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STRATEGIES FOR COLLEGE WRITING A Rhetorical Reader, Second Edition Robert Funk

(Emeritus) Eastern Illinois University

Susan X Day

Iowa State University

Linda S. Coleman

Eastern Illinois University This rhetorical reader unifies reading and writing process through a who, what, why, how heuristic that is easy for students to understand.

Contents

1. Engaged Reading. Getting Started. Reading with a Plan: Who? What? Why? and How? Gender Gap in Cyberspace, Deborah Tannen. Using Who? What? Why? and How? Making the Reading-Writing Connection. Using the Core Strategies. 2. Writing from Reading. Developing Your Writing Skills. Constructing an Essay. Revising and Editing. A Sample Essay from Draft to Final Copy. Internet Sources for Writers. Using Internet Resources. Twelve Tips to Search the Internet Successfully, Bruce Maxwell. 3. Strategies for Discovering and Relating Experiences: Narration. Informal Discovery Writing. Diary, Anne Frank. From Discovery to

Narration. Formal Narration: Relating Discoveries to Readers. Getting Started on a Narrative. Organizing a Narrative. Developing a Narrative. Opening and Closing a Narrative. Using the Model. Jackie's Debut: A Unique Day, Mike Royko. Salvation, Langston Hughes. Street Scene: Minor Heroism in a Major Metropolitan Area, Ian Frazier. No Name Woman, Maxine Hong Kingston. Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell. Further Ideas for Using Narration. 4. Strategies for Appealing to the Senses: Description. The Grandfather, Gary Soto. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on a Description. Organizing a Description. Developing a Description. Using the Model. Two Views of the Mississippi, Mark Twain. Marrying Absurd, Joan Didion. White Breast Flats, Emilie Gallant. In the Kitchen, Henry Louis Gates Jr. Once More to the Lake, E. B. White. Further Ideas for Using Description. 5. Strategies for Making a Point: Exemplification. Just Walk on By: A Black Man Ponders His Power to Alter Public Space, Brent Staples. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on Exemplification. Organizing Exemplification. Developing Exemplification. Opening and Closing Exemplification. Using the Model. On the Interstate: A City of the Mind, Sue Hubbell. Shitty First Drafts, Anne Lamott. Slow Descent into Hell, Jon D. Hull. In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens, Alice Walker. A Weight That Women Carry, Sallie Tisdale. Further Ideas for Using Exemplification. 6. Strategies for Explaining How Things Work: Process Analysis. Cat Bathing as a Martial Art, Bud Herron. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on a Process Analysis. Organizing a Process Analysis. Developing a Process Analysis. Opening and Closing a Process Analysis. Using the Model. Wall Covering, Dereck Williamson. Why Leaves Turn Color in the Fall, Diane Ackerman. Embalming Mr. Jones, Jessica Mitford. How to Write a Personal Letter, Garrison Keillor. The Trouble with French Fries, Malcolm Gladwell. Further Ideas for Using Process Analysis. 7. Strategies for

Clarifying Meaning: Definition. The Company Man, Ellen Goodman. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on a Definition. Organizing a Definition. Developing a Definition. Opening and Closing a Definition. Using the Model. Who's a Hillbilly? Rebecca Thomas Kirkendall. I Want a Wife, Judy Brady. Mother Tongue, Amy Tan. Father Hunger, Michel Marriott. The Fear, Andrew Holleran. Further Ideas for Using Definition. 8. Strategies for Organizing Ideas and Experience: Division and Classification. The Technology of Medicine, Lewis Thomas. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on Division and Classification Writing. Organizing Division and Classification Writing. Developing Division and Classification Writing. Opening and Closing Division and Classification Writing. Using the Model. Doublespeak, William Lutz. Three Kinds of Discipline, John Holt. The Ways We Lie, Stephanie Ericsson. What Friends Are For, Phillip Lopate. What We Now Know about Memory, Lee Smith. Further Ideas for Using Division and Classification. 9. Strategies for Examining Connections: Comparison and Contrast. Day to Night: Picking Cotton, Maya Angelou. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on Comparison and Contrast. Organizing Comparison and Contrast. Developing Comparison and Contrast. Opening and Closing Comparison and Contrast. Using the Model. Parallel Worlds: The Surprising Similarities (and Differences) of Country-and-Western and Rap, Denise Noe. Pole Vaulting, William Finnegan. Sex, Lies, and Conversation, Deborah Tannen. The Men We Carry in Our Minds, Scott Russell Sanders. Dividing American Society, Andrew Hacker. Further Ideas for Using Comparison and Contrast. 10. Strategies for Interpreting Meaning: Cause and Effect. Shopping and Other Spiritual Adventures in America Today, Phyllis Rose. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on Cause and Effect. Organizing Cause and Effect. Developing Cause and Effect.Opening and

Closing Cause and Effect. Using the Model. Why Boys Don't Play with Dolls, Katha Pollitt. My Wood, E.M. Forster. The Greenland Viking Mystery, Kathy A. Svitil. On Reading and Writing, Stephen King. The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria, Judith Ortiz Cofer. Further Ideas for Using Cause and Effect. 11. Strategies for Influencing Opinion: Argument. Bake Your Bread at Home, Laurel Robertson. Writing from Reading. Getting Started on an Argument. Organizing an Argument. Developing an Argument. Opening and Closing an Argument. Using the Model. Marriage as a Restricted Club, Lindsay Van Gelder. Further Ideas for Using Argument. Debate: How Is the Internet Affecting Young People? Young Cyber Addicts, Amy Wu. We're Teen, We're Queer, and We've Got E-mail, Steve Silberman. The Wired Teen, Sue Ferguson. Debate: Are TV Talk Shows Harmful? Tuning in Trouble: Talk TV's Destructive Impact on Mental Health, Jeanne A. Heaton. In Defense of Talk Shows, Barbara Ehrenreich. Debate: Should the Death Penalty Be Abolished? Death and Justice, Edward I. Koch. Forgiving the Unforgivable, Claudia Dreifus. The Death Penalty on Trial, Jonathan Alter. 12. Further Readings: Two Thematic Clusters. Life and Hard Times on the Mexican Border, Luis Alberto Urrea. Two Ways to Belong in America, Bharati Mukherjee. Five Myths about Immigration, David Cole. Ideas for Writing about Immigration. Let's Get Rid of Sports, Katha Pollitt. SuAnne Marie Big Crow, Ian Frazier. Bad as They Wanna Be, Thad Williamson. Ideas for Writing about Sport. Appendix. Glossary. Index. © 2003, 640 pp., paper (0-13-098255-5)

THE BRIEF PROSE READER: Essays for Thinking, Reading, and Writing Kim Flachmann and Michael Flachmann

Both of California State University-- Bakersfield

Kathryn Benander Cheryl Smith

This brief reader helps students improve their abilities to think, read, and write on progressively more sophisticated levels by integrating critical thinking and reading apparatus into every chapter within the context of the rhetorical pattern.

