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Dorchester School District Two

Leading the Way, Every Student, Every Day

Board of Trustees

Mr. Bufort "Bo" Blanton, Chairman Mrs. Frances Townsend, Vice Chairman Mrs. Gail Hughes, Secretary Mr. Harry Blake, Jr. Mrs. Barbara Crosby Mr. Charles Stoudenmire Mrs. Lisa Tupper

Dorchester School District Two Mission Our mission is to meet the needs of all students by establishing standards of learning that all students are expected to achieve.

Joseph R. Pye, Superintendent Dr. Barbara Kingsby-Stroble, Deputy Superintendent Dr. W. Glenn Huggins, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum & Instruction

102 Green Wave Boulevard Summerville, South Carolina 29483-2455 Phone: (843) 873-2901 Fax: (843) 821-3959 www.dorchester2.k12.sc.us

Ashley Ridge High School 9800 Delemar Highway Summerville, SC 29485 Phone: (843) 695-4900 Fax: (843) 695-4905 Karen Radcliffe, Principal http://ashleyridge.schoolfusion.us

Fort Dorchester High School 8500 Patriot Boulevard North Charleston, SC 29420 Phone: (843) 760-4450 Fax: (843) 760-4852 E. James Atkinson, Principal http://fdhs.ddtwo.org

Summerville High School 1101 Boone Hill Road Summerville, SC 29483 Phone: (843) 873-6460 Fax: (843) 821-3989 Roger Edwards, Principal http://dorchester.shs.schoolfusion.us

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Registration and Course Selection................................................................................................................................... 3 Graduation & Promotion Requirements .......................................................................................................................... 3 Grading Scale and Uniform Grading Scale ..................................................................................................................... 4 Class Rank and Honor Graduates .................................................................................................................................... 5 Retaking a Course, Summer School, and Credit Recovery ............................................................................................. 5 South Carolina Virtual School Program .......................................................................................................................... 5 Homebound Instruction ................................................................................................................................................... 6 Scholarships and Grants .................................................................................................................................................. 6 SC High School League Eligibility Rules for Athletes and NCAA Eligibility Requirements ........................................ 7 Personal Pathways and High Schools That Work (HSTW) ............................................................................................ 7 Dorchester County Career and Technology Center (DCCTC) ........................................................................................ 8 Educational and Career Assessments .............................................................................................................................. 8-9 Advanced College Coursework ....................................................................................................................................... 9-10 Dorchester District Two Curriculum Framework............................................................................................................ 11 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS English............................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Mathematics .................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Science ............................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Social Studies .................................................................................................................................................................. 22 School of Arts and Humanities ..................................................................................................................................... 26-40 Fine Arts and Performing Arts .......................................................................................................................... 26 International Baccalaureate (IB) Program ......................................................................................................... 33 Modern and Classical Languages ...................................................................................................................... 34 Teaching and Training; Journalism and Mass Communication ........................................................................ 38-40 School of Business and Information Systems .............................................................................................................. 41-44 Business Management; Finance ........................................................................................................................ 41 Marketing; Information Technology ................................................................................................................. 42 School of Engineering, Manufacturing, and Industrial Technologies ...................................................................... 45-49 Engineering - Project Lead the Way ................................................................................................................. 45 Welding; Agriculture and Natural Resources; Architecture and Construction ................................................. 46 Automotive ....................................................................................................................................................... 48 School of Health Science, Human and Public Services .............................................................................................. 49-55 Health Science; Physical Education; Early Childhood ..................................................................................... 49-50 Fashion and Interior Services; Personal Care.................................................................................................... 51 Hospitality and Tourism.................................................................................................................................... 52 Law, Public Safety and Security; Service and Leadership ................................................................................ 53 ROTC ................................................................................................................................................................ 54 Research and General Electives ...................................................................................................................................... 57 Special Services .............................................................................................................................................................. 60

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REGISTRATION/COURSE SELECTION

This guide provides course selection information for grades nine through twelve to assist students in planning their Individual Graduation Plan (IGP). The guide is designed to provide parents of students entering the ninth grade with sufficient information to plan a complete high school course of study. Particular attention should be paid to the courses available for each grade and the prerequisites for individual courses and course levels. With prerequisites that refer to concurrent enrollment, it should be noted that concurrent enrollment is defined as enrollment at the same time. Use EXTREME CARE in designating alternatives for courses, as they will be assigned if the primary course cannot be scheduled. All students who are presently enrolled and who will return for the following school year will make course selections before the end of the school year. Scheduling during the summer vacation is reserved for NEW students and students requiring changes due to extended year or summer school classes. Failure to complete course selections on time may result in desired courses not being available. Students who fail to register within the appropriate time limit will be assigned classes by school personnel. Students who receive a failing grade should meet with a counselor to reschedule courses. All students are required to be enrolled in a full instructional day as stated in Dorchester School District Two Board Policy. Any senior requesting less than the full instructional day needs to petition the Principal to request work based learning opportunity. Teacher choice cannot be honored. Class sizes are balanced by computer. Changing course selections may adversely affect eligibility for interscholastic competitions including athletics. Student athletes should consult their counselor and coaches prior to requesting any course changes. Decisions on whether courses can be offered depend on student enrollment and teacher staffing. If a selected course is not offered, the student's alternate choice will be used. If the alternate course is unavailable, the counselor will make every attempt to contact the student. Please note that no course can be offered unless a sufficient number of students register for it.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To be eligible to receive a South Carolina High School Diploma, students must earn twenty-four units, pass all sections of the HSAP, and demonstrate computer literacy. Based on state law, requirements to receive a South Carolina High School Diploma (graduation requirements) for students in grades 9-12 are as follows: English Mathematics Science Physical Science ** US History & the Constitution Economics US Government Other Social Studies Physical Education or JROTC Computer Science (computer literacy)* Foreign Language or Vocational Elective Additional Electives Total * See counselor for applicable courses ** Entering class of 2006-2007 and beyond 4 units 4 units 2 units 1 unit 1 unit ½ unit ½ unit 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 7 units 24 units

PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS

Beginning in 9th grade, students will move with their academic grade level each year through their 11th year of high school. Any prerequisite courses must be taken and passed in sequential order. Only students with sufficient Carnegie units as outlined by South Carolina graduation requirements will be allowed to graduate. Students requesting a 5th year in high school must apply for the 5th year status with their principal. College-bound students can find more information at http://www.che.sc.gov/New_Web/GoingToCollege/collprepprereq.htm.

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GRADING SCALE

All South Carolina schools use a uniform method of grading children's progress in school. All report cards and transcripts will use numerical grades for all students receiving Carnegie units. Each nine-week grade is used to compute the semester average giving a 20% weight to the semester examination. The two semester averages are used to determine the final grade along with the final examination or EOCEP examination which is weighted 20% of the final course grade. A 93-100 B 85-92 C 77-84 D 70-76 F < 70

GRADE POINT RATIO (GPR)

All grades will be interpreted for all purposes according to the South Carolina Uniform Grading Policy. The SC Uniform Grading Scale assigns grade points for each numerical grade. Numerical grades will appear on the report card. All South Carolina public schools will use the following formula to compute all GPRs: GPR = sum (quality points X units) sum of units attempted If a student withdraws from a course with a passing grade after the 10 th day of a 180-day course, the 5th day of a 90-day course, or the 3rd day of a 45-day course, a grade of 61 will be posted and calculated in the student's grade point ratio (GPR). Numerical Average

100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 0-61 61 61 ----

South Carolina Uniform Grading Scale Conversions Letter Grade College Prep Honors AP/IB/Dual Credit

A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B B C C C C C C C C D D D D D D D F F F F F F F F F FA WF WP 4.875 4.750 4.625 4.500 4.375 4.250 4.125 4.000 3.875 3.750 3.625 3.500 3.375 3.250 3.125 3.000 2.875 2.750 2.625 2.500 2.375 2.250 2.125 2.000 1.875 1.750 1.625 1.500 1.375 1.250 1.125 1.000 0.875 0.750 0.625 0.500 0.375 0.250 0.125 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 5.375 5.250 5.125 5.000 4.875 4.750 4.625 4.500 4.375 4.250 4.125 4.000 3.875 3.750 3.625 3.500 3.375 3.250 3.125 3.000 2.875 2.750 2.625 2.500 2.375 2.250 2.125 2.000 1.875 1.750 1.625 1.500 1.375 1.250 1.125 1.000 0.875 0.750 0.625 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 5.875 5.750 5.625 5.500 5.375 5.250 5.125 5.000 4.875 4.750 4.625 4.500 4.375 4.250 4.125 4.000 3.875 3.750 3.625 3.500 3.375 3.250 3.125 3.000 2.875 2.750 2.625 2.500 2.375 2.250 2.125 2.000 1.875 1.750 1.625 1.500 1.375 1.250 1.125 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

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CLASS RANK

Once a GPR has been computed for all students, all grade point ratios are ranked numerically from highest to lowest and each student's class rank is determined by the position of his/her GPR relative to all other students in a given grade. Class ranks and GPRs are calculated at the end of the academic school year, not at the end of semester. Students are reminded that one's position in the class rank is relative to the rank of all other students in a particular grade. Therefore, as the numbers and performances of other students in a particular grade group changes, a student's class rank may vary as well, even though his/her own academic performance may remain constant. Class rank is one consideration in the college admissions process as well as a criterion for some scholarships. It is also used to determine valedictorians, salutatorians, and junior class marshals.

HONOR GRADUATES

At the end of 4th quarter of the senior year, seniors with an overall GPR of 4.000­ 4.3699 are considered honor graduates for graduation. Those seniors with an overall GPR of 4.3700 and above are distinguished honor graduates.

RETAKING A COURSE

According to the SC Uniform Grading Policy, students are allowed to retake the same course at the same difficult level under the following conditions: Only courses in which a grade of a D or F is earned may be retaken. The course in which a D or F is earned may only be retaken during the current academic year or no later than the next academic school year. In addition, the student must retake the course before enrolling in the next sequential course (unless the student is granted approval by school administration to do so). The student's record will reflect all courses taken and the grade earned. Students who repeat a course in which a D was earned will only receive credit for the repeated course grade. A student taking courses for a Carnegie unit prior to their 9 th grade year my retake any such course during the 9th grade year regardless of the grade earned. In this case, only the 9 th grade retake grade is used in figuring the student's Grade Point Ratio (GPR) and only the 9th grade attempt is shown on the transcript. This rule applies whether the grade earned is higher or lower than the pre-ninth grade attempt. Eighth grade students will bring all earned Carnegie units to high school unless the exact course is retaken the 9 th grade year. Only then will the first attempt be removed from the transcript. Honors credit may be earned only for courses that have published syllabi with established higher standards. Honors credit may be awarded at all levels.

SUMMER SCHOOL REGULATIONS

All courses to be taken in summer school must have the final approval of a school principal or counselor from the school where the student is currently enrolled on a full-time basis. Classes cannot be offered unless a sufficient number of students register.

SOUTH CAROLINA VIRTUAL SCHOOL PROGRAM

The South Carolina Virtual School Program (SCVSP) in an effective online learning opportunity for secondary school students. Online courses provide an effective alternative for motivated students to meet graduation requirements, to resolve scheduling conflicts, and as a homebound option. They also provide a flexible option for students who require an alternative setting. Students must be enrolled full time at a Dorchester School District Two school to participate in this program. As a student enrolled in SCVSP through Dorchester School District Two, students must have a strong commitment to perform in order to achieve academic success. Online learning is not easier than the traditional education process. In fact, many students say that it requires more time and commitment than traditional coursework. Students interested in SCVSP must meet proper prerequisites and complete registration. Please see your Guidance Counselor for further information.

CREDIT RECOVERY

Credit Recovery offers students an opportunity to recover credits for failed courses. Students wishing to participate in Credit Recovery must see their Guidance Counselor for a petition packet. Each school's committee will review the petition request. Students may be charged a fee for courses beyond the regular school day, extended year, and during summer school. Dorchester District Two currently utilizes Apex Learning for Credit Recovery courses.

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HOMEBOUND INSTRUCTION

Medical homebound instruction is provided to students according to SDE Regulation 43-241. R 43-241 defines homebound or hospitalized instruction as teaching that is offered to the student who has an acute or chronic medical condition that prevents him or her from attending classes in school, is certified by a physician that the student is unable to attend school but may profit from instruction given in the home or hospital, is approved by the district superintendent or his or her designee on standardized forms provided by the State Department of Education. All approved forms must be maintained by the district for documentation, is conducted by an individual who holds a South Carolina teacher's certificate, and takes place in a room especially set aside for the period of instruction.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS

The South Carolina legislature provides several opportunities for students to receive scholarship. Below is a brief overview of the State Scholarships and Grants programs. Students will only be awarded one scholarship although they may meet the criteria for more than one. These requirements are subject to change by the State Legislature. For more detailed information, refer to the Commission on Higher Education's website at www.che.sc.gov or see your Guidance Counselor. PALMETTO FELLOWS Early Awards Available: Public & Private four-year SC institutions Value: Up to $6700 Requirements: 1200 SAT/27 ACT (by November administration); 3.5 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale; Top 6% of sophomore or junior class OR 1400 SAT/32 ACT (by November administration); 4.0 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale Final Awards Available: Public & Private four-year SC institutions Value: Up to $6700 Requirements: 1200 SAT/27 ACT (by June administration); 3.5 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale; Top 6% of senior class OR 1400SAT/32ACT (by June administration); 4.0 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale LIFE SCHOLARSHIP Available: Public & Private four-year SC institutions Value: Up to $5000 (including a $300 book allowance) Requirements: 1100SAT/24 ACT; 3.0 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale; Top 30% of graduating class (Must Meet 2 of 3) Available: Value: Requirements: Public & Private two-year SC institutions Up to $5000 3.0 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale

HOPE SCHOLARSHIP Available: Public & Private four-year SC institutions Value: Up to $2800 (including a $300 book allowance) Requirements: 3.0 GPR on Uniform Grading Scale SC NEED-BASED GRANT Available: Public & Private four-year SC institutions Value: Up to $2500 full-time; up to $1250 part-time Requirements: File a FAFSA; 12 credit hours (full-time) or 6 credit hours (part-time) LOTTERY TUITION ASSISTANCE Available: Public & Private two-year SC institutions Value: Up to the cost of tuition (amount dependent upon number of eligible participants and total funding available) Requirements: SC Residence for at least one year; Enrolled in at least six credit hours each semester toward a certification degree, diploma program or Associate degree program; File a FAFSA; Make satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of program requirements

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SC HIGH SCHOOL LEAGUE ELIGIBILITY RULES FOR ATHLETES

A student, while participating in athletics, must be a full time student as determined by guidelines set forth by the State Department of Education. A student who is repeating a course for which he has previously received credit cannot count this course as one required for eligibility. To participate in interscholastic activities, students must achieve an overall passing average in addition to the following: To be eligible in the first semester, a student must pass a minimum of five Carnegie units applicable toward a high school diploma during the previous year. At least two units must have been passed during the second semester or summer school. 1. To be eligible during the second semester, the student must meet one of the following conditions: If the student met first semester eligibility requirements, then he or she must pass four subjects during the first semester in order to play second semester. If the student did not meet first semester eligibility requirements, then he or she must pass five subjects during first semester to play second semester. 2. Academic deficiencies may not be made up through enrollment in extension, correspondence schools, or adult education programs.

NCAA ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has in force policies regarding athletic eligibility for Division I and Division II schools. To be eligible for financial aid, practice and competition during the freshman year, students must: (1) graduate from high school; (2) present a minimum combined test score on the SAT or a minimum combined score on the ACT according to a sliding scale using the GPR from core courses; and (3) present a minimum GPA in at least 16 core courses in subject areas as defined by the NCAA. Students planning to participate in athletics at Division I or Division II colleges or universities must be certificated by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse. Students should contact the athletic office, the guidance office or the Clearinghouse site at (www.ncaaclearinghouse.net or www.ncaa.org) for specific information regarding core course grades, minimum test scores and minimum GPR as defined by the NCAA.

Personal Pathways and HSTW

The Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) was written and passed by the South Carolina legislature to create the context and infrastructure needed by schools to implement changes from kindergarten through post-secondary education. Specifically, the new legislation requires high schools to: Revise the secondary curriculum around organized clusters of study with major areas of academic focus consisting of electives that relate to preparation of post-secondary plans, Develop an Individual Graduation Plan (IGP) that lists the academic courses required for both graduation and entry into post-secondary education and courses related to the student's selected major and includes extended learning opportunities such as internships and job shadowing, and Implement the principles of the High Schools that Work (HSTW) organizational model and address the ten key practices enumerated by the Southern Regional Education Board in the HSTW model: o Setting high expectations o Increasing access to challenging career/technical studies o Increasing access to rigorous academic studies o Having students complete a challenging program of study o Having a structure and schedule for teachers to work together o Giving students choices for school-based and work-based learning o Having each student actively engaged in the learning process o Involving students and parents in a guidance and advisement system o Providing a structured system of extra help o Using student assessment and program evaluation data for continuous improvement. All high schools are HSTW sites. The HSTW Assessment, administered to seniors in even-numbered years, is used by HSTW states, districts and schools to document and inform school improvement efforts. The assessment includes three subject tests (reading, mathematics and science), a student survey, and a teacher survey. The assessment results give schools, districts and states a unique opportunity to determine what is and is not working to increase student achievement.

