Read Microsoft Word - Syllabus XIV Seminario Internacional.doc text version

XIV SEMINARIO INTERNACIONAL DE ORTOPEDIA INFANTIL

XIV INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON PAEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDICS

directores / chairmen

JUlio de PaBlos

Hospital de Navarra y Hospital San Juan de Dios, Pamplona

JosÉ lUis GonZÁleZ lÓPeZ

Hospital Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid

Syllabus

08mk060 - DISEÑADO Y PRODUCIDO POR MBA MARKETING

hotel holiday inn madrid madrid, 07-08 noViemBre 2008 / NOVEMbER 2008

XIV Seminario Internacional de ORTOPEDIA INFANTIL

XIV International Seminar on PAEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDICS

Madrid, 07-08 Noviembre / November, 2008

VIERNES, 07 Noviembre 2008 / FRIDAY, November 7th, 2008 08:20 ­ 08:30 INTRODUCCIÓN / INTRODUCTION J. de Pablos/ J. L. González López

I - PARTE GENERAL / GENERAL PART 08:30-09:00 Genética en Ortopedia Infantil / Genetics in Pediatric Orthopaedics D. Eastwood 09:00 ­ 09:30 Ortopedia neonatal / Neonatal Orthopaedics R. Hensinger Discusión (10´) 09:40 ­ 10:10 10:10 ­ 10:50 movement Infecciones / Infections P. Cervera Alteraciones neuromusculares: la enfermedad en movimiento / Neuromuscular disorders: the disease in C. Turriago Discusión (10´) 11:00 ­ 11:20 11:20 ­ 11:50 PAUSA / BREAK Displasias óseas / Bone Dysplasias D. Eastwood Discusión (10´) 12:00 ­ 12:30 Tumores benignos y lesiones paratumorales / Benign Tumors and Paratumoral lesions J. Hui Tumores Malignos / Malignant Tumors J.L Jouve Discusión (10´) 13:20 ­ 13:50 Atención integral al niño amputado / Multidisciplinary care to the amputated child F. Haces Discusión (10´) 14:00 ­ 15:00 COMIDA / LUNCH

12:30 ­ 13:10

II- MIEMBRO SUPERIOR / UPPERLIMB 15:00 ­ 15:30 Problemas ortopédicos en EESS / Upper Extremity Orthopedic Problems M. Aguirre

III­ COLUMNA / SPINE 15:30 ­ 16:00 16:30 ­ 17:00 Patología Congénita / Congenital Disorders J.L Jouve Escoliosis Idiopática / Idiopathic Scoliosis R. Hensinger Discusión (20´) 17:20 ­ 17:40 17:40 ­ 18:10 18:10 ­ 18:40 18:40 ­ 19:10 PAUSA / BREAK Cifosis / Kyphosis J.L. González Espondilolisis-listesis / Spondylolysis-lysthesis R. Hensinger Dolor de Espalda / Backpain in Children an Adolescents J.L Jouve Discusión (20´) FIN DE SESIONES/END OF SESSIONS

19:30

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

SÁBADO, 8 de Noviembre de 2008 / SATURDAY, November 08th, 2008 III - MIEMBRO INFERIOR / LOWER LIMB 1. General / General 08:45 ­ 09:25 Deformidades Angulares y Rotacionales / Angular & Rotational Deformities P. Stevens 09:25 ­ 09:55 Dismetrías / Limb Length Discrepancies J. McCarthy Discusión (10') 2. Pie / Foot 10:05 ­ 10:35 10:35 ­ 10:55 10:55 ­ 11:20 Pie zambo y Metatarso Varo / Clubfoot and Metatarsus Varus D. Eastwood Pie Plano-Valgo y Cavo Esencial / Flatfoot-Pes Cavus J. Hui Pie neurológico / Neurologic Foot C. Turriago Discusión (10´) 11:30 ­ 11:50 PAUSA / BREAK

3. Rodilla y Pierna / Knee and Leg 11:50 ­ 12:20 Pseudoartrosis Congénita de Tibia y otras Alteraciones Congénitas de la Pierna / Congenital Pseudoarthrosis of the Tibia and other Congenital Disorders J. McCarthy Inestabilidad rotuliana congenital y adquirida / Congenital and acquired patellar dislocation J. Hui Discusión (10´) 12:50 ­ 13:15 Rodilla dolorosa/ Knee pain J. de Pablos Discusión (5´) 13:20 ­ 13:50 CONFERENCIA INVITADA/ GUEST LECTURE ¿Esta esto encendido? La importancia de la comunicación con el paciente / Is this thing on? The importance of communication with the patient R. Hensinger COMIDA / LUNCH

12:20 ­ 12:40

14:00 ­ 15:00 4. Cadera / Hip 15:00 ­ 15:30 15:30 ­ 16:10

Fémur Corto Congénito / Congenital Short Femur J. McCarthy Displasia de Desarrollo (Luxación Congénita) / Developmental Hip Dysplasia R. Hensinger Enfermedad de Perthes y Sinovitis Transitoria / Perthes Disease and Transient Synovitis P. González Herranz Discusión (20´)

16:10 ­ 16:40

17:00 ­ 17:20 17:20 ­ 17:50

PAUSA / BREAK Cadera Neurologíca / Neurologic Hip C. Turriago Epifisiolisis / Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis J. Hui Problemas en la cadera del Adolescente y Adulto joven / The problematic Adolescent/young adult hip. J. McCarthy Discusión (20´)

17:50 ­ 18:20 18:20 ­ 18:50

19:10

DESPEDIDA / ADJOURN

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

GENETICA EN ORTOPEDIA INFANTIL

Deborah Eastwood There can be few diseases in which genetic factors do not have an influence if only affecting the nature vs nature balance that is individual to every patient. Sometimes a genetic defect is the major and only determinant of an abnormality present at birth (eg achondroplasia) or one that develops over time (eg Huntingdon's chorea). Considerable progress has been made in the field of genetics over recent years and all orthopaedic surgeons require some knowledge of the language used by geneticists and some understanding of the principles that guide their practice. The fields of genetics and the understanding of embryogenesis are closely related. The embryonic limb bud forms at the age of 4 weeks and its development is controlled by specialized areas such as the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) which in turn are controlled by genetic information from the homeobox (HOX) and sonic hedgehog (SHH) genes. In order to understand the genetic basis of some paediatric orthopaedic conditions it is important to have a knowledge of the normal chromosomal content of a somatic and a germ line cell and the changes that occur during meiosis and mitosis. Each gene consists of a group of nucleotides and each nucleotide comprises a deoxyribose sugar, a phosphate and either a purine or pyrimidine base. The standard gene has a start point and a stop point enabling the `code' for protein production to be read sensibly. A mutation is any permanent change in DNA sequencing or structure and various types of mutations occur which influence protein production - for example the protein may still be formed but in lesser quantities than normal or it may be produced in an inactive form. Each situation may result in a similar but different clinical picture and may influence treatment of that condition. Chromosomal abnormalities may be of number and/or structure and may affect the autosomes or the sex chromosomes. Most trisomy conditions are fatal but a few such as Trisomy 21 (Downs syndrome) are not. Turners and Klinefelters syndromes also have classical clinical appearances. Single gene disorders are common: inheritance is autosomal or x-linked, dominant or recessive. The clinical picture is affected by penetrance, variable expressivity, imprinting, uniparental disomy and anticipation. Autosomal Dominant Conditions Classic examples are achondroplasia and neurofibromatosis. In both cases the nature and the site of the genetic mutation has been identified. Many cases particularly of achondroplasia arise spontaneously as the result of a new mutation.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

X-Linked Dominant Disorders The classic condition of interest to orthopaedic surgeons is hypophosphataemic rickets. Close metabolic control is required and surgical intervention to prevent or correct deformity is often performed. X-linked Recessive Conditions Haemophilia is the classic example. Genetic testing can identify some conditions and prenatal testing can be offered in selected circumstances but such tests are invasive and there may be a risk to the foetus. Many of the skeletal dysplasias and the inborn errors of metabolism such as the mucopolysaccharoidoses are genetic in orgin. The site of the genetic defect may influence what other associated anomalies are seen. The field of genetics is changing constantly and rapidly and although we are paediatric orthopaedic surgeons not geneticists, in the future I think we will have to keep friendly with them if we want to understand the aetiology and the pathology of the conditions that affect our patients.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

NEONATAL ORTHOPAEDICS

Robert N. Hensinger, M.D. Fortunately, musculoskeletal problems are not common in the neonatal period, but those that do occur often require immediate attention. The neonatal period is the time of most rapid growth. As a consequence, it is possible to achieve correction of deformities, particularly of soft tissue (i.e. clubfoot) to much a greater degree than will be possible later in life. Due to improved imaging capability, along with technologic advances, we are now able to diagnose and treat a number of conditions in the neonate. Nearly all diagnostic studies can be performed - X-ray, ultrasound, MRI, and CT. Similarly most treatment modalities such as physical therapy, cast correction, bracing and surgeries can be accomplished with relative ease, and without interfering with other care. An obvious success is the early management of developmental dysplasia of the hip, with early reduction, patients achieve near normal development and function of the hip. Traditional Problems: Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in its management with the Pavlik harness has been excellent. Both the clinical examination and the ultrasound is helpful in establishing a diagnosis and also assisting in treatment. The Ponsetti method is ideal for clubfoot management in the neonate with excellent early results. Other less common conditions such as congenital dislocation of the knee can be treated very effectively. 50% are associated with dislocation of the hip, most due to breech position with feet trapped beneath the chin or in the axilla. Arthrogryposis: Intrauterine paralysis, stiff joints with limited range of motion. Early stretching and bracing can be very effective. Trauma Upper Extremity: Erb's Palsy: Maternal diabetes and large infants. Difficult cephalic delivery (86%), shoulder dystocia (88%), traction results in brachial plexus or cervical spine injury, flaccid extremity. Early management, ROM and positioning to avoid contractures. Avoid subluxation of joints, early neurologic return (biceps) good prognostic sign. MRI to determine the extent of the injury. Pseudo Paralysis of the Upper Extremity: Differential includes fracture, dislocation, and infection. Fracture of the Clavicle: Most common fracture (3%) but seldom recognized. Differential should include Erb's Palsy (9%), cervical injury and shoulder trauma. Cervical Region: Congenital Muscular Torticollis: Head tilt with rotation Etiology is Compartment Syndrome of the sternocleidomastoid muscle leading to contracture of the muscle, 85% on the right side. Often associated with breech presentation. 20% incidence of DDH, Plagiocephaly: facial or skull flattening is 2nd to sleeping position. Surgical release if conservative measures fall 1-4 years of age if done later the face and skull changes may not resolve.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Cervical Spine Fracture: Cephalic Delivery, C1-C2 or C2-C3 injuries Epiphyseal Separation: More common than dislocation of the joints in this age group. This is particularly true in the shoulder, hip and elbow. These can occur silently and can be very difficult to diagnose. Arthrograms and ultrasound can be very helpful to determine diagnosis and rule out infection. Once the diagnosis is made, treatment is simple, reduction and immobilization. Treatment: Arthrogram (ultrasound) will confirm the diagnosis and treatment. Maintain position in cast or splint. Heals in a month or less. Long Bone Fractures: Usually diagnosed at the time of the injury. 1) Fractured Femur: Torsional injury, recognized immediately, uncommon. Associated with children with fragile bones. Must control rotation and angulation. Traction not necessary may result in decreased blood flow to the well leg. Pavlik harness can cause shortening. Spica cast in neonates often causes problems with temperature control. 2) Humeral fractures in a soft dressing, clavicle fractures no specific treatment. 3) Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Level of involvement, mild to severe. Bone fragility may be severe and require special precautions in the nursery. Plastic carrying tray. Fortunately, most are less involved and discovered later. 4) Late Fractures: ? child abuse (avg. age 3 mo). Osteogenesis Imperfecta, arthrogryposis, rickets of infancy, Menke's Syndrome, congenital contracture arachnodactyly. Neonatal Infections: Multiple joints (skeletal survey), limited response (bone scan), swelling, tenderness, pseudo-paralysis, may start in the metaphysic and spread to the joint, physis is thin, transepiphyseal vessels. 1) Pyarthrosis of the Hip: Anterior drainage, avoids blood supply and instability, facilitates postural drainage. 2) Gangrene and Vascular Injuries in the Neonate. Surgery in the Neonate: Avoid if possible, anesthesia risk, elective surgery (< 6 months), simple procedures, heel cord tenotomy for club foot. 1) Congenital Annular Bands: Bands may be limb threatening and require early Zplasty. Often necessary to release the fascia and decompress the compartments. 2) Club feet common due to oligohydramnios. 3) Lumbar kyphosis in myelodysplasia. May be difficult to obtain satisfactory skin closure. Can partially resect the prominence. Spinal Deformity: 1) Congenital Scoliosis: Associated problems: Klippel-Feil Syndrome, renal anomalies, hearing deficit, head and neck anomalies, Sprengel's Deformity. 2) Infantile Scoliosis: Associated with prematurity, hypotonic infants, Plagiocephaly. 3) Sacral Agenesis: Associated with diabetic mothers important to start range of motion and stretching Fetal Diagnosis: Ultrasound excellent at finding extremity problems. 1) Difference in Limb Length: Congenital amputations, upper and lower extremity. Deficiency, tibial and fibular. Radial and ulnar. Short femurs (PFFD) 2) Terminal Deformities: Hand and Foot, club feet, clefts, gigantism. Sacral agenesis. 3) Fetal Surgery: Diaphragmatic Hernias, billary atresia. Few centers involved. Myleodysplasia, early closure in uteri.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

PALOMA CERVERA

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

ALTERACIONES NEUROMUSCULARES: LA ENFERMEDAD EN MOVIMIENTO

Camilo A. Turriago. Bogotá. El desarrollo y crecimiento del aparato locomotor depende de factores genéticos, mecánicos y ambientales. Salvo algunas excepciones y desde el punto de vista ortopédico el niño con trastornos neurológicos nace sano: la alineación angular y torsional de sus extremidades es normal, los músculos tienen una longitud normal y las articulaciones tienen una movilidad normal. El niño con trastornos neurológicos desarrolla problemas ortopédicos en los segmentos óseos, articulaciones y músculos. El crecimiento musculo-esquelético depende de un desarrollo psicomotor normal. La remodelación angular y torsional de los miembros inferiores depende de factores genéticos, de la actividad física y de las cargas. Por ejemplo: al nacer existe torsión interna del fémur que disminuye cuando el niño inicia la bipedestación y marcha. Esto ocurre gracias a las fuerzas que ejercen el psoas, la cápsula anterior de la cadera y ligamentos iliofemorales sobre el aspecto anterior del cuello femoral. Si la marcha se retarda, y por el contrario el cuello femoral es sometido a cargas anormales, la torsión no cambiará o por el contrario aumentará, y el ángulo cérvico-diafisiario también se modificará anormalmente. La falta de movimiento genera fibrosis (ley del colágeno) y esto puede ocurrir en las articulaciones de niños con trastornos neuropáticos cuando sus articulaciones permanecen siempre en la misma posición. A diferencia del sistema óseo que crece especialmente gracias a estímulos hormonales y su rata de crecimiento es mayor durante el sueño, los músculos crecen por que se estiran durante el juego habitual y diario de los niños. Se estima que los niños requieren al menos dos horas de actividad física para que sus músculos crezcan apropiadamente. Si un músculo no se estira se queda corto con respecto al esqueleto (contracturas o retracciones musculares). Existen alteraciones neurológicas que aumentan el tono muscular, lo que dificulta el estiramiento muscular y estos niños frecuentemente desarrollan contracturas articulares. De tal manera que todos los componentes del sistema musculo esquelético: los huesos, articulaciones, cápsulas y ligamentos, y los músculos pueden sufrir cambios anormales si no tienen un adecuado balance muscular y un nivel de actividad normal. Pero el problema para los ortopedistas no termina aquí: sucede además que la función del aparato locomotor depende de una estrecha integración con el sistema neurológico. Unos músculos deben contraerse mientras que otros se relajan. Mientras unos músculos se contraen concéntricamente otros lo hace excéntricamente o isométricamente. Por ejemplo: si nosotros deseamos beber un poco de agua servida en un vaso frente a nosotros, nuestra corteza cerebral junto con los núcleos de la base debe planear los movimientos, enviar esta información al cerebelo, posteriormente a los núcleos vestibulares y reticulares del tallo cerebral que se encargan de estabilizar músculos necesarios para controlar la postura y las articulaciones proximales para que finalmente los músculos agonistas y antagonistas puedan realizar el movimiento preciso para sostener el peso del vaso y llevarlo con precisión a la boca. Pero además nuestro sistema sensitivo utiliza los receptores de movimiento y posición informando permanentemente al cerebelo para que este verifique si el movimiento se realiza de

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

acuerdo a lo planeado y si no es así, envíe las señales necesarias a la corteza cerebral para realizar las correcciones pertinentes. Entonces podemos imaginar cómo se puede alterar la capacidad del movimiento de un niño con trastorno neurológico: su aparato locomotor se ha alterado y además el control neurológico del mismo no funciona bien. Por otra parte el niño crece y se va a convertir en un adulto. Un niño sano a la edad de 7 años es una especie de Hércules, difícilmente un adulto puede sostener el mismo nivel de actividad física. Pero sucede que el adolescente ya no tiene esta capacidad y el adulto mucho menos. Lo que sucede es que la proporción entre la potencia muscular y la masa corporal favorece al niño. Si bien el adulto tiene mayor potencia muscular que un niño, también tiene que movilizar una masa mucho mayor. Mientras que la potencia muscular aumenta en una relación r2 con respecto al diámetro transverso del músculo, la masa crece al cubo. Entonces podemos entender por qué un niño con alto consumo de energía durante la marcha puede llegar a ser un adulto aún con mayores problemas e incluso puede llegar a perder la capacidad de caminar. El tratamiento de las lesiones ortopédicas ocasionadas por trastornos neurológicos se fundamenta en un diagnóstico preciso las alteraciones. Se busca restablecer los sistemas de palanca comprometidos (enfermedad de brazo de palanca) y optimizar la función de los músculos respetando los aceleradores y des-aceleradores. Lo anterior se realiza con base en el análisis computarizado del movimiento. El diagnóstico y cuantificación del impacto de las alteraciones en la función y calidad de la marcha es un reto que escapa a la capacidad del ojo humano y requiere de ayudas adicionales. Las alteraciones en la marcha en enfermedades como parálisis cerebral ocurren simultáneamente en varios segmentos y en los tres planos: sagital, coronal y transverso, y para cualquier examinador solo es posible observar un segmento a la vez y en un único plano. Por otra parte, durante la marcha anormal existen problemas primarios que ocasionan respuestas compensatorias en otros segmentos, la diferenciación entre los problemas primarios y las compensaciones puede ser difícil y ocasiona errores terapéuticos. El examen observacional de la marcha patológica tiene una alta variabilidad interobservador que en la práctica clínica lo hace poco confiable cuando existen alteraciones complejas de la marcha. El análisis computarizado de la marcha consta de: cinemática, cinética, electromiografía dinámica, podobarografía y mediciones de consumo de energía. La cinemática articular registra la forma como se desplazan los diferentes segmentos durante la marcha: simplemente muestra la enfermedad en movimiento. Esta información registra la movilidad de la pelvis, la cadera, la rodilla y el tobillo y se obtiene en tres dimensiones: el plano sagital, coronal y transverso. La información se presenta en gráficas que permiten determinar la movilidad de cada segmento en cada plano. La cinemática articular muestra lo que sucede durante la marcha anormal. La cinética registra los momentos de fuerza y poderes generados en las articulaciones, también en tres dimensiones. Esta información se obtiene gracias a la utilización de principios físicos de dinámica inversa y permite calcular los momentos de fuerza y la energía generada o absorbida en las diferentes articulaciones. Utilizando electrodos de superficie para electromiografía de superficie es posible identificar la contracción de los principales grupos musculares del muslo y la pierna (electromiografía dinámica). También es posible tomar una huella electrónica de las presiones que recibe la planta del pie durante la marcha (podobarografía). Toda esta información, junto con los hallazgos del examen físico y estudios imagenológicos son analizados para identificar los principales problemas de la marcha y constituyen el análisis computarizado de la marcha.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

El análisis computarizado de la marcha permite identificar los problemas primarios de la marcha y con base en estos, brindar recomendaciones terapéuticas específicas. Este estudio ha permitido establecer tratamientos más racionales que garantizan un mejor resultado en los pacientes con trastornos neurológicos, en especial cuando son varios los segmentos comprometidos.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

BIBLIOGRAFÍA 1. Gage, J. R. Gait Analysis in Cerebral Palsy. London : Mc Keith Press, 1991. 2. Reliability of observational kinematic gait analysis. Krebs, D.E., Edelstein, J.E.,Fishmann S. 1985, Physical Therapy, Vol. 65, págs. 1027-1033. 3. The effect of preoperative gait analysis on decision making. Kay RM, Dennis S, Rethlefsen S, et al. 2000, Clin Orthop, Vol. 372, págs. 217-222. 4. Alterations in surgical decision making in patients with cerebral palsy based on threedimensional gait analysis. DeLuca PA, Davis RB, Ounpuu S, et al. 1997, J Pediatr Orhtop., Vol. 17, págs. 608-614. 5. Cook RE, Schneider I, Hazlewood ME, et al. Gait analysis alters decision-making in cerebral palsy : s.n., 2003, J Pediatr Orthop., Vol. 23, págs. 292-295. 6. Relationships among musculoskeletal impairments and functional health in ambulatory cerebalr palsy. Abel MF, Damiano DL, Blanco JS, et al. 2003, J Pediatr Orthop, Vol. 23, págs. 535-541. 7. Effectiveness of Instrumented Gait Analysis in Children With Cerebral Palsy Comparison of Outcomes. Chang, Franklin M. MD, y otros. 2006, Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, Vol. 26, págs. 612-616. 8. Gage, J. R. The Treatment of Gait Problems in Cerebral Palsy. London : Mac Keith Press, 2004.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

DISPLASIAS OSEAS

Deborah Eastwood The skeletal dysplasias are a group of largely genetic disorders characterized by abnormal growth and remodeling of bone and its cartilaginous precursor ie disordered osteochondral development. Classically, the dysplasias have been grouped by their clinical and radiological features but this will undoubtedly change as our understanding of the genetic basis of disease and growth disorders increases. These conditions are quite common and in order to discuss them sensibly with colleagues and with the families it may be necessary to learn a new `language'! The clinical features that suggest a skeletal dysplasia are short stature with short limbs and/or a short trunk so that the short stature may be proportionate or disproportionate. The deformity will be present from early childhood although not always visible at birth. Joint contractures are common and in some cases the malformations are relatively localised. The limb shortening may affect different segments of the limb with the term rhizomelic referring to proximal shortening and acromelic relating to hands and feet. The anatomical classification of skeletal dysplasias is based on a descriptive system relating to plain radiographs. A skeletal survey will allow a variety of bones to be assessed and described. It is important to note the presence of Wormian bones in the skull. Often, the name of the disorder relates to the areas of the long bone that are involved and to whether or not there is spinal involvement hence, the term spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tells you that along with spinal involvement there is epiphyseal involvement of the long bones. Pattern recognition is also important in diagnosing skeletal dysplasias and a good textbook may be essential! Now that the genetic basis of some of these disorders is better understood the classification is changing and conditions are being grouped together according to their genotype rather than to their phenotype. When looking at a child with a possible skeletal dysplasia, the `surgical sieve' must be considered and diagnoses such as metabolic bone disease, infection and trauma excluded as necessary. Further investigations may be indicated. The principles of management involve the following problem areas: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) Communication/Counselling Maintenance of an independent lifestyle Prevention (and/or correction) of deformity Support brittle/weak bones Maintain equal leg lengths Increase height??

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

The genetic basis of many of these conditions allows for their early diagnosis but as yet no genetic based treatment is available other than, with assisted fertilization techniques, the screening and subsequent selection of unaffected embryos for implantation. In situations where termination of pregnancy is permitted, antenatal diagnosis may allow the doctor to discuss this measure with family early in pregnancy. The genetic basis behind some of these skeletal dysplasias has already been discussed in the lecture on genetics in paediatric orthopaedics. Several conditions need to be recognised by the paediatric orthopaedic surgeon even if they feel they have no expertise generally in the field of skeletal dysplasias: Achondroplasia This is a common dysplasia with a consistent phenotype and characteristic radiographic features. There is inhibition of endochondral bone formation and failure of the proliferative zone of the physis. Problems may occur with the foramen magnum and with spinal stenosis. Lower limb deformity in combination with the ligamentous laxity can pose problems and surgical intervention may be required. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia A variety of genetic anomalies have been identified that affect production of COMP or type IX collagen. The phenotype maybe quite varied and a differential diagnosis must be considered. Early onset arthritis is common. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia The abnormality is with collagen II or XI. Severe short stature is the rule. Clinically there may be problems with atlanto-axial instability and with scoliosis. Diaphyseal aclasis Several genetic `causes' of this condition have been identified and they may account for different phenotypes and may determine the risk of malignant transformation. The exostoses may lead to local symptoms and deformity particularly when one bone of a pair is affected in the lower leg or in the forearm. Correction of deformity by control of physeal growth or with an external fixator device may be indicated. Osteogenesis imperfecta.(OI) A variety of genetic problems affecting collagen 1 formation occur but there are still many cases of OI in which the underlying abnormality can not be identified. Modern management includes control of the anabolic and catabolic balance of bone turnover with the use of bisphosphonates indicated in some patients. Early surgical intervention is indicated in long bones to maintain alignment and independent mobility.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

BENIGN TUMORS & LYTIC BONE LESIONS

James Hui. Singapur. Most benign bone tumors can be diagnosed through a systematic approach. This includes proper assessment of history, physical examination, blood investigation, radiological appearance and type of bone involved. Having the background knowledge of the tissue of origin and the age distribution of benign bone tumor is also important. Benign bone tumors can be staged using Enneking staging consisting of 3 stages; latent, active and aggresive. It considers behaviour, and dictates treatment and prognosis. Certain tumors have peculiarity to present at certain site of the bone. Common sites include epiphysis, metaphysic, diaphysis of long bones and the spine. If the spine is involved it may involve the vertebral body, posterior element, sacrum or pelvis. Some bone tumors or lytic bone lesions present as multiple and may be associated with increased malignant potential. Lodwick classification describes the zone of transition into three; slow, fast and rapid growth. Radiographic diagnosis is often adequate for most benign lesions. When there is suspicion of malignancy, biopsy should be done as last step in evaluating child with bone tumor. Treatment of benign bone lesions is individualized to type of lesion and stage. Many benign tumors can be managed with good outcomes. However always consider possibility of malignant tumors or malignant change.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

MALIGNANT BONE TUMOURS

JL Jouve, G Bollini, F Launay , E Viehweger, Y Glard, M Panuel. Marseille Bone tumours and tumour-like conditions are uncommon in childhood and adolescence Optimal management by clinical practitioners, radiologists and pathologists working together as a multidisciplinary team in a specialized unit is mandatory. It is also important to bear in mind the fact that children and adolescents are not just small adults; the lesions they are affected with, the way they behave biologically and they way they should be explored are radically different. The main features of a malignant tumour are that it develops rapidly and its cells do not differentiate normally. It is also highly invasive, spreading to the neighbouring tissues and metastasising in other parts of the body. According to the WHO, the incidence of bone tumours from 0 to 14 years is 6.6 per million people-years, standardized for the world population. The two main histological diagnoses are osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma which account respectively for 50 and 40% of the bone malignancie diagnosed in children. The aetiology is not yet entirely clear. Some of the factors that contribute to the development of a tumour are the usual ones. However, the frequency of bone tumours peaks during the second decade of childhood, suggesting that the major period of bone growth is a fertile terrain. Radiation exposure is another factor that is reputed to be oncogenic for bone tumors; it is now a recognized fact that osteosarcomas can develop after radiation therapy, which is why the indication for this type of treatment in children has now been restricted. There is definitely a genetic predisposition; multiple exostosis is an autosomal dominant disorder. Family forms of osteosarcoma with mutations of the RB1 gene have been described and/or Li Fraumeni syndrome. More recently it has been demonstrated that some hereditary disorders are connected with a higher risk of developing an ostesarcoma . Bone tumours are still frequently incorrectly diagnosed or diagnosed late. This is usually due to a combination of two reasons; firstly the warning signs are non-specific and secondly, because they are uncommon, bone tumours are rarely envisaged as a primary diagnosis by the attending physician. The way they are discovered can vary; sometimes they are found incidentally on an x-ray film usually taken for pain after a traumatic injury. If the pain occurs at night and has an impact on the patient's physical activity, this can have a certain value for the diagnosis. More rarely a mass may be palpated or a pathological fracture may occur. Some focal bone lesions can be caused by infectious agents, which is why a complete blood test and cell count should be done to research for bacterial markers. During the two first decades osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcomas are by far the most frequent malignant tumours. Before the age of 10, Ewing's sarcoma accounts for almost half of the cases, whereas after this age osteosarcoma is more frequently diagnosed.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

The other malignant tumours such as primary lymphoma, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, haemangioendothelioma or admantinoma are much rarer and are only found in exceptional cases. When a malignant tumour is suspected on a plain x-ray a complete imaging work-up must be made immediately (bone-scan, MRI) before the biopsy is taken. The MRI will give details of the boundaries of the tumour within the bone segment and any extension to the soft tissues (staging process). MRI will also be useful to research for other foci in the same bone segment (skip metastasis). The bone scan will be useful to search for any other bone tumours elsewhere. A complete general assessment of the extension of the disease must be made to search for possible lung metastases or medullary involvement in Ewing's sarcoma. For osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma the current treatment is based on neo-adjuvent chemotherapy, the goal being to treat micro-metastatic disease and reduce the bulk of the primary tumour before surgery make the procedure easier. The surgical strategy should be based on the imaging data. The patient's response to chemotherapy is assessed on the histological criteria, which are factors of prognosis in osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma. Good responders are defined as having a percentage of residual viable cancerous cells below 5% for osteosarcoma and below 10% for Ewing's sarcoma. After surgery a second course of chemotherapy is started, based on a rationale that is closely linked to how the tumour responds to the initial course of chemotherapy. The first step of the treatment is the preoperative chemotherapy. The second step is the carcinlogic resction. The principle in the exeresis that must be performed in healthy tissue. The goal of staging is to establish the margins of exeresis for a malignant tumour. In practice, we always make this evaluation in close cooperation with the imaging team. MRI has a position of choice in the evaluation of the borders of a tumour. The two main steps in making an evaluation of the extension of the tumour are the MRI performed in the initial stage before the biopsy and the preoperative MRI performed after the first cycle of chemotherapy, before carcinological resection. Intraosseous extension of the tumour should be assessed on the weighted T1 sequences without contrast medium on the initial imaging work-up. In most cases, if the endomedullary extension has been assessed in this way a regression on the preoperative MRI work-up will not be taken into account. However, conversely, if the preoperative work-up picks up any signals that indicate an extension towards the epiphysis, this will be taken into account. These changes in the signal should be considered as an intraosseous extension of the tumour. Extension into the soft tissues will be established on the basis of the boundaries observed on the last preoperative MRI. On the initial MRI the changes in signal show the tumour and also the reactive oedema. The effect of chemotherapy can change these values substantially, especially in Ewing's sarcoma. Based on the margins described above we perform our exeresis 10mm from the osseus and extra-osseus boundaries if by reducing the margin we can spare the epiphysis. The carcinological resection stage must be carefully prepared preoperatively in great detail. It is essential to control the vascular and nerve structures first. The vascular and nerve sheaths must be opened and separated from the tumour sub-adventitiously. The bone must be resected under fluoroscopic control to make sure that the resection is precise. The principles of carcinological resection must be respected at all times. The resections must always be performed in healthy tissue; no breach must be made in the tumour.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