Contents

Chapters end with Chapter Writing Assignments. Preface. Introduction: Thinking, Reading, and Writing. Thinking Critically. Reading Critically. Preparing to Read. Reading. Rereading. Reading Inventory. Writing Critically. Preparing to Write. Writing. Rewriting. Writing Inventory. Conclusion. 1. Description: Exploring Through the Senses. Defining

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Description. Thinking Critically by Using Description. Reading and Writing Descriptive Essays. Student Essay: Description at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Description. Description in Review. Summer Rituals, Ray Bradbury. Notes from the Country Club, Kimberly Wozencraft. The Pines, John McPhee. The View from 80, Malcolm Cowley. 2. Narration: Telling a Story. Defining Narration. Thinking Critically by Using Narration. Reading and Writing Narrative Essays. Student Essay: Narration at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Narration. Narration in Review. For My Indian Daughter, Lewis Sawaquat. New Directions, Maya Angelou. The Saturday Evening Post, Russell Baker. Only Daughter, Sandra Cisneros. 3. Example: Illustrating Ideas. Defining Examples. Thinking Critically by Using Example. Reading and Writing Essays That Use Examples. Student Essay: Examples at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Examples. Example in Review. The Baffling Question, Bill Cosby. Darkness at Noon, Harold Krents. Mother Tongue, Amy Tan. A Brother's Murder, Brent Staples. 4. Process Analysis: Explaining Step by Step. Defining Process Analysis. Thinking Critically by Using Process Analysis. Reading and Writing Process Analysis Essays. Student Essay: Process Analysis at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Process Analysis. Process Analysis in Review. Managing Your Time, Edwin Bliss. Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain, Jessica Mitford. How to Say Nothing in Five Hundred Words, Paul Roberts. E-mail: What You Should--and Shouldn't--Say, Mark Hansen. 5. Division/Classification: Finding Categories. Defining Division/Classification. Thinking Critically by Using Division/ Classification. Reading and Writing Division/ Classification Essays. Student Essay: Division/ Classification at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Division/Classification. Division/ Classification in Review. Memory: Tips You'll Never Forget, Phyllis Schneider. Why

Readers: Rhetorical Patterns

Readers: Rhetorical Patterns

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I Want a Wife, Judy Brady. Second Chances for Children of Divorce, Judith Wallerstein and Sandra Blakeslee. The Truth About Lying, Judith Viorst. 6. Comparison/Contrast: Discovering Similarities and Differences. Defining Comparison/Contrast. Thinking Critically by Using Comparison/Contrast. Reading and Writing Comparison/Contrast Essays. Student Essay: Comparison/Contrast at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Comparison/Contrast. Comparison/Contrast in Review. Grant and Lee: A Study in Contrasts, Bruce Catton. A Child Is Born, Germaine Greer. Japanese and American Workers: Two Casts of Mind, William Ouchi. The Politics of Muscle, Gloria Steinem. 7. Definition: Limiting the Frame of Reference. Defining Definition. Thinking Critically by Using Definition. Reading and Writing Definition Essays. Student Essay: Definition at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Definition. Definition in Review. When Is It Rape?, Nancy Gibbs. The Barrio, Robert Ramirez. Beliefs About Families, Mary Pipher. How to Find True Love: Or Rather, How It Finds You, Lois Smith Brady. 8. Cause/Effect: Tracing Reasons and Results. Defining Cause/Effect. Thinking Critically by Using Cause/Effect. Reading and Writing Cause/Effect Essays. Student Essay: Cause/Effect at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Cause/Effect. Cause/Effect in Review. Why We Crave Horror Movies, Stephen King. The Fear of Losing a Culture, Richard Rodriguez. Meet the Bickersons, Mary Roach. Beauty: When the Other Dancer Is the Self, Alice Walker. 9. Argument and Persuasion: Inciting People to Thought or Action. Defining Argument and Persuasion. Thinking Critically by Using Argument and Persuasion. Reading and Writing Persuasive Essays. Student Essay: Argument and Persuasion at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Argument and Persuasion. Argument/Persuasion in Review. Arming Myself with a Gun Is Not the Answer, Bronwyn Jones. Take a Ticket, Peter Salins. Opposing Viewpoints: Computers and Books.

Readers: Rhetorical Patterns

The Demise of Writing, Geoffrey Meredith. Will We Still Turn Pages?, Kevin Kelly. 10. Documented Essays: Reading and Writing from Sources. Defining Documented Essays. Reading and Writing Documented Essays. Student Essay: Documentation at Work. Some Final Thoughts on Documented Essays. Documented Essays in Review. The Ecstasy of War, Barbara Ehrenreich. Appearance and Delinquency: A Research Note, Jill Leslie Rosenbaum and Meda Chesney-Lind. 11. Essays on Thinking, Reading, and Writing. I Am Writing Blindly, Roger Rosenblatt. To Read Fiction, Donald Hall. The Rules of Writing Practice, Natalie Goldberg. Instantly Growing Up, John Greenwald. Writing as a Moral Act, Rita Mae Brown. Glossary of Useful Terms. Credits. Index of Authors and Titles. © 2003, 512 pp., paper (0-13-049497-6)

OTHER READERS OF RELATED INTEREST

THE NEW MILLENNIUM READER Third Edition Stuart Hirschberg

Rutgers University

Terry Hirschberg

This thematic reader identifies and collects some of the most important insights, discoveries, and reflections of the past millennia as produced by its most noteworthy writers and through a variety of genres.

Contents

Introduction: Reading in the Various Genres. 1. Reflections on Experience. Nonfiction. Number One!, Jill Nelson. Boyhood with Gurdjieff, Fritz Peters. West with the Night, Beryl Markham. Initiated into an Iban Tribe, Douchan Gersi. Confessions of a Fast Woman, Lesley Hazelton. So, This Was Adolescence, Annie Dillard. The Myth of the Latin Woman, Judith Ortiz Cofer. Fiction. The Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The Miller's Tale, Jerzy Kosinski. Poetry. The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock, T.S. Eliot. Sonnet 30: When to the Sessions of Sweet Silent Thought, William Shakespeare. The Solitary, Sara Teasdale. Funny, Anna

Kamienska. 2. Influential People and Memorable Places. Nonfiction. Liked for Myself, Maya Angelou. My Father's Life, Raymond Carver. Antidisestablishmentarianism, Gayle Pemberton. My Brother, Gary Gilmore, Mikhal Gilmore. The Taj Mahal, P.D. Ouspensky. Niagara Falls, William Zinsser. Reflections in Westminister Abbey, Joseph Addison. Moonlit Nights of Laughter, Fatima Mernissi. Fiction. Reunion, John Cheever. Looking for a Rain God, Bessie Head. Poetry. The Youngest Daughter, Cathy Song. Those Winter Sundays, Robert Hayden. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, William Wordsworth. 3. The Value of Education. Nonfiction. Learning to Read and Write, Frederick Douglass. The Human Cost of an Illiterate Society, Jonathan Kozol. Civilize Them with a Stick, Mary Crow Dog. On Becoming a Chicano, Richard Rodriguez. In Defense of Elitism, William A. Henry III. How the Web Destroys the Quality of Students' Research Papers, David Rothenberg. Areopagitica: Defense of Books, John Milton. Speech Codes on Campus, Nat Hentoff. Fiction. The School, Donald Barthelme. Poetry. Learning to Read, Francis E. W. Harper. Workday, Linda Hogan. 4. Perspectives on Language. Nonfiction. Language and Thought, Susanne K. Langer. The Day Language Came into My Life, Helen Keller. Thinking in Pictures, Temple Grandin. The Language of Clothes, Alison Lurie. Sex, Lies, and Conversation, Deborah Tannen. The Rhetoric of Advertising, Stuart Hirschberg. Propaganda under a Dictatorship, Aldous Huxley. Pornography, Margaret Atwood. Fiction. What We Talk about When We Talk about Love, Raymond Carver. Poetry. Crow Goes Hunting, Ted Hughes. Drama. Words, Words, Words, David Ives. 5. Issues in Popular Culture. Nonfiction. The Culture of Consumerism, Juliet B. Schor. On Bad Teeth, Slavenka Drakulíc. TV News as Entertainment, Neil Postman and Steve Powers. Urban Legends.