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DORCHESTER COUNTY CAREER & TECHNOLGY CENTER (DCCTC)

Dorchester County Career & Technology Center in conjunction with Dorchester School District Two is pleased to announce the offering of core academic courses (English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies) on our Dorchester campus. This is an excellent opportunity for students who are having difficulties in reaching their academic and career potential in a large school setting to receive academic credit as well as hands-on experience in a career focused environment. While on our campus, students will be able to integrate academic and career skills, personalizing education to each student's unique needs. Students will remain enrolled at Dorchester District Two and can participate in extracurricular activities (athletics, etc); graduate from their respective high schools; take required academic and career courses on our Dorchester campus; and receive individual attention in small class settings. Our classrooms simulate actual work environments creating responsible work ethics. Students can explore career interests now instead of waiting until college and possibly earn college credit and be provided employment opportunities related to training while in school and perhaps after graduation. DCCTC welcomes the opportunity to offer this additional service to the students of Dorchester County. Vision Statement: Dorchester County Career & Technology Center will be a leader in blending academic courses with career and technology education to provide an educated and skilled workforce. We will continue to advance student learning and achievement through well-rounded educational programs leading to career pathways and/or college admission.

EDUCATIONAL AND CAREER ASSESSMENTS

END-OF-COURSE EXAMINATION PROGRAM (EOCEP) Algebra 1, Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 2, English 1, Physical Science, Applied Biology 2, Biology 1, and US History & the Constitution will have end-of-course examinations as mandated by the state of South Carolina. Test dates are mandated by the State, and students cannot be excused or exempt from this testing. Current state law mandates that these tests count 20% of the final grade for the course. HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (HSAP) In order to receive a South Carolina High School Diploma, all students must pass the South Carolina High School Assessment Program (HSAP) exam in mathematics and English language arts which includes reading and writing. Failure to pass any section obligates the student to enroll in an appropriate remedial course during the following school year for elective credit. All students must take the HSAP during spring of their second year of high school. Opportunities are provided in the fall and spring of subsequent years. EXPLORE ­ 8th grade In the eighth grade, all students participate in the EXPLORE assessment during the month of October. This assessment measures student achievement in four academic areas: English, mathematics, reading and science reasoning. In addition, students complete a comprehensive career interest inventory. EXPLORE results, along with other information in the student's record, are utilized to guide students, with assistance from their parents, as they begin developing their IGP in the eighth-grade planning conference. Ninth-graders are encouraged to refer to their EXPLORE results as they further develop and refine their four-year plan. EXPLORE scores also predict scores on PLAN, a 10th grade assessment, which in turn, predicts scores on ACT. Therefore, students have early access to specific information related to their strengths and weaknesses in the four academic areas measured by ACT as well as an indicator of expected performance on the ACT itself. Ninth-grade students have the opportunity to review the Explore results and hear speakers from their chosen career cluster. They also have the opportunity to identify careers using SCOIS, KUDER, or Career Direction. Each of the three assessments will allow students to identify a career from an interest inventory and explore numerous careers. Counselors spend time with students in classroom guidance, small group guidance, and individual guidance and counseling through Individual Graduation Plans with parents. The IGP conferences will be scheduled each year of high school. PLAN ­ 10th grade The PLAN assessment is very similar to EXPLORE. It measures student achievement in the same four academic areas: English, reading, mathematics, and science reasoning. PLAN also includes a career interest inventory. PLAN is administered to all 10th graders because the information is beneficial to students as they revise their IGP for the last two years of high school. In addition, this information is helpful in making post-secondary plans. PSAT ­ 11th grade The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT, NMSQT) introduces students to the organization and question type found on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Students gain test test-taking skills and can use their PSAT results to predict their scores on the SAT. The junior year scores are also used in selecting semifinalists for the national merit Scholarship awards. Several colleges use PSAT for determining early admissions along with programs such as the governor's School in their selection process.

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ASVAB ­ 12th grade The Armed Services Vocational Assessment Battery (ASVAB) is a multi-aptitude test battery known as the Career Exploration Program administered by the Department of Defense. The ASVAB comprises ten individual tests and gives composite scores in verbal, math, and academic ability. The test is given by the military and is free to high school students. The ASVAB Career Exploration Program is a tool to help students make better school and career choices. There is a workbook that contains a career interest inventory and an exercise to help students learn more about occupations and how to match their interests and abilities to certain occupations. The ASVAB is available through the high schools and local military recruiter. Although students who plan to enter the military are required to take the ASVAB, information gained from this career assessment is beneficial to any student. ASSET ­ 12th grade ASSET is the placement test offered by Trident Technical College. The ASSET test includes an essay, a reading comprehension section and a mathematics section. WORK KEYS ­ 12th grade Work Keys Foundational and Personal Skills assessments provide reliable, relevant information about workplace skill levels. SCOIS The South Carolina Occupational Information System (SCOIS) is used in grades 6 th through 12th. It is a computer-based system of up-to-date career, educational, and occupational information. Students may complete interest inventories and explore more than 1,700 occupations. The college search feature includes all two- and four-year colleges and universities in the United States. Other features include a course planner and a scholarship search. Students are also encouraged to use SCOIS at home using the www.scois.net website. Please see your Guidance Counselor for a login and password for your school.

ADVANCED COLLEGE COURSEWORK

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES/INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE COURSES Advanced Placement (AP) is taught at the level of understanding and competency expected in college classes. Students should expect intensified study and great demands placed on their time and energy. This program is operated by the College Board, a national organization that develops the course curriculum, provides teachers training and administers a national standardized exam for each AP course. Students MUST pass the appropriate Advanced Placement in order to have an opportunity to receive college credit after completing a course. Advanced Placement courses currently being offered are listed in this guide. Prerequisites are specified in the course description section of this guide. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE COURSES The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program at Fort Dorchester High School is designed to provide a rigorous, well-rounded education for highly motivated students who plan to attend a four-year university immediately after high school. Students who earn the IB diploma are awarded advanced standing at many universities in the United States and throughout the world. The International Baccalaureate Programme serves the needs of students who work to gain the IB diploma as well as students who desire to take coursework at the college level but not pursue the Diploma Programme as a whole. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the full IB Diploma Programme; however, students may take IB courses for certificates with the exceptions of English HL, History of the Americas HL, Language ab initio SL, and Theory of Knowledge. Students interested in IB courses at Fort Dorchester High School should see the IB Section of this guide under School of Arts & Humanities. CAREER AND TECHNICAL ADVANCED PLACEMENT Trident Technical College has a program that allows qualified high school students to earn TTC credit by demonstrating mastery of college course competencies. High school students who successfully complete specific high school courses in Career and Technology Education (CATE) and who demonstrate mastery of college course competencies will be awarded exemption credit toward their programs at TTC. For more information about Career and Technical Advanced Placement, visit www.tridenttech.edu > Academic Programs > High School Programs. DUAL CREDIT COURSES The Dual Credit program at TTC allows eligible high school students to earn both high school and college credits by successfully completing college courses. In accordance with SC state policy, students will earn one unit toward their high school degree for each three-semester hour college course they successfully complete. Juniors and seniors who desire to participate in the Dual Credit Program must have the appropriate forms approved by a parent and the principal or designee. The forms and a list of course offerings may be obtained from the Guidance Department. All prerequisite requirements for the desired course must be met before enrollment is approved. Students may need to take the appropriate college placement test per admission guidelines. Some Dual Credit courses will be offered on the high school campus, but most will be offered at the college campus. Students may take advantage of Dual Credit opportunities during the school day, after regular school hours, or

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during the summer. Failure to successfully complete a dual credit course may result in not graduating from high school. Any dual credit course grade awarded will be converted in accordance with the SC Uniform Grading Policy. Tuition and other college course fees shall be at the expense of the individual student or his parent(s) and/or legal guardian(s). Dual credit students who are taking at least six college credit hours during the same semester may reduce the amount of tuition they owe by receiving lottery-funded tuition assistance. TTC will also provide need-based scholarships for Dual Credit students who are eligible for free or reduced school lunch programs. All dually enrolled students receiving Lottery Tuition Assistance will not have their term limits under the LIFE or Palmetto Fellows Scholarships affected in any way. The credit hours earned by dually enrolled high school students will not count against their allowable semesters for state scholarships. Please see your guidance counselor to apply. Course Transfer Information: South Carolina public two-and four-year colleges and universities have a list of courses that are transferable within the state public college system. Students should verify if the course they choose is a part of their college major or can be counted as an elective credit. Some courses may be transferable to Trident Technical College but not to all South Carolina public colleges and universities. If a student plans to attend a private or out-of-state college, he/she should check with the college to see if the course will be accepted for college credit. Students needing assistance with this may contact the Trident Technical College Office of High School Program at 574-6312 or www.tridenttech.edu > Academic Programs>University Transfer> Four-Year Colleges.

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Dorchester School District Two Curriculum Framework

School of Arts and Humanities School of Business and Information Systems School of Engineering, Manufacturing, & Industrial Technologies School of Health Sciences, Human and Public Services

Arts and Humanities Cluster

Graphic Technology, Animation & Printing Journalism and Mass Communication World Languages Visual Arts Performing Arts

Business Management and Administration Cluster

Business Analysis Business Information Management General Management

Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Cluster

Conservation & Natural Resources Horticulture

Government and Public Administration Cluster

Military Science

Health Science Cluster

Medical Science and Research Health Diagnostic & Treatment

Finance Cluster

Accounting Business Financial Management

Education and Training Cluster

Teaching and Training

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Cluster

Automotive Service and Collision Repair

Marketing, Sales & Service Cluster

Marketing Communications, Management and Promotion Global Marketing

Hospitality and Tourism Cluster

Restaurant, Food, & Beverage Services

Architecture and Construction Cluster

Residential & Commercial Construction Drafting and Design

Human Services Cluster

Early Childhood Development & Childcare Services Fashion, Clothing, and Interior Design Personal Care Services

Information Technology Cluster

Information Support Services Interactive Media Program and Software Development Networking Systems

Manufacturing Cluster

Welding

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Cluster

Engineering

Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security Cluster

Law and Legal Services Public Safety & Security

INDIVIDUAL GRADUATION PLANS (IGPs) The purpose of the IGP is to help students and parents plan for and explore educational and professional possibilities in order to make appropriate secondary and post-secondary decisions. This educational plan consists of: (1) the state high school graduation requirements and/or college entrance requirements; and (2) course recommendations for successful completion of a major that aligns to post-secondary education and the workplace. In the eighth grade (beginning with the Class of 2011), students, along with their parents or guardians, will meet individually with counselors and draft an initial IGP, identifying a cluster of study they are interested in exploring and mapping out courses they may take in high school. These selections can change. The IGP will be reviewed and updated every year until graduation. There are four schools of study that help organize the curriculum into broad program areas that are interrelated in terms of academic content and career pathways. A cluster is a means of organizing instruction and students experiences around broad categories that encompass virtually all occupations from entry level through professional level. A major is a concentration of coursework in a specialized area. A major consists of the completion of at least four required units of study as well as complementary electives that relate to that area. Majors help students focus their course selection around a concentration in a specific area. Students are never locked into a specific cluster or major. There is ample opportunity to complete a major and participate in other areas of interest. A student who completes a major as defined in the Curriculum Framework will be entitled to wear a cord representing the School of Study at graduation. Students may be completers in more than one major in a cluster, or more than one major in multiple clusters and may wear cords accordingly.

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Individual Graduation Plan Template

Name Academy/School of Study (Optional) Clusters Majors See List

________________________________________

_________________________________________

_________________________________________ _________________________________________ [ ] Declare Only [ ] Intend to Complete _________________________________________

Career Goal Post-secondary Plans

[ ] Workforce/Apprenticeship

[ ] Two-Year College/Technical Training [ ] Military

[ ] Four-Year College

Prepared By In Attendance

_________________________________________ _________________________________________ ( ) Parent/Step Parent/Guardian ( ) Other Representative ( ) No Representative

9th Grade English Mathematics Science Social Studies Requirements/Electives Uncategorized Total Credits Earned Required Courses for Major

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

College

Complementary Course Work

Extended Learning Opportunity Options Related to Major

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ENGLISH

To meet the South Carolina State High School graduation requirements, students must earn four (4) units in English. Completion of English 1, English 2, English 3, and English 4 will meet this criterion. Dorchester District Two Board Policy requires students to take an English course each year of high school. ENGLISH 1 CP 301100CW Unit: 1 Grade: 9 This course will provide students with the comprehension and analytic strategies needed to interpret printed materials as well as a structured review of grammar and mechanics. Students will expand a working, generalized, subject-specific vocabulary. Students will use listening and speaking skills to communicate effectively and to learn and appreciate language. Students will write for different audiences and purposes and work to develop research skills. Standardized test practice will also be included. ENGLISH 1 Freshman Seminar CP 309901CW Unit: 1 English Elective Grade: 9 Must be taken concurrently with English 1 CP or English 1 Honors In English 1 A&E, students will continue to develop and expand skills and strategies addressed in English 1 CP: comprehension and analytic strategies needed to interpret printed materials as well as a structured review of grammar and mechanics; expanded working, generalized, subject-specific vocabulary; listening and speaking skills to communicate effectively and to learn and appreciate language; writing for different audiences and purposes; developing research skills, study skills, test taking skills, and organization skills; and preparing for successful performance on the ELA End-of-Course test. Emphasis will be on involving the students in activities designed for application and enrichment. ENGLISH 1 HONORS 301100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 8-9 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation English 1 Honors is a rigorous course designed for students who hope to develop an expertise in writing and analytical skills. Literature and composition are the focus of this class. Students in this course are expected to work on rigorous differentiated assignments. Students will also be enrolled in English 1 Freshman Seminar CP. ENGLISH 2 CP 301200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisite: English 1 This course will provide students with the comprehension and analytical strategies needed to interpret printed materials as well as a structured review of grammar and mechanics. Students will expand a working generalized, subject-specific vocabulary. Students will use listening and speaking skills to communicate effectively and to learn and appreciate language. Students will write for different audiences and purposes and work to develop research skills. Standardized test practice will also be included. ENGLISH 2 HONORS 301200HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisite: English 1 Honors English 2 Honors is a rigorous course designed to develop advanced skills and knowledge in genre-based literature, composition, grammar, and speaking. Most students will be a year ahead of their grade level in order to take Advanced Placement English as seniors. Students in this course are expected to work at an accelerated pace on multiple assignments. ENGLISH 3 CP 301300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: English 2 English 3 CP is a chronological survey course of American literature from the 1600's to the present. Students will use numerous strategies to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of short stories, nonfiction writings, novels, plays and poems. Research, a major component of this course, requires students to access valid information from a variety of sources and to demonstrate competence in MLA format. Students study vocabulary in the context of literature and grammar on an asneeded basis. ENGLISH 3 HONORS 301300HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-11 Prerequisite: English 2 Honors The purpose of English 3 Honors is to expand the students' understanding of American literature. Students will use the eleventh grade anthology of literature along with parallel readings in all genres including poetry, short stories, drama, and the novel. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to demonstrate their understanding of theme, symbolism, characterization, the elements of drama, figurative language, and other literary concepts by expressing their ideas in written essays as well as class discussions. A major research project will be an important part of the course.

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ENGLISH 4 CP 301400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: English 3 English 4 CP is a survey course of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Students will work on analyzing text and writing about them in a critical manner. This level of English is a correlation of language and literature with emphasis on vocabulary, literary analysis, grammar, and mechanics through writing and values found in literature. ENGLISH 4 HONORS 301400HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: English 3 Honors English 4 Honors is a survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the postmodern period. Students should expect to write analytical essays and research papers, and to read extended works of literature beyond the textbook. ENGLISH 5/ADVANCED COMPOSITION CP 303000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: English 4 CP or English 4 Honors This course is intended to further a student's preparation for a four-year college or university. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course for individualized attention and can be student driven according to interest level. The course is a survey of world literature and students will write analytical pieces focused on the literature. Students can also expect to write expository and persuasive essays as part of the course. Research-based assignments will also be completed. Readings will be text-based and include outside reading as well. ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION AP 307000AW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum. This course provides students the opportunity to earn three hours of college credit while still in high school by demonstrating proficiency on the May exam. English Literature and Composition AP engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. Writing is also an integral part of the course because the AP exam is geared toward student writing and literature. Writing assignments will focus on the critical analysis of literature and will include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. This is a college-level course and students should expect collegelevel assignments, workload, and grading. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION AP 307100AW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This course provides students the opportunity to earn three hours of college credit while still in high school by demonstrating proficiency on the May exam. English Language and Composition AP engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. The intense concentration on language in this course should enhance students' ability to use grammatical conventions both appropriately and with sophistication as well as to develop stylistic maturity in student writing. This is a college-level course and students should expect college-level assignments, workload, and grading. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit.