There are two stages in a reconstruction, with two main goals: firstly to ensure that the limb is functional and secondly to ensure that the bone can continue to grow to avoid shortening of the limb in the future. Amputation and rotation plasty These have now become exceptional indications with the progress that has been made in chemotherapy. They are measures that are now reserved for the forms that invade the vascular and nervous structures, those located on the extremities and some local recurrences. Reconstruction with no functional joint This method is based on arthrodesis. We use it systematically in lesions of the shoulder when the rotator cuff has been removed or for the ankle because the limb is more functional than when treated by arthroplasty These reconstructions require large amounts of bone-graft obtained from autografts or allografts. In our experience we use a vascularised fibula graft sleeved on to an allograft for the reconstruction . Reconstruction with a functional joint Without the epiphysis This method will be based on arthroplasty, using extensive prosthetic replacements. In our experience prosthetic reconstructions are restricted to knee and hip replacement. The immediate result is satisfactory and some prostheses can be extended as the child grows. However, there is the long-term issue of loosening and wear to consider when there is little bone stock left. The child and family must be warned of the risk of having to resort to an arthrodesis later. With the epiphysis This method is based on intercalated bone grafts. The graft can be an allograft, a nonvascularized autograft or a vascularized autograft. In our experience we have used one or two vascularized fibulas, combined with an allograft in some cases, for over 10 years . Masquelet's so-called « induced membrane » technique seems to be a promising avenue for intercalated bone reconstructions. . This type of surgery is obviously a major operation for a patient whose immune system is already compromised. After surgery chemotherapy must be resumed immediately; the rationale must be adapted to suit the histological response. The complication rate is high in this type of setting and the family must be given objective information . . In the short-term the most daunting complication is post-operative infection. Once this type of complication is confirmed, bacterial tests must be done to research the causal agents and surgical revision is indicated. As a first line of treatment the prosthetic materials or osteosynthesis hardware will be left in place. The surgical wound must be thoroughly cleaned and drains should be put in and left in place for a long period. An antibiotic treatment must be started, using a combination of antibiotics to suit the germ(s) detected. The antibiotics must be continued for six months, which means that the second and last phase of chemotherapy will be over once the treatment is finished. . Once the antibiotic treatment is withdrawn if the infection develops again the prosthetic materials or the osteosynthesis hardware must be removed. Prior to replacing the prosthetic device an antibiotic impregnated spacer should be used. In the medium term the most daunting complication is a local recurrence of the tumour. Until recently, when this type of complication occurred, as long as the systemic aspects

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

of the disease were under control, amputation or removal of the joint was considered justified. This position is not quite so clear-cut today and some articles are in favour of surgical revision to remove the tumour once again and salvage the limb The different components that have an impact on the prognosis are not yet clearly established. The only known adverse factor is when the tumour does not respond to chemotherapy or the presence of metastases located in the trunk. The prognosis for malignant bone tumours has changed dramatically over the last 20 years with the new chemotherapy rationales. Since the beginning of the eighties, 60 to 80% of the children with non-metastatic osteosarcoma are still alive and in remission at 5 years. This rate seems to be stable. In Ewing's sarcoma the 5-year survival without recurrence is close to 70% in the non-metastasised forms. For those that have already metastasised the prognosis is much poorer with a 5-year survival rate at 20%, mainly due to metastases in the lungs. Managing the diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant bone tumours is complex and requires a very strict approach based on a number of basic rules: - Good quality imaging is essential because it provides a good overview of how the lesion is behaving and sometimes a formal diagnosis can be made. - A complete imaging workup must be done before a biopsy is taken. - The team that are to manage the child should perform the biopsy if possible. - Each stage of the treatment must be envisaged in consultation with a multidisciplinary team, especially for malignant tumours.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

EVALUACION DE LA CALIDAD DE VIDA DE PACIENTES EN EDADES PEDIATRICAS CON AMPUTACIONES POR CAUSA CONGENITAY ADQUIRIDA MANEJO INTEGRAL DEL PACIENTE AMPUTADO

Alma Iris Castillo Rivera, Felipe Haces. Hospital Shriners. México

OBJETIVO: Determinar la calidad de vida de pacientes en edades de 11 -18 años , con amputaciones por causa congénita y adquirida , a través de escalas de evaluación funcional , y un enfoque integral del mismo. MATERIAL Y METODO Se trata de un estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo, explicativo , transversal, efectuado en el Hospital Shriners para niños, México D.F., 76 pacientes cumplieron con los criterios de inclusión: amputaciones por causa congénita y adquirida , edades de 11-18 años ,a los cuales que se analizo de manera integral ,a través de diferentes escalas de evaluación: PODCI, que evalúa la calidad de vida en base a funcionalidad en situaciones de vida real, función de miembro toráxico , de transferencia y movilidad básico ,función en los deportes y actividades físicas y función global. Se aplico el sistema de ambulación funcional de Karen Friel; para la adaptación protésica en miembros inferiores que se evalúan desde el nivel K-0 a el K-4. RESULTADOS Del total de 76 pacientes : a edad en la que se evaluaron tuvo un rango de 11-18 años ,con promedio de 14.5 años, el genero que predomino fue el masculino 58 (76%) y femenino en 18 (23.6%) . , 50 pacientes con amputaciones secundarias a patología congénitas, con diagnostico: Múltiples malformaciones congénitas 4 , Hipoplasia femoral 10 , Hipoplasia femoral +,Hemimelia peronea 20 , ausencia congénita de MI 4 , bandas amnióticas 1 , Pseudoartrosis congénita de tibia, 3 ,Hipoplasia tibial 1, Meromelia paraxial terminal del peroné 1 ,Deficiencia longitudinal del peroné 1, Meromelia carpometacarpal 5., 26 pacientes presentaron amputación por causa adquirida, con diagnósticos de : Secuelas de artritis séptica en MI 12, amputación por mordedura de serpiente MPD 1, amputación secundaria a quemadura MPD 2, amputación de MI de origen traumático 3, secuelas postraumáticas de antebrazo derecho 8. El tipo de amputación que mas frecuente fue SYME: 24 transtibial: 23 supracondilea femoral 12, desarticulación de cadera 4, y por debajo de codo: 13. La edad de amputación tuvo un rango 5-7 años ,5.25 promedio en patología congénita, y en patología adquirida 8-9 años, promedio: 8,5 años.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

La edad promedio de inicio de tratamiento protésico en patología congénita fue de 5.25 años, y en patología adquirida 8.5años. Los tipos de prótesis adaptadas fueron: prótesis de Syme , transtibial, ,prótesis de pedestal, transfemoral, , de canasta ,prótesis de MT . Se utilizo la prueba de CHI cuadrado, para comparación de muestras independientes. Se hizo estudio multivariado de ANOVA, intervalo de confianza 95% y el nivel de significancia 5%. El análisis estadístico se realizo en SPSS, Windows 11.5. Los resultados de la escala del PODCI , para los 76 pacientes amputados secundarios a patología congénita y adquiridos en relación a la extremidad torácica para los padres y adolescentes fue entre 94-100,promedio 99.4 , intervalo de confianza 93.7-99 .8 ,desviación Standard 1.4 .En relación a la transferencia y movilidad para los dos grupos : de 90-100 promedio 99.9 ,intervalo de confianza de : 99-100 % , desviación Standard: 0.6, la transferencia y movilidad para los dos grupos de 90-100, promedio 99.3 ,un intervalo de confianza de : 98-100 % , desviación Standard: 0.8 .En relación a deporte y función a la actividad física para los dos grupos, de 85 -100 , promedio 96.1 , un intervalo de confianza de : 90-99 % , desviación Standard: 3.3 . En relación a deporte y función a la actividad física para los dos grupos: de70-100 , promedio 94.3 , un intervalo de confianza de : 90-97 , desviación Standard: 7.4% .En relación a dolor /comodidad para los dos grupos : de 70- 100 , promedio de : 87.2 , un intervalo de confianza de : 81-92% , desviación Standard: 12.2 . En relación a dolor /comodidad para padres de adolescentes: un mínimo de 80 ,un máximo de 100 ,un promedio de : 92.4% , un intervalo de confianza de : 83-94% , desviación Standard:13.1% La función global para los dos grupos, de 88 -100, promedio 95.8% , intervalo de confianza de : 93-98%, desviación Standard:3.2 . El sistema k de para la ambulación funcional de cada paciente fue de : para los pacientes con amputación de MM PP, 45 son por patología congénita y 18 por patología adquirida, del total l de 63 pacientes ,45 fueron K-4, 11 fueron K-3, 4 K-2,: 3 K-1. DISCUSION En la calidad de vida de un paciente amputado, independientemente de la etiología, intervienen múltiples factores. Los resultados en relación, a la calidad de vida fue evaluado tanto en pacientes con amputaciones por causa congénita como por causa adquirida. A través de la escala del: PODCI y Karen Friel, fueron los métodos objetivos de la evaluación de la calidad de vida del paciente amputado. En relación a la edad de amputación e inicio de uso de prótesis fue más temprano en las patologías congénitas que las adquiridas. La evaluación de la escala del PODCI, en todas las escalas hubo buenos resultados, no hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre ellas tanto en las amputaciones de causa congénita como la adquirida. La escala de deporte y función a la actividad física tuvo una rango de 70-100, promedio de 80, este fue el mas bajo, sin embargo en la función global, el rendimiento para los dos grupos de pacientes es satisfactorio, así como sus desviaciones estándares para estas calificaciones es muy baja ,lo que indica que los resultados individuales no varían de la media. En la escala de Karen Friel, con t = 0.58 no hubo diferencias significativas entre las amputaciones por causa congénita de la adquirida, si la hubo en la edad de inicio de uso de prótesis y la ambulación funcional tanto para las adquiridas como para las congénitas.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

CONCLUSIÓN Es importante puntualizar que los resultados de un tratamiento definitivo, con amputación bien indicada y planeada es el primer paso de la rehabilitación ,pudiendo permitir una buena adaptabilidad protésica temprana , y mejor calidad de vida y así mejorar la rehabilitación integral del paciente. Existen métodos de evaluación objetivos como el PODCI y la Escala K, para evaluar la calidad de vida de este grupo de pacientes pediátricos, que nos permiten tener una pauta en el manejo de estos pacientes con deficiencias ortopédicas tanto congénitas como adquiridas.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

MALFORMACIONES DE LA EXTREMIDAD SUPERIOR

Màrius Aguirre Canyadell, Francisco Soldado. Barcelona. Las malformaciones de la extremidad superior son raras, menos de 2 por cada 1000 nacidos vivos y la mayoría de ellas con escasa repercusión funcional, sin embargo, las deformidades severas producen inicialmente un gran impacto emocional en los padres, pero son los pacientes quienes tendrán de convivir con su déficit funcional, su alteración estética y sus repercusiones psicológicas y sociológicas. Los tres objetivos de la cirugía reconstructiva serán proporcionar la habilidad de ubicar la mano en el espacio, obtener una buena cobertura cutánea con una adecuada sensibilidad y adquirir una capacidad de agarre y unas pinzas de precisión que permitan una optima manipulación de los objetos. CLASIFICACIÓN IFSSH La clasificación propuesta por Swanson y aceptada por la International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand es la más empleada en la actualidad, divide las malformaciones congénitas en 7 grupos: I. Fallo de formación Déficit transversal Déficit longitudinal (radial, ulnar, central e intersegmentario) II. Fallo de diferenciación Partes blandas: Sindactilia Esqueletico: Sinostosis III. Duplicación Preaxial, central y postaxial IV. Sobrecrecimiento V. Infracrecimiento VI. Síndrome de la banda constrictiva VII. Anomalías esqueléticas generalizadas. I.- FALLO DE FORMACIÓN DEFICIENCIA TRANSVERSAL Se produce por un fallo de formación de la extremidad distal a un punto determinado. Los niveles más frecuentes son el tercio proximal del antebrazo y el transcarpiano. Casi siempre es unilateral y esporádico. Suelen existir rudimentos digitales en el extremo. Si el codo está presente suele presentar un balance articular libre. En general la función global es remarcablemente buena. Raramente requieren procedimientos quirúrgicos. El tratamiento fundamental es la protetización. Se inicia a partir de los seis meses de edad con prótesis pasivas. Entre los 2-3 años de edad se indica una prótesis activa que puede ser mioeléctrica o mecánica. La protetización no ha demostrado un aumento

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

global de la función de la extremidad. Se ha de plantear como un instrumento que ayuda en algunas actividades.

DÉFICIENCIA RADIAL (MANO ZAMBA RADIAL) La deficiencia longitudinal radial es un espectro de malformaciones que afecta a las estructuras del lado radial del antebrazo y mano incluyendo huesos, músculos, vasos, ... Su incidencia se estima en 1:30000 RN vivos. Características clínicas La deficiencia radial se asocia a múltiples síndromes congénitos por lo que requiere una exploración física completa y consultar con el genetista. Los trastornos más frecuentemente asociados son: hematológicos (Anemia Fanconi, Sd TAR), cardíacos (Holt -Oram) y de la línea media (VACTERL). Se debe explorar ambas extremidades porque frecuentemente es bilateral y asimétrico, a veces con manifestaciones muy sutiles. El paciente presenta una desviación radial de la muñeca, un acortamiento e incurvación del antebrazo e hipoplasia del pulgar. Los niños con Deficiencia Radial severa bilateral presentan un déficit funcional considerable debido a la disfunción del pulgar, inestabilidad de muñeca y acortamiento de la extremidad. Esto dificulta el desarrollo de las actividades de la vida diaria. Sin embargo, los pacientes no tratados desarrollan patrones motores adaptativos que permiten cumplir muchas funciones. Evaluación Preoperatoria Es necesario una Rx simple de raquis, ecografia renal y ecocardiograma para descartar síndromes asociados. Es fundamental descartar anemia de Fanconi pues aunque es eventualmente letal el diagnostico precoz permitiría el tratamiento con trasplante de médula ósea. La radiografía de la extremidad nos muestra el grado de afectación ósea y nos permite clasificar el grado de deficiencia radial. Clasificación de Bayne Se diferencian 4 formas en función de la severidad de la deficiencia del radio. · Tipo I: forma más leve. Acortamiento radial moderado con discreta desviación radial de la muñeca. · Tipo II: Hipoplasia del radio con fisis proximal y distal presentes y desviación radial de la muñeca moderada. · Tipo III: Ausencia parcial del radio, mas frecuentemente la porción distal, con desviación radial de muñeca severa. · Tipo IV : Forma más frecuente. Ausencia completa del radio. La mano suele tener una relación perpendicular al antebrazo Tratamiento · Objetivos básicos - Corregir la desviación radial manteniendo la movilidad de la muñeca y dedos y crecimiento fisario cubital - Reconstruir el pulgar - Mejorar la función de la extremidad

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Los procedimientos más utilizados para intentar mejorar la función y cosmética de la extremidad son la centralización del carpo, la reconstrucción del pulgar y al alargamiento del antebrazo. · El tratamiento varia con la severidad y la edad del paciente. Los pacientes con los tipos 0,1 y 2 leve pueden ser tratados mediante estiramiento y ferulización. Los tipos 2 severo se pueden tratar con alargamiento del radio o centralización. En los tipos 3 y 4 se tratan mediante la centralización del carpo. Los mejores resultados se obtienen cuando se interviene antes del año de edad. El estiramiento de partes blandas previamente mediante fijador externo es necesario para facilitar la centralización y evitar la necesidad de resección ósea. Se asocia una osteotomia de cúbito si este presenta una angulación > 30º. La reconstrucción del pulgar se realiza en una segunda etapa. El alargamiento del cúbito se puede realizar en edades más avanzadas (cerca de adolescencia) · Contraindicaciones - Médicas - Rigidez de codo - Patrones motores adaptativos claramente establecidos en el niño de más edad (riesgo de perdida de función). Resultados A largo plazo, la centralización condiciona una mejora del aspecto de la extremidad pero no de la función. Además existe una recidiva de la desviación radial (60º de media) y puede desarrollar rigidez articular. La reconstrucción del pulgar aporta una mejora sustantiva a la función de la mano. HIPOPLASIA DEL PULGAR La hipoplasia del pulgar se presenta como un espectro de deformidades que va desde un pulgar de discreto menor tamaño a la ausencia completa del pulgar. Más frecuentemente ocurre en el contexto una deficiencia radial. De hecho, la hipoplasia del pulgar forma parte del espectro de las deficiencias longitudinales radiales y por tanto, también es imperativo descartar síndromes asociados (hematológicos, cardiacos y de la línea media principalmente). Según la gravedad y las posibilidades quirúrgicas Blauth clasifica la hipoplasia del pulgar en 5 tipos : tipo I: acortamiento mínimo . tipo II: cierre primera comisura, hipoplasia tenar e inestabilidad MCF . tipo III A: tipo II + hipoplasia metacarpiana con estabilidad CMC . tipo III B: tipo II + hipoplasia metacarpiana con inestabilidad CMC . tipo IV: falanges rudimentarias tipo V: pulgar aplásico El punto clave, desde el punto de vista de la reconstrucción, es la existencia de una articulación carpometacarpiana (CMC) estable. El pulgar hipoplásico con articulación CMC estable es reconstruible. El tipo I no requiere tratamiento. El tipo II y IIIA requieren reconstrucción dirigida a cada uno de los componentes deficitarios: plastia de oposición, apertura de la primera comisura y reconstrucción del ligamento colateral ulnar metacarpofalángico.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

En los tipos IIIB, IV y V, la ablación y pulgarización con el índice ofrece mejores resultados funcionales. Aunque el "timing" ideal de la cirugía es controvertido parece lógico intervenir antes del desarrollo de la pinza de oposición (< 12 m). DEFICIENCIA ULNAR La deficiencia longitudinal ulnar es aproximadamente 5 veces menos frecuente que la radial. Frecuentemente se asocia a otras malformaciones del aparato locomotor (raquis, deficiencia femoral focal proximal y deficiencia longitudinal peroneal) pero raramente malformaciones de otros órganos. Características clínicas

El paciente presenta una desviación ulnar de la muñeca y acortamiento del antebrazo. En el 90 % de los casos asocian dedos ausentes, 70% anomalías del pulgar y 30 % sindactilia .

A diferencia de la deficiencia radial, la desviación de la muñeca no condiciona un déficit funcional severo. La causa fundamental de empeoramiento de la función son las anomalías de la mano y, por tanto, la indicación más frecuente de cirugía. La función del codo suele estar afectada; la forma más severa es la fusión humeroradial La radiología simple establece 4 tipos de gravedad progresiva según el grado de afectación del cúbito .

Tratamiento quirúrgico

La mayoría de las intervenciones están dirigidas al tratamiento de las malformaciones de la mano asociadas: liberación de sindactilias, reconstrucción del pulgar y de la primera comisura. Respecto a la deficiencia ulnar básicamente existen 2 procedimientos: - Excisión del esbozo ulnar: cuando condiciona una angulación ulnar progresiva por efecto brida. - Osteotomia derotativa humeral: (sinostosis humeroradial) cuando el antebrazo se encuentra en rotación interna muy marcada con la palma orientada hacia posterior. DEFICIENCIA CENTRAL DE LA MANO (MANO HENDIDA) La mano hendida es el resultado de una deficiencia central con un defecto en V y diferentes grados de ausencia de los radios centrales. Frecuentemente es bilateral y hereditario con transmisión ligada al cromosoma X dominante. Puede acompañarse de sindactilia del resto de dedos, afectar a los pies y asociar fisura labiopalatina. La mano hendida constituye un problema fundamentalmente estético. No suele generar déficits funcionales relevantes. El tratamiento quirúrgico debe solucionar precozmente las sindactilias del borde de la mano. El cierre de la hendidura tiene principalmente un objetivo cosmético y por tanto, puede demorarse. II.- FALLO DE DIFERENCIACIÓN SINDACTILIA La sindactilia es una anomalía congénita frecuente con una incidencia de 2-3 casos por 10000 nacidos vivos. El 50 % es bilateral. El 30% es familiar con una transmisión autosómica dominante pero de expresión y penetración variable. Se produce por un defecto de segmentación interdigital. La sindactilia es completa cuando afecta toda la longitud de ambos dedos e incompleta cuando hay un avance parcial de la comisura. En la sindactilia simple la unión se

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

produce por partes blandas; en la compleja existe fusión ósea.Afecta más frecuentemente al tercer y cuarto espacio interdigital (60 y 30% respectivamente). La sindactilia del segundo y tercer espacio interdigital impide la movilización individual de los dedos pero pueden ser separados en etapas tardías porque presentan un crecimiento armónico. Normalmente la separación se realiza a los 12-18 meses. En cambio, en la sindactilia de los dedos de los bordes de la mano (primer y cuarto espacio), el tamaño y crecimiento asimétrico de los dedos condiciona una flexión y rotación progresiva de los éstos por un efecto de brida. Por ello, la separación se ha de realizar en los primeros meses de vida. Casos especiales de sindactilia compleja ocurren en los síndromes de Apert, banda amniótica y simbraquidactilia. CAMPTODACTILIA La camptodactilia es una contractura congénita de la articulación interfalángica proximal. Generalmente afecta al meñique aunque puede afectar al resto de dedos. La camptodactilia es bilateral en 2/3 de los casos aunque habitualmente es asimétrica. Se distinguen 3 tipos: tipo I o infantil, el más frecuente, se manifiesta en la infancia de forma aislada y afecta al meñique. La incidencia en ambos sexos es igual. tipo II o del preadolescente se manifiesta entre los 7 y 11 años. Es más frecuente en el sexo femenino. La deformidad es progresiva y sin tendencia a la resolución espontánea. Durante el brote de crecimiento de la adolescencia puede llegar a flexionarse 90º. tipo III o sindrómico aparece en el contexto de síndromes, es severo y afecta múltiples dedos. Más frecuentemente se asocia a artrogriposis pero también a otros síndromes que asocian talla baja, deformidades craneofaciales y anomalías cromosómicas. La patogenia es controvertida pero la deformidad se asocia en muchos de los casos a anomalías en el tendón flexor profundo y en la musculatura intrínseca. Las contracturas leves (< 30-40º) no interfieren con las actividades y se tratan de forma conservadora. Deformidades > 40 º generan un déficit funcional y pueden se tributarias de corrección quirúrgica aunque los resultados de la cirugía no son consistentes. LUXACIÓN CONGÉNITA DE LA CABEZA DEL RADIO La luxación congénita de la cabeza del radio es habitualmente bilateral y más frecuentemente anterior o posterior. El diagnóstico suele hacerse a partir de los 3 años de edad porque la ausencia de pronosupinación no se hace evidente hasta iniciar actividades de la vida diaria más complejas. Clínicamente se manifiesta con una limitación leve de la flexoextensión (aprox.30º) y un limitación moderada de la pronosupinación. A nivel funcional sólo las actividades que requieren pronación o supinación completa están comprometidas. La radiografía simple confirma el diagnóstico, muestra la desalineación capitelo-radial, cabeza radial convexa y capitellum hipoplàsico Raramente se requiere cirugía durante la infancia aunque se han propuestos diversas técnicas de reducción. La presencia de dolor en la adolescencia por el desarrollo de artrosis es indicación de resección de la cabeza radial. Ésta mejora el dolor y apariencia del codo; en ocasiones mejora el balance articular. SINOSTOSIS RADIOULNAR PROXIMAL CONGÉNITA La sinostosis radioulnar proximal congénita es una entidad infrecuente. El 40% de los casos es bilateral.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Existe una unión ósea entre el extremo proximal del radio y la ulna que bloquea la rotación del antebrazo. Éste suele estar fijo en pronación. Suele diagnosticarse a partir de los 3 años de edad. A nivel funcional sólo los antebrazos en pronación superior 60º condicionan un déficit relevante. Ésta es la indicación fundamental de tratamiento quirúrgico que consiste en una osteotomía derotativa en la zona de la sinostosis. Cuando la afectación es bilateral se recomienda fijar la extremidad dominante en 10-20º de pronación y la contralateral neutra. En el unilateral 0-15º de pronación. Se han intentado múltiples técnicas de separación de la sinostosis con interposición de tejidos y materiales para conservar la pronosupinación. Éstas han fracasado sistemáticamente excepto la interposición de tejido fasciograso libre vascularizado. Se requiere más tiempo de seguimiento para valorar los resultados de esta técnica. CLINODACTILIA La clinodactilia es una angulación digital en el plano radioulnar. Se origina típicamente en falange media por una anomalía de la fisis que condiciona una desviación de la articulación interfalángica distal, habitualmente del meñique. Desviaciones de <10º son muy frecuentes y no se consideran patológicas. Ocasionalmente afecta varios dedos. La clinodactilia suele ser hereditaria con un patrón autosómico dominante de expresión y penetrancia variable. Estas formas familiares no se asocian a síndromes. Sin embrago múltiples síndromes asocian clinodactilia. Típicamente el Síndrome Down en un porcentaje de 60%. La clinodactilia del pulgar es muy característica del Sde de Apert. La clinodactilia usualmente genera un problema cosmético. Sólo las formas severas que interfieren con la función de la mano y la clinodactilias del pulgar son indicación de corrección quirúrgica. III.- DUPLICACIÓN POLIDACTILIA La polidactilia es una anomalia congénita por duplicación que afecta a los dedos. Puede ocurrir en el lado preaxial (radial) y postaxial (ulnar) o los dedos centrales. La polidactilia preaxial es más frecuente en la raza blanca y la postaxial en la negra. La polidactilia central es mucho menos frecuente. La duplicación ocurre entre los dedos de la mano. Puede estar "escondida" en una sindactilia concomitante (sinpolidactilia). La polidactilia postaxial en el individuo blanco es infrecuente y puede ser indicativa de un síndrome subyacente. Es usualmente heredada de forma autosómica dominante. El dedo supranumerario puede estar completamente desarrollado (tipo A) o rudimentario y pediculado (tipo B). El tipo B de pedículo estrecho puede ser extirpado mediante una ligadura en la base. El tipo B grande i tipo A requiere exéresis reglada. Además en el tipo A el procedimiento no es una simple exéresis del segmento duplicado sino que es imperativa una reconstrucción articular con reinserción del ligamento colateral ulnar y músculo abductor digiti quinti para evitar desalineaciones articulares futuras. La polidactilia preaxial suele ser esporádica, unilateral y no asociada a síndromes. Según el segmento duplicado existen varios tipos. En el tipo más frecuente (50%), F1 y F2 están duplicadas y comparten articulación MCF. Normalmente requiere exéresis del segmento radial y también impera la reconstrucción articular con reinserción del ligamento colateral radial y abductor pollicis brevis.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

IV.- SOBRECRECIMIENTO MACRODACTILIA La macrodactilia es un sobrecrecimiento de patogenia incierta, comprende todas las estructuras del dedo. Puede afectar uno o varios dedos siendo mas frecuente en el lado radial. En ocasiones ocurre asociado a neurofibromatosis o Sd Klippel-Tranaunay. Existe una forma estática que aparece en el nacimiento y crece de forma proporcionada durante el crecimiento. La forma progresiva es más frecuente, aparece en la infancia y crece de forma desproporcionada. Los dedos afectados aumentan de tamaño hasta el cierre de las fisis y se hacen rígidos progresivamente. El tratamiento incluye técnicas de reducción de volumen y la epifisiodesis (cuando el dedo adquiere la longitud del dedo del padre) que se pueden combinar entre sí. En dedos que han perdido la función por rigidez es preferible la amputación.

V.- INFRACRECIMIENTO

SIMBRAQUIDACTILIA La simbraquidactilia está representada por un espectro de deficiencias de la mano que presenta desde dedos cortos que pueden estar unidos (sindactilia) hasta la ausencia de los dedos similar a una deficiencia transversal. No se asocia a problemas sistémicos ni es hereditaria. Ante una simbraquidactilia es recomendable explorar la pared torácica pues puede asociar una agenesia de la porción esternal del pectoral mayor (Sd de Poland). Además de la anomalía de los dedos el resto de extremidad presenta una disminución de tamaño de gradiente menor de distal a proximal respecto a la contralateral. Esto permite diferenciar esta entidad de ciertas formas de ausencia de dedos por síndrome de la banda amniótica donde el tamaño se la mano seria normal. El tratamiento depende del grado de supresión digital. Formas moderadas con pulgar competente y dedos no requiere tratamiento porque desarrollan una pinza digital con el tiempo. Formas severas pueden ser tributarias de transferencias de dedos de pie a mano.