The Boyfriend's Death, Jan Harold Brunvand. The Flesh and the Devil, Kim Chernin. Want Creation Fuels Americans' Addictiveness, Philip Slater. The Burden of Race, Arthur Ashe. The Stealth Virus: AIDS and Latinos, Ann Louise Bardach. Fiction. Désirée's Baby, Kate Chopin. An Old Man, Guy de Maupassant. Poetry. Barbie Doll, Marge Piercy. Lisa's Ritual, Age 10, Grace Caroline Bridges. Streets of Philadelphia, Bruce Springsteen. Drama. Tea Party, Betty Keller. 6. Our Place in Nature. Nonfiction. The Lowest Animal, Mark Twain. Am I Blue?, Alice Walker. A Very Warm Mountain, Ursula K. LeGuin. Big Mac and the Tropical Forests, Joseph K. Skinner. How to Kill an Ocean, Thor Heyerdahl. Waking Up the Rake, Linda Hogan. The Greenhouse Affect, P.J. O' Rourke. Fiction. I Am a Cat, Natsume Soseki. A River Ran Over Me, Lin Sutherland. Poetry. Sleeping in the Forest, Mary Oliver. The Sound of the Sea, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 7. History in the Making. Nonfiction. The Naked Source, Linda Simon. Finding the Tomb, Howard Carter. To Make Them Stand in Fear, Kenneth M. Stampp. From a Native Daughter, Haunani-Kay Trask. The San Francisco Earthquake, Jack London. R.M.S. Titanic, Hanson W. Baldwin. A Noiseless Flash from Hiroshima, John Hersey. Fiction. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, Ambrose Bierce. Home Soil, Irene Zabytko. Poetry. A Worker Reads History, Bertolt Brecht. Child's Memory, Eleni Fourtouni. Titanic, David R. Slavitt. 8. The Pursuit of Justice. Nonfiction. Rights of Man, Thomas Paine. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs. I Have a Dream, Martin Luther King, Jr. We Have Our State, Golda Meir. At the Center of the Storm, Rae Yang. Daisy, Luis Sepulveda. Fiction. The Guest, Albert Camus. The Censors, Luisa Valenzuela. Poetry. The Unknown Citizen, W.H. Auden. At First I Was Given Centuries, Margaret Atwood. Drama. Protest, Václav Havel. 9. The

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Impact of Technology. Nonfiction. A Clone Is Born, Gina Kolata. Sperm in a Jar, Anne Taylor Fleming. Identical Twins Reared Apart, Constance Holden. Monsters of the Brave New World, Carol Gruenwald. How Not to Use the Fax Machine and the Cellular Phone, Umberto Eco. The Haves and the Have-Nots, Lyn Nell Hancock. The Road Ahead, Bill Gates. Fiction. The Enormous Radio, John Cheever. Poetry. When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer, Walt Whitman. I'm Gonna Be an Engineer, Peggy Seeger. 10. The Artistic Impulse. Nonfiction. How to Write with Style, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Still Just Writing, Anne Tyler. What Is Real?, Alice Munro. The Exorcist Massage Parlor, Wilson Bryan Key. Mick Jagger, Sexuality, Style & Image, Sheila Whiteley. The Paradox of St. Mark's, Mary McCarthy. Imprisoning Time in a Rectangle, Lance Morrow. General Nguyen Ngoc Loan, Photo by Eddie Adams. Fiction. The Tatooer, Junichiro Tanizaki. Poetry. The Author to Her Book, Anne Bradstreet. Tell It Slant, Emily Dickinson. In Goya's Greatest Scenes We Seem to See, Lawrence Ferlinghetti. The Third of May 1808, Illustration by Francisco Goya. 11. Matters of Ethics, Philosophy, and Religion. Nonfiction. The Myth of Immortality, Clarence Darrow. Did a Barnyard Schism Lead to a Religious One?, Dinitia Smith. Slaughter of the Innocent, Hans Ruesch. Lifeboat Ethics, Garrett Hardin. The Prisoner's Dilemma, Stephen Chapman. If I Die in a Combat Zone, Tim O'Brien. Salvation, Langston Hughes. Fiction. The Country of the Blind, H.G. Wells. Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?, Joyce Carol Oates. Parables. The Allegory of the Cave, Plato. Parables in the New Testament. Parables of Buddha. Islamic Folk Stories, Nasreddin Hodja. Poetry. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost. Hope, Lisel Mueller. Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas. The Second Coming, W.B. Yeats. Credits. Index of Authors and Titles. © 2003, 846 pp., paper (0-13-097991-0)

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Contents

Introduction. I. The Individual Experience: Private Lives, Public Voices. Gayatri Devi, A Princess Remembers. Anne Frank, from The Diary of Anne Frank. Joan of Arc, I Have Nothing More to Say. Paul Monette, Becoming a Man. Lord Chesterfield, Letter to His Son. Stendhal, The Crystallization of Love. John Keats, Letters to Fanny Brawne. Joseph Addison, Reflections in Westminster Abbey. George Bernard Shaw, She Would Have Enjoyed It. II. The Collective Experience: The Human Condition. Thomas Robert Malthus, The Principle of Population. Diane Ackerman, The Social Sense. Thomas Paine, Rights of Man. Kenneth M. Stampp, To Make Them Stand in Fear. Frederick Douglass, Learning to Read and Write. James Baldwin, Letter to My Nephew. Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Decolonising the Mind. George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant. Margaret Sanger, The Turgid Ebb and Flow of Misery. Simone de Beauvoir, The Married Woman. Marilyn Yalom, The Wife Today. III. The Historical Dimension: The Importance of the Past. R. G. Collingwood, What Is History? Herodotus, Concerning Egypt. Howard Carter, Finding the Tomb. Arnold J. Toynbee, Challenge and Response. Elaine Pagels, The Social History of Satan. Thomas Carlyle, On Heroes and Hero-Worship. Walt Whitman, Death of Abraham Lincoln. Maurizio Chierici, The Man from Hiroshima. John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address, 1961. Oscar Handlin, Steerage. Edward Said, Reflections on Exile. IV. The Natural World: Instinct and Survival. Arthur D. Hasler and James A. Larsen, The Homing Salmon. Charles Darwin, from The Origin of Species. Konrad Lorenz, The Dove and the Wolf. Jean Henri Fabre, The Praying Mantis. Mark Twain, The Lowest Animal. Hans Ruesch, Slaughter of the Innocent. Constance Holden, Identical Twins Reared Apart. Matt Ridley, Genome. Gina Kolata, A Clone Is Born. V. The Physical Universe: Knowledge of Animate and Inanimate Worlds. Sir Leonard Woolley, The Flood.

