethical and legal issues; behavior modification; skills in counsellor care training of trainers; dealing with crises. Pre-requisites. ICM 051

ICM 066 Personal and Professional Development for Counsellors 3 credits

This course will include what is personal and professional development; further training; professional recognition; personal therapy; supervision; contribution to the furtherance of knowledge; resourcing yourself; determining a personal and professional development. Pre- requisites: ICM 056, ICM 060, ICM 057, ICM 051.

ICM 067 Spiritual Growth and Development 3 credits

This course is intended to help a Christian growth in faith. The contests will include understanding and applying the biblical principles in one's daily life; understanding Christian faith and applying it in daily life; understanding sin and salvation in order t develop deeper 2003-2007 Catalogue

247 faith in Jesus Christ; spiritual in order to develop deeper faith in Jesus Christ; spiritual morals and discipline; discipleship and discipline; interpreting the mission of Daystar University and its philosophy.

ICM 071 Substance Abuse

3 credits

An introduction to chemical dependency including definitions of alcohol and drug dependencies; diagnosis; management; recovery; community responses to dependency problems and Case studies.

ICM 081 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits

The nature of sociology and theories; socialization; organization and mobilization; social stratification and inequality; race and ethnicity; group relations; the changing family; functions of religion; problems of social change; African social issues and problems e.g polygamy, barenness and impotency, medicine men and women, soothsayers, sorcerers, witches and wizards, witch craft, magicians, elders, priests and prophets, etc. and their roles in society; African concept of God and his/ her role in regulating individual and corporate life.

ICM 099 Field Project in Christian Counseling 6 credits

Assigned tasks related to the course work done as agreed upon by the student, the faculty, and , where applicable, the employer. A minimum of 10 weeks ( 400 clock hours) and production of a project paper of at least 30 pages typed in double spacing will be required.

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SUGGESTED TWO-YEAR STUDY PROGRAMME Diploma in Counselling

1ST YEAR Semester I ICC 011 A ICC ICC ICC ICM 021 051 092 056 Semester II 011 B 3 031 3 041 3 051 3 061 3 081 3 18

3 3 3 1 3 15

ICC ICC ICC ICM ICM ICM

2ND YEAR Semester I ICM 053 ICM 064 ICM 057 ICM 065 Electives

3 3 3 3 3 15

Semester II ICM 059 3 ICM 066 3 Electives 3 ICC 061 3

12

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Diploma in Development Rationale

The Development Diploma was established to train on-the-job leaders who do development work in churches, church related ministries and Para-church organizations. Such leaders may be first time entrants into a post-secondary education programme or they may already have a first degree. What all have in common is the desire to build on their past training and experience. The courses offered in this programme are designed to provide advanced training in the practical skills of community development. The concentration in Development builds student competencies in facilitating church related ministries that are focused on meeting that are focused on meeting human needs in community-based ministry.

Admission Requirements

Applicants will be expected to fulfill the general entry requirements for the Diploma programme of Daystar University.

Student Assessment

The Diploma in Development primarily puts emphasis on mastery of concepts and principles pertinent to community development and project management work. A letter grade will be given for each course on the basis of continuous assessment and a final examination. The continuous assessment will constitute 70% of the total possible mark while the final examination will constitute 30% of the total mark. The field project will be graded differently whereby 20% of the total mark will be derived from periodical reporting and 80% from the field project evaluation.

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Requirements for Graduation

Common Core Courses Development Free Electives TOTAL Credit Hours 15 33 12 60

Required Courses Credit Hours ICC 022 Basic Functions of Management 3 IMD 014 Fundamentals of Leadership 3 IMD 021 Basic Principles and Practices of Administration 3 IMD 033 Foundations of Community Development 3 IMD 051 Communication For Development 3 IMD 099 Field Project/Practicum in Management or Development 6 IMD 034 Facilitation of Development in Local Communities 3 IMD 035 Urbanization and Development 3 IMD 042 IMD 065 Community Development and the Church Gender and Development

3 3

Free Electives IMD 061 IMD 053 IMD 064 IMD 068 IMD 041 ICO 011 ICO 014 ICM 051 ICM 021 IMU 011

Credit Hours Managing Change for Development 3 Training of Trainers 3 Environmental Conservation 3 Health, Community and Communication 3 Special Topics in Development 3 Interpersonal Communication 3 Group Dynamics 3 Introduction to Counseling 3 Evangelism and Discipleship 3 Communication Through Music 3

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251 NOTE: IMD 064: Environmental Conservation is housed by the Science Department. Some other Courses are also housed and taught by specific departments. Your HoD will advise.

Exemptions into the Undergraduate Programme

Community Development Major

Community Development Major Equivalent Required Course SOC 111 DEV 214 DEV 111 DEV 211 DEV 213 DEV 508 3 3 3 3 3 6 21

ICM 081 IMD 022 IMD 033 IMD 034 IMD 051 IMD 099 Sub Total Hours

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Course Descriptions

IMD 014 Fundamentals of Leadership 3 Credits

Biblical models and principles of leadership; various leadership qualities roles described and students do self analysis to determine their own spiritual gifts, strengths and limitations as leaders; proper use of authority; practical aspects of managing conflict group dynamics, managing conflict and evaluating group effectiveness; Understanding a world view in working with diverse types of people groups is also studied.

IMD 021 Basic Principles and Practices of Administration 3 Credits

Building on a Biblical Perspective of accountability, the course develops introductory level skills in financial management through level skills in financial accounting and financial controls including budget and audit practices. Other topics include: General procurement; Maintenance of inventory; Preparing correspondence for business purposes; Time Management; Record keeping and concepts for filling systems; Office layout and management of space. Also introduced are modern trends in informational technology.

IMD 033 Foundations of Community Development 3 Credits

Foundations of Community Development for Christian workers; The nature of community (koinonia) and development is studied from Biblical perspective then applied to contemporary development issues; Causes of poverty and need for development; Six steps around development cycle; Different strategies and approaches to Community problems; Definition of key terms: relief and rehabilitation, development, Community, participation, transformation, facilitation.

IMD 034 Facilitation of Development in Local Communities 3 Credits

Focus is on rural Community Development; Understanding power and conflict issues at Community level; Overcoming hopelessness and encouragement of less developed communities toward development; Community organization, empowerment and capacity 2003-2007 Catalogue

253 building; Applying the "scientific method" to problem solving for development decisions; Characteristic of successful community facilitators; Practice in performance of basic community facilitation skills. Pre-requisite: IMD 031, IMD 051.

IMD 035 Urbanization and Development

3 Credits

Theories of urban development focusing on how to help the poor; Factors influencing rural-urban migration; Social problems unique to urban living; Church related interventions especially for slum areas; Public policy and planning processes; Problems of housing and ecological issues in urban living; Developing understanding And unity among peoples of diverse cultures; Strategies for assistance to the most vulnerable groups: street children, prostitute, adult beggars, etc.

IMD 041 Special Topics in Development 1-3 Credits

The content will vary with specific courses. Topics may include, but are not limited to: Participatory rural assessment; Training of Trainers; Low cost housing; AIDS prevention, Conflict Resolution, justice and peace.

IMD 042 Church

Community Development and the 3 Credits

A theology for social interventions; Biblical mandate for the Christian ministry to poor and suffering people provides the basis for this course; The responsibility for, and activities of Christians as light and salt of the world; Church involvement in business and political issues related to development; A pro-active role of local churches and Para-church organizations in meeting specific needs is discussed; Problems of partnership among churches and with government agencies; How the church can minister to those with special needs.

IMD 042 Community For Development

3 Credits

Understanding the community as media audience; Community participation in communicating development messages; Organizing the communication work; media; Evaluating the impact of communications. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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IMD 052

Supervision and on-the-Job Training 3 Credits

The course explores the activities and skills necessary for adequate supervision and training of workers on the job; the biblical mandate for discipleship is applied to boss-subordinate relations as the boss oversees work activities and personal growth workers; Participatory approaches to setting performance standards and work objectives; Job task analysis; How to plan and conduct an on-job training programme; How to adjust training strategies when outcome is change in knowledge Vs. skills Vs. attitude Vs. thinking process. Prerequisite: ICC 021; Prior experience as supervisor. Class size limited to 15.

IMD 053 Training of Trainers

3 Credits

Adult learning principles establishes a basis for practical student experiences in the following areas: writing lesson plans and learning objectives, developing, selecting and using appropriate training aids and methods, handling problem situations among learners, preparing and facilitating a learning session; The process of critical, reflective thinking; Assessment of learning styles and evaluation of teaching effectiveness. Pre-requisite: IMD 031. Class limited to 15.

IMD 061 Managing Change for Development 3 Credits

Understanding change as a process of Information in knowing, doing, feeling, and acting; The process is studied as applied to individuals, groups, organizations and communities; factors that lead to resistance or promotion of change; Four models for change: Force Field Analysis, Problem solving; Adopting-diffusion, Praxis.

IMD 065 Gender and Development

3 Credits

Definition of gender and how gender issues affect men and women differently; Gender roles in the society; Women, rural economy and the impact of urbanization on gender dynamics; Gender and health; Justice and Gender, Marriage, separation, succession and inheritance.

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IMD 068 Health, Community and Communication 3 Credits

Community health problems; community based Health Care Programme: planning, implementation; appropriate preventative methods; Appreciating traditional and modern methods of prevention; How to evaluate community based health practices; Community health education and services; Methods of contacting the community; How to produce media training materials; How to train others in their use.

IMD 099 Field Project/ Practicum in Management and/ Or Development 6 Credits

Supervised field experience; Professional practice opportunities; Selected readings; Written project reports.

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SUGGESTED TWO-YEAR PROGRAMME Diploma in Development

1st YEAR Semester I Core Courses ICC 011A ICC 022 ICC 091 IMD 033 IMD 035 IMD 014

3 3 1 3 3 3 ---- 16 ===

Semester II Core Courses ICC 031 ICC 041 ICC 011B IMD 021 IMD 051 IMD 068

3 3 3 3 3 3

----15 ===

2nd YEAR June/August Block IMD 099 (PRACTICUM) 6

Semester I ICC 051 IMD 068 IMD 064 IMD 034 IMD 052

3 3 3 3 3 --15 ==

Semester II IMD 042 IMD 065 IMD 061

3 3 3 ===

9

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I. Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Community Development

Rationale

The curriculum for a Community Development major is designed to equip an undergraduate student with integrated knowledge and skills that he/she may apply in a wide range of community development situations. The programme's aim is to develop a worker who has both a high degree of creativity and leadership skills, and who understands that community development work is holistic and involves all aspects of community life (spiritual, economic, social, political). Specifically, the goals of the major are to: 1. equip the student with skills and techniques of involving communities in planning, implementation and evaluation of plans towards the attainment of their goals at the individual, group and community levels; 2. enable the student to integrate his/her Christian ministry with development, addressing the diverse needs at the individual, group and community levels; 3. present community development to the student from a Christian ministry perspective, emphasizing the concept that it involves meeting the needs of the whole person-- spiritual, physical, emotional, social and material; 4. enable the student to carry out social science research which will serve as a valid basis for the development of new social policies and programmes; 5. enable the student to introduce appropriate methods and practices for preventing and overcoming human poverty, ignorance and disease; 6. adequately equip the student with knowledge and skills for better conceptualization and articulation of development issues; and

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7. prepare the student for employment in Christian, nongovernmental, public and private sector organizations in community development positions.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must possess a minimum grade of C+ or its equivalent in any of the following subjects: economics, Christian Religious Education or social ethics.

Student Assessment

1. All course grades in this major will be derived 70% from final examination and 30% from continuous assessment. 2. Practicum marks will be based 40% on student's field reports, 30% from site supervisor's report and 30% by Daystar University supervisors. Requirements for Graduation General Education Major Requirements Minor (optional) and/or Free Electives TOTAL Credit Hours 52 66 11 129

Required Courses for Integrated Community Development and Rural Development Majors

DEV 111 DEV 211 DEV 213 DEV 214 DEV 323 DEV 413 DEV 415 DEV 416 Credit Hours Introduction to Community Development 3 Community Development and the Church 3 Communication for Development 3 Development Administration 3 Economic Development 3 Gender and Development 3 Participatory Development Techniques/Methodology 3 Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

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a) Specialized Courses in Integrated Community Development Major (24 Credit hours)

DEV 310 DEV 317 DEV 318 DEV 319 DEV 320 DEV 408 DEV 414 DEV 417 DEV 418 DEV 419 DEV 422 DEV 496 DEV 597 TOTAL Credit Hours Urban Sociology and Sustainable Development 3 Planning for Development 3 Human Resource Management for Development 3 Extension, Education for Development 3 Financial Management for Development 3 Special Topics in Development: Issues on Contemporary Development 3 Integrated Appropriate Technology 3 Community Development Approaches and Strategies 3 Project Management 3 Sociology and Politics of Development 3 Programmes for Community Development 3 Independent Study 3 Senior Project in Integrated Community Development 3 24

b) Specialized Courses in Rural Development ( 24 Credit hours)

Credit Hours RUD 311 RUD 312 RUD 313 RUD 314 Concepts and Dimensions of Rural Development Community Health Rural Industrialization Psychology for Rural Development 2003-2007 Catalogue 3 3 3 3

260 RUD 316 RUD 408 RUD 412 RUD 414 RUD 417 RUD 418 RUD 419 RUD 496 RUD 597 TOTAL

Daystar University

Rural Sociology and Susstainable Development Special Topics: Issues in Rural Development Cartographis and other Techniques for Rural Development Rural appropriate Technology Integrated Rural Planning and Management Strategies and Programmes for Rural Development Rural Economics and Agricultural Extensions Independent Study Senior Project

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24

Minor in Community Development

Requirements for Graduation with a Minor in Community Development To graduate with a minor in either Integrated Community Development option or Rural Development Option, the Student must take the following courses: DEV 111 PSY 111 SOC 111 DEV 323 Introduction to Community Development Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Sociology Economic Development 3 3 3 3

In addition to the above courses, the student must take a minimum of 9 credits from one specific Concentration. Total number of required hours for a minor 21

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II. Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Psychology

Rationale

The Psychology major degree is designed to equip students with skills for the change of human behaviour, promotion of human growth, and development of human communities. The programme aims at producing graduates whose responsibility is not only to help change maladjusted behaviour of members of the community, but also to promote spiritual maturity. It enables the student to acquire knowledge of human behaviour and mental processes, rehabilitation through restoration and reconciliation, in the light of God's word. Specifically, the goals of the major are to: 1. provide students with a clear understanding of the principles of human behaviour; 2. enable the student to develop coping skills, self-acceptance, self-appreciation, positive self-image, self-esteem, self-dignity and appreciation of other people despite their limitations; 3. promote and foster human relationships and adopt an objective outlook to life; 4. provide Psychological tools to collect, analyze, and evaluate information and behaviour in order to draw out/formulate sound conclusions; 5. promote holistic growth and maturity in the student as an individual; 6. provide courses which will enhance the understanding of the student and help him/her appreciate and promote God's workmanship in human creation; 7. enable the student to integrate Psychology and Christianity; and, Psychology and African Traditional Culture.

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8. prepare the student for advanced study at the graduate level in Psychology; and 9. enable the student to assume the responsibilities of a Christian professional whose main goal is commitment to bettering the contemporary society as God's steward, co-worker and an agent of change. Admission Requirements Applicants must have obtained a minimum of C (Plain) in Biology or General Science in KCSE or its equivalent, and a minimum of C+ in English, in addition to the general admission requirements. Student Assessment 1. The final course grades will be derived 30% from continuous assessment and 70% from the final examination except for Independent Study and Practicum courses. 2. Practicum will be based 40% from student's field report, 30% from site supervisor's written report, and 30% from evaluations by Daystar University supervisors. Requirements for Graduation A Psychology major student must complete the following credit hours to be able to graduate: Credit Hours General Education 52 Psychology Major 55 Minor (optional) 22 TOTAL 129

Required Courses for Psychology Major

PSY 111 PSY 112 PSY 211 PSY 212 PSY 213 PSY 214 PSY 311 Credit Hours Introduction to Psychology 3 History, Systems and Schools of Psychology 3 Human Development 3 Psychology of Personality 3 Physiological Psychology 3 Abnormal Psychology 3 Psychology of Learning 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

263 PSY 312 PSY 313 PSY 408 PSY 411 PSY 412 PSY 413 PSY 414 PSY 415 PSY 507 SOC 314 SOC 315 TOTAL Christian Guidance and Counselling Introduction to Clinical Psychology Special Topics in Psychology Social Psychology Theories of Marriage and Family Group Dynamics in Psychology Ethics in Psychology Human Sexuality Psychology Practicum Introduction to Social Statistics Social Reseach Methods 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 55

Minor in Psychology

To graduate with a minor in Psychology, the student MUST take PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology 3 PSY 211 Human Development 3 PSY 311 Psychology of Learning 3 PSY 411 Social Psychology 3 In ADDITION to these courses, the student must take any other three (3) courses out of the following: PSY 212 PSY 214 PSY 312 PSY 313 PSY 408 PSY 412 PSY 413 PSY 414 PSY 415 PSY 496 Psychology of Personality Abnormal Psychology Christian Guidance and Counselling Introduction to Clinical Psychology Special Topics in Psychology Theories of Marriage and Family Group Dynamics in Psychology Ethics in Psychology Human Sexuality Independent Study in Psychology 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

A student who graduates with a minor in Psychology is not professionally qualified to counsel or set up a counselling clinic.

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III. Bachelor of Arts Degree with Major in Social Work

Rationale

1. The social problems facing Africa are many and the needs are pressing. Poverty, homelessness, AIDS, natural and humanmade disasters, domestic violence, community tensions, criminal activity, hunger and unemployment plague the continent. There is an urgent need for Christians with social work problem-solving knowledge and skills to address these problems both within the church, in non-government agencies, and in the public sector. Social Work programme prepares students to help stand in the gap that is very large and demanding within and outside Kenya. 2. It is natural, in deed critical way to carry out the mission of Daystar by providing Social Work programme that prepares men and women to respond to the many pressing social needs in Africa. 3. While Social Work is taught and practiced from many different philosophies, it is widely agreed that the profession emerged out of a Judeo-Christian commitment to ministering to those in need. Religion that is pure and undefiled before God, according to James, involves caring for orphans and widows in their distress (1:27). Jesus relates judgment to the feeding of the hungry, giving water to the thirsty, clothing the naked, caring for the stranger, and visiting those in prisons. The social work profession, with its emphasis on values of service, dignity and worth of the individual, social and economic justice, competence, and integrity, particularly when presented from a Christian framework, fits well with the stated Christian philosophy of the university and its Biblical statement of faith and practice.

Social Work Major Objectives

The programme objectives for Social Work major include the following: 1. to prepare students for general social work practice in public and private organisations with a special commitment to needs of Africa; 2. to utilize a spiritually enriched Ecological Systems framework in providing students with a holistic perspective about themselves, others, society, the world, and their creator; 2003-2007 Catalogue

265 3.to teach students to identify themselves, others, society, the world, and their creator; 3. to teach students to identify multiple causes of problems and act as agents of social change in order to bring about inner peace, interpersonal reconciliation, and social justice. 4. to prepare students to work sensitively with diverse populations including people of various ages, ethnic groups, religions, countries, and income levels with special commitment to needy and those who are at risk; 5. to instill in students a commitment to life-long learning, and provide preparation for graduate social work education, research and consultancy; 6. to provide a learning context that empowers students to think crititically and integrate social work techniques with their Christian faith in a profesionally sound manner; 7.to provide a stimulating and challenging educational experience that is personal, interactive, and responsive to students with faculty who are role models as professional and Christians.

Requirement For Graduation

Students majoring in Social work must complete the following credit hours to be able to graduate: Credit Hours General Education 52 Major requirements 60 Minor (optional)/ Electives 17 Total Required Course 129

Required Courses for Graduation in Social Work

SOC 111 PSY 111 SWK 111 SWK 112 SWK 211 SWK 212 SWK 213 Introduction to Sociology 3 Introduction to Psychology 3 Introduction to Social Work 3 Principles of Helping and Ethics of Social work 3 Human Behaviour and Social Environment 3 Methods and Techniques of Social Work 3 Social Work and the Church 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

266 SWK 214 SWK 311 SWK 312 SWK 313 SOC 314 G SOC 315 SWK 317 SWK 412 SWK 413 SWK-414 SWK 507 TOTAL

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Social Work Practice With The Individual & Family Crime And Criminal Justice Community Health Family Studies Statistics for Social Sciences Social Research Methods Social work Practice With Groups Social Policy and Social Welfare Administration Gender and Development Social Work Practice With Communities Seminars and Social Work Practicum

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 9 60

Electives in Social Work

SWK-215 SWK-316 SWK-318 SWK-408: Youth and Development Medical Information And Psychiatric Social Work Social Action & Social Movements Special Topics a) Working with the Disabled Persons b) Aging in a Changing Society c) Child Welfare d) Working with NGOs and other Agents of Change e) Working with the Pastoral Communities f) Population Studies g) Appropriate Technology h) HIV/AIDS Stress Management Social Conflict and Disaster Management Participatory Development Techniques /Methodologies Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

SWK-410 SWK-411 SWK-415 SWK-416

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267 SWK-417 SWK-418 SWK-419 SWK-420 SWK-496 SWK-596 Labour Problems and Labour Welfare Project Management Strategies and Programmes for Rural Development Poverty Eradication Independent Study Senior Project 3 3 3 3 3 3

Minor in Social Work

Requirements for graduation with a minor in Social Work To graduate with a minor in Social Work, the student must take SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 3 PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology 3 SWK 111 Introduction to Social Work 3 SWK 112 Principles of Helping and Ethics of Social work 3 SWK 212 Methods and Techniques of Social 3 In addition to the above courses, the student must take a minimum of two courses adding up to a total of six credit hours from any of the required/ elective courses in Social Work. Total number of required credit hours for a minor 21

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Course Descriptions in Department of Community Developement

DEV-111 Introduction to Community Development 3 Credits

Definition of the problem: Definitions and principles of community development; Essential elements, philosophies and faiths behind and objectives of community development (including directed vs. non-directed approaches) and Approach to rural development. Communication: problem and approaches; Cultural factors in community development and how they affect development; Micro and macro level factors in planning and implementation; Difference between extension worker and a community development worker; Agents and their roles; Types and case studies of community development programmes in developing countries and their changing nature; Case studies of community development programmes in the Western world; Projects; and project visits; Extension and administration: extension work in Kenya, extension abroad; Meaning and principles of programme planning (including the interplay between central formulated policies and locally generated projects); Need for developed programmes in underdeveloped countries; The integration of the Christian faith and community development. Prerequisites: PSY-111 and SOC-111

DEV-211 Community Development and the Church 3 Credits

Introduction and definitions: The city as a city of God; Systems, empowering the poor through community organization, urban work which empowers; Networking; Coalition building; Acting/reflecting/ acting; and Leadership empowerement. The birth of a community: Difference between community organization and community development; and Standards upon which local ministry is built; The task of para-church organizations; denominations; or mission groups in supporting the local Church; Issues and leaders; The gatekeepers, the caretakers; flak catchers, brokers; Organizing the money; Making a power analysis; Confrontation. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

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DEV-213 Communication for Development 3 Credits

Meaning and significance; Theories and principles; Social, cultural, political and economic environment; Communication versus development programmmes i.e. Family Planning, AIDS awareness, agriculture, etc.; Understanding channels: The audience; Participatory communication; Formulation of messages; Types and tools of development communication (media selection). Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

DEV-214 Develpment Administration

3 Credits

Meaning, nature and scope; Need and changing role of administration; Bureaucracy and development; Theories and assumptions; Education and training in development administration; Development administration at various spatial levels; People's participation, leadership and participatory development; Development programmes i.e. DFRD; International agencies and development administration. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

DEV-323 Economic Development

3 Credits

Meaning and importance: Features of the underdeveloped economies; Main obstacles to economic development; Natural resources - land, water, forests water and energy resources; Agriculture - role in development; Human resource: meaning, use, size and growth. Consequences of high and low growth to development; Financial resources, sources, importance; Industrialization: meaning and contribution to development; Poverty and unemployment:- nature, causes, trends and consequences to development; Problems in the African continent i.e. obstacles to development; Development theories and analysis for social change; Examples of theories; Modernization, Liberation and Transformation; their relationship to participation in Community Development, strategies for development in urban and rural poor communities; Evaluation of strategies; micro-enterprise development, community organization, consciousness raising, relief and development and project development and appraisal. World system Theory; Dependency school of thought; Dependent development perspective. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

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DEV-413 Gender and Development

3 Credits

Introduction to gender and development; Feminism and ethnocentrism; Housing, health and welfare; Population policies and reproductive rights; Environment and eco-feminism: Provision of fodder and fuel in the rural areas; Sexual division of labour and women's status; Women workers in the global economy; Impact of international debt and structural adjustment on women; Women, resistance and empowerment. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-415 Participatory Development Techniques/ Methodologies 3 Credits

Development; Rural development approaches/strategies; Participatory rural appraisal; Participatory rural appraisal tools/menu; Conducting a participatory rural appraisal exercise; Other participatory development methodologies; PRA case studies; Participatory development methodologies. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-416 Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation 3 Credits

Project plans, objectives, choice and design: feasibility report, financial estimates, programme monitoring and accountability-target population and programme coverage monitoring delivery of services; strategies for impact assessment-single and group designs for impact assessment, measuring efficiency, the content of evaluation research - financial, economic and social cost benefit analysis. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-508 Practicum/ Project Work

6 Credits

The student will be assigned to work for 11 weeks full time (420 hours) with a community development agency on a project. During that time, they will also be expected to assess the status of the project and to prepare a comprehensive report at the conclusion of the Practicum experience; Covering understanding the community social profile; Establishing the demographics of the community and whether there is any systematic way in which people have settled in the light of the following factors; tribal, religious, social class, income 2003-2007 Catalogue

271 variations, education, family composition, employment and political application; Community work profession; components of community work practice. Pre-requisites: All 100, 200 and some 300 level courses e.g. SOC-314 & SOC-315. DEV-508 will be taken only at the end of the third year. Integration of theory and practice will be brought out in the written report.