VI. SÍNDROME DE LA BANDA CONSTRICTIVA

VII.- ANOMALIAS ESQUELETICAS GENERALIZADAS DEFORMIDAD DE MADELUNG La deformidad de Madelung se caracteriza por una angulación ulnar y palmar del radio distal debido a la anomalía de la zona volar y ulnar de la fisis distal del radio y las partes blandas adyacentes. A la deformidad puede contribuir la presencia de un ligamento anormal volar que se inserta en el semilunar (Ligamento de Vickers) y actúa a modo de brida. Clínicamente destaca la prominencia dorsal progresiva de la cabeza del cúbito. En el niño con fisis abierta está indicado el procedimiento de Langeskiöld (resección del puente fisario + interposición de grasa) y la liberación del ligamento de Vickers para evitar la progresión de la deformidad. En el paciente con fisis cerrada la deformidad asintomática no requiere tratamiento. En el paciente maduro sintomático se realizará una osteotomia distal de radio. Si existen signos degenerativos en la articulación radiocubital distal se asociará el procedimiento de Sauvé-Kapandji.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

CONGENITAL DISORDERS OF THE SPINE

JL Jouve, G Bollini, F Launay, Y Glard. Marseille. France. Any discovery of a spinal deformity has to be carefully analysed with a peripheral sensory, motor, and sphincteral neurological exam in order to find an associated abnormality. An antero-posterior and profile radiographic assessment of the whole spine, in standing position if the child can walk, will reveal any osseous spinal abnormalities which will allow to diagnose a congenital scoliosis. These abnormalities are usually classified in formation defect with hemivertebra (HV) as a basic deformity,in segmentation defect with intervertebral block as a basic deformity, and in complex defect with vertebral jigsaw as a representative abnormality. The discovery of such spinal abnormalities (all the more if the peripheral neurological exam is abnormal) will prove the completion of complementary investigations such as a vertebro-medullary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). From 1980 to 2003, a consecutive series of 75 patients with 80 HV responsible for evolutive congenital scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis were personally managed by HV resection using a double approach and a short anterior and posterior convex fusion. Associated genitourinary abnormalities were found in 24% of patients, cardiac abnormalities in 8% and intrathecal abnormalities in 15%. The intrathecal abnormalities consisted of six tethered spinal cords, three syringomyelias,one amputation of distal conus, two meningoceles and one myelocystocela. One patient had association of tethered spinal cord and syringomyelia, and another patient had association of meningocele and tethered spinal cord. Medullar abnormalities were more frequent in case of vertebral malformations at the lumbosacral level compared with the thoracic or lumbar levels. There was no statistical difference concerning frequency of medullar-, cardiac- or genitourinaryassociated abnormalities between single or multiple vertebral malformations, nor between segmented or semisegmented HV, nor between right- and left-sided HV, nor between males and females. In our study, intrathecal abnormalities were found in 15% of the patients. Apart from an evident pelvic malformation, the paediatric orthopaedic surgeon will look for an asymmetry of motion and/or a hip instability, because a neurological pathology can lead to an asymmetry of muscular activity of muscles stabilizing the hip with an instability as a consequence. This instability can be seen after the neonatal period. Because a high percentage of curves in congenital scoliosis are progressive and non-responsive to bracing, operative treatment is the mainstay of care. The three basic operations are fusion in situ, convex growth arrest (epiphyseodesis) and HV resection. Isolated posterior fusion with or without instrumentation is not recommended for young children, because correction is limited and a crankshaft phenomenon of the spine occurs in 15% of patients and in 36% when age at surgery is <4 years. Combined anterior and posterior fusion adds the potential benefit of greater correction, and of correction in the sagittal plane, because the excision of discs allows for greater mobility of segments. It also decreases the likelihood of pseudarthrosis and prevents crankshaft phenomenon by removing the growth plates.Cheung et al. reported a long-term follow-up (10.8 years) of a series of six thoracolumbar HV cases treated by convex fusion combined with instrumented concave subcutaneous distraction . They reported a mean improvement of 41% from 49 to 29° at the latest follow-up assessment. Convex growth arrest or epiphyseodesis on the convex side is appropriate only for patients with growth potential remaining on the concave side. This procedure must be

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

done early (before 5 years of age) and before the curve has progressed beyond 50 or 60°. To obtain epiphysiodesis effect, two levels above and below the HV have to be fused. In lumbar spine it should represent an important loss of mobility of the lumbar segment. combined anterior and posterior convex spinal growth arrest alone does not prevent progression of deformity in infantile idiopathic scoliosis, and that the addition of posterior instrumentation can retard or arrest deformity progression but not reverse it .The HV excision is the best indication in thoraco lumbar, lumbar and lumbo sacral hemivertebras Numerous authors have reported series of HV resection using successive or simultaneous anterior and posterior approaches, or posterior approach alone. Improvement rates vary in these studies from 24.3 to 71.1% .Apart from these three basic interventions for evolutive congenital scoliosis, a new technique, rib's distraction, has been proposed. This technique is especially useful in cases of complex congenital thoracic spine malformations associated with rib's hypoplasia or aplasia. Kyphosis Congenital kyphosis is often associated with intraspinal neurological malformations. For evolutive congenital kyphosis early surgery is indicated. Posterior arthrodesis is indicated when performed before 3 years of age in mild angular kyphosis. For major kyphosis two options are available: first is to perform anterior disc excision plus anterior distraction and anterior plus posterior arthrodesis. The second option is to perform a posterior closing wedge osteotomy followed by posterior compression instrumentation plus arthrodesis.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS

Robert N. Hensinger, M.D. Idiopathic scoliosis is the most common cause of spinal curvature. The prevalence is 22 per 1000. It is genetic in origin and the inheritance of this condition is becoming better understood. It is usually dominant; however inheritance is mutifactorial with variable expressivity and a high degree of penetrance. 80% of children will have positive family history. The female/male ratio is about the same, although females are more likely to have a progressive curve, 7:1. The earlier the onset the more likely the curvature will progress particularly juvenile curves that start before age 10. Clinical Examination: The bending test is the easiest way to identify children with curvature. As the curvature increases, the spine tends to rotate making the rib hump more prominent. However, there is not a direct relationship between the degree of curvature and rotation. Large curves can be easily missed if there is a small degree of rotation. The shoulders are uneven and usually there is some trunk shift The most common pattern of curvature is the right thoracic and left lumbar. There may be single or double curves. One must be familiar with the various patterns and there are several excellent classification systems, Lenke's classification is the most widely used for surgical planning. The lateral examination is important to assess in thoracic lordosis, as it can cause pulmonary compromise. Thoracic lordosis is unusually common in children with idiopathic scoliosis. The incidence of spondylolysis is the same as the general population. "Wrong way curves" .It is very important to recognize when curves are in the opposite direction, Idiopathic curves are right thoracic, left lumbar. When curves do not have that pattern or are the reverse, an MRI is recommended. That is also true for children under the age of 10 and those with a negative family history. Whenever you operate on a child with scoliosis you should obtain a pre-operative MRI. X-ray examination: The standard exam is usually standing AP and lateral films of the entire spine. The Cobb measuring system is used to determine the degree of curvature. Risser sign assessment of the pelvic apophysis for maturation. Not all curves progress, in fact a relatively small percentage, 15-20%. As a consequence, many children will be followed to identify a small group that are at risk of progressive curvature. Treatment Spine Bracing: is helpful and works for some children, particularly those with curves less than 40 degrees. There are a wide variety of braces which will be discussed. Braces are not corrective, if the curvature is of large degree and progressive despite bracing then surgical intervention is suggested Surgical Technicques: Currently we use pedicle screws in the lumbar and thoracic spine. Surgical correction is now well into 75%. The hospital stay is only a few days (4.5 average), no cast or brace following surgery with quick return to function. Return to school 2 ­ 3 weeks, no contact sports for the first 6 months.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

. Surgical Indications: 1) Curves over 40 degrees 2) Curves that cannot be controlled with bracing 3) Progressive curves in mature individuals 4) Curves > 50 ­ 60 degrees in adults Benefits of surgery include: 1) Correct the deformity 2) Stabilize the curve so that it does not progress in the future 3) Improve or at least stabilize pulmonary function 4) Improve the quality of life. Risks associated with surgery: 1) Neurological injuries including paraplegia, 2) Blood loss 3) Infection 4) Failure of fusion (pseudoarthrosis). 5) Anesthesia complications.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

CIFOSIS

José Luis González López. Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón. Madrid El término Cifosis define una angulación de convexidad posterior en el plano sagital. La columna vista desde un plano anterior es recta, pero en el plano lateral, presenta cuatro curvas fisiológicas equilibradas entre sí: lordosis cervical, cifosis torácica, lordosis lumbar y cifosis sacrococcígea, lo que le proporciona una mayor flexibilidad y absorción de estrés. La cifosis sacrococcígea es congénita, por la anatomía del sacro y cóccix, pero el resto de las curvas se adquieren con el desarrollo motor, y se establecen cuando el niño comienza la bipedestación. La cifosis torácica es muy variable, considerándose un rango normal un valor angular comprendido entre 20-40° medida entre TI-TI2, situándose el ápex entre T5-T8; esta cifosis fisiológica se compensa con una lordosis usualmente 20° mayor, ya que el disco L5-S1 tiene una gran participación su composición. La deformidad cifótica comprende una curva anormal de convexidad posterior, bien por un gran aumento de la cifosis fisiológica, o por localización anómala en zonas dónde debe haber lordosis, lo que siempre será patológico. Biomecánicamente, existe una clara desproporción entre las fuerzas de compresión anteriores con respecto a las de tracción posteriores, por lo que cualquier factor puede desequilibrante puede producir una hipercifosis: disbalance muscular, alteraciones ligamentosas, alteraciones óseas posteriores o anteriores etc.

Fig. Hipercifosis armónica secundaria a enf. de Scheuermann

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Clasificación La más aceptada es la etiológica, propuesta por la SRS: 1. Postural II. Enf. de Scheuennann III. Congénita IV. Neuromuscular V. Mielomenin gocele VI. Traumática VII. Postquirúr gica VIII. Postirradi ación IX. Metabólica X. Displasia óseas XI. Colageno sis XII. Tumoral XIII. Inflamatoria. Pese a la gran variedad etiológica, el 85% son posturales o enfermedad de Scheuermann. También es importante determinar si la cifosis es armónica (de radio largo o corto) o angular, ya que ello tiene claras implicaciones sobre la integridad medular, así como las compensadas, que mantienen buen equilibrio o las descompensadas que básicamente son las secundarias a Espondilitis Anquilosante, espondilolistesis de alto grado, mielomeningocele y congénita. Exploración Se debe determinar la localización y forma de la cifosis, rigidez de la misma, del tronco, asociación con escoliosis, existencia y tipo de dolor, localización y horario, su relación con actividades y existencia de antecedentes familiares, ya que la enfermedad de Scheuermann suele ser familiar. Radiología Se deben tomar, en una primera visita, TeleRxs AP y LAT de la columna en Bipedestación, así como una lateral en supino con rodillo bajo ápex. La medición se hará con el método de Cobb cuantificando cifosis y lordosis. En las Cifosis Congénitas e infecciones, la RMN es muy útil para definir la deformidad y valorar el estado de la médula; la TAC con reconstrucción tridimensional define muy bien la deformidad ósea con el inconveniente de la gran radiación que supone para el paciente.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Tratamiento En reglas generales, el tratamiento se debe plantear según la cifosis sea armónica o angular, y si es rígida o flexible. Ortopédico: Es solamente aplicable en cifosis armónicas y elásticas; la fisioterapia y reeducación postural puede tener su papel cuando la deformidad se mantiene entre los 50 y 60°; a partir de los 60° y en estadío de Risser menor de 3, son útiles las ortésis, dentro de los cuales, el corsé de Milwaukee es el más efectivo, aunque por la baja colaboración que suele tener, pueden utilizarse corsés tipo TLSO (sobre todo si el ápex está por debajo de T7), de los que el de Swan parece el más adecuado. Sin embargo, en revisiones de grandes cohortes de pacientes, se ha comprobado que el resultado final solamente proporciona una mejoría de unos 8º. Quirúrgico: Al Cifosis armónica: Se indica a partir de los 70-75°, aunque una deformidad cosmética importante puede cambiar la indicación; el tratamiento clásico es liberación mediante discectomía e injertos en empalizada intersomáticos que se completa con artrodesis posterior amplia, desde T2 hasta la vértebra lumbar más horizontal; si en las Rxs con rodillo bajo ápex, muestra corrección a menos de 55°, puede ser susceptible de un único abordaje posterior, con gran aporte de injerto. En la actualidad se está imponiendo el abordaje posterior único utilizando instrumentación pedicular torácica incluyendo todas las vértebras posibles, con lo que se consigue muy buenas correcciones

Fig. 2: Cifosis corregida por vía posterior con instrumentación pedicular.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

B/Cifosis angular: Dado que la médula suele estar en riesgo, un primer paso ineludible es liberarla, extirpando las partes posteriores de cuerpos vertebrales y discos que la puedan comprimir mediante abordaje anterior o posterior único; si es preciso hacer corporectomía, se pondrán injertos costales, tricorticales de cresta "en puntal" o bien con cajas intersomáticas, completándose con instrumentación y artrodesis posterior de la zona afecta.

Fig.3: Cifosis Congénita angular. tuberculosis vertebral

Fig.4: Cifosis angular secundaria a

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

BIBLIOGRAFIA Ascani E, LaRosa G, Ascani C.: Scheuermann Kyphosis. En: The Pediatric Spine. Editado por: Weinstein SL. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2001: 413432. Geck MJ, Macagno A, Ponte A, Shufflebarger HL.: The Ponte procedure: posterior only treatment of Scheuermann's kyphosis using segmental posterior shortening and pedicle screw instrumentation. J Spinal Disord Tech. 2007 Dec;20(8):586-93. Lee SS, Lenke LG, Kuklo TR, Valenté L, Bridwell KH, Sides B, Blanke KM.: Comparison of Scheuermann kyphosis correction by posterior-only thoracic pedicle screw fixation versus combined anterior/posterior fusion. Spine. 2006 Sep 15;31(20):2316-21. Saraph VJ, Bach CM, Krismer M, Wimmer C.: Evaluation of spinal fusion using autologous anterior strut grafts and posterior instrumentation for thoracic/thoracolumbar kyphosis. Spine. 2005 Jul 15;30(14):1594-601. Johnston C, Elerson E, Dagher G.: Correction of adolescent hyperkyphosis with posterior-only threaded rod compression instrumentation: is anterior spinal fusion still necessary?. Spine. 2005 Jul 1;30(13):1528-34 Arlet V, Schlenzka D.: Scheuermann's kyphosis: surgical management. Eur Spine J. 2005 Nov;14(9):817-27. Lim M, Green DW, Billinghurst JE, Huang RC, Rawlins BA, Widmann RF, Burke SW, Boachie-Adjei O.: Scheuermann kyphosis: safe and effective surgical treatment using multisegmental instrumentation. Spine. 2004 Aug 15;29(16):1789-94. Soo CL, Noble PC, Esses SI.: Scheuermann kyphosis: long-term follow-up. Spine . 2002 Jan-Feb;2(1):49-56 Wenger DR, Frick SL.: Scheuermann kyphosis. Spine. 1999 Dec 15;24(24):2630-9. Platero D, Luna JD, Pedraza V.: Juvenile kyphosis: effects of different variables on conservative treatment outcome. Acta Orthop Belg. 1997 Sep;63(3):194-201. Sachs B, Bradford D, Winter R, Lonstein J, Moe J, Willson S.: Scheuermann kyphosis. Follow-up of Milwaukee-brace treatment. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1987 Jan;69(1):50-7. Scheuermann HW.: The classic: kyphosis dorsalis juvenilis. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1977 Oct;(128):5-7. Dubousset J.: Congenital kyphosis and lordosis. En: The Pediatric Spine. Editado por: Weinstein SL. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2001: 179-192.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Domanic U, Talu U, Dikici F, Hamzaoglu A.: Surgical correction of kyphosis: posterior total wedge resection osteotomy in 32 patients. Acta Orthop Scand. 2004 Aug;75(4):449-55. Kim YJ, Otsuka NY, Flynn JM, Hall JE, Emans JB, Hresko MT.: Surgical treatment of congenital kyphosis. Spine. 2001 Oct 15;26(20):2251-7. McMaster MJ, Singh H.: Natural history of congenital kyphosis and kyphoscoliosis. A study of one hundred and twelve patients. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1999 Oct;81(10):136783. Jain AK, Dhammi IK.:Tuberculosis of the spine: a review. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2007 Jul;460:39-49. Luke KDK, Leong JCY, Ho EKW. Tuberculosis of the spine. En: The Pediatric Spine. Editado por: Wnstein SL. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2001: 635-648. Sponseller PD.: The spine in skeletal dysplasias. En: The Pediatric Spine. Editado por: Wnstein SL. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2001: 279-300. Pauli RM, Breed A, Horton VK, Glinski LP, Reiser CA Prevention of fixed, angular kyphosis in achondroplasia. J Pediatr Orthop. 1997 Nov-Dec;17(6):726-33.

.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

SPONDYLOLYSIS/SPONDYLOLISTHESIS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Robert N. Hensinger, M.D. Classification of Spondylolysis/ Spondylolisthesis Type I, Dysplastic - congenital deficiency and posterior elements. Type II, Isthmic - a fracture or a break in the pars interarticularis. Type III, Degenerative - occurs in older adults. Type IV, Traumatic - an acute fracture of a pedicle lamina or facet. Type V, Pathologic, structural weakness, neurofibromatosis and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Etiology: Spondylolysis is usually traumatic and associated with hyperextension of the lumbar spine. There is also a genetic predisposition with both familial and racial propensities. It is rare to find a lesion before age 5. The incidence gradually increases over the growing years until it reaches the adult percentage of 5%. Athletes are at greater risk for spondylolysis, particular sports include weight lifting, gymnastics and football. It has not been reported in non-ambulatory adults and it is extremely common (35%) in children who have dorsal lumbar kyphosis. Clinical Presentation: Initial presentation with low back pain and pain into the posterior thighs. Symptoms usually begin in adolescence. Hamstring tightness is extremely common and a very good index of activity of the condition. Clinically the children have a flat back coupled with scoliosis. Neurological findings are not common and particularly with the early degrees of slipping (Grade I and II). Neurologic problems (motor and sensory) are more often with increased episodes of pain further slipping (Grade III and IV). Cauda equina syndrome is a serious problem and should be managed emergently. X-ray Diagnosis: can be made on plain films, particularly if oblique films are obtained. Also bone scan, CT scan and MRI can all be helpful to identify the lesion. With increased slipping there is a great deal of change in both the sacrum and L5. Treatment of Spondylolysis: Includes limitation of activity and most respond with time. More significant problems can occur if the lesion is at L4 level. The patient does not respond as quickly to symptomatic care and symptoms may be of longer duration than L5. Spondylolisthesis: When spondylolisthesis accompanies spondylosis, it can be of low degree (Grade I and II) and few associated problems. If the spondylolisthesis advances, particularly in the young child (Grade III and IV) it can be quite a significant problem. In high grade slips, L5-S1 instability is a significant problem. Symptoms are directly related to instability or looseness. As the L5-S1 junction becomes more kyphotic, symptoms increase and the deformity becomes progressive.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Surgical stabilization: Surgical fusion is often considered in grades III and IV. Modern instrumentation, pedicle screws are used now to achieve stabilization and fusion. There are associated neurologic risks with reduction of L5-S1. Bilateral lateral fusion has provided the best results. Reduction is not necessary in a child to achieve relief of symptoms. Reduction can cause the cauda equina syndrome. Surgical Indications: 1) Intractable pain 2) Progression of slip 3) Subluxation > 50% (Grade III or IV) 4) Unacceptable gait or posture

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

BACK PAIN IN CHILDREN

JOUVE Jean-Luc, LAUNAY Franck, GLARD Yann, BOLLINI Gérard. Marseille. During the last decade, back pain is becoming a very frequent motive for consultation in paediatrics. This is an event common to all developed countries, and which deeply modifies the clinician's thought and reasoning. In fact, in the past a lumbago in a child was almost always synonymous with an organic disease. Nowadays, no aetiology is found in 50% to 80% of cases. This overabundance of patients lead us to have doubts in terms of epidemiology, in terms of sport behaviour and in terms of choice of investigations considering such a symptom. The problematics is still simple: even if back pain in children is regularly increasing, the research of an organic aetiology has to remain the priority of all clinicians. The question is: What is the exam I have to ask for and for which patient? The clinical step is still a major step but a difficult one. Some points have to be established in a precise manner right from the interrogation because of the risk of rough errors. These points are the length, the mode of beginning, the real intensity of symptoms, and the repercussion on sport activities. All these items, apparently simple, are curiously difficult to obtain in pediatrics. The physical exam is also important because, contrary to adults, the discovery of an objective physical sign is practically synonymous with an organic disease. The child does not have any degenerative phenomena, he recovers very quickly from benign sport injuries. Thus, a paravertebral or a harm-strings contraction, a radiculalgia, a sacro-iliac pain are important signs. One have to remember that scoliosis in children is strictly painless and it can not be the cause of the pain. Then the medical imaging will be oriented by the clinical exam. Several authors have tried to show some significant items which could have a good value in favour of an organic disease. Similarly some items have been recognized as very little significant items. These items are summarized in table 1. Significant items Length of symptoms > 4 weeks Age < 4 years Presence of general signs Sleep disruption Modification of sport activities Trouble of spine static Spine or hip stiffness Radicular or muscular pain Peripheral neurological deficit Non significant items Superficial sensitivity of the back Inexplicable symptoms Diffuse irradiation (all directions) Simulation of locked motion Lack of attention during exam Hypertrophied reaction

Table: summary of clinical signs recognized as significant or no significant of an organic disease.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

An organic cause will be looked for right from the clinical step. On can distinguish in order of decreasing frequence. - Spondylosysis and spondylolisthesis - Scheuermann's disease - Sacro-iliac or spinal infection - Abdominal pathology - Intervertebral disc pathology, rim fracture or slipped disc - Osseous or medullary tumor The main difficulty for the clinician will be to decide on the opportunity to ask for medical imaging exploration and its chronology. This task is all the more difficult since such indications are very dependent on the technical capacity. During a first consultation, the association of recent pain after a benign injury, without general sign, without any significant physical sign does not justify any complementary investigation. Logic consists in recommending no medication but one have to see the child again after 15 days in case of persistent symptoms. If there is a significant sign or a pain longer than 4 weeks, it is justified to recommend a X-ray. Most of the time it is a complete spine X-ray. When there is a precise physical sign, one ask for centered X-rays. So this is the case of the lombo-sacral hinge when one evoke an isthmic spondylolysis. In most of the cases one will demonstrate a spondylolysis or a Scheuermann kyphosis. The diagnostic step is then completed and no more complementary investigation is necessary except for refine a particular therapeutic strategy. In athletic children, the Scheuermann disease can demonstrate a typical aspect in medical imaging. This is a lacuna of the antero-superior corner of the lombar vertebral body. Such an aspect is currently frequent in children practising sport in a high level. Like in isthmic spondylolysis this is the result of repeated microtraumas in axial compression. This probably explains its increasing frequence in gymnasts. Prognosis is theoretically very good, but continuing sport allows some doubt about the future of such lesions. When a clear condensation evokes an osteoid steome or an osteoblastoma, this is a rare indication for CT-scan in paediatrics. Sometimes one have the surprise to find an unilateral lysis with a contralateral condensation. In all other circumstances, particularly in case of radiologic osseous lacuna or when the X-ray is normal, the MRI seems to supplant the other imaging strategies. Its easy access allows to ask for such an exam at the least doubt. MRI allows the diagnosis of bone and medullar tumors and the infectious causes as well. MRI has its limits in the diagnosis of osteolytic lesions and does not always allow to do without biopsy. However MRI has the advantage to scan almost the whole paediatric pathology. Its allows in particular the diagnosis of the rare discal lesions in children. Sciatic pain in children is not very common. Contrary to adult, it is rare to observe sauch a symptom in paediatrics, and one have to do everything possible to determine its origin. Except tumors and infections, it can be a tear of the perichondral rim which is interdependent with the nucleus pulposus. This osteocartilaginous fragment projects into the vertebral canal like a slipped disc. The slipped disc can also exists in children. However it is a rare condition. In both cases the symptomatology os sciatic is typical, usually combined with a very positive Lassegue sign. The place of scintigraphy seems to become secondary. Its indication is still the absence of any clear sign of localization. It does not give any information about the content of the vertebral canal and about discs. Then its place is discussed and seems to be very dependent on the technical capacity of the hospital.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

In summary back pain in children is a symptom in continuous evolution. Considering the epidemiologic level, its frequence is still increasing and it leads us to consider back pain as a life hygiene issue. Most of the time this is an inadequate sport practise, in particular in the high level sport. It is essential to define some consensual attitudes in term of efficiency and in term of cost. On the strategic level, MRI can completely modify the way to treat this symptom for which no aetiology is found. The position of this exam early in the decision-making process of a painful back in children could be logical in order to avoid repetition of imaging exams and an appreciable irradiation. In all cases a clinical follow-up is still the best way to have an efficient diagnostic approach.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

PEDIATRIC LIMB DEFORMIES: ANGULAR/ROTATIONAL

Peter M Stevens, M.D. DEVELOPMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS · Intrauterine growth · Mesenchymal condensation · Chondrification · Chondral modeling · Nutrition/placenta · Environmental factors · Intra-uterine space/moulding LIMB ORIENTATION: mechanism? · INTRAUTERINE LIMB ROTATION @ 8 WEEKS POSTNATAL GROWTH: 24 x 7 x 1.5 decades · Chondral modeling · Endochondral ossification · Environmental factors · Physical activity · Joint reaction forces · Gravity HEALTHY PHYSIS · Parallel to ground · Perpendicular to gravity · Well suited vs. compression NORMAL CLINICAL EXAM * · Straight legs · Equal limb lengths · Neutral rotational profile · Normal gait "ORTHOPAEDICS" = STRAIGHT CHILD ­ Nicholas Andry 1741 NORMAL CLINICAL ALIGNMENT (MATURITY) · X Axis +/-50 (varus/valgus) physiologic: varus <2 yrs. valgus <6 yrs. · Y Axis +/-2 centimeters · Z Axis +/-150 (inward/outward)

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

NET RESULT: BALANCED GROWTH · Stature · Symmetry · Rom · Normal gait · Resiliency NORMAL RADIOGRAPHIC ALIGNMENT · horizontal physes (if open) · horizontal joints · neutral mechanical axis @ 870 · equal limb lengths 1 cm growth = 100 Angle MECHANICAL AXIS · Knee quadrants · (- ) = varus (+) = valgus · Physiologic = neutral or within zones +/- 1 (+) valgus/varus (-) 870

Z AXIS NORMAL VALUES (= VERSION) · Femur = 110 - 150 inward (anteversion) · Tibia = 150 ­ 250 outward TORSION DEMOGRAPHICS · Age - childhood (<8) vs. adolescence · Gender differences (female predilection) · Family history (often positive) · Clinical findings may not be symmetrical LIMB DEFORMITIES · X Axis - angular (most harmful) · Y Axis - length · Z Axis ­ torsion (insidious) PHYSES MAY BE "SICK" DUE TO: · Intrinsic weakness · Pathologic loading · Compression · Shear · Torque PHYSI0LOGICAL "DEFORMITIES" · Symmetrical · Age related · Self limiting · No ill effects · No Rx necessary

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

PATHOLOGIC DEFORMITIES · Asymmetrical vs. symmetrical · Age related · Persistent/progress · Adverse · Timely intervention UNDECIDED: PHYSIOLOGIC vs. PATHOLOGIC? · Re-examine in 6 ­ 12 months +/- comparison radiograph Z = TORSION "the axis of evil" · · · · Tibia Femur Both = pan genu torsion (a.k.a.- "miserable malalignment")

TORSION: NATURAL Hx · Embryology · Growth / development · Adolescence * onset symptoms o Accelerated growth o Longer lever arm (femur/tibia) o Body mass o Competitive sports o Patellar maltracking/instability TORSIONAL DEFORMITY: · Females > males · Often bilateral · Not necessarily symmetrical · +/- familial · Manifest /c patellofemoral sx ALGORITHMS FOR PATELLAR INSTABILITY - (Rx FOR TORSION NEVER INCLUDED) PATELLA = DECOY: (Q ANGLE = HOAX?) · Re-examine patient, and · Rule out angular or torsional malalignment · Rx malalignment before treating patella

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

ANGULAR DEFORMITY Rx · Closed physes ­ osteotomy · Open physis ­ guided growth GUIDED GROWTH - PREREQUISITES: · Open physes · Pathologic varus/valgus · 1 cm = 100 (Approximate) GENU VALGUM (KNOCK)/VARUM (BOW) · Knee = "ground zero" · Film /c knee horizontal · Overlay mechanical axis · Rx goal = neutral axis SUMMARY: LIMB DEFORMITIES · Physiologic - observe/educate · Pathologic - document/rx · Angular - guided growth (physis open) osteotomy (physis closed) · Rotational - osteotomy · Combine/stage rx as necessary GUIDED GROWTH

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

LIMB LENGTH DISCREPANCIES

James McCarthy. Madison, Wisconsin, USA Leg length inequality is common; 23% of the general population has a leg length inequality of 1 cm or more. Gait asymmetry requires a leg length inequality of at least 2 centimeters (3%). Minor leg length inequalities (< 2 cm) do not seem to alter the kinematics or kinetics of gait. Larger inequalities are associated with greater mechanical work, and equalizing limb length improves the symmetry of gait. The effect of gait asymmetry on back pain, scoliosis, and knee and hip arthrosis is less clear. There does not appear to be an increase in the incidence of back pain in patients with small leg length inequalities, although there is evidence of improvement in back pain in patients after they underwent lengthening for correction of large (3-14 cm) leg length inequalities. Prior to undergoing a limb equalization procedure, we suggest a trial of a shoe lift in a patient with a leg length inequality and back pain to determine if equalizing limb length will improve the back pain. Numerous radiographic and clinical measurements have been used to assess leg length inequality. Clinical assessment should include determination of a level pelvis with the patient standing and the Galeazzi test, (Figure 1). The teleroentgenogram is a single exposure AP radiograph of the lower extremity with a ruler. This is subject to magnification error of 5-10% at the outer border of the film but has the advantage of showing coronal (angular) deformities and is not subject to movement errors. Orthoradiography incorporates three separate exposures (of the hip, knee and ankle) in an effort to avoid magnification errors. The use of CT and ultrasound to assess limb length has increased. A prediction of the ultimate leg length inequality at skeletal maturity will be needed to determine treatment. Three methods are typically used to do this, the arithmetic method, the growth remaining curve, the Moseley straight line graph, and the multiplier method. Limb length inequality is typically classified either by etiology or degree of inequality. There are numerous causes of limb length inequality. In general, they can be divided into two broad categories: congenital and acquired. Limb length inequality is also classified by the magnitude of inequality at the time of skeletal maturity. Limb length inequalities less than 2 cm typically do not need treatment, those greater than 2 cm but less than 6 are treated with epiphysiodesis or shortening, and for limb length inequalities over 6 cm, lengthening is considered. The decision to shorten versus lengthen a limb will depend on the patient's actual or predicted height and the degree of leg length inequality. General guidelines for the treatment of leg length inequality are outlined below. Leg length inequality < 2 cm Leg length inequality 2-6 cm Leg length inequality > 6 cm Leg length inequality 5-20 No treatment (or in shoe lift) Epiphysiodesis or shortening procedure Lengthening procedure Lengthening+/epiphysiodesis or amputation

Treatment of leg length inequality involves many different approaches, such as orthotics, epiphysiodesis, shortening, and lengthening, which can be used alone or

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

combined in an effort to achieve equalization of leg lengths. Phemister first described his technique for epiphysiodesis. He removed a section of the epiphysis, then rotated it 90 degrees and replaced the bone. Currently, the most common technique is the percutaneous drill epiphysiodesis, performed with the aid of image intensifier. This technique has been reported to result in physeal closure in 85 to 100% of patients. Other methods include, screws or plates. Shortening techniques can be used after skeletal maturity to achieve leg length equality. Quadriceps weakness may occur with femoral shortenings, especially if a mid-diaphyseal shortening of greater than 10% is performed. Lengthening is usually performed by corticotomy and gradual distraction. This technique can result in lengthenings of 25% or more, but typically lengthening of 15%, or about 6 cm, is recommended. About 30 days in the fixation device per centimeter of length gained are necessary for both lengthening and consolidation. Treatment of large leg length inequalities can be performed by staged lengthenings or by simultaneous ipsilateral femoral and tibial lengthenings. Additionally, lengthenings can be combined with appropriately timed epiphysiodesis in an effort to produce leg length equality. Staged lengthenings are often used for congenital deficiencies such as fibular hemimelia, where 15 cm or more may be needed to produce leg length equality. We typically plan for the final lengthening to be completed by 13 or 14 years, and allow at least 3 years between lengthenings. Lengthening over an IM nail can be performed in an effort to decrease the amount of time the fixator needs to be worn and prevent angular malalignment (Figure 4). This technique requires that the patient be skeletally mature and it carries a higher risk of osteomyelitis (up to 15%). Additionally, if premature consolidation occurs, a repeat corticotomy is more difficult. A number of designs for totally implantable IM devices are being used. This would offer the advantages of producing immediate axial stability, preventing angular deformity, and eliminating pin tract infections and scarring. Numerous complications occur frequently when performing limb lengthenings, even in experienced hands, fortunately, the ultimate objective often can still be obtained. The most common complication is pin site infection. Knee range of motion decreases uniformly in femoral lengthenings, and other more ominous complications include fracture, osteomyelitis, or joint subluxation. The incidence of these more serious complications is about 25% with an experienced surgeon.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

REFERENCES 1.Liu XC, Fabry G, Molenaers G, Lammens J, Moens P: Kinematic and kinetic asymmetry in patients with leg-length discrepancy. J Pediatr Orthop 18:187-189, 1998 2.Goel A, Loudon J, Nazare A, Rondinelli R, Hassanein K: Joint moments in minor limb length discrepancy: a pilot study. Am J Orthop 26:852-856, 1997 3.Song KM, Halliday SE, Little DG: The effect of limb-length discrepancy on gait. J Bone Joint Surg 79A:1690-1698, 1997 4.Bhave A, Paley D, Herzenberg JE: Improvement in gait parameters after lengthening for the treatment of limb-length discrepancy. J Bone Joint Surg 81A:529-534, 1999 5.Moseley CF: Leg length discrepancy, ch. 28. In: Pediatric Orthopaedics,5th ed. (Lovell WW, Winter RB, eds.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, pp.1107-1108, 2001. 6.Stanitski DF: Limb length inequality: assessment and treatment options. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 7:143-153, 1999 7.Allen PE, Jenkinson A, Stephens MM, O'Brien T: Abnormalities in the uninvolved lower limb in children with spastic hemiplegia: the effect of actual and functional leg-length discrepancy. J Pediatr Orthop 20:88-92, 2000 8.Paley D, Bhave A, Herzenberg JE, Bowen JR: Multiplier method for predicting limb-length discrepancy. J Bone Joint Surg 82A:1432-1446, 2000 9.Baumgart R, Zeiler C, Kettler M, Weiss S , Schweiberer L: Fully implantable intramedullary distraction nail in shortening deformity and bone defects. Spectrum of indications. Orthopade 28:1058-1065, 1999