PAST TO PRESENT Ideas That Changed Our World Stuart Hirschberg

Rutgers University

Terry Hirschberg

PAST TO PRESENT encapsulates for students essential readings from the fields of humanities, social science, and science of the great ideas that have changed our world. It is divided into seven thematic parts that trace the history of important ideas from their roots to their current incarnations. Each of the 74 readings includes discussions that focus on the history of the idea, the writer's rhetorical strategies, and the context in which the piece was written.

Dave Sobel, The Prize. Nathaniel Philbrick, The Attack. Thor Heyerdahl, How to Kill an Ocean. Peter D. Ward and Donald Brownlee, Rare Earth. Blaise Pascal, The Two Infinites. Fred Hoyle, The Continuous Creation of the Universe. Charles H. Townes, Harnessing Light. Christopher Evans, The Revolution Begins. Neil Postman, Information. Bill Gates, The Road Ahead. VI. The Mind and the Spirit: Understanding The Unknown. G. E. Moore, The Indefinability of Good. Plato, The Allegory of the Cave. Sigmund Freud, Typical Dreams. Marcel Proust, The Bodily Memory. Readings from the Scriptures in Hinduism: Rig-Veda, the Upanishads, and the Bhagavad-Gita. Three Texts from The Hebrew Bible: Genesis, Burning Bush, and The Ten Commandments. The Prophet Muhammad, The Koran. St. Matthew, Parables in The New Testament. The Enlightenment of the Buddha, Buddhacarita. Alan W. Watts, Beat Zen, Square Zen, and Zen. Clarence Darrow, The Myth of Immortality. Jean Paul Sartre, Existentialism. VII. The Arts of Civilization: The Human Element. Aristotle, Poetics. Giorgio Vasari, The Life of Leonardo da Vinci. David Sylvester, The Genius of Michelangelo: An Interview with Henry Moore. John Ruskin, The Stones of St. Mark's. P. D. Ouspensky, The Taj Mahal. Paul Roberts, Something About English. Gustav Flaubert, Letters to Louise Colete. Edward Rothstein, Why We Live in the Musical Past. Sergei Eisenstein, The Cinematographic Principle and the Ideogram. Agnes de Mille, Pavlova. John Berger, Ways of Seeing. Appendix: Writing About Great Ideas. A Sample Comparative Essay. Credits. Index of Authors and Titles. © 2003, 768 pp., paper (0-13-097948-1)

YOU ARE HERE Readings on Higher Education for College Writers Russel K. Durst

University of Cincinnati This engaging anthology of "immediate relevance" features reading and writing assignments that will improve students' ability to analyze and synthesize.

Contents

Dear Student. Credits. I. Education and Culture. How Selective Colleges Heighten Inequality, Robert Reich. Learning Silence: Scenes from the Class Struggle, Peggy Orenstein. Education: The Trouble with Single-Sex Schools, Wendy Kaminer. The War Against Boys, Christina Hoff Sommers. Success Against the Odds: Young Black Men Tell What It Takes, Benjamin P. Bowser and Herbert Perkins. Something to Push Against, Ron Suskind. Who Gets Called Queer in School?, Andi O'Conor. Why the Americans are More Addicted to Practical than to Theoretical Science, Alexis de Toqueville. II. Being In College. The Difference between High School and

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College, Jack Meiland. On the Uses of a Liberal Education: As Lite Entertainment for Bored College Students, Mark Edmundson. On the Uses of a Liberal Education: As a Weapon in the Hands of the Restless Poor, Earl Shorris. The Allegory of the Cave, Plato. Lowering the Bar, Stuart Rojstaczer. Too Many Students are Holding Jobs for Too Many Hours, Jacqueline E. King. Introduction to Beer and Circus: How Big-Time College Sports Are Crippling Undergraduate Education, Murray Sperber. The University Serving the Community, Thomas Ehrlich. A Guide to Good Teaching: Be Slow and Inefficient, Michael Randall. III. The Purposes of College. The Democratic Framework, Steven Cahn. The Liberal Arts: A Practical View, Mark Jackson. What People Learn in College: The Major, Jacob Neusner. Specialization: The Enriched Major, Ernest Boyer. Hire Education: The Secretary of Labor Tells You Where the Jobs Will Be in the New Economy, Robert B. Reich. Of Studies, Francis Bacon. The Mission of the University, Robert Solomon and Jon Solomon. You Make Your Own Chances: Wealth as an Educational Goal, Paul Rogat Loeb. The $10,000 Hoop: Has Higher Education Become an Exercise in Futility for Most Americans?, Zachary Karabell. The Practical Path, Too, Can Be High-Minded, Richard M. Freeland. IV. Education and Assessment. Inventing Intelligence: The Origins of Mental Measurement, Peter Sacks. Those Who Can't, Test, Brian Doherty. The SAT: A New Defense, William C. Dowling. More Testing, More Learning, Patrick O'Malley. A Whole Lot of Cheatin' Going On, Mark Clayton. College Students Speak about ADD, Patricia O. Quinn, M.D. Sorting Out Which Students Have Learning Disabilities, Perry A. Zirkel. Grading Your Professors, Jacob Neusner. References. © 2003, 368 pp., paper (0-13-027761-4)

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REVISITING AMERICA Readings in Race, Culture, and Conflict Susan Wyle

Stanford University This chronologically organized reader offers contributions on myriad racial, social, and cultural struggles in past and present America.

Contents

1. Early Conflicts on the Eastern Shore. A Distant Mirror, Ronald Takaki. The Pocahontas Perplex, Rayna Green. Disney's Politically Correct Pocahontas, Jacquelyn Kilpatrick. The Pocahontas Myth, Powhaten Nation Response. Introduction to What Happened in Salem? David Levin. Trial Testimony, Sarah Good. Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem, Elaine Breslaw. Why I Wrote `The Crucible', Arthur Miller. Act I of The Crucible--excerpt, Arthur Miller. The Black Slave Trade, Richard Hofstader. Ain't I a Woman, Deborah Gray White. The Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson. 2. The Native Americans vs. the Newcomers. Fathers and Children, Michael Rogin. Jefferson and the Indians, Wallace. Policy on Civilization and Assimilation, Thomas Jefferson. Message to Congress, Andrew Jackson. The Federal Government and the Indians, Richard White. Introduction to I Have Spoken, Frederick