15

MATHEMATICS

To meet the South Carolina State High School graduation requirements, students must earn four (4) units in Mathematics. Students must also pass the mathematics section of the HSAP in order to receive a SC High School Diploma. Additionally, the Commission on Higher Education (CHE) established minimum course requirements for applicants to four-year programs in SC public colleges and universities. CHE requires three units in mathematics, including Algebra 1 (Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 1 and 2 may count together as a substitute if a student successfully completes Algebra 2), Algebra 2, and Geometry. A fourth or fifth higher-level mathematics course is strongly recommended and may be required for some majors. The fourth course may be selected from among Pre-calculus, Probability & Statistics, or Calculus. Students are encouraged to pay special attention to recommended prerequisites as students may otherwise have more difficulty achieving a satisfactory grade. Students successfully earning credit in any of the Math core courses listed in the guide meet the state requirement. Dorchester District Two Board Policy requires students to take a math course each year of high school. ALGEBRA 1 CP 411100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 8-12 This course is designed for the college preparatory student or one desiring a formal background in mathematics. Topics include the real number system; operations involving exponents, matrices, and algebraic expressions; relations and functions; writing and solving linear equations; graphs and characteristics of linear equations; and quadratic relationships and functions. Students will take the SC end-of-course examination as the final exam in this course. ALGEBRA 1 HONORS 411100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 7-12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Algebra 1 Honors is a challenging course that is the basis for the student desiring to meet the rigors of the honors curriculum. Topics include applying and solving linear and quadratic equations, real numbers, functions, relations, and graphing. This course also includes applications of algebraic concepts and problem-solving processes that require abstract reasoning abilities and/or a creative analysis of information. Students will take the SC end-of-course examination as the final exam in this course. ALGEBRA 2 CP 411200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (at least a C average) or Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 2 (at least a B average) This course continues the work of Algebra 1 and adds complex numbers; nonlinear relationships including exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational; conic sections; and sequences and series. The South Carolina Intermediate Algebra Standards will be used in this course. ALGEBRA 2 HONORS 411200HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Honors; Teacher Recommendation This course is designed for the advanced math student who wishes to continue in the honors mathematics program. This course continues the work of Algebra 1 and includes extensive coverage of matrices, conics, imaginary numbers, nonlinear relationships, functions and relations, and sequences and series. ALGEBRA 3 CP 411300CW Unit: 1 Grade: 10-12 Prerequisites: Algebra 2 and Geometry CP This course is designed to offer intermediate and advanced algebra content to students preparing for academic or technical careers. The topics studied will be functions, systems of equations, inequalities, the complex number system, mathematical modeling, and conics. Upon successful completion of this course, the students should be prepared to take Pre-calculus. CALCULUS AP 417000AW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and who have completed Pre-Calculus This course provides students with the opportunity to pursue college credits while still in high school. It consists of a full high school academic year of work in calculus and related topics, comparable to courses in colleges and universities. There is extensive coverage of theory and applications of differential and integral functions of a single variable. Topics in plane analytic geometry will also be covered. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through The College Board for possible college credit.

16

MATHEMATICS (continued)

CALCULUS CP 413500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus This course provides a review and extension of circular and trigonometric functions with an emphasis on limits, derivatives, and integrals. This course is highly recommended for students who are going to college and are interested in majoring in engineering, business, or science. ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA FOR THE TECHNOLOGIES 1 314100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-11 This is the first part of an algebra course designed to provide students with the mathematical skills and conceptual understanding necessary for them to further their mathematical ability. The content of the elementary algebra standards encompasses the real number system; operations involving exponents, matrices, and algebraic expressions; relations and functions; writing and solving linear equations; graphs and characteristics of linear equations; and quadratic relationships and functions. ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA FOR THE TECHNOLOGIES 2 314200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 1 or Algebra 1 This is the second part of an algebra course designed to provide students with the mathematical skills and conceptual understanding necessary for them to further their mathematical ability. The content of the elementary algebra standards encompasses the real number system; operations involving exponents, matrices, and algebraic expressions; relations and functions; writing and solving linear equations; graphs and characteristics of linear equations; and quadratic relationships and functions. Students will take the SC end-of-course examination as the final exam in this course. GEOMETRY CP 412100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 8-12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1; or Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 1 and 2 This course covers topics involving properties of basic geometric figures; properties of triangles; properties of quadrilaterals and other polygons; properties of circles, lines, and special segments intersecting circles; transformations; coordinate geometry; vectors; surface area and volume of three-dimensional objects; and proofs. GEOMETRY HONORS 412100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 Honors; Teacher Recommendation Geometry Honors is a challenging course in geometry that incorporates a high level of analytical thinking. Inductive reasoning with investigations and deductive reasoning with formal proofs are included. Algebra and coordinate geometry are integrated extensively within the context of geometry. Also included are detailed compass constructions and an introduction to basic trigonometry. GEOMETRY FOR THE TECHNOLOGIES 3 314300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 2 or Algebra 1 This is a geometry course designed to provide students with the mathematical skills and conceptual understanding necessary for them to further their mathematical ability. Students will explore geometry concepts that are developed through concrete, real world, and work place applications. MATHEMATICS IB SL 311A00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Pre-calculus Site: FDHS The aim of this course is to provide students who will continue to study math in college with a background in mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability. Course topics include logarithms, sequences and series, linear and quadratic functions and equations, binomial theorem, arcs and sectors, trigonometry, functions and calculus, vectors and matrices and probability and statistics. Students must complete one of two optional topics in analytical geometry and calculus or further probability and statistics. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. MATH STUDIES IB SL 311B00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisites: Algebra 2 and Geometry Site: FDHS This course is designed to provide a realistic mathematics course for students with varied backgrounds and abilities who may not study mathematics in college. The course develops the skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society with an emphasis on the application of mathematics to everyday situations. Course topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions; approximation and error; algorithms; probability and statistics; sets and logic; simple sequences and finance; linear programming; vectors and matrices; and trigonometry. A personal research project involving the collection and analysis of data is a requirement of this course. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. 17

MATHEMATICS (continued)

PRE-CALCULUS CP Grades: 10-12 P

413100CW Unit: 1 Prerequisites: Algebra 2 and Geometry; 80 or higher is recommended in Algebra 2 or successful completion of Algebra 3. This course examines characteristics and behaviors of functions, operations on functions, behaviors of polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, and conic sections. Topics also include polynomial and transcendental functions, solutions of right triangles, trigonometric identities and equations, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, and advanced graphing techniques. PRE-CALCULUS HONORS 413100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Algebra 2 H and Geometry H; 85 or higher is recommended in Algebra 2 Honors This is a college preparatory course that covers many topics of Algebra 2 in greater depth. Additional topics include advanced graphing techniques, logarithms, right triangle trigonometry, unit circle trigonometry, trigonometric equations and identities, polar coordinates, and arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS CP 414101CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra 2 Statistics is the science of data, and probability is the tool necessary to work with data and to make predictions. This course will give students the opportunity to produce data, to put data into usable form, and to interpret data so that they can draw conclusions about the world around us. This course allows students to develop statistical thinking and stresses the importance of communication. It is a course designed to help students develop strong problem-solving skills and uses, connections to other school subjects, and the student's world. PROBABILITY & STATISTICS FOR THE TECHNOLOGIES 4 314400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Geometry for the Technologies 3 or Geometry CP; and three math credits This course focuses on the development of the students' understanding and ability to apply mathematics to solve real-world problems dealing with probability, statistics, and data analysis. Counting methods and probability formulas are used to evaluate the likelihood of events occurring. Data is described using central tendency, variation, and position statistics. This course will give students the opportunity to produce data, organize and display data, and interpret data so students can draw conclusions and solve problems from a workplace or manufacturing environment. This should be the terminal course in the Math for the Technologies series. STATISTICS AP Grades: 11-12 417100AW Unit: 1 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and have completed Geometry and Algebra 2 with at least a B average This course is designed for students who wish to earn college level work in statistics. It is designed to include topics on data analysis and probability. Students will be expected to conduct independent projects that will involve explorations into project design, data gathering and organization, data treatment, and statistical reporting of the findings. A project for each quarter will be selected to reflect the statistics being studied at that time. It is expected that at least one of these projects will be interdisciplinary in nature and involve other courses in which the student is enrolled. The course will also emphasize the use of technology in data analysis, both with calculators capable of statistical reporting and graphing, and with relevant statistical software in a computer lab setting. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit.

MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES (not for core mathematics credit)

COMPUTER SCIENCE AP "A" 477100AW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and who have completed at least once course in Computer Programming. Using the object-oriented programming language Java, students will write both structured and object-based software applications. The emphasis will be placed on creating classes of objects, methods that operate their data, inheritance and class associates. Topics to be covered include arrays, classes and object-based programming, techniques, searching and sorting algorithms, and an introduction to algorithm analysis. This course is designed to prepare students for the A exam in Computer Science AP.

18

SCIENCE

To meet the South Carolina State High School graduation requirements, students must earn three (3) units in science. In addition, students who plan to attend a four (4) year college may encounter additional requirements. Most colleges require students entering their institution to have earned three (3) units in a laboratory science. These courses are: Biology 1, Chemistry 1 and Physics. Students may substitute one of these courses with a course in which the prerequisite is Biology 1, Chemistry 1, or Physics to satisfy this requirement. Please check with the college of your choice concerning science and other course requirements. ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY CP 326300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Biology 1 (or Biology 2 Applied) This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in a health related profession such as nursing, physical therapy, medical technology, medical office practices, etc. It encompasses a survey of the body systems and their functions. Students are required to participate in all lab exercises, including dissections. ASTRONOMY CP 325100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Astronomy is a course which explores the universe around us. Topics include the scale of the universe, historical perspectives, stars (their lives and deaths), galaxies, solar system and space exploration, and life in the universe. This course is developed theory with projects, laboratory investigations, night labs, and other activities that supplement major topics. APPLIED BIOLOGY 322700CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course is a laboratory course that emphasizes problem solving, decision making, and applied learning that meets the state life science standards for Biology. Students explore the concepts and principles of biology and apply these concepts and principles to issues in the workplace, in society, and in personal experiences. Concepts developed include the biological evolution, interdependence of organisms, along with behavior and regulation. Investigative, hand-on lab activities that address the high school inquiry standards are an integral part of this course. A state mandated end-of-course examination is required. BIOLOGY 1 CP 322100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course is an introductory laboratory-based course designed to meet the SC Curriculum Standards in Science. Students will be introduced to the major concepts of biological science: the cell; molecular basis of heredity; biological evolution; interdependence of organisms; matter, energy, and science process skills. Critical thinking and an appreciation for the nature of science will be developed through laboratory experiences. Students planning on enrolling in a four-year college are recommended to should take this course. A state mandated end-of-course examination is required. BIOLOGY HONORS 322100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisite: Physical Science H; Teacher Recommendation This course is a rigorous year-long laboratory course for 9th and 10th grade students. It is an accelerated college preparatory biology class for highly motivated students who have demonstrated excellent study skills and high aptitude in math or English. The course will cover basic chemistry, cellular biology, genetics, evolution, classification, ecology, and inquiry skills in greater depth than Biology CP. The curriculum integrates writing skills, critical thinking skills, and laboratory skills as they apply to the standards. In addition, this course will emphasize microscopy, calculating data, graphing, and essay exam questions. Students planning on enrolling in AP/IB Biology or AP/IB Chemistry should take this course. BIOLOGY AP 327200AW Unit: 1 BIOLOGY LAB AP 322601HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and have completed Honors Biology. Biology AP is a college course taught in high school. This course covers two semesters of college freshman biology. College level labs are an integral part of the class. This course is designed for academically motivated students as is it prepares them to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Biology in order to earn possible college credit as well as practicing for the rigors of a four-year college curriculum. Students enrolling in AP Biology are required to concurrently take the lab portion of the course for one unit, which is an integral part of the class. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through The College Board at the end of the course which will determine college credit earned.

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SCIENCE (continued)

BIOLOGY IB SL 322A00IW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Biology Site: FDHS This course is designed to give students a secure knowledge of a limited body of facts and at the same time a broad understanding of the field of biology. Four central themes are covered: structure and function, universality verses diversity, equilibrium within systems, and evolution. Students must complete three of seven optional topics in diet and human nutrition, physiology of exercise, cells and energy, evolution, neurobiology and behavior, applied plant and animal science or ecology and conservation. Students will seek to develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. BIOLOGY IB HL 322B00IW Units: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Biology Honors Site: FDHS This course is designed to give students a secure knowledge of a limited body of facts and at the same time a broad understanding of the field of biology. Four central themes are covered: structure and function, universality verses diversity, equilibrium within systems, and evolution. Students perform further study in cells, nucleic acids and proteins, cell respiration and photosynthesis, genetics, human reproduction, defense against infectious diseases, classification and diversity, nerves, muscles and movement, exertion and plant science. Students will seek to develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. CHEMISTRY AP CHEMISTRY LAB AP Grades: 11-12 327300AW Unit: 1 327301 HW Unit: 1 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and have completed Chemistry 1H, Algebra 2H, Enrollment in Pre-calculus This course is a college course taught in high school. College level labs are an integral part of the class. This course is designed for academically motivated students as it prepares participants to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry and to prepare students for the rigors of a four-year college curriculum. Students enrolling in Chemistry AP are required to concurrently take the lab portion of the course for one credit. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. CHEMISTRY CP 323100CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Physical Science and Algebra 2 (or concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2) It is recommended that this course be taken after completing Biology CP. This courses presents chemical theory, the structure and periodicity of the elements, classification of matter, types of bonding, gas laws, and other chemical concepts related to changes in matter. Laboratory experiments are conducted to demonstrate the basic concepts of the course. Students planning on enrolling in a four-year college are recommended to take this course. CHEMISTRY HONORS 323100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Physical Science; Algebra 2 H (or concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2 H); Teacher recommendation This course is a rigorous year-long laboratory course. It is an accelerated college preparatory chemistry course for highly motivated students who have demonstrated excellent study skills and high aptitude in math. Chemistry topics covered are the same as Chemistry CP, but they are covered in much more theoretical depth and have more strenuous mathematical expectations. Much more independence will be expected of the students, both in homework and lab procedures. Students planning on enrolling in AP/IB Chemistry or AP/IB Biology should take this course. CHEMISTRY FOR THE TECHNOLOGIES 323600CW Unit: 1 Grades 11-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science and Algebra 1 (or Elem. Algebra for the Technologies 1 and 2) This course is designed for students planning to pursue technical careers and for students planning to continue their education in a two-year college program. Students will learn the technology of chemistry from real-life situations and procedures. The focus of this course is hands-on lab activities and activities that are enhanced by using simulated industrial data. CHEMISTRY 2/FORENSIC SCIENCE CP 323200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Biology CP 1 or Applied Biology 2; and Chemistry 1 or Chemistry for the Technologies This second year chemistry class is for students who are interested in the forensic science aspects of chemistry. This course will briefly review chemistry topics taught previously using a forensic science perspective. Focus will be on analytic chemistry aspects of forensic science as it pertains to evidence collection, drug chemistry/toxicology, arson investigations, chemistry of explosions, estimating time of death, dirty bombs and nuclear terrorism, poisons, and identification of victims using fingerprint analysis. Biology related areas of study include microscopy, hair and fibers, serology, and DNA. This course uses laboratorybased activities and a hands-on approach to provide students the opportunity to investigate the application of science to law. 20

SCIENCE (continued)

CHEMISTRY IB SL 323A00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science or Chemistry Site: FDHS Course topics include stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, energetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry. Students must complete three of six optional topics in higher organic chemistry, higher physical chemistry, human biochemistry, environmental chemistry, chemical industries, or fuels and energy. Students will seek to develop experimental and investigative scientific skills with 25% of the classroom time devoted to performing practical lab work. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. CHEMISTRY IB HL 323B01IW Units: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Chemistry Honors Site: FDHS This course is designed to meet the needs of those who want to study science in college. Course topics include stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, energetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry. Students in Chemistry HL will perform further studies in all these areas. Students must complete two of six optional topics in higher organic chemistry, higher physical chemistry, human biochemistry, environmental chemistry, chemical industries, or fuels and energy. Twenty-five percent of the classroom time will be devoted to performing practical lab work. Students will seek to develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. EARTH SCIENCE 326500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Topics addressed in this course are specifically those in the South Carolina State Science Standards in the areas of inquiry, energy in the earth system, geochemical cycles, origin and evolution. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES CP 326100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Biology 1 or Biology 2 Applied This course is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify environmental problems both natural and man-made, to identify risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and preventing them. This course is an inter-disciplinary course using a wide variety of topics from different areas of study that can serve as a third science credit. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AP 327700AW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. MARINE BIOLOGY CP 322500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science, and Biology CP or Applied Biology Marine Biology is a study of the marine environment and the organisms that live in it. Topics will include, but will not be limited to, the following: the origins of the oceans; the chemical, physical, and geological aspects of the marine environment; the ecology of various sea zones; marine communities; characteristics of major marine phyla/divisions; and the interrelationship between man and the ocean. Lab investigations, including dissections, are an integral part of this course. PHYSICAL SCIENCE CP 321100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrently enrolled in Algebra 1 CP All students are required to take this course by their second year of high school in order to prepare for the state-mandated endof-course examination. This course is not considered a laboratory science credit as required by state supported colleges and universities. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for other high school science courses. It is a laboratory course, emphasizing process skills and higher order thinking skill. Chemistry units include matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, and nuclear chemistry. Physics units include forces, motion, conservation of energy, electricity, magnetism, and wave phenomena which address the SC Physical Science Standards along with their accompanying inquiry standards. A state mandated end-of-course examination is required.