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

PIE ZAMBO Y METATARSO VARO

Deborah Eastwood The club foot (or talipes equinovarus) deformity is a classic paediatric orthopaedic problem which can be described in terms of ankle equinus, hindfoot varus and forefoot adduction with pronation of the first ray giving the appearance of cavus. The postural deformity will resolve spontaneously or with minimal treatment by the age of 3 months. Some foot deformities are associated with obvious syndromic conditions such as arthrogryposis or neuromuscular conditions such as spina bifida but the majority are classified as idiopathic. As the name implies, the aetiology of this type of deformity is unclear although various theories do exist. Genetic influences are present and there may be a family history of similar problems. The diagnosis can now be made with some degree of accuracy by foetal ultrasound scan (antenatal) but there is still some inaccuracy in judging the severity of the deformity particularly in the idiopathic cases. This is an important fact to remember when counselling parents on the basis of a scan performed at 12-20 weeks. The pathoanatomy of the clubfoot must be clearly understood in order to understand how to improve the situation with treatment. The primary problem is essentially a subluxation of the talonavicular joint with similar changes present in the talocalcaneal and the calcaneocuboid joints. The talus is abnormally shaped and abnormally aligned with respect to the calcaneum which is, itself, plantarflexed. All these abnormal relationships are held by capsular, ligamentous or musculotendinous contractures. Histological abnormalities in many of these structures have been identified and some authors feel that these changes give a clue to the aetiology of the deformity. It is unlikely that one single aetiological agent or theory can account for all cases of clubfoot deformity. The aetiology is probably multifactorial with different influences affecting foot development at different stages with potentially a summative effect on the severity of the deformity. The diagnosis of the deformity is clinical but the child must be fully assessed in order to exclude associated abnormalities. The severity of the deformity must be classified by either the Dimeglio system and/or the Pirani system and this could be linked in to the Clubfoot Assessment Protocol published by Andriesse et al that can be used for documenting outcome following treatment. The treatment of the clubfoot has undergone a radical change over the last decade with conservative methods of `stretching and strapping' or `manipulating and casting' regimes popularised by Ponseti and the use of continuous passive motion promoted by Dimeglio and by Bensahel. Globally, the Ponseti regime is probably the most popular technique. It has been shown to work well in many different countries and with many different practitioners of various different backgrounds. His technique has been modified by many people but most feel that the basic technique that he first described remains the gold standard. If the pathoanatomy of the foot is understood and the condition treated according to his standard and precise protocol (with a percutaneous Achilles tenotomy in all feet that lack ankle dorsiflexion) then a major surgical

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

procedure can be avoided in around 95% of idiopathic feet. There are some feet that are known to be more difficult than others and certainly the success rate is significantly less in the syndromic or the neuromuscular foot. Compliance with the bracing regimes is essential if relapse/recurrence is to be avoided but a significant proportion of the feet will require a muscle rebalancing procedure such as a tibialis anterior tendon transfer at a later stage. Some authors believe that such surgery should be performed early if non-compliance with the `boots and bars' is anticipated. Surgical treatment with an `a la carte' release of the soft tissue contractures and correction of the joint malalignment is still required in some feet. There are also many feet with recurrent or residual deformity following initial surgery who may require further soft tissue or bony surgery. Correction can be achieved via standard osteotomies and/or by using external fixator devices to obtain and then maintain the correction. Care must be taken to ensure that such surgery does not damage the joints or the physes unnecessarily. Figures Dimeglio and Pirani Classification methods -see attached sheets . Metatarsus Varus This is almost always a minor and often postural abnormality that causes parents concern but is not usually a problem to the orthopaedic surgeon. It may be a cause of an intoeing gait in the toddler. Some texts consider the metatarsus varus and the metatarsus adductus deformities to be separate entities and others consider them to be essentially the same thing. It is always important to ensure that there is no other forefoot or hindfoot deformity. The association of metatarsus adductus (or varus) and a valgus hindfoot is known as the `skew foot' and may occur secondary to the surgical treatment of a clubfoot . Treatment usually consists of physiotherapy and patience and most deformities will improve with time. Surgical treatment for the isolated metatarsus varus should be avoided.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

A Modified Pirani Scoring System

PC

The severity of the posterior crease Foot held in maximal correction The emptiness of the heel Foot held in maximal correction 0 0.5 1 0 0.5 1 multiple fine creases one or two deep creases deep creases change the contour of the arch tuberosity of calcaneus easily palpable tuberosity of calcaneus more difficult to palpate tuberosity of calcaneus not palpable ankle dorsiflexes fully ankle dorsiflexes to `neutral' angle between lateral border of foot and leg </= 90o ankle dorsiflexion severely limited ­ fixed equinus. angle between lateral border of foot and leg > 90o multiple fine creases one or two deep creases deep creases change the contour of the arch navicular completely reduces, lateral talar head cannot be felt navicular partially reduces, lateral talar head less palplable navicular does not reduce, lateral talar head easily felt straight border mild curve of lateral border distally lateral border curves at calcaneo-cuboid joint

EH

HFCS

Hindfoot contracture score Max score 3 RE

The rigidity of equinus Knee extended, ankle maximally corrected

0 0.5

1

MC

The severity of the medial crease Foot held in maximal correction of the head of the talus Forefoot held fully abducted

0 0.5 1 0

MFCS

Midfoot contracture score Max Score 3

LHT Palpation of the lateral part

0.5

1

CLB The curvature of the lateral

border

0 0.5 1

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Dimeglio Classification for CTEV

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

FLAT FEET

James Hui. Singapur. Flat feet is nearly ubiquitous in infants as the arch will only develop at 6 years of age in children. With concomitant ligamentous laxity (loose ligaments) present in nearly all infants, children usually have absent medial longitudinal arch and variable degree of valgus (outward angulation of the joint). During examination the longitudinal arch of foot is not elevated during standing in flat foot. The child will be made to stand on tiptoe so that the arch is more pronounced. Flat feet can either be flexible or rigid. Some causes of pathological flat feet include excessive ligamentous laxity, hyper mobility syndromes and some forms of cerebral palsy. Orthotics can be used in the treatment of this problem. However, studies have shown that orthotics such as sole inserts do not alter the natural progression of this problem. Patients who were treated with orthotics had the same results as those who were not. Having said that, simple medial arch supports may be helpful in alleviating pain. The rigid flat foot is commonly associated with tarsal coalition which is mostly asymptomatic. Symptomatic flat foot patients or those fail conservative treatment may warrant surgical resection of the connecting bar.

CAVUS FOOT

James Hui. Singapur. Cavus foot or pes cavus is a high arch of the foot that does not flatten with weight bearing. The causes include neuromuscular disease, malunion of calcaneal or talar fractures, burns, sequelae resulting from compartment syndrome and residual clubfoot. Identifying the etiology is essential to determine if the deformity is progressive Neuromuscular diseases, such as muscular dystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, spinal dysraphism, polyneuritis, intraspinal tumors, poliomyelitis, syringomyelia, Friedreich ataxia, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord tumors, can cause muscle imbalances that lead to cavus foot. Evaluation of a patient who presents with pes cavus begins with a thorough history and complete examination to determine the etiology. Neuromuscular disorders can be identified by family history. Examination begins with observation of the gait. Hindfoot positioning is evaluated through gait analysis looking for varus. During swing phase, foot positioning is analyzed, looking for anterior tibialis weakness and foot drop. The range of motion of the ankle, subtalar, midfoot, and forefoot is examined. The deformity is determined to be flexible or rigid. The forefoot is observed for plantarflexion, and the hindfoot is observed for varus. Documenting the strength of the individual muscles is essential for determining surgical options. The Coleman block test determines if the subtalar joint is flexible. A neurologic examination is required, specifically including detailed muscle strength testing. Sensory examination is important. The goal of treatment is to produce a plantigrade foot that allows even distribution of weight. Standing radiography of the feet and ankles is essential. Radiographs should be inspected for evidence of degenerative arthritis, the positioning of the calcaneus, and forefoot alignment. Physical therapy to stretch tight

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

muscles and strengthen weak muscles may provide early relief. Orthotics with extradepth shoes to offload bony prominences and prevent rubbing of the toes may improve symptoms. The goal of surgery is to provide a plantigrade foot. Surgical procedures can be broadly categorized into soft-tissue and bony procedures.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

EL PIE NEUROLÓGICO

Camilo Turriago. Bogotá. El pie es la estructura que brinda el soporte mecánico y funcional al cuerpo; es la palanca sobre la que actúan los principales músculos propulsores de la marcha; está diseñado para absorber y disipar las cargas producidas por el choque del talón durante la marcha; es además es el órgano propioceptivo más importante para mantener el equilibrio y el efector primario de las reacciones de balance en respuesta ante las variaciones en el apoyo. El pie está compuesto por 26 huesos, todos ellos articulados con huesos vecinos a través de articulaciones sinoviales, siendo así el segmento con la mayor superficie de cartílago hialino del cuerpo humano. Este gran número de articulaciones implican un gran número de ligamentos y de músculos extrínsecos e intrínsecos. Función del pie: 1. Es una estructura diseñada para soportar cargas, aun en movimiento. Por tal motivo debe ser estable. 2. Es un brazo de palanca y sobre el actúa el principal acelerador de la marcha: el gastrosóleo. Por esto debe ser un brazo de palanca suficientemente rígido durante la contracción del gastrosóleo durante el apoyo medio y durante el prebalanceo. 3. Es una estructura sensitiva que envía constantemente información propioceptiva al cerebro sobre nuestra posición y sobre las características del terreno. 4. Gracias a su gran cantidad de articulaciones con cartílago hialino, ligamentos , músculos y tendones, está especialmente diseñado para absorber y disipar cargar evitando sobrecargas en estructuras proximales. Si bien esta estructura es ideal para soportar, absorber y disipar cargas, también lo hace vulnerable cuando existen imbalances musculares. El pie se comporta como una especie de títere y los músculos con sus respectivos tendones son los que ocasionan movilidad del mismo. Estas fuerzas deben estar equilibradas, pero si no están balanceadas, el pie se deformará siguiendo la dirección del músculo o grupo muscular que ejerza mayor fuerza. El pie tiene una función primordial durante la marcha: es una estructura para absorber cargas durante el choque del talón y la respuesta a la carga, durante el apoyo monopodal es una estructura estable que soporta el peso del cuerpo en movimiento, durante el prebalanceo funciona como un brazo de palanca rígido sobre el que actúa el gastrosóleo, principal acelerador de la marcha humana. Las enfermedades de origen neurológico pueden deformar el pie de diferentes maneras: las parálisis flácidas, por ejemplo en secuelas de mielomeningocele, se desarrollan imbalances musculares que son muy deformantes. También es frecuente la presencia de un peroné corto que da la apariencia de valgo al retropie. Otras alteraciones como las miopatías o neuropatías periféricas ocasionan imbalances muy sutiles que ocasionan deformidades de lenta progresión, el pie cavo es una de las alteraciones más frecuentes en estas condiciones.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Las alteraciones en las que se afecta el tono muscular como la parálisis cerebral espástica, producen alteraciones en el pie por imbalance muscular pero también porque el pie recibe fuerzas anormales durante la marcha. Un buen abordaje en la evaluación y tratamiento del pie neuropático es determinar el impacto en la calidad de vida y en la funcionalidad del paciente. Un pie severamente deformado es incapaz de proveer un apoyo estable y frecuentemente es doloroso, puede llegar a impedir que el paciente utilice calzado. En general, se recomienda que todos los pacientes independientemente del pronóstico de marcha logren soportar carga en sus miembros inferiores. Esto mejora la función cardiopulmonar, gastrointestinal y renal, mejorando además la calidad ósea. Para esto se debe contar con pies plantígrados a los que razonablemente se les pueda adoptar una ortesis, y que no desarrollen áreas de presión o dolor. Cuando se habla de marcha el objetivo es restablecer la función mecánica del pie. Para esto es necesario realizar un completo examen clínico del pie con y sin apoyo, anotando no solamente la movilidad en los diferentes planos, sino determinando la actividad y fuerza muscular de los músculos que actúan sobre este. El examen dinámico del pie también puede proveer información importante respecto a la función durante la marcha, los datos de cinemática, cinética y podobarografía (mapa electrónico que mide las presiones en la planta del pie durante la marcha) complementan esta información. El objetivo terapéutico es contar con un pie bien orientado y estable, que permita una adecuada transmisión de cargas y además funcione adecuadamente como un buen brazo de palanca. Un pie inestable, incapaz de proveer un apoyo estable durante la fase de apoyo monopodal (40% del ciclo de la marcha), determinará que nuestros pasos sean cortos, se afecta la fase de balanceo de la extremidad contraria, los músculos de los miembros inferiores tendrán que contraerse frecuentemente para tratar de estabilizar la marcha por lo tanto aumenta el consumo de energía, se sufren caídas frecuentes y cansancio fácil. Un brazo de palanca flexible que no permite que el sistema acelerador funcione adecuadamente, obligará a utilizar otros músculos aceleradores menos eficientes y nuestro consumo de energía aumentará. Si la sensibilidad de la planta del pie no es adecuada, tendremos que suplir esta falta de receptores utilizando propioceptores más proximales y menos eficientes. Esto sin mencionar las lesiones que puede sufrir un pie anestésico. Pero en trastornos neurológicos el pie no siempre es causa de trastornos biomecánicos en la marcha, en ocasiones la función del pie se ve comprometida por alteraciones proximales, tales como la excesiva flexión de la rodilla al final del balanceo, que impide un adecuado choque del talón. Otro ejemplo de lo anterior es la torsión tibial externa aumentada que al desorientar el pie ocasiona disfunción del brazo de palanca. La disfunción de grupos musculares también es causa de ineficiencia del pie durante la marcha. Un ejemplo de lo anterior es la ausencia de contracción del tibial anterior durante el balanceo. Esto ocasiona "pie caído", impidiendo el choque del talón, ocasionando una mala transmisión de fuerzas hacia proximal y además generando respuestas compensatorias proximales tales como excesiva flexión de la cadera y la rodilla para evitar arrastrar el pie. Otro ejemplo de disfunción muscular es la insuficiencia del sóleo que desafortunadamente en muchos casos es iatrogénica, al alargar el tendón de Aquiles. El sóleo desacelera la progresión hacia anterior de la tibia durante el apoyo monopodal, lo que mantiene la rodilla extendida. Si el sóleo es insuficiente su contracción excéntrica será muy débil y la tibia progresará rápidamente hacia anterior, ocasionando que la rodilla se flexione durante el apoyo medio, este tipo de marcha es de muy alto consumo de energía y se asocia a artrosis temprana de las rodillas, finalmente conduciendo perder la capacidad de marcha.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

En resumen: el abordaje del pie neurológico implica un buen diagnóstico fundamentado en el análisis preciso de las fuerzas deformantes y de la función biomecánica del pie. El tratamiento debe estar orientado a obtener un buen balance muscular y a restablecer su función como estructura de apoyo y brazo de palanca.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Bibliografía . Gage J.R.: Gait analysis in cerebral palsy, London, PA: Mac Keith Press. 1991: 108. . Gage J.R., Schwartz M.L: Pathological gait and lever arm dysfunction. In: Gage J.R, ed. The treatment of gait problems in cerebral palsy. London, PA: Mac Keith Press; 2004: 197. . Tachdjian´s Pediatric Orthopaedics, Editor John A. Herrings. 3rd ed. PA: W.B. Saunders Company; 2002: 1150. . Novacheck T.M. Diplegia and Quadriplegia: Pathology and Treatment. In: Gage J.R, ed. The treatment of gait problems in cerebral palsy. London, PA: Mac Keith Press; 2004: 360-362. . Bleck E.E. Cerebral palsy. In: Staheli L.T. ed. Pediatric Orthopaedic Secrets. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley and Elfos INC; 1997: 355 . Turriago CA, Duplat JL, Larrota C, et al. Tratamiento del pie plano valgo espástico mediante triple artrodesis por doble abordaje: presentación de una técnica modificada. Rev. Col. Ortop. Traumat. 2001 Abril; 15(1): 52-56. . Mosca VS. The child´s foot: principles of management. J Pediatr Orthop 1998;18: 281-282.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

CONGENITAL PSEUDOARTHROSIS OF THE TIBIA AND OTHER DISORDERS

James McCarthy. Madison, Wisconsin, USA There are multiple etiologies for tibial bowing. Classically, this term refers to bowing of the diaphysis of the tibia, with the apex of the deformity directed either anterolaterally, anteromedially, or posteromedially. Each type of bowing tends to have a classic etiology. Anterolateral bowing is associated with pseudarthrosis of the tibia and neurofibromatosis. This is discussed in a separate chapter. Anteromedial bowing is associated with fibular hemimelia, and is also discussed in a separate chapter. The focus of this chapter is on posteromedial bowing. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT) poses one of the most challenging management problems in pediatric orthopaedics. Its treatment compounds the difficulty of achieving and then maintaining union while simultaneously providing a functional extremity. The etiology of CPT remains unclear. The fibula is affected in approximately one third of patients. Approximately 6% of patients with NF type 1 develop deformity of the tibia, while up to 55% of cases of anterolateral bowing and pseudarthrosis are associated with NF. Because anterolateral bowing of the tibia frequently presents in the first year of life, it may be the first recognized manifestation of NF. At the site of pseudarthrosis there is thickened periosteum and a cuff of fibrous tissue. The main histopathologic change was the growth of an abnormal, highly cellular fibrovascular tissue. Numerous classification systems of CPT have been suggested, including those of Boyd, Andersen, and Crawford. Johnston et al suggested that two criteria be considered to initially classify anterolateral bowing of the tibia: (1) presence or absence of fracture and (2) the age at which the first fracture occurs (early onset before age 4 years, delayed onset after age 4 years). Tibias that fracture and go on to pseudarthrosis are treated surgically; intact tibias are observed, Treatment of CPT is challenging. The primary goal is to obtain and maintain union while minimizing angular deformity. The use of a brace before fracture occurs is the mainstay of early treatment. Its use is recommended at all times when weight bearing and is continued through skeletal maturity. The anatomic alignment of the limb should be controlled to avoid fracture. After surgery, a brace also may play a complementary role in treatment. The highest rates of union have been reported after surgical intervention although no single method of surgery has proved to be ideal. The basic biologic considerations with surgery include resection of the pseudarthrosis, biologic bone bridging of the defect with stable fixation, and correction of any angular deformity. Intramedullary (IM) stabilization has been recommended as first-line surgical treatment of CPT with acceptable healing, the IM nail provides stability to allow healing of the

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

pseudarthrosis and is relatively easy to perform. Several IM nail designs have been used to treat CPT. Telescoping nails, which are affixed at both ends in the epiphyses, lengthen as the child grows. The Williams nail, a two-part nail (inner rod and insertion rod), is inserted antegrade through the pseudarthrosis site and out the heel, then is driven retrograde across the pseudarthrosis, and finally is detached, leaving the end of the indwelling nail in the desired distal position, several steps are common to successful IM treatment of CPT. The decision to go across the ankle remains controversial. Some authors recommend the addition of bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) for clinical. Free vascularized fibula grafts from the ipsilateral leg, if possible or the contralateral leg, if not has been described with good initial healing (>90%) but donor site morbidity may be underestimated. The Ilizarov external fixator has been used with union rates of 60-100%. Residual limb-length discrepancy and valgus deformity were commonly reported, with a complication rate of 30% to 100%. The need for fibular surgery remains controversial. The fibula typically is stabilized with an IM device, such as a Kirschner wire or Steinmann pin, to accommodate the small diameter of the canal. Amputation is seldom a consideration in the early management of the child with CPT. Technical ability to achieve healing of the CPT has improved greatly over the years. With recent advances in treatment, including the use of rhBMP-2, the number of children who undergo amputation may decrease. Indications for amputation as follows: (1) failure to satisfactorily achieve bony union after three surgical attempts; (2) significant limb length discrepancy (ie, >5 cm), which necessitates the use of a cosmetically unacceptable orthotic shoe to equalize the leg lengths; (3) a permanently deformed foot with resultant poor function; and (4) functional loss resulting from prolonged medical care and hospitalization. The best functional amputation in a child is a modification of the Syme amputation, which retains the distal tibial epiphysis and results in a longer stump. Posteromedial bowing is a congenital bowing of the tibia (with the apex directed posterior and medially) and a calcaneovalgus foot deformity. Both of these deformities tend to resolve so that there is little clinical disability, but a leg length inequality common develops and often requires treatment. Fibular hemimelia is the most frequently occurring congenital deficiency of the long bones. Primary treatment options include Syme or Boyd amputation with early prosthetic fitting versus tibial lengthening. Numerous studies document the success of both early amputation and lengthening techniques. The decision regarding which treatment to implement is very difficult. Frequently, the parents are not comfortable with an amputation; conversely, lengthening often requires multiple procedures and a long treatment course. We studied 30 limbs in 25 patients treated with either an amputation or lengthening procedure, 15 patients underwent amputation and 10 lengthening. We found that the group that underwent amputation were able to perform more activities, had less pain, were more satisfied and had a lower complication rate (0.26 vs.1.9), despite the fact that those undergoing lengthening typically achieved their goals and were active. As expected, patients who underwent amputation had fewer procedures (1.9 vs. 7.0), at a lower cost ($7,016 vs. $26,900) than those who had a lengthening.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Tibial Hemimelia is absence of all or part of the tibia, with an associated hypoplastic femur, and proximal dislocation of fibular head, 30% percent of cases are bilateral. It is uncommon with an incidence is 1 in 1 million. Unlike fibular hemimelia, it has a familial inheritance. It presents with a shortened extremity and a supinated foot, the knee joint may be unstable and contracted in flexion (it is important to determine whether the knee joint and the quadriceps are functional. Importantly, there are associated anomalies in about ¾ of patients, these include: DDH occurs in 20%; and lobster hand. Treatment options depend on a functioning quadricpts mechanism, if this does not exist than a through knee amputation is recommened, centralization of fibula (is no longer recommended). If there is a good quadriceps mechanism the synostosis of the tibia to the fibula (one bone leg) with either a Syme amputation or lengthening can be considered.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

References 1. Dobbs MB, Rich MM, Gordon JE, Szymanski DA, Schoenecker PL: Use of an intramedullary rod for the treatment of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia: Surgical technique. J Bone Joint Surg Am 2005; 87: 33-40. 2. Richards BS, Welch RD, Shrader MW, , et al: Use of rhBMP-2 in congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America, Ottawa, Ontario. May 12-15, 2005. 3. Vander Have KL, Hensigner RN, Caird M, Johnston C, Farley FA. Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2008 apr;16(4): 228-36. 4. McCarthy JJ, Glancy GL, Chang FM, Eilert RE: Fibular hemimelia: comparison of outcome measurements after amputation and lengthening. J Bone Joint Surg Am 82:1732-1735, 2000

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

PATELLAR DISLOCATION IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

James Hui. Singapur. The patellofemoral joint relies on muscular, ligamentous and bony support for normal stability and function. The medial patellofemoral ligament is the major medial ligamentous stabilizer of the patellar. The patellotibial and patellomeniscal ligament complex plays an important secondary role in restraining lateral patellar displacement. Lateral dislocations commonly occur and are often due to simultaneous rotational force with contraction of the quadriceps. Factors which increase susceptibility to dislocation can be divided into bony, muscular or a combination of both. The majority of children with dislocation will show radiological evidence of patellofemoral dysplasia. Congenital abnormality in the uninjured knee may predict a worse prognosis. Patellar dislocations can be broadly classified into congenital, which is usually rare, and acquired (traumatic), which is commonly sports related. Congenital dislocation of the patellar can be persistent, obligatory or habitual type. Acute traumatic patella dislocation is a typical mechanism of a twisting injury to the knee. With recurrent subluxation, the intensity of pain and swelling is less than at the time of the initial injury. Quadriceps wasting is common and the patellar apprehension test is positive. The role of imaging the knee after an acute patellar dislocation serves important functions in assisting management. Types of imaging include plain, true lateral, Merchant view radiographs and dynamic CT. Conservative methods should be used when possible, with control of pain and swelling, physiotherapy and functional retraining in acute dislocation. Various surgical procedures for recurrent dislocations have been described such as lateral retinacular release and distal or proximal realignment of the extensor mechanism. Factors such as the patient's age, functional needs, extent of malalignment and joint condition are important aspects to be considered prior to operative intervention.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

LA RODILLA DOLOROSA EN LA INFANCIA Y ADOLESCENCIA

J. de Pablos Hospital de Navarra y Hospital San Juan de Dios. Pamplona. Navarra

La rodilla es una localización relativamente frecuente de dolor musculoesquelético en el paciente esqueléticamente inmaduro. También hay un abanico amplio de condiciones patológicas que pueden producir este síntoma, por lo que es importante tenerlas en cuenta con el fin de poder realizar un diagnóstico diferencial eficaz. Por otro lado, éstas puede asentarse en la propia rodilla o en otras localizaciones y generar en la rodilla los llamados dolores referidos. En esta presentación trataremos de los trastornos cuya manifestación "princeps" es el dolor y pasaremos más por encima otros problemas como tumores, artritis séptica y traumatismos agudos donde, aunque también producen dolor, el diagnóstico se basa también en otros signos y manifestaciones tan importantes o más que aquel y, por otro lado, debido a su importancia deben ser contemplados en otros capítulos monográficos. TRASTORNOS ORTOPÉDICOS 1. Osteomielitis Hematógena Subaguda (OHS). Al contrario de otros trastornos infecciosos agudos, como la artritis séptica o la osteomielitis hematógena aguda, que presentan una cohorte de signos y síntomas de aparición brusca y , en muchas ocasiones, muy alarmante, los pacientes que presentan OHS presentan generalmente una clínica insidiosa de dolor, cojera e inflamación moderada, con un trastorno funcional de poca importancia. La OHS se desarrolla generalmente en niños pequeños (a partir de 3-4 años) como resultado de un aumento de las resistencias del hospedador (mal llamado huesped) concomitante con una disminución de la virulencia bacteriana que hace que la infección se desarrolle de una manera lenta y con expresión clínica insidiosa (16). Las pruebas de laboratorio son habitualmente negativas y la radiología convencional, sobre todo al inicio, puede ser negativa. Una vez desarrollado el cuadro, es común observar una imagen osteolítica epifisaria que en la TAC es más obvia y que se rodea de un halo esclerótico bien delimitado. No obstante, no es infrecuente apreciar signos radiológicos de agresividad (p. ej. rotura de la cortical) que pueden llegar a ser preocupantes aunque siempre predominan los rasgos de benignidad de la lesión. Con la RM se aprecia generalmente una imagen menos específica con una flogosis medular intensa rodeando a la lesión primaria. Nuestra recomendación ante esta lesión es realizar una punción-aspiración de la lesión y obtención de material para citología y microbiología a pesar de que los resultados, en nuestros casos, han sido casi siempre inconcluyentes . Esta, y la benignidad del pronóstico, ha hecho que algunos autores no estime necesario ni la biopsia, ni, por supuesto el desbridamiento quirúrgico más que en los excepcionales casos recalcitrantes (6).

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Como decimos, a pesar de lo alarmante en ocasiones, de las imágenes de TAC (benignidad "agresiva"), la evolución, es como regla, benigna y la lesión tiende autolimitarse y desaparecer espontáneamente. La recomendación terapéutica más consensuada es la antibioterapia oral de amplio expectro por 6 semanas con lo que generalmente los síntomas, así como la imagen radiológica, remiten sin secuelas (16). Nosotros, aunque por seguir una pauta, digamos, ortodoxa también recomendamos esta actitud terapeútica, tenemos que decir que, en algún caso en que no se ha llegado a un diagnóstico inicial de OHS y por tanto no se ha instaurado antibioterapia, hemos observado remisión espontánea del proceso tanto en rodilla como en otras localizaciones, también sin dejar ningún tipo de secuelas. 2. Menisco Discoideo El menisco discoideo (MD) es una malformación frecuente, que fue descrita inicialmente por Young en 1889, y consiste en la existencia de un menisco en forma de pastilla o disco en vez de la forma semilunar habitual. Afecta, sobre todo, al menisco externo y suele ser bilateral, siendo el menisco interno discoideo un hallazgo excepcional. Watanabe (29) realizó una clasificación, ya clásica, del menisco discoideo en tres tipos: completo, incompleto y tipo Wrisberg. Los dos primeros son meniscos con inserciones normales, por lo tanto estables, y cuya única alteración es la forma en "galleta" más o menos completa. El tercer tipo de MD carece de inserción posterior al platillo tibial y, posteriormente, queda sujeto únicamente por el ligamento menisco-condilar (ligamento de Wrisberg). El MD de Wrisberg, por tanto, es inestable lo que hace que se produzcan permanentes pellizcamientos del menisco y éste adquiera una forma irregular, hialinizada y engrosada. El MD tipo Wrisberg es casi siempre sintomático, mientras que los dos primeros tipos habitualmente no lo son, y solo cuando se rompe ­generalmente en la edad adulta- aparecen los síntomas. Por tanto, cuando en un niño/a joven (6-8 años) se empiezan a producir resaltes de importancia progresiva con molestia o dolor concomitante en la cara externa y posterior de la rodilla hay que descartar la existencia de un MD tipo Wrisberg en el diagnóstico diferencial. Cuando un MD completo o incompleto se rompe, la clínica es de dolor progresivo selectivo en interlínea externa, a veces asociado a quiste meniscal externo y, más raramente, puede acompañarse de bloqueo articular pero, como decimos esto ocurre casi siempre en la edad adulta. El tratamiento del MD depende de la edad y la sintomatología del paciente. En los casos asintomáticos la abstención es la actitud más recomendable (1). Si la sintomatología es leve o moderada y, sobre todo, si el paciente es muy joven (<10 a.), se debe iniciar un tratamiento conservador, aunque si, por el contrario, los resaltes producen dolor importante o los bloqueos son frecuentes, se recomienda la meniscectomía parcial artroscópica tratando de dar la forma semilunar al menisco lesionado (5, 7). Un aspecto técnico importante, en estos casos, es dejar un remanente meniscal suficiente en la zona del hiato popliteo para evitar roturas ulteriores a dicho nivel. De hecho, la rotura del hiato popliteo conduciría a la necesidad de completar la meniscectomía lo cual como hemos mencionado no es deseable, sobre todo en niños. La meniscectomía completa, insistimos, debe evitarse en lo posible para que no se produzcan artrosis prematuras que, en la serie de Washington y cols (28), llegan a producirse en el 50% de los casos. De todos modos, en los MD tipo Wrisberg, a veces no hay otra solución que la resección completa debido a la forma tan alterada que puede llegar a tener, así como a la importante limitación que pueden producir incluso en edades tempranas. En estos casos se puede considerar la meniscectomía parcial artroscópica asociada a la estabilización posterior