W. Turner III. Address to President Grant, Chief Red Cloud. What the Indians Mean to America, Luther Standing Bear. Regeneration through Violence: The Language of Myth, Richard Slotkin. Captivity and Restoration, Mary Rowlandson. The Last of the Mohicans, James Fenimore Cooper. Dangers of the Mail, Ruth Rosen. 3. Conflicts on the Way West. Racialism on the Run, Patricia Limerick. The Significance of the Frontier in American History, Frederick Turner. The Thesis Disputed, Richard Hofstadter. The American West and the Burden of Belief, M. Scott Momaday. My Life on the Plains, George Armstrong Custer. Slavery in the Antebellum West, Quintard Taylor. War and Destiny, Robert Hine and John Faragher. Black Pioneers, John W. Ravage. Introduction from The Gathering of Zion, Wallace Stegner. Westering Women, Sandra Myres. Wife No. 19, A Life in Bondage, Ann Eliza Young. Gendered Justice in the American West, Anne M. Butler. Deadwood Dick, The Prince of the Road, Edward Wheeler. 4. Slavery and the Civil War. First Inaugural Speech, Jefferson Davis. The Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln. Sociology for the South, or the Failure of Free Society (1854), George Fitzhugh. The Anatomy of the Myth, Alan Nolan. Gone with the Wind --Chapter 1, Margaret Mitchell. The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, Sojourner Truth. Men of Color, To Arms, Frederick Douglass. A Grand Army of Black Men: Letters, Edwin S. Redkey, ed. All the Daring of the Soldier, Elizabeth Leonard. To `Joy My Freedom, Tera Hunter. Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, Ambrose Bierce. 5. Conflicts in California: the Missions, the Gold Rush, and Building the Railroad. Letter to Juan Andres, Father Junipero Serra. It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own, Richard White. Myth and Myopia, David Gutierrez. Ramona, Helen Hunt Jackson. California and the American Dream, Kevin Starr. The Shirley Letters from the California Mine, Dame Shirley. Gentle Tamers of the West, Dee Brown. The Luck of Roaring Camp, Bret Harte. Nothing Like it in the

World, Stephen Ambrose. Closing the Gate, Andrew Gyory. In the Land of the Free, Sui Sun Far. 6. Poverty, Wealth, and the American Dream. Wealth, Andrew Carnegie. The Personal Relation in Industry, John D. Rockefeller. Declarations of Independence, Howard Zinn. World of Our Fathers, Irving Howe. The New Colussus, Emma Lazarus. A Bundle of Letters, Isaac Metzker, ed. The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, Leon Stein. Testimony before the Senate Committee on the Relations between Capital and Labor, Samuel Gompers. Tis, Frank McCourt. Stereotypes of Immigrant Women, Mazine Seller. The Subjection of Women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The Supreme Court Ruling: Minor vs. Happersett (1875). 7. The Depression and the Two World Wars on the Home Front. Woodrow Wilson's War Message (1918). The American People on the Eve of the Great Depression, David Kennedy. Introduction to Grapes of Wrath, Studs Terkel. The Grapes of Wrath, excerpt, John Steinbeck. Pearl Harbor Address, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The Story of the Pacific Coast Japanese Evacuation, Karl Bendetsen. Farewell to Manzanar, Jean Wakatsuki Houston. "How to Tell the Japs from Your Friends", Time Magazine. Rosie the Riveter Revisited, NAME? Gluck. Jaysho, moasi, Bruce Watson. 8. Civil Rights, Protest, and Foreign Wars. Senator Joseph McCarthy speech at Wheeling West Virginia. I Have a Dream, Martin Luther King, Jr. Men and Women Talking, Gloria Steinem. The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan. American Indian Activism and Transformation: Lessons from Alcatraz, Troy Johnson, et al. Address to the Commonwealth, Cesar Chavez. The State Department White Paper. This Incredible War, Paul Potter. The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam, Robert S. McNamara. "The Things they Carried," Tim O'Brien. Address to the Nation (August, 1990), George Bush. 9. Conflicts Past and Conflicts Present. Visit to the Buffalo Bill Museum, Jane Tompkins. The Solace of Open Spaces, Gretel Erlich. In Search of

Readers: Race/Class/Gender

Our Mothers' Gardens, Alice Walker. Backlash, Susan Faludi. No Turning Back, Estelle Freedman. For Better or Worse: The Case for Gay (and Straight) Marriage, Jonathan Rauch. Fences Against Freedom, Leslie Marmon Silko. Fresh off the Boat, Anonymous. A Different Mirror, Ronald Takaki. Black Men and Public Spaces, Brent Staples. Ashes, Phillipe Lopate. Address to Congress on September 20, 2001, George W. Bush. Susan Sontag, from The New Yorker, Sept. 24, 2001. Political Cartoons about September 11 and the War on Terrorism. ©) 2003, 800 pp., paper (0-13-029305-9)

THE WORLD IS A TEXT Jonathan Silverman

Virginia Commonwealth University

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Dean Rader

University of San Francisco This cultural studies reader is devoted to teaching students how to "read" all kinds of texts. Its comprehensive and inclusive approach focuses on the relationship between reading traditional workssuch as short stories, and poemsand other less-traditional ones-such as movies, the Internet, race, ethnicity, and television.

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Contents

Introduction: The World Is a Text. Semiotics: The Study of Signs (and Texts). Systems of Reading: Making Sense of Cultural Texts. The "Semiotic Situation" (or the "Moving Text" ). Texts, The World, You, and Your Papers. Learning to Read the World as a Text: Three Case Studies. Reading This Text as a Text. So, the World is a Text, What Can You Do With It? The World Is a Text: Writing. I. How Do I Write a Text for College?: Making The Transition from High School Writing. II. How Do I Make an Argument about a Building?: Strategies for Constructing a

Thesis and Building a GoodPaper. III. How Do U Read and Write about Race?: A Tour through the Writing Process. IV. How Am I a Text?: On Writing Personal Essays. V. How Do I Know What a Good Paper Looks Like?: An Annotated Student Essay. VI. How Do I Get Info about this Ad?: Researching Popular Culture Texts. The World Is a Text: Reading. 1. Reading Literature. Jean Toomer, BloodBurning Moon. James Tate, Goodtime Jesus. Pablo Neruda, Ode to My Socks. Carolyn Forche, The Colonel. Bernard Malamud, The Magic Barrel. William Shakespeare, Sonnet 130. Emily Dickinson, My Life Had Stood-a Loaded Gun. Wislawa Szymborska, Slapstick. Kate Chopin, The Story of an Hour. Literature Suite-Social and Economic Class. Langston Hughes, Harlem. Chris Haven, Assisted Living. Adrian Louis, Dust World. Flannery O'Connor, Good Country People. Theodore Roethke, My Papa's Waltz. 2. Reading Television. Robert Abelman, Taking Television Seriously. Charles M. Young, Beavis and Butt-Head on What's Cool and What Sucks. Sallie Tisdale, Citizens of the World, Turn on Your Televisions. Ariel Gore, TV Can Be a Good Parent. Harry Waters, Life According to TV. Michelle Cottle, How Soaps Are Integrating America: Color TV. Katherine Gantz, Not That There's Anything Wrong with That. Student essay: Archana Mehta, Society's Need For A Queer Solution: The Media's Reinforcement of Homophobia Through Traditional Gender Roles. The Simpsons Suite. Bill Broux, Keeping Up with the Simpsons. Les Sillars, The Last Christian TV Family in America. Jaime J. Weinman, Worst Episode Ever. Anne Waldron Neumann, The Simpsons. Peter Parisi, `Black Bart' Simpson: Appropriation and Revitalization in Commodity Culture. Dale E. Snow and James J. Snow, Simpsonian Sexual Politics. Student essay: Hillary West, Media Journal: The Rosie O'Donnell Show. 3. Reading Space: Public and Private. Margaret Crawford, The World in a Shopping