DEV-310 Urban Sociology and Sustainable Development 3 Credits

Sociology as a discipline; Origins of urban sociology; Major concerns of urban sociology; Research methodologies; Research applied to village communities and the rural-urban continuum debate; Case studies of urban communities: slum dwellers and hawkers. Community leadership; Social stratification; Urban social institutions: definition of social institutions, the family, cooperatives, harambee self-help; Sociological issues in urban labor; Social change and development; homelessness. Urban Development; municipality, towns, programs for urban development; Planning; Administration; Problems; Strategies for alleviation of problems. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

DEV-317 Planning for Development

3 Credits

Development and underdevelopment; Meaning and definitions of planning, elements of planning, nature and need for planning, types of planning; Economic planning; Development planning; The rationale of planning in developing countries; Planning models - Thingan; Theories and technique of development planning: basic two sector planning models, Harrod-Doman model, the solo model, input output, linear programming; planning experiences in developing i.e. implementation; Future of planning. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

DEV-318 Human Resource Management for Development 3 Credits

Human resources, management, meaning and need, development, changing needs of development; Recruitment, training and development - types and methods of training; Promotion; maintenance of discipline, motivation, participation. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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DEV-319 Extension Education for Develpment 3 Credits

Definition, principles, concepts, types, techniques and approaches, methods, role in development; foreign aid; factors affecting, planning and designing, training, experiences and lessons learnt. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

DEV-320 Financial Management for Development 3 Credits

Finance, meaning, need and importance; types, sources of revenue; Meaning and nature of principles of accounting i.e. cost accounting, proposal writing, budgeting; co-operative loans; capital structure; cost of capital; working capital management; capital expenditure decisions; and investment decisions. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

DEV-408 Special Topics in Development: Issues in Contemporary Development 3 Credits

Course content will be defined each time the course is offered as is appropriate to the subject matter to be covered. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-414 Appropriate Technology

3 Credits

Meaning; its unique position in development; its integration with technical and social sciences; provisions of the basic needs such as food, shelter, water, health, housing, agriculture and energy; issues: Understanding the rural environment; Needs identification; Resource mobilization; Water; Soil; Agricultural technology; Forestry; Renewable energy; Production technology. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-417 Community Development Approaches and Stategies 3 Credits

Meaning and need; Economic, socio-psychological and cultural approach political or power approaches; Organization; Mobilization; Participation; Motivation; Empowerment; Issues of concern obstacles. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

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DEV-418 Project Management

3 Credits

Introduction to project planning and organization; Project planning process, goals, objectives and targets; Implementation and management techniques and systems programming. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-419 Sociology and Politics of Development 3 Credits

Empowerment; Gender, Power and Empowerment; Alternative Development and Power; Civil Society Building; Social Capital; Religious or Spiritual Alternatives; Globalization and Collective Action; Introduction to Politics of Development; State, Nations and Civil society; Power, Politics and Development; Power, Politics and Development; African State; Ethnicity, Nationalism and Gender; Markets, Civil society and NGOs; Capitalism and Democracy in Third World; Global Capitalism and State; Review of African Political Development. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-422 Strategies and Programmes for Community Development 3 Credits

Evolution of strategies and programmes, changing concept of community development; Growth oriented strategy; Welfare oriented strategy; Responsive strategy; Holistic strategy; Area development strategies and programmes. Community based programmes: adult education, primary health care, sustainable agriculture, Jua Kali artisans. Programme management; Need based programmes; Goals and objectives; Design, plan and adjustment; Organization and administration politics; Human resources; Activities and defined expected results; Performance management and monitoring; Indicators, evaluation and reporting. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-496

Independent Study

3 Credits

The content for each study will vary depending on the topic chosen. The student will choose the topic and discuss it with the lecturer responsible for the subject. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course outline done in community development. The whole study must be done by the student in

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consultation with the lecturer who will ensure the availability of textbooks, magazines, newspapers etc. and also supervise; Assessment tests and examinations; and weekly consultation meetings. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

DEV-597 Senior Project in Integrated Community Development 3 Credits

A 3-4 page proposal containing enough information about the project, for the advisor to advise. The components are: Objectives of study; Methods of study; Preliminary outline of study; Expected results of study; Tentative bibliography; The writing of the paper which will be reviewed weekly. This will be divided into: Review of research; Statement of problem; Statement of method; Presentation of research data; Interpretation of findings and Conclusions and recommendations. Prerequisites: All required 100, 200, and 300 level courses.

PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology

3 Credits

Introduction; Psychology and Christianity; Family issues and parenting; Neuroscience and behaviour; Sensing; Learning; Cognition; Memory; Motivation; Emotion; Personality; Stress and health; States of consciousness; Psychological disorders: anxiety disorders, somatoform, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, organic mental disorders, paranoia, affective disorders, schizophrenia; Preventive measures of psychological disorders; Treatment and therapy; Individual and cultural diversity.

PSY 112 History, Systems and Schools of Psychology 3 Credits

Historical roots of psychology; Development of psychology from its beginnings to today; Contributions of Sigmund Freud, Erick Erickson, Carl Jung, Gestalt, Skinner, C. Rogers, J. Watson, Beck, W. Glasser, A. Adler, A. Ellis, T.S. Mwa Mwenda; How psychology relates to philosophy, science; Psychology and African culture. Pre-requisite: PSY 111.

PSY 211 Human Development

3 Credits

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275 development in infancy; Early influence on development; The preschool child; The school age child; Adolescence; Early adulthood; Middle adulthood; Late adulthood; Death and dying; Developmental theories. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 112.

PSY 212 Psychology of Personality

3 Credits

Theories of personality: Sigmund Freud-- Psychoanalytic; Neofreudian-- Analytic; Abraham Maslow-- Humanistic; Albert Ellis (RET)-- Cognitive; Pavlov and Skinner-- Learning; J. Watson-- Behavioural; J. Piaget-- Developments; Integration of personality theories with biblical teachings on human personality. Pre-requisite: PSY 111, PSY 112.

PSY 213 Physiological Psychology

3 Credits

Introduction; Body senses and how they work; The nervous systems such as central, autonomic, and somatic; The muscular systems such as striated, smooth, and cardiac and the glandular systems such as endocrine and exocrine; The relationship between physiological systems and behaviour; Chemo-physiological influence or behaviour including drug effects. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 112.

PSY 214 Abnormal Psychology

3 Credits

The history of psychological disorders; Various kinds of psychological disorders including anxiety, mood and personality disorders, stress, schizophrenia, substance use and addiction; Special emphasis on identification; Symptomatology; Aetiology; Management: biological, pharmaceutical, psychosocial; Cultural and demoniacal view points. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 211.

PSY 311 Psychology of Learning

3Credits

Introduction; Historical background of learning; Observational learning; Theories of learning-- classical or Pavlovian conditioning, Pavlov's experiments, their meaning and application; Operant or Skinner's conditioning, Skinner's experiments, their meaning and application; Application of principles of learning to animal and human

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behaviour including transfer of learning; Relationship between animal experiments and human behaviour; Perception; Cognition; Sensation and motivation. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 112, PSY 211.

PSY 312 Christian Guidance and Counselling 3 Credits

Introduction and definition of counselling; The Principles of counselling; The counsellor/counselee's language; Model of counselling (Carkhuff's): Psychoanalytical Therapy, Reality Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, Cognitive Therapy; A biblical view of people, problems and solutions; Counselling attitudes; Basic Skills: Listening, Responding and Feelings; Case analysis/case study; The communication process; Crisis intervention; Some essential conditions for crisis counselling; Loneliness/depression: Grieving Process; Drug abuse/drug addiction: commonly abused drugs; Alcoholism: the scope of the problem, the family of the alcoholic; Suicidal persons and suicidal counselling; Basic principles of suicide prevention; AIDS/HIV counselling; Ethical issues. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 211.

PSY 313 Introduction to Clinical Psychology 3 Credits

Meaning of clinical psychology; Examine psychological assessment theories; Interviewing techniques -- carry out video taped and audiotaped interviews with clients; Classroom presentations and role play on interviewing style with a client; Practical exercises on taking of the history; Test construction, analysis and application; Diagnosis and how to draw out therapeutic conclusions. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 211, PSY 312.

PSY 408 Special Topics in Psychology

3 Credits

The course content will vary depending on the topic chosen. Examples of special topics are Loss and Bereavements; Identity crises, relationships and dating; AIDS/HIV etc. Pre-requisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

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PSY 411 Social Psychology

3 Credits

Introduction; Social theories; Relationship between social theories and individual/social behaviour; Development of the self as a process ,individual/social perception attitudes, motives, values, affiliations, aggression and relationships; Interpersonal commnication dynamics in the society; Peace and resolution in homes, churches and society. Pre-requisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

PSY 412 Theories of Marriage and Family

3 Credits

Introduce the major models and schools of marriage and family theories-- structural, functional, post-modern, behavioural etc; General systems theory; Family systems; Family communication; Intergenerational and multigenerational patterns; Marriage and family structural-strategic systems; Marriage and family cognitive behaviour patterns; Genograms; African and biblical concepts of marriage and family; Marriage and family functions and role allocation today; Changing concept of marriage and family; Its effects on couples, siblings, society and the church. Pre-requisites: PSY 111, PSY 211.

PSY 413 Group Dynamics in Psychology

3 Credits

Introduction and definition of groups; Characteristics of groups; Major concept of groups; Group resources; Types of groups; Roles played by members; Advantages and disadvantages of groups; Conflicts in groups, home, church, family and application of group dynamics in East Africa and the region; Peace and Conflict resolution. Prerequisites: PSY 111, PSY 211.

PSY 414 Ethics in Psychology

3 Credits

Introduction; Morality, community standards, laws, professionalism; Legal and ethical issues in child abuse, rape, incest, homosexuality, lesbianism, sodomy, infidelity, suicide and suicidal attempts; Confidentiality; Human rights and divorce; Abortion; Professional codes governing a therapeutic relationship; Legal, moral, and spiritual issues and the African code of conduct. Prerequisites: PSY 111, PSY 211.

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PSY 415 Human Sexuality 3 Credits Introduction; Sex roles; Gender issues; Sexual dysfunctions and

functions; Sexual script and attitudes; Traditional African and biblical concepts of human sexuality; Pre and extra marital sex; The role of sex in marriage; Homosexuality, lesbianism, sodomy; Other perverted sexual behaviours in relation to African Traditional beliefs and biblical teachings on sex. Pre-requisites: All 100 and 200.

PSY 496 Independent Study in Psychology 3 Credits

The content for each study will vary depending on the topic chosen. The student will choose the topic and discuss it with the lecturer responsible for the subject. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course outline done in a Psychology Major but must not be part of a course already taken by the student. The whole study is to be done by the student in consultation with the lecturer who will ensure the availability of textbooks, magazines, newspapers etc; Assessment tests; Examinations; and weekly consultation meetings.

PSY 507 Psychology Practicum 3 Credits Supervised field work in a placement site. The student is

expected to apply knowledge in Psychological assessment, History taking and Diagnosis. Other areas of supervision include the ability to work with site supervisor and other personnel demonstrating maturity, responsibility, stewardship, and promoting interpersonal and interactional skills. At the end of the practicum, the student presents a written document of his/her observation and experience, including a sealed confidential letter of the student's report from the site supervisor. This must be sent directly to the University Departmental Supervisor/ Chairman/Director. PSY 507 can only be done during blocks either after completion of third year, or during fourth year. The student must NOT register for any other course during practicum. Pre-requisites: All 100, 200, and 300 level courses e.g. PSY 111, PSY 112, PSY 211, PSY 212, PSY 213, PSY 311, PSY 312.

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RUD-311 Concept Development

and

Design

of Rural 3 Credits

Rural development concept meaning; Objectives; Principles; Historical review; Rural social structures and constraints to rural development (poverty, unemployment, disease, low motivation, landlessness, malnutrition, ignorance); Theories of development; as applicable to rural development; Planning organization; Resources; Finance; Local level participation as a prerequisite for rural development. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

RUD-312

Community Health

3 Credit

Meaning; Theories and historical background; Principles, Approaches; Preventive clinical and curative strategies; Primary health care centres; Nutrition; Pre-natal and post-natal; Family planning; Infectious diseases (diarrhea, cholera, typhoid, TB, STD's, HIV\AIDS); Industrial related diseases (lung cancer, stress, injuries, carcinogens): National health policies. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

RUD-313

Rural Industrialization

3 Credits

Meaning; The rural environment "Back to land policy"; District focus for rural development policy. Income generating activities for rural areas; Rural industrialization; Types of industries and their integration with agriculture handicrafts; Capital techniques and skills; Extent of market and market organization; Prices and quality of production; labour intensive or capital intensive. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

RUD-314 Psychology for Rural Development 3 Credits

Meaning; Basic counseling skills; Psychology as a science of human behaviour; Heredity and environment motivation of rural people for development; Social behaviour; Social psychology; Beliefs and attitudes; Structure and functions of social groups; Leadership; Carkhuffs model of counseling. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

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RUD-316 Rural Sociology and Sustainable Development 3 Credits

Sociology as a discipline; Origins of rural sociology; Major concerns of rural sociology; Research methodologies; Research applied to village communities and the rural-urban continuum debate; Case studies of rural communities: peasantry and pastoralism; Community leadership; Social stratification; Rural social institutions: definition of social institutions, the family, cooperatives, harambee self-help; Sociological issues in rural labor and migration; Social change and development; Land tenure. Rural Development; municipality, small rural towns, programs for rural development; Planning; Administration; Problems; Strategies for alleviation of problems; Foreign Aid; Dependency Syndrome and its effects. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses.

RUD-408 Special Topics: Issues in Rural Development 3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each time the course is offered, as it is appropriate to the subject matter to be covered. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

RUD-412 Cartography and other Techniques for Rural Development 3 Credits

Definition of cartography and communication; Relevance in rural development, Importance in project planning, Generation of resource data, Cartographic products, Conventional signs and symbols, Computer usage. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

RUD-414 Rural Appropriate Technology

3 Credits

Meaning, principles, types and sources; Appropriate technology as a source of income generation among the rural communities; the various sources of funding for appropriate technology: private, cooperative and commercial banks; Long term prospects of rural industrialization; national industrial structure; Challenges facing the adoption of appropriate technology among the rural communities; How the rural communities can be encouraged to adopt appropriate technology. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

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RUD-417 Integrated Rural Planning And Management

3 Credit

The major concepts; Approaches and paradigms in development; Project management rural capacity; Building the process of mobilization of communities; Project formulation and planning; Networking techniques; Project sustainability; monitoring and evaluation; Impact assessment; Approaches and techniques; Project Proposal writing; Projects; Formulation; Appraisal; Implementation; Monitoring; Management information system; Evaluation. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

RUD-418 Strategies and Programmes for Rural Development 3 Credits

Meaning of key concepts; Strategies for rural development; Community development process; Integrated rural development programmes:- Target group approach; Area development welfare programmes and self help groups; DFRD Systems approach to rural development; Planning for rural development. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

RUD-419 Extension

Rural Economics And Agricultural 3 Credits

Rural economics and its meaning; Scope and subject matter of rural economics; Land and its implications; Rural industrialization; Labour; Agriculture and rural technology; Production marketing and pricing; in rural development; Significance in rural development. Sustainable agriculture; Sustainable development; Banking credit; Economics of agriculture; Ownership and land reforms; Agricultural policies in Kenya, including their historical background; Methods applied in agricultural extension. Agricultural extension: meaning and scope of extension education, methods of extension education, training of extension personnel, field visits, philosophy and significance of extension education in rural development. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

RUD-496 Independent Study In Rural Development

3 Credits

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responsible for the subject. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course outline done in community development. The whole study is to be done by the student in consultation with the lecturer who will ensure the availability of textbooks, magazines, newspapers etc.; Assessment tests and examinations; and weekly consultation meetings with the lecturer. Prerequisites: All 100 and 200 level courses.

RUD-597 Senior Project Report In Rural Development 3 Credits

A 3-4 page proposal containing enough information about the project, for the advisor to advise. The components are: Objectives of study; Methods of study; Preliminary outline of study; Expected results of study; Tentative bibliography; The writing of the paper which will be reviewed weekly. This will be divided into: Review of research; Statement of problem; Statement of method; Presentation of research data; Interpretation of findings; Conclusions and recommendations. Prerequisites: All required 100, 200, 300 and 400 level courses.

SOC-314 Introduction to Statistics

3 Credits

Meaning of statistics; Use of statistics in development research; Functions of statistics; Data summarizing - Frequency distributions and Graphical Presentations; Measures of Dispersion and skewness; Simple correlation Analysis; Simple Regression Analysis; Introduction to Probability theory and concepts; Discrete Probability Distribution; The Normal Probability Distribution; Tests of Hypothesis: Large and small samples; CHI - Square Distribution and Tests of Independence; Analysis of Variance; Non-parametric Tests; Time Series Analysis. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses and MAT-102.

SOC-315 Social Research Methods

3 Credits

Introduction to social research; Simple observation; Uses of available data; Participant observation; Experimental method; Survey research; Data analysis; Special techniques; Report preparation; Ethical issues in research; Quantitative and qualitative analysis. Prerequisites: All 100 level courses and SOC- 314.

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SWK 111 Introduction to Social Work

3 Credits

Competing Perspectives on Social Welfare: Basic Concepts, Political perspectives, Competing worldviews, Christian theology of social welfare, Social welfare in Africa, Social Work as a Profession: Historical development in western society, Development of social work in Africa, Social work values and ethics, Christianity as a foundation for social work, Social Work Practice: Theories, frameworks and models of social work practice, Methods of social work practice, Generalist social work practice, The relationship of social work to other helping professions, Fields of Social Work Practice: Child Welfare, Crime and Criminal Justice, Mental Health and Developmental Disability, Health Care, Housing and Homelessness, Aging and Displaced Persons.

SWK 112 Principles of Helping and Ethics of Social Work 3 Credits

Basic Components in Social Work Helping: What we mean by help, The helping relationship, What it takes to give help, What it takes to receive help, The helping factor, Helping, values systems, and religious belief, Interviewing: Nonverbal communication, Active listening, Questioning, Introductory phase, developmental phase, termination, Special aspects of interviewing, Recording: Uses of social work records, Content of social work records, Social history, Narrative and other clinical records; Practice Issues: Professional Social Work Ethics, Ethical principles, Ethical Values and Christianity and Social Work Ethics. Pre-requisites: SOC-111 and PSY-111.

SWK 211 Human Behaviour and the Social Environment 3 Credits

Introduction; The Social Systems Approach; Culture and Society; Communities and Organizations; Groups; Families and The Person. Pre-requisites: SOC-111 and PSY-111.

SWK 212

Methods and Techniques of Social Work 3 Credits

Social case work; History and development of social case work; Definitions of social case work; principles of social case work; components of social case work; Basic skills in social case work; 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Intervention models; use of worker-client relationship; interviewing in social case work; Recording in social case work. Social Group work: Social group work as a method of social work; Role of a group in personality development; Basic principles of social group work; Types of groups in social group work; Group planning and Development in social group work; concept of leadership in relation to group work; Role of a group worker. Community Organization: Definition of community, Difference between rural and urban community; community organization as a method of social work; objectives; principles and steps of community organization; community organization and community development; Inter-relationship of case work; group work and community organization; Role of a community organizer. Pre-requisite PSY111, SOC-111and SWK-111.

SWK 213

Social Work and the Church

3 Credits

Introduction; The Church as a Community: The historical framework, Life in the community, The Church's participation in social welfare network; Importance of faith and people's relentless economic deprivation/ social isolation: Generalist practice, The five divine role of a Church social worker, the Gestalt intervention of a Church setting; Justice, values and ethics of Church social work: God's justice and social segregation, Social work and the pursuit of justice through meditation; Counseling using social work theory: Ethnic variation in dying, death and grief, Attempted suicide; Changing dysfunctional behaviour relying on spiritual beliefs and practices; Mental health services in faith communities: The role of the clergy in service delivery, Service delivery in Christian communities, Factors responsible and associated with service delivery; The social worker as a moral citizen: Ethics in Christian action: Contemporary transformation, Framework of moral citizenship, Moral citizenship in practice; Church and Denominational Interventions: Mezzo-level intervention, Skills and knowledge necessary to help mobilization for resources for social ministry and various subsystems in the community and the Church. Pre-requisites: All 100 level courses, SWK-211.