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SCIENCE (continued)

PHYSICAL SCIENCE HONORS 321100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1 H; Teacher recommendation This honors level course is designed to relate the basic scientific concepts of chemistry and physics to students' everyday lives while challenging them to use their higher order thinking skills in a problem-solving manner. Chemistry concepts include composition and classification of matter, atomic structure and periodic table, and chemical bonds and reactions with some nuclear chemistry. Physics concepts include forces and motion, energy and electricity, and wave characteristics and behavior including electromagnetic/sound/light waves. Investigative, hands-on lab activities that address the high school inquiry standards are an integral part of this course. Additional emphasis on the use of mathematical formulas and deeper investigation into concepts differentiate the honors level from college-prep physical science. Students must have a good understanding of algebraic concepts and be adept at math skills prior to entering this course. Students planning to enroll in future honors courses in science should take this course as this sequence prepares students for the AP/IB sciences. Completion of Physical Science is required of all students by the end of their second year of high school. A state mandated end-of-course examination is required. AP PHYSICS B 327400AW Unit: 1 PHYSICS LAB AP (concurrently enrolled) 327402HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and who have completed Algebra 2, Geometry with a "B" or better, and who are concurrently enrolled in Pre-Calculus This course in physics differs from the usual high school physics course with respect to the textbook used, the extensive laboratory work expected of the students, the depth in which topics are covered, and the time spent on the course by students. This course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college physics course. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. AP PHYSICS C Grades: 11-12 327501AW Unit: 1 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum and who have completed Physical Science H; Chemistry CP; Algebra 2 H, Geometry, and concurrently enrolled in Pre-Calculus; Teacher Recommendation This course is a college course taught in high school. This course covers one semester of college freshman physics and mechanics (physics with calculus). This course is designed for the academically motivated students as it prepares them to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Physics in order to earn college credit as well as adapts students for the rigors of a four-year college curriculum. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. PHYSICS CP 324100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science, and Geometry or Math Tech 3 This course is designed to help students appreciate the world around them, enabling them to obtain information from the world by direct measurement and by applying the Laws of Nature (Physics), allow them to perform experiments and draw independent conclusions consistent with their physical environment. This course helps the student think and analyze problems in the real world while preparing students for a four-year college or university. The first year Physics course will cover measurement, vectors, kinematics, statics, dynamics, momentum, work, power, energy, thermodynamics, and heat. The application of the theory will be tested with applied mathematics. PHYSICS FOR TECHNOLOGIES 324300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Physical Science and Elem. Algebra for the Technologies 2 or Algebra 1 This is a competency-based course designed to teach the basic components of physics. The course uses hands-on techniques as well as lab experiences to teach employability skills. Concepts, rather than mathematical problem solving, are emphasized. Topics include the following: Newton's Laws of Motion, Laws of Gravity, Einstein's Theory of Relativity, electricity, magnetism, light, atomic structure and radioactivity. This course is designed for those who are interested in physics, but do not have strong math skills and are planning to attend a two-year college.

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SOCIAL STUDIES

To meet the South Carolina State High School graduation requirements, students must earn three (3) units in social studies (US Government/Economics, US History), and one unit of Social Studies elective. The following sequence of study is recommended: 9th Grade ­ Global Studies 1 11th Grade ­ US History & the Constitution th 10 Grade ­ Global Studies 2 12th Grade ­ Economics/US Government ECONOMICS CP 335000CH Unit: ½ Grade: 12 The goal of this course is to sharpen students' critical thinking and analytical skills in regard to the structure of the American economic system and financial literacy. The course will focus on economic principles with an emphasis on the efficient allocation of resources through the market forces of demand and supply. Students will study the principles of economics involving the production, consumption, and distribution of wealth in a market economy that is manipulated by governmental policies. In the area of financial literacy, students will also be asked to study banking and financial institutions, credit card and credit management, and stock and bond markets. Through class activities and projects, this course will prepare the collegebound student for college courses with reading skills, study skills, and technology skills. ECONOMICS HONORS 335000HH Unit: ½ Grade: 12 Recommended Prerequisite: At least a "B" average in US History The goal of this course is to sharpen student's critical thinking and analytical skills in regard to the structure of the American economic system and financial literacy. The course will focus on economic principles with an emphasis on the efficient allocation of resources through the market forces of demand and supply. Students will study the principles of economics involving the production, consumption, and distribution of wealth in a market economy that is manipulated by governmental policies. In the area of financial literacy, students will also be asked to study banking and financial institutions, credit card and credit management, and stock and bond markets. Importance is placed on the development of technology skills, research skills, and writing skills that highlights both primary and secondary sources. An individual research project required. MICROECONOMICS AP 337500AW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculu. This college-level course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of markets and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students should demonstrate the ability to analyze economic situations set forth and evaluate general microeconomic principles. Independent research and outside reading are course requirements. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through College Board for possible college credit. US GOVERNMENT CP 333000CH Unit: ½ Grade: 12 The focus of this course is to sharpen students' critical thinking and analytical skills with respect to the US Federal Government, SC State Government, and Local Government. The course will focus on the operation of major American institutions such as the presidency and the offices of the executive branch, the Supreme Court and lower courts, and the American Congress. Students will also study the functions of the bureaucracy, roles of political parties, actions of interest and advocacy groups, and the impact of mass media. The course will also discuss civil liberties, civil rights, civil responsibilities, and public policies. Through class activities and projects, this course will prepare the college-bound student for college courses with reading skills, study skills, technology skills and research skills. US GOVERNMENT HONORS 333000HH Unit: ½ Grade: 12 Recommended Prerequisite: At least a "B" average in US History The focus of this course is to sharpen student's critical thinking and analytical skills with respect to the US Federal Government, SC State Government, and Local Government. The course will focus on the operation of major American institutions such as the presidency and the offices of the executive branch, the Supreme Court and lower courts, and the American Congress. Also students will study the functions of the bureaucracy, roles of political parties, actions of interest and advocacy groups, and the impact of mass media. The course will also discuss civil liberties, civil rights, civil responsibilities, and public policies. Comparisons are made between American government and other political systems. Students examine primary and secondary sources as they analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information. Emphasis is placed on the development of technology skills, research skills, and writing skills. An individual research-project is required. 23

SOCIAL STUDIES (continued)

US GOVERNMENT AP 337300AW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This college-level course gives students a critical perspective in government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Students should be familiar with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that make up the American political system. Independent research and outside reading are course requirements. Students develop analytic perspectives for interpreting, understanding, and explaining political events in this country. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. US HISTORY & THE CONSTITUTION CP 332000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 The focus of United States History and the Constitution is the story of the American people from the discovery and settlement of America by Europe to the present day a span that includes the early Native Americans, the establishment of various European colonies, the creation of the United States as a new nation during the American Revolution, the territorial expansion to the West, the American Civil War and Reconstruction, the industrialization and immigration of the late nineteenth century, and the nation's developing role in world affairs in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through class activities and projects, this course will prepare the college-bound student for college courses with reading skills, study skills, technology skills and research skills. An individual research project required. Students will take the SC end-of-course examination as the final exam in this course. US HISTORY AND THE CONSTITUTION HONORS 332000HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Recommended Prerequisite: Global Studies 2 H, AP European History, or at least a "B" average in Global Studies 2 CP The focus of United States History and the Constitution is the story of the American people from the discovery and settlement of America by Europe to the present day. Students examine primary and secondary sources as they analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information in order to construct sound historical interpretations with evidence. Emphasis is placed on the development of technology skills, research skills, and writing skills. An individual research project required. Students will take the SC end-of-course examination as the final exam in this course. US HISTORY AND THE CONSTITUTION AP 337200AW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This course provides students with the opportunity to pursue college credit while still in high school and is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and development of American History. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of full year introductory college courses. Emphasis is placed on analyzing historical data, synthesizing evidence, and evaluating the ideas of others as students develop the ability to express themselves with clarity and precision when writing essays. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. Students will also take the SC end-of-course examination as the final exam in this course.

OTHER SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES (at least one unit is required for graduation)

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 1 339900CW Units: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Global Studies 1 or 2 This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of the significant contributions made by African Americans to the economic, social, political, and cultural development of the United States. As a part of the overall social studies philosophy, this course aims to help students develop a sense of history, as well as an understanding and acceptance of others in a multicultural society. Students will study African American history, art, music, and literature encompassing past and present contributors on a local, national, and international scale. Students will complete individual as well as group projects, readings, and assignments with specific emphasis on developing and enhancing better reading, writing, technological, and analytical skills. AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 2 339901CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: African American Studies 1 This course is designed to give serious-minded students an in-depth study into the affairs of African-Americans in the PostCivil War era through contemporary events in the world as it relates to the African migration. This course will also focus on current affairs such as political awareness, economic empowerment, and goal setting. The political awareness component is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the American government and prepares them to be future voting citizens. The economic empowerment component is designed to provide students with an understanding of personal finance. The goal setting portion is designed to help students develop skills to succeed in today's world and to give them a sense of self24

SOCIAL STUDIES (continued)

esteem, pride and value. Students will also be able to participate in various activities such as mentoring younger students in the elementary and middle schools and teaching others in neighboring communities. Funding will be pursued through grants and various agencies. EUROPEAN HISTORY AP 337601AW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This course provides students with the opportunity to pursue college credit while still in high school. The course emphasizes the chronological development of European politics and diplomacy from the Renaissance to the present and the social, economic, cultural and intellectual developments of the European people. The Advanced Placement European History program is designed for college-bound students who wish to prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination given in May by the College Examination Board. Those students who qualify may receive college credit in European History. GLOBAL STUDIES 1 CP 331000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 9 This college preparatory course is designed to give students a basic understanding of world geography and world history from the time of earliest civilization through the Middle Ages. Students will study the political, economic, cultural, and social events that shaped the world in their geographic context. Students will create individual and group projects throughout the course and develop their writing skills. All students should strongly consider taking Global Studies 2 as a sequel to Global Studies 1. GLOBAL STUDIES 1 HONORS 331000HW Unit: 1 Grade: 9 This course presents a comprehensive view of world geography and world history through an in-depth and analytical study of major geographical regions and major events in world history from the time of earliest civilization through the Middle Ages. Students will be involved in group and independent projects which will require research skills, writing and speaking skills, and the use of the critical and creative thinking skills necessary in problem solving. GLOBAL STUDIES 2 CP 336000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 10 Prerequisite: Strongly urged to have taken Global Studies 1 as this is a sequential course This college preparatory course is designed as a sequel to Global Studies 1. It gives students a basic understanding of world geography and world history from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will study the political, economic, cultural and social events that shaped the world in their geographic context. Students will create individual and group projects throughout the course and develop their writing skills. GLOBAL STUDIES 2 HONORS 336000HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisite: Global Studies 1H This course presents a comprehensive view of world geography and world history through an in-depth and analytical study of major geographical regions and major events in world history from the time of the Renaissance to the present. Students will be involved in group and independent projects which will require research skills, writing and speaking skills, and the use of the critical and creative thinking skills necessary in problem solving. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY AP 337900AW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This course emphasizes the importance of geography as a field of inquiry and emphasizes the study of diverse groups of people and areas organized around a set of concepts. These concepts can help students understand how human geography is related to the remainder of the field. The course introduces students to the importance of spatial organization, geographic concepts, spatial interaction, spatial behavior, patterns of culture, economic use of Earth, political organization of space, and human settlement patterns, particularly urbanization. Students will also learn how to use, make, and interpret maps. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. PSYCHOLOGY CP 334000CH Unit: ½ Grades: 11-12 This course in the science of behavior and mental processes will acquaint students with the basic psychological theories and tools of analysis. Students are exposed to the psychological assumptions, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. A set of process skills that revolve around the application of the scientific method to psychological questions are central to the study of psychology. The application of the scientific method in psychology, human growth and development, cognition and learning, personality, mental health, and behavioral disorders will be explored.

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PSYCHOLOGY AP 437100AW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students willing to attempt the rigors of the prescribed curriculum This course will introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. PSYCHOLOGY IB SL 334A00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Site: FDHS This course gives students a broad understanding of psychology and of its different theoretical approaches. The course guides students through the study of human behavior by examining key topics from three distinct perspectives: behavioral, cognitive, biological, logical and psychodynamic. One of eight optional topics will be studied in comparative psychology; delinquency and crime; dysfunctional behavior; the psychology of gender; intelligence and personality; life span psychology; the migrant, sojourner and tourist experience; organizational psychology or social psychology. Students will be introduced to diverse methods of psychological inquiry through research design, methods, statistics and ethical issues. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. SOCIOLOGY CP 334500CH Unit: ½ Grades: 9-12 This course introduces the concepts of culture, groups, personality, collective behavior, and the mass media. Group activities and role-playing are stressed. Concepts of sociology are applied in dealing with social problems such as civil rights, crime, poverty, and ecology.

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School of Arts & Humanities

Fine Arts Courses

The Dorchester School District Two Fine Arts Mission Statement acknowledges that: "The creative, visual, and performing arts are a part of the core academic curriculum in Dorchester School District Two. Our standards-based fine arts curriculum provides knowledge and skills essential to every student's intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and cultural development." Our course offerings are planned to provide arts education to all students. Courses are available for the technical student, the college preparatory student, the professional career student, and the artistically talented. Students seeking a four-year degree will need one unit in the Fine or Performing Arts which includes appreciation of, history of, or performance in one of the fine arts. Honors 3 and Honors 4 are advanced upper-level courses. ART APPRECIATION CP 351100CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 This course is designed for the college bound student. It is a survey of art history with a basis on the role of visual art in world cultures. This course can be taken as preparation for college level humanities or as credit through Trident Technical College for three semester hours of credit. ART HISTORY AP 357100AW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Global Studies 1 or higher This course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Art History test that covers world visual art from prehistoric to contemporary times. Students taking this course will be required to do extensive reading and writing. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. ART STUDIO AP (DRAWING) 357200AW Unit: 1 ART STUDIO AP (SCULPTURE) 357500AW Unit: 1 ART STUDIO AP (2D PORTFOLIO) 357400AW Unit: 1 Grades: 10 -12 Prerequisites: Two years of visual art and/or portfolio review (by Studio Art teacher) that includes a minimum of twenty-four works This course is for students who wish to pursue college credit while still in high school. Students who successfully pass the portfolio review administered by ETS may receive college credit. Each student must take the Advanced Placement examination through the College Board for possible college credit. DRAWING AND PAINTING 1 350101CW Unit: 1 DRAWING AND PAINTING 2 350201CW Unit: 1 DRAWING AND PAINTING 3 350301CW Unit: 1 DRAWING AND PAINTING 4 350401CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Drawing techniques are used as a basis for the development of paintings in a variety of media. Students will use their drawing and design skills to create multiple images through printing. The principles and elements of art, as well as art from different cultures, styles, and time periods will be used to enhance and reinforce the students' skill and understanding of 2D art. DRAWING AND PAINTING HONORS 3 350301HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Drawing and Painting 2 and portfolio review DRAWING AND PAINTING HONORS 4 350401HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting Honors 3 DRAWING AND PAINTING HONORS 5 459901HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting Honors 4 These courses are for students who are interested in developing visual art skills beyond the high school level. Students in 2-D Art Honors define their style and approach to drawing and painting.

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SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS 1 350103CW Unit: 1 SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS 2 350203CW Unit: 1 SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS 3 350303CW Unit: 1 SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS 4 350403CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Students are expected to demonstrate competency in a variety of hand building and glazing or finishing techniques. They should experience and develop skills involving throwing on the wheel. A variety of techniques and processes including additive, subtractive, casting, and kinetic are presented. The students will explore these techniques through the use of different media including plaster, paper, and clay. The principles and elements of art, as well as art from different cultures, styles, and time periods will be used to enhance and reinforce the students' skills and understanding of 3D Art. SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS HONORS 3 350303HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Sculpture and Ceramics 2 and portfolio review SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS HONORS 4 350403HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Sculpture and Ceramics Honors 3 SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS HONORS 5 459903HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Sculpture and Ceramics Honors 4 Sculpture and ceramics Honors continues personal artistic development. This is a Course for students who are interested in developing visual art skills beyond the high school level. Students will be challenged in an intensive, creative, and intellectual examination of the production of sculpture. MEDIA ART 1 CP 459910CW Unit: 1 MEDIA ART 2 CP 459920CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Media Art 1 CP MEDIA ART 3 CP 459930CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Media Art 2 CP MEDIA ART 4 CP 459940CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Media Art 3 CP The students will study the role of visual arts in the business world. After a unit on the principles and elements of design, students will produce and critique posters, logos, stationery, and advertisements. Hand rendering and computer graphics techniques will be utilized. The course will emphasize artistic thought and creative expression to achieve original solutions to design problems. Utilizing learning from Media Art 1, students will further develop their design skills with an emphasis on creating overall design images for organizations. Students will investigate the emotional responses to color, line and shape. Cultural and historical aspects of design will be incorporated. PHOTOGRAPHY 1 CP 459913CW Unit: 1 Grade: 9-12 This course begins with the elements and principles of design and their relationship to the photographic process utilizing the text, Photographic Eye. Students will study the history of photography and its development as an art form. The course covers the basics of camera operation and picture taking with 35mm and digital equipment. Labs include the black and white darkroom and the color computer lab. Students are required to have access to a 35mm SLR manual camera. PHOTOGRAPHY 2 CP 459914CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Photography 1 This course covers advanced projects in black and white, color photography, and digital photography. The students will utilize the printing process as a tool for creativity. Students are required to have a 35mm SLR manual camera and a supply of film. PHOTOGRAPHY 3 CP 459915CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Photography 2 This course is an advanced course for the serious student of photography. Photographic assignments will involve various photographic equipment and dark room experiments. Students will develop a personal photographic portfolio. A 35mm SLR manual camera and a digital camera are required. PHOTOGRAPHY 4 CP 459916CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Photography 3 Students will begin the process of a photographic specialization and the development of a personal style. A variety of photography career options and opportunities will be explored. Students will produce an artist's portfolio illustrating the breadth and depth of the photographic process. A 35mm manual camera and a digital camera are required. 28

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VISUAL ARTS IB SL 351A06IW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Site: FDHS Visual Arts IB SL is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop aesthetic, imaginative and creative thinking. Of two options, a student chooses one: Option A (studio) includes an introduction to the principles of a visual arts experience in several media and techniques. The students will create a portfolio of work that is evaluated by an outside examiner approved by the IB Organization, or Option B (research) concentrates on compiling one or more personal visual and written practical and experimental work. Students are assessed by the IB Organization.