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

mediante artrotomía, aunque los resultados de esta última intervención no han sido, en nuestra opinión, todavía suficientemente contrastados. 3. Osteocondritis Disecante La osteocondritis disecante de la rodilla (ODR) es una lesión, en la que un segmento del hueso subcondral sufre una isquemia transitoria y consecuente necrosis pudiendo llegar a despegarse del resto del hueso epifisario. Con el tiempo, el cartílago articular adyacente puede también fallar, llegando, entonces, a desprenderse un fragmento osteocondral al espacio articular (cuerpo libre o "ratón articular"). La articulación más frecuentemente afectada es la rodilla (ODR)pero también el codo, la cadera y el tobillo pueden ser asiento de esta lesión. Quien primero describió cuerpos libres en una rodilla fue Ambroise Paré en 1558. En 1870, sir James Paget se refirió a la necrosis aséptica como la base patológica sobre la que se forman dichos cuerpos libres. Sin embargo, el nombre "Osteocondritis Dissecans" (Osteocondritis Disecante) se debe a F. König (9) en un artículo publicado en 1887. La ODR, en un 20-30%, tiene una presentación bilateral y se da más frecuentemente en varones que en mujeres (relación 3-4/1). Como veremos, el rango de edad de aparición de la ODR es amplio pero podemos decir que es infrecuente en niños menores de 8-10 años y más frecuente en adolescentes y, sobre todo, en adultos jóvenes. Etiología/patogenia. Se han barajado múltiples teorías patogénicas pero ninguna ha logrado un consenso general. La etiología traumática (sobre todo asociada a "fatiga" por trauma repetido) parece gozar de más predicamento aunque también el factor hereditario se ha relacionado con la aparición de ODR, fundamentalmente por la frecuencia con que esta lesión se asocia a lesiones múltiples (30%) y a baja talla (13%) (12). Sea cual sea la etiología, la isquemia podría ser la base patogénica común y su resolución antes o después explicaría las diferencias en cuanto a la evolución de la ODR. Clasificación. Se han propuesto diversas clasificaciones en función de otros tantos factores pero las más populares se han realizado basadas en la edad, integridad condral, estabilidad ósea y localización de la lesión. En lo referente a la edad, la ODR puede dividirse en Juvenil y del Adulto dependiendo de si el paciente es esqueléticamente inmaduro o ya maduro. En cuanto a la integridad del cartílago articular, la ODR puede ser Cerrada o Abierta dependiendo de que el cartílago esté en continuidad o no, y en cuanto a la estabilidad ósea ésta puede ser Estable o Inestable dependiendo de que haya nexo de unión entre el hueso subcondral afectado y el lecho de la lesión. Un cuerpo libre, por ejemplo, sería una lesión abierta e inestable (22). En lo referente a la localización de la ODR, la mayoría (70%) asientan en el cóndilo interno y después le siguen el cóndilo externo (20%) y la patela (10%) (4). Clínica. Los síntomas son variables y dependen sobre todo del tiempo de evolución desde el diagnóstico a la primera consulta. En un inicio, la sintomatología es poco definida siendo el dolor y la inflamación variables, pudiendo además aparecer en reposo o solo con la actividad (19). Los bloqueos son raros y se producen en caso de que haya cuerpos libres desprendidos de la lesión. La palpación pude ser dolorosa en el lugar de la lesión pero, por regla general, este signo es difícil de obtener.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Para las lesiones localizadas en el "asiento clásico" (cara externa del cóndilo interno), el signo de Wilson (32) puede ser de ayuda: con la rodilla en 30º de flexión, al rotar internamente la tibia, se provoca dolor ya que la lesión osteocondrítica se comprime de esa manera contra la espina tibial y el Ligamento Cruzado Anterior. Diagnóstico por imagen. Generalmente la lesión es detectable en radiología convencional AP, L y axial de rótula. En ocasiones es útil la proyección de Fick (proyección desenfilada de túnel intercondíleo) pero por nuestra experiencia lo es más en adultos que en niños. La imagen típica de lesión osteocondral rodeada de un halo de mayor o menor esclerosis en el cóndilo interno nos da el diagnóstico en la mayoría de los casos. Un hallazgo frecuente es una imagen de refuerzo (esclerosis) en la meseta tibial interna en espejo a la lesión femoral. La Resonancia Magnética nos puede ayudar en los casos poco frecuentes de diagnóstico difícil por radiología convencional. La R M, sin embargo, tiene su mayor utilidad en la valoración de la lesión, sobre todo en dos aspectos: la integridad del cartílago articular y la disección (separación) del fragmento osteocondral de su lecho epifisario. Diagnóstico diferencial. Es muy importante, sobre todo de cara a evitar errores en el tratamiento, diferenciar la ODR de los llamados defectos de osificación epifisarios femorales distales o patelares. Estos se dan generalmente en niños pequeños (menores de 10 años), casi siempre son asintomáticos y con frecuencia se asientan en zonas "atípicas" para una ODR. Además, como su nombre indica los defectos de osificación, al contrario de la ODR, se presentan como lesiones "vacías" o semivacías en las distintas pruebas diagnósticas por imagen. Historia natural y pronóstico. La historia natural de la ODR depende en gran medida del estado de madurez esquelética del paciente (17). Mientras la fisis está abierta (ODR juvenil) y la lesión es cerrada y estable el pronóstico es muy favorable (10). Al contrario ocurre en la ODR del adulto joven sobre todo si el cartílago articular no está íntegro. Esta diferencia viene dada lógicamente por la menor capacidad de regeneración tisular en el adulto comparada con los adolescentes. De hecho, en nuestra experiencia, las ODR en pacientes con 2 o más años de crecimiento remanente son de buen pronóstico con solo tratamiento conservador en la gran mayoría de los casos. Otros factores asociados con peor pronóstico en la ODR son: la aparición de signos de disección del fragmento osteocondrítico, la localización "atípica" de la lesión y la disminución del flujo sanguíneo en el fragmento osteocondral afecto (3, 8, 11). Tratamiento. El tratamiento lo basamos inicialmente en la historia natural de la ODR en cada caso. Los casos de ODR en niños de menos de 10-12 años son de buen pronóstico sin tratamiento por lo que, en principio, se deben dejar a su libre evolución. En los casos sintomáticos, además de la edad, el grado de inestabilidad y la integridad de la superficie articular son factores que debemos valorar (esto a veces solo es posible con RM previa) de cara a indicar un tratamiento quirúrgico. - Las lesiones sintomáticas sin solución de continuidad en el cartílago articular son tratadas con frecuencia mediante perforaciones con broca o aguja de Kirschner de 2 mm (2). De todos modos no hay evidencia de que este gesto sea realmente eficaz por lo que también puede ser razonable un tratamiento conservador manteniendo la movilidad articular y protegiendo al menos parcialmente la carga. - Cuando se aprecian signos de desprendimiento (inestabilidad) sin desplazamiento del fragmento debemos intentar fijarlo al hueso subyacente para lo que disponemos de una amplia variedad de métodos dentro de los que

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

nosotros preferimos los tornillos de Herbert que brindan una gran estabilidad y que dejamos enterrados en el cartílago articular. - Si el fragmento osteocondrítico se ha desplazado intentamos reponerlo y fijarlo siempre que sea posible pero, sin embargo, si el fragmento es muy pequeño o está fragmentado, lleva mucho tiempo desprendido o es fundamentalmente cartilaginoso, a veces, es más práctico y efectivo hacer un desbridamiento de la zona y realizar unas perforaciones tratando de reavivar el lecho de la lesión después de haber extirpado el fragmento o los fragmentos osteocondrales. - "Mosaicoplastia". Los autotrasplantes cartilaginosos desde zonas de poca carga a la zona de la lesión son prometedores pero todavía carecemos de evidencia de que esta operación sea de elección, sobre todo en niños. De hecho, en artroscopias o RM de seguimiento en pacientes inmaduros, hemos llegado a observar recubrimiento hialino de lechos de fracturas osteocondrales que habían sido tratadas con el sólo refrescamiento del mencionado lecho de la lesión. Esto nos hace pensar que bien podría ocurrir algo similar tras las perforaciones del lecho de ODR sin necesidad de recurrir a la mosaicoplastia. Todas las operaciones mencionadas en este apartado pueden realizarse mediante cirugía convencional o artroscópica pero nosotros recomendamos siempre que sea posible esta última ya que consideramos que goza de unas claras ventajas con respecto a la cirugía abierta, sobre todo en lo referente a invasividad y recuperación postoperatoria. Como mensaje final en este apartado diremos que el viejo axioma de "tratar al enfermo, no a su radiografía" es vital en la ODR juvenil. De esta manera, basándonos en el diagnóstico diferencial y la historia natural de este proceso, será más fácil evitar caer en actitudes agresivas innecesarias (sobretratamiento). 4. Apofisitis y tendinitis Junto con la ODR, las apofisitis constituyen la más frecuente causa de dolor en la rodilla entre los 10 años y la madurez esquelética. En este apartado incluimos dos procesos que son las (mal llamadas) enfermedades de Osgood Schlatter y Sinding Larsen-Johanson y otros mucho menos frecuentes en niños como son las entesopatías y tendinitis. Todos ellos tienen en común el estar producidos por una mayor o menor sobrecarga del aparto extensor de la rodilla. A.- Proceso de Osgood-Schlatter (POS) Este trastorno, eminentemente productor de dolor en la región de la tuberosidad tibial anterior (TTA), adquiere su denominación tras su descripción (separada pero casi simultánea) en 1903 por los cirujanos Osgood (USA) (15) y Schlatter (Alemania) (20). No obstante, como en tantos otros trastornos musculoesqueléticos, Sir James Paget ya se había referido a ella en 1891. Concepto: El proceso consiste en una lesión debida a un trauma tensional submáximo repetitivo sobre la TTA inmadura que produce un desprendimiento lento (subagudo) y, en ocasiones, fragmentación de dicha estructura con respecto a la metáfisis tibial proximal (14). Se trata de un proceso autolimitado que, por definición, no dura más allá de la madurez esquelética en que desaparecen las fisis de los huesos largos. Aunque se ha barajado múltiples agentes etiológicos parece que todo apunta al trauma repetitivo referido como causante del POS. Se podría comparar, por tanto, con las conocidas fracturas fisarias de sobrecarga ("stress") de otras localizaciones

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

(muñecas, pelvis, etc) generalmente asociadas a excesos en entrenamiento deportivo. Clínica: El paciente tipo es un varón pre-adolescente o adolescente generalmente deportista, que presenta dolor intermitente que apenas interfiere con la vida normal pero sí lo hace con la práctica deportiva (sobre todo fútbol en nuestro entorno). El POS es bilateral aproximadamente en un 20-25% de los casos. El examen clínico es muy clarificador ya que casi siempre hay un dolor selectivo a la palpación de la TTA y una patente inflamación local en esa misma zona. Diagnóstico por imagen. Junto con la clínica, la radiología convencional nos da la clave del diagnóstico en la gran mayoría de los casos. En los primeros meses se pueden apreciar distintos grados de separación/fragmentación de la TTA y conforme avanza el grado de madurez del individuo se observa, en mayoría de los casos, una fusión progresiva de la TTA al resto de la metáfisis proximal tibial quedando finalmente, o una situación normal o una simple protusión de dicha TTA. Sólo en un pequeño porcentaje de casos, la TTA no se fusiona con el resto de la tibia, quedando como secuela un, llamado, "osículo" en ese lugar que en la mayoría de los casos es asintomático. La RM no añade mayor información sobre todo en cuando al diagnóstico. Nos ha ayudado, sin embargo, a entender mejor lo que sucede en el POS (lesión por tracción) ya que con ella hemos podido apreciar la íntima relación que hay entre el tendón rotuliano y el hueso avulsionado/fragmentado de la TTA. Tratamiento: Quizá la parte más dificil del tratamiento del POS es la labor de convencimiento hacia el paciente y su familia de la benignidad de lo que le sucede ya que con frecuencia vienen a la consulta alarmados por la aparatosidad del dolor y la tumefacción que presenta el niño en su rodilla. Salvo situaciones excepcionales, que comentaremos, el tratamiento es siempre conservador. En la fase aguda, recomendamos al paciente interrumpir la práctica deportiva durante unas semanas, aplicarse frío local dos o tres veces al día y, si fuera necesario, tomar Acido Acetil Salicílico o Ibuprofeno hasta mejorar el cuadro clínico. También, en ocasiones, se recomienda fisioterapia con el fin de mejorar sobre todo la inflamación. Una vez que la sintomatología ha cedido de manera estable, se insta al paciente a reiniciar la práctica deportiva de manera progresiva y, según el deporte, con protección de la TTA mediante rodilleras almohadilladas. Evolución: La historia natural del POS es la de un proceso autolimitado con resolución espontánea normalmente en 18-24 meses o al llegar a la madurez. Por esto es importante informar al paciente/familia que a pesar de una mejoría notable, en el cuadro clínico, durante estos meses, son frecuentes las recidivas que debemos tratar de modo similar al mencionado en la fase aguda. Por definición este es un proceso que desaparece con la madurez esquelética y las únicas secuelas que pueden quedar son una protusión de la TTA y, más raramente, un fragmento de la TTA ("osículo") que no llegó a fusionarse con el resto de la tibia. Ambas secuelas suelen ser asintomáticas, pero en raras ocasiones, el osículo no fusionado puede producir dolor y obligarnos a extirparlo quirúrgicamente. B.- Proceso de Sinding-Larsen ­Johansson (PSLS) Descrito en 1921 (21) por dos cirujanos nórdicos (no tres) casi simultáneamente: M.F. Sinding-Larsen (Dinamarca) y S. Johansson (Suecia). Se trata de un proceso similar al POS y de la misma causa pero localizado en el polo inferior rotuliano (PIR) en vez de en la TTA. También se da en varones deportistas en la época previa a la madurez esquelética. En la exploración se aprecia un dolor agudo y selectivo a la palpación del polo

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

inferior rotuliano y ,en la radiografía convencional, se puede observar separación/fragmentación del PIR con respecto al resto de la patela. La historia natural es asimismo benigna con tendencia a la resolución espontánea sin secuelas en 18-24 meses. Por ello, el tratamiento deber ser conservador y enfocado principalmente a evitar el mecanismo de tracción repetitiva que presumiblemente es el causante del PSLS. Las recaídas son posibles y el paciente debe estar informado de ello. C. Entensopatías y tendinitis. El PSLJ tiene su equivalente en los adultos jóvenes en la "rodilla del saltador" ("Jumper's Knee") que, como es sabido también es un síndrome de sobreuso del aparato extensor de la rodilla. Tanto este problema como las tendinitis del aparato extensor y entesopatías en la TTA son ya más propios del paciente maduro y son debidos a programas de entrenamiento y competición deportiva demasiado intensos y agresivos. El protocolo de tratamiento incluiría cinco pasos: identificación del factor de sobrecarga, modificación del mismo, control del dolor tras el diagnóstico, fisioterapia y reincorporación progresiva (con fisioterapia de mantenimiento) para evitar recidivas (24). 5. Dolor anterior de la rodilla del adolescente. (DARA). Este, sin lugar a dudas, constituye uno de los problemas de más difícil estudio y resolución de la Ortopedia Infantil y, más que por su gravedad, lo es por lo difícil que es en un muchas ocasiones conseguir la revisión del cuadro clínico del/la paciente. El paciente suele referir un dolor sordo, limitante y prácticamente continuo en la parte anterior de la rodilla sin poder determinar un punto concreto. De hecho es frecuente que si se le pide que localice el dolor, el paciente cubre con su mano toda la cara anterior de la rodilla ("grab sign" o signo de agarrarse) (24) Lo que más nos debe importar al valorar un adolescente con este tipo de dolor es identificar la causa, cuestión que, como veremos, en un buen porcentaje de casos quedará sin resolver (DARA idiopático). El diagnóstico diferencial del DARA incluye: apofisitis y tendinitis del aparato extensor (ya comentado), plica sinovial patológica, inestabilidad patelar, rótula bi- o multipartita, osteocondritis disecante patelar (ODP) y la algodistrofia simpatica refleja ASR. Plica Sinovial Patológica (PSP) Las plicas son pliegues sinoviales que existen normalmente en los fondos de saco y recesos laterales de la rodilla. Debido generalmente a traumatismos directos o indirectos se puede producir hemorragias dentro de la plica, hialinización y fibrosis, convirtiendo dicha plica en patológica (es decir, no normal). Estas plicas patológicas, generalmente localizadas en la región paratatelar interna pueden producir resaltes dolorosos a la flexoextensión de la rodilla sobre todo en grados intermedios de flexión (40º-60º). Si la etiología es un problema de sobrecarga (por ej. en los entrenamientos deportivos) de nuevo lo más importante es modificar la actividad que la ha causado. En los casos más recalcitrantes puede llegar a ser necesaria la resección artroscópica de la plica patológica, procedimiento relativamente incruento y muy efectivo en la mayoría de las ocasiones. Hay que evitar resecar plicas normales indiscriminadamente. Inestabilidad patelar. Bajo esta denominación se incluye un amplio espectro de trastornos femoro-patelares de los que nos interesan fundamentalmente los que producen dolor con menor inestabilidad o desplazamiento patelar, es decir, el síndrome

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

de hiperpreción patelar externa (SHPE) (26). Los grados mayores de inestabilidad (luxación recidivante, habitual y permanente) quedan fuera de los objetivos de este capítulo por producir más inestabilidad que dolor y constituir "per se" un capítulo aparte.. La mayoría de pacientes con SHPE se presentan en la consulta con dolor en la región parapatelar externa sin signos de inestabilidad. En la exploración, tanto la palpación del alerón rotuliano externo como la presión sobre la carilla lateral de la rótula contra el cóndilo externo pueden resultar dolorosas. El ángulo "Q" puede no ser normal pero en nuestra opinión ésta es una exploración clínica y proclive a proporcionar datos falseados que pueden dar lugar a confusión por lo que nosotros no la usamos. El signo de aprensión al desplazar la rótula hacia externo puede ser positivo aunque, repetimos, aquí el problema no es tanto de inestabilidad como de encarrilado defectuoso de la rótula en la tróclea femoral("maltracking"). En la radiografía puede apreciarse un cierto grado de báscula externa y, a veces lateralización de la rótula, pero esto es valorable sobre todo en los cortes axiales tanto de TAC como de RM. Estos pacientes suelen responder bien a un programa de fisioterapia tendente a fortalecer la musculatura extensora de la rodilla, evitando sobrecarga de la articulación femoro-patelar. En los casos muy refractarios al tratamiento conservador, la sección (artroscópica o abierta) del alerón rotuliano externo proporciona en general buenos resultados. No obstante hay que señalar que este es quizá una de las intervenciones con mayor índice de complicaciones (sobre todo hemartros) por lo que se aconseja el mayor cuidado en la indicación y ejecución técnica de esta operación. Rótula bi o multipartita Excepcionalmente, la falta de unión de uno (rótula bipartita) o varios (rótula multipartita) de los núcleos secundarios de osificación, producen dolor en el paciente inmaduro. Estos son, por tanto, en su mayoría hallazgos casuales en radiografías de rodilla practicadas a estos pacientes por otros motivos. Saupe (18) realizó una clasificación dependiendo de la localización del fragmento: Tipo I (fragmento inferior), tipo II (fragmento lateral) y tipo III (fragmento supero-lateral). Lo más común es que el núcleo no fusionado sea externo (20% del total) o superoexterno (75%) y, como decimos, el paciente no suele presentar síntomas localizados en ese punto. En la radiología simple, la localización mencionada y los bordes redondeados del núcleo de osificación secundario nos dan el diagnóstico. Un trauma directo sobre la rótula bipartita puede producir separación de los fragmentos y, como consecuencia, dolor en la zona. El diagnóstico diferencial no es difícil y debe realizarse con fractura patelar aguda y con el proceso de Sinding-Larsen ­ Johansson en el caso de fragmento polar inferior. El tratamiento deber ser siempre conservador mediante simples controles periódicos. En caso de trauma agudo, unas 4 semanas de inmovilización relativa bastarán. En el adulto puede quedar como secuela una molestia/dolor que puede incluso a obligarnos a resecar el núcleo secundario no fusionado pero, éstos, son casos excepcionales. Osteocondritis disecante patelar (ODP) La patela es asiento de una osteocondritis disecante en raras ocasiones (10% del total de OD) y puede producir síntomas como dolor anterior e incluso resaltes, pseudobloqueos e incluso derrames articulares. La radiografía (fragmento generalmente localizado es polo inferior) y otros estudios como RM sobre todo

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

nos darán la clave diagnóstica, de localización y de la actitud terapéutica basados en tamaño, grado de disección y estado del cartílago articular. El diagnóstico diferencial debe realizarse con el defecto dorsal patelar que al contrario que la ODP, no produce o produce muy poco dolor y no da problemas de disección de fragmento osteocondral. El tratamiento de la ODP está basado en los puntos ya comentados en el apartado correspondiente (ODR). Distrofia Simpático Refleja (DSR) Este proceso, casi exclusivo de los adultos, es raro pero se da en los pacientes inmaduros. La clínica consiste en dolor desproporcionado, flogosis articular con o sin hidrops y gran dolor a la palpación en prácticamente todos los puntos de la rodilla afecta. La radiología, sobre todo en casos floridos, nos muestra una atrofia ósea (porosis) difusa con halos de osteolisis subcondral y zonas de leve condensación en zonas epifisarias más centrales que le dan ese aspecto en "copos de algodón" característico. Es, creemos, muy importante conocer el hecho que un elevado porcentaje de estos casos presentan una historia de problemas familiares y fracaso escolar notables. La historia natural es hacia la resolución espontánea en un número variable de meses (hasta un año aproximadamente) y se puede tratar de acelerar la mejoría mediante la fisioterapia, AINE's y el ánimo por nuestra parte a que el paciente utilice la extremidad afecta. En los casos en que sea necesario, la ayuda psicológica puede ser de crucial importancia. El pronóstico, en líneas generales es mejor que en los adultos (24, 31). DARA Idiopático Podemos etiquetar de esta manera a los dolores anteriores de rodilla del adolescente en que hemos descartado las causas mencionadas arriba y no encontramos anomalías ni en la exploración, ni en las pruebas de imagen que lo justifiquen. A pesar de las múltiples teorías etiopatogénicas (neuropatías retinaculares, mínimos desplazamientos femoropatelares). La causa y el mecanismo de este tipo de dolor son desconocidos por el momento (23). El término Condromalacia Patelar que clásicamente hacía referencia a un ablandamiento del cartílago articular que se podía apreciar en cirugías en autopsias, altamente se emplea como concepto clínico para justificar, sobre todo ante el paciente, estos dolores es difícil explicación. Dado que estos trastornos anatomopatológicos no son demostrables en la mayoría de estos pacientes, estamos de acuerdo con otros autores (23) en que hay que tratar de evitar este término en estos casos. Precisamente por la ausencia de hallazgos patológicos, en estos pacientes el tratamiento es muy empírico y dirigido a corregir los síntomas. En la gran mayoría de los casos, con un manejo conservador que va desde el nihilismo hasta tratamiento fisioterápico, terapia de contraste frio-calor, rodilleras, plantillas y AINE's se puede apreciar mejoría o desaparición de los síntomas (13). Evidentemente aquí no puede descartarse el efecto placebo de varios o todos estos tratamientos. El DARA idiopático puede generar la tentación en el cirujano de usar la artroscopia ante la ausencia de hallazgos con otros medios. En nuestra opinión, la artroscopia diagnóstica no solo está prácticamente siempre contraindicada (debemos ir a la cirugía con un diagnóstico previo al menos presunción) sino que sabemos que la cirugía artroscópica patelofemoral presenta el mayor índice de complicaciones de todos los procedimientos artroscópicos (25). Por todo ello, recomendamos evitar la cirugía artroscópica en el DARA a no ser que tengamos un objetivo terapéutico concreto "a priori", lo cual conlleva al diagnóstico previo mencionado. Una vez que estamos convencidos de que todas las causas que conocemos de DARA han quedado descartadas y nuestro diagnóstico es DARA idiopático, una labor muy

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

importante del médico es educar al paciente y la familia sobre la benignidad de su cuadro, la innecesidad de tomar actitudes terapéuticas agresivas para mejorar el cuadro y la confianza de que este proceso no es el principio de una grave degeneración articular de la rodilla. Finalmente, es necesario mencionar que, subyacente al DARA idiopático, puede haber problemas psicológicos (familiares, autoestima, rendimiento deportivo en competición, aversión a la educación física, etc.), que expliquen el cuadro y nos dirijan en cuanto a la actitud terapéutica. 7) DOLOR CRÓNICO POST-TRAUMÁTICO Además del trauma agudo que también produce dolor pero, por razones obvias, debe ser tratado en otros capítulos, el niño y, sobre todo, adolescentes puede presentar dolor crónico postraumático. Las principales causas son, los desarreglos internos (antiguas fracturas osteocondrales, meniscopatías, etc.) y la rodilla inestable que, generalmente acaba generando lesiones condrales y meniscales secundarias. En estos casos la clave de un manejo acertado es llegar al diagnóstico correcto. Con las fracturas osteocondrales antiguas suele bastar con la exéresis del cuerpo libre (si lo hay) ya que el lecho con frecuencia está cubierto de fibrocartílago y las meniscopatías son fácilmente tratadas con reparación o resección selectiva de la zona meniscal lesionadas. En cuanto a la inestabilidad, sobre todo si ésta está generando clínica de dolor, inseguridad o desarreglos internos osteocondrales/meniscales, es importante corregirla mediante las técnicas (nosotros recomendamos las artroscópicas) actualmente en uso. Otra causa de dolor post-traumático , ahora que cada vez se hacen más reconstrucciones ligamentosas, es la cicatrización exuberante de la plastia de ligamento cruzado anterior (Síndrome del Cíclope). Esto hace que se produzca un conflicto de espacio en el surco intercondíleo que produce una imposibilidad, con dolor, para conseguir la extensión completa de la rodilla. El tratamiento con resección artroscópica de la cicatriz "sobrante" suele conseguir excelentes resultados. 8) OTROS DOLORES DE RODILLA Aquí incluimos dolores de la rodilla cuyo origen o localización es otro y dolores de causa oscura. 1. Dolor referido Es tan común el hecho de que una lesión en la cadera duela en la rodilla que hay autores que afirman que "el dolor de rodilla es dolor de cadera en tanto no se demuestre lo contrario" (23). Independientemente de que esta aseveración sea más o menos exagerada, sí que es cierto que no pocos problemas de cadera comienzan doliendo en la rodilla. Por ello, ante cualquier paciente con este síntoma, la exploración y, si es necesario, estudio radiológico de la cadera es, en nuestra opinión, obligado. Dependiendo de la edad, las enfermedades de cadera que debemos descartar son, principalmente la enfermedad de Perthes entre 4 y 8 años aproximadamente y la epifisiolisis no traumática de cadera en adolescentes. La sinovitis transitoria de la cadera también puede generar dolor en la rodilla pero, en nuestra experiencia, el dolor en ingle y la cojera son dominantes y, además, la habitual evolución satisfactoria en pocos días es tranquilizadora. Otra localización que, en ocasiones produce dolores referidos a la rodilla en la diáfisis femoral. En niños pequeños, que comienzan a cojear y se refieren a la rodilla hay que descartar problemas en esa localización como el granuloma eosinófilo (un estudio radiográfico simple bastaría) o, en chicos más mayores, el osteoma osteoide que, a

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

veces no es fácil de detectar incluso después de un adecuado estudio radiográfico (aquí el TAC y/o la gammagrafía isotópica son de gran utilidad). 2. Leucemia. La leucemia linfoblástica aguda es el tipo más frecuente de leucemia y su pico de incidencia se encuentra entre los 2 y 6 años de edad. Aproximadamente en un 20% de estos pacientes los síntomas iniciales afectan al aparato locomotor y, concretamente, un estudio reciente informa de que en un 12% de los niños con leucemia, ésta se manifiesta principalmente con una cojera (27). Tenemos que descartar este problema en niños con claudicación antálgica, fiebre de mayor o menor importancia, y, sobre todo si presenta linfadenopatías, hepatiesplenomegalia y alteraciones significativas en el hemograma (anemia, trombocitopenia, neutropenia, linfocitosis, etc.) o en el sedimento (células blásticas). Las radiografías pueden ser normales pero, ante la sospecha de leucemia, debemos buscar bandas metafisarias que constituyen signo radiológico más precoz en esta enfermedad. 3. Dolores de crecimiento Los dolores de crecimiento, también denominados "crecederas" en algún ambiente, constituyen un cuadro común en el niño cercano a los brotes de crecimiento en que el paciente se queja de dolores en las piernas ( no sólo en las rodillas) que es bilateral y que generalmente aumenta con la actividad y es de mayor intensidad por la noche (30). Ya el hecho de ser dolores bilaterales los diferencia de dolores más graves de otro origen como infecciones o tumores osteoarticulares. Las radiografías son normales y los análisis de sangre y orina lo son también por lo que los llamados "dolores de crecimiento" son un diagnóstico de "exclusión" después de descartar cualquier otro problema tanto desde el punto de vista clínico (bilateralidad, niño normal) como radiológico (Rx normales). También en este tipo de dolores puede haber un sustrato digamos emocional. No es infrecuente econtrarnos con el niño que "necesita" unos masajes en las piernas todas las noches por parte de uno de los padres para poder dormir. En ocasiones, cuando se investiga en este cuadro encontramos que más que otra cosa lo que ocurre es que el niño presenta una carencia afectiva que aflora mediante estos dolores. En ocasiones los AINE'S pueden ser útiles en mejorar el cuadro, así como la fisioterapia pero insistimos, siempre de manera empírica. Es importante tener siempre en cuenta que aunque esos dolores carezcan de importancia, no los debemos confundir con otros como los producidos por la leucemia que, aunque parecidos, conllevan un cuadro mucho más grave (30). 4. Artritis reumatoidea juvenil y otros problemas inflamatorios En la artritis pauciarticular juvenil (40-60% de todas las artritis reumatoideas juveniles) el paciente puede acudir a la consulta desde incluso los dos años de edad. Estos niños generalmente presentan una cojera con dolor moderado acompañada de inflamación y calor local en rodilla, tobillo o incluso articulación subtalar. Puede haber varias articularciones afectadas simultáneamente lo que nos dará una pista diagnóstica a partir de la cual investigar. Las niñas se afectan cuatro veces más que los niños en esta enfermedad. Las pruebas de laboratorio, incluidos los reactantes de fase aguda, pueden ser normales. Es frecuente la asociación de este problema con uveitis (20 %). Ante un cuadro en que quepa diagnóstico diferencial de artritis pauciarticular y, sobre todo, si hay uveitis asociada, el paciente debe ser enviado a una consulta de Reumatología infantil.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Finalmente, y digamos excepcionalmente, si el paciente tiene dolor en una o más articulaciones asociado con inflamación, eritema, "rash" cutáneo y síntomas sistémicos, debemos sospechar otros problemas inflamatorios como: fiebre reumática, enfermedad de Lyme, Lupus eritematoso o síndrome de Guillain-Barré. Estos son casos obviamente, no para ser tratados por los cirujanos ortopédicos, sino por la especialidad pediátrica correspondiente. 5. Problemas psicológicos Ya hemos mencionado algunos cuadros de dolor en la rodilla (DARA idiopático, dolores de crecimiento) que pueden tener un sustrato psicológico, al menos en parte. Esto no es nuevo. Sigmund Freud que vivió a caballo entre los siglos XIX y XX, ya llamó la atención sobre la relación entre trauma psicológico en la infancia y ulterior aparición de síntomas histéricos. Esta relación entre subconsciente y comportamiento es, según Freud, de vital importancia a la hora de entender que problemas familiares, excesiva exigencia en la competición deportiva o la aversión a la educación física pueden ser la causa fundamental de un dolor anterior de la rodilla del adolescente. Un cuadro, si no frecuente, si típico en los Servicios de Urgencias son los adolescentes (más chicas que chicos) con un bloqueo de rodilla sin causa aparente. En caso de hablar con la paciente y encontrar alguno de los problemas emocionales y afectivos mencionados y, sobre todo si el bloqueo es atípico, es probable que nos encontremos ante un bloqueo, llamado, histérico. Nos referimos a un bloqueo atípico p.ej. al bloqueo en extensión con imposibilidad para flexionar, cuando el típico es justo al contrario (posición de semiflexión con imposibilidad para extender). Evidentemente no hay que insistir en que nunca hay que etiquetar un dolor de rodilla en un niño de "psicológico" sin antes haber descartado, en la medida de nuestras posibilidades, cualquier causa orgánica. En el manejo de estos niños el mayor problema es conseguir la aceptación de la familia porque, entre otras cosas, eso supone aceptar que a veces el problema este precisamente en la propia familia. El problema de la rodilla del niño y adolescente más grave que suele tener un sustrato psicológico es la Algodistrofia Simpático Refleja (Enfermedad de Südeck) a la que ya nos hemos referido y que, aunque a veces lenta, suele presentar casi siempre una evolución satisfactoria con el apoyo psicológico, fisioterápico y familiar correspondiente.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