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SWK 214 Social Work Practice with the Individual and Family 3 Credits

Review of Helping Principles and Philosophy: The helping relationship, Principles of helping, Spiritually Enriched Ecological Systems framework, Phases of helping individuals and families: Initial phase, Ongoing phase, Ending phase, Modalities, Methods, and Skills when Working with Individuals & Families: Casework, Stressful life transitions, Traumatic events, Environmental stressors, Dysfunctional processes, Diversity sensitive practice: Ethnic issues, Gender issue, Religious issues, Economic issues and Special situations. Pre-requisites: All 100 level courses, SWK-211 and SWK212.

SWK 215

Youth and Development

3 Credits

The changing role of development today: emphasis on people participation; The place of the youth in development viz understanding the youth, socio-economic, cultural, political and spiritual settings; existing disparities, challenges and problems; Empowerment, capacity building strategies for youth development; Youth projects/ programs by the government, NGO's, Church and other development partners and Case studies i.e. youth and health, education, sports, culture, technology etc. Pre-requisites: All 100 level courses, SWK 211, SWK 212.

SWK 311 Crime and Justice

3 Credits

The nature of crime and deviance; definitions of concepts; legal classification of crime; classification according to age; Theories of crime causation; penology, treatment of offenders and crime control; the rationale or justification for punishment; efficacy or non-efficacy of types of punishment and penal reform; Juvenile Delinquency; The causes and prevention of crime and Juvenile delinquency; Institutional organization; the role of a Christian in the prevention of crime and in the handling of offenders. Pre-requisite All 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK312

Community Health

3 Credits

Meaning; Theories and historical background; Principles, Approaches; Preventive clinical and curative strategies; Primary health care centres; Nutrition; Pre-natal and post-natal; Family 2003-2007 Catalogue

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planning; Infectious diseases (diarrhoea, cholera, typhoid, TB, STD's, HIV\AIDS); Industrial related diseases (lung cancer, stress, injuries, carcinogens): National health policies. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK 313

Family Studies

3 Credits

Exploring the family: definition and functions, theories of the family, types of families, influences that impact families today, methods of studying the family; Dating: personal ties, mate selection, love, self esteem; Sexual selves: singles, sexuality through marriage; Defining marriage and family marriage: beginning a marriage, communication in marriage, power\ authority in marriage and families, problems in marriage, conflict resolution; Family commitment: parenting, work and family, managing financial resources; Family change and crisis: dysfunctional families, divorce, abuse, illness, Aging policies ­ family and Impact of religion i.e. Christianity on the family. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK 316 Medical Information and Psychiatric Social Work 3 Credits A. MEDICAL INFORMATION AND MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK

Concept of health and disease; causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the following diseases, Tuberculosis, Leprosy, venereal diseases including AIDS; Malaria; cancer; diabetes; heart diseases; hypertension, small pox; whooping cough. Nutrition and balanced diet; effects of malnutrition; common deficiency diseases and their prevention; Blood; blood grouping; blood bank; concept and development of social preventive medicine, social and public health approach in prevention of illness. Scope and uses of medical social work; social and emotional Psychological components of illness with special references to diseases like, Tuberculosis, Leprosy, cancer, heart diseases, physical handicaps: epilepsy and HIV/AIDS. Role of social worker in hospitals, special clinics and community health programme. Pre-requisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

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B. PSYCHIATRIC INFORMATION AND PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORK Psychiatric - definition; concept; development of psychiatry and social sciences; concept of mental health; factors affecting mental health; Brief reference to major psychiatric disorders; use of psychiatric social work; Psychiatric social work with various types of psychiatric disorders; Role of the social worker in different types of psychiatric settings like mental hospitals; child guidance clinics, and psychiatric clinics. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses. SWK-317 Social Work Practice with Groups 3 Credits

Group Work Theories and Terms: Group work history, Group theories, Types of groups; Stages of Group Development: Forming a group, Initial stage of a group, Transition stage, Working stage, Final stage; Special Considerations: Record keeping for groups, Groups with children, Groups with teens, Groups with adults and Groups with mental/emotional issues.

SWK-318

Social Action and Social Movements 3 Credits

Introduction and definition of social action; Introduction and definition of social movements; Community organization and social action; Church and social problems; Social policy; Social development; Politics and governance and The impact of social movement and social action in Community Development. Pre-requisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-408

Special Topics

3 Credits

Course content will be defined each time the course is offered as is appropriate to the subject matter to be covered. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-410

Stress Management

3 Credits

Introduction: Definitions of stress/ stressors, Stress psychophysiology, Stress and illness; General Applications: - Life-situations & perception Intervention: Intervention, Life-situation intervention: Interpersonal & Intrapersonal, Perception intervention; Relaxation

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techniques: Meditation, Autogenic training, Progressive training, Biofeed back & other techniques; Physiological Arousal and Behavioural change intervention; Strategies for reducing stressful behaviours; Specific applications: Occupational stress, College student stress; Stress and sex-roles and Family stress. Prerequisites: All required 100, 200 and level courses.

SWK-411 Social Conflict and Disaster Management 3 Credits

Introduction and definition of social conflict; Introduction and definition of disaster management; Causes and actors of social conflicts; Dynamics of social conflicts; Types of disaster management; The role and impact of disasters management; The dynamics of disaster management and Ethical issues in social conflict and disaster management. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-412 Social Policy and Social Welfare

3 Credits

Introduction, social policy; Administration; social welfare administration; The social services, Basic needs, Fund raising, Role of a social welfare administrator. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-413: Gender and Development

3 Credits

Defining gender issues; women in rural society; women in urban society; women in development, men in development, justice and gender, gender roles in the economy; women in politics, Women in education; women empowerment. Pre-requisites: All 100 and 200 level courses. Prerequisites: All required 100, 200 and 300 level courses.

SWK-414

Social Work Practice with Communities 3 Credits

Models of macro practice; Historical roots of macro practice; Locality development; Social planning; Community organizing; Administration and Management; The Community as a Target of Change; A framework for conceptualizing community; Identifying target populations; Determining community characteristics; Identifying structure; Understanding community human service

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289 system; The Organization as a Target of Change; Bureaucracy and organizational structure; Management theories; Decision-making; A framework for organizational analysis; Macro Change; Identifying the population and the problem; Analyzing the problem; Developing an intervention strategy; Assessing resource considerations and Selecting appropriate tactics. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-415 Strategies and Programmes for Rural Development 3 Credits

Meaning of key concepts; Strategies for rural development; Community development process; Integrated rural development programmes:- Target group approach; Area development welfare programmes and self help groups; Systems approach to rural development; Planning for rural development. Prerequisites: All required 100, 200 and 300 level courses.

SWK-416 Planning , Monitoring and Evaluation 3 Credits

Project plans, objectives, choice and design: feasibility report, financial estimates, programme monitoring and accountability-target population and programme coverage monitoring delivery of services; strategies for impact assessment-single and group designs for impact assessment, measuring efficiency, the content of evaluation research - financial, economic and social cost benefit analysis. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-417 Labour Problems and Labour Welfare 3 Credits

Labour Conditions Development of modern industry, evolution of industrial labour, characteristic of African labour, Wage levels, Family budgets, consumer price index, standard of living of workers in different industries and regions. Industrial housing, industrial hazards, hours of work. Economic implications of labour in a developing economy, Labour market demand and supply, labour's share in national income, wage theories, wage structure, wage determination, minimum wage and living wage. Labour Welfare Concept, need, objectives, principles and limitation. Agencies of labour welfare employees; trade unions, voluntary agencies, welfare trusts, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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coordination of various agencies. Labour welfare activities; education, housing, health hygiene, safety, recreation, catering, family and child welfare, employees' benefit plans, prevention of social evils such as drinking, gambling, indebtedness, prostitution, corruption. Use of methods of social work in industries like employing counselling, family therapy, etc. Labour welfare officer, training and his role, duties and status, Labour welfare department in an industry undertaking. Labour legislation Its need, scope and principles, historical development, labours' basic laws or legislation like the factories Act, minimum wages Act, maternity benefits Act, provident fund Act, etc. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-418

Project Management

3 Credits

Introduction to project planning and organization; Project planning process, goals, objectives and targets; Implementation and management techniques and systems programming. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-419

ParticipatoryDevelopment Techniques/ Methodologies 3 Credits

Development; Rural development approaches/strategies; Participatory rural appraisal; Participatory rural appraisal tools/menu; Conducting a participatory rural appraisal exercise; Other participatory development methodologies; PRA case studies; Participatory development methodologies. Prerequisites: All required 100 and 200 level courses.

SWK-420

Poverty Eradication

3 Credits

Understanding development vs. underdevelopment; Understanding poverty i.e. nature; Manifestation and effect on the society; Strategies/ Interventions for prevention and poverty eradication i.e. Macro and Micro level; strategies, Participatory development techniques, SAP; The role of the government N.G.O.'s, the Church and other development partners and Case studies of poverty eradication programmes or projects. Prerequisites: All required 100 & 200 level courses.

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SWK-496

Independent Study

3 Credits

The content for each study will vary depending on the topic chosen. The student will choose the topic and discuss it with the lecturer responsible for the subject. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course outline done in Social Work. The whole study is to be done by the student in consultation with the lecturer who will ensure the availability of textbooks, magazines, newspapers etc.; Assessment tests and examinations; and weekly consultation meetings with the lecturer. Prerequisites: All 100, 200 and 300 level courses.

SWK-507

Seminars and Social Work Practicum 9 Credits

The student will be assigned to work for 17 weeks (650 hours) with a Social Work agency or project. The student will be under the supervision of a Social Worker in the agency for four days in a week for the entire working day (8 hours). This experience will afford the student an opportunity to apply and integrate social Work philosophy, ethics, values and skills in a soicla work setting. In addition, a seminar will be held weekly with other social works tudents and faculty to process the experience, and help make connections to social work theory, and to provide required support. SWK-507 will be taken only at the end of the fourth year. Integration of theory and practice will be brought out in the written report. Pre-requisites: All 100, 200, 300 level required courses.

SWK-597

Senior Project

3 Credits

The student will be required to come up with a 3-4 page proposal containing enough information about the project, for the advisor to advise. The components are: Objectives of study; Methods of study; Preliminary outline of study; Expected results of study; Tentative bibliography; The writing of the paper which will be reviewed weekly. This will be divided into: Review of research; Statement of problem; Statement of method; Presentation of research data; Interpretation of findings; Conclusions and recommendations. Prerequisites: All required 100, 200 and 300 level courses.

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SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR PROGRAMME C0MMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MAJOR Integrated Community Development Option

1ST YEAR Semester I PSY 111 SOC 111 INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 098/111 MAT 102 ICA 111 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 ---- 18 Semester II DEV 111 ENG 111/112 BIL 112 HPE 113 ECO 111 PHL 111 PHY 112 3 3 3 1 2 3 2 ---- 17

2ND YEAR Semester I DEV 211 DEV 213 Electives or Minor POL 111 INS 112 ACS 101 3 3 3 1 3 2 Semester II DEV 214 DEV 323 INS 212 BIO 111 ENV 112 Electives or Minor DEV Elective 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 ---- 18

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3RD YEAR Semester I SOC 314 DEV 316 DEV Electives BIL 212 LIT/MUS/ ART 111 RET 320 ---- 3 3 6 2 2 2 18 Semester II SOC 315 DEV Electives INS 313 RET 321 3 9 3 2

---- 17

4TH YEAR Semester I DEV 413 DEV 415 INS 412 DEV 416 DEV Electives 3 3 3 3 6 Semester II DEV 508 Electives or Minor DEV Elective 6 9 3

---- 18

----18

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MAJOR Rural Development Option 1ST YEAR Semester I Semester II

PSY 111 SOC 111 INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 098/111 MAT 102 ICA 111

3 3 3 3 3 2 1 ---- 18

DEV 111 ENG 111/112 BIL 112 HPE 113 ECO 111 PHL 111 PHY 112

3 3 3 1 2 3 2 ---- 17

2ND YEAR Semester I DEV 211 DEV 213 Electives or Minor POL 111 INS 112 ACS 101 3 3 3 1 3 2 ---- 15 Semester II DEV 214 RUD Electives INS 212 ENV 112 BIO 111 Electives or Minor 3 3 2 2 2 6 -- 18

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3RD YEAR Semester I SOC 314 RET 320 RUD Electives BIL 212 LIT/MUS/ART 111 3 2 6 2 2 ---- 18 Semester II SOC 315 RUD Electives INS 313 RET 321 3 9 3 2

---- 17

4TH YEAR Semester I DEV 413 DEV 415 DEV 416 RUD Electives INS 412 3 3 3 6 3 ---- 18 ----15 Semester II DEV 508 Electives or Minor 6 9

NOTE: Electives must come from 300 or 400 level courses. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR

1ST YEAR Semester I INS 111 BIL 111 ENG 098/111 MAT 102 ICA 111 PSY 111 ECO 111 3 3 3 2 1 3 2 ----17 Semester II HPE 113 INS 112 POL 111 BIL 112 PHL 111 PSY 112 ENG 111/112 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 ---- 17

2ND YEAR Semester I Semester II PSY 213 PSY 214 INS 212 ENV 112 BIL 212 PSY 311 SOC 314 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 ------ 18

ACS 101 2 PHY 112 2 BIO 111 2 PSY 212 3 PSY 211 3 Free Electives or Minor 3 ------ 18

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3RD YEAR Semester I LIT/ MUS/ART 111 INS 313 PSY 313 SOC 315 PSY 411 PSY 312 RET 320 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 ----16 Semester II RET 321 PSY 412 PSY 413 PSY 415 Free Electives or Minor 2 3 3 3 6 ------ 17

4TH YEAR Semester I INS 412 PSY 408 PSY 415 PSY 414 Free Electives or Minor 3 3 3 3 3 ---- 15 Semester II PSY 507 Electives or Minor 4 10

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SOCIAL WORK MAJOR

1ST YEAR Semester I PSY 111 SOC 111 INS 111 ICA 111 BIL 111 ENG 098/111 POL 111 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 ------ 17 Semester II SWK 111 SWK 112 Electives INS 112 BIL 112 ENG 112 3 3 3 3 3 3 ------18

2ND YEAR Semester I SWK 211 SWK 212 Electives HPE 113 BIO 111 INS 212 PHY 112 3 3 3 1 2 2 2 ----16 Semester II SWK 213 SWK 214 Electives ENV 112 BIL 212 ACS 101 ART/LIT or MUS 111 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 ---- 17

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3RD YEAR Semester I SWK 311 SWK 312 SWK 314 INS 313 Electives RET 320 3 3 3 3 3 2 ---- 17 Semester II SWK 313 SWK 315 Electives RET 321 ECO 111 3 3 6 2 2 ---- 16

4TH YEAR Semester I SWK 412 SWK 413 Electives INS 412 3 3 9 3 ----18 Semester II SWK 414 SWK 507 3 9

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Faculty of Science and Technology

Science Applied Computer Science Pre-university Programme

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Department of Science

Rationale

The Science courses taught at Daystar University are required courses for all undergraduate students enrolled for any degree programme. This enables the student to have an all-round development which is the aim of a liberal arts education. It helps students to have a broad knowledge of the world around them with a Christian perspective in addition to their major areas of specialization, which helps them develop an all round personality. They gain basic knowledge in physical science, environmental science, biology, mathematics and Health.

Admission Requirements

The science courses offered are a requirement for all students admitted to the undergraduate degree programme.There is therefore, no special entry requirement for doing these courses once the student has been admitted to any undergraduate programme.

Student Assessment

Assessment will be based on continuous assessment work and final examination. Generally, continuous assessment items carry 30% and final examination carries 70% of the total marks.

Requirements for Graduation

In order to graduate, all undergraduate students in the University must obtain 9 credit hours in science courses ( 10 for Commerce Students)

Course Offering

General Science Courses MAT 102 MAT 111 Basic Mathematics

(Non Commerce Students)

Credit Hours 2

3

Mathematics (For Commerce Students)

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304 BIO 111 ENV 112 PHY 112 HPE 113 Biology Environmental Science Physical Science (Non ACS Students) Health and Physical Fitness

Daystar University

2 2 2 1 Credit Hours 0(3) 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Mathematics Courses

MAT 096 Bridging Mathematics MAT 120 College Algebra (For Science and Mathematics Students) MAT 121 Differential Calculus MAT 221 Integral Calculus MAT 223 Discrete Mathematics MAT 312 Linear Algebra MAT 322 Probability and Statistics MAT 334 Differential Equations Physics Courses PHY 121 Physics I PHY 122 Physics II

4 4

MAT 096 is a non-credit course for those students who wish to take a major in Commerce but who had a grade of D+ to C- in KCSE in Mathematics. This course is done before or while applying for entrance to the University. A grade of B- or better in this course allows the student to select a major in Commerce.

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Mathematics Minor

Rationale

The Minor provides a background for those disciplines that require a knowledge of mathematics for further study. Specifically, the goals of the Mathematics Minor are: 1. to help the student to take up postgraduate studies in disciplines that require a background in mathematics. 2. to prepare the student to work for private or public organizations in professional positions which require mathematical skills. 3. to prepare the student to be of service to volunteer groups, such as church and welfare organizations, in areas such as data collection, analysis, and interpretation. 4. to enable students to develop into decisive, innovative, and productive members of the society, who are able to use mathematical tools in meeting challenges and solving problems ethically.

Admission Requirements

1. The student must, in addition to meeting the entry requirements of the undergraduate programme of the University, possess a minimum grade of C+ in Mathematics in KCSE or score 60% in Mathematics in systems that use percentages.

Student Assessment

Final score grades in this department will usually be comprised 30% from continuous assessment items and 70% from the final examination.

Requirements for Graduation

To graduate with a minor in Mathematics, a student must successfully complete 18 credit hours, (excluding MAT 111 (Mathematics). These 18 credit hours comprise 15 hours of required courses and 3 hours of electives as follows:

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Required courses Electives TOTAL

Credit Hours 15 3 18 Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 15 Credit Hours 3 3 3

Required Courses

MAT 120 MAT 121 MAT 221 MAT 312 MAT 322 TOTAL College Algebra Differential Calculus Integral Calculus Linear Algebra Probability and Statistics

Electives (Choose One)

MAT 211 MAT 334 ACS 111 Operations Research Differential Equations Introduction to Programming

Students interested in Business oriented programme may substitute STA 111 (Business Statistics I) for MAT 322 and STA 212 (Business Statistics II) for MAT 334. This is not allowed for Commerce majors.

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Course Descriptions

BIO 096 (Bridging Biology) Human Biology for Psychology 0(3) Credits

This course is designed for those students who wish to major in Psychology but did not achieve the required grade of C in Biology on their KCSE examination. For admission to the course the student must have received a grade of D or better in KCSE Biology or its equivalent. If the student achieves a grade of C+ or better in this course and meets all of the other admission requirements for Daystar University he/she may be admitted into the Psychology Major. The course covers the following: Introduction to biology and the scientific method of study; An overview of systems that make up the human body; Coordination and behaviour, the human nervous system, the endocrine system; Genetics, Mendelian patterns of inheritance, genes and chromosomes, DNA, RNA, genetic disorders, introduction to genetic engineering; Human reproduction, male and female reproductive systems, prenatal development, embryonic development, foetal development and birth, birth control and sexually transmitted diseases.

BIO 111 Biology

2 Credits

The cell, taxonomy of living organisms, rules and binomial nomenclature, elements of the cell physiology, principles of nutrition, transport systems in plants and animals, respiration, growth and development, reproduction in plants and animals, genetics, evolution, economic importance of viruses and bacteria.

ENV 112 Environmental Science

2 Credits

The need to study the environment, introduction of environmental concepts, environmenal pollution, impact of pests and pesticides on the environment, environmental improvement, role of man in the environment, population, demography and renewable and nonrenewable resources, deforestation and desertification, environmental conservation, the environment and human health, nuclear science and radiation, weathering, soil erosion and earthquakes. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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HPE 113 Health and Physical Fitness

1 Credit

General anatomy: naming and identification of bony and soft tissue landmarks; Health: meaning of and differences in health; Benefits of physical fitness: description of importance of physical fitness and activity well-being; Identification and description of the five healthrelated components of fitness; Description of the proper strategies to exercising effectively; Nutrition and weight control: identification and description of the six classes of nutrients and their relationship to wellness; Body composition: definition, description of body fat and obesity and its health related problems; Cardio-respiratory endurance: explanation of effective exercise strategies to develop cardio-respiratory endurance; Muscular endurance; Strength training and flexibility; interpretation of diagnostic signs and triage; Athletic injuries: Dislocations and sprains; Basic life support (CPR).

MAT 096 Bridging Mathematics

0 (3) Credits

This course is to provide basic mathematical knowledge and skills to candidates who did not achieve the grade C in mathematics in secondary school that is required for entry into Commerce major. Topics include: arithmetic operations; percent; fractions, algebraic fractions; factoring; linear equations, simultaneous equations; word problems involving linear and quadratic equations; solution of quadratic equations by factorisation, completing the square and the quadratic formula; functions, graphing; and basic trigonometry.

MAT 102 Basic Mathematics

2 Credits

Logic: simple statements, compound statement, logical connectivesconjuction, disjunction, implication, biconditional and negation; Symbolizing statements; Truth tables, types of statements-tautology, false statement, contradictory statement, equivalent statements, converse, inverse and contrapositive statement; Sets: definition, elements, belonging, the roster and setbuilder notations; Equality of sets, subsets,empty sets, disjoint sets universal set, Venn diagramss, operations on sets-union, intersection, complementary sets, a set minus a second set, problems involving two sets only; Numeration systems and calculating devices: simple grouping systems,

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309 multiplicative systems, positional numeral systems; Early computing Egyptian duplation and mediation method, the gelosia method, the gallery methods; Indu-Arabic numeral system, arbitrary bases, modern calculating devices-the four function calculator, the scientific calculator, the computer; Estimating and rounding off to given decimal places and significant figures; Sets of numbers: natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, real numbers; Expressing recurring decimal numbers as fractions, properties of natural numbers, prime numbers, prime factors, LCM & HCF, number line, properties of real number system- commutativity, associativity, identity and inverse elements, the distributive property, absolute values, power and the standard form; Compound interest, population or economic growth; Linear equations: definition of a varible and equations, emphasis on word problems; Functions: general concept of a function, examples, definition, domain and range, equation of a straight line, concept of gradient; Co-ordinates and graphs: examples and definition, Cartesian co-ordinate system, other formats, log scales, bar graphs, pie charts; Permutations: counting principles, permutaions, formula for permutations, and combinations of things that are not all different; Probability: definition of sample space and event of an experiment, probabilities in a finite sample space, events and sets, mutually exclusive events, independent events, conditional probability.

MAT 111 Mathematics

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide students with basic mathematical skills that will be required for sebsequent courses in the student's major. Specifically, this is the first mathematics course for s tudents in the Commerce major. Topics include: sets; logic; the number system; linear equations and their solution; the parabola; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series; permutations and combinations; functions and limits.