Readers: Popular Culture

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Mall. Daphne Spain, Spatial Segregation and Gender Stratification in the Workplace. Kenneth Meeks, Shopping in a Group While Black: A Coach's Story. Robert Bednar, Caught Looking. Katherine F. Benzel, Room for Learning with Latest Technology. Student essay: Matt King, Reading the Nautical Star. Space: The Suburban Suite. William L. Hamilton, How Suburban Design is Failing Teenagers. Joel Garreau, Edge City: Life on the New Frontier. William Booth, A White Migration North from Miami. Sarah Boxer, A Remedy for the Rootlessness of Modern Suburban Life? Claire Shepherd Lanier, Rethinking `Main Street'. Whitney Gould, New Urbanism Needs to Keep Racial Issues in Mind. 4. Reading Race and Ethnicity. Tamar Lewin, Growing Up, Growing Apart. Art Nauman, Who Picks the Term `Whites'? Kwame J. McKenzie and N. S. Crocroft, Race, Ethnicity, Culture, and Science: Researchers Should Understand and Justify Their Use of Ethnic Groups. Michael Omi, In Living Color: Race and American Culture. James P. Loewen, `Gone with the Wind': The Absence of Racism in American History Textbooks. Handsome Lake, How America Was Discovered. Amy Tan, Mother Tongue. Jim Mahfood, True Tales of Amerikkkan History Part II: The True Thanksgiving. Malcolm Gladwell, The Sports Taboo. Jason Zengerle, Alabama's New Schoolhouse Door. Sorority Row. MultiRacial Suite. Leonard Pitts Jr., Face It, Tiger: If They Say You're Black, Then You're Black. George F. Will, Melding in America. Denene Millner, In Creating a Word to Describe His Racial Makeup Golfer Tiger Woods Has Also Stirred Up a Round of Controversy Among Blacks. Ellis Cose, Census And The Complex Issue Of Race. Teja Arboleda, Race Is a Four-Letter Word. 5. Reading Film. David Denby, High School Confidential: Notes on Teen Movies. Michael Parenti, Class and Virtue. bell hooks, Mock Feminism. Michael Medved, Hollywood Poison Factory. Freya Johnson, Holy Homosexuality Batman!: Camp and Corporate Capitalism in `Batman Forever'.

Anthony Lane, Review of `Pearl Harbor.' Four Reviews of Moulin Rouge: Roger Ebert, Stanley Kaufmann, Elvis Mitchell, Owen Glieberman. The Movie Suite: Film Violence. Linda Williams, Film Bodies: Gender, Genre, Excess. Two Poems by American Indians: Louise Erdrich, Dear John Wayne. and Sherman Alexie, Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Tough Talk on Entertainment. Interchapter: Reading Images. America, Cowboys, The West, and Race. The Images of Gender. The Semiotics of Architecture. Landscape, Earth, and Excavation. Laundry. Two Flags. 6. Reading Gender. Deborah Tannen, Marked Women, Unmarked Men. Holly Devor, Gender Role Behavior and Attitudes. Paul Theroux, Being a Man. Susan Douglas, Where the Girls Are. Alfonsina Storni, You Would Have Me White. Student essay: Sharisa Jones, No Name Woman and Feminism. Gender Suite: The Myths of Gender. Jill Birnie Henke, Diane Zimmerman Umble, and Nancy J. Smith, Construction of the Female Self: Feminist Readings of the Disney Heroine. Jane Yolen, America's Cinderella. Maxine Kingston, No Name Woman. Sandra Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek. 7. Reading Visual Arts. John Berger, Ways of Seeing. Wanda Corn, The Birth of a National Icon: Grant Wood's American Gothic. Alan Pratt, Andy Warhol: The Most Controversial Artist of the Century? Susan Sontag, America, Seen through Photographs Darkly. This Will Be Fun: Four Curators Share Their Top 10 Picks and Reasoning behind the Most Influential Visual Artworks of the Past 1,000 Years (2000). E. G. Chrichton, Is the NAMES Quilt Art? Dean Rader, (Re)Versing Vision: Reading Sculpture in Poetry and Prose. Scott McCloud, Sequential Art. Student essay: Anne Darby, #27: Reading Cindy Sherman and Gender. Visual Arts Suite: Sensations. Diana Mack, It Isn't Pretty But Is It Art? Peter Schjeldahl, Those Nasty Brits: How Sensational is `Sensation?' William F. Buckley, Giuliani's Own Exhibit. Benjamin Ivry, Modern Art is a Load of

Bullshit: Why Can't the Art World Accept Social Satire from a Black Artist? 8. Reading Advertising and the Media. Advertising. Stuart Ewen and Elizabeth Ewen, In the Shadow of the Image. Dave Barry, The Most Hated Advertisements. Malcolm Gladwell, The Coolhunt. Jean Kilbourne, Advertising, Violence, and Gender. Clint C. Wilson and Felix Gutierrez, Advertising and People of Color. Rob Walker, Diet Coke's Underwear Strategy. Student essay: Brittany Gray, Hanes Her Way. News/Media. Jeff Cohen and Norman Solomon, 15 Questions about the `Liberal Media'. Kevin Williams and David Miller, AIDS News and News Cultures. David McGowan, The America the Media Don't Want You to See. Advertising/Media-Manipulation Suite. Mark Crispin Miller, Advertising: Seeing through Movies. William Lutz, Weasel Words. Michael Parenti, Methods of Media Manipulation. Trudy Lieberman, Slanting the Story. 9. Reading Music. Kevin J.H. Dettmar and William Richey, Musical Cheese: The Appropriation of Seventies Music in Nineties Movies. Student essay: Fouzia Baber, Is Tupac Dead? Student essay: Sarah Hawkins, Right on Target: Revisiting Elvis Costello's My Aim is True. The Song Suite. Chuck Berry, Johnny B. Goode, by Dave Marsh. The Tokens, The Lion Sleeps Tonight, by Rian Malan. The Beatles, I am the Walrus, by Ian MacDonald. Bob Dylan, Like a Rolling Stone, by Robert Shelton. Nirvana, Smells like Teen Spirit, by Michael Azerrad. Student essay: Matt Compton, Smells like Teen Spirit. Ice-T, Cop Killer, by Christopher Sieving. Suite within a Suite: Rolling Stone "Pop 100." Backstreet Boys, I Want It That Way. Britney Spears, Baby, One More Time. Wyclef Jean, Gone Till November. Review. Eminem, The Marshall Mathers LP, by Will Hermes. 10. Reading Technology. Po Bronson, Gen Equity. Donald A. Norman, Infuriating By Design: Everyday Things Need Not Wreak Havoc On Our Lives. Elizabeth Weil, The Girl-Game Jinx. Dale Spender, Print. Langdon Winner, Silicon

Readers: Popular Culture

Valley Mystery House. Lisa Nakamura, Where Do You Want to Go Today? Student essay: Virginia Colwell, Internet-Order Brides. Internet and Identity Suite. Frederick C. McKissock, Jr. Cyberghetto: Blacks are Falling Through the Net. Glen Martin, Internet Indian Wars: Native Americans Are Fighting To Connect The 550 Nations--In Cyberspace. Brenda Danet, Text As Mask: Gender and Identity On The Internet. Andrew Sullivan, The InnerNet. Appendix A: How Do I Cite this Car?: Guidelines for Citing Popular Culture Texts. © 2003, 800 pp., paper (0-13-094984-1)

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THE PRENTICE HALL GUIDE FOR COLLEGE WRITERS Sixth Edition Stephen P. Reid

Colorado State University This best-selling writing guide integrates writing process and rhetorical strategies into every purpose based chapter. And the author-written instructor support materials, make it the ideal text for the new instructor.