BIBLIOGRAFÍA 1. Aichroth PM, Patel DV y Marx CL: Congenital discoid lateral meniscus in children: A follo-up study and evolution of management. J Bone Joint Surg, 1991; 73 - B:932 - 939. 2. Bradley J, Dandy DJ. Results of drilling osteochondritis dissecans before skeletal maturity. J Bone Joint Surg 1989; 71B: 642-644 3. Crawford EJ, Emergy RJ, Aichroth PM. Stable osteochondritis dissecans: Does the lesion unite?. J Bone Joint Surg 1990;72B:320. 4. Desai SS, Patel MR, Michelli LJ. Osteochondritis dissecans of the patella. J Bone Joint Surg 1987;69B:320-325. 5. Fujikawa K, Iseki F y Mikura Y: Partial resection of the discoid meniscus in the child's knee. J Bone Joint Surg, 1981;63 - B: 391 - 395. 6. Handy RC, Lawton L, Carey T, Wiley J, Marton D: Subacute hematogenous osteomylitis are biopsy and surgery always indicated? J Pediatr Orthop 1996; 16: 220-223. 7. Hayashi LK, Yamaga H, Ida K y Miura T: Arthroscopic meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus in children. J Bone Joint Surg, 1988; 70 - A:1495 ­ 1500. 8. Hefti F. Osteochondritis dissecans. En: J. de Pablos, The Immature Knee, Masson, Barcelona 1998. 9. König F. Veber freie Körper in den Gelenken. Dtsch. Z Chir 1887; 27-90. 10. Linden B. Osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyles: A long-term follow up study. J Bone Joint Surg 1977;59ª:769-776 11. Litchman HM, Mc Cullough RW, Grandsman EJ. Computerized blood flow analysis for decision making in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans. J Pediatr Orthop 1988;8:208-212. 12. Mubarak SJ, Carroll NC. Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the knee: etiology. Clin Orthop 1981;157: 200-211. 13. Nimon G, Murray D, Sandow M, Goodfellow J: Natural history of anterior knee pain. A 14 to 20 year follow-up of nonoperative management. J Pediatr Orthop 1998; 18: 118-122. 14. Ogden JA, Southwick WO. Osgood-Schlatter's disease and tibial tuberosity development. Clin Orthop 1976; 116: 180-189. 15. Osgood RB. Union of the tibial tubercle occurring during adolescence. Boston Med Surg J 1903; 8: 114-117 16. Rasool MN. Primary subacute haematogeneous osteomyelitis in children. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2001; 83: 93-98. 17. Rodríguez EC, Gómez-Castresana F, Ortega M. Osteocondritis disecante de la rodilla. Revisión Ortopédica Traumatológica 2002;5:428-435 18. Saupe: Citado por Stanitski (10). 19. Schenck RC, Goodnight JM. Osteochondritis dissecans. J Bone Joint Surg 1996;78A: 439-453. 20. Schlatter C. Verletzungen des schnabel formigen fortsatzcs der oberen tibiaepiphyse. Bitr Khin Chir 1903; 38: 874-887. 21. Sinding-Larsen MF. A hitherto unknown affection of the patella in children. Acta Radiol 1921; 1: 171-173. 22. Stanitski CL, Delee AB, Drez CD. Pediatric and adolescent sports medicine. Filadelfia, WB Saunders 1994: 396

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

23. Stanitski CL. Adolescent anterior Knee pain. En: de Pablos J. Ed. The immature knee. Barcelona: STM, 1998: 175-179 24. Stanitski CL. Anterior knee pain syndromes in the adolescent. Instr Course Lect 1994; 43: 211-220. 25. Stanitski CL. Knee Disorders. En: Sponseller PD, ed. Orthopaedic knowledge Update. Pediatrics 2. Park Ridge. Illinois: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2002: 191-201. 26. Stanitski CL. Patellar instability in the school age athlete. Inst Course Lect 1998; 47: 345-350. 27. Tuten HR, Gabos PG, Kumar SJ. The limping child: a manifestation of acute leukemia. J Pediatr Orthop 1998; 18: 625-629 28. Washington ER 3rd, Root L y Liener UC: Discoid lateral meniscus in children. Longterm follow-up after excision. J Bone Joint Surg, 1995; 77 - A:1357 - 1361. 29. Watanabe M, Takeda S, Ikeuchi H. Atlas of arthroscopy. 3rd ed. Tokyo: Igakushoin, 1979; 88. 30. Wenger DR. Knee pain in children and adolescents. En: Wenger DR, Rang M, eds. The art and practice of children's orthopaedics. Nueva York: Raven Press, 1993:220-255 31. Wilder RT, Berde CB, Wolohan M. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in children. J Bone Joint Surg 1992; 74-A: 910-919. 32. Wilson N. A diagnostic sign in osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. J Bone Joint Surg 1967;49A: 477-480.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

KNEE PAIN IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE

J. de Pablos Hospital de Navarra and Hospital San Juan de Dios. Pamplona. Navarra

The knee is a relatively frequent location of musculoskeletal pain in the skeletally immature patient. There is also a broad range of pathological conditions that may produce this symptom, so they must be taken into account with a view to making an efficacious differential diagnosis. Moreover, these conditions may appear in the actual knee or in other locations and generate this type of pain in the knee. This presentation will address disorders whose principle symptom is pain, and will skip other problems such as tumours, septic arthritis and acute trauma where, while they also cause pain, the diagnosis is based on other signs and symptoms equally or more important than pain, and which, on the other hand, due to their importance, should be addressed in other monographic chapters. ORTHOPAEDIC DISORDERS 2. Subacute Haematogenous Osteomyelitis (SHO). Unlike other acute infectious disorders, such as septic arthritis or acute haematogenous osteomyelitis which present an abrupt-onset cohort of signs and symptoms, on many occasions, and alarmingly so, patients who present SHO generally present insidious clinical symptoms of pain, lameness and moderate inflammation, with a functional disorder of lesser importance. SHO develops generally in small children (over 3-4 years) as a result of an increase in host resistance combined with a reduction in bacterial virulence that leads the infection to develop slowly, with an insidious clinical expression (16). Laboratory tests are usually negative, and conventional radiology may also be negative, particularly at the beginning. Once the symptoms have developed, it is common to see an epiphyseal osteolytic image which is more obvious on the CT scan and is surrounded by a well-delimited sclerotic halo. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to appreciate radiological signs of aggressiveness (e.g. breakage of the cortical) that may be worrying, although the benign traits of the lesion always predominate. MRI generally shows a less specific image with intense medullary phlogosis surrounding the primary lesion. In the case of this lesion, our recommendation is to perform a puncture-aspiration of the lesion and obtain material for cytology and microbiology, although the results, in our cases, have almost always been inconclusive. This, and the benign prognosis, has led some authors to regard biopsy, and of course surgical debridement, as necessary only in exceptional recalcitrant cases (6). As we said, although the CT images are sometimes alarming ("aggressive" benignness), evolution, is, as a rule, benign, and the lesions are self-limiting and disappear spontaneously. The most consensus-based therapeutic recommendation is broadspectrum oral antibiotic therapy for 6 weeks, whereupon generally speaking the

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

symptoms, as well as the radiological image, remit without sequelae (16). We, even if only to follow a, so to speak, orthodox regimen, also recommend this therapeutic approach, and we must say that in some cases in which an initial diagnosis of SHO has not been made, and therefore antibiotic therapy has not been initiated, we have observed spontaneous remission of the process both in the knee and in other locations, also without leaving any type of sequelae. 2. Discoid Meniscus Discoid meniscus (DM) is a frequent malformation that was described initially by Young in 1889, and consists of the existence of a meniscus in round or disc form, instead of the usual C shape. It particularly affects the external meniscus and tends to be bilateral, with internal discoid meniscus being an exceptional finding. Watanabe (29) made what is now a classic three-type classification of discoid meniscus: complete, incomplete and Wrisberg-type. The first two are menisci with normal, and therefore stable, insertions, and whose only alteration is the more or less complete "biscuit" shape. The third type of DM has no insertion posterior to the tibial plateau and subsequently is held only by the meniscofemoral ligament (Wrisberg's ligament). Wrisberg's DM is therefore unstable, leading to permanent impingement of the meniscus which later acquires an irregular, hyalinised and engrossed form. Wrisberg-type DM is almost always symptomatic, whereas the first two types are usually not so, and only when the ligament is torn ­generally in adult age - do symptoms appear. Therefore, when a young child (6-8 years) starts to complain of projections of progressive importance with concomitant discomfort or pain on the external and posterior face, the existence of a Wrisberg-type DM should be ruled out in the differential diagnosis. When a complete or incomplete DM is torn, the clinical symptoms are selective progressive pain in external interline, sometimes associated with external meniscal cyst and, more rarely, accompanied by joint blockade, although, as we said, this occurs almost always in adult age. The treatment of DM depends on age and patient symptomatology. In asymptomatic cases, abstention is the most recommendable approach (1). If the symptomatology is mild or moderate and particularly if the patient is very young (<10), conservative treatment should be instigated, although if on the other hand, projections produces considerable pain or the blockades are frequent, an arthroscopic partial menisectomy is recommended in an attempt to give the affected meniscus the C shape (5, 7). One important technical aspect in these cases is to leave sufficient meniscal tissue in the popliteal hiatus area to avoid subsequent breakage. In fact, the breakage of the popliteal hiatus would lead to the need to complete the menisectomy, which, as we have mentioned, is undesirable, particularly in children. A complete menisectomy, we repeat, should be avoided as far as possible to avoid premature arthroses which, in the series by Washington et al. (28), occurred in 50% of cases. In any event, in Wrisberg-type DM, sometimes there is no alternative but to perform complete resection due to the extent of the alteration, as well as the major limitation that this may cause, even at early ages. In these cases, partial arthroscopic menisectomy associated with posterior stabilisation by means of arthrotomy may be considered, although the results of the latter have not yet been, in our opinion, properly proven. 3. Osteochondritis Dissecans Osteochondritis Dissecans of the knee (ODK) is a lesion in which a segment of the subchondral bone suffers a transient ischemia leading to necrosis, and may even become detached from the rest of the

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

epiphyseal bone. With time, the adjacent joint cartilage may also fail, leading to the detachment of an osteochondral fragment into the joint space (free body or "joint mouse"). The most frequently affected joint is the knee (ODK) although the elbow, hip and ankle may also be affected by this lesion. Ambroise Paré first described free bodies in a knee in 1558. In 1870, Sir James Paget referred to aseptic necrosis as the pathological bases on which these free bodies are formed. However, the name Osteochondritis Dissecans is due to F. König (9) in an article published in 1887. ODK is present bilaterally in 20-30% of cases and occurs more frequently in men than women (ratio 3-4/1). As shall be seen, the age range of appearance of ODK is broad, but we may say that it is infrequent in children under 8-10 years and more frequent in adolescents, and particularly in young adults. Aetiology/pathogeny. Numerous pathogenic theories have been suggested, although no general consensus has been reached. The traumatic aetiology (particularly associated with "fatigue" caused by repeat trauma) seems to enjoy greater support, although the hereditary factor has also been related to the appearance of ODK, fundamentally through the frequency with which this lesion is associated with multiple lesions (30%) and low height (13%) (12). Whatever the etiology may be, ischemia may be the common pathogenic base and its earlier or later resolution would explain the differences in terms of the evolution of the ODK. Classification. Different classifications have been proposed according to other factors, but the most popular ones have been based on age, chondral integrity, bone stability and location of the lesion. As regards age, ODK may be divided into juvenile and adult, depending on whether the patient is skeletally immature or already mature. In terms of the integrity of joint cartilage, ODK may be closed or open depending on whether the cartilage is in continuity or not, and in terms of bone stability, which may be stable or unstable depending on whether there is a nexus of union between the affected subchondral bone and the bed of the lesion. A free body, for example, would be an open and unstable lesion (22). In terms of localisation, most ODK (70%) are in the internal condyle, followed by the external condyle (20%) and the patella (10%) (4). Clinical symptoms. Symptoms are variable and depend particularly on the time of evolution from diagnosis to first consultation. In the beginning, symptomatology is rather undefined, with pain and inflammation being variable, and even appearing at rest or only with activity (19). Blockades are rare and occur if there are free bodies detached from the lesion. Palpation may be painful at the lesion site, although generally speaking this sign is difficult to obtain. For the lesions localised in the "classic site" (external side of the internal condyle), Wilson's sign (32) may be of help: with the knee at 30º flexion, on rotating the tibia internally, pain is provoked since the costochondritic lesion is thus compressed against the tibial spine and the Anterior Cruciate Ligament. Imaging diagnosis. Generally speaking, the lesion is detected in conventional AP, L and axial patella radiology. Sometimes, Fick's projection is useful (defilade projection of the intercondylar tunnel) although in our experience more so in adults than in children. The typical image of the osteochondral lesion surrounded by a thicker or thinner halo of sclerosis in the internal condyle provides the diagnosis in most cases. One frequent finding is a reinforcement image (sclerosis) in the internal tibial plateau mirroring the femoral lesion.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Magnetic resonance may help us in the rather infrequent cases of difficult diagnosis by conventional radiology. However, MR is most useful in the assessment of the lesion, particularly in two aspects: the integrity of the joint cartilage and dissection (detachment) of the osteochondral fragment from its epiphyseal bed. Differential diagnosis. This is very important, particularly with a view to avoiding errors in treatment, to differentiate ODK from so-called distal or patellar femoral epiphyseal ossification defects. These generally occur in small children (aged less than 10 years), are almost always asymptomatic and are frequently lodged in "atypical" areas for an ODK. Furthermore, as their name indicates, ossification defects, contrary to ODK, present as "empty" or semi-empty lesions in the different imaging diagnostic tests. Natural history and prognosis. The natural history of ODK largely depends on the patient's skeletal maturity status (17). While the physis is open (juvenile ODK) and the lesion is closed and stable, prognosis is very favourable (10). The opposite occurs in ODK of the young adult, particularly if the joint cartilage is not fully intact. This difference stems logically from lower tissue regeneration capacity in the adult, as compared to adolescents. In fact, in our experience, ODKs in patients with 2 or more years of remaining growth have a good prognosis with conservative treatment alone in most cases. Other factors associated with a worse prognosis in ODK are: the appearance of signs of detachment of the osteochondritic fragment, the "atypical" localisation of the lesion and the reduction in the blood flow in the affected osteochondral fragment (3, 8, 11). Treatment. Treatment is initially based on the natural history of the ODK in each case. Cases of ODK in children aged below 10-12 years have a good prognosis without treatment, and so are initially left to evolve freely. In symptomatic cases, besides age, the degree of instability and the integrity of the joint surface are the factors to be evaluated (this is sometimes only possible with prior MR) in order to determine the suitability of surgical treatment. - Symptomatic lesions without interruption in the joint cartilage are frequently treated by means of drilling with a 2-mm Kirschner bit or needle (2). In any event, there is no evidence that this approach is really efficacious, so that conservative treatment maintaining joint mobility and at least partially protecting the load may be reasonable. - When signs of detachment (instability) appear without displacement of the fragment we must try to attach it to the underlying bone. A wide variety of methods are available, of which we prefer Herbert screws as they afford greater stability and can be left inserted in the joint cartilage. - If the osteochondritic fragment has been displaced, we try to replace it and attach it wherever possible, although if the fragment is very small or is fragmented, has been detached for a long time or is fundamentally cartilaginous, sometimes it is more practical and effective to perform a debridement of the area and drill in an attempt to revive the bed of the lesion following extirpation of the osteochondral fragment or fragments. - "Mosaicplasty". Cartilaginous autografts from areas with a low load to the area of the lesion are promising, but we still lack evidence that this operation is the one of choice, particularly in children. In fact, in arthroscopies or MR monitoring in immature patients, we have observed hyaline coating of beds of osteochondral fracture that had been treated by only refreshing the lesion bed. This leads us to believe that something similar might occur following drilling of the ODK bed without the need to resort to mosaicplasty. All the operations mentioned in this paragraph may be performed by means of conventional or arthroscopic surgery, but we always recommend the latter wherever

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

possible, since we feel that it offers certain clear advantages over open surgery, particularly with regard to invasiveness and postoperative recovery. As a final message in this section we would like to say that the old axiom of "treat the patient, not the x-ray" is vital in juvenile ODK. In this way, on the basis of differential diagnosis and the natural history of this process, it will be easier to avoid unnecessary aggressive approaches (overtreatment). 6. Apophysitis and tendonitis Together with ODK, apophysitis is the most frequent cause of knee pain between the age of 10 and skeletal maturity. This paragraph includes two processes, the (wronglynamed) Osgood Schlatter and Sinding Larsen-Johanson diseases and many other less frequent ones in children such as the enthesopathies and tendonitis. They all share the fact that they are caused by a greater or smaller overload of the extensor apparatus of the knee. A.- Osgood-Schlatter Disease (OSD) This disorder, which produces pain in the region of the tibial tuberosity (TT), takes its name from its description (separate but almost simultaneous) in 1903 by the surgeons Osgood (USA) (15) and Schlatter (Germany) (20). Nevertheless, and as occurs in many other musculoskeletal disorders, Sir James Paget had already referred to it in 1891. Concept: The process consists of a lesion caused by repeat submaximal tensional trauma on the immature TT that produces a slow (subacute) detachment and, on occasions, fragmentation of this structure with regard to the proximal tibial metaphysis (14). It is a selflimiting process which by definition does not last beyond skeletal maturity when physis of long bones ceases. Although multiple etiological agents have been considered, everything seems to point to repeat trauma described as the probable cause of OSD. It could be compared, therefore, to known physeal stress fractures of other locations (wrists, pelvis, etc) generally associated with overtraining in sports. Clinical symptoms: The typical patient is a preadolescent or adolescent male, generally an athlete, who presents intermittent pain that hardly interferes with normal life, but does with sports activity (particularly football in our setting). OSD is bilateral in approximately 20-25% of the cases. The clinical examination is very enlightening since there is almost always selective pain on palpation of the TT and patent local inflammation in this same area. Imaging diagnosis. Together with clinical symptoms, conventional radiology gives us the key to the diagnosis in most cases. In the early months it is possible to appreciate different degrees of separation/fragmentation of the TT, and in most cases, as the degree of maturity of the individual advances, progressive fusion of TT to the rest of the proximal tibial metaphysis, leading finally to a normal situation or a simple protrusion of the TT. Only in a small percentage of cases does the TT not fuse with the rest of the tibia, leaving the so-called "ossicle" as a sequela in this place, which in most cases is asymptomatic. The MR does not add further information, particularly in terms of the diagnosis. However, it helps us to better understand what happens in OSD (lesion by traction),

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

since with it we have been able to appreciate the close relationship between the patellar tendon and the avulsed/fragmented bone of the TT. Treatment: Perhaps the most difficult part of the treatment of OSD is convincing the patient and their family of the benignness of what they have, since they frequently come to the office alarmed about the magnitude of the pain and the numbness presented by the child in the knee. Barring exceptional situations, which we shall address, treatment is always conservative. In the acute phase we advise the patient to refrain from sports for a few weeks, applying local cold two or three times a day and, if necessary, to take acetyl salicylic acid or Ibuprofen to improve the clinical symptoms. Also, on occasions, physiotherapy is recommended, particularly to reduce inflammation. Once the symptoms have remitted to stability, the patient is asked to start sports again progressively and, according to the sport, with protection from TT using kneepads. Evolution: The natural history of OSD is that of a self-limiting process with spontaneous resolution normally in 18-24 months or on reaching maturity. This is why it is important to inform the patient/family that despite a notable improvement in the clinical symptoms over these months, relapses are frequent, and should be treated in similar fashion to those mentioned in the acute phase. By definition, this is a process that disappears with skeletal maturity and the only sequelae that may remain are a protrusion of the TT and, more rarely, a fragment of TT ("ossicle") that did not fuse with the rest of the tibia. Both sequelae tend to be asymptomatic, but on rare occasions the non-fused ossicle may cause pain and render surgical extirpation necessary. B.- Sinding-Larsen ­Johansson Disease (SLJD) Described in 1921 (21) by two Nordic surgeons (not three) almost simultaneously: M.F. Sinding-Larsen (Denmark) and S. Johansson (Sweden). This process is similar to OSD and has the same cause, albeit localised in the lower patellar pole (LPP) instead of in the TT. It also occurs in male athletes in the period prior to skeletal maturity. The exploration shows acute and selective pain on palpation of the lower patellar pole and separation/fragmentation of the LPP from the rest of the patella may be observed in conventional radiography. The natural history is also benign, tending to resolve spontaneously without sequelae in 18-24 months. Treatment should therefore be conservative and focused mainly on avoiding the repeat traction mechanism which is presumably the cause of the SLJD. Relapses are possible, and patients must be informed of this. C. Enthesopathies and tendonitis. SLJD has its equivalent in young adults in Jumper's Knee, which, as is well known, is also a syndrome of overuse of the knee's extensor apparatus. Both this problem and tendonitis of the extensor apparatus and enthesopathies in the TT are already more specific to mature patients and are due to over-intensive and aggressive training and competition programmes. The treatment protocol should include five steps: identification of the overload factor, its modification, pain control following diagnosis, physiotherapy and progressive reincorporation (with maintenance physiotherapy) to avoid relapses (24).

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

7. Adolescent anterior knee pain. (AAKP). This is undoubtedly one of the most difficult problems to study and resolve in Infantile Orthopaedics, albeit more so because often it is difficult to reverse the patient's clinical symptoms rather than for its seriousness. The patient tends to report a dull, limited and practically continuous pain at the back of the knee without being able to define a specific point. In fact, frequently, on being asked to define the pain, the patient will cover the whole anterior side of the knee ("grab sign") (24) On evaluating an adolescent with this type of pain the most important thing is to identify the cause, a question which, as we shall see, will remain unresolved in a large percentage of cases (idiopathic AAKP). The differential diagnosis of AAKP includes: apophysitis and tendonitis of the extensor apparatus (already commented), pathological synovial plica, patellar instability, bi- or multipartite patella, patellar osteochondritis dissecans (POD) and reflex sympathetic algodystrophy (RSA). Pathological Synovial Plica (PSP) The plicae are synovial folds that normally exist in the bursae and lateral recesses of the knee. Direct or indirect trauma may give rise to haemorrhages in the plica, hyalinization and fibrosis, making the plica pathological (i.e. not normal). These pathological plicae, generally localised in the internal parapatellar region, may give rise to painful projections on flexion-extension of the knee, above all in intermediate degrees of flexion (40º-60º). If the etiology is a problem of overload (e.g. in sports training), once again the most important thing is to modify the causal activity. In the most recalcitrant cases, arthroscopic resection of the pathological plica may be necessary, a relatively little invasive procedure which is very effective on most occasions. The indiscriminate resection of normal plicae must be avoided. Patellar instability. This name includes a broad spectrum of femoropatellar disorders, although here we are most interested in those that produce pain with less instability or patellar displacement, i.e., the external patellar hyperpressure syndrome (EPHS) (26). The greater degrees of instability (habitual and permanent dislocation) fall outside the objectives of this chapter, as they produce more instability than pain, and so merit a separate chapter in themselves. Most patients with EPHS present pain in the external parapatellar region without signs of instability. During examination, both palpation of the external patellar wing and pressure on the lateral facet of the patella against the external condyle may be painful. The "Q" angle may not be normal, but in our opinion this is a clinical exploration and prone to providing false data that may give rise to confusion, and so we do not use it. A sign of apprehension on displacing the patella towards the outside may be positive although, we repeat, that here the problem is not so much one of instability as maltracking of the patella in the femoral trochlea. The radiography may show a certain degree of external basculation and sometimes lateralisation of the patella, but this is assessable, particularly in the axial sections of the CT scan and the MR. These patients tend to respond well to a physiotherapy programme designed to strengthen the extensor musculature of the knee, avoiding overload of the femoropatellar joint.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

In cases which are highly refractory to conservative treatment, the (arthroscopic or open) resection of the external patellar wing generally provides good results. Nevertheless, it must be mentioned that this is perhaps one of the interventions with the highest rate of complications (particularly haemarthrosis) whereby great care is advised in the indication and technical implementation of this operation. Bi- or multipartite patella Exceptionally, the lack of union of one (bipartite patella) or several (multipartite patella) of the secondary ossification centres produces pain in the immature patient. These are therefore mostly casual findings of knee radiographies performed in patients for other reasons. Saupe (18) performed a classification depending on the localisation of the fragment: Type I (inferior fragment), type II (lateral fragment) and type III (superolateral fragment). The most common thing is that the unfused centre is external (20% of the total) or superoexternal (75%) and that the patient does not tend to present localised symptoms at this point. In simple radiology, the localisation and rounded edges of the secondary ossification centre provide the diagnosis. Direct trauma on the bipartite patella may cause separation of the fragment and resulting pain in the area. Differential diagnosis is not difficult and should be performed with acute patellar fracture and with the Sinding-Larsen ­ Johansson disease in the case of inferior polar fragment. Treatment must always be conservative by means of simple regular controls. In the case of acute trauma, about 4 weeks of relative immobilisation will suffice. In adults, one sequela may be a complaint/pain that may even oblige resection of the non-fused secondary centre, although these are exceptional cases. Patellar Osteochondritis Dissecans (POD) The patella is rarely affected by osteochondritis dissecans (10% out of total OD) and may cause symptoms such as anterior pain and projections, pseudoblockage even joint effusions. The radiography (the fragment generally localised is the inferior pole) and other studies such as MR particularly will give us the key to diagnosis, localisation and therapeutic approach based on size, degree of dissection and the status of the joint cartilage. Differential diagnosis should be performed with the dorsal patellar defect which, unlike POD, does not produce, or produces very little pain, and does not give rise to osteochondral fragment dissection problems. The treatment of POD is based on the points commented in the corresponding paragraph (ODK). Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) This process, almost exclusive to adults, is rare but occurs in immature patients. The clinical symptoms consist of disproportionate pain, joint phlogosis with or without hydrops and great pain on palpation in practically all points of the affected knee. The radiology, particularly in overt cases, shows us a diffuse osseous atrophy (porosis) with halos of subchondral osteolysis and areas of mild condensation in more central epiphyseal areas that give it the characteristic cotton flake look. We believe that it is very important to know that a high percentage of these cases present a history of family problems and high school drop-out rates. The natural progress is towards spontaneous resolution in a variable number of months (up to one year, approximately) and it may be possible to accelerate the improvement by means of physiotherapy, NSAIDs and by encouraging the patient to use the affected limb. If necessary, psychological aid may be of crucial importance. The prognosis, generally speaking, is better than in adults (24, 31).

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Idiopathic AAKP This label may be used to describe anterior knee pains of the adolescent where the causes mentioned above have been ruled out and no anomalies are found during examination or in imaging tests. Despite multiple etiopathogenic theories (retinacular neuropathies, minimum femoropatellar displacements), for the moment, the cause and mechanism of this type of pain are unknown (23). The term Patellar Chondromalacia which classically referred to the softening of the joint cartilage that could be seen in surgery andautopsies, is highly used as a clinical concept to justify, particularly to the patient, these difficult-to-explain pains. Since these anatomopathological disorders are not demonstrable in most of these patients, we agree with other authors (23) in that this term should be avoided in these cases. Precisely because of the absence of pathological findings, treatment in these patients is very empirical and targets symptom correction. In most cases, with conservative treatment that ranges from denial to physiotherapeutic treatment, cold-heat contrast therapy, kneepads, insoles and NSAIDs, an improvement or disappearance of the symptoms may be appreciated (13). Evidently, here the placebo effect of several or all these treatments cannot be ruled out. Idiopathic AAKP may tempt the surgeon to use arthroscopy in the absence of findings with other media. In our opinion, diagnostic arthroscopy is not only practically always contraindicated (we must go to surgery with a prior diagnosis, or at least a presumption), but patellofemoral arthroscopic surgery is known to present the greatest rate of complications of all arthroscopic procedures (25). For all these reasons, we advise against arthroscopic surgery in AAKP unless we have a specific therapeutic objective "a priori", and this requires a prior diagnosis. Once we are convinced that all the known causes of AAKP have been ruled out and the diagnosis is idiopathic AAKP, a very important part of the doctor's work is to educate patients and family on the benignness of the symptoms, that there is no need to take aggressive therapeutic approaches to improve symptoms and the certainty that this process is not the beginning of a serious degeneration of the knee joint. Finally, it must be mentioned that, there may be underlying psychological problems in idiopathic AAKP (relatives, self-esteem, sports performance in competition, aversion to physical education, etc.), that explain the symptoms and guide us in terms of the therapeutic approach. POST-TRAUMATIC CHRONIC PAIN Besides the acute trauma that also produces pain but which, for obvious reasons, should be addressed in other chapters, the child and, particularly the adolescent, may present chronic post-traumatic pain. The main causes are internal disorders (old osteochondral fractures, meniscopathies, etc.) and unstable knee, which generally eventually generates secondary chondral and meniscal lesions. In these cases the key to proper treatment is making the right diagnosis. With the old osteochondral fractures it will suffice to perform an exeresis of the free body (if there is one), since the bed is often covered with fibrocartilage and meniscopathies are easily treated with selective repair or resection of the affected meniscal area. As for instability, particularly if it is generating pain, insecurity or internal osteochondral/meniscal disorders, it is important to correct it by means of techniques (we recommend arthroscopy) currently in use. Another cause of post-traumatic pain, now that increasingly more ligamentoplasties are being made, is the exuberant scarring of anterior cruciate ligament graft (Cyclope

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Syndrome). This produces a conflict of space in the intercondylar sulcus that renders it impossible, even with pain, to achieve full extension of the knee. Treatment with arthroscopic resection of the "surplus" scar tends to bring excellent results. OTHER KNEE PAINS Here we include knee pains whose origin or localisation is different, and pains of obscure origin. 6. Pain reported It is so common that a disorder of the hip causes pain in the knee that there are authors that hold that "knee pain is hip pain until proven otherwise" (23). Regardless of whether this assertion be rather exaggerated, it is true that many hip problems begin with knee pain. Thus, when dealing with any patients with this symptom, an examination and, if necessary, radiological study of the hip is, in our opinion, obligatory. Depending on the age, the hip diseases we must rule out are mainly Perthes disease between 4 and 8 years approximately, and non-traumatic epiphysiolysis of the hip in adolescence. Transient synovitis of the hip may also generate pain in the knee, although in our experience pain in the thigh and lameness are dominant and, furthermore, the usual satisfactory evolution in a few days is reassuring. Another localisation that sometimes produces knee pain is femoral diaphysis. In small children that start to limp and complain about the knee we must rule out problems in this location such as eosinophilic granuloma (a simple radiographic study would suffice) or, in older young people, osteoid osteoma, which is sometimes not easy to detect, even after a suitable radiographic study (here CT scan and/or isotope gammagraphy are very useful). 7. Leukaemia. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is the most frequent type of leukaemia and its peak of incidence is between 2 and 6 years of age. In approximately 20% of these patients the initial symptoms affect the locomotor apparatus and, more specifically, a recent study reports that in 12% of children with leukaemia it mainly presents with lameness (27). This problem should be rejected in children with antalgic claudication, fever of more or less importance, and above all, if they present lymphadenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly and significant alterations of the haemogram (anaemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, lymphocytosis, etc.) or in sediment (blast cells). The radiographies may be normal, but in the event of suspicion of leukaemia we must search for metaphyseal bands that are the earliest radiological sign in this disease. 8. Growth pains Growth pains, also called "growers" in some settings, are a common symptom in the child close to growth episodes in which the patient complains about pains in the legs (not just in the knees), which are bilateral, generally increase with activity and are more intense at night (30). The mere fact that they are bilateral pains distinguishes them from more serious pains of a different origin such as osteoarticular infections or tumours. The x-rays are normal, as are the blood and urine analyses, so that the so-called "growth pains" are an "exclusion" diagnosis after ruling out any other problem both from the clinical (bilaterality, normal child) and radiological (normal X-ray) standpoint.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

There may also be an emotional substrate in this type of pains. It is not infrequent to find children that "need" massages in the legs every night by their parents to get to sleep. On occasions, when further investigating this complaint we find that more than anything else the child presents a lack of affection that appears as these pains. Sometimes, NSAIDs may be useful to improve symptoms, as well as physiotherapy, although, we repeat, always empirically. It is important to always take into account that while these pains are not important, we should not confuse then with others such as those caused by leukaemia which, while similar, are much more serious (30). 9. Rheumatoid arthritis juvenile and other inflammatory problems In pauciarticular juvenile arthritis (40-60% of all juvenile rheumatoid arthritis) the patient may consult as early as the age of two. These children generally present lameness with moderate pain accompanied by inflammation and local heat in the knee, ankle or even the subtalar joint. Several joints may be affected simultaneously, which will give us a diagnostic clue to begin our investigation. Girls are affected four times more than boys in this disease. Laboratory tests, including acute-phase reactants, may be normal. This problem is frequently associated with uveitis (20%). In symptoms where differential diagnosis of pauciarticular arthritis is possible, and particularly with associated uveitis, patients should be referred to an infantile rheumatologist. Finally, and exceptionally, if the patient has pain in one or more joints associated with inflammation, erythema, skin rash and systemic symptoms, we must suspect other inflammatory problems such as: rheumatic fever, Lyme's disease, lupus erythematosus or Guillain-Barré syndrome. These cases are obviously not to be treated by orthopaedic surgeons, but rather by the corresponding paediatric speciality. 10. Psychological problems We have already mentioned some knee pain symptoms (idiopathic AAKP, growth pains) that may have a psychological component, at least partially. This is not new. Sigmund Freud, who lived in both the 19th and 20th Centuries, drew our attention to the relationship between psychological trauma in childhood and the subsequent appearance of hysteric symptoms. This relationship between the subconscious and behaviour is, according to Freud, of vital importance in understanding that family problems, extreme demands in sports competitions or aversion to physical education may be the fundamental cause of adolescent anterior knee pain. While not frequent, it is typical to see adolescents (girls more often than boys) in the Casualty Department with knee blockade with no apparent cause. If we talk to the patient and find some of the above emotional and affective problems, particularly if the blockade is atypical, we are probably talking about what is known as a hysteric blockade. We are referring to an atypical blockade, e.g. the blockade in extension with the impossibility of bending, when the opposite is more typical (semiflexion position with the impossibility of extending). Evidently, we must never label knee pain in children as "psychological" without first ruling out, in so far as may be possible, an organic cause. In the management of these children the greatest problem lies in securing the family's acceptance because, among other things, this entails accepting that sometimes the problem is in the actual family. The most serious child and adolescent knee problem that tends to have a psychological component is Reflex Sympathetic Algodystrophy (Südeck's disease), already referred to, and which, while sometimes slow, tends to almost always present a satisfactory evolution with the corresponding psychological and family support and physiotherapy.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