MAT 112 Mathematics for Economics and Management 3 Credits

Fundamentals of mathematics: Basic algebra sets, graphs, functions-- linear, non-linear and applications; Matrix algebra: 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Definitions, operations, input-output analysis types, Maskov chains; Calculus: concepts of limits, differentiation, integration, optimization; Maximum, minimum, legrangian multipliers and application; Mathematics of finance: simple and compound interest, present and future values, ordinary amenities, capital investment appraisal method, linear progamming, formulation and solution method, graphic method. Pre-requisite: MAT 111

MAT 120 College Algebra

3 Credits

University level course in algebra, analytic geometry and pre-calculus. Topics include: review of basic algebra, functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, series, permutaions and combinations as an introduction to probability; linear and quadratic equations, graphing, introduction to vectors, matrices and conic sections.

MAT 121 Differential Calculus

3 Credits

Differential calculus, including the topics of limits, continuity, gradient, definition of derivative, differentiating products and quotients, chain rule, mean value theorem, maximum and minimum theory, differentiating logarithmic and exponential functions trigonometric functions and their differentiation, L'Hospital's Rule, practical application involving rates of change. Pre-requisite: MAT 120.

MAT 221 Integral Calculus

3 Credits

Integral calculus, including the topics of integration as the reverse of differentiation, integration of various important functions. Integration techniques such as integration by substitution and integration by parts, the fundamental theorem of calculus, improper integrals, multiple integrals, applications of integrals. Pre-requisite: MAT 121.

MAT 223 Linear Algebra

3 Credits

Matrix algebra, determinants, solutions to systems of linear equations, linear inequalities, eigen vectors, real vector spaces, linear transformation, introduction to vector analysis, equations of a line in two and three dimensions, equations of planes. The dot (scalar) 2003-2007 Catalogue

311 product of vectors, cross and triple products. Applications of those products. Angles between lines, planes and chords. Pre-requisite: MAT 221.

MAT 312 Discrete Mathematics

3 Credits

Basic concepts of descrete mathematics are introduced including understanding the concepts of sets and logical statements, defining functions, constructing a function, knowing what constitutes a formal proof and understanding the basic concept of applied logic. Topics will include: elementary notations, functions, construction techniques, equivalence, order and inductive proof, analysis techniques, elementary, preducate, applied and computational logic. Prerequisite: MAT 221.

MAT 322 Probability & Statistics

3 Credits

Dependent and independent events conditional probability, Baye's Theorem on probability, random variables, probability distribution, skewness and kurtosis, simple and multiple regression. Prerequisite: MAT 120.

MAT 334 Differential Equations

3 Credits

Ordinary differential equations, equations of first order, separation of variables, higher order equations, equations with constant coefficients, exact equations, integrating factors, series solutions, solutions to systems of differential equations. Pre-requisites: MAT 120.

PHY 112 Physical Science

2 Credits

This course is intended to demonstrate the magnificence of God's creation by providing students with a basic understanding of physical sciences. Topics include: nature of science, scientific methods, impact of science on life; properties of matter, states of matter, periodic table of the elements; acids, bases and salts; chemical 2003-2007 Catalogue

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reactions; inorganic, organic and polymer chemistry; measurement; forms of energy, Newton's laws of motion, conservation of energy, second law of thermodynamics, basic electricity and nuclear energy.

PHY 121 Physics I

4 Credits

Basic concepts of mechanics, work and energy, waves and sound, heat and thermodynamics. This is a first course in physics at the university level. In addition to the specific knowledge areas, the student will see the application of physics to real world situations; appreciate the scientific method; learn the methods of doing research in the laboratory by making a hypothesis and developing a method to test the hypothesis and drawing conclusions; learn to analyze a problem and determine a solution by logical reasoning; learn to write clear concise scientific reports showing the objective, methodology, data reduction and draw valid conclusions. The course consists of three hours of lecture per week and two hours of laboratory work.

PHY 122 Physics II

4 Credits

Basic concepts of electricity and magnetism, electrical currents, basic electronic circuits, semi-conductor devices, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, light and optics including a section on fiber optics. This is a second course in physics at the university level and follows PHY 121 (PhysicsI). Pre-requisites: PHY 121.

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Department of Computer Science

Bachelor of Science Degree in Applied Computer Science

Rationale

The goal of Daystar University is to train students to become servantleaders in Kenya and throughout Africa and other parts of the world. As such the students need to be creative and innovative thinkers who will create jobs and lead in the development of new technologies and systems in whatever area they work. The use of computers in business, industry and service organizations has completely changed the way we work and live. Computers affect almost every area of life. Computer technology is changing at a rapid pace. Those working in this area must have the critical thinking skills needed to not only adapt or react to the changes but to creatively participate in the changes to ensure that progress is made in the proper direction. Students will be encouraged to relate their Christian faith to their work as computer scientists. This may express itself in a variety of ways. It will be demonstrated in the nature of the work that they do, their motivation, their level of commitment to their employer and employees and to society through their ethical and moral convictions. In the liberal arts tradition the students will be expected to study in a number of areas such as Bible, literature and language, history, music or art and communication to provide a broad-based education. As professional leaders the graduates will need to effectively communicate their ideas both orally and by the written word. In addition to teaching specific skills, a significant goal of the program will be to teach the students to think critically, broadly and conceptually. Admission Requirements Applicants must fulfill entry requirements that apply to admission of all Daystar undergraduate students as stated in the current

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315 Daystar University Catalogue. They must have a C+ or better overall average on the KCSE examination or equivalent. In addition, they must meet the following requirements: C+ or better in mathematics on the KCSE examination or equivalent. [Note that a C+ grade does not guarantee entrance into the major] C+ or better in physics on the KCSE examination OR B­ or better in physical science on the KCSE examination or equivalent. Students may also enter the ACS major from the Daystar University Pre-university program if their grades in mathematics and physical science meet the equivalent KCSE requirements. For students coming from outside Kenya the equivalent percentages will be used. Student Assessment Student assessment will be based on class participation, class attendance, continuous assessment such as assignments, group work and quizzes, project work and a final examination. The relative weight of each will vary from course to course depending on the nature of the course and will be specified in the course syllabi.

Requirements for Graduation

To graduate with a degree in Applied Computer Science, students must obtain 139 credit hours distributed as follows: Credit Hours 46 58 46 12 9 26 139

General Education Applied Computer Science Required Courses Electives MIS Mathematics and Science TOTAL

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Required Courses (58)

Credit Hours

2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Computer Science Courses (46 Credits) ACS 102 Basic Computer Skills ACS 111 Introduction to Programming ACS 112 Introduction to Object Oriented Programming ACS 201 Computer Ethics and Social Values ACS 211 Algorithms and Data Structures ACS 221 Computer Organization and Design ACS 222 Introduction to Computer Architecture ACS 231 Operating Systems ACS 302 Software Engineering ACS 311 Principles of Programming Languages ACS 351 Computer Networks ACS 352 LAN Design and Installation ACS 361 Introduction to Database Systems ACS 431 Computer Security ACS 441 Applied Artificial Intelligence ACS 490 Computer Science Project 3 Management Information Systems Courses MIS211 MIS281 MIS282

(9 credits) 3 3 3

Management Information Systems Systems Analysis and Design Methods I Systems Analysis and Design Methods II

Electives in Computer Science (Choose Four) ACS 408 ACS 411 ACS 412 ACS 451 ACS 452 ACS 461 ACS 462 MIS 451 Special Topics in Applied Computer Science Developing Distributed Applications Computer Graphics Data Communication Security & Network Controls Internet/Intranet Application Development Advanced Database Systems Data and Database Administration Designing and Building Web Pages and Sites 2003-2007 Catalogue 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

317 Mathematics and Science MAT120 College Algebra MAT121 Differential Calculus MAT221 Integral Calculus MAT223 Discrete Mathematics MAT312 Linear Algebra MAT322 Probability and Statistics PHY121 Physics I PHY122 Physics II TOTAL

3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 26

TOTAL

139

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Course Descriptions

ACS 101 Basic Computer Knowledge Credits 2

Basic introduction to personal computers (PC). This is a General Course required of all students. PC history, function, hardware and software will be introduced including current, commonly used operating systems and application programmes. Topics include PC hardware and peripherals; word processing (such as MSWORD), spread sheets ( such as MS EXCEL), databases (such as MS Access), presentation graphics(such as MS PowerPoint), e-mail and use of the internet.

ACS 102 Basic Computer Skills Credits

2

This couse is for students majoring in Applied Computer Science and MIS. It includes all of the content of ACS 101 with additional work in number systems of Base 2, 8 and 16 and the microprocessor hierarchy.

ACS 111 Introduction to Programming

3 Credits

A first course in programming that covers basic programming concepts and style. Topics include: definition of a program, algorithms, design, flowcharts, and pseudocode, structure, modules, and hierachy charts, decision making, using Boolean, AND/OR logic, looping using:While, For, Do Until, Nesting loops; arrays, menus, debugging. The programming language will be current, simple, structured language such as basic, C or Pascal. Co- requisite ACS 102.

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ACS 112 Introduction to Object Oriented Programming 3 Credits

An advanced course that further develops programming skills using visual, object oriented application development and programming techniques applied to real world problems. Topics include: Data structures such as arrays, lists, stacks, queues, indices, records, files, and data base structures; hierarchy of data; virtual functions; problem solving and algorithm development; control structures; objects and events; user interface construction; programming correctness verification and validation; data structures and processing; streams and files; linked lists, data access, data maintanance, and algorithm development. A major project will be carried out that will involve user interface construction, simple file/ database/ object searches and updates, and report generation. The software to be used will be a current structured language such as C++, Visual BASIC or JAVA. Pre-requisite: ACS 112.

ACS 221 Computer Organisation and Design 3 Credits

Students are exposed to the register level architechture of a modern processor. Topics include: computer abstractions and technology, integrated circuits, RISC and CISC, the role of performance measurement, language of the machine, arithmetic for computers, processors, and peripherals, I/O devices, multiprocessors.

ACS 222 Introduction to Computer Architecture 3 Credits

An introduction to computer architecture and implementation. Topics include: review of digital electronics, combinatorial and sequence circuit design, flip-flops and sequence and adders, and U storage mechanisms and their organisation; advanced pipelining. Laboratory experiments introduce elementary integrated circuit building blocks, including gates, flip-flops, registers, counters and elementary sequential circuits. Pre-requisites: ACS 221 and PHY 122.

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ACS 231 Operating Systems

3 Credits

General survey of operating system concepts. Topics include: process management, CPU scheduling, process synchronisation, inter-process communiation, deadlock multi programming and multi processing; storage management, memory management, overlays, static dynamic relocation, virtual memory, file systems, logical and physical I/O, device allocation, resource protection. Pre-requisite: ACS 221.

ACS 302 Software Engineering

3 Credits

Advanced topics associated with design and implementation of software systems. The empasis is on software methodology and engineering. A continued emphasis on problem solving concepts is integrated with a treatment of modeling the process and the soft ware life cycle, planning and managing the project, requirement specifications, writing and testing the programs, testing and delivering the system, verification and validation, maintaining the system. Other topics include code control, management of tests and administration of bug fixes. Consideration is given to make /buy decisions. Prerequisite: ACS 211.

ACS 311 Principles of Programming Languages 3 Credits

Advanced programming topics and skills incorporating the most recent developments in programming language design. Topics include: programming environment, compilaton and interpretation, semantics, lexical and syntax analysis, top down and bottom-up parsing, grammar and language classes, control flow, data abstraction and object orientation. Pre-requisite: ACS 211.

ACS 351 Computer Networks

3 Credits

In-depth knowledge of data communications and networking requirements including networking and telecommunications technologies, hardware, and software, Topics include: network applications, LAN and WAN, architecture, topologies, devices and 2003-2007 Catalogue

321 circuits, layers of network technology, telecommunication devices, media, systems; network protocols such as TCP/ IP, IPX/SPX, X.2225 etc, network configuration; intranet and internet; management of emerging technologies. Practical experience in setting up a small LAN.

ACS 352 LAN Design and Installation

3 Credits

Working in groups, students instal the necessary hardware and software to set up a LAN server with several clients and configure it for WAN application. Topics include: defining a network specification, installation and configuration of LAN and WAN networks; cost benefits analysis; installation and operation of bridges, routers and gateways; network performance, analysis, privacy , security, reliability; line configuration - error control, flow control, multiplexing; and regulatory issues. The course will be based on a current popular operating system such as Windows 2000, UNIX or LINUX. Prerequisites: ACS 351.

ACS 361 Introduction to Database Sysems 3 Credits

Design and implementation of data base management systems. Topics covered include: file systems and data bases, models and modeling tools/techniques, ER modeling; structured and object design approaches, introduction to SQL; models for databases: relational, hierarchical, networked and object oriented designs; data dictionaries, repositories, warehouses, conceptual design verification, logical design and implementation, data base administration, limitations of relational data bases management systems. Software used will be popular current database management program such as MS-ACCESS, Oracle, Infomix or Ingress. Pre-requisite: ACS 211.

ACS 408 Special Topics in Applied Computer Science 3 Credits

Courses offered under this course number will vary depending on faculty availability and interest and student need. These topics will allow students to go into greater depth in areas of special interest. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Regular topics will include, without being lilmited to the following: a) Programming, b) Data base design development, and management, c) Networking, d) Internet and website development, e) Multimedia Programming. Pre-requisite: All 300 level courses.

ACS 411 Developing Distributed Applications 3 Credits

This course covers the development of distributed applications. Topics include: COM, ODBC ( Open Database Connectivity), ADO (Active Data Objects), and OLE-DB ( Object Linking and Embedding Database), modeling objects for the data base; review of web protocols, communication complexity, class modules, collection characteristics, polymorphism, Internet protocols, creating code components and controls, universal data access; three-tiered client server architecture. Pre- requisite: ACS 311.

ACS 412 Computer Graphics

3 Credits

A study of the hardware and software principles of computer graphics. Topics include an introduction to the basic concepts; 2-D transformations, viewing transformations, display file structure, geometric models, picture structure, interactive and non- interactive techniques raster graphics fundamentals, 3-D fundamentals , graphics packages, graphics systems and multi media. The course will cover the latest technologies including the Web and DVD. Practicals and case studies shall include Web sites, games and Web commerce sites. Pre-requisite: ACS 211.

ACS 431 Computer Systems Security

3 Credits

Business, conceptual and technical aspects of network security. Topics include: analysis, design, implementaion, and management issues sorrounding effective computer security; security models; UNIX and Windows security, potential lapses, distributed systems and www, cryptography, network and data base security, & multilevel and object -oriented security. Pre-requisite: ACS 231

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ACS 441 Applied Artificial Intelligence

3 Credits

An exploration of concepts, approaches and techniques of artificial intelligence with an application to problem solving. Emphasizes both underlying theory and applications. Topics include: Al defined, problem solving, knowledge and reasoning, acting logically, expert systems, fuzzy logic, uncertain knowledge and reasoning, learning methodology, perceiving, acting, and robotics. Pre-requisites: All 300 level courses.

ACS 451 Data communication Security and Network Controls 3 Credits

This course continues from ACS 431 with an emphasis on network security issues. Conventional encryption, cryptography and many other hardware, software, and managerial controls needed to operate a data communication network in a safe secure manner. Emphasis is on security attaks, malicious programs, authentication and availability. Legal and ethical issues may also be discussed. Topics include cryptography, message authentication, digital signature, electronic mail security, IP, web, intruders, viruses, and worms and fire walls. Pre requisites: ACS 352, ACS 431.

ACS 452 Internet/intranet Application Development 3 Credits

Internet working applications and development with a focus on the internet and corporate intranets. Topics include: design principles of e-commerce applications in a business context; application reengineering; object-oriented client- server Internet environments, methodology for planning and modelling ; building new web-based applications; enterprise data architecture; fundamental enabling technologies, including World Wide Web, browsers, search engines, portals and website metering tools; implementation concepts such as Web, CORDA, Active X DCE, Encina. Pre-requisites: MIS 451.

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SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAMME FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS

FIRST YEAR 1ST Semester ACS 102 ACS 111 MAT 120 BIL 111 INS 111 ENG 111 ICA 111 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 18 2ND Semester ACS 112 MIS 211 MAT 121 BIL 112 INS 112 ENG 112 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

SECOND YEAR 1ST Semester

2ND Semester

ACS 201 ACS 211 MIS 281 MAT 221 PHY 121 BIO 111 HPE 113 TOTAL

2 3 3 3 4 2 1 18

ACS 221 MIS 282 MAT 223 PHY 122 ECO 111 ENV 112

3 3 3 4 2 2 17

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THIRD YEAR 1ST Semester 2ND Semester

ACS 222 ACS 231 ACS 351 ACS 311 MAT 312 PHL 111

3 3 3 3 3 3

ACS 302 ACS 352 ACS 361 MAT 322 MUS/ART/ LIT 111 POL 111 INS 212

3 3 3 3 2 1 2 17

18

BLOCKS FOURTH YEAR 1ST Semester ACS 490 ACS 431 ACS 441 ELECTIVE ELECTIVE INS313

PROJECT

2ND Semester 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 ELECTIVE ELECTIVE BIL 212 RET 320 RET 321 INS 412 3 3 2 2 2 3 15

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Pre-University Programme

This is a one-academic year programme meant for Christian, high school leavers, who achieved a KCSE grade C (Plain) and thus have not got direct admission to the undergraduate degree programme of Daystar University. It is intended to prepare students for admission to the undergraduate degree programmes. However, no guarantee is given that students admitted to this class will be automatically admitted to these programmes. The aim of this programme is to help the student to develop skills, knowledge, understanding and attitudes required for further education at Daystar University.

Admission Requirements

Students intending to join this programme should apply at least three months prior to the beginning of each academic Semester which begin in August and January. The following should be sent to the Registrar's office for consideration for admission: Students are required to register in person at the time designated. Registration schedule is included in the University calendar in this Catalogue. A late registration fee of Kshs 300 will be charged after the day of registration. An additional fee of Kshs 50 will be charged for each additional day late up to the last working day of the second week of the semester. After this, students will not be permitted to register for that semester.

Admission to Programmes

the

Undergraduate

Degree

1. Obtain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 at the end of the Pre-university programme. 2. Receive a favourable recommendation from the University Chaplain regarding spiritual growth and commitment.

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Financial Information and Academic Policies

Pre-University students are charged flat fee of Ksh. 131, 200(subject to change) for 30 credit hours, done in two semesters.

Academic Probation

A cumulative grade point average (Cum GPA) of 2.50 is required for the Pre-University Programme. Any student whose cumulative GPA is below 2.50 is placed on academic probation at the end of the first semester. Such students are given extra help and guidance and counselled. If the student does not get a cum GPA of 2.50 at the end of the second semester, he/she will NOT secure admission to the undergraduate degree programme. However, all students who complete two semesters will receive a certificate of attendance.

Course Load

The course load for the Pre-University class is 15 hours per semester.

Examination

Students are examined in all the courses taken during the semester. Exemptions & Transfer of Credits A student who is admitted to the undergraduate degree programme and obtains a grade of C and above in the relevant courses will be given credits or exempted from these courses as follows: Exemptions in the following course Students Admitted to the undergraduate programme will not be required to take ENG 098 (Basic English). They will take ENG 111.

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328 Transfer of Credits in the following courses Pre-Univeristy Courses BIL 093P O.T Introduction and Survey HPE 081P First Aid and HPE 091P Volleyball/Physical Fitness COM 091P Communication Skills BIO 092 P Biology PHY 092P Pysical Science TOTAL

Daystar University

Undergraduate courses Hours BIL 111 OT Introduction and Survey 3 HPE 113 Health and 1 Physical Fitnesss

ICA 111 Interpersonal Communication BIO 111 Biology

1 2

PHY 112 Physical Science 2 9 Hours

Pre-University Curriculum

The following courses are to be taken by all Pre-University students:

Communication

ENG 092P LIT 092P SKI 092P COM 091P English Language English Literature Study Skills Communication Skills

Hours 2 2 2 1

Mathematics

ALG 092P Algebra MAT 092P Geometry TRI 092P Trigonometry 2 2 2

Science

BIO 092P PHY 092P Biology Physical Science 2 2

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Humanities

HIS 092P History CIV 091P Civics GEO 092P Geography 2 1 2

Bible and Religious Studies

BIL 093P BIS 093P Christian Religious Education Bible Survey 3 3

Physical Education

HPE 081P HPE 091P TOTAL First Aid Volleyball/Physical Fitness 1 1 30

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Course Descriptions

ALG 092P Algebra 2 Hours

Designed to improve basic mathematical skills. Introduction to basic algebra to prepare students for the required University Mathematics courses.

BIL 093P Christian Religious Education

3 Hours

Introduction to academic Bible study at university level, exploring some basic techniques, tools and purposes of individual and group Bible study. Comprehending significant Bible passages through memorization, dramatization, oral performance, group discussion or individual reports.

BIO 092P Biology

2 Hours

The cell, taxonomy of living organisms, rules and binomial nomenclature, elements of the cell physiology, principles of nutrition, transport systems in plants and animals, respiration, growth and development, reproduction in plants and animals, genetics, evolution, economic importance off viruses and bacteria.

BIS 093P Bible Survey

3 Hours

Introduction to the contents and message of the Old Testament in its historical, cultural and theological context. The relationship between the Old and New Testaments and their importance to the Christian life, compatible with BIL 111 syllabus.

CIV 091P Civics

1 Hour

An overview study of African governments during and after the colonial period, African socialism, the district focus for rural development, constitution of Kenya. It will also examine the International co-operations such as Commonwealth agencies, UNO, UNEP, WHO, World Bank, etc.

COM 091P Communication Skills

1 Hour

The basic principles of good study, importance and purpose of goals, priorities and planning, library usage, research paper preparation, 2003-2007 Catalogue

331 increasing reading speed, other methods of study and time management, listening, exam preparation, compatible with ICA 100.

ENG 092P English Language

2 Hours

This course involves intensive practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Main focus is on developing writing skills, sentence construction, paragraph development, grammar composition and comprehension.

GEO 092P Geography

2 Hours

A brief overview of physical geography of the world, the problems and development and exploration of natural resources.

HPE 081P First Aid

1 Hour

An introduction to the accepted and essential principles of treatment when injury or sudden illness occur. Demonstration of the accepted practices of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, artificial respiration and Heimlich maneuver. Practice of the skills of resuscitation, bandaging, splinting, lifting and carrying, compatible with HPE 113 syllabus.

HPE 091P Volley Ball/Physical Fitness

1 Hour

Develop an understanding of physical fitness and its importance in the maintenance of good health. A study of nutrition, basic physical exercise, muscle strength, endurance, flexibility and encouragement of self-discipline. Volley ball will be taught as a team game suitable for development of physical fitness and social efficiency. Common injuries associated with physical activity and its management, compatible with HPE 113 syllabus.

HIS 092P History

2 Hours

A basic overview of African history since 1900 to the present, focusing on the rise of nationalism, political and economic systems.

LIT 092P English Literature

2 Hours

A study of African Literature with critical reading of selected prose, poetry and novel.