Performing Arts Courses

Students enrolled in the Performing Arts will be expected to maintain a uniform and an instrument and attend scheduled rehearsals and performances beyond the school day. MARCHING BAND Membership in Summerville High Green Wave Marching Band, Fort Dorchester High Patriot Band, and Ashley Ridge High School Swamp Fox Marching Band is open to all instrumental music students. Marching band members must be enrolled in an instrumental class and are selected by audition. BAND FLAGS/COLOR GUARD 1 459902CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 BAND FLAGS/COLOR GUARD 2 459903CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Band Flags/Color Guard 1 This course will include instruction in basic dance and equipment performance techniques, and in the development of timing and coordination of equipment routines with music. Students may participate in fall marching band and winter color guard activities including SCBDA, BOA, WGI, local and regional fall marching and winter competitive events. Students who choose to participate in competitive ensembles will be expected to purchase and maintain uniforms and equipment. Equipment used and demand increases with each level. BAND HONORS 3 353300HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Two instrumental music credits and teacher recommendation BAND HONORS 4 353400HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Band Honors 3 This course develops independence in instrumental musicianship, performance techniques, and aesthetic awareness through the rehearsal and performance of varied instrumental literature. Special emphasis is placed on performance. The content includes, but is not limited to, independent interpretation of difficult instrumental music, development of independent musicianship, tone production and performance techniques: the analysis of form, style, and history included in the performance of varied instrumental literature, formulation of critical listening skills and aesthetic values. BRASS ENSEMBLE CP 455912CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Large and small brass ensemble groups will study and perform literature from a variety of periods and cultures. Emphasis will be on ensemble playing, style and interpretation. Students may be enrolled in another instrumental music class. CONCERT BAND 1 CP 353321CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Middle School Band Concert Band 1 is open to all students with middle school or previous playing experience. The course is designed for students to develop their skills in performance along with knowledge in the areas of music history, criticism, and band literature. CONCERT BAND 2 CP 353322CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Concert Band 1 Concert Band 2 presents a balanced study of performance literature to prepare the student for life-long music making. Students will develop their knowledge of music theory, history and criticism. CONCERT BAND 3 CP 353421CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Concert Band 2 Students will study and perform a variety of band literature of increasing difficulty. This course is designed to provide students with a well-rounded musical education.

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JAZZ ENSEMBLE CP 453000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation In this course students study and perform musical styles associated with jazz, rock, Latin, and fusion music. Improvisation will be an integral part of the course. Students may be enrolled in another instrumental music class. MUSIC APPRECIATION CP 356100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course is designed for the college bound student as a survey of music history with emphasis on the role of music in world cultures. This course can be taken as preparation for college level humanities or as credit through Trident Technical College. MUSIC IB SL 356A00IW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Site: FDHS Students in IB Music SL will explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world; develop perceptual skills through a breadth of musical experiences, learning to recognize, speculate, analyze, identify, discriminate, and hypothesize in relation to music; develop creatively their knowledge, abilities, and understanding through performance and composition; and develop their potential as musicians both personally and collaboratively. Candidates will demonstrate use of appropriate musical language and terminology to describe and reflect their critical understanding of music, develop perceptual skills in response to music, and understand music in relation to time and place. SL candidates may opt to develop performance skills through solo or ensemble music making or to develop compositional skills through exploration and investigation of musical elements. A substantial piece of music will be prescribed for study in class and will also carry out an independent musical investigation. MUSIC THEORY 357600CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Band 1, Chorus 1 or Strings 1 This is an advanced course for the serious musician in music theory and composition. Students will be required to do independent research and to work with computer technology. MUSIC THEORY AP 357600AW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Open to all students who are willing to accept the rigor of the prescribed curriculum This is an advanced course for the serious musician in music theory and composition. Students will be required to do independent research and to work with computer technology. PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE CP 459909CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course is for the advancing percussionist to study and perform a variety of percussion ensemble works. Emphasis is on rudiments, battery percussion, mallet technique, and the role of percussion instruments in a musical organization. The student may be enrolled in another instrumental music class. PIANO CP 454100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course focuses on classical piano technique and literature taught in a class setting while emphasizing individual development. Preference is given to students who have completed at least two years of piano in middle school. This class is limited to 16 students. WORLD PERCUSSION CP 459921CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This introductory course provides students with the opportunity to study and perform the non-Western music of Africa, Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. Emphasis is placed on the steel band music if Trinidad, the Taiko drumming of Japan, the Djembe drumming of West Africa, and the samba drumming of Brazil. STRING ORCHESTRA 1 CP 355100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Previous string experience or Middle School Band This course emphasizes basic musicianship and performance techniques. Students will participate in small and large ensembles in which quality traditional and contemporary literature will be performed. STRING ORCHESTRA 2 CP 355200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: String Orchestra 1 This course is a continuation of String Orchestra 1. Students will increase both their technical and musical development. Small ensemble participation is emphasized and students will expand their understanding of orchestral literature. 30

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STRING ORCHESTRA 3 CP 3553002CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: String Orchestra 2 This course is a continuation of String Orchestra 2. Students may assume additional leadership responsibilities as section leaders and as soloists. STRING ORCHESTRA 4 CP 355400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: String Orchestra 3 String Orchestra 4 is for the serious student who wishes to develop their musical skills and performance to a high level. The course will focus on the history and performance of the classical repertoire. STRING ORCHESTRA HONORS 3 355300HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: String Orchestra 2 and teacher recommendation STRING ORCHESTRA HONORS 4 355400HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11- 12 Prerequisite: String Orchestra Honors 3 STRING ORCHESTRA HONORS 5 459905HW Unit: 1 The honors courses develop independence in instrumental musicianship, performance techniques, and aesthetic awareness through rehearsal and performance of varied instrumental literature. SYMPHONIC BAND CP 353423CW Unit: 1 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Concert Band 3 Symphonic Band is for serious students who wish to develop their music skills and knowledge to a high level. An advanced repertoire is studied representing various periods and cultures. WOODWIND ENSEMBLE CP 459952CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Large and small wind ensemble groups will study and perform literature from a variety of periods and cultures. Emphasis will be on ensemble playing, style and interpretation. Students may be enrolled in another instrumental music class. Students enrolled in the Performing Arts will be expected to maintain a uniform and attend rehearsals and performances beyond the school day. CHORUS 1 CP 354100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This is an introductory course in the basic elements of choral music history, criticism, performance, and the role of music in society. Performance elements of study will include pitch, duration, dynamics, and part singing. CHORUS 2 CP 354200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Chorus 1 This course is further development of the singer's art. The student will continue to study music history, criticism, theory and the principles of group performance. Instruction is based on the four components of the South Carolina Standards for the Arts. CHORUS 3 CP 354300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Chorus 2 This course provides an in-depth study in choral music history, criticism, literature, and performance. Students will perform choral works representing a wide variety of periods and cultures. CHORUS 4 CP 354400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Chorus 3 This is an advanced course for the serious music student who has knowledge in choral music history, criticism, literature and performance. Students enrolled in this course will provide the nucleus for Concert Choir. Emphasis in Concert Choir is on sight-singing and the ability to sing in various styles and genre.

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CHORUS HONORS 3 354300HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Chorus 2 and teacher recommendation CHORUS HONORS 4 354400HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Chorus Honors 3 CHORUS HONORS 5 459906HW Unit: 1 This course develops independence in vocal musicianship, performance techniques, and aesthetic awareness through the rehearsal and performance of varied choral literature. Special emphasis is placed on performance. The content includes, but is not limited to, independent interpretation of difficult choral music, development of independent musicianship, tone production and performance techniques: the analysis of form, style, and history included in the performance of varied choral literature, formulation of critical listening skills and aesthetic values. MUSICAL THEATRE CP 459000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 1, Chorus 1 This course continues the skills and knowledge developed in previous courses. Emphasis will be placed on musical theatre history, literature, and methods of performance. Students will have the opportunity to perform for live audiences and scenes for competitions. DANCE 1 CP 450101CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course provides an introduction to basic ballet, modern, and jazz techniques. Students will explore physical aspects of technique, composition concepts, dance criticism and performance. Previous dance experience is not required. DANCE 2 CP 450202CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Dance 1 This course is a continuation of dance education beyond the beginning level. Students will continue training in the techniques of ballet, modern, and jazz with the addition of dance theater styles. Composition, improvisation, dance history, dance criticism, and performance are strong parts of the curriculum. DANCE 3 CP 450300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Dance 2 This course provides an in-depth study of ballet, modern, and jazz techniques for the serious dance student. Students will continue working in the areas of composition, dance history, criticism, and performance at a more intense pace. DANCE 4 CP 450400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Dance 3 This is a course designed for advanced students to develop personal styles and interests. Along with continued technical mastery, students will focus on composition in various genre. Students will utilize past course work to synthesize their abilities in a pre-professional manner. DANCE HONORS 3 450300HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Dance 2 and teacher recommendation DANCE HONORS 4 450401HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Dance Honors 3 DANCE HONORS 5 459906HW Unit: 1 The Dance Honors program is for serious students at an advanced pre-professional level. In addition to the continuation of technical and composite work in the classroom, training and experience in a private studio is required. The Honors program is designed so that students work independently and with instructor guidance to focus on choreography and/or performance in order to prepare for future work in dance. THEATRE ARTS 1 CP 452100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course will focus on theatre conventions and history, dramatic literature, pantomime, voice and diction, improvisation, fundamentals of acting and introduction to theatre design. Students will frequently perform in front of peers. THEATRE ARTS 2 CP 452200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 1 This course continues the skills and knowledge developed in previous courses. Emphasis will be placed on methods of acting, styles of theatre, and script writing. Students will have the opportunity to perform for live audiences and competitions. 32

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THEATRE ARTS 3 CP 452300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 2 This course continues the skills and knowledge developed in previous courses. Emphasis will be placed on students' personal acting style, range of characterizations, script analysis, producing and directing. Students will perform for live audiences and competitions. THEATRE ARTS 4 CP 452400CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 3 This course continues the skills and knowledge developed in previous courses. Emphasis will be placed on independent study based on students' personal goals for theatre beyond high school. Students will have the opportunity to write, direct and perform for live audiences and competitions. THEATRE ARTS HONORS 3 452300HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Theatre Arts2 and teacher recommendation THEATRE ARTS HONORS 4 452400HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts Honors 1 THEATRE ARTS HONORS 5 459907HW Unit: 1 These courses continue the skills and knowledge developed in previous courses. Emphasis will be placed on independent study at a semi-professional level based on student's personal goals for theatre beyond high school. Students are expected to write, direct and perform for live audiences and competitions. THEATRE DESIGN 1 CP 459500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Theatre Arts 1 CP, Media Art CP THEATRE DESIGN 2 CP 459917CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Theatre Design 1 CP THEATRE DESIGN 3 CP 459918CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Theatre Design 2 CP This course continues the skills and knowledge developed in previous courses. Emphasis will be placed on non-performance areas of script analysis and production of set, costumes, props, lighting, sound, hair and make-up. Students are expected to run crew for live audiences and competitions.

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International Baccalaureate Courses

The International Baccalaureate program serves the needs of students who work to gain the IB diploma as well as students who desire to take coursework at the college level but not pursue the diploma programme as a whole. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the full IB Diploma Programme; however, students may take IB courses for certificates with the exceptions of English HL, History of the Americas HL, Language ab initio SL, and Theory of Knowledge. 9th Grade English 1 Honors or English 2 Honors Algebra 1 or Geometry or Algebra 2 Physical Science or Biology Global Studies 2 10th Grade English 2 Honors or English 3 Honors Geometry or Algebra 2 or Pre-Calculus Biology or Chemistry Economics & US Government or AP European History Spanish 2, French 2, German 2, Latin 2 11th Grade English 4 IB HL Math IB SL or Pre-Calculus Chemistry SL History of the Americas IB HL 12th Grade English 5 IB HL Math IB SL or Math Studies IB SL or Calculus AP or Statistics AP Biology IB HL History of Americas IB HL

English Group 1 Math Group 5

Science Group 4 Social Studies Group 3 Foreign Language Group 2

Spanish 3 IB SL or Spanish 4 IB SL or French 3 IB SL or French 4 IB SL or German 3 IB SL or German 4 IB SL or Latin 3 IB SL, or Latin 4 IB SL or Spanish ab initio 1 IB Spanish ab initio 2 IB SL * SL * Visual Arts IB SL or Theory of Knowledge IB Electives Psychology IB SL or Group 6 Music IB SL Students who have English 1 Honors credit from 8 th grade will take English 2 Honors. Other 9th grade students will take English 1 Honors. Spanish ab initio will fulfill the Group 2 requirements for an IB Diploma. This option allows students who do not begin their foreign language instruction as freshmen to participate in the IB Diploma Programme. The curriculum of Spanish ab initio is designed to be finished in two years. Theory of Knowledge is a core course required by the IB Organization; the 100 required hours for this course will be fulfilled through out-of- class experiences and assignments. Students are required to submit an extended essay to the IB Organization during their senior year. Students are required to complete Creative, Action, and Service Projects (CAS) during their junior and senior years. Requirements for graduation must still be met for a high school diploma.

Spanish 1, or French 1, or German 1, or Latin 1

International Baccalaureate Diploma Candidate Required Courses

ENGLISH 4 IB HL 301B00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: Enrollment in the IB diploma programme at FDHS English 4 IB HL promotes an appreciation of literature and knowledge of the students' own culture and that of other societies. This course is designed to develop students' power of expression, both oral and written communication, by emphasizing the skills involved in writing and speaking one's native language in a variety of styles and situations. Students will read 15 texts grouped by literary genres and styles as well as literature from other languages and cultures read in translations. Oral and written examinations are used to assess students' individual language skills, their ability to critically analyze and comment upon familiar and unfamiliar texts, and their ability to express a personal and independent response to literature. English 4 IB HL satisfies half of the 240 contact hours required by the IB Organization. Students who complete English 4 IB HL will continue their requirements in the course English 5 IB HL. ENGLISH 5 IB HL 301C00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Enrollment in the IB diploma program at FDHS English 5 IB HL is the second part of the IB group 1 requirement. This course promotes an appreciation of literature and knowledge of the students' own culture and that of other societies. The course is designed to develop students' power of

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expression, both oral and written communication, by emphasizing the skills involved in writing and speaking one's native language in a variety of styles and situations. Students will read 15 texts grouped by different literary genres and styles as well as literature from other languages and cultures read in translations. Oral and written examinations are used to assess students' individual language skills, their ability to critically analyze and comment upon familiar and unfamiliar texts, and their ability to express a personal and independent response to literature. During this course, the IB Organization will assess students both internally and externally. SPANISH AB INITIO 1 IB SL 365F00CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: Enrollment in the IB Diploma Programme Site: FDHS Spanish ab initio gives students an opportunity to further their linguistic skills by taking up a second foreign language, or by learning a foreign language for the first time. Completion of the internal and external assessments for Spanish ab initio completes the requirements for Group 2 (second language) in the IB Diploma Programme. The course focuses on everyday situations and aspects of Spanish culture related to them, with a focus on communication. Students will learn to communicate information and basic ideas, to understand and use essential spoken and written Spanish, and to develop an awareness of Spanish culture. SPANISH AB INITIO 2 IB SL 365F01IW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Spanish ab initio 1 IB SL Site: FDHS Spanish ab initio gives students an opportunity to further their linguistic skills by taking up a second foreign language, or by learning a foreign language for the first time. Completion of the internal and external assessments for Spanish ab initio completes the requirements for Group 2 (second language) in the IB Diploma Programme. The course focuses on everyday situations and aspects of Spanish culture related to them, with a focus on communication. Students will learn to communicate information and basic ideas, to understand and use essential spoken and written Spanish, and to develop an awareness of Spanish culture. HISTORY OF AMERICAS IB HL 336C00IW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Enrollment in the IB Diploma Programme at FDHS History of Americas IB HL is the IB group 3 requirement for the IB diploma. History of the Americas is a high level study of the Western Hemisphere and select 20th century topics with comparative studies in Canada and Latin America. Students will take the SCEOCEP for US History at the end of the course as well. THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE IB 338G00IW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Enrollment in the IB Diploma Programme at FDHS Theory of Knowledge is a required course for the IB Diploma Program. The purpose of the course is to stimulate reflection on the knowledge and experience of students both in and outside the classroom. The course examines various areas of knowledge, truth, logic, value judgments, and the role of language and thought in knowledge. The course challenges students to be aware of subjective and ideological biases and to develop a personal mode of thought based on analysis of evidence and expressed in rational arguments.

Modern & Classical Languages Courses

Foreign language courses are designed to develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing, and to foster an appreciation and understanding of world cultures. Minimal success in one level of foreign language does not guarantee success in the next level. It is recommended that students have a final average of a "77" or better to progress to the next level. Students attending a four year college are encouraged to have at least two years of the same foreign language. FRENCH 1 CP 361100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 8-12 Prerequisite: None (English 1 is highly recommended) This course is an introduction to the French language designed to enable college-bound students to meet requirements for proficiency by communicating through conversation, and by comparing and connecting the target language to English. FRENCH 2 CP 361200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: French 1 This course is a continuation of French 1 with increased emphasis on spontaneous self-expression in speaking and writing. Emphasis will be on the application of materials mastered in French 1, as well as vocabulary enrichment and the development of more difficult grammatical structures.