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Contents

(NOTE: * Denotes selections new to this edition.) 1. Writing Myths and Rituals. Writing Fitness: Rituals and Practice. Place, Time, and Tools. Energy and Attitude. *Shitty First Drafts, Anne Lamott. Keeping a Journal. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. On Keeping a Journal, Roy Hoffman. 2. Purposes and Processes for Writing. Writing for Myself, Russell Baker. Purposes for Writing. Writer-Based Purposes. Subject- and Audience-Based Purposes. Combinations of Purposes. Subject, Purpose, and Thesis. Purpose and Audience. Audience Analysis. The Writing Situation. Purpose and Audience in Two Essays. The Struggle to Be an All-American Girl, Elizabeth Wong. I'm OK, but You're

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Not, Robert Zoellner. Dimensions of the Process. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. The Whole Process. Writing with a Computer. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. A Writing Process at Work: Collecting and Shaping. Athletes and Education, Neil H. Petrie. On Writing `Athletes and Education,' Neil H. Petrie. A Writing Process at Work: Drafting and Revising. From The Declaration of Independence. 3. Observing. Techniques for Writing About Observations. Observing People. Observing Places. From Sierra, John Muir. Observing Objects. Observing Events. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. *From September 18, 2001, by Robin Morgan. Take This Fish and Look at It, Samuel H. Scudder. *High Tide in Tucson, Barbara Kingsolver. Observing Wolves, Farley Mowat. Observing: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. Permanent Tracings, Jennifer Macke. Empty Windows, Stephen White. 4. Remembering. Techniques for Writing About Memories. Remembering People. Remembering Places. Remembering Events. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. The Day Language Came into My Life, Helen Keller. Lives on the Boundary, Mike Rose. Beauty, Author?" When the Other Dancer Is the Self, Alice Walker. Remembering: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. The Wind Catcher, Todd Petry. *The Red Chevy, Juli Bovard. 5. Reading. Techniques for Writing about Reading. How Readers Read. Summarizing and Responding to an Essay. Teaching Diversity--with a Smile, Barbara Ehrenreich. Summarizing. Responding. Summarizing and Responding to Media Texts. *Beauty and Violence, Adam Forest. Some Don't Like their Blues at All, Karyn Lewis. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. *Barbies, Emily Prager. *Atlas Shrugs, Nicholas Lemann. Animal Rights and Beyond, David Quammen. Reading and Writing Processes. Choosing a Subject.

Rhetorics/Writing Guides

*Teaching Tolerance in America, Dudley Erskine Devlin. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. Drawing the Line, Paula Fisher. Two Responses to Deborah Tannen, Jennifer Koester and Sonja H. Browe. 6. Investigating. Techniques for Investigative Writing. Summary of a Book or Article. Investigation Using Multiple Sources. The Personality Pill, Anastasia Toufexis. Profile of a Person. Here Comes Oprah, Joan Barthel. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. How the Web Works, Gene Cowan. Surfin' the Louvre, Elizabeth Larsen. Plotting a Net Gain, Connie Keonenn. *Life After Oil, Jeremiah Creedon. The Homeless and Their Children, Jonathan Kozol. Investigating: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. *The Hollywood Indian, Lauren Strain. My Friend, Michelle, An Alcoholic, Bridgid Stone. 7. Explaining. Techniques for Explaining. Explaining What. Explaining How. Explaining Why. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. *Multiracialness, La Mer Stepptoe. Les Tres Riches Heures de Martha Stewart, Margaret Talbot. The Global Village Finally Arrives, Pico Iyer. How Male and Female Students Use Language Differently, Deborah Tannen. Explaining: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. English Only, Christine Bishop. Anorexia Nervosa, Nancie Brosseau. 8. Evaluating. Techniques for Writing Evaluations. Evaluating Commercial Products or Services. Evaluating Works of Art. Evaluating Performances. *Mr. Spielberg Strikes Again, David Ansen. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. *All's Not Well in Land of `The Lion King', Margaret Lazarus. *Prime Time Art, Kathyrn Hughes and Ben Rogers. First Born, Later Born, Geoffrey Cowley. Watching the Eyewitless News, Elayne Rapping. Evaluating: The Writing Process. Choosing a subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. Borrowers

Can be Choosy, Linda Meininger. The Big Chill, Kent Y'Blood. 9. Problem Solving. Techniques for Problem Solving. Demonstrating That a Problem Exists. Proposing a Solution and Convincing Your Readers. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. Solving for Pattern, Wendell Berry. *The Argument Culture, Deborah Tannen. Virtual Students, Digital Classroom, Neil Postman. Problem Solving: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. No Parking, by Kristy Busch, Steve Krause, and Keith Wright. Who Should Take Charge?, Eui Young Hwang. 10. Arguing. Techniques for Writing Argument. Claims for Written Argument. Appeals for Written Argument. Rogerian Argument. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. The Ethics of Endorsing a Product, Mike Royko. The Internet: A Clear and Present Danger?, Cathleen A. Cleaver. The Damnation of a Canyon, Edward Abbey. Three Perspectives on the Death Penalty. Death and Justice, Edward I. Koch. *Death Be Not Proud, Robert Badinter. *Death and Justice, John O'Sullivan. Arguing: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. Welfare is Still Necessary for Women and Children in the U.S., Crystal Sabatke. *Standardized Tests: Shouldn't We Be Helping Our Students?, Eric Boese. 11. Responding to Literature. The Story of an Hour, Kate Chopin. Techniques for Responding to Literature. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. Purposes for Responding to Literature. Responding to Short Fiction. Responding as a Reader. Reading with a Writer's Eye. A Worn Path, Eudora Welty. The Lesson, Toni Cade Bambara. Responding to Literature: The Writing Process. Collecting, Shaping, Drafting, Revising. Postscript on the Writing Process. Responding to Literature: Student Writing. On `A Worn Path', Julia MacMillan and Brett MacFadden. Death: The Final Freedom, Pat Russell. 12. Writing a Research Paper. Techniques

for Writing a Research Paper. Using Purpose, Audience, and Form as Guides. Finding the Best Sources. Using Sources to Make Your Point. Documenting Your Sources. Preparing yourself for the Research Process. Warming Up: Journal Exercises. Research Notebook. Research Timetable. Documentation Format: MLA and APA Styles. Research Paper: The Writing Process. Choosing a Subject. Collecting. Basic Internet Glossary. Evaluating Internet Sources. Shaping. Shaping Strategies. Drafting. Revising. Documenting Sources. Postscript on the Writing Process. Foreign Language Study: An American Necessity, Kate McNerny. Appendix: Writing Under Pressure. Know Your Audience. Analyze Key Terms. Make a Sketch Outline. Know the Material. Practice Writing. Proofread and Edit. Sample Essay Questions and Responses. Handbook. Section 1--Review of Basic Sentence Elements. Section 2-- Sentence Structure and Grammar. Section 3--Diction and Style. Section 4-- Punctuation and Mechanics. Annotated Instructor's Edition: © 2003, 752 pp., cloth (0-13-099299-2) © 2003, 752 pp., cloth with Handbook (0-13-044731-5) © 2003, 688 pp., paper without Handbook (0-13-098258-X)