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MAT 092P Geometry

Introduction to basic geometrical principles.

2 Hours 2 Credits

PHY 092P Physical Science

This course is intended to demonstrate the magnificence of God's creation by providing students with a basic understanding of physical sciences. Topics include: nature of science, scientific methods, impact of science on life; properties of matter, states of matter, periodic table of the elements; acids, bases and salts; chemical reactions; inorganic, organic and polymer chemistry; measurement; forms of energy, Newton's laws of motion, conservation of energy, second law of thermodynamics, basic electricity and nuclear energy.

SKI 092P Study Skills

2 Hours

To develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills, study techniques and strategies, detailed aspects of grammar and vocabulary to support the skill being developed.

TRI 092P Trigonometry

2 Hours

Review of elementary trigonometrical principles to enable students to acquire satisfactory mathematical proficiency.

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Department of Postgraduate Studies

Christian Ministries Communication Counselling Psychology MBA

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Goals of the Postgraduate Programme

The Daystar University postgraduate programmes are designed to prepare key individuals for leadership roles in church and society. It is expected that the graduates whether church leaders, educators, researchers, or professionals in the market place, will play an important role in helping the church to effectively communicate the message of Jesus Christ to a rapidly changing world. It is expected that they will be equipped to contribute to constructive changes in society within the African context and beyond, for the furthering of the kingdom of God. The programme has four major goals. 1. By building on undergraduate training, the student will train to an academic level consistent with high leadership responsibility in churches, para-church organiations or society in general; 2. The student will demonstrate skills in analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and constructive criticism in his or her discipline of study, so as to be able to c ontribute to the ongoing development of human knowledge and the leadership of others within a multicultural world. 3. The student will demonstrate competence in both theory and practice within the field of study, able to comprehend, communicate, and apply the acquired skills within the realities of the contemporary African context. 4. The student will be able to articulate and live out his/her Christian faith at a level consistent with the level of academic training within the field of discipline. The integration of faith, field of expertise, and practice will be evidenced in their lives.

Common Regulations

1. Admission Requirements

a. Direct Entry

(1) General Academic Requirements: The minimum entry requirement shall be possession of an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution of higher learning, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.7 (on a 4.0 scale), or the degree awarded with first class or upper second class honours. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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(2) Language Proficiency: The student must exhibit sufficient mastery of the English language to study in classes taught in English, as demonstrated by a score of 500 or higher on the Test of English as a Foreign Language, (TOEFL) or an equivalent score on the British English language examination (International English Language Test), or on an examination set by the University. Students from anglophone countries will be exempted from the test, though the University may request any student to sit for a diagnostic English examination if the academic staff believes the student's mastery of English may be insufficient. (3) Bible and Theology Proficiency: The student must demonstrate proficiency in a basic knowledge of Bible and theology, such as a Christian lay leader should have, as demonstrated either by standardized written examination set by the University, with a pass mark of 60%, or by undergraduate credit in survey courses covering Old Testament, New Testament, and theology. (Those lacking the required background in Bible and theology may enroll in the necessary undergraduate courses at Daystar, but without University credit for them.) (4) Computer Proficiency: The student must possess at least basic computer competency in word processing, able to type at least 20words per minute and able to do formatting of documents. If lacking this competency, the student is expected to gain this competence within the first semester, to be able to write papers and projects to a master's level standard. (5) Christian Faith: The University shall admit for study for degrees, diplomas, certificates or other awards of the University, such candidates as shall have been accepted by the Senate as being academically qualified, and who are committed Christians.

b. Admission from other Institutions

Daystar will accept credits of B or better for relevant masters level courses from recognized accredited universities, up to a maximum of 25% of the total course work required and 25% of the course work in the major area of study. No credit for thesis may be transferred and the written comprehensive examination must be 2003-2007 Catalogue

337 taken at Daystar. Credits cannot be transferred for courses that have already earned an academic certificate.

2. Course Load

a. The normal class load for full time postgraduate students is between 9 and 12 credit hours per semester. No student will be permitted to enroll for more than 15 credit hours (exclusive of thesis) of course work in any semester. b. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00 will be required to enroll for fewer credits than normal until his/her cumulative grade point average rises to the minimum of 3.00.

3. Probation and Discontinuation

a. Each student working towards the M.A. degree must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 throughout one's programme. One must have achieved a final minimum grade point average of 3.00 in order to graduate. b. A student is placed on academic probation at the conclusion of any semester in which one's cumulative grade point average falls below the required standard. c. Action will be initiated by the Dean's office to help the student on probation to overcome one's academic problems, and will include a restriction on total course load permitted in any given semester.

4. Special Students

Only persons who are eligible for admission into particular programmes can enroll as special students. Such students will be enrolled for a maximum of one academic year only. Students who wish to continue beyond this period must apply for admission into the regular programmes.

5. Student Assessment

a. Continuous assessment shall be part of each student's evaluation throughout the degree programme. Tests, assignments, term papers, practical work, etc., will be included in the calculation of one's final 2003-2007 Catalogue

338 mark for a given course.

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b. In addition to the continuous assessment, a final examination shall be administered at the end of each semester and the marks scored will be added to the continuous assessment in accordance with the special regulations for each degree programme. c. For each course the student is given a letter grade, which has the following significance: Marks 91 - 100 81 - 90 76 - 80 71 - 75 66 - 70 61 - 65 56 - 60 51 - 55 46 - 50 41 - 45 40 and below Letter Grade Per Credit A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D F Grade Points 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.0 Significance

Superior Average

Below Average Unacceptable for Credit

(1) A course receiving less than a C grade will automatically be graded an F and must be repeated in order to receive credit. (2) Students will be allowed to repeat failed courses. Whatever grade the student achieves after repeat will be averaged in the GPA. (3) Courses which are required but carry no credit are not used in calculating the grade point average. (4) The grade point average (GPA) for a student is obtained by dividing the total number of credits attempted into the total number of grade points obtained.

6. Incompletes

The letter `I' may be awarded as a course grade, and it signifies that 2003-2007 Catalogue

339 the student's work in that course is not complete, and a regular grade will not be assigned until it is completed. Incomplete grades are given only on arrangement with the instructor and for valid, excusable reasons such as illness. A student must make up any incomplete work within six weeks after the semester's end. If one does not do so, the incomplete grade will be changed to `F'. (This policy does not apply to incomplete grades in thesis hours, or practicum, since thesis may be prepared over several semesters, and no grade is assigned until completion of the full project.)

7. Graduation Requirements

Each student will satisfy the requirements specified in the departmental special regulations for his/her degree programme.

8. Class Attendance

It is assumed that students will make the most of the educational opportunities available to them by regularly and punctually attending all class sessions. Students who miss 25% or more of class sessions will receive no credit for the course. If a student must be absent from classes for a very good reason, he/she must fill in absencefrom-class forms which are obtained from the office of Admission and Records.

9. Auditing of Courses

A student may audit any course in this Catalogue, as long as one's presence as an auditor does not displace someone taking the course for credit. Enrolling for audit permits one to attend lectures and to participate in various class activities, but no academic credit is earned for the experience. The instructor may mark assignments submitted by the auditor but is not obligated to do so. For a person to audit an M.A. course, one must satisfy the requirements for admission to the M.A. programme and the pre-requisites of the course.

10. Course Numbering

Only courses carrying a number of 600 or above following the subject prefix (e.g. GRA 611) gain postgraduate credits for the student completing them. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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11. Adding or Dropping of Courses

a. Students may add or drop courses from their schedules without financial penalty during the first week of a course that runs for a full semester. Ninenty percent is refundable up to the end of the second week; after which nothing is refundable. b. The last day to add a course is the last working day of the second week after returning students have reported. c. Such changes are not allowed during the June-August Blocks except in cases of emergency approved by the Dean's Committee.

12. Withdrawal

a. If a student must, for some personal emergency, withdraw from a course after the deadline for routine changes has expired, he/she may do so only as long as two thirds (2/3) of the course has not passed, but the student's transcript will show one's performance. Withdrawals will be noted by `WP' (Withdrawing Passing) or `WF' (Withdrawing Failing) depending on whether the student was passing or failing at the time of withdrawal. b. After 2/3 of the course has passed, the student may not withdraw from any course, unless there is a pressing personal emergency or illness that requires it. Then one must petition to the Dean's Committee to do so.

13. Transcripts

All grades for course work must be recorded on the student's transcript and averaged into the grade point average (except those courses carrying no credit are not calculated into the cumulative grade point average). If a student fails a course or gets a grade less than C and retakes the course, the F grade will remain on the transcript but the new grade, will be averaged in the grade point average in place of the old one. A failed course can be retaken only twice.

14. University Examinations

University examinations shall be conducted at the end of every semester over course work taught in that semester. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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15. Academic Dishonesty

In the event of an alleged examination irregularity, the same shall be reported to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic Affairs) who will consult with the Chairman of the Senate and make an appropriate decision. Where the matter will require investigation, the Senate shall appoint a committee that shall investigate the alleged irregularity. Any person involved in the alleged irregularity shall be required to appear before this committee. The Chairman of the said committee shall then report the findings and the recommendations of the committee to the Vice-Chancellor who on behalf of the Senate shall decide what further action may be necessary. Such action shall be reported to the Senate at its next meeting for ratification. Such disciplinary action taken shall be in accordance with the procedures and regulations established by the Senate.

16.Time Limit for Degree Work

Work for the Master of Arts degree normally must be completed within five (5) years from the time of admission into the programme. Extensions of time may be granted by the Senate only for good reason, upon application through the Dean and the Head of the postgraduate Studies Department. No extensions can be granted beyond seven (7) years from the beginning of course work for the degree. A student must be fully registered in the semester he/she plans to graduate.

17.Late Assignments and Examinations

Each faculty member is asked to state in the course outline his/her policy concerning acceptance of late assignments and examinations in the course. Normally, such work can be made up only for good reason (e.g. serious illness, death in the immediate family etc.). IN NO CASE WILL EXAMINATIONS BE GIVEN EARLY. If circumstances warrant, they may be given late and the student may be charged a grade penalty and/or a late examination fee.

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18. Additional Information

More information on each programme or course is found in the complete syllabus on file in the office of the Department Head. For more Financial Information see page 18 of this Catalogue.

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Common Academic Regulations for Master of Arts Programmes

(Christian Ministries, Communication and Counselling Psychology)

Student Assessment

a. In some courses, where development of skills is the objective, the final examination and other assignments will include, or be limited to, elements which require demonstration of the skills taught. b. Final marks in postgraduate courses will be derived as follows, depending on the type of course: (1) Grades for courses that are primarily conceptual in content are based 40% on the final examination score and 60% on combined score for continuous assessment items. (2) Marks for courses that are both conceptual in content and require development of skills are derived 60% from the final examination and 40% from continuous assessment items. (3) Grades for Independent Study courses and thesis are based entirely on the final paper (and the oral examination with it, in the case of a thesis).

Requirements for Graduation

a. A student will successfully complete credit hours outlined in specific majors. b. The student must orally defend his or her thesis before a panel of at least three (3) post graduate teaching staff appointed by the Chair of Post Graduate Studies, and pass with a grade of B (GPA 3.00) or better. Grade to be determined by the committee. An error 2003-2007 Catalogue

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free copy of the thesis must be deposited with the department no more than 90 days after a successful defence, and final copies must be bound, before a student will be allowed to graduate.

Common Core Course Requirements for MA

The following 15 credits are common to all M.A. programmes as follows: Credit Hours ANT 612 Cultural Anthropology 3 BIL 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service 2 COM 612 Principles and Processes of Communication 3 GRA 613 Introduction to Postgraduate Study 1 GRA 614 Leadership Development 3 RES 619 Research Methods 3 TOTAL 15

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I. Master of Arts with Major in Christian Ministries

The MA in Christian Ministries is a two -year, 48 credit hour programme, designed to train and equip Christian leaders for ministries both within and beyond the church. Though many of our students are in full -time ministry as pastors or lay leaders, a number of students come from business, media, and administrative contexts. Recent Christian Ministries graduates are serving as Deans of Universitites, General Secretaries and Directors of NGO's, Community Developers, Educators, and Counsellors, as well as serving full-time in church or para-church ministries.

Rationale

It is the purpose of the postgraduate curriculum in Christian Ministries to advance the Kingdom of God through training of effective leaders for church outreach ministries of various kinds. Building on prior training and experience of students in Bible, theology, practical ministry of various forms, and other relevant disciplines, the programme prepares students for effective service as Christian leaders in church, para-church organisations, and society at large. The programme also prepares students for further academic training at higher levels.

Requirements for Graduation with MA in Christian Ministries

Common Courses to all MA Christian Ministries Concentration Electives Thesis Practicum TOTAL Credit Hours 15 18 6 6 3 48

Courses required of all students in Christian Ministries, 18 credits (Requirements as listed below are pending the final approval of Biblical and Religious studies department. Any changes, if any, will 2003-2007 Catalogue

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be communicated by the post graduate department in writing). ANT BIL CHM CHM RET RET TOTAL 617 617 661 665 611 613 Urbanization in Africa Hermeneutics Introduction to Counselling Evangelism and Discipleship Christian Theology: God & Man Christian Theology: Church & Mission 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

In addition, any two courses (i.e. 6 credits) of electives depending on the ministry for which one is preparing and the availability of courses: CHM 608 CHM 611 CHM 625 CHM 662 CHM 663 CHM 664 CHM 668 CHM 696 Seminar in Christian Ministries Dynamics of Church Growth Curriculum Design and Development Marriage and Family Counselling Counselling Young People Christian Education as a Ministry The Local Church and Community Development Independent Study in Ministries 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Plus CHM 607 Practicum CHM 698 Thesis Practicum and Thesis

3 6 9

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II. Master of Arts Degree

with Major in communication

Rationale

It is the purpose of the Postgraduate programme in Communication to prepare students for further postgraduate study in communication and for service in communication related offices in churches, parachurch organizations, and in other social institutions.

Requirements for Graduation with MA in Communication

Common Courses to all MA (see page 332) Communication Core Communication Concentration Practicum Thesis TOTAL Credit Hours 15 9 15 3 6 48

Communication Core Courses

COM621 COM624 COM629 TOTAL Communication Theory Communication Ethics Comparative Media Systems 3 3 3 9

Communication Concentration

Completion of 15 credits of courses to be chosen from specific concentrations. If one is doing a concentration in Print or Broadcast Media, then all 15 must be within the concentration. If one is working towards a general degree in Communication, then one may take all 15 within the general category, or may take COM628 plus any other 4 courses. A course marked with an asterisk is required for the concentration. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Print Concentration

COM608 *COM641 COM644 COM645 COM646 COM647 COM696 Seminar in Communication Journalism Fiction Writing Magazine Writing Magazine Editing and Management Principles of Graphic Arts Independent Study in Communication 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Broadcast Concentration

COM608 *COM661 COM662 COM663 COM664 COM665 COM696 Seminar in Communication Broadcast Writing Broadcast Drama Broadcast Management Broadcast Production Audio Production and Editing Independent Study in Communication 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

General Communication

COM608 COM626 *COM628 COM630 COM631 COM635 COM696 Seminar in Communication Public Relations Intercultural Communication Persuasion and Communication Innovations Interpersonal and Small Group Communication Oral Communication Systems Independent Study in Communication 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Plus:(for all concentrations) COM607 Practicum COM698 Thesis Practicum & Thesis:

3 6 9

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III. Master of Arts with Major in Counselling Psychology

Rationale

The MA in Counselling Psychology is a two-year, 48 credit hour programme, designed to equip Christian professional counsellors who will be well grounded in Christian theology, psychological principles, and an African perspective. The programme incorporates integration on a number of levels: psychology and the Christian worldview; ethical and multi-cultural concerns throughout the entire curriculum; training students to help clients become whole persons: spiritually, emotionally, socially, intellectually, and physically; enabling students to grow personally, spiritually, emotionally, socially, intellectually, physically and professionally. The objectives for the M.A. in Counselling Psychology are: 1. 2. to prepare students academically and professionally to counsel effectively and ethically to provide advanced training in experimental design and data analysis so that students may conduct research in psychology to equip students to be knowledgeable consumers of research literature to provide opportunities for advanced study and practice in counselling methods with clinical populations of interest to the student to promote students' ability to integrate psychology with Christianity and with multi-cultural issues to develop students' ability to think critically about human problems and solutions to instill in students a desire for life-long learning through continued study and through informal academic/professional pursuits. to prepare women and men to assume leadership roles, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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5. 6. 7.

8.

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9.

10.

especially in Africa, with the aim of reducing human suffering and promoting psychological well being. to improve students' ability to communicate clearly both orally and in writing, to professionals and to lay persons about psychological matters. to integrate throughout the course content, discussion, and practical experiences relevant to psychological knowledge, Christian principles and an African perspective.

Student Assessment

Though the guidelines for assessment which apply to all MA programmes are the standard, it is noted that in the MA in Counselling Psychology programme, the percentage of the final course grade determined by continuous assessment will vary from course to course.

Requirements For Graduation

The MA in Counselling Psychology consists of the following components: 48 semester credits in specified coursework, which includes a 500hour internship. Optional electives are available but must be taken over and above the specified 48 credits. 1. Students must do a thesis or an internship.

2. Students must provide verification from a professional counselor that the student has completed a minimum of 25 sessions of personal psychotherapy. The student must also submit a report of what has been gained from the experience of personal psychotherapy, including lessons learned, difficulties faced, and overall evaluation of the process of the personal psychotherapy experience. 3. Students will periodically be evaluated by faculty on a number of dimensions related to personal readiness to engage in the profes

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351 sional practice of psychology. Daystar University recognizes that it has responsibility to graduate only those students who exhibit the ability to practice psychology independently with the highest degree of professional/ ethical standards. Credit Hours 15 33 48

Core courses for all MA Counselling Psychology courses Total Core Courses in M.A. Postgraduate programs

Credit Hours ANT 612 Cultural Anthropology 3 BIL 615 Biblical Foundations of Christian Service 2 COM 612 Principles and Processes of Communication 3 GRA 613 Introduction to Post Graduate Studies 1 GRA 614 Leadership Development and Management 3 RES 619 Research Methods 3 Total 15 Courses required of all students in Counselling Psychology PSY640 PSY641 PSY642 PSY643 PSY644 PSY646 PSY650 PSY651 PSY656 PSY657 Personality Theories Theories of Counselling Addictions and Intervention Counselling Fundamentals and Micro skills Family Systems and Marital Therapy Group Processes Psychopathology Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology Psychological Assessment I {Career and Intelligence Assessment Psychological Assessment II {Personality and Psychopathology Assessment, Report Writing and Treatment Planning} Professional Issues and Ethics Integration of Psychology, Christian 2003-2007 Catalogue 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 2

PSY662 PSY671

2 2

352 Theology and African World View PSY606 Practicum I and Seminar I PSY607 Practicum II and Seminar II - or instead of PSY697 & PSY698: PSY698 Thesis Total Total credits required for the degree

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1 3 3 6 33 48

If a student chooses, it is possible to take additional credits: PSY696 Independent Study - Elective PSY 608 Seminar in Special Topics in Psychology ­ Elective

3 3

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IV. Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Rationale

The 21st century organizations operate within an increasingly intricate framework of interrelated environments, with disparate stakeholders whose expectations of business include profit maximization, public policy compliance, and ethical responsibility. The Daystar Masters in Business Administration (MBA) degree is a broad-based, internationally oriented programme that aims at providing advanced skills in selected business and management disciplines including practical exposure in the application of those skills in a contextualized perspective. The program also aims at giving opportunity to working executives aiming at high standards of attainment so as to be able to understand the organizational work environment and to enhance their ability to contribute positively to the organizational welfare and development. The course will also benefit those students completing first degrees and intending to take careers in private, public and other organizations in the areas of finance, marketing, business management and human resource management. Specifically, the objectives of MBA are: 1. To enable the student to acquire advanced knowledge in such areas as Finance; Accounting; Marketing; Economics; Social and ethical issues in Management; Investment; Human Resource Management and other business disciplines; 2. To equip the student with knowledge and skills needed for playing an effective role in the running of organizations in this age of diversity and change; 3. To enable the student to learn how to obtain knowledge they will need to have to keep abreast with new developments in the ever changing and competitive global environment. 4. To assist the student to understand the need for economic interdependence between the various countries in the world today. 5. To enable the student to understand the realities of global 2003-2007 Catalogue

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economic problems and to acquire skills that will enable them to play an important role in their organization's efforts to cope with the problems. 6. To provide opportunity for the student to exchange knowledge with students from other countries. 7. To provide the student with opportunity to learn to be creative and innovative managers by gaining knowledge about what creative and innovative managers are doing in the local and international business scene. 8. To enable students to adopt firm Christian values and ethics that will enable them to contribute to the building of a just society within the organizations, in the countries, and in the world as a whole. 9. To provide the student with opportunity to learn to be a manager with an international outlook by studying such subjects as General Management, Advanced International Management, Advanced International Marketing and International Finance. 10. To enable the student to learn to be socially responsive manager who has a desire to respond positively to the social, economic and environmental problems in the world, both in the role of executive, and as volunteer workers, giving assistance to the under-privileged, the suffering and those who assist in the effort to eliminate poverty and improve people's standards of living.

Thesis/Project

Thesis or Projects will be based 90% on final paper and 10% on continuous assessment items.

Curriculum for the MBA Degree

The MBA program consists of four specialized concentrations with a total of 58 credit hours. The program is arranged in three parts: the core or required courses (compulsory for all students), the concentration requirements and the general electives parts.

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Requirement for Graduation

Core Courses Concentration Core Courses BIL 615 BUS 610 BUS 611 ECO 610 FIN 610 FIN 611 FIN 610 GRA 613 HRM 610 MAK 610 MAT 611 MAT 610 MGT 610 MGT 611 MIS 610 Credit Hours 42 16 42 Credit Hours Biblical Foundations of Christian Service 2 Business Research Methods 3 Ethics and corporate social responsibility3 Managerial Economics 3 Financial Accounting Theory 3 Financial Management and Control 3 Managerial Accounting 3 Introduction to Postgraduate Studies 1 Human Resource Management 3 Marketing Management 3 Operations Research 3 Quantitative Techniques 3 Cross Cultural Management 3 Strategic Management & Innovation 3 Management Information Systems 3

MBA - Finance Concentration

Concentration Requirements 16 Credit Hours BUS 620 Integrative Project or Thesis 4 FIN 613 Financial Analysis and Reporting 3 FIN 614 International Financial Management 3 FIN 615 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management 3 FIN 617Finance Seminar 3

MBA ­ Marketing Concentration

Concentration Requirements 16 Credit Hours BUS 620 Integrative Project or Thesis 4 MAK 611 Marketing Strategy and Management 3 MAK 612 Consumer Behavior 3 2003-2007 Catalogue

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3 3

MBA ­ Strategic Management Concentration

Concentration Requirements BUS MGT MGT MGT MGT 620 612 613 614 617 16 Credit Hours 4 3 3 3 3

Integrative Project or Thesis Strategic Policy Management Global Strategic Management Management Design and Organisation Transformation Strategic Management Seminar

MBA ­ Human Resource Management Concentration

Concentration Requirements 16 Credit Hours BUS 620 Integrative Project or Thesis 4 HRM 611 Human Resource Management Strategy 3 HRM 612 Managing Behavior 3 HRM 613 Employee Motivation and Productivity 3 HRM 616 Human Resource Management Seminar 3

MBA - General Elective Courses (Over and above the 58 required courses)

BUS 612 BUS 613 BUS 614 ECO 611 ECO 612 FIN 616 HRM 614 HRM 615 INS 610 INS 700 Special Topics Independent Study Business Logistics and Management Monetary Economics Gender and Economic Development Corporate Finance Compensation and Employee Benefits Public Relations for Managers Christian Mission and Economic Justice Christian Mission and Social 2003-2007 Catalogue 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

357 Transformation Marketing Financial Services Advertising Production and Consumption Marketing Research Management of Non-Business Organizations 3 3 3 3 3

MAK MAK MAK MGT

615 614 616 615

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Course Descriptions in Postgraduate Department

ANT 612 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits

The relevance of cultural anthropology; The historical development of the discipline: schools of thought, related disciplines; Major proponents and their books, conceptual, theoretical and methodological contributions; Definitions of culture; Weaknesses; Applications; Christian approaches of value to students; Biblical cultural relativism; Cultural and supracultural contrasts; Christ and culture continuum; The Kingdom of God and the cultures of men; Selected concepts in culture studies: systems, institutions, complexes and traits; Form, function, and meaning; Patterns and performance; Application to communication/Christian ministries; World View: historical and theoretical background; Its nature and models; Functions, problems and limitations; Christian perspectives; Application to communication/Christian ministries.