REFERENCES 1. Aichroth PM, Patel DV and Marx CL: Congenital discoid lateral meniscus in children: A follow-up study and evolution of management. J Bone Joint Surg, 1991; 73 - B:932 - 939. 2. Bradley J, Dandy DJ. Results of drilling osteochondritis dissecans before skeletal maturity. J Bone Joint Surg 1989; 71B: 642-644 3. Crawford EJ, Emergy RJ, Aichroth PM. Stable osteochondritis dissecans: Does the lesion unite? J Bone Joint Surg 1990;72B:320. 4. Desai SS, Patel MR, Michelli LJ. Osteochondritis dissecans of the patella. J Bone Joint Surg 1987;69B:320-325. 5. Fujikawa K, Iseki F and Mikura Y: Partial resection of the discoid meniscus in the child's knee. J Bone Joint Surg, 1981;63 - B: 391 - 395. 6. Handy RC, Lawton L, Carey T, Wiley J, Marton D: Subacute hematogenous osteomylitis are biopsy and surgery always indicated? J Pediatr Orthop 1996; 16: 220-223. 7. Hayashi LK, Yamaga H, Ida K and Miura T: Arthroscopic meniscectomy for discoid lateral meniscus in children. J Bone Joint Surg, 1988; 70 - A:1495 ­ 1500. 8. Hefti F. Osteochondritis dissecans. In: J. de Pablos, The Immature Knee, Masson, Barcelona 1998. 9. König F. Veber freie Körper in den Gelenken. Dtsch. Z Chir 1887; 27-90. 10. Linden B. Osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyles: A long-term follow up study. J Bone Joint Surg 1977;59ª:769-776 11. Litchman HM, Mc Cullough RW, Grandsman EJ. Computerized blood flow analysis for decision making in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans. J Pediatr Orthop 1988;8:208-212. 12. Mubarak SJ, Carroll NC. Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the knee: etiology. Clin Orthop 1981;157: 200-211. 13. Nimon G, Murray D, Sandow M, Goodfellow J: Natural history of anterior knee pain. A 14 to 20 year follow-up of nonoperative management. J Pediatr Orthop 1998; 18: 118-122. 14. Ogden JA, Southwick WO. Osgood-Schlatter's disease and tibial tuberosity development. Clin Orthop 1976; 116: 180-189. 15. Osgood RB. Union of the tibial tubercle occurring during adolescence. Boston Med Surg J 1903; 8: 114-117 16. Rasool MN. Primary subacute haematogeneous osteomyelitis in children. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2001; 83: 93-98. 17. Rodríguez EC, Gómez-Castresana F, Ortega M. Osteocondritis disecante de la rodilla. Revisión Ortopédica Traumatológica 2002;5:428-435 18. Saupe: Cited by Stanitski (10). 19. Schenck RC, Goodnight JM. Osteochondritis dissecans. J Bone Joint Surg 1996;78A: 439-453. 20. Schlatter C. Verletzungen des schnabel formigen fortsatzcs der oberen tibiaepiphyse. Bitr Khin Chir 1903; 38: 874-887. 21. Sinding-Larsen MF. A hitherto unknown affection of the patella in children. Acta Radiol 1921; 1: 171-173. 22. Stanitski CL, Delee AB, Drez CD. Pediatric and adolescent sports medicine. Filadelfia, WB Saunders 1994: 396

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

23. Stanitski CL. Adolescent anterior Knee pain. In: de Pablos J. Ed. The immature knee. Barcelona:: STM, 1998: 175-179 24. Stanitski CL. Anterior knee pain syndromes in the adolescent. Instr Course Lect 1994; 43: 211-220. 25. Stanitski CL. Knee Disorders. In: Sponseller PD, pub. Orthopaedic knowledge Update. Pediatrics 2. Park Ridge. Illinois: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2002: 191-201. 26. Stanitski CL. Patellar instability in the school age athlete. Inst Course Lect 1998; 47: 345-350. 27. Tuten HR, Gabos PG, Kumar SJ. The limping child: a manifestation of acute leukemia. J Pediatr Orthop 1998; 18: 625-629 28. Washington ER 3rd, Root L and Liener UC: Discoid lateral meniscus in children. Long-term follow-up after excision. J Bone Joint Surg, 1995; 77 - A:1357 - 1361. 29. Watanabe M, Takeda S, Ikeuchi H. Atlas of arthroscopy. 3rd ed. Tokyo: Igakushoin, 1979; 88. 30. Wenger DR.. Knee pain in children and adolescents. In: Wenger DR, Rang M, pub. The art and practice of children's orthopaedics. New York: Raven Press, 1993:220-255 31. Wilder RT, Berde CB, Wolohan M. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in children. J Bone Joint Surg 1992; 74-A: 910-919. 32. Wilson N. A diagnostic sign in osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. J Bone Joint Surg 1967;49A: 477-480.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

IS THIS THING ON? THE CHALLENGES OF COMMUNICATION IN ORTHOPAEDICS.

Robert N. Hensinger, M.D. Communication is very important part of the doctor patient relationship. In a survey by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, 75% of orthopaedic surgeons believe they communicate satisfactorily with their patients. However, only 21% of orthopaedic patients report satisfactory communication with their orthopedist. Orthopedists want a brief and focused history with yes and no answers, closed ended questions. The average orthopedist interrupts the patient after 12 seconds. However, if you allow the patient talk, they seldom speak longer than 30 seconds. In 2 minutes, they will have told you 80% of what they know. The physical examinations have become perfunctory and orthopedists rely more on tests, MRI and CT scan. Communication is key to developing a long term relationship with the patient. It improves patient satisfaction and contributes to positive health outcomes. Patients are much more satisfied with the encounter if they have an opportunity to communicate to their physician, particularly if they feel the physician has listened to them. Listening is a very important part of the process, particularly in orthopaedics, the patient can tell you a great deal about their musculoskeletal problem and how it affects their activities. 60% of my patients have been on the internet prior to seeing me. Greetings: Knock on the door. Smile. Shake hands. Look them in the eye. Tell them your full name and say, "How can I help you." Physicians begin to diagnose the first moment they meet the patient, pattern recognition, body language, demeanor, attitude and dress. Physical Examination: It is important to stay at eye level or below and look directly at the patient. Ask them to comment and give them time to answer. In a typical pediatric interview the doctor speaks the most, 61% the parent 25% and to the child only 4%. Discussion: Make sure to cover all aspects of the problem, don't use scary words. It is very important to be accurate and truthful. It is very important to discuss the problem in language they can understand. Be sure the patient and family understand the definition of the words that you use and you understand what the words mean to the family. It is important to clarify expectations in the beginning and more importantly, discuss the limits of the treatment. Patients are very sensitive to your feelings, if you appear worried or concern, this can increase their anxiety. Anticipation can be emotionally painful, it is important to deal with the emotions. Bad news needs to be discussed in a quiet, sensitive place. The physician should understand the desires of the patient, sense if the patient risk adverse, their intolerance for uncertainty, and knowledge of the patient and their family. Patient Education: A very important part of what we do. X-rays, CT scans, drawings and models are all very helpful. The patient can become an important contributor to the process by providing information regarding their expectations and following instructions after the visit.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

The Art of Persuasion: Don't scare them into compliance. If the patient feels you are a good person, you understand their situation, are an expert in your field and you have their best interests at heart, they will usually accept your recommendations. You have to earn the patients trust by assuring them that you empathize with them, your goals are altruistic, and you are capable of achieving success. Failure of Communication: Know when you are not communicating. Do they have any questions? Do they understand? Offer brochures or videos. Have them return in a week after they have had a chance to think about it. Common Mistakes: 1. Premature Closure: the failure to continue considering reasonable possibilities after reaching an initial diagnosis. 2. Search Satisfaction: Tend to stop searching for a diagnosis once you find something. (Finding something is good, but not finding everything can be tragic). 3. Cognitive errors: Faulty knowledge, data gathering and synthesis. 4. Commission Bias: Tendency to action rather than inaction. Over confident physicians tend to jump to a conclusion. (Don't do something, just stand there) 5. Flexible Response: Orthopaedics is often one on one and we need to deal with a wide variety of patients. Conclusion: Establish trust, get the patients story, and show respect. Watch your word choice, active listening, enjoy the encounter.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

CONGENITAL SHORT FEMUR

James McCarthy. Madison, Wisconsin, USA Congenital short femur (CSF), is part of a spectrum from proximal femoral focal deficiency (PFFD), in which much of the proximal femur may be missing, with significant hip and knee pathology to a relatively normal, but short femur. It is an uncommon but complex problem (with an incidence of 1 case per 50,000 to 200,000. The etiology of PFFD is not known . Clinically, the femur is shortened, flexed, abducted, and externally rotated. This can be confused for a child with DDH. The knee is may be secondary to absent cruciate ligaments. The absence of the tibial spines on xray, is correlated with the absence of the cruciate ligaments clinically. The hip (acetabulum and proximal femur) are often dysplastic. There is a high incidence (>70%) of other anomalies, such as of fibular deficiency and valgus feet, cleft palate, clubfoot, congenital heart defects, and spinal anomalies. Several classification systems describe congenital anomalies of the femur, the Aitken classification, which is the most widely used for PFFD, it divides PFFD into 4 categories based on the radiographic appearance. Aitken class A, a shortened femur is present proximally, ending at or slightly above the level of the acetabulum. The femoral head is present but may have delayed ossification. Class B also develop a femoral head but at skeletal maturity, there is no connection between the femoral head and proximal femur. Class C has an absent femoral head that does not ossify and a markedly dysplastic acetabulum. Class D, the most severe form, there is a severely shortened shaft, which often has only an irregularly ossified tuft of bone proximal to the distal femoral epiphysis. No acetabulum is present because the lateral pelvic wall is flat. The Paley classification system is a treatment based classification: Type 1: intact femur with mobile hip and knee a) normal ossification proximal femur b) delayed ossification proximal femur Type 2: mobile pseudarthrosis (hip not fully formed, a false joint) with mobile knee a) femoral head mobile in acetabulum b) femoral head absent or stiff in acetabulum Type 3: diaphyseal deficiency of femur (femur does not reach the acetabulum) a) knee motion > 45 degrees b) knee motion < 45 degrees Indications for lengthening include a limb with a predicted discrepancy at maturity not exceeding 20 cm, a hip that is or can be made stable, and a relatively good knee, ankle, and foot . If the predicted discrepancy is greater than 20 cm, or if for any other reason the child is not suitable for limb lengthening, prostheses should be considered. Prosthetic fitting is used for the patient with CSF who elects not to undergo a series of lengthening procedures. A foot in foot prosthesis can be used, without and surgical intervention. This has several associated problems with long term use so multiple amputative reconstruction options have been suggested. Typically the combination of a Syme amputation, knee fusion, and epiphysiodesis at the knee results in an above-knee stump, results in a functional AKA equivalent. The

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

epiphysiodesis should be planned so that the distal stump on the affected side is proximal to the contra-lateral side, so that the hinged knee joint in the prosthesis matches the contra-lateral knee. A Van Nes Rotationplasty procedures can be considered if the ankle is stable and allows for improved function by using the ankle as a knee, but may be considered less cosmetically acceptable. An iliofemoral arthrodesis in an attempt to address the hip instability. Steel described fusing the distal femoral segment to the pelvis with the femur is flexed 90º, making it perpendicular to the body axis and parallel to the floor. As a result, when these patients extend their anatomic knees, they are effecting hip flexion. Brown described a second procedure in which a rotationplasty is performed in conjunction with an iliofemoral arthrodesis. In this case, the distal femur is rotated 180º prior to fusion, with its axis parallel with that of the body, the knee functions as the hip joint and the ankle serves as the knee, thereby enabling these patients to function as below-knee amputees. Lengthening procedures are performed in patients with congenital femoral deficiencies who do not have focal defects. The most appropriate candidate has a congenital hypoplastic femur in which the hip and knee can be made functional. Hip dysplasia must be addressed prior to lengthening of the femur and instability of the knee must be carefully controlled or treated pre operatively. Lengthening involved multiple long intrusions in to a patients childhood, with a significant cost to the family in time and potentially income.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

REFERENCES 1. Oppenheim WL, Setoguchi Y, Fowler E. Overview and comparison of Syme's amputation and knee fusion with the van Nes rotationplasty procedure in proximal femoral focal deficiency. In: Herring JA, Birch J, eds. The Child With a Limb Deficiency. Chicago, Ill:. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons;1998. 2. Fixsen JA, Lloyd-Roberts GC. The natural history and early treatment of proximal femoral dysplasia. J Bone Joint Surg Br. Feb 1974;56(1):86-95. 3. Maldjian C, Patel TY, Klein RM, Smith RC. Efficacy of MRI in classifying proximal focal femoral deficiency. Skeletal Radiol. Mar 2007;36(3):215-20. 4. Bernaerts A, Pouillon M, De Ridder K, Vanhoenacker F. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in early assessment of proximal femoral focal deficiency (PFFD). JBR-BTR. Nov-Dec 2006;89(6):325-7. [Medline]. 5. Griffith SI, McCarthy JJ, Davidson RS. Comparison of the complication rates between first and second (repeated) lengthening in the same limb segment. J Pediatr Orthop. Jul-Aug 2006;26(4):534-6. 6. Fuchs B, Sim FH. Rotationplasty about the knee: surgical technique and anatomical considerations. Clin Anat. May 2004;17(4):345-53. 7. Steel HH, Lin PS, Betz RR, et al. Iliofemoral fusion for proximal femoral focal deficiency. J Bone Joint Surg Am. Jul 1987;69(6):837-43.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

DEVELOPMENTAL DYSPLASIA OF THE HIP

Robert N. Hensinger, M.D. Previously, we used the term Congenital Dislocation of the Hip (CDH), in 1986 Prader Klisic (Yugoslavia) convinced the pediatric orthopaedic community to change the name of this condition to Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH). This term better reflects the true nature of the condition. Etiology: There are both mechanical and physiological causes. Mechanical factors include the first born child, breech presentation and left hip due to crowding of the intrauterine space. Physiologic factors include high levels of estrogen and relaxin at the time of birth, which relax both the maternal and infant's pelvis. There are genetic influences (hormonal) and environmental factors as well, such as swaddling causing increased tension across the hip joint. Hip at Risk: First born, breech presentation, positive family history and congenital muscular torticollis. I recommend hip examination at every visit to the pediatrician and x-rays at 3 months of age. Beware! Boys with dislocated hips are not common, particularly if it is the right side, there is often an underlying problem usually neurologic. Clinical Examination: 1)The Ortolani exam, the hip is manually reduced into the acetabulum with an abduction maneuver associated with an audible "klunk". 2) The Barlow is a provocative test, the hip is adducted and we gently push the femoral head out of the acetabulum. Unfortunately, the clinical examination is not consistently done well. Clinical findings become more apparent as the child grows; shortness of the thigh, increased thigh skin folds. When the child begins to stand and walk, if the dislocation is unilateral the difference between the two sides become more marked. A child with the bilateral dislocation is difficult to tell clinically. 3) Ultrasound: In many areas, the ultrasound is used for routine screening. The ultrasound is expensive and leads to a high percentage of false positives. However, dynamic ultrasound can be very good at assessing the stability of the hip and reduction in the brace. 4) X-ray examination usually become positive in the first three months and much more obvious with the passage of time. Treatment: Early treatment is simple positioning, flexion and abduction to keep the hip reduced into the acetabulum. Currently I use the Pavlik harness. However, there are many devices that provide the same function. If the hip is maintained in the reduced position, the joint capsule will contract and stabilize the hip with a good long term prognosis. Failure of the Pavlik harness occurs when one is unable to maintain the reduction or anatomic obstruction or children with excessive laxity. Children who achieve a "Pavlik Perfect" result will have a 17% risk of acetabular dysplasia at 12 year follow ­up.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

If the hip cannot be reduced with the Pavlik harness, closed reduction should be done under general anesthesia and maintained with cast immobilization. It is important to keep the hip in the safe zone and if narrow it can be increased with an adductor tenotomy. Also, adductor tenotomy reduces the incidence of avascular necrosis. Surgical Reduction: As the child ages, it becomes increasingly difficult to reduce the femoral head into the acetabulum due to soft tissue contractures and surgical reduction is required. Indication for open reduction: major impediment, technical problems, (cast or position), unnatural position, forced abduction, concurrent illness; neuromuscular problem. In the young child less than 12 months of age, the medial adductor approach has been very successful. Anterior approach is better for the older children. Children that are 18 months or older, the acetabulum will usually require modification. Salter osteotomy and Pemberton are very popular to improve acetabular coverage. The longer the hip is dislocated, the tissues around the joint become more contracted and the risk of avascular necrosis is increased. Relaxing the soft tissues, muscle and joint capsule, becomes very important, in the past traction was popular but now has been replaced by femoral shortening. Complications in early years: (Coleman) 1. Failure to diagnosis 2. Failure to obtain a concentric reduction 3. Failure to follow-up 4. Avascular necrosis Neglected DDH: Management of the older child with an unreduced hip requires a great deal of pre-operative planning. Excellent understanding of the pathologic anatomy and a good technologic assessment, arthrogram, CT scan etc. are all necessary to properly plan the reduction in the neglected hip.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

ENFERMEDAD DE PERTHES SINOVITIS TRANSITORIA DE LA CADERA

Pedro González-Herranz. A Coruña

Enfermedad de Legg-Calvé-Perthes

Generalidades · Descrita en 1910, por Legg en Boston, Perthes en Alemania y Calvé en Francia como una enfermedad no tuberculosa que afectaba a la cadera de los niños. · Niños entre 3 - 12 años, siendo más frecuente en los varones entre los 5-7 años. · Bilateral en el 10-20%. En el 8-12% historia familiar. · Se ha relacionado con bajo peso al nacer, con retraso entre la edad cronológica y ósea o con trastornos de la coagulación del tipo de trombofilia. Sintomatología · Cojera · Dolor inguinal o referido al muslo o rodilla. · A veces relacionado con un traumatismo. · Limitación de la abducción de la cadera y de la rotación interna. Etiología · La causa de los cambios avasculares permanecen poco claros. · No ha podido demostrarse una obstrucción mecánica de los vasos extra-óseos · Se ha sugerido que inflamación capsular + sinovitis pueden provocar una obstrucción mecánica de los vasos retinaculares ( pero no ha podido ser demostrado). · Incidencia de sinovitis transitoria aguda en pacientes de Perthes entre el 1%-20%. · Estudios epidemiológicos apoyan la teoría de que la enfermedad puede ser un reflejo de un trastorno sistémico con una manifestación local predominante a nivel de la cabeza femoral. Patogénesis Los cambios morfológicos e histológicos de la enfermedad se han descrito basados en los trabajos de Catterall sobre 6 necropsias de niños con Perthes y los de Jonsäter (7) tras la realización de biopsias de la cabeza femoral repetidas y artrografía. · En la fase inicial de avascularidad: necrosis ósea con aplastamiento trabecular. La capa basal del cartílago articular puede mostrar cambios degenerativos en las zonas que contactan con áreas de necrosis ósea. · En la fase de reabsorción se advierte revitalización de la cabeza femoral por sustitución progresiva y aposición ósea. Yemas vasculares van invadiendo el hueso necrótico reabsorbiéndolo activamente por acción osteoclástica y sustituyéndolo por hueso inmaduro recién formado. El aspecto de esta reparación varía en las diferentes zonas epifisarias, no es uniforme. La osificación encondral de las porciones viables de la cabeza femoral prosigue su curso normalmente. · Existen también alteraciones metafisarias que presenta áreas de fibrocartílago y osificación desorganizada. También el cartílago de crecimiento puede sufrir isquemia presentando distorsión de sus columnas celulares y no se osifica

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

normalmente apareciendo un exceso de cartílago calcificado a nivel del hueso trabecular primario de la metáfisis. Imagen 1. Radiología simple: base de las clasificaciones para el estadiaje y pronóstico de la enfermedad, así como para valorar los resultados. La fractura subcondral suele verse mejor en la proyección axial. 2. Artrografía: para planificación operatoria, permite valorar grado de subluxación, esfericidad de la cabeza y el grado de varización necesaria para obtener una adecuada cobertura. 3. Gammagrafia ósea: es útil en las fases precoces de la enfermedad, en las que se observa una zona fría (avascular) en la cabeza femoral. En fases posteriores se observa aumento de captación, hallazgo este más inespecífico. Hoy en desuso. 4. Resonancia Magnética: útil también en fases precoces y proporciona una imagen nítida de la superficie articular Diagnóstico Diferencial Afecciones Unilaterales 1. Sinovitis transitoria de la cadera: 2. Artritis séptica / osteomielitis múltiple 3. Artritis reumatoide juvenil. 4. Tuberculosis falciformes Afecciones bilaterales 1. Hipotiroidismo 2. Displasia epifisaria 3. Enfermedad de Gaucher 4. Anemia de células

Clasificaciones: · Clasificación de Catterall: 4 grupos según el grado de afectación. - Grupo I: afecta aproximadamente al 25% de la cabeza, la región antero-central. - Grupo II: afecta a casi el 50% de la cabeza, a nivel de la región antero-lateral. - Grupo III: afecta al 75% de la extensión de la cabeza. - Grupo IV: afectación completa de la cabeza, 100%. · Clasificación de Salter & Thompson: extensión de la fractura subcondral: -Grupo A: la fractura subcondral afecta aproximadamente a la mitad de la cabeza, puede equivaler a los I- II de Catterall. -Grupo B: la fractura subcondral prácticamente a todo lo largo de la epífisis, puede equivaler a los grupos III y IV de Catterall. · Clasificación del Pilar Externo de Herring: grado de afectación del pilar externo de la cabeza femoral en la radiografía PA: - Grupo A: no hay afectación del pilar externo, no hay colapso o radiolucencia significativa. - Grupo B: pilar externo presenta cierta radiolucencia, manteniéndose la densidad ósea y la altura del pilar al menos en el 50%. - Grupo B-C: pilar externo muy estrecho pero conserva mas del 50% de su altura, o pilar externo poco osificado pero conserva mas del 50% de su altura o pilar externa con exactamente el 50% de su altura - Grupo C: mayor afectación del mencionado pilar, con una mayor radiolucencia y la altura se ve afectada en más del 50%. Es la clasificación más ampliamente aceptada debido a que existe una buena correlación con el pronóstico sobre todo cuando tenemos en cuenta la edad del paciente y existe escasa variabilidad inter o intra observador. · Clasificación de Stulberg: valora el grado de deformidad de la cadera y la evolución hacia la coxartrosis, 5 grupos :

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

- Clase I: cabeza femoral normal. No desarrolla artrosis. - Clase II: cabeza femoral esférica, coxa magna o cuello corto. Congruencia esférica. No desarrolla artrosis a los 30 años, y solamente un 18% a los 40 años. - Clase III: cabeza femoral no esférica, ovoidea, pero no plana, tiene forma de champiñón. Congruencia anesférica. Desarrollan artrosis el 50% de los casos después de 30 años. - Clase IV: cabeza plana, con repercusión en cuello y acetábulo. Congruencia anesférica. Desarrollan artrosis más del 80% de los casos. - Clase V: cabeza plana. Cuello y acetábulo normales. Incongruencia anesférica. Desarrollan artrosis en la práctica totalidad de los casos. Factores pronóstico: A. Clínicos: 1. Edad > de 9 años al diagnóstico: 2. Pérdida persistente de la movilidad articular 3. Obesidad. B. Radiológicos: 1. Signo de Gage: defecto de osificación de la porción lateral de la epífisis. 2. Calcificación lateral epifisaria 3. Extrusión o subluxación de la cabeza 4. Rarefacción metafisaria difusa 5. Horizontalización de la fisis 6. Grado de extensión: Catterall III-IV, Salter & Thompson B, o grupo C del pilar externo Tratamiento: · Objetivo del tratamiento son la prevención de: - deformidad de la cabeza - alteraciones del crecimiento - coxartrosis · Principios del tratamiento:: 1. Restaurar la movilidad articular: debe ser considerado como primordial, pues nos va a permitir separar/abducir las caderas y colocar la porción anterolateral de la cabeza femoral en el acetábulo, en posición de contención. Esto debe conseguirse ANTES de instaurar cualquier tratamiento, sea quirúrgico u ortopédico. Si no es así, riesgo de cadera "en bisagra" 2. Mantener la cabeza femoral con una buena cobertura (Contención). El tratamiento actual de la enfermedad se basa en la premisa de si conseguimos una adecuada contención de la cabeza femoral en la cavidad acetabular cuándo esta es vulnerable a la deformidad y mientras dura el proceso de regeneración, proporcionaremos una cabeza femoral más esférica y congruente. - tratamiento debe iniciarse en la fase inicial o de fragmentación, que es cuando la cabeza tiene aún capacidad plástica. - tratamiento no está indicado en los niños que NO tengan signos clínicos o radiológicos de riesgo, si ya se ha iniciado la fase de reosificación o si la enfermedad está en fase de secuelas. - Tratamiento Conservador: Se pueden dividir en: - No permiten la deambulación: Yesos pelvipédicos ,...... - Si permiten la deambulación: Yesos de Petrie, férula de Toronto, férula de Newington, férula de Atlanta Scottish-Rite, férula de Tachdjian. · Petrie y Bitenc, pioneros en aplicar los principios de Contención de la cadera empleando calzas de yesos en abducción unidas distalmente por una palo de escoba ("broomstick"). Este método demostró que la carga con la cadera contenida no era perjudicial. Este sistema permite, además de la carga, la movilidad de las caderas en posición de contención (abducción y rotación interna).

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

·

· ·

El sistema más ampliamente difundido en USA es la férula de Atlanta que proporciona contención solamente por abducción sin necesidad de rotación interna, pero recientes artículos han demostrado que este sistema no proporcionan la adecuada cobertura de la porción anterolateral de la cabeza y no altera la evolución natural de la enfermedad El tiempo de duración del tratamiento muy variable, dependiendo de la edad del paciente y del estadio de evolución según Waldenström. Otros métodos de tratamiento no fundamentados en la contención: campos electromagnéticos, pero su empleo en estudio realizado a doble ciego se ha mostrado ineficaz y por tanto no recomendable ya que no altera el curso de la enfermedad.

- Tratamiento Quirúrgico: Los métodos quirúrgicos están basados en el concepto de contención de la cabeza en el interior del acetábulo. La premisa es que la reorientación de la porción proximal del fémur o del acetábulo o de ambos permite que la vulnerable cabeza femoral esté centrada más profundamente en el acetábulo. - Osteotomía femoral: · Requiere buena movilidad articular, · Buena congruencia articular, y · Comprobación de la correcta cobertura en abducción y rotación interna · La corrección debe estar entre 10º-30º con 10º-25º de rotación interna. · No excederse en la varización , nunca menos de 110º - 115º, · Síntesis más aconsejable: placa AO de 90º o placa con tornillo deslizante tipo Richards tamaños pediátricos. - Osteotomía innominada de Salter · Requiere una adecuada movilidad · No realizar en una articulación incongruente. · Indicada en niños mayores de 6 años, con afectación mayor del 50% de la cabeza femoral (Catterall II - IV), así como subluxación de la cadera en posición de carga. - Osteotomía femoral más Salter · Máxima cobertura posible evitando las complicaciones derivadas de un solo método. La osteotomía femoral dirige la cabeza en el interior del acetábulo reduciendo en teoría cualquier incremento de la presión articular o rigidez que pudiera ocasionar la osteotomía de Salter. La cobertura que proporciona la osteotomía del ilíaco nos permite reducir la varización necesaria en la osteotomía femoral. · Inconveniente: mayor tiempo quirúrgico y perdida de sangre. Más difícil. - "Shelf" Artroplastia Aunque formalmente está descrita como método de tratamiento de "salvamento" en los casos incongruentes, recientemente se realiza de forma primaria en niños mayores de 8 años Catterall III-IV. Este procedimiento permite recubrir la porción más anterolateral de la cabeza femoral previniendo la subluxación o el crecimiento lateral de la epífisis. Otras indicaciones son la subluxación lateral de la cabeza, inadecuada cobertura o la cadera en "bisagra" asociada a las formas severas. Opciones de tratamiento de caderas NO contenibles y presentación tardía: · Casos que se diagnostican o vienen para que los tratemos en fase de reosificación, con una deformidad de la cabeza no contenible o que han perdido la contención tras tratamiento quirúrgico o conservador.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Estos pacientes presentan habitualmente una cadera en "bisagra" demostrable por la artrografía, tienen dolor, acortamiento de la extremidad y contractura fija en flexo y adducto. Posibles tratamientos: Osteotomía de Chiari, "Shelf" Artroplastia, Queilectomia, "hipjoint-distraction", osteotomía de extensión y abducción. Tratamiento de la Osteocondritis Disecante: · rara complicación, > 3 % de los pacientes con enfermedad de Perthes · casos de gran afectación ( Catterall III-IV) o edad avanzada · pueden ocasionar dolor intermitente · Tto. sintomático, a base de AINEs y descarga de la extremidad. · Si el dolor es persistente: perforaciones a través del cuello femoral y fijación interna con agujas o tornillos canulados tipo Herbert. · Si fragmento desprendido de su lecho y no puede ser repuesto, extirpación. Tratamiento del hipercrecimiento relativo del trocánter mayor: · En casos con afectación severa de la cabeza femoral con lesión fisaria. · Pueden desarrollar marcha de Trendelemburg y dolor por insuficiencia glútea, aunque esto nunca ha sido un problema mayor en las series revisadas a largo plazo. · Procedimientos quirúrgicos pueden realizarse: - Epifisiodesis trocantérica: antes de los 8-9 años, - Descenso y lateralización del trocánter mayor: poco efectivo y pocos cirujanos lo recomiendan. Riesgo de Condrolisis

·

SINOVITIS TRANSITORIA DE LA CADERA

Introducción: · la causa más frecuente de cojera en menores de 10 años. · cojera antiálgica de inicio que se resuelve gradualmente en el transcurso de los días. · Sinonimia: cadera irritable, artritis transitoria de la cadera, cadera de observación, coxitis transitoria, coxitis fugans, coxitis serosa simple, cadera fantasma, epifisitis transitoria aguda , y sinovitis tóxica · Afectar a niños varones entre 3 y 6 años. Solo 5% bilateral. · movilidad articular limitada, rot. int., actitud flexión, abducción y rotación externa. · Puede existir historia trauma o infección respiratoria, por anticuerpos como respuesta a antígenos bacterianos o virales o por predisposición alérgica con fiebre, leucocitosis, y elevación de la VSG. · El dolor y la limitación de la movilidad suele remitir después de varios días de reposo en cama Imagen: · Radiológicamente no se observan alteraciones óseas, aunque puede existir un aumento del espacio articular > de 2 mm. · Ecografía suele confirmar la existencia de liquido articular. · Otras pruebas diagnóstica en casos de dudas diagnósticas o Gammagrafía ósea con Tecnecio 99 que no mostrará una zona fría como aparece en el Perthes en fases precoces o Resonancia Magnética que probará la indemnidad epifisaria pero con derrame articular.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Diagnóstico Diferencial: · Perthes, Osteomielitis, Artritis séptica, Displasia capitis femoris, Artritis reumatoide monoarticular, Fiebre reumática, y Osteoma Osteoide Evolución: · curación sin secuelas, · se han descrito Coxa Magna residual o pequeños cambios degenerativos a largo plazo Tratamiento · descarga de la articulación mediante reposo en cama · ocasionalmente tracción blanda de la extremidad · si tras este tratamiento no se obtiene una mejoría sustancial, es conveniente vigilar al paciente mas estrechamente pues pude ser que el reposo no haya sido el adecuado o esté desarrollando una Enfermedad de Perthes o presente una causa no identificada de sinovitis secundaria.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