Rhetorics/Writing Guides

6. Organizing Sources and Notes: Preparing to Write. 7. Turning Your Research into the Written Report. 8. Documenting Sources. Appendix A: Writing for the Web. Appendix B: Creating a PowerPoint Presentation. Appendix C: Sample Paper, APA Style. Appendix D: Sample Paper, MLA Style. Appendix E: Sample Paper, CSE Style. ©) 2003, 240 pp., Paper Package (0-13-079073-7)

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Rhetorics/Writing Guides

THE RESEARCH PAPER: A Guide to Library and Internet Research Third Edition Dawn Rodrigues

University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College Full of practical writing assignments, this adaptable, state-of-the-art text teaches students to write research papers and to search libraries and Websites in preparation for drafting and documenting research papers. Each text comes with a FREE subcription to ContentSelect, a database of over 25,000 online periodicals and journals, as well as Evaluating Online Resources, a must-have guide for research.

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Contents

1. The Research Paper in the Information Age. 2. Getting Started: Discovering Your Topic, Preliminary Searching, and Organizing Your Research. 3. From Research Questions to Research Plans. 4. Finding Sources. 5. Evaluating Sources.

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PRENTICE HALL REFERENCE GUIDE Fifth Edition Muriel Harris

Purdue University Based on over twenty-five years of writing center experience, this brief handbook offers students a clear and easy way to find information quickly without having to know grammatical terminology in addition to all of the traditional aspects of grammar, punctuation, mechanics, writing, and research. And every page is online for instant access!

Contents

I. The Writing Process. 1. Purposes and Audiences. 2. Writing Processes and Strategies. 3. Paragraphs. 4. Argument. 5. Writing with Computers. II. Revising Sentences for Accuracy, Clarity, and Variety. 6. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences. 7. Subject-Verb Agreement. 8. Sentence Fragments. 9. Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers. 10. Parallel Constructions. 11. Consistency/Avoiding Shifts. 12. Faulty Predication. 13. Coordination and Subordination. 14. Sentence Clarity. 15. Transitions. 16. Sentence Variety. III. Parts of Sentences.

17. Verbs. 18. Nouns and Pronouns. 19. Pronoun Case and Reference. 20. Adjectives and Adverbs. 21. Prepositions. 22. Subjects. 23. Phrases. 24. Clauses. 25. Essential and Nonessential Clauses and Phrases. 26. Sentences. IV. Punctuation. 27. Commas. 28. Apostrophes. 29. Semicolons. 30. Colons. 31. Quotation Marks. 32. Hyphens. 33. End Punctuation. 34. Other Punctuation. V. Mechanics and Spelling. 35. Capitals. 36. Abbreviations. 37. Numbers. 38. Underlining/Italics. 39. Spelling. VI. Style and Word Choice. 40. Sexist Language. 41. Unnecessary Words. 42. Appropriate Words. VII. ESL Concerns. 43. American Style in Writing. 44. Verbs. 45. Omitted Words. 46. Repeated Words. 47. Count and Noncount Nouns. 48. Adjectives and Adverbs. 49. Prepositions. 50. Idioms. VIII. Research. 51. Finding a Topic. 52. Searching for Information. 53. Evaluating Sources. 54. Taking Notes. 55. Using Sources. IX. Online Research. 56. Research Online. 57. Web Resources. 58. Evaluating Internet Resources. 59. Citing Internet Resources. X. Documentation. 60. Documenting in MLA Style. 61. Documenting in APA Style. 62. Documenting in Other Styles. XI. Document Design, Public Writing, Writing about Literature. 63. Document Design. 64. Public Writing. 65. Writing About Literature. APPENDICES. Glossary of Usage. Glossary of Grammatical Terms. Answer Key for Exercises. Index. © 2003, 528 pp., Spiral Bound with Companion Website Subscription (0-13-048605-1)

THE BLAIR HANDBOOK Fourth Edition Toby Fulwiler

University of Vermont

Alan Hayakawa

The Patriot News, Harrisburg Focused on the needs of contemporary college writers, the widely acclaimed Blair Handbook provides most extensive research coverage found in any comprehensive handbook. And every page is online for instant access!

Contents

I. Writing In College. 1. About Writing. 2. Reading Critically. 3. The Writing Process. II. Planning. 4. Keeping a Journal. 5. Inventing and Discovering. 6. Situating Writing. III. Drafting. 7. Reflecting. 8. Explaining. 9. Arguing. 10. Interpreting. IV. Researching. 11. Research Essays. 12. Library Research. 13. Internet Research. 14. Field Research. 15. Research Sources. 16. Using Sources. 17. Sampler of Research Essays. Essays. V. Revising. 18. The Revising Process. 19. Focused Revising. 2 0. Responding to Writing. 21. Creative Nonfiction. VI. Editing. 22. The Editing Process. Editing for Effectiveness. 23. Paragraphs. 24. Openings and Conclusions. 25. Sentence Structure.

26. Emphasis and Variety. 27. Vitality. 28. Being Concise. 29. Tone. 30. The Right Word. 31. Biased Language. Editing for Grammar. 32. Sentence Fragments. 33. Fused Sentences, Comma Splices. 34. Verbs. 35. Modifiers. 36. Using Pronouns Correctly. 37. Consistent and Complete Sentences. Editing Punctuation. 38. End Punctuation. 39. Commas. 40. Semicolons. 41. Colons. 42. Apostrophes. 43. Quotation Marks. 44. Other Punctuation. Editing Mechanics. 45. Spelling. Capitalization. 47. Hyphenation. 48. Italics. 49. Numbers and Abbreviations. VII. Presenting Your Work. 50. Designing Documents. 51. Portfolios and Publishing. 52. Writing for the World Wide Web. 53. Oral Presentations. VIII. Writing Across the Curriculum. 54. The College Curriculum. 55. Languages and Literature. 56. Humanities. 57. Social Sciences. 58. Physical Sciences. 59. Business. 60. Columbia Online Style. 61. Essay Examinations. IX. A Grammar Reference. 62. Parts of Speech. 63. Sentence Elements. 64. Sentence Classification. Glossary of Usage. Glossary of Terms. ESL Index. Index. Paperbound: © 2003, 1,007 pp., with Companion Website subscription (0-13-048603-5) Clothbound: © 2003, 1,007 pp., with Companion Website subscription (0-13-078219-X)

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