ANT 617 Urbanization in Africa

3 Credits

The biblical basis for Urban Studies: the Old Testament, the New Testament; Definitions: Urban, urbanism, urbanization; The Urban Explosion; World-wide data; Africa's urbanization; History and trends of urbanization in Africa; Ancient cities; The impact of colonization: Muslim, European; Patterns of urbanization and implications for: Christian ministry, economic and technological patterns, secularization, industrialization, housing, employment, social patterns, social networks, deviancy, migration, ethnicity, organizations, family, youth and children; Christian Strategies for the city; Ministry in the city, Evangelism and church growth; Shepherding in the city.

BIL 615

Biblical Foundations of Christian Service 2 Credits

Introduction and definition of terms: Kingdom of God; Servanthood; Jesus' teaching on the Kingdom of God; Parables of the Kingdom; The teaching of the early church on the Kingdom of God; Various 2003-2007 Catalogue

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BIL 617

Hermeneutics

3 Credits

Definition of hermeneutics as art of science, with historical overview of practices of interpretation from Old Testament times to the present day; Basic issues of historical and cultural context, semantics, including denotative and connotative meanings; A survey of genres found in biblical literature with basic principles of interpreting each; Introduction to exegetical methodology using sample passages from Old and New Testaments; Introduction to contextualization here and now; Introduction to important tools available to assist in interpreting the Bible.

BUS 610 Business Research Methods

3 Credits

Problem selection and formulation; Writing proposals that work; Project definition; Research objectives and design; Sampling; Questionnaire design; Fieldwork; Using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), Data analysis using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Thesis writing; Reporting results.

BUS 611 Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibity 3 Credits

Introduction to Sources of Law ­ Kenya and the East African Community (EAC); The legal system in Kenya; The law of persons, Law of torts, Law of contracts; Legal principle on partnership and corporations; Protection of Business Secrets; Company law Company Act, Property law, Protection of Business Secrets; Introduction to ethics concepts; Businessmen's attitudes towards ethical issues; Some ethical problem areas in business organizations; Protecting consumers, shareholders, employees, and the environment; Christian influence in ethical decisions making in business; The gospel, business and the state.

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BUS 612 Special Topic

3 Credits

Course content will vary according to the subject. The instructor will define the content for each course. Possible topics include: Africa Development Policy, African Business Development, Development Consulting, Development of Cooperatives, Strategies for Inner City Ministry, Housing in Community and Economic Development, Restructuring, Decontrol of Prices, Past Present and Future Role of the Stock Exchange, etc.

BUS 613 Independent Study

3 Credits

The student will discuss the topic chosen with the lecturer responsible for the subject. The lecturer will make suggestions to ensure that sufficient ground will be covered. The lecturer will give a list of textbooks, newspapers and magazines to the student. He will set questions each week and discuss answers with the student.

BUS 614 Business Logistics Management 3 Credits

The role of logistics in the economy and the organization; Customer service; Logistics Information Systems; Inventory concepts; Investory management; Management materials flow transportation; Warehousing; Materials handling, Computerization, and packaging issues; Purchasing; Global logistics; Organizing for effective logistics; Methods to control logistics perfomance; Supply Chain management; Implementing logistics strategy.

BUS 620 MBA Thesis Or Project

4 Credits

The third and final part of the MBA degree, is the preparation of a thesis or a project that should commence after the two taught semesters. Thesis is more theory-based and often involves testing of hypothesis while projects are focused more on providing solution(s) to practical problems in a firm or outside a firm. Students are encouraged to think about their topics from early in the Second Semester so that they can begin work immediately the examination results are available. Most students might find that the thesis or project represents three to four months of full-time work. Projects are of an academic nature fulfilling the requirements of thesis 2003-2007 Catalogue

361 writing i.e. they should include chapter 1, 2 and 3 similar to that of a thesis, with slight variation to suit the nature of the project. Instead of Chapter 5 and 6 which traditionally have data analysis and interpretation, the project should be a creative solution to a particular well-documented problem. Early in thesecond semester the MBA Coordinator will circulate a list of possible supervisors and their areas of interest. Students should then approach two appropriate supervisors to discuss their proposals. Students wishing to undertake a project within a firm are responsible for organizing their own placements. However, the Postgraduate Office will have a file of possible leads from companies and other organizations.

CHM 607 Practicum

3 Credits

An assigned task for which a student's courses can be applied, and to which a student's faculty and employer agree. Minimum 150 hours with the employer, either 10 hours per week for 15 weeks during the semester or 15 hours per week for 10 weeks during the blocks or in other configurations approved by the department. Assignment must require competence to areas relevant to the student's course of study, and which will enable growth in that area. Written assessment will be part of the experience. Pre-requisite: completion of 36 credits within the M.A programme.

CHM 608 Seminar in Christian Ministries

3 Credits

Course content will be defined for each offering of the course as is appropriate for the subject matter covered. Possible topics include counselling substance abusers, ministry to the aging, and homiletics. Pre-requisite depends on topic.

CHM 611 Dynamics of Church Growth

3 Credits

Introduction to church growth; Foundational teachings; Church growth principles; Statistics and church growth; Vital signs of a church; How to do a church survey; Setting goals; Evangelism; How to grow a church; Spiritual dynamics of growth.

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CHM 625 Curriculum Design and Development 3 Credits

Definition of models of curriculum design at various levels, philosophies of educational curriculum design, andragogy vs pedagogy, models of education; Steps of curriculum development from situational analysis, to aims, goals, instructional objectives, selection of content, and learning experiences, evaluation strategies for curricula; curriculum implementation documentation; Principles to be applied to students' fields of interests, whether communication, Christian education, or related fields of training others.

CHM 661 Introduction to Counselling

3 Credits

Basic concepts in the theology of man: creation in God's image, fall and its consequences, redemption, Christian maturity; Theories of personality development: Piaget, Freud; Evaluation of theories of personality development from Scripture; Lawrence Crabb's model of counselling-- cultural adaptation and application; Counselling issues in the local church: substance abuse, depression, suicide and homicide, stress and burnout, marital problems and divorce, polygamy, demonization; Basic Counselling skills: listening, guiding, asking questions, empathy, accountability boundaries; Practice listening skills and counselling in dyads and triads: Practice, discussion of practice; Support systems available locally for referral; Counselling ethics: confidentiality, privileged information, contracts, Mental Health Act (1989).

CHM 662 Marriage and Family Counselling 3 Credits

Key concepts defined; Family: parental and sibling units, family boundaries, genogram; Family systems theory; Anatomy of the genogram; Structural approach to family counselling; African family: nuclear, extended, effects of modernity on nuclear and extended family; Premarital counselling issues; Traditional, Contemporary, Polygamy; Husband-wife relationship; Parent-child relationship; Family and marriage: a biblical perspective.

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CHM 663 Counselling Young People

3 Credits

Detailed exploration of normal development, physiologically, psychologically, and socially, from birth to young adulthood; Selected theories of development, including: Freud, Piaget, Erickson; Childhood and child rearing problems; Understanding adolescence; Interpersonal issues: relating to the opposite sex, Sex apart from marriage; Sex deviations and perversion; Peers and peer pressure; Relating to parents; Quest for autonomy; Courtship and marriage; Identity issues: development of self esteem, singleness, adolescent subculture(s); Special youth issues: substance abuse, delinquent behaviour, stress and depression.

CHM 664 Christian Education as a Ministry 3 Credits

Definition of Christian education; Theology of Christian education; Means of Christian nurture; Education in the church: the children's ministry, the youth ministry, the adults' ministry, the women's ministry, the singles' ministry, the physically challenged ministry; Education in para-church organizations; Christian education in schools.

CHM 665 Evangelism and Discipleship

3 Credits

Definition of evangelism and discipleship; Biblical basis for evangelism and discipleship; Content of evangelism; Motives, methods and objectives for evangelism; Types and levels of evangelism; Difference between evangelism and discipleship; Principles and methods of effective discipleship; Design of an effective discipleship programme; Biblical model of Jesus ministry of discipleship and mandate to make disciples; Content of discipleship.

CHM 668 Local Church and Community Development 3 Credits

Introduction and definition: Community, Development, Church, Community work, Work of the Church; Analysis of urban poverty, poverty and power, the city and the city of God, systems, involvement of both poor and rich in community development; the church's role: the church to the city, the church with the community, why local church should be involved, supportive task of para-church, denomination, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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and mission agency, standard for local ministry; community development activity: Community organization vs community development, urban work which empowers, networking, coalition bulding, reflecting, acting, leadership empowerment, the pedagogy of action and reflection, organizing and money; issues and leaders: gatekeepers, caretakers, flak catchers, brokers, action and project, power analysis, confrontation; birth of a community.

CHM 696 Independent Study in Ministries

3 Credits

Content will depend on the topic chosen and will be worked out in conference with the assigned lecturer for the project. Examples of topics which might be explored are curriculum development for nonliterates, theological education by extension, church relationships with people of a different religion, etc. Pre-requisite: Departmental approval, based on adequacy of background course work and availability of qualified instructor.

CHM 698 Thesis or Project

6 Credits

Content will depend on the topic chosen and will be worked out in conference with the student's thesis advisor.

COM 607 Practicum

3 Credits

An assigned task for which student's coursework can be applied, and to which student, faculty, and employer agree. Minimum 150 hours with the employer, either 10 hours per week for 15 weeks during the semester or 15 hours per week for 10 weeks during the blocks. Assignment must require competence in areas relevant to the student's course of study, and which will enable growth in that area. Written assessments will be part of the experience. Pre requisite: completion of 36 credits within the MA programme.

COM 612 Principles Communication

and

Processes of 3 Credits

Introduction of basic communication terms and 23 principles of communication under the following heads: Introductory principles; The importance of goals and purpose; Personality factors and 2003-2007 Catalogue

366 communication; The 12 signal systems; The social context of communications; Media; The change message.

COM 621 Communication Theory

3 Credits

Foundational concepts: God as communicator (Webber); The need to communicate; Basic postulates (Mortensen); Classical roots (Aristotle, Cicero); Communication as process (Schramm); Source variables: source's image of audience and feedback response, source credibility, research (Hovland, et al); Communicator's increased commitment; Message variables: medium as message (McLuhan); Information theory (Rappaport); General semantics; Message structure and outcomes; I. A. Richards and study of meaning; Audience variables: identification (Burke); Adopter categories (Rogers and Shoemaker); Opinion leadership; Communication networks (Rogers and Kincaid); Cultural differences; Patterns of thinking; 12 signal systems (Smith); Attitude as a concept; Social structure; Attention, retention, perception; Communication effects. Pre-requisite: COM 612 or equivalent.

COM 624 Communication Ethics

3 Credits

Definition of ethics; Fundamental concerns; Components of ethical systems: behaviour rules, underlying principles, ideals and virtues, highest good; Bases for ethical judgment: emotivist ethics, egoist ethics, utilitarian ethics, situation ethics, absolutist ethics; Ethical issues in communication: truth telling; Effectiveness as responsibility; Completeness of message; Listener responsibilities; Ethical issues in mass media; Legal constraints on the mass media; Laws concerning defamation, libel and slander; Copyright law; Registration of publications; Systems of media law; Constitutional guarantees; Toward a Christian ethic of communication.

COM 626 Public Relations

3 Credits

Definition of theory and practice of PR as a profession in the modern organisational context.; The social context of PR and its growing importance in the African and global setting today; The organisational context of PR and its role in organisational management; Pubilic Relations strategy and management; The role of PR in communicating an organisation's purpose and goals; Identifying key 2003-2007 Catalogue

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publics-internal and external, and strategizing for effective cmmunications with these publics; Setting goals and objectives and planning for Public Relations; The role of research and evaluation in public relations; PR tactics and dealing with the media; Communications strategies for crisis situations; Fund raising and donor relations; Written communications; Oral communications; Public Relations as practiced in Christian ministries, NGO's, governments, corporations, and other enterprises; Public Relations ethics. Pre-requisite: COM 621.

COM 628 Intercultural Communication

3 Credits

Assumptions in intercultural communication; Basic concepts; Dyadic communication; Terministic screens; Cultural boundaries: positive and negative; Functions of culture: self-discovery and selfexpression; Technology and culture, Technology transfer and cultural dominance; Translatability; Comparative methodology; Cultural variables; Localists; Cosmopolitans and multiculturals; Language; Myths; Stories; Ideologies; Values; Belief structures; Cognitive structures and ways of thinking; Emotional expression; Equality system; Exchange system; Social control system; Cultural interdependency; Applications; International mass communication; Commerce; Politics; Entertainment; Education; Inter-ethnic and interracial communication; Intercultural marriage; The missionary enterprise; Ethnocentrism; Transcending one's own culture. Prerequisite: COM 612.

COM 629 Comparative Media Systems

3 Credits

Mass media as social systems; Factors for the development of media systems; Theories and models of media systems; Key concepts in media systems; Media policies; Emerging media systems; Information realities in developing countries; Transborder data flow; Remote sensing; Defamation; Socio-cultural impact of new media on the developing world, particularly Africa; The new world information order; Information networks in Africa; International religious media; Impact of international religious media on Africa; News trends and issues in international media realities.

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COM 630 Persuasion and Communication of Innovations 3 Credits

Historical foundations of persuasion theory: Aristotle, Cicero, other ancient theorists; Persuasion as a special case of communication; Persuasive effects; Persuasive ethics; Attitudes and beliefs; Prediction of response; Group influence; Influence of the message source; Message variables in persuasion; Non-verbal codes; Message structure and appeals; Communication channels; Interpersonal persuasion; Special applications; Negotiation; Persuasion in small groups; Persuasion in formal organizations; Social action; Comparison of empirical and humanistic theorists. Pre-requisite: COM 612

COM 631 Interpersonal and Small Group Communication 3 Credits

Dyads Self as a communicator; Interpersonal attraction; Friendship, selfdisclosure; Interpersonal competence (turn-taking, rituals); Symbolic mediation, signification, and conflict; Trust, power, and signification; Marital communication; Boundaries-- time, space, ethnicity and culture. Triads and larger groups Organized systems-- groups; Group types-- purpose; Group types-- structure; Dealing with problems-- group thought, deviance; Decision making; Group roles; Conflict resolution; Group leadership; Group action.

COM 635 Oral Communication Systems

3 Credits

Non-literacy as a world-wide phenomenon; Communication variables as related to non-literacy; Objectives of communication with nonliterates; Differences between `oral' and `print' cultures; The Bible: oral and written culture; The vitality of the oral system; Participation as necessary element; Alternative traditional means: (a) Drama (b) Music and dance (c) Literary forms (poetry, oratory etc.), (d) Objects (e) Traditional structures and procedures; Alternative means -- electronic media (a) Audio cassettes (b) Film (c) Video. Prerequisite: COM 621. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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COM 641 Journalism

3 Credits

Definition of terms such as journalism, journalist, information, communication; The journalist: role and responsibilities; What is news: news judgement, expectations of news report, qualifications of news; News gathering: news sources and how to use them, selecting the news, improving news gathering, writing skills; Writing more clearly: punctuation, emphasis, sentences, words, numbers, capitalization, abbreviations; Writing the news: news story format, leads and types, body of the story, ending straight news versus new journalism, copy preparations, attribution, news writing skills; Covering and writing speeches and meetings: advance preparations, unethical bluff, news sources/observation/off-the-record; Writing the story; Feature stories: definition and meaning, type of features, format and organization, writing style; Editing: What is editing, basic copy reading operations, problems and solutions, editing symbols, headlines ­ objectives, forms, writing heads. Pre-requisite: COM 098 or equivalent.

COM 644 Fiction Writing

3 Credits

Introduction to the building blocks of fiction; Theme and plot; Characterization; Setting and atmosphere; Crisis and suspense; Dialogue; Flashbacks; Story beginnings; Story endings; Humor; Short story analysis with a view to giving greater understanding of the elements of fiction; Novel analysis; Short story and novel; Short story project. Pre-requisite: COM 612, COM 098 or equivalent.

COM 645 Magazine Writing

3 Credits

Magazine analysis; Query letter; First person narrative article; Howto-do-it article; News features; General expository; The personality article; The interview article; Evaluation and analysis of magazine articles.

COM 646 Magazine Editing and Management 3 Credits

Introduction to the world of magazines in Africa: their personalities, markets, staffs, management and role in society; Formulae for magazine success and failure; What it takes to be an effective magazine manager; The editorial side of magazines: creating the 2003-2007 Catalogue

370 concept, the role of research, the editor and his/her staff, the editor and his/her content, developing editorial skills in evaluating manuscripts, copy editing, re-writing and reshaping; The business side of magazines: circulation and promotion, advertising, revenue projection/budgeting, developing a business plan; The production side of magazines: developing the visual personality of a magazine, dealing profitably with suppliers-- typesetters, printers, color separators, etc, desktop publishing, avoiding production headaches and maximizing production profits. Pre-requisite: COM 645.

COM 647 Principles of Graphic Arts

2 Credits

This course will concentrate on five major areas in the field of graphic design: (a) preparation of manuscripts for production; (b) the typesetting process; (c) design and layout principles; (d) the printing and binding processes; and (e) publications management. Specific Topics Include: Introduction to graphics: The visual element of communications; Overview of publication production process; Understanding typography (a) Dealing with typesetters; (b) Knowing type; (c) Specifying type; (d) Handling/editing proofs; Pre-production techniques: How to avoid printing nightmares; Copy preparation and editing; Manuscript Preparation; Introduction to design principles: Creating the "Look" with a minimum of cost and hassle; Layout materials and techniques; Handling photography and illustrations; Dealing with printers -- getting the most for your money; Knowing and effectively using the printing processes available; Color and paper choices; Negotiating printing contracts; Controlling quality and schedules; The role of desktop publishing in modern design.

COM 661 Broadcast Writing

3 Credits

Overview of radio as a communication medium-- the nature of the radio audience; Writing for the ear; Basic elements of radio production that each writer should know: microphone, sound effects, music; Sports and commercials or writing to persuade; Writing news: style, sources, script formats; News features and documentaries; Entertainment programmes-- music shows, variety shows, radio magazine; Radio drama: idea, main character, conflicts, planning, plotting, research, theme, dialogue; Analysis and critique of radio drama; Children's programmes, women's programmes; Writing for the Christian world. Pre-requisites: COM 612, COM 098 or equivalent. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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COM 662 Broadcast Drama

3 Credits

Introduction: The writer for radio; The nature of drama; Inventing a plot; Character and theme; Script design; Dialogue narration; Types of drama; Evaluation of African plays for radio: E. G. Sunil's Dilemna; The Trial of Busumbala; Adaptation of short plays to radio drama; Discussion of problems about major scripts; Production issues and studio techniques. Pre-requisites: COM 661, COM 098 or equivalent.

COM 663 Broadcast Management

3 Credits

Fundamental principles of broadcast management: definition of terms, philosophy of broadcasting and broadcast management as a function of ownership and control; Audience research for management; Programme management; Technical aspects of management; Broadcast market management; Human resource management.

COM 664 Video Production

3 Credits

Tools of production; The camera; Camera shots and camera movements; Camera lenses; Picture composition; Scripting; Lighting; Television studio and control center; Electronic editing; Post production techniques.

COM 665 Audio Production and Editing

3 Credits

Communication theories as they relate to broadcasting by radio; The medium of radio; Tools of the producer; Production techniques; Characteristics of a producer; Sound; The portable tape recorder; Programme formats; Presentations; Production work; Programme evaluation; Editing techniques. Pre-requisite: COM 661.

COM 696 Independent Study in Communication 3 Credits

Content will depend on the topic chosen and will be worked out in conference with the assigned lecturer for the project. Pre-requisite: COM 612, COM 621. Departmental approval based on adequacy of background course work and availability of qualified instructor.

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COM 698 Thesis or Project

8 Credits

Content will depend on the topic chosen and will be worked out in conference with the student's thesis advisor.

ECO 610 Managerial Economics

3 Credits

Introduction: Factors influencing managerial decisions; scope of managerial economics. Demand analysis; Theory of Production; The laws of return; Returns to scale; proportional change in inputs; Economies of sale: Internal and external; Optimal input combination; Cost concepts; Optimum size and long run cost curves; Break-even analysis; Pricing and market structure: Monopoly, monopolistic, Competition; Oligopoly.

ECO 611 Monetary Economics

3 Credits

Definition of money and banking; Depositing institutions; Central banks of independent states; Bonds, Interest rates, discounting; Commercial banks; Private state and joint stock banks; Financial markets with a view to their impact on the national and world economy; Monetary theory and policy; The functioning of banks and other financial institutions; Financial deregulation; Money and capital markets; Simple Share Valuation relationships; Interest rates and foreign exchange rates; International finance and economy; Third world debt problems, aid financing and debt servicing.

ECO 612 Women in Economic Development 3 Credits

Introduction: Concepts for the analysis of women; Reproductive versus production; the subordination of women' female and nutrition; Theories of women in development; Women in the rural areas; The economies of polygamy: status of younger wives, work input and women status, Influence of caste on woman's work and wages; The impact of agricultural modernization on the employment of women; Urban women and development; Women in a man's world; Why employers prefer male workers to women, Urban job opportunities for women; The design of education; The new home economics; Economics and intra-household relationship; Policy implications; Practical strategic needs; Aim on how to improve the current rates of return to investment in women and female children; Practical 2003-2007 Catalogue

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gender needs; Protection of entitlement; Changing rights to land and common property resources; Access to credit; Gaining equal opportunities to employment and equal wages, Empowering Women.

FIN 610 Financial Accounting Theory

3 Credits

Preparation of important financial statements from various accounts books. Accounting Theory; Accounting Concepts; Accounting Standards and Valuation of asset; Budgeting and the use of budgets in financial control.