BIBLIOGRAFIA 1. Catterall A. The natural History of Perthes`disease . J Bone Joint Surg 1971;53B:37-53. 2. Glueck CJ, Crawford A, Roy D, Freiberg R, Glueck H, Stroop D. Association of antithrombotic factor defeiciencies and hypofibrinolysiswith Legg-Perthes disease. J Bone Joint Surg 1996;78-A:3-13. 3. Gallists S, Reitinger T, Linhart W, Muntean W . The role of inherited Thrombotic disorders in the etiology of Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease JPO 1999;19:82-83. 4. Salter RB, Bell M. The pathogenesis of deformity in Legg-Perthes disease: an experimental investigation. J Bone Joint Surg; 1968;50-B:436-42. 5. Landin LA, Danielson LG, Wattsgard G. Transient synovitis of the hip: its incidence, epidemiology and relation to Perthe's disease. J Bone Joint Surg 1987;69-B:238-42. 6. González Herranz P, Rapariz JM. Enfermedad de Legg-Calvé ­Perthes. En de Pablos J, González Herranz P. Apuntes de Ortopedia Infantil, Madrid: Editorial Ergon , 2002; 270-281. 7. Jonsäter A. Coxa Plana , a histopathologic and arthrographic study.Acta Orthop Scand 1953;12 (Supl): 1-13. 8. Stulberg SD, Cooperman DR, Wallesten R. The natural history of Legg-CalvePerthes disease. J Bone Joint Surg 1981;63-A: 1095-1108. 9. Tsao AK, Dias LS, Conway JJ, Straka P. The prognostic value and significance of serial bone scintigraphy in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. J Pediatr Orthop 1997;17:230-239. 10. Song HR, Lee SH, Na JB, Cho SH, Jeong ST, Ahn BW, Koo KH. Comparison of MRI with subchondral fracture in the evaluation of extent of epiphyseal necrosis in the early stage of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. J Pediatr Orthop 1999;19:70-75. 11. Wiggs O, Terjesen T, Svenningsen S. Interobserver reliability of radiographic classifications and measurement in the assessment of Perthes`disease. Acta Ortop Scand 2002;73:523-30 12. Wenger DR, Ward WT, Herring JA. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: current concepts review. J Bone Joint Surg 1991;73-A:778-787. 13. Gigante C, Frizziero P, Turra S. Prognostic value of Catterall and Herring classification in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. J Pediatr Ortop 2002;22:345-9. 14. Herring JA. The treatment of Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease: a critical review of the literature. J Bone Joint Surg 1994;76-A:448-458. 15. Herring JA, Neustadt JB, Williams JJ et al. The lateral pillar classification of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. J Pediatr Orthop 1992;12:143-150. 16. Friedlander JK, Weiner DS. Radiographic results of proximal femoral varus osteotomy in Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease. JPO 2000;20:566-71. 17. Lappin K, Kealey D, Cosgrove A. Herring Classification: How useful is the initial radiograph ? J Pediatr Orthop 2002;22:479-482. 18. Podeszwa DA, Stanitski CL, Stanitski BF, Woo R, Mendelow MJ. The effect of pediatric orthopaedic experience on interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the Herring lateral pillar classification of Perthes disease. J Pediatr Orthop 2000;20:562-5. 19. Ippolito D, Tudisco C, Farsetti P. The long-term prognosis of the unilateral Perthes' disease. J Bone Joint Surg 1987; 69-B:243- 250.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

20. Talkhani IS, Moore DP, Dowling FE, Fogarty EE. Neck-shaft angle remodeling after derotation varus osteotomy for severe Perthes disease. Acta Orthop Belg 2001;67:248-251. 21. Harrison MHM, Bassett CAL. The result of a double-blind trial of pulsed electromagnetic frequency in the treatment of Perthes`disease. JPO 1997;17:264-5. 22. Kitakoji T, Hattori T, Iwata H. Femoral varus osteotomy in legg-Calvé Perthes disesase: Points at operation to prevent residual problems. J Pediatr Orthop 1999; 19:76-81. 23. Noonan KJ, Price ChT, Kupiszewski SJ, Pyevich M. Results of femoral varus osteotomy in children older than 9 years of age with Perthes disease. J Pediatr Orthop 2001;21:198-204. 24. Zenios M, Hutchinson C, Galasko CSB. Radiological evaluation of surgical treatment in Perthes' disease. Int Orthop 2001;25:305-307. 25. Hau R, Dickens DRV, Natras GR, O`Sullivan M, Torode IP, Graham HK. Wich implant for proximal femoral osteotomy in children ? A comparison of the AO (ASIF) 90º fixed-angle blade plate and the Richards Intermediate Hip Screw. JPO 2000;20:336-43. 26. Guarniero R, Luzo C, Montenegro NB, Godoy RM . Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: a comparative study between two types of treatment: femoral varus osteotomy and arthrodiatasis with an externa fixator. AAOS . Poster presentation. 13-17 Febrero, 2002. 27. Salter RB The present status of surgical treatment for Legg-Perthes disease. JBJS 1984; 66-A:961-6. 28. Catterall A. Adolescent hip pain after Perthes' disease. Clin Orthop 1986,209:6569. 29. Kehl DKJ. Transient synovitis. En Morrissy RT, Weinstein SL Eds. . Lovell & Winter`s Pediatric Orthopaedics. 4ª Edición. Philadelphia, Lippincott-Raven 1996:912-917. 30. Miller OL. Acute transient synovitis of the hip joint. JAMA 1931;96:575-79. 31. Hardinge K. The etiology of transient synovitis of the hip in childhood. J Bone Joint Surg 1970;52:100-7 32. Lockhart GR, Longobardi YL, Ehrlich M. Transient Synovitis: lack of serologic evidence for acute Parvovirus B-19 or Human Herpesvirus ­6 infection. J Pediatr Orthop 1999;19:185-7. 33. Miralles M, Gonzalez G, Pulpeiro JR, Millan JM, Gordillo I, Serrano C, Olcoz F, Martinez A .Sonography of the painful hip in children: 500 consecutive cases. Am J Roentgenol 1989; 152:579-82. 34. Fernández de Valderrama JA. The "observation hip" syndrome and its late sequelae. J Bone Joint Surg 1963;45-B:462-70. 35. Kallio PE. Coxa magna following transient synovitis. Clin Orthop 1988;228:4956.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

LA CADERA NEUROLÓGICA

Camilo A. Turriago. Bogotá. El desarrollo y normal crecimiento de la caderas depende de aspectos genéticos y funcionales. La bipedestación y marcha son fuertes estímulos para que la cadera logre un crecimiento normal, el balance entre las diferentes fuerzas musculares permite que el fémur proximal y el acetábulo maduren satisfactoriamente como caderas estables y anatómicamente sanas. A diferencia del adulto, la cadera en formación en presencia de trastornos neurológicos o musculares que impidan o retrasen la bipedestación y marcha, y la presencia de fuerzas musculares no balanceadas alteran su anatomía y estabilidad. La cadera se puede alterar en trastornos flácidos como mielomeningocele o en trastornos espásticos como la parálisis cerebral. El comportamiento es completamente diferente dependiendo del tipo de lesión. En mielomeningocele, frecuentemente las caderas presentan deformidad y posteriormente inestabilidad progresiva, especialmente cuando no hay balance entre los músculos flexores y aductores que predominan sobre los extensores y abductores que están parcial o totalmente inactivos, esto ocurre especialmente en los niveles lumbar medio o bajo (L3-L5). La luxación de la cadera ocurre hacia los tres años de edad y puede ser uni o bilateral. La luxación unilateral se asocia a oblicuidad de la pelvis con el consiguiente impacto sobre la columna. La luxación de la cadera en mielomeningocele no se asocia dolor y el impacto en la función es discutido. Autores com Menelaus afirman que la calidad de la marcha y el consumo de energía aumentan, sin embargo otros autores como Dias afirman que el consumo elevado de energía obedece a la presencia de deformidades articulares y no a la luxación de la cadera. De tal manera que hay autores que recomiendan realizar procedimientos reconstructivos consistentes en osteotomías femorales, acetabuloplastias y transferencias musculares del oblicuo del abdomen para mantener las caderas reducidas, mientras que otros tan solo recomiendan corregir las deformidades asociadas que evitan la correcta alineación de la extremidad. Esta última parece ser la tendencia actual mas recomendada ya que los estudios sugieren que no se modifica el pronóstico de marcha al llegar a la vida adulta. En trastornos como la parálisis cerebral la condición es bien diferente. El 20% de los niños con parálisis cerebral, usualmente paciente con cuadriplejia, no tienen pronóstico de marcha. Es en estos pacientes en quienes las caderas sufren alteraciones más graves y es más frecuente la luxación. Esta se presenta por deformidad progresiva del cuello femoral debido a las fuerzas anormales que recibe y a la falta de apoyo durante la bipedestación y marcha. Esta deformidad asociada a fuerzas musculares aductoras y flexoras no balanceadas ocasionan inestabilidad de la cadera, usualmente posteroexterna. La luxación ocurre más frecuentemente entre los 6 y 7 años de edad pero puede ocurrir incluso durante la adolescencia. El curso natural de la luxación espástica de la cadera es dolor. Un dolor que en un principio es leve pero que aumenta hasta el punto de ser intolerable y permanente. Pueden imaginar un paciente con pobre o nula comprensión del medio que lo rodea, con dolor que la mayoría de las veces es ocasionado por la movilización de los miembros inferiores o el cambio de posición. La consecuencia es la asociación entre la presencia de cualquier persona y dolor. Esto se traduce en llanto y gritos que no pueden ser fácilmente entendidos por los padres o por los cuidadores con el consiguiente deterioro de la calidad de vida, no solo del paciente sino de sus cuidadores. La luxación espástica

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

de la cadera también se asocia al desarrollo de oblicuidad de la pelvis y escoliosis progresiva secundaria. Se presenta una mayor frecuencia de úlceras por decúbito, de fracturas del fémur y dificultad para la higiene y aseo del periné. Por estas razones es altamente recomendable monitorizar el desarrollo de las caderas en niños con parálisis cerebral espástica y tratarlas quirúrgicamente en caso de documentarse subluxación progresiva, aun en el paciente sin pronóstico de marcha. Los procedimientos más recomendados son osteotomías femorales inter-trocantéricas, osteotomías pélvicas (especialmente Dega), tenotomía o alargamiento de los aductores y tenotomía del psoas. El tratamiento de la luxación dolorosa inveterada es difícil y de resultados impredecibles debido al acondicionamiento sicológico de los pacientes. En nuestra experiencia los mejores resultados los hemos obtenido con la reducción de la cadera dentro del acetábulo y la realización de osteotomías en el fémur y en el acetábulo para mantener la reducción. Los niños con parálisis cerebral que caminan presentan menos frecuentemente inestabilidad de la cadera y la patología de esta articulación se asocia más a trastornos de la movilidad y función del mecanismo abductor. Los grupos musculares pueden afectar la cadera especialmente en los planos sagital y coronal. En el plano sagital el psoas frecuentemente está retraído o espástico y ocasiona hiperlordosis, aumento de la movilidad y de la inclinación anterior de la pelvis y dificulta la extensión de la cadera durante el apoyo. Los extensores de las caderas frecuentemente son débiles y tienen mal control neurológico. Entre estos están el glúteo mayor y los isquiotibiales. En el plano coronal los aductores usualmente son espásticos frente a unos débiles abductores cuya función se hace aún más insuficiente ante la presencia de un fémur proximal valgo y anteverso. La marcha en "tijera" ocurre por la anteversión femoral aumentada asociada al aumento en la aducción de la cadera durante el apoyo. Es importante que la cadera tenga la mejor función posible en estos pacientes ya que el compromiso distal (pie y rodilla) es usualmente mayor. Es por esta razón que la principal aceleración de la marcha en pacientes con parálisis cerebral se lleva a cabo justamente en la cadera. Es importante tener esto claro con el fin de evitar debilitar los pocos músculos aceleradores de estos pacientes. Por tal motivo en pacientes que caminan no es recomendable realizar tenotomía completa del psoas iliaco o de los isquiotibiales. Uno de los problemas que ocurren con relativa frecuencia es la insuficiencia del mecanismo abductor de las caderas. Este puede ocurrir por debilidad y ausencia de adecuado control del glúteo medio. Es cuyo caso el tratamiento es extremadamente difícil y rara vez estos pacientes alcanzan niveles satisfactorios en la función del mecanismo abductor. De manera afortunada el principal problema del mecanismo abductor es la insuficiencia del mismo por brazo de palanca corto. Este es ocasionado por el aumento del ángulo cérvico-diafisiario, que tiene el efecto de acercar el centro de giro de la cabeza femoral al vector de tracción del glúteo medio al insertarse en el trocánter mayor. El tratamiento generalmente efectivo de esta condición es el restablecimiento quirúrgico de la anatomía normal del fémur proximal mediante una osteotomía femoral intertrocantérica. Debe anotarse que durante el crecimiento esquelético estas anormalidades tienden a recidivar de tal manera que la oportunidad quirúrgica está cerca de los siete años de edad y se recomienda permitir algunos grados de sobre-corrección.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

Bibliografía 1. Bleck, E. E. Orthopaedic Management in Cerebral Palsy. London. Mac Keith Press. 1991 2. Diméglio A, Kalein A, Bonnel F, et al. The growing hip: specifications and requirements. J Pediatr Orthop Br. 1994; 14: 135-137. 3. Gage J.R.: The Treatment of Gait Problems in Cerebral Palsy. Mac Keith Press, 2004 4. Miller F., Bachrach S.J.: Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide For Caregiving. The John Hopkins Univerity Press, 1995 5. Rang, M.: Cerebral palsy. In Morrisy R.T. (Ed.) Pediatric Orthopaedics, 3rd Edn. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott. Pp 465 ­ 506. 1990 6. Root L., Treatment Of Hip Problems In Cerebral Palsy. Instructional Course Lectures 1987, Volume 36:237 7. Stahelli L. T. Pediatric Orthopaedic Secrets,Hanley and Elfos, INC, 1997 8. Taborda J.C., Turriago C.A., Rosselli P., Gómez O.: Tratamiento de la Luxación Dolorosa de la Cadera en Adolescentes con Parálisis Cerebral Sin Pronóstico de Marcha: Rev. Col. De Ortop. y Traumat. Vol 13: N° 3: 242-247: 1999

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

SLIPPED CAPITAL FEMORAL EPIPHYSIS

James Hui. Singapur. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common adolescent hip disorder. The incidence is between 0.7 to 3.4 per 100,000 children per year. SCFE occurs because of a dehiscence through the hypertrophic zone of the physis. Approaching and during adolescence, the physis widens with diminution of the perichondral ring. The theories that have been advocated include trauma, mechanical factors (eg. Obesity, and retroversion of the physis), endocrine abnormalities, renal failure and irradiation. The traditional classification was to divide SCFE into acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic slips. A newer classification by Loder has become increasingly popular because of its prognostic significance. This classification divides the slips into either stable or unstable depending on the ability to weight-bearing. As the femoral neck slips anterior and superiorly, a retroversion deformity is created. At maturity, fusion of the slipped epiphysis will occur with the femoral neck. Untreated SCFE, especially if severe, will eventually lead to secondary osteoarthritis in most cases. The patient most commonly an adolescent presenting with pain in the hip or groin. Occasionally, the patient may present with referred pain to the knee instead, leading to a diagnostic delay. The patient with an acute, unstable SCFE will be unable to weight-bear completely. A chronic, stable SCFE can occasionally present with merely gait abnormality associated with mild hip discomfort. Physical examination will reveal a patient with an antalgic gait with the affected limb in external rotation. There is usually an associated loss of internal rotation. Essential radiographs include anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral view of the pelvis. On the anteroposterior view, a line drawn along the superior cortex of the femoral neck (known as Klein's line) should transect the femoral epiphysis in normal hips. However, in the presence of a slipped epiphysis, Klein's line fails to do so, and lies above the epiphysis instead. The severity of the slip can be assessed based on the anteroposterior or frog-leg lateral views. If the anteroposterior view is used, the percentage of femoral head displacement with reference to the neck diameter can be measured and graded as mild, moderate or severe. The classification as described by Southwick is used if a frogleg lateral is used instead. In this case, the head-shaft angle of the normal hip is deducted from that of the affected hip. The chronicity of the slip can be evaluated on radiographic views. In a chronic slip or an acute-on-chronic slip, some evidence of metaphyseal remodelling may be seen along the superior and anterior femoral neck. The exact management of the unstable SCFE is still highly controversial. Current trends favour percutaneous in situ fixation of unstable SCFE. The role of deliberate, gentle manipulation and reduction in unstable SCFE is controversial as well. While 2 screws afford more rotational stability, a single screw has been shown to be sufficient for fixation even in unstable SCFE. There is less controvery with regards to management of stable slips. In general, a single percutaneous screw is sufficient. Prophylactic pinning is offered in patients who have risk factors such endocrinopathy, young age at initial presentation and inability to perform close follow-up till skeletal maturity. Prevention of avascular necrosis is key in the management of SCFE. This is particularly so in unstable slips, when the risk is highest. Prevention of permanent pin or screw penetration into the hip joint is the best way to prevent chondrolysis.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

THE PROBLEMATIC ADOLESCENT/YOUNG ADULT HIP

James McCarthy. Madison, Wisconsin, USA Adolescent hip problems can occur from residual childhood disorders, such as septic arthritis, SCFE, and Perthes disease, or occur in children with no history of childhood hip disorders, this section refers to the later. Hip pain can easily be confused with pain radiating from the lower back and must be carefully differentiated. Additionally patients with anterior thigh or knee pain may actually have hip pathology. Pain radiating from the hip, especially associated with snapping or clicking may be from extra-articular pathology, such as the psoas tendon snapping over the femoral head, or the iliotibial band snapping over the greater trochanter. It may also be from interarticular pathology, such as a labral tear. To make the diagnosis more confusing, patients may have more than one pathology. For example patients with DDH may develop labral pathology. Developmental Dysplasia Hip (DDH) may not present until late adolescent or early adulthood. We found a 20% incidence in "silent" hip dysplasia in the contralateral hip of children with known DDH. The pain will typically be described as groin or lateral hip pain, and occurs after walking a short distance. Patients with pain and radiographic evidence of hip dysplasia, which included a center edge angle less than 20°on AP or false profile views, should be evaluated with a MRA (magnetic resonance arthrogram) to identify labral pathology. This study may also be helpful in identifying significant articular defects. Surgical indications include continued pain that is refractory to conservative treatment. Progressive dysplasia, especially with evidence of subluxation (ie a break in Shenton's Line) may also be an indication for surgical intervention. Non congruent or osteoarthritic hips tend to do poorly. Treatment for dysplasia typically involves a periacetabular osteotomy, of which there are several described. Evaluation of the hip can be performed at that time. For hips with labral tears and dysplasia it may be difficult to determine the source of pain. Hip arthroscopy can be effective for resecting or repairing labral tears, but in general dyplastic hips tend to have poorer results with labral resection, than the those without evidence of dysplasia. Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) Definition: Aberrant morphology of the acetabulum and/or proximal femur that results in abnormal contact between the acetabular rim and femoral head and neck, it is an important and sometimes unrecognized etiology of premature hip degenerative joint disease (DJD) It is classification (Ganz) as cam-type impingement (femoral side) Pincer-type impingement (acetabular side). Cam type is associated with active young adult men and childhood hip diseases like SCFE and LCPD. Pincher type is more often associated with

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

middle-aged women, acetabular retroversion, and over-coverage from osteotomies. Both types may be found together.

The clinical Diagnosis is made from a history of intermittent activity-related hip or groin pain, especially pain with prolonged sitting. They typically have limited hip ROM, esp. internal rotation and adduction with the patient supine with hip flexed to 90° (Anterior impingement test). Less commonly a posterior impingement test may be positive (patient supine, leg over edge of table with hip extended, pain is elicited with passive hip external rotation). Imaging involves a true AP and lateral views of hip and a cross-table lateral view in neutral rotation. Important findings include acetabular retroversion diagnosed by "crossover" sign and prominence on femoral neck, head-neck offset. Non-surgical treatment includes activity restriction, NSAIDs and rehabilitation for strengthening. Surgical treatment includes hip arthroscopy, which may be valuable for diagnostic evaluation, minor labral tears and simple cam-type impingement requiring limited femoral neck osteoplasty. Open surgical dislocation allows for greater exposure to more completely see and treat the pathology. It also allows for treatment of acetabular FAI. Chondrolysis represents a process characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage resulting in secondary joint space narrowing and stiffness. It may follow infection, trauma, prolonged immobilization and severe burns about the lower extremities. Also, it may be a complication of slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Conversely idiopathic type is characterized by an acute form of rapidly progressive chondrolysis occurring most frequently during adolescence with isolated involvement of the hip joint, but without a demonstrable cause. Insidious onset of pain in anterior or medial side of affected hip associated with joint stiffness and limp. Laboratory values are typically normal although the ESR can be slightly elevated and rarely over 30. The hallmark is narrowing of the joint space from normal 3-5 mm to values <3 mm. Other studies such as MRI, or arthrography may be of benefit. The differential diagnosis is long and it is important to rule out infectious or inflammatory etiologies. Treatment involes NSAIDS, aggressive PT, periodic traction and bedrest, prolonged non-weight, bearing or limited weightbearing and CPM. Some authors have recommended surgical intervention for refractory cases.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

REFERENCES Clohisy JC, Barrett SE, Gordon JE, Delgado ED, Schoenecker PL: Periacetabular osteotomy for the treatment of severe acetabular dysplasia. J Bone Joint Surg. 2005, 87 (2): 254-259. Beck M, Leunig M, Parvizi J, Boutier V, Wyss D, Ganz R: Anterior femoroacetabular impingement:II. Clinical midterm results. Clin Orthop Relat Res 2004; 418: 67-73. Ganz R, Gill TJ, Gautier E, Ganz K, Krugel N, Berlemann U: Surgical dislocation of the adult hip: A technique with full access to the femoral head and acetabulum without the risk of avascular necrosis. J Bone Joint Surg Br 2001; 83: 1119-1124. Ganz R, Parvizi J, Beck M, Leunig M, Notzli H, Siebenrock KA: Femoroacetabular impingement: A cause for early osteoarthritis of the hip. Clin Orthop Relat Res 2003; 417:112-120. Parvizi J, Leunig, M, Ganz, R: Femoroacetabular impingement; J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2007; 15: 561-570. Philippon MJ, Schenker ML: Arthroscopy for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in the athlete. Clin Sports Med 2006; 25:299-308. Bleck EE. Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip. JBJS (AM) 1983;65:1266.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

PRIMARY HIP SPICA OR FLEXIBLE INTRAMEDULLARY STAINLESS STEEL NAILING FOR PEDIATRIC DIAPHYSEAL FEMUR FRACTURES: A PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED STUDY

Dr Dipak Shrestha, MBBS, MS (Ortho), Dr Ruhullah Mohammad , MD, Dr Darsan Dhoju, MBBS, MS( Ortho), Dr Umesh Kumar Sharma, MBBS, MD ( Radiodiagnosis). Dhulikhel Hospital. Nepal Introduction / Objetives: Variable treatment options for paediatric diaphyseal femur fracture available. Flexible intramedullary nailing has become popular method for internal fixation of femur fracture. We present randomized controlled trial comparing flexible intramedullary nailing with standard method of primary hip spica. Material and Methods: Fifty children of age 3-13 years (mean 6.4±3.46 years) with isolated diaphyseal femur fracture, presented over 2 years period were randomly allocated into two groups. They were treated with either primary hip spica or closed reduction and internal fixation with two intramedullary flexible stainless steel nails and followed up for average duration of 17 months. Results: Average time of walking with aids (52.33 vs. 13.38 days, p=0.000), average time of walking independently (6.6 vs.10.67 weeks, p=0.002), mean duration of clinico radiological union (13.25 vs. 10.76 weeks, p=0.000) and mean period of returning to normal activities (12.08 vs. 8.76 weeks, p=0.027) was earlier in nailing group. But mean duration of hospital stay (3.32 vs. 6.56 days, p=0.000) was longer and average treatment cost (NRs. 2731.8 vs. 4460, p= 0.000) was more for nailing group than spica group. 33.3% children in spica group had minor complications as compared to 16% minor and 4 % major complications in nailing group. Conclusion: Children of age 3 to 13 years with diaphyseal femur fracture managed with closed reduction and two intramedullary stainless steel nails have earlier ambulation status, shorter union time and returned to pre injury condition earlier with few complications than children managed with primary hip spica. But hospital stay and treatment cost is more for intramedullary nailing which can be attributed to social and geographic peculiarities of the study center.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

CLAUDICACIÓN A LA MARCHA EN UN NIÑO SIN ANTECEDENTE TRAUMÁTICO

V. Pellicer García, M. Salom Taverner, L. Miranda Casas. Hospital Universitario la Fe. Valencia Objetivos: Presentamos el caso de un niño de 6 años, atendido en nuestro Servicio, por presentar dolor moderado de 6 semanas de evolución en muslo derecho, que dificultaba la deambulación. En las radiografías se apreció lesión lítica en la diáfisis femoral. Método: Se completó el estudio con analítica, RMN, TAC, llegando al diagnóstico de GRANULOMA EOSINÓFILO tras biopsia. El granuloma eosinófilo es una forma localizada de HISTIOCITOSIS DE CÉLULAS DE LANGERHANS, de etiología desconocida, afecta fundamentalmente a pacientes menores de 30 años, manifestándose con frecuencia por dolor, inflamación o febrícula. Afecta a cráneo (donde produce una imagen típica en sacabocados), fémur, pelvis, costillas y raquis (con una imagen característica de vértebra plana). Nuestro paciente sólo presentaba la lesión femoral. Resultados: Dada su agresividad local, simula procesos neoplásicos malignos, siendo necesario en la mayoría de los casos recurrir a una punción biopsia para llegar al diagnóstico. Debe descartarse siempre que forme parte de un cuadro sistémico. El granuloma eosinófilo solitario presenta un curso clínico habitualmente benigno, con remisión espontánea, no precisando tratamiento en sujetos asintomáticos. Cuando existe sintomatología, como en nuestro paciente, puede optarse por tratamientos mínimamente invasivos como la infiltración percutánea con corticoides, como en nuestro caso, consiguiéndose la remisión completa de la lesión. Conclusion: El granuloma eosinífilo, considerado el gran simulador, por poder adoptar casi cualquier aspecto radiográfico, debe entrar en el diagnóstico diferencial de toda lesión ósea, especialmente en menores de 30 años.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

OSTEOMIELITIS AGUDA MULTIFOCAL

Rovira MªP., Provinciale E., Iftimie P., Gordillo A., Giné J. Tarragona. Objetivos: La osteomielitis subaguda es una infección hematógena del hueso caracterizada por la dificultad en su diagnóstico debido a su clínica insidiosa de dolor, e inflamación moderada, con un cuadro sistémico de poca importancia así como un patrón radiológico variado entre las características benignas y malignas. Método: Paciente varón de 14 años que presenta gonalgia izquierda de 6 meses de evolución, de predominio nocturno, que cede con ibuprofeno. A la exploración se aprecia un dolor en fosa poplítea, sin calor, ni eritema. No presenta fiebre. Se le realiza una analítica, radiografías, RM, TAC, gammagrafía, y una biopsia ósea. Diagnosticándole de osteomielitis subaguda multifocal. Resultados: Se realiza un tratamiento antibiótico que normalizo los parámetros de la inflamación y disminuyo el número de lesiones. No requiriendo por tanto tratamiento quirúrgico. Conclusión: El patrón radiológico en la osteomielitis aguda es variado. En el absceso de Brodie encontramos una lesión osteolítica en la metáfisis de un hueso largo, pudiendo sobrepasar la cortical o la fisis de crecimiento. La presentación en la que encontramos múltiples lesiones anulares bien definidas, como se aprecia en nuestro caso, es poco habitual. El tratamiento recomendado de la osteomielitis subaguda es el curetaje o escisión de la lesión y el tratamiento postoperatorio antibiótico que va desde semanas a meses. Algunos autores han descrito, como en nuestro caso, que se puede realizar un tratamiento correcto con solo antibióticos dejando el desbridamiento para los casos en que no se obtenga una buena evolución o en los casos con un patrón radiológico agresivo.

XIV Seminario Internacional de Ortopedia Infantil / XIV Internacional Seminar on Paediatric Orthopaedic

ACTIVIDADES ACADÉMICAS PREVISTAS PARA LOS PRÓXIMOS MESES XV Seminario Internacional de FRACTURAS INFANTILES · Fecha: Pos determinar. · Lugar: Valencia. · Dirigido a: Especialistas en COT con interés en COT infantil, Residentes en COT y especialidades afines (Pediatría, Rehabilitación, Reumatología, Radiología, etc.)

Para información adicional, por favor, rellene el boletín adjunto, enviénoslo y le responderemos tan pronto como dicha información esté disponible. .......................................................................................................................................................... XV Seminario Internacional de Fracturas Infantiles

Nombre:___________________________________________________________________ Dirección:_______________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________ Ciudad: _______________________ C.P.:________________ País: ______________________ Teléfono: _______________________________ Fax: ______________________________ E-Mail:___________________________________________________________________

XII Seminario Internacional de ORTOPEDIA INFANTIL XII International Seminar on PAEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC

La Encuesta de Satisfacción permite a la organización detectar y solucionar algunos fallos que pueden afectar a la calidad del curso. Le rogamos cumplimente los diferentes apartados leyendo con atención las cuestiones que le planteamos. Para cada cuestión de valoración se plantean puntuaciones de 1 a 5 puntos y se indican los valores extremos. Entregue el formulario cumplimentado en la Secretaria Técnica

A - INFORMACIÓN ­ (Muy escasa (1) ­ Excelente (5)) La información previa que tenía sobre los objetivos del curso ha sido La información previa que tenía sobre el contenido del curso ha sido La información previa que tenía sobre el calendario y sede ha sido El tiempo del que ha dispuesto para información e inscripción ha sido B - CONTENIDO (Muy poco adecuado (1) ­ Excelente (5)) La selección de contenidos le ha parecido El desarrollo de los temas en cuanto a contenido ha sido Los conceptos introducidos han sido La profundización en los temas desarrollados ha sido C - METODOLOGÍA: (Muy baja adecuación (1) ­ Excelente (5)) Para el aprendizaje, la adecuación de la metodología empleada ha sido El tiempo destinado a la exposición de ponentes ha sido El tiempo destinado a la discusión abierta entre los asistentes ha sido La distribución del tiempo en función de los temas ha sido D - PROFESORADO (Muy mal (1) ­ Excelente (5)) La preparación de los temas por los ponentes le ha parecido La disposición de los ponentes para el diálogo ha sido Su capacidad para adaptarse a las necesidades del grupo ha sido Su capacidad para estimular la participación de los asistentes ha sido E - MATERIAL DOCENTE (Muy malo/a (1) ­ Excelente (5)) La calidad del material en cuanto a contenido le ha parecido La calidad del material en cuanto a presentación le ha parecido F - ORGANIZACIÓN (Muy malo/a (1) ­ Excelente (5)) La capacidad de resolver problemas en la Secretaría Técnica ha sido Las condiciones (comodidad, visibilidad, sonido) del salón le parecen La organización general del curso le ha parecido Los servicios de apoyo (personal, medios, hosteleria,..etc) han sido G - RESULTADOS (Deficiente (1) ­ Excelente (5)) La actividad ha respondido a sus expectativas en grado El nivel de los conocimientos adquiridos ha sido El grado de aplicación de los conocimientos adquiridos en su trabajo es 1 2 3 4 5

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

Comentarios y Sugerencias

Information

Microsoft Word - Syllabus XIV Seminario Internacional.doc

121 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

106172

Notice: fwrite(): send of 218 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531