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FRENCH 3 CP 361300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: French 2 This course stresses conversation and composition. Basic grammar rules and vocabulary will be reviewed before new material is presented. Students will also study the Impressionist painters, and the provinces of France. FRENCH 3 IB SL 361300HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: French 2 Site: FDHS This course prepares students to fulfill their IB Language B requirement. In this course, students develop increased proficiency in the foreign language by developing their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through questions, discussion and presentations. French will be used exclusively as the vehicle for communication. Pertinent culture, grammar, and syntax are examined and applied in context. Students follow a syllabus that contains written, aural and oral assessments. FRENCH 4 HONORS 361400HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: French 3; Teacher recommendation This course is designed to expand proficiency in French with an emphasis on oral and written expression. Grammar elements in French 1, 2, and 3 will be reviewed and expanded. Course work will include history, culture, social issues and selected readings. As topics are explored using a variety of resources, students will develop skills in reading comprehension and a wide variety of communicative tasks. FRENCH 4 IB SL 361G00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: French 3 IB SL Site: FDHS This course prepares students to fulfill their IB Language B requirement as it continues to develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through questions, discussion and presentations. French will be used exclusively as the vehicle for communication. Pertinent culture, grammar, and syntax are examined and applied in context. Students follow a syllabus that contains written, aural and oral assessments. FRENCH 5 HONORS 361500HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: French 4 Honors; Teacher recommendation This is an advanced course in which all grammar elements will be reviewed and students' proficiency will be expanded through a variety of written and oral activities. Students will study selected literary works and be able to discuss them in terms of style, theme, and content. GERMAN 1 CP 362100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: None (English 1 is highly recommended) This course is an introduction to the German language and culture. It is designed to enable college-bound students to meet requirements for proficiency in reading, writing, understanding and speaking German. Students will learn basic conversation and grammatical structures as well as develop an understanding of and appreciation for the German-speaking people, their culture and civilization. Basic comprehension, speaking and writing skills will be developed through a variety of classroom activities. Oral participation in the class is essential, and students will be evaluated on oral listening skills, as well as written mastery of the language. GERMAN 2 CP 362200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: German 1 This course continues to build and expand on the foundation of vocabulary and structure begun in German 1 through exposing students to more cultural situations, idioms, and the complete basic grammar structure. Students should be able to communicate immediate survival needs and minimum courtesy requirements with some accuracy in conversation and composition. The German-speaking countries and customs will continue to be explored through the use of media and reading materials. The class will be conducted increasingly in German, and students will be expected to participate. GERMAN 3 CP 362300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: German 2 This course is an expansion of conversation and composition skills through the reading and discussion of literature, contemporary topics, and history. Special cases and exceptions to the grammatical structure will be handled with an emphasis on stylistic variances. Various topics and text types pertaining to German-speaking countries will be used as students expand their language ability to accomplish a wide variety of communicative tasks.

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GERMAN 3 IB SL 362300HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: German 2 Site: FDHS This course is designed for students with a high level of ability in German. This course strengthens student's vocabulary for use in situational conversations and for understanding a variety of authentic texts. A brief review of previous grammar is provided. New grammar and vocabulary that allows for more complex thought and expression is presented. Emphasis is placed on creative self-expression and the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Oral participation is essential. GERMAN 4 HONORS 362400HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: German 3; Teacher recommendation German 4 is designed to acquaint students with many aspects of the German culture around the world. Topics will include history, culture, social issues, literature, popular customs, folklore, and the German influence in the United States. As these topics are explored using a variety of resources, the students will develop skills in reading comprehension and expression. Grammar elements outlined in German 1, 2, and 3 will be reviewed and expanded. GERMAN 4 IB SL 362G00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: German 3 IBSL Site: FDHS This course is designed for students with a high level of competency in German. Students are given the opportunity to reach a high level of ability in a second language through the study of a number of prescribed texts (literature, business, magazines) and, at the same time, to appreciate the range of issues generated by the understanding of German culture; their ability to express themselves in German with clarity, coherence, and fluency; and their ability to engage in close, detailed and critical examination of a wide range of texts. INTERCULTURAL, INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGES AND SOJOURNS 369900CW Unit: 1 FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS CP Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: 2 units of a foreign language and teacher approval This course furthers the study of foreign cultures, places, and societies with a combination of classroom study and an international exchange or sojourn. The course objectives are to improve understanding of non-American countries and cultures, travel skills, and foreign language skills. Students must complete all application procedures with the instructor prior to enrollment. Special cases and exceptions to the grammatical structure will be handled with an emphasis on stylistic variances. Various topics and text types pertaining to foreign countries will be used as students expand their language ability to accomplish a wide variety of communicative tasks. Language proficiency required and will be determined by teacher. LATIN 1 CP 363100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 This course is an introduction to the Latin language. Provisions will be made for learning the syntax and structure of a language that is the base of modern French, Spanish, and Italian. Students will integrate Latin vocabulary with English derivatives to increase word power. Learning elements of Roman culture will develop an awareness of its effect on western civilization. LATIN 2 CP 363200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Latin 1 This course continues to build and expand on the foundation of vocabulary and language skills developed in Latin 1. Students will be able to use tools acquired in Latin 1 to comprehend the meaning of passages adapted from Latin literature. LATIN 3 CP 363300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Latin 2 This course continues to build proficiency in vocabulary and syntax as students read Latin passages from authentic Latin works. Roman writers from different periods of Latin literature will be studied.

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LATIN 3 IB SL 363300HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: Latin 2 Site: FDHS This course is designed for students with a high level of ability in Latin. It gives students the opportunity to reach a high level of competency in Latin through the study of prescribed texts. Students will develop the ability to understand and translate texts in Latin along with gaining knowledge and understanding of these texts within their historical and cultural contexts. An emphasis will be placed on students' awareness of the relationships between the modern and classical worlds. Students in Latin SL will also learn to appreciate and analyze the techniques and styles of a variety of ancient texts. The external assessments required by IB include the study of works by prescribing authors, but the foundation of the IB Latin SL class is primarily linguistic. LATIN 4 HONORS 363400HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Latin 3; Teacher recommendation Latin 4 Honors is an intensive grammar review designed to assist students to prepare for college placement exams. Written tests will focus on the correct use of grammar and structure using the content of translations. Emphasis will be given to literary devices used in Latin poetry and prose. LATIN 4 IB SL 363A00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Latin 3 IBSL Site: FDHS This course is designed for students with a high level of ability in Latin. It gives students the opportunity to reach a high level of competency in Latin through the study of prescribed texts. Students will develop the ability to understand and translate texts in Latin along with gaining knowledge and understanding of these texts within their historical and cultural contexts. An emphasis will be placed on students' awareness of the relationships between the modern and classical worlds. Students in Latin SL will also learn to appreciate and analyze the techniques and styles of a variety of ancient texts. The external assessments required by IB include the study of works by prescribed authors, but the foundation of the IB Latin SL class is primarily linguistic. During the Latin 4 IB SL course, students will complete the external assessments required by the IBO: the study of one prescribed author (in order to develop language skills) including the translation into English of an unprepared text; and a detailed study of two topics, in Latin and in translation, chosen from five prescribed topics. SPANISH 1 CP 365100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 8-12 Recommended Prerequisite: English 1 is highly recommended This course is an introduction to the Spanish language and culture. It is designed to enable college-bound students to meet requirements for proficiency in reading, writing, understanding and speaking Spanish. Students will learn basic conversation and grammatical structures as well as develop an understanding of and appreciation for the Spanish-speaking people, their culture and civilization. Basic comprehension, speaking and writing skills will be developed through a variety of classroom activities. Daily oral communication in the class is essential, and students will be evaluated on oral and listening skills, as well as written mastery of the language. SPANISH 2 CP 365200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Spanish 1 This course expands on the foundation of vocabulary and structure begun in Spanish 1, exposing students to more cultural situations, idioms and more advanced grammatical structure. Students should be able to communicate survival needs and courtesy requirements with some accuracy in conversation and composition. The Hispanic countries and customs will continue to be explored through the use of media and reading materials. The class will be conducted increasingly in Spanish, and students will be expected to communicate orally in Spanish daily. SPANISH 3 CP 365300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Spanish 2 This course stresses conversation and composition. Basic grammar rules and vocabulary will be reviewed before students move on to more advanced language skills. Students will also study Spanish and Latin American painters from the art periods of Realism, Impressionism and Cubism. SPANISH 3 IB SL 365300HW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: Spanish 2 Site: FDHS This course is designed for students with a high level of ability in Spanish. It gives students the opportunity to reach a high level of competency in a second language through the study of a number of prescribed texts (primarily literary) and, at the same time, to appreciate the range of issues generated by the study of language and culture. Students perform oral and written assessments to demonstrate their understanding of Spanish culture; their ability to express themselves in Spanish with clarity, coherence, and fluency; and their ability to engage in close, detailed and critical examination of a wide range of texts. 38

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SPANISH 4 HONORS 365400HW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Spanish 3; Teacher recommendation Spanish 4 Honors is designed to provide advanced students with authentic language experiences as they use Spanish to explore a variety of cultural topics and contemporary social issues. The study of grammar and literary selections will be included as vehicles for improving communicative competency. Many facets of life in Hispanic countries are discussed, comparing present day life and that of the recent past. Movies, novels and the Internet are used as springboards for discussions. Daily oral communication is an essential part of the class. Topics for communication, comprehension and composition include social and cultural themes. SPANISH 4 IB SL 365G00IW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Spanish 3 IBSL Site: FDHS This course is designed for students with a high level of ability in Spanish. It gives students the opportunity to reach a high level of competency in a second language through the study of a number of prescribed texts (primarily literary) and, at the same time, to appreciate the range of issues generated by the study of language and culture. Students perform oral and written assessments to demonstrate their understanding of Spanish culture; their ability to express themselves in Spanish with clarity, coherence, and fluency; and their ability to engage in close, detailed and critical examination of a wide range of texts and discussions. Daily oral communication is an essential part of the class. Topics for communication, comprehension and composition include social and cultural themes. SPANISH 5 HONORS 365500HW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Spanish 4 Honors; Teacher recommendation This course expands students' proficiency in Spanish as they use the language to further their knowledge of other cultures and other disciplines. Supplementary materials will include pertinent selections from the Internet and literary collections. Comprehension and composition include social and cultural themes. WORLD LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTICS 369901CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Site: FDHS Students in this course will explore the basic language structures and characteristics of numerous world languages including Japanese, Chinese, Esperanto, and American Sign Language. The history of world languages and basic linguistic theory and terminology are introduced. This course will also teach students unique skills and knowledge related to the nature of language and language learning that allow students to be more successful in any language course (foreign or English). Near the end of this course, student will have obtained the skills necessary to create their own language. Students who are interested in joining the military, or studying a language or linguistics in college are highly encouraged to take this course. No prior foreign language experience is necessary. Note: This course is an elective and does not count toward fulfilling a foreign language requirement for either high school or college.

Teaching & Training Courses

TEACHER CADET PROGRAM 379900EW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisites: At least 3.0 GPR; Teacher recommendations; Interview; Selection Process This is an orientation to the teaching profession. The course is designed to expose students of high-level academic achievement to the many facets of education through class discussions, observations, and interactions with teachers and students at all levels: pre-school through grade 12. The student receives three hours of college credit and one unit of high school credit. STUDENTS MAY NOT SIGN THEMSELVES UP FOR THIS COURSE. Please see your Guidance Counselor for an application packet. SC TEACHING ASSISTANT 408003CH Unit: ½ Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: At least 2.7 GPR; Teacher recommendation 408003CW Units: 1 The Teaching Assistant Program operates as an individualized course matching Teaching Assistants who excel in a particular area with supervising teachers. It provides an opportunity to experience hands-on, field-based and other practical experiences for students who are interested or even considering the field of education. The course is available for 11th and 12th grade students with a 2.7 GPR who have a desire to teach. Students MUST have recommendations from at least two teachers WORK BASED LEARNING/SCHOOL TO WORK 549983CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11 -12 Academic Tutor: Students with at least a B average in a subject area (i.e. English, Mathematics, etc) may apply to be an academic tutor. Students will work under the direction of an academic teacher in order to provide tutoring for their peers. Students interested in serving as an academic tutor need to apply in Guidance.

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Journalism & Mass Communication Courses

CREATIVE WRITING 1 CP 303200CH Unit: ½ Grades: 10-12 Co-requisite: English 1 This course is designed for students who have an interest in writing poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction and writing for stage and screen. Each of the four units will last approximately one quarter and will conclude with a major project. Students will produce original written pieces on a weekly basis and will collaborate with the teacher and with each other during the revising and editing process. Students are also encouraged to submit their work for publication. CREATIVE WRITING 2 CP 303201CH Unit: ½ Grades:10-12 Prerequisite: Creative Writing 1 Students will learn to analyze, apply and synthesize various techniques, styles and forms through diverse genres. Students will master elements of short fiction, poetry, drama and personal non-fiction through extensive writing and reading assignments. INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM 305000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course is designed to prepare students to enter a chosen journalism program--broadcast, newspaper, or yearbook. All students will learn journalism skills such as writing editorials, news and feature stories, interviewing, and more. Also, all students will learn technical skills such as working with software programs for photography, page layout, and video editing as well as learning photography/videography basics. In addition, each student will select an area of concentration so that he can fine-tune his skills for a given journalism course. For example, a student might choose a program of study that concentrates on broadcasting, learning all other areas, but emphasizing broadcasting. At the end of the course, each student will be required to complete a major project in his area of concentration. This course is designed to be a feeder course for the main journalism programs, providing them with skilled staff members and enabling these staffs to expand beyond their current level of production. JOURNALISM/NEWSPAPER 1 CP (9th) 305306CW Unit: 1 JOURNALISM/NEWSPAPER 2 CP (10th) 305303CW Unit: 1 JOURNALISM/NEWSPAPER 3 CP (11th) 305307CW Unit: 1 JOURNALISM/NEWSPAPER 4 CP (12th) 305301CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisites: Introduction to Journalism or previous newspaper experience Journalism teaches students basic skills needed for writing news, features, editorials, and sports stories. Students learn techniques for headline writing, layout and copy reading, in addition to the principles of photography, business management, advertising, and printing. JOURNALISM/ANNUAL 1 CP (9th) 305401CW Unit: 1 JOURNALISM/ANNUAL 2 CP (10th) 305402CW Unit: 1 JOURNALISM/ANNUAL 3 CP (11th) 305404CW Unit: 1 JOURNALISM/ANNUAL 4 CP (12th) 305405CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisites: Introduction to Journalism or previous newspaper experience This course is designed as an elective for students who desire an opportunity to gain competency in journalism and wish to work on the school yearbook. PUBLIC SPEAKING 1 CP (9th) 304002CW Unit: 1 PUBLIC SPEAKING 2 CP (10th) 304004CW Unit: 1 PUBLIC SPEAKING 3 CP (11th) 304005CW Unit: 1 PUBLIC SPEAKING 4 CP (12th) 304006CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisites: Courses must be taken in sequence. This course is designed to help students think and speak coherently, confidence in front of other people, and to develop speaking and listening abilities. Other topics covered include speech composition, delivery, research techniques, oral interpretation, and special forms of speaking.

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VISUAL COMMUNICATION/ BROADCAST JOURNALISM 1 CP 5298905CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 In this course, students will learn basics of the broadcasting industry including the areas of news writing and reporting, advertising, video production, public relations, and aspects of film. Students will actually film, edit, and produce videos from several minutes in length to longer features. VISUAL COMMUNICATION/BROADCAST JOURNALISM 2 CP 529806CD Units: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Visual Communication/Broadcast Journalism 1 Students will produce the morning news shows along with the Visual Communication 1 students. The Visual Communication 2 students will focus on production and direction. Most of the work will be done during class time, but many activities (both school and non-school related) are done after school. Students must be willing to commit to the extra work in order to be part of the class.

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School of Business & Information Systems

Business education courses and the specialized areas of Accounting, Computer Technology, and Business Administration are college preparatory and Career and Technology Education courses designed to enable students to succeed in business and industry, two-year and four-year college programs. Technical Advanced Placement (TAP) agreements with Trident Technical College and other educational institutions offer the student the opportunity to obtain dual credit for high school and college. Contact guidance counselors and business education teachers for more details on dual-credit opportunities. Students must receive one unit of "computer science credit" in order to graduate (appropriate courses denoted by an *).

Business Management Courses

BUSINESS ENTREPRENEURSHIP CP 540000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Computer Applications This course is designed to provide a general overview of the American enterprise system with special emphasis being placed on small business ownership. An important part of the course will be development of business and managerial leadership skills under the title NFTE (National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship) as they relate to the functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling a small business. FASHION MERCHANDISING CP 541001CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Site: SHS This course is designed to explore the concepts and practices of the fashion business to include an overview of the fashion industry, the nature of fashion, and career development. Functions of product technology, selling, advertising, visual merchandising, fashion buying, merchandising and management will be analyzed. BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, & ADMINISTRATION WORK-BASED LEARNING 549001CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: three of the four credits required for a major The components of Work Based Learning programs enable students to become aware of career options, explore career opportunities, and plan for post-secondary educational and career experiences. The program will provide students with a better understanding of relationships between rigorous and relevant education and employment success. Juniors or seniors who have completed at least three of the four credits required for a major in this career cluster and desire work experience in a field related to their program may enroll in this course. Students should express their interest in enrolling in this work based learning experience to their teacher and counselor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites. Students must be able to accrue a minimum of 180 hours to earn one high school credit. A maximum of two credits may be earned during high school and a student may not enroll in two Work Based Learning courses during the same semester.