FIN 611 Financial Management and Control 3 Credits

The role and environment of financial management; International sources of finance and financial markets; Capital structure and cost of capital; Managing working capital, Planning and control; The `new' business environment; AMT and changes in production flow techniques, Capital investment appraisal. Strategic management accounting issues; Performance evaluation in domestic and multinational organizations; Transfer pricing in domestic and multi-national organizations; Short-termism; Dividend policy, Mergers and holding companies.

FIN 612 Managerial Accounting

3 Credits

Evolution of management accounting; User decision models; Information economics and its relation to management accounting; The nature of managerial decisions; Short-term Planning decisions; Basic C-V-P analysis, C-V-P under uncertainty, real risks analysis with multiple products, selection of product mix, analysis of special orders; Performance evaluation decisions; Cost-variance investigation models; materiality significance, statistical significance, and control charts, cost-benefit investigations. Inventory control decisions; Stock replenishment models; Strategic and tactical decisions; and Game theory.

FIN 613 Finacial Analysis and Reporting

3 Credits

Accounting Theory: Objectives of financial statements, user groups, and desirable characteristics of accounting reports, fundamental accounting concepts-I.A.S.I "presentation of financial statements";

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374 The Companies Act: Legal framework, requirements of the Act in reporting. Regulatory Framework: Accounting standards Committee, standards setting process, standardization; International accounting standards-an overview of all international accounting standards; Cooperate Governance; Published accounts and annual reports including income statements, Balancesheet and cash flow, Statements based on I.A.S.7, I.A.S.1, I.A.S.22; Valuation of tangible and intangible assents I.A.S.38 and 16; Accounting for Investments and business combinations; Reconstruction of companies; Valuation of business and shares; Different methods; Ratio analysis.

FIN 614 International Financial Management 3 Credits

International trade concepts; Foreign currency accounts; International monetary agreements and institutions; International trade finance; Players in international trade finance; International cash management; Financial Control in multi-national enterprises; Financial policy in multi-national enterprises.

FIN 615 Investment Analysis & Portfolio Management 3 Credits

Introduction to investment; An overview of investment, Differences between investments, savings and speculation, Risk and returns, Types of investments: Fixed and variable return securities, shares and debentures, Government securities, real estates, certificate of deposit, Investment in building societies and other kinds of investments. Security Markets; Securities commissions, Capital markets, Stock exchange operations, i.e. organization, members and dealings of the stock exchange, listing requirements, regulation of the stock exchange e.g. the capital market authority and retirement benefits authority acts. Security analysis; Valuation of securities, Fundamental analysis, Technical analysis and random walk analysis. Portfolio management; Portfolio risk and return, Efficient market hypothesis: forms and tests, Portfolio construction models, Capital asset pricing model, Arbitrage pricing theory, Need for and problems of portfolio revision. Introduction to derivatives; Financial futures, options and warrants.

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FIN 616 Corporate Finance

3 Credits

Corporate governance and Investor protection; Portfolio theory; The Capital Asset Pricing model; Capital budgeting under uncertainty; Cost of capital; Gearing and Corporate valuation; Dividend policy; Mergers, Acquisitions, Restructuring and Corporate control.

FIN 617 Finance Seminar

3 Credits

Overview of financial management-concept of value; Capital market efficiency; Market risk return relationship and valuation of risky assets-CAPM and APT; Capital structure and the cost of capital; Portfolio selection decision; Dividend policy decision; Theory of the firm-agency theory; Financial strategy and analysis-the discriminant analysis; Understanding the stock exchange; Topical issues in Kenya for example, interest rates control level of investment and so on.

GRA 613 Introduction to Post Graduate Study 1 Credit

Effective study methods for post-graduate students; Analysis, summary and synthesis skills; Reading rapidly and for comprehension; Library usage; Analysis and reporting skills; Linking disciplines; Thesis preparation; Proposal and research writing.

GRA 614 Leadership Development and Management 3 Credits

Defining leadership vs. management (differentiating Christian leadership); Introduction to and comparison and contrast of the basic models and theories of leadership and their applications; Exposition of Clinton's model of leadership in The Making of a Leader; Spiritual giftedness, Biblical models of leadership-- New Testament; The disciplines of leadership; The major tasks of leadership; Guidelines for excellence in leadership; Building trust, vision, teamwork, finishing well; Issues of leading in an African context.

HRM 610 Human Resource Management

3 Credits

Introduction; a historical view of Human Resource Management (HRM), HRM models, competitive challenges influencing HRM, meeting the competitive challenges through HRM practices, a conceptual framework of HRM. Acquiring human resources: the 2003-2007 Catalogue

376 Human resource planning process; Job choice and recruitment of human resources; employee selection and placement. Assessing work and work outcomes: the analysis and design of work, performance management. Compensating human resources: Pay structure decisions, recognizing individual contributions with pay, employee benefits. Developing human resources: training, employee development, and career management. Increasing the effectiveness of human resource practices through technology.

HRM 611 Human Resource Management Strategy 3 Credits

Corporate and Business Strategy; the Academic debate on human resource management; The changing business environment; The contribution of HRM to business strategy: the planning process, philosophies and policies; Organization structure and the human resource function; Human resource management models and roles

HRM 612 Managing Behaviour

3 Credits

Fundamentals of organizational behavior; Working with people, Historical developments of organizational behavior; Fundamental concepts; Organizational climate and models of behavior and social systems; Motivation and reward systems; Mainsprings of motivation, Motivating employees, Job satisfaction; Organizational change; Leadership, Employee participation, Interpersonal dynamics, Group dynamics, and managing change. Conflict management; Organization and social environment; Communication and counseling, Employee communication, Communication relationships, Employee stress and counseling

HRM 613 Employee Motivation and Productivity 3 Credits

Introduction: The motivation process; Motivation theories; Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation; The relationship between motivation and performance; The Nature of work: the psychological contract; Motivational models for developing countries; Bases of work; Motivation in developing countries; Designing work in developing countries; The issue of culture fit; Reward management: Employee

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benefits, pensions and allowances; The management of compensation and Welfare services; Involvement and participation management; Work alienation.

HRM 614 Compensation and Employee Benefits 3 Credits

Economic and psychological foundations related to compensation. Job analysis: job description, job specification and person specification. Administration of salaries and wages; Distinguish, factors influencing wage rates wage and salary policy; Objectives of a sound policy; Wage structure, salary structure, creating scales from job evaluation results; Discretional increments, overtime payments; Salary planning, wage salary surveys, international comparison of salaries. Pay related benefits, total benefits package; Conditions of service; Hours of work, holidays, shift working, Sickness pay, pension schemes, and welfare policies. Pricing and updating performance appraisals; Incentives management; Administration of fringe benefits.

HRM 615 Public Relations for Managers

3 Credits

Nature of Public Relations; Origin and development of Public Relations function, The concept of `publics', responsibility of the Public Relations function, Theoretical underpinnings. Need for Public Relations; Public Relations management process; Experiences of managing the PR activities in Kenya; Strategic planning and organizing the Public Relations function; Social and ethical issues in Public Relations; Social responsibility and the PR function; Communication in Public Relations; Leading and control in Public Relations; Managers as leaders of PR activities; Evaluating the PR Function; Interpreting and using results of evaluation for control of PR activities.

HRM 616 Human Resource Management Seminar 3 Credits

The field of Human Resource Management; The external context of HRM; Functions of Human Resources Management; The secular view of work; Christian views of work; The internal context of HRM; Management of the employee relationship; Christian principles of employee relations; The managing diversity; Outcomes of HRM. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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MAK 610 Marketing Management

3 Credits

The market objectives of successful organizations, the information input (MIS) market research, market research, Sales forecasting; Product planning, development, and management; Promotion, planning and management of sales advertising, sales promotion, publicity. Distribution; understanding and managing the distribution channels; Customer service, framework for marketing planning; Control: profits and performance analysis, contribution analysis cash flow analysis and net present value.

MAK 611 Marketing Strategy and Management 3 Credits

The strategic role of marketing; Nature and value of strategic management; Business strategy and competitive advantage; Formulating long-term strategies and grand market strategies; Marketing strategy; Strategic analysis and choice of markets; Market segmentation; Analyzing competition; Designing marketingstrategy; Marketing and program development; Implementing and managing marketing strategy

MAK 612 Consumer Behaviour

3 Credits

Introduction; Keys to consumer behavior; Market segmentation and consumer research; Consumer needs and motivation; Personality and consumer behavior; Consumer perception; Learning and consumer involvement; The nature of consumer attitudes; Communication and persuasion; Group dynamics and consumer reference groups; The family; Social class and consumer behavior; The influence of culture and sub-cultural aspects on consumer behavior; Consumer decision-making process; Diffusion of innovations; Public policy and consumer protection.

MAK 613 Global Marketing

3 Credits

A Conceptual Overview: Introduction to global marketing; Global marketing planning. The global marketing environment: Economic environment, Social and cultural environment, Legal and regulatory environment, Financial environment. Targeting global markets: Global marketing information systems and research, Global segmentation, targeting and positioning. Formulating global marketing strategy; Sourcing decisions and the value of chain, Strategy alternatives for global market entry and expansion, Competitive analysis and strategy, 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Cooperative strategies and global strategic partnership. The global marketing mix: Global product strategies, Global pricing strategies, Logistics. Global business involvement: market entry strategies, Global promotion strategies. Exporting and importing. Leading, organizing and controlling the marketing effort. Ethics and global marketing; The future of global marketing.

MAK 614 Advertising Production and Consumption

3 Credits

History of advertising, advertising and the marketing mix, models of communication, semiotics, targeting, advertising, media choices gender, race, ethical issues, and the future of advertising

MAK 615 Marketing Financial Services

3credit

Market segmentation; product development; pricing; branch location and distribution; advertising; promotion and communications; control of marketing programs; credit cards; insurance salespersons management.

MAK 616 Marketing Research

3 Credits

The Marketing research system; Role of marketing research; The marketing system; Gathering marketing intelligence; Research process; The Christian faith and marketing research; The Marketing research business; Practice of marketing research, Ethics and legal aspects; The problem setting, study proposal and the research project; The Research designs; Exploratory, descriptive and causal; The Data-Collection Methods; Secondary and primary; Marketing decision support systems; The Sampling and Data Collection; The Measurement and Causality; The measurement process, Attitude measurement, causal design; Data Analysis; Data processing; Reporting research findings; Applications; Demand measurement and forecasting; Product research and test marketing; Advertising research.

MAK 617 Marketing Seminar

3 Credits

Seminar Topics Course introduction and overview of marketing management. Topics for presentation and discussion in class; Citing introduction, where appropriate, discuss the relevance of "Marketing management as demand management" in Kenya's market place environment. Briefly 2003-2007 Catalogue

380 discuss the major market (customer) characteristics in Kenya. Role and importance of market places and roadside selling in Kenya. Critically review the promotion mix (advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, and publicity) as it is currently used in Kenya. Is marketing catalyst (stimulus) or response to Kenya's socioeconomic development? The main objective of the Structural Adjustment Programs (SAPS) in Kenya has been to reduce the role of government in the production and distribution of goods and services and to increase that of the private sector. To what extent has this objective been achieved? Critically discuss the marketing strategies followed by micro and small-scale enterprises (SSEs) in Kenya. What are the Marketing implications of the Uruguay Round Agreement to Kenya? Critically discuss marketing implications of the recent adoption of modern information technology (IT) by financial and product distribution sectors in Kenya. Problems and opportunities for transferring marketing know-how from Western Countries to Kenya and vice versa. Evaluate the marketing roles of regional economic groupings with special reference to those in Africa. Marketing cases and problem solving exercises will be given later. Time allowing guest speakers will also be invited.

MAT 610 Quantitative Techniques

3 Credits

Functions; Definitions; Graphical representation; Types of functions; Polynomial; Experimental and logarithmic; Multivariate; Matrix Algebra; Matrix operations; Matrix applications; Solutions to systems of equations; Input-Output models, Markov analysis. Calculus; Integration and applications; Linear programming; Descriptive statistics; Probability; Decision theory and decision trees. Probability distributions; Inferential statistics; Hypothesis testing: z test, t test, x2 tests, ANOVA tests, Non-parametric tests; Correlation; Regression Analysis; Scatter diagrams, Parameter estimation; Fitness of overall model ­ R2 and F-tests; Significance of regression parameters.

MAT 611 Operations Research

3 Credits

Meaning and scope; Linear programming; Graphic, Simplex and Duality methods; Transportation; Assignment and sequencing Problems; Replacement decisions; Queuing theory; Inventory management; Statistical quality Control; Investment; PERT and CPM; Forecasting techniques; Work study; Simulation. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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MGT 610 Cross-Cultural Management in a Global Society 3 Credits

Comparing culture; shifts in culture; organisational sulture vs national culture; culture and ethic; cross cultural managemnt and communication; culture and structure; motivating across cultures; conflict mediation across cultures; cross -cultural negotiations; culture's influence on decision making and planning; global staffing policies; managing culticultural teams; training for an expatriate assignment; doing business with : Europeans, Americans, Latin Americans, Arabs, Asians and Africans.

MGT 611 Strategic Management and Innovation 3 Credits

The nature of Strategic Management: An introduction; Models of Strategic management; Competitive advantage; Strategic planning for IT; Organizational learning as a competitive strategy; Crosscultural transferability of management strategies; IT Outsourcing as a competitive strategy; Managing technical change in Japan; Innovation and management of information systems; Managing business process re-engineering; Exploiting the World Wide Web for marketing and business collaboration; The investment appraisal of innovative IT based projects; Managing the IT resource infrastructure.

MGT 612 Strategic Policy Management

3 Credits

Introduction to the course; methodological practices; practices of integrating work groups; general strategies; strategic administration; types of strategies; implementation of strategies; business missions; external evaluation; internal forces; analysis and choosing strategies; annual policies and objectives; aspects of marketing, finances, research and development and information systems in the implementation, evaluation and control strategies; strategic managemnt in a globalized world.

MGT 613 Managing Behaviour

3 Credits

Fundamentals of organizational behavior; Working with people, Historical developments of organizational behavior; Fundamental concepts; Organizational climate and models of behavior and social

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382 systems; Motivation and reward systems; Mainsprings of motivation, Motivating employees, Job satisfaction; Organizational change; Leadership, Employee participation, Interpersonal dynamics, Group dynamics, and managing change. Conflict management; Organization and social environment; Communication and counseling, Employee communication, Communication relationships, Employee stress and counseling

MGT 614 Management Design and Organisation Transformation 3 Credits

Introduction; different tyypes of change; understanding change; organisation vision and strategic planning; managing change; organisation development and change; designing and developing organizations; organisation culture as a vehicle of change; designing work-centric organisations;; the learning organisation; transformational processes/ models.

MGT 615 Management of Non-Business Organizations 3 Credits

Meaning of non-business organization: Historical perspectives of nonprofit organizations; Mission, purpose and objectives of non-profit organizations; Principles of management - the meaning of management; Organizing in the non-profit organization; Management and people; Employment policy; Communication, co-ordination, delegation and control; Managing donor relations and conflict resolution; Financial management: Mechanics of non-profit finance management, Budgetary control, costing control; Measurements of performance; Serving the consumer, The satisfaction of consumer's needs. Public relations: Dealing with interested parties; government, suppliers, associations, staff, and organization.

MGT 617 Strategic Management Seminar

3 Credits

The management challenge; The formulation, implementation and control of competitive strategy focusing on concepts like: key success factors, core competencies, strategic business units, employee empoewerment, reengineering, organization restructuring and total quality management in an African context.

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MIS 610 Management Information Systems 3 Credits

Business systems fundamentals; Transaction processing systems and management reporting systems; Decision support systems; Expert systems & executive information systems; Data as a corporate resource; Models of MIS; The IT platform; The systems development lifecycle; Tools of structured systems analysis; Controlling MIS; management issues arising from MIS and IT.

PSY 606 Practicum I

and Seminar I

3 Credits

Students are responsible for acquiring their own practicum sites, which meet the minimum requirements of the Daystar graduate programme. They will be guided and encouraged in that process by the faculty. Students will average 20 hours per week at the site over the course of the school year from August to May, for a minimum total of 500 hours combined. Students will be required to receive at least one hour per week of individual supervision from their on-site supervisor. About half of the student's hours should be in direct clinical service, with the remaining hours dedicated to staff meetings, supervision, consultation with staff, and other training activities. The site and supervisor must be approved by Daystar and meet qualification standards established by the Daystar M.A. programme. Overview of issues surrounding Christian and African Counselling: What does it mean to be psychologically healthy? Spiritually healthy? Are they related? Inner healing: Healing of memories; Steps to freedom, Prayers, offerings, sacrifices and use of scripture in Counselling. Spiritual abuse; Misbelief Therapy: Nouthetic Counselling. Hyponotherapy; Sin, evil, forgiveness, and redemption; Case presentations weekly.

PSY 607 Practicum II and Seminar II

3 Credits

Students are responsible for acquiring their own practicum sites, which meet the minimum requirements of the Daystar graduate programme. They will be guided and encouraged in that process by the faculty. Students will average 20 hours per week at the site over the course of the school year from August to May, for a minimum total of 500 hours combined. Students will be required to receive at least one hour per week of individual supervision from their on-site 2003-2007 Catalogue

384 supervisor. About half of the student's hours should be in direct clinical service, with the remaining hours dedicated to staff meetings, supervision, consultation with staff, and other training activities. The site and supervisor must be approved by Daystar and meet qualification standards established by the Daystar M.A. programme. Overview of issues surrounding Christian counselling: What does it mean to be psychologically healthy? Spiritually healthy? Are they related? Inner healing: Healing of memories; Steps to freedom, Prayer and use of scripture in counselling. Spiritual abuse; Misbelief Therapy: Nouthetic Counselling. Hyponotherapy; Sin, evil, forgiveness, and redemption; Case presentations weekly. Prerequisite: PSY-662, PSY-697 must be successfully passed in order to register for PSY-698. NOTE: A student will be required to take either PSY697 and 698, or PSY698. he internship will be assessed as follows: 30% from student's written reports of experience at the internship site, 30% from the site supervisor's written reports and evaluations, 40% from the Daystar's faculty supervisor's evaluations.

PSY 608 Seminar In Special Topics

3 Credits

Family Violence; Substance Abuse Evaluation and Treatment; Psychopharmacology; Human Sexuality and Sexual Therapies; Virginity in the African Context; Aging; Loss and Grief; Gender Issues; Adolescence; Psychological Issues of Orphaned/ Adopted Children; Crisis Intervention; Using Psychology in School Classrooms; Effective Parenting Training; Psychological Issues in the AIDS Crisis; Mental Health Care in Refugee Camps; Mental Health Support of Pastors, Missionaries and Families.

PSY 640 Personality Theories

2 Credits

Overview of personality theory; Research and methodology Issues in personality theory; Psychodynamic theory, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Alfred Adler, Karen Horney, Erich Fromm, Harry Stack Salivan, Phenomeno-Logical theory; Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow. Behavioural theories; B.F. Skinner, J. B. Watson, Ivan Pavlov.

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Cognitive Behavioural theory; Albert Bandura, Julian Rotter, Cognitive theories; Jean Piaget, Albert Ellis, Kolberg. Dispositional theory; Gordon Allport, Raymond Cattel.

PSY 641

Theories Of Counselling

2 Credits

Overview of theories of Counselling. Creating a personal philosophy of counselling; Research and methodology issues in counselling. The Counselling relationship and the issue of effectiveness; Client and therapist variables affecting effectiveness, effectiveness of psychodynamic and brief therapies, critique of the psychoanalytic model of Counselling. Feminist approaches and cross-cultural issues. Transference and counter transference issues in Counselling. Boundary issues; touch and physical contact in Counselling; Therapist self disclosure and the ethics of sharing Christian faith in Counselling. Gestalt model of Counselling.

PSY 642 Addictions And Their Interventions 3 Credits

Addiction diagnosis, treatment, research and theory; Codependency diagnosis, treatment, theory and research; Christians and addictive disorders; Africans and addictive disorders; Substance abuse involving alcohol, marijuana, prescription medication, amphetamines, nicotine, cocaine, opiates, hallucinogens, sedatives, khat, hypnotics, gasoline, glue, and paint; Behavioral/impulse control disorders such as rage, gambling and sex addiction, and eating disorders; Common co-morbid disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorders; Treatment models such as AA, harm reduction, abstinence, inpatient, residential, outpatient group, family, and individual therapies; Case reviews; Program visits and participation; Termination issues.

PSY 643 Counselling Fundamentals And Microskills 3 Credits

Introduction to counselling: The counselor as a person; General counselling models; Introductory ethical issues and art of constructive feedback. Diversity issues in counselling; Rapport and structuring: Attending behaviour; Observational counselling and "Active Partnership". Clarifying client's present scenario: Clarifying core

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386 concerns and assets; Basic listening sequence; Encouraging, paraphrasing, summarizing reflecting feeling and positive asset search. Establishing therapeutic contact; Goal setting; "Best-fit" strategies and agreeing on counselling plan. Implementing counselling plan; Evaluation and modification. Termination and followup; Skills of integration and personal style including African therapeutic skills such as story-telling, myths.

PSY 644 Family Systems & Marital Therapy 2 Credits

Extended African family systems; Key family theorists: Munching, Bowen, Papp, Whitaker, Aponte, Satir, and others. General Systems Theory and how it applies to family systems; Family relationship and communication patterns; Multigenerational patterns; Genograms and family sculpting; Cultural, especially African, considerations in family theory and therapy: Polygamy and adultery; Economic pressures; Family violence and social change. New directions in family therapy: The Milan School and Narrative Therapy. Theological perspectives; Rites of passage: Conception, birth, naming, initiation, marriage, council of elders, and death.

PSY 646 Group Processes

2 Credits

History of group therapy; Theoretical approaches to group therapy; Curative factors and limitations of group therapy; Group therapist characteristics; Group therapy techniques; Group formation: Screening and selection of members; Ground rules; Group development: Conflict, power, coalitions, cohesiveness; African community support system; Dynamics of African social groups; Special issues in group therapy: Termination issues; Ethical issues in group therapy.

PSY 650 Psychopathology

3 Credits

Course Introduction - Ethical, political, and economic considerations in diagnosis: Validity and reliability of diagnostic categories. Overview of DSM-IV: Multi-axial Assessment and Emerging diagnostic categories. Mood disorders; Anxiety disorders; Thought disorders; Interface between mental and medical conditions; Eating disorders; Sexual disorders; Personality disorders; Childhood disorders; Substance abuse disorders; Christian and African understanding of mental disorders, Witchcraft, demonology; exorcism; Wholistic understanding of psychopathology - psychologically, physiologically, socially, culturally and spiritually. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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PSY 651Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology 3 Credits

Introduction to the field of neuropsychology: Neuron structure and function and synaptic transmission. Principles of drug action: Depressants; Stimulants and hallucinogens. Nervous system organization: Neurological assessment and brain development; visual perception: Other sensory systems; Movement and opiates. States of consciousness: Motivation and sexual behaviour. Emotions: Learning and memory; Cognitive disorders; Alcohol and benzodiazepines. Lateralization and language: Disorders of language and brain damage. Clinical disorders & their psychopharmacologic treatment; African medicin; Herbs; Antipsychotic drugs, Anti -anxiety drugs, Anti-depressant drugs and ECT (shock therapies). Theological concerns.

PSY 656 Psychological Asssessment I {Career & Intelligence Assessment} 2 Credits

Philosophy and history of psychological assessment; Issues in administering surveys and tests. Norms, reliability, and validity in assessment; Cross-cultural issues; Issues arising from the use of assessment instruments in Africa; Clinical hypothesis testing: Ethics of psychological testing. Report writing; Interest inventories; Aptitude measures; Intelligence testing: Achievement testing; Organicity testing and Social Maturity Testing; Future of assessment.

PSY 657 Psychological Assessment Ii {Personality Psychopathology Assessment, Report Writing & Treatment Planning 2 Credits

Course Introduction and Overview: Diagnostic Interviewing. Mental Status Exam; MMPI - 2 - Theory, administration, interpretation, report writing; MCMI - 3, Beck Depression Inventory: BVGT, SCL-R-90: Theory, administration, interpretation, report writing. Projective Testing - theory, administration, interpretation and report writing; Integrating Assessment Data: Considerations of Testing in the Future and Limitation, especially cultural bias, of assessment instruments.

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PSY 662 Professional Issues And Ethics

2 Credits

Introduction to African Code of Conduct; Ethical, legal, and professional issues; Client rights: Confidentiality. Professional responsibilities: Duty to warn. Child abuse and liabilities of counselling practice. Values and controversial issues; Christian perspectives; Competence, training, certification; Ethics in research, testing, and diagnosis; Suicide and right to die; Multicultural concerns; Boundary issues, especially dual role relationships; Supervision; Consultation; Child, marriage, and family issues; Group therapy issues; Community issues; Counsellor as person; Recognizing burnout; Termination issues.

PSY 671 Integration Of Psychology, Christian Theology and African World View 1 Credit

Definition of worldview, and specifically, a Christian worldview, and an African world view; The Kingdom of God and the individual; spiritual maturity stages; African spirit world; Models of integrating psychology, Christianity and African world view; A biblical understanding of nature of persons, sin, evil, demonology, and spiritual warfare with implications for Counselling psychology; The role of personal faith in professional life; The process of healing.

PSY 696 Independent Study

3 Credits

This is an elective course, which allows the student to focus intensively on an area of interest, which is not covered in the regular curriculum. The content for the independent study course will vary depending on the topic chosen. The student is responsible for choosing a topic and securing the approval of the lecturer who will be supervising the student's study. The topic chosen must have sufficient content equivalent to any course outline found in the M.A. in Counselling Psychology programme, but must not be part of an existing required course or any other graduate course already taken by the student. The independent study is to be conducted by the student in consultation with the lecturer who will ensure the availability of textbooks, articles from journals, newspapers, and/or magazines, assessment tests, examinations, and weekly consultation meetings. It is advisable for the lecturer and student to establish a written 2003-2007 Catalogue

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contract at the outset of the course specifying the course content and means of assessment.

PSY 698 Thesis

6 Credits

The Masters' Thesis for the M.A. in Counselling Psychology is a research project designed and carried out by the student, under the direction of a faculty advisor and graduate committee. While all students in the M.A. programme are expected to be good consumers of research, the thesis project is designed to prepare students to contribute to the research in the field and to gain important research experience necessary for entrance into a doctoral program. Students interested in an academic career should seriously consider completing a Masters Thesis. Prerequistie: RES619

RES 619 Research Methods

3 Credits

Foundational issues: definition of research, steps in the scientific method, kinds of research introduced, criteria for doing research, goals of research, misconceptions about research, limitations of research, applications in communication and ministry; Research planning: planning and research based strategy, ethical issues, challenges and problems of research in Africa; Steps in the research process; Criteria for a research study; Statement of the problem; Secondary research; Hypotheses; Research designs; Experimental vs. non-experimental methods; Determining data sources and sampling; Ethnographic methods; Project proposals; Data collection; Measurement issues; Data collection methods; Asking questions; Ranking and rating methods and scales; Likert scale; Semantic differential; Q-sort; Projective statements; Ethnographic techniques; Choosing informants and sampling; Probability and sampling statistics; Sampling methods; Sampling types and approaches; Ethnographic informants; Fieldwork, Pre-testing; Interview techniques; Field techniques; Ethnographic techniques; Analysis; Role of statistics; Coding and tabulation; Statistical analysis; Graphic presentation; Evaluation and interpretation; Ethnographic analysis; Computer usage; The research report. Students will be divided into quantitative vs qualitative tracks towards the end of term depending on their research interests.

2003-2007 Catalogue

390

RET 611 Christian Theology: God and Man 3 Credits

Introduction to fundamental aspects of Christian theology in contemporary Africa; Historical context of Christianity in Africa, including the western missionary inheritance and emergent African theology; the nature, task, sources, and methods of theology; selected aspect of doctrine of God, Christ, creation, humanity, the fall, sin, salvation, atonement, sanctification, individual and community, birth, life, and death. Exploration of theology in the context of Africa with application for ministry.

RET 613 Christian Theology: Church and Mission 3 Credits

Overview of church and church growth in Africa; a biblical perspective of the church; relationship of the church to the kingdom of God. Purpose and function of the church. The mission task of church as seen in cosmic, community, and charismatic perspective; the church as ecumenical, missiological, academic, and pastoral; evangelistic, prophetic and discipleship roles; theHolySpirit, the ministry of teaching, healing and guidance. Spiritual reality and power in Africa, spiritual warfare; the priesthood of all believers, spiritual gifts and the mission of the church. Role and practice of sacraments; church growth related to kingdom growth; independent church movement in Africa; forms and structures of the church as contrasted to those of para-church organization; church and contemporary politics; church and responsibility in society, the church and the poor; theology of suffering and healing; staffing; personnel administration; staff development; evaluation; decision making, conflict resolution; authority; types of power; delegation, motivation; building trust; mission; team-work; issues of leading within an African context.

2003-2007 Catalogue

391

Daystar University

2003-2007 Catalogue

392

University Chancellor & Chairman of the Council

Dr. (Hon) James Mwangi Kamunge Education Specialist, The World Bank, Kenya Office

2003-2007 Catalogue

393

Daystar University

University Council

1. Chairman and Chancellor Dr. James Mwangi Kamunge, Education Specialist, Kenya Office of The World Bank. 2. Vice Chairman Dr. Daniel Lema, Managing Director, Delwrite, Arusha, Tanzania. 3. Secretary Prof. Stephen Talitwala, Vice Chancellor, Daystar University, Kenya.

Members

4. Mr. Ammishaddai Dei Awuku, Africa Christian Press, Ghana.

5. Mrs. Bernice Gachegu,

Lawyer, Attorney General's Chambers, Kenya.

6. Mr. Mulatu Belachew,

Compassion International, Nairobi.

7. Rt. Rev. Joseph Kanuku,

Bishop, Machakos Diocese, Anglican Church of Kenya.

8. Prof. Yusto Kaahwa 9. Dr. Florence Musiime 10. Dr. Lilian T. Wambua

Makerere University, Kampala. United Nations Habitat, Nairobi. World Relief, Nairobi.

11. Rev. Canon Clement Janda Uganda Christian University 12. Prof. Zablon Nthamburi Retired Presiding Bishop, Methodist Church in Kenya. 13. Mr. Erastus Mureiithi Suera Flowers Ltd., Nairobi.

14. Rev. (Dr.) MacMillan Kiiru Executive Director, Africa Centre for Missions. 2003-2007 Catalogue

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Daystar US Office

18. Mr. Ron Tschetter

17. Mr. Simeon Havyarimana

16. Rev. Daniel Bitrus

15. Prof. George R. Kinoti

2003-2007 Catalogue

& d A n e r t a S e l l e h c i M . s M . 7 n i F k r o M y r r e h S . s r M . 6 n e n i r a H n e t s i r K . s r M . 5 u S r i D d n u l g n E m o T . r D . 4 d A e k o o C y t s i r h C . s M . 3 p O e k o o C n a l A . r M . 2 x E w o r r o M . R s i n n e D . r D . 1

Africa, Nairobi. Association of Evangelicals in AISRED, Nairobi. 394

395

Daystar University

Management Board

1. Prof. Stephen E. Talitwala 2. Prof. Samuel K. Katia Vice-Chancellor (Chairman) Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Finance, Administration and Planning) Dean, Faculty of Arts Dean, Faculty of Social Sciences Dean, Faculty of Science and Technology University Registrar

3. ********************

4. Dr. Kituyi 5. Dr. Stephen Nyambegera 6. Dr. Jon Masso

7. Mrs. Nkita T. Arao 8. Mrs. Rosemary Ngige-Kinoti 9. Mr. Joseph K. Muiruri

a w b O n o s m a S . r D . 0 1

Corporate Affairs Manager Chief Internal Auditor

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2003-2007 Catalogue

396

Academic Staff

1. Talitwala, Stephen E. J., B.Sc. Eng. (Honours), University of East Africa (Nairobi); Ph.D., University of Leeds; M.I.E.K., M.U.I.P.E., R. Eng. 2. Katia, Samuel K., S1 (Diploma), Kenyatta College; B.Ed. (Physics & Mathematics), University of Nairobi; M.Sc. (Science), University of Nairobi; Ph.D. (Physics), University of Connecticut, USA. .......................................................................................................................................... 3. Abok, Ager, B.Sc. (Honours), University of Leeds, U.K; M.Div., NEGST. 4. Achoka, John D., Dip. Ed. (Science), Kenyatta University College; B.Ed. (Science), University of Nairobi; D.E.S., University of Leeds; M.Sc. (Environmental Education), Reading University; D. Phil., Moi Universtiy. 5. Akelola, Sarah, B.Com., University of New Delhi; M.B.A., Cochin University, India. 6. Amata, Evans O., B.A. (Rural Industries & Management), Gandhigram Rural Institute (Deemed University); M.A. (Finance & Control), Madurai Kamaraj University, India. 7. Arao, Nkita Tshiama, B.A.(Mathematics/Psychology), Mills College; M.A. (Education Administration), Claremont Graduate School. 8. Awiti, Jane Atieno, B.A. (Honours), Postgraduate Diploma in Education, University of Nairobi; M.A. (Communication), Wheaton Graduate School. PHD Candidate 9. Ayaa, Dominics Dan, B.A. Economics and Sociology (Honours), M.A. (Sociology), University of Nairobi. 10. Bennett, Marta, B.A. (High Honours), Lewis & Clark College; 2003-2007 Catalogue

397

Daystar University

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Seattle University. 11. Booker, Nancy A., B.A. ( Communication) Candidate, Daystar University. M.A Candidate (Communication) Daystar Univeristy. 12. Broberg, Bruce, B.S. (Chemical Engineering), Purdue University; M.B.A., Indiana University. 13. Chandran, Emil, B.Sc. (Statistics), Madras University; M.Sc., Annamalai University, India; M.A. (Demography), Free University of Brussels; Ph.D., Catholic University, Belgium; Diploma in Thelogical Studies, The Association for Theological Extension Education, India. 14. Chege, Kimani, M.S. (Counselling Psychology) Iowa College, USA; Certificate (Stephen Ministries), University of California, Berkeley; D.Min. (Counselling) Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, USA; Certificate (Counselling and Psychotherapy), Westchester Institute, USA; Certificate of Theology, St. Paul's College; Diploma of Theology, Makerere College. 15. Chiko, Wilson, B.A., University of Mary Hardin-Baylor; M.A., Hardin-Simmons University, USA, Ph.D Candidate (Islamic Studies), University of Wales, Lampeter, UK. 16. Chinchen, Delbert, B.A. (Missions), LeTourneau College; M.Div., Talbot Theological Seminary; Ph.D. (Cross-cultural Education), Biola University, USA. 17. Chirimi, Lucas, Dip. Theology, Pentecostal Bible College; B.A. (Honours), Pan African Christian College; M.A. Candidate, Daystar University. 18. Gachari, Regina, B.Ed., Kenyatta University, M.A. (English Studies), Oxford Brookes, UK. 19. Githaiga, Anna, B.A. (Honours), University of East Africa; M.A., University of Leeds, U.K. 20. Haile, Ahmed Ali, B.A. (Economics), Goshen College; M.A. 2003-2007 Catalogue

398 (Peace Studies--MAPS), Goshen Biblical Seminary; M.A. (Public Administration), Postgraduate Studies in Political Science, Indiana State University. 21. Imbuye, Ruth, B.Ed., University of Nairobi, M.A. (Counselling Psychology), U.S.I.U (Africa). 22. Kadenge, Judith E., B.Com., Providence College, India; M.B.A., University of Calicut, Kerala, India; Diploma in Finance Management, India. PHD Candidate 23. Kaimenyi, Bertha, B.A., University of Eastern Africa, Baraton; M.A. (Education Administration), D.Ed., Andrews University, USA. 24. Kitui, Philip M., B.Ed., University of East Africa (Makerere College); M.Ed., University of Nairobi; Certificate in Educational Testing and Measurements, Educational Testing Services, Princeton, USA; Ed.D. (Management of Christian Education), Seattle Pacific University, USA. 25. Kamau, Washington C., B.D., St. Paul's Theological College, Limuru; Th.M. (Missiology), D.Miss., Fuller Thelogical Seminary, USA. 26. Kiambi, Purity, B.Ed., University of Nairobi; M.A., Moray House College, U.K. 27. Kiarie, Martha, B.Ed. (Science), M.Sc., Kenyatta University. 28. Kimani, Rosemary, B.Ed., (Honours), Kenyatta University; M.A., Wheaton College, USA. 29. Kingsbury, Charles E., Dip. (Bible), Full Faith Bible College; B.A., William Jewel College; M.A., Wheaton College; Ph.D Candidate, Florida State University, USA. 30. Kitheka, Obadiah, Diploma (Education), University College of Nairobi; B.Sc. (Mathematics) University of London External Studies; M.Sc. (Mathematics Education), University of Keele, U.K. 2003-2007 Catalogue

399 31. Kizito, Mary N., B.A., M.A. (Journalism & Mass Communication), Marquette University, USA.

Daystar University

32. Kombo, James, B.Th., Scott Theological College; M.Div., NIST; M.Th, Ph. D University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. 33. Kuria, Mike, B.A., M.A., Moi University; Ph.D Leeds University, U.K 34. Maleche, Hellen N., B.Ed. (Home Economics), Kenyatta University; M.A. (Communication), Daystar University. 35. Masiga, Maurice, B.Ed., Kenyatta University; M.Sc., University of Oregon, USA. 36. Masindano, Peter Wangila, B.A. (Anthropology), M.A. (Anthropology), University of Nairobi. M.A Candidate (Communication) Daystar University. 37. Masso, Jon D., B.S. (Physics), Drexel University; M.S. (Physics), Ph.D. (Physics), Colorado State University, USA. 38. Maswili, Richard M., B.A. (Honours) in Public Administration, Punjab University, Chandigarh; M.B.A. (Marketing and Human Resource), Vikram University, India. 39. Mbugua, Naomi, B.Ed. (Honours), Makerere University; M.Ed., Kenyatta University. 40. Mbugguss, Martha, B.A (1st Class Honours), Jabalpur University (India); Post-graduate Diploma (Mass Communication), University of Nairobi; M.A (Communication), Daystar University. 41. Mbunga, Joseph, Diploma (Theology), B.Th., Scott Theological College; M.A. (Christian Ministry), Nairobi International School of Theology. 42. Mbutu, Paul, B.A., Messiah College; M.A., Wheaton College, USA.

2003-2007 Catalogue

400 43. M'Mutungi, Daniel, Dip. (Education), Kenyatta University; B.A. (Theology), Manchester University; M.A., Dayton University; D.Mis, Boston University, USA. 44. M'Mutungi, Evangeline M.A. (Psychology), Boston University School of Theology; M.A. (Religious Communication), Dayton University, USA. 45. Mogute, Mary M., B.A., M.A. (Social Work), Nagpur University, India. 46. Muchiri, Mary N., B.A., P.G.D.E., University of Nairobi; M.Ed., Manchester; Ph.D., Lancaster, U.K. 47. Musembi, Patrick, B.A., (Economics and Geography), Egerton University; M.Div., Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology. 48. Musonye, Miriam, B.Ed., M.Phil., Moi University. 49. Muthami, Phoebe, B.Th., Scott Theological College; M.Div., NEGST. 50. Muthoka, Margaret, B.Th., Scott Theological College; M.Th. (Theology, Development and Culture), University of Edingburg, U.K. 51. Mutua, James S., B.A. Literature and Linguistics (Honours), Kenyatta University; Diploma (Film/Video Production & Directing), Kenya Institute of Mass Communication; Certificate (Training of Trainers -- Training Methodologies), Kenya Institute of Administration; Post Graduate Diploma in Education, Kenyatta University; M.A. (Communication) Daystar University. 52. Mutunga, Daniel K., B.A. (Social Work), University of Nairobi; Master of Social Work, Monash University, Australia. 53. Mtawali, Hellen A., B.A. (Education), Messiah College; M.A. (Communication) Candidate, Daystar University.

2003-2007 Catalogue

401

Daystar University

54. Munyao, Joseph K., B.Ed., (Mathematics); M.Sc. (Statistics), Egerton University. MSc. Candidate (MIS), University of Nairobi 55. Muutuki, Joseph, Dip. (Christian Communications), Daystar Communications; Dip. Theology (M.Div.) Freie Theologische Akademic e.v. (Germany); M.Th., Covenant Theological Seminary; M.A., St. Louis University; Doctor Religious Education & Christian Administration, Lael College & Graduate School. 56. Najoli, Ernest, B.A., Rajasthan University; M.A.(Economics); M.Sc. (Economics), Wales, Swansea. 57. Ndirangu, Beatrice, B.Ed., M.Phil., Moi University. 58. Ng'ang'a, Rebecca, B.Com., University of Nairobi, M.A. (Communication), Daystar University. 59. Nguu, John N., B.Sc., M.Sc., Egerton University. 60. Ngure, Peter K., B.Ed. (Science) Honours, Kenyatta University; M.Phil. (Zoology), Moi University. 61. Nguru, Faith Gathu, B.A. ( High Honours), Messiah College; M.A., Wheaton College, M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University, USA. 62. Njoroge-Bility, Lucy N., B.A., M.A. (Journalism and Communication), Point Park, U.S.A. 63. Njui, Harriet, Dip. Ed. Music (Distinction), B.Ed. Music (High Honours), M.Ed., Music Ed., Kenyatta University; ABRSM Grade B. 64. Nyaga, Caroline, B.Ed. (English Language and Literature), Kenyatta University; M.A. (Philosophy in English Language), Moi University. 65. Nyaga, Rahab, B.Com. (Honours), University of Nairobi; M.A (Communication), Daystar University.

2003-2007 Catalogue

402 66. Nyambegera, Stephen M., B.A., M.B.A., Osmania University, India; Ph.D., University of Sheffield, UK. 67. Oladipo, Rebecca, B.A., (Honours) Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria Nigeria; M.A. (Modern English), Ph.D. (Linguistics), University of Leeds, U.K. 68. Omondi, Joab Esamwata, B.D.A. (Development Administration), Gandhi Gram University, M.D.A. (Development and Administration), Madurai Kamaraj University. 69. Ondera, Gladys, B.A. (Education), M.A. (Anthropology), University of Nairobi. Ph.D Candidate 70. Onyango, Maurice, B.A. Sociology (Honours), University of Nairobi; M.Sc. (Urban Environmental Management (Distinction) IHS/Wageningen Agricultural University, The Netherlands. 71. Stinton, Diane, B.A,. B.Ed. University of Calgary; M.TS., Regent College; Ph.D University of Edinburg, Scotland. 72. Talitwala, Elizabeth N., B.A. (Honours) Psychology; M.A. (Counselling Psychology), USIU Africa; Diploma in Education (Health Professions), Medical Training Centre Nairobi; Diploma in Community Health, Leeds University; Midwifery Certificate, St. James Hospital, Leeds; Diploma (Kenya Registered Nurse), Medical Training Centre Nairobi. Ph.D Candidate 73. Wachira, David, Diploma (Management), Kenya Institute of Management; B.Sc. (Forestry), M.Phil. (Natural Resources Economics), Moi University. CPA (K), CPS(K). 74. Waithima, Abraham, B.A. (Economics), Moi University; M.Sc. (Economics), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 75. Waweru, Jimna, B.A. (Economics), Moi University; M.A. (Economics), University of Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania.

2003-2007 Catalogue

403

Daystar University

Faculty On Study Leave

1. Arthasery, Phyllis, B.Sc., Kerala University; M.Sc., Madras University; B.Ed., Osmania University, Ph.D (Chemistry) Candidate, Baylor University, USA. 2. Boyo, Bernard K., B.Th., Scott Theological College; M.Div. (Biblical Hermeneutics), Nairobi International School of Theology; M.Th, Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology; Ph.D (Theology) Candidate, Fuller Theological Seminary. 3. Karanja, Anne Mumbi, B.A., M.A., University of Nairobi; Ph.D Candidate, Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands. 4. Makau, Agnes, B.Th. (Scott Theological College); M.Div., Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology; M.Th, NEGST. 5. Munene, Alice, B.Ed., Kenyatta University; M.A. (Counselling Psychology), U.S.I.U (Africa). PHD Candidate, Biola University. 6. Mbuvi, Andrew, B.A. (Honours), University of Nairobi; M.Div., NEGST; M.Th., Calvin Theological Seminary; Ph.D Candidate, Westminster Seminary, USA. 7. Mutinda, Paul O.K., Dip. (Theology), Scott Theological College, M.A. (Missions), Fuller Theological Seminary, USA; M.Div. (Missions), D.Min. (Leadership) Talbot School of Theology, USA; D.Th Candidate, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. 8. Obonyo, Levi, B.A., Messiah College; M.A.,Wheaton College; D.T.E., Potchefstroomse Universiteit vir Christelike Hoer Onderwys, South Africa; Ph.D (Journalism) Candidate, Temple University, USA. 9. Oluoch, Jemima, B.Ed., University of Nairobi; M.Div., Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology; M.Th (African Christianity), University of Natal in Conjunction with AkrofiChristaller Memorial Centre. 2003-2007 Catalogue

404

10. Njoya, Wandia, B.Ed. (French), M.A. (French), Kenyatta University; Ph.D (French) Candidate, Pennsylvania State University.

Adjunct Staff

1. Ichihashi, Takao, B.A., Osaka University of Foreign Studies (German; B. Agri., Mie College of Agriculture; M.Min., Th.M., The Uniting Theological Seminary Tokyo; Southern California Theological Seminary. 2. Wetzel, Rodney N., B.S. (Agricultural Education), Pennsylvania State University; M.S. (Agricultural Education), University of Illinois; Ed.D. (Education), University of Illinois, USA.

2003-2007 Catalogue

405

Daystar University

2003-2007 Catalogue

406

2003-2007 Catalogue

407

Daystar University

2003-2007 Catalogue

408

2003-2007 Catalogue

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