Finance Courses

ACCOUNTING 1 CP 500100CW Unit: 1 Grades 9-12 This course is designed to help the student develop the skills necessary for the highly technical interaction between accounting and business, to develop an understanding of the steps of the accounting cycle as applied to several different kinds of business operations, and to develop an understanding of accounting concepts, principles, and practices. Use of the computer in simulated activities gives the student an opportunity to see the advantages of technology in accounting procedures. ACCOUNTING 2 CP 500500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Accounting 1 This course expands the student's understanding of accounting subsystems and develops an understanding of various methods of internal control procedures. The student develops competence in using subsidiary ledgers, in preparing financial statements, and in performing end-of-period procedures. The student will demonstrate the use of accounting principles through the use of computer software and simulated activities. BUSINESS FINANCE CP 527300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in corporate business finance concepts and applications including fundamentals, financial environment, management planning, maintenance and analysis of financial records, long and short term financial activities, financial business activities, financial institutes and banking services, consumer credit, business insurance, technology and financial management, and international finance. 42

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS and INFORMATION SYSTEMS (continued)

PERSONAL FINANCE 513100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 This course is designed to introduce the student to basic financial literacy skills which includes budgeting, obtaining credit, maintaining checking accounts, analyzing the basic elements of finance, computing payroll, recording business transactions, and applying computer operations to financial management.

Marketing Courses

FASHION MERCHANDISING CP 541001CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Computer Applications Site: SHS This course is designed to explore the concepts and practices of the fashion business to include an overview of the fashion industry, the nature of fashion, and career development. Functions of product technology, selling, advertising, visual merchandising, fashion buying, merchandising and management will be analyzed. GLOBAL BUSINESS 544001CH Unit: ½ Grades: 10-12 The Global Markets course is an online project-based innovative method of delivering an exciting student-centered course on introductory world trade. The course is more than a glimpse into the world of importing and exporting goods and services. It is a virtual experience in trade, coupled with real life experiences and exposure to experts in the field. The vision of the course is to create globally minded young people and build South Carolina's trading community. Students are offered the opportunities to learn abroad and communicate with students from other countries. The course focuses on the skills and abilities required to start and manage a business locally and internationally. Join the exciting world of International Trade. SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING CP 542500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Site: FDHS, SHS This course is for students who wish to pursue careers in the various areas of the sports and entertainment industry. This includes careers in box office management and sales, group sales, public sales, marketing, operations, development and sports programming. SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING CP 542500CW Unit: 1 E-COMMERCE CP 503600CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Site: DCCTC This program is for students who wish to pursue careers in the various areas of the Sports and Entertainment industry. This includes careers in box office, group sales, public sales, marketing, operations, development and sports programming. Through hands-on experiences, students will apply technical knowledge and skills to plan, design, create and evaluate visual and printed media related to advertising and marketing. E-commerce is implemented as it relates to the internet and websites in the Sports and Entertainment industry. Students will be enrolled in both courses. MARKETING, SALES, & SERVICE WORK-BASED LEARNING 509100CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: three of the four credits required for a major The components of Work Based Learning programs enable students to become aware of career options, explore career opportunities, and plan for post-secondary educational and career experiences. The program will provide students with a better understanding of relationships between rigorous and relevant education and employment success. Juniors or seniors who have completed at least three of the four credits required for a major in the Business, Management, & Administration career cluster and desire work experience in a field related to their program may enroll in this course. Students should express their interest in enrolling in this work based learning experience to their teacher and counselor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites. Students must be able to accrue a minimum of 180 hours to earn one high school credit. A maximum of two credits may be earned during high school. A student may not enroll in two Work Based Learning courses during the same semester.

Information Technology Courses

ADVANCED ANIMATION AND GAMING CP 539800CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Keyboarding and Computer Programming 1 CP Site: FDHS Advanced Animation and Gaming is an advanced course with focus on animation and gaming using the Maya software program. Students will develop skills in designing and editing backgrounds and characters. Students learn the advanced features of character rigging, rendering, dynamics and MEL scripting with Maya. The course takes a project-based approach to instruction as students learn the new techniques while creating complex three-dimensional movies.

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS and INFORMATION SYSTEMS (continued)

*ANIMATED COMPUTER PRODUCTION CP 535000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Digital Multimedia Site: FDHS, SHS This course teaches students how to model, animate and render with a focus on establishing a working knowledge of animation tools and techniques. The course builds a foundation for developing 3-D computer graphic, animation, modeling, deformations and character animation. Animated Computer Production examines the features of Macromedia's popular Flash software that is becoming the professional standard for producing high-impact websites using movie graphics and sound. Students create and modify movies using objects, graphics, sound, animation, and special effects. They also publish for the web. *COMPUTER APPLICATIONS CP 500800CH Unit: ½ Grades: 8-10 Prerequisite: Keyboarding This course teaches students introductory competencies in the use of database, spreadsheet, word processing, and graphics applications software in analyzing and solving business-related problems. Other content areas include components of computer systems and the impact of computers on businesses and individuals. The computer is used as the primary tool. COMPUTER SERVICE & TECHNOLOGY 1 532000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: DCCTC (Trolley) The course prepares students for the required fundamentals of Direct Current Electricity. With the fundamentals mastered, the focus of the course is to prepare the students to achieve CompTIA A+ certification. This is the nationally recognized entry level for proficiency in Computer Repair for such companies as IBM, Compaq and Hewlett-Packard. Upon completion of this course, the technician will have a thorough knowledge of computer hardware, hard drives, floppy drives, CD-ROMs, Zip drives and DVDs, installation and configuration of Windows XP and Windows 2000 Professional. The technician will be able to upgrade computers and install various types of hardware and use multimeters to troubleshoot problems and maintain a computer. Each lesson in this course features extensive use of audio-video presentations and hands on lab work. COMPUTER SERVICE & TECHNOLOGY 2 532100CD Units: 2 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Computer Service & Maintenance 1 Site: DCCTC (Trolley) The focus of this course is on computer networking. Technicians will install, configure, and maintain a Windows NT or Novell Network, add devices, upgrade servers and reconfigure software. This class will lead the technician to CompTIA Net+ Certification. The course is not limited to Network basics, peer-to-peer networking, Windows NT X.X, Volume Sets, RAID, Hubs & Switches, CSU/DSC & routers. Cabling will include CAT5, CAT5e, CAT6 ThinNet, ThickNet and Coaxial. *COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 1 CP 505000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Business Applications This course introduces students to a graphical interface approach to programming using Visual Basic code language. Topics include fundamentals of computer programming, creating the environment, development of event-driven coding procedures, and solving common run-time errors. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 2 CP 505100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Computer Programming 1 CP In this course, students learn Object Oriented programming using Java programming language. Topics include fundamental java applications and simple applets. Employing a concept base approach to create and utilize classes, objects and methods to control program flow, development of event-driven coding procedures, and solving common run-time errors. *DIGITAL DESKTOP PUBLISHING CP 517600CW Unit: 1 Grades 10-12 Prerequisite: Keyboarding and Computer Applications or IBA 1 This course is an expansion of office computing incorporating the use of desktop publishing software or word processing software with desktop capabilities, a computer system, and a printer to produce professional-looking documents. The student will learn how to edit clip art and photographs for inclusion in printed documents. *DIGITAL IMAGING 1 CP 534000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Business Applications or Computer Applications Site: FDHS, SHS This course is designed for the student interested in continuing their education in the Interactive Media segment of the Information Technology Cluster. Students are instructed in the fundamental features of using digital imaging software in editing and designing both photos and graphics. Students also learn the use of technologies related to digital imaging such as: basic computer operations; file sharing across networks; digital scanning; digital photography; preparing documents for output to various types of high resolution printers; and color calibration.

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS and INFORMATION SYSTEMS (continued)

*DIGITAL INPUT TECHNOLOGIES CP 518000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 8-12 This course is designed to introduce students to new and emerging technologies that are impacting the way we input data into a computer. Students will have the opportunity to explore digital imaging with cameras and scanners, use personal digital assistants, graphics tablets, and learn about speech recognition software. *DIGITAL MULTIMEDIA CP 503000CH Unit: ½ Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Keyboarding and Computer Applications 1; or Integrated Business Applications This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed for entry-level positions in multimedia and web publishing. Multimedia combines computer-based text and graphics within an interactive environment. The students will use the computer to learn digital imaging, multimedia presentation techniques, and compact disk creation. *INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATIONS CP 527000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Site: SHS This course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts in computer and information technology. The areas of instruction covered include computer hardware, software, internet, and network systems. Upon successful completion of this course, a student should be able to successfully enter any one of the Information Technology Cluster majors. This course will also prepare the student to take the IC3 Certification test. *INTEGRATED BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 1 CP 502001CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Computer Applications Sites: ARHS, FDHS, SHS, & DCCTC This course of study is designed to teach the student computer concepts as related to processing data into useful information needed in business situations by using database, spreadsheet, word processing, and presentation software. Office 2007 is used to teach students the skills needed to succeed in college and/or business while using the appropriate software applications. This course prepares students for Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS). *KEYBOARDING 510000CH Unit: ½ Grades: 7-9 This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to master the skill of entering alphabetic, numeric, and symbolic information on a keyboard and a ten-key pad using the touch method of key stroking. Emphasis is placed on development of accuracy and speed, proper techniques, and correct fingering. The student will develop skill in formatting letters, memoranda, reports, tables, and other business documents. Classrooms will consist of one computer per student. *ORACLE MANAGEMENT/ SEQUENTIAL 532400CW Unit: 1 QUERY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING Site: FDHS, SHS Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Integrated Business Applications This course introduces students to an online curriculum through Oracle Academy. They will analyze case studies to identify patterns and connections between information as it relates in a database system. Students will be trained to create physical relational database tables, create, maintain, and manipulate data objects and use SQL programming language to query (retrieve) information from a database. This course will also prepare students to take the Oracle 9i SQL Certification Exam. *WEB PAGE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT 1 CP 503100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Sites: ARHS, FDHS, SHS, & DCCTC Prerequisite: Keyboarding and Computer Applications; or Integrated Business Applications 1 This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to design web pages. Students will develop skills in designing, implementing, and maintaining a Web site using authoring tools. Computer and Internet access required, one computer per student. Students will be provided an introduction to CSS, Java Script and DreamWeaver. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WORK-BASED LEARNING 539000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: three of the four credits required for a major This program enables students to become aware of career options, explore career opportunities, and plan for post-secondary educational and career experiences. Students will gain a better understanding of relationships between rigorous and relevant education and employment success. Juniors or seniors who have completed at least three of the four credits required for a major in this career cluster and desire work experience in a field related to their program may enroll in this course. Students should express their interest in enrolling in this work based learning experience to their teacher and counselor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites. Students must be able to accrue a minimum of 180 hours to earn one high school credit. A maximum of two credits may be earned during high school and a student may not enroll in two Work Based Learning courses during the same semester. 45

School of Engineering, Manufacturing, & Industrial Technologies Electives

Engineering Courses - Project Lead the Way

Project Lead the Way is a series of courses which introduces students to the scope, rigor and discipline of engineering and engineering technology prior to entering college. By engaging in hands-on, real-world projects, students understand how the skills they are learning in the classroom can be applied in everyday life. Introduction at this level while still in high school allows students to determine if engineering is the career they desire. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN HONORS, LEVEL 1 605100HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisites: Algebra 1 Honors; Teacher recommendation This course lays the foundation for all sequential engineering classes with an emphasis on critical thinking and the design process. Students will progress from sketching basic 3-D objects to application of a solid modeling computer program called Inventor. They will advance their problem-solving skills by evaluating and synthesizing design briefs, brainstorming ideas, developing design matrices, and choosing designs based on established criteria. Another core component of the course will be building a portfolio to showcase all of the work. PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING HONORS, LEVEL 2 605000HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 This course helps students become cognizant of the field of engineering and engineering technology. Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem-solving process to benefit people. Students in engineering teams apply technology, science, and mathematical concepts and skills to create designs and solve engineering design problems. The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change. This course serves as a keyboarding replacement. DIGITAL ELECTRONICS HONORS, LEVEL 3 605200HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design & Principles of Engineering This course in applied logic encompasses the application of digital circuits and devices. Computer simulation software is used to design and test digital circuitry prior to the actual construction of circuits and devices. This is the third level course for the Project Lead The Way curriculum. CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE HONORS, LEVEL 4 605800HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design Site: SHS This course provides an overview of the fundamental design and development aspects of architectural and civil engineering activities. Students will be provided opportunities to design, simulate, and evaluate the construction of buildings and communities. Hands-on projects and activities will cover topics such as: the roles of civil engineers and architects, project planning, site planning, building design, and project documentation and presentation. Application and design principles will be used in conjunction with mathematical and scientific knowledge. During the planning and design phases, instructional emphasis will be placed on related transportation, water resources, and environmental issues. BIOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING HONORS 605703HW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Principles of Engineering Honors and Biology 1 Honors Site: FDHS This course relates engineering to cell structure and genetics. Students develop an understanding of genetics through experiments using biological materials. The major focus of the Biotechnical EngineeringTM (BE) course is to expose students to the diverse fields of biotechnology including biomedical engineering, bio-molecular genetics, bioprocess engineering, and agricultural and environmental engineering. Lessons engage students in engineering design problems that can be accomplished in a high school setting related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, agricultural biotechnology, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, human interface, bioprocesses, forensics, and bio-ethics. PRE-ENGINEERING/INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY WORK BASED CREDIT 609000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Senior and four Engineering credits The components of Work Based Learning enable students to become aware of career options, explore career opportunities, and plan for post-secondary educational and career experiences. This provides students with a better understanding of relationships between rigorous and relevant education and employment success. Seniors who have completed four credits required for a major in Engineering and desire work experience in a field related to their program may enroll in this course. Students should express their interest in enrolling in this work based learning experience to their teacher and counselor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites.

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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, MANUFACTURING, & INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES (continued)

Welding Courses

WELDING TECHNOLOGY 1 CP 634000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Elementary Algebra for the Technologies 1 Site: DCCTC Welders join metals using intense heat produced by electric arcs and special gases. Parts are fabricated and welded to produce structures such as buildings, ships, and bridges. This course will help students learn basic skills in the art of shielded metal arc as well as oxyacetylene cutting. Measurement and layout procedures are introduced along with proper tool usage and equipment safety. Students taking this course should enjoy physical activity, being creative, and doing detailed work. WELDING TECHNOLOGY 2 CP 634100CD Units: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Welding Technology 1 Site: DCCTC Students completing the second year welding program should have sufficient skills to gain entry-level employment in the job market. These skills include advanced techniques in shielded metal arc, gas metallic arc, and gas tungsten arc welding, oxyacetylene cutting and welding, basic blueprint reading, identification of metal types, and layout and fabrication procedures. Job opportunities are available in many areas including construction, manufacturing, maintenance, marine, automotive, and aerospace industries. MANUFACTURING WORK BASED LEARNING 649000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Senior and completer of career and technology program at DCCTC Seniors who have completed a career and technology program at DCCTC and desire work experience in a field related to their completed program or desire to further enhance their skills may enroll in a Level 3 course. Students enrolled in Level 3 courses should express their interest in enrolling in Level 3 to their DCCTC instructor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites.

Agriculture & Natural Resources

INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE CP 565000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Site: ARHS This course is designed to be an introduction to the Horticulture pathway and is recommended as a prerequisite for all other horticulture courses. This course includes organized subject matter and practical experiences related to the culture of plants used principally for ornamental or aesthetic purposes. Instruction emphasizes knowledge and understanding of the importance of establishing, maintaining, and managing ornamental horticulture enterprises. Instructional activities include hands-on experiences with propagating, growing, establishing, and maintaining nursery plants and greenhouse crops; tissue culture techniques; designing landscapes; preparing designs; sales analysis and management; participating in personal and community leadership development activities; as well as planning and implementing a relevant school-to-work transition experience. SPORTS TURF MANAGEMENT CP 565500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Horticulture Site: ARHS This course is designed to teach technical knowledge and skills for entry-level positions in the Sports Turf Management career field. The principles and practices involved in establishing, managing, and maintaining grassed areas for recreational purposes are studied. Instructional activities may include hands-on experiences with analyzing problems and developing site plans for athletic fields; establishing, fertilizing, irrigating, and pest management control of grassed areas; operating and maintaining machinery and equipment; participating in personal and community leadership development activities; planning and implementing a relevant schoolto-work transition experience; and participating in FFA activities.

Architecture & Construction Courses

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 1 CP 617000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Sites: DCCTC & FDHS This course, together with the second course, is intended to develop the basic skills for the completion of two years of drafting. Skills developed in this course should prove useful to a student who is interested in furthering his/her education in the architectural or engineering area. The course will assist the student in developing basic skills in sketching, multi-view drawings, auxiliary views, floor plans, elevations and sections with emphasis on Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD). With virtually every career endeavor making use of technical drawings, this course is a must. Student should also enjoy math.

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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, MANUFACTURING, & INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES (continued)

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 CP 617100CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Architectural Design 1 Sites: DCCTC & FDHS This course is intended to develop the existing skills learned in Architectural and Design 1. The knowledge and skills learned are also used to prepare the student for a position in drafting and/or post-secondary school. With heavy emphasis in Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD), Architectural Design 2 will be of value to a student interested in engineering or architectural fields and many other occupational areas such as electrical engineering, landscape architecture, building construction and many other areas requiring CADD trained employees. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 1 CP 606001CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: FDHS This course is designed to prepare students to perform building construction tasks under the supervision of an experienced craftsman. Students will explore cabinet making, carpentry, heating and air conditioning system installation, landscaping, masonry, plumbing, residential electricity, and safety practices. This program of study is designed to prepare a student for a wide variety of vocational opportunities. Shop safety practices will be used at all times. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 2 CP 606102CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Building Construction 1 Site: FDHS This course refines skills taught in Building Construction 1 and will develop additional skills in cabinet making, carpentry, heating and air conditioning system installation, landscaping, masonry, plumbing, residential electricity, and safety practices. CARPENTRY 1 CP 609100CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: DCCTC Carpenters use hand and power tools to construct and repair residential and commercial buildings according to blueprints governed by federal, state, and local building codes. Students interested in this program should enjoy working indoors and outdoors and have an understanding of basic math. Emphasis on construction safety is included in the program. Students normally build a 1,100 s.f. house for Habitat for Humanity. CARPENTRY 2 CP 609200CD Units: 2 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Carpentry 1 Site: DCCTC The carpenter is involved in assembling the building so that it is level and true. In addition, the carpenter must be able to work from the architect's drawings and specifications. Various types of building materials and component parts are discussed. Finishing exterior is also studied and practiced. Students normally build a 1,100 s.f. house for Habitat for Humanity each year. ELECTRICITY 1 CP 628700CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: DCCTC & FDHS Residential electricians lay out, assemble, install, maintain, and test electrical fixtures, equipment and wiring systems used in lighting, power, air conditioning, and heating systems of residential buildings in accordance with federal, state, and local codes. Students taking this course should have a basic understanding of math and enjoy working both outdoors and indoors. All students will become Registered Youth Apprentices through the Bureau of Apprenticeship training. Students are guaranteed a job in the summer between their junior and senior years working for an electrical contractor at a wage of $8.00 per hour. ELECTRICITY 2 CP 628800CD Units: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Electricity 1 Site: DCCTC & FDHS Students in the second year program will apply theory and work from their first year to make a transition to the second year. Students will learn to bend and install conduit. They will learn how single and polyphase motors operate; how the motors are controlled by manual, electrical, and programmed controllers; and how to install and maintain the equipment. Upon completion of all course objectives, the student will be employed at an entry level position as a residential or industrial second year apprentice at a starting wage of $11.20 per hour. Electrical completers are also guaranteed one semester of credit towards an associate's degree in electrical engineering at TTC or OC Tech. Electricity graduates do very well in a four-year course of study in electrical engineering at the University of South Carolina, Clemson or The Citadel. MASONRY 1 CP 625000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: DCCTC During the first year, students are instructed in how to use tools and equipment safely and efficiently. This course includes instruction in the history of brick and block laying and masonry technology. Students learn how to construct walls, partitions, and other structures from brick, block, and other related materials. Students desiring to learn masonry should like working with hand tools, supervising helpers, seeing the physical results of their work, be able to follow directions, make accurate calculations, judge straight lines, spaces, proportions, and physically must have good manipulative dexterity, enjoy working outdoors in high places, and be able to stoop, kneel, and bend. 48

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, MANUFACTURING, & INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES (continued)

MASONRY 2 CP 625100CD Units: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Masonry 1 Site: DCCTC Second year students continue using knowledge gained from their first year. Students read blueprints, lay brick, stone, structural tile, marble, concrete blocks, fireplaces, and other masonry materials to build residential and commercial buildings according to federal, state, and local codes. Often, live projects are completed by Masonry 2 students. Jobs in the masonry field include bricklayer, block mason, cement finisher, tile setters, stonemason, marble setter, brick chimney builder, and firebrick and tile mason. ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION WORK BASED LEARNING 669000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Senior and completer of career and technology program Seniors who have completed a career and technology program and desire work experience in a field related to architecture and construction or desire to further enhance their skills may enroll in a work based learning course. Students should express their interest in enrolling to their instructor and counselor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites.

Automotive Courses

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR 1 CP 602000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: DCCTC This course is designed to instruct students in the repair and refinishing of today's vehicles through the use of specialized tools and equipment. Areas of study will include automotive construction, body shop operations, safety, automotive tools and equipment, refinishing preparations, simplified metal straightening and repairs, abrasives, automotive paints, and paint applications equipment. Students interested in this field should have an understanding of basic math and enjoy the challenge of working with their hands under the direction of the instructor. AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR 2 CP 602100CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Automotive Collision Repair 1 Site: DCCTC Students in the second year will be able to MIG weld, use a plasma cutting torch, plastic welding and use of fiberglass, operate a unitized bench repair system, operate a downdraft paint booth, and refinish a vehicle using computerized paint mixing equipment. The student will use the latest in base/clear and urethane refinishing systems. The student will develop the attitudes, knowledge, and skills required in today's workplace. AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1 CP 603000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: DCCTC This course provides instruction in the components, systems, and repairs common on modern automobiles. The students learn to identify parts, explain system operations, perform problem diagnosis and complete common service operations on electrical systems, braking systems, steering and suspension systems, and engine and transmission systems. Basic math skills and a foundation of physical science are required. Students planning a career in automotive mechanics should have good reading skills to be able to interpret the vast amount of technical information and reference material used in automotive repair. Upon successful completion of all course objectives, the student should be qualified for an entry-level position in an automotive quick service business where minimal training and experience are required, or the continuation of training by enrollment in Automotive Technology 2. It is strongly recommended that the students have a valid driver's license for this class. AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 2 CP 603100CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Automotive Technology 1 Site: DCCTC This course refines skills in two particular areas: brakes and steering/suspension. Working closely with the A.S.E. and NATEF standards along with the NATEF task list, second year students receive intense training in these particular subjects. This also offers students a greater chance in passing the A.S.E. test (along with 1-year work experience) which most of the automotive industry now requires. The students will have access to tools, equipment, and information on vehicles as current as the 2000+ year model. Without direct supervision, students will be able to perform course objectives using logic and problem solving skills with emphasis on safety and proper techniques. Upon successful completion of all course objectives, the student should be able to secure employment at an entry level position in an automotive garage, new car dealership, or continue further education in a post-secondary automotive program or factory school. TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND LOGISTICS WBL 679000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Senior and completer of career and technology program at DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) Seniors who have completed a career and technology program at DCCTC and desire work experience in a field related to their completed program or desire to further enhance their skills may enroll in a Level 3 course. Students enrolled in Level 3 courses should express their interest in enrolling in Level 3 to their DCCTC instructor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites. 49

School of Health, Human & Public Services Electives

Health Science Courses

HEALTH SCIENCE 1 555002CD Units: 2 Grade: 11 Site: DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) This course is designed to familiarize students with health care career opportunities and assist them in acquiring entry-level knowledge and skills applicable to health care fields. Emphasis will be placed on selecting a health care career, recognizing health care facilities and methods of paying for health care, professional communication skills, safe work practices and the prevention of infection, and human anatomy with related medical terminology. HEALTH SCIENCE 2 Grade: 12 555100CD Units: 2 Site: DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) Prerequisite: Completion of Health Science 1 with at least an 80 average and teacher recommendation. Second year students are required to provide their own transportation to the clinical setting This course begins with core information in medical math, growth and development, death and dying, and nutrition. After completing the core, students will select one of the following components: nursing, dental, medical clerical, veterinary, and medical back office. Upon completion of the core modules, students will be placed in a local health care facility for a real world experience. During the course, the student will be instructed in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and have the opportunity to become CPR certified. HEALTH SCIENCE WORK BASED CREDIT 559000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Senior and completer of career and technology program at DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) Seniors who have completed a career and technology program at DCCTC and desire work experience in a field related to their completed program or desire to further enhance their skills may enroll in a Level 3 course. Students enrolled in Level 3 courses should express their interest in enrolling in Level 3 to their DCCTC instructor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites. PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 558000HW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Site: ARHS This course provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through exciting hands-on projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. The key biological concepts embedded in the curriculum include homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defense against disease. Additionally, engineering principles including: the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to function are studied. SPORTS MEDICINE 1 CP 555500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course will provide students with knowledge and understanding of sports medicine. The program provides instruction in role delineation, liability, basic muscular-skeletal anatomy and physiology, CPR, emergency first-aid procedures, and taping and rehabilitation techniques specific to sports injuries. SPORTS MEDICINE 2 CP 555600CD Unit: 2 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Sports Medicine 1 This course is designed to present the skills necessary to perform as a student trainer or as a first responder in an emergency. Students will work with a certified trainer at junior varsity and varsity sports events gaining experience in taping and emergency techniques specific to sports injuries. SPORTS MEDICINE 3 CP WORK BASED CREDIT 559100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Sports Medicine 2 This course is a continuation of Sports Medicine 2 and will include internship and after-school work experience where students apply formal classroom learning to actual work situations. Students' workplace activities may include working on special projects, sampling tasks from different jobs, and/or learning tasks related to a single occupation.

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Physical Education Courses

All students are required to successfully complete one (1) unit of physical education to meet South Carolina graduation requirements. Exemption from this requirement will be granted to a student only when a medical doctor states in writing that participation is not possible because of physical disability or for other valid medical reasons. One unit of JROTC may be substituted for the physical education requirement. All band students are required to take Physical Education. PERSONAL FITNESS/MOVEMENT 344100CW Unit: 1 ACTIVITIES/COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CP (PE 1) Grades: 9-12 This course is required for graduation and can be taken at any grade level during high school. The intent of this course is to encompass a personal fitness and wellness component as outlined by the state physical education curriculum. PHYSICAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES 344200CH Unit: ½ Grades: 9-12 344200CW Unit: 1 This course is an elective which will focus on a variety of individual and team activities. This course does not satisfy the basic physical education requirement for graduation. WEIGHT TRAINING 1 CP 349930CH Unit: ½ Grade: 9-12 349930CW Unit: 1 This is an elective course for students with an interest in intensive physical training with the intent of maintaining strength and endurance through a physical workout regimen. WEIGHT TRAINING 2 CP 344205CH Unit: ½ Grade: 10-12 Prerequisite: Weight Training 1 344205CW Unit: 1 This course is a continuation of Weight Training 1 for students wishing to continue strength and conditioning training. WEIGHT TRAINING 3 CP 344306CH Unit: ½ Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Weight Training 2 344306CW Unit: 1 This course is a continuation of Weight Training 2 for students wishing to continue strength and conditioning training. WEIGHT TRAINING 4 CP 344402CH Unit: ½ Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Weight Training 3 344402CW Unit: 1 This course is a continuation of Weight Training 3 for students wishing to continue strength and conditioning training.

Early Childhood Education Courses

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1 CP 580000CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course is a study of human growth and development from conception through age six. The care and guidance of young children relative to the physical, social, emotional, and mental development tasks are stressed. Efforts are made to incorporate guided observations and participation with young children and their parents in order to promote personal confidence in responding to young children. The knowledge, skills, attitudes, and understanding gained will prepare students to assume parental roles and/or careers involving the care and nurturing of the young. Students will be required to furnish some equipment and supplies. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 1 570000CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Site: FDHS/SHS This course is designed to provide students with hands-on opportunities to actively explore and observe the world of preschool children. This course provides an in-depth study of career paths, developmentally appropriate practices, curriculum development, safe and healthy learning environments, collaborative relationships, and professional employment skills. Integration of the Family and Consumer Sciences student organization, Family Careers, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), greatly enhances this curriculum.

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2 570100CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education 1 Site: FDHS/SHS This course prepares students for careers that involve working with young children. It is also beneficial for students who will eventually be parents to understand the developmental and educational process of their children. This course will help students identify career paths in child-related fields, analyze developmentally appropriate practices, understand how to set up a safe and healthy environment, develop appropriate guidance and teaching techniques, and how to maintain professionalism. Early Childhood Education 2 builds on skills acquired in Early Childhood Education 1. Integration of the Family and Consumer Sciences student organization, Family Careers, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), greatly enhances this curriculum. EDUCATION & TRAINING WORK BASED CREDIT 639000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Senior and completer of career and technology program Seniors who have completed a career and technology program and wish to have work experience in a field related to their completed program or wish to further enhance their skills may enroll in this course. Students should express their interest in enrolling to their teacher and counselor. Students aspiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites.

Fashion & Interior Services Courses

FASHION, FABRIC, AND DESIGN 1 CP 580400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Site: SHS This course involves students in planned learning experiences to acquire basic skills in clothing construction. Skills in the operation and maintenance of the home sewing machine, basic hand sewing techniques, pattern interpretation and layout, and garment construction will be acquired through a combination of teacher demonstrations and student practice and application. FASHION, FABRIC, AND DESIGN 2 CP 580500CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Textiles 1 or Fashion, Fabric and Design 1 Site: SHS This course will encompass many advanced sewing techniques. A series of activities designed to assist the student in mastering specific skills will be used. Several projects include: skirt/pants, alternate seam methods, fully lined jacket, prom/formal dress (student choice) and more. A class sponsored community sewing project will be included during the course of the year. Projects will be tailored to students' ability. Construction techniques will be acquired through a combination of teacher demonstration and student practice and application. Each student will be responsible for furnishing his/her sewing supplies. HOUSING AND INTERIORS 1 CP 583000CW Units: 1 Grades: 10-12 Site: SHS This course is designed to help students understand housing needs and to develop knowledge and skills for future use. The course will emphasize the creation of a favorable home climate for family living. Projects will include house plan evaluation, housing selection, and equipping and decorating the home. HOUSING AND INTERIORS 2 CP 583100CW Units: 1 Grades: 11-12 Site: SHS This course provides students opportunities to develop skills in applying the elements and principles of design. Students will study interior backgrounds, furnishings, lighting and accessories. Comprehensive design projects are integrated throughout the course. Career and entrepreneurial opportunities within housing, interiors, and the furnishing industries are explored. Integration of the Family and Consumer Sciences student organization, Family Careers, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), greatly enhances this curriculum.

Personal Care Services Courses

BARBERING 1 CP 579800CT Units: 3 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Interview with teacher Site: FDHS Barber-Styling is the full practice of Barbering, and deals with both operator skills and management functions. Students begin practicing skills on clients from the beginning weeks of the course, all under the expert guidance of licensed barber teachers. The course combines theory, practice on mannequins and clinic (client) work in an integrated manner working on technique, speed and finish as the course progresses. Students must also pay a $35 permit fee to be enrolled in the course and purchase a barbering kit which is currently $300 (subject to change each year). BARBERING 2 CP 579801CT Units: 3 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Barbering 1 CP Site: FDHS This course goes beyond entry level, and trains the student in the basic barbershop skills, and in shop ownership and management skills, giving a more comprehensive education. Upon completion of 1500 course hours, students will be eligible to take the state board exam to receive a license. 52

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COSMETOLOGY 1 CP 615000CT Units: 3 Grade: 10-11 Prerequisite: Interview with teacher Site: DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) Cosmetology is the scientific study of the hair, nails, and skin. The course is designed to teach the student the basics of how to care for, cut, style, and chemically change the hair. The course also teaches the student the basic care of the skin and nails, which includes application of makeup and nail artistry. The first and second nine weeks are spent in the classroom training, with work being done on mannequins. Students must have a cosmetology kit purchased through the school for each year of the program which is currently $300 and is subject to change each year. COSMETOLOGY 2 CP 615100CT Units: 3 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Cosmetology 1 Site: DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) This course is a basic overview of Cosmetology 1 with emphasis on clinic work. Students will do clinical work on mannequins and clients. The clinical work will incorporate hair coloring, hair styling, hair cutting, facials, hair removal, and permanent waving. Cosmetology 1 and 2 are designed to teach and prepare students for the Cosmetology State Board Exam at the end of the senior year. Successful completion of both written and practical portions of the exam results in National Certification as a Licensed Cosmetologist. NAIL TECHNOLOGY 615401CT Units: 3 Grades: 11-12 preferred Site: DCCTC/DCCTC (Trolley) This course is designed to prepare students to become licensed nail technologists. Students learn the art and science of nail technology that includes performing manicures, pedicures, and various procedures for applying artificial nails. This is a one-year course, and upon successful completion of 300 training hours and passing the State Board of Cosmetology written and practical exams, students will receive their Nail Technologist license.

Hospitality & Tourism Courses

FOODS AND NUTRITION CP 582400CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-l2 Students will study the principles of nutrition and the relationship of nutrition to individual health and well being. Teacher demonstrations and guided laboratory experiences will enable students to gain skills in kitchen management, safety and sanitation, food preparation, and meal services. The emphasis of this course is nutrition and not food preparation and cooking. Responsible behavior is stressed. Students will be required to furnish some food, equipment, and supplies. CULINARY ARTS 1 CP 572000CD Units: 2 Grades: 10-11 Site: FDHS Culinary Arts prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into post-secondary education in the food production and service industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the industry and its career opportunities. Laboratory experiences simulate commercial food production and service operations. CULINARY ARTS 2 CP 572100CD Units: 2 Grade: 11-12 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts 1 Site: FDHS Culinary Arts 1 and Culinary Arts 2 serve as the introduction to the study of the industry. It is a two-year course using the ProStart curriculum aligned with the standards from our national and state organizations. The focus of the training is to fulfill business needs for employment in restaurants, hospitals, public schools and colleges, childcare facilities, retirement homes, and deli-bakeries. All students meeting guidelines and completing the two-year program will be given the opportunity of becoming ProStart certified through the National Restaurant Association. This certification will afford students the opportunity to earn scholarships and recognition for mastering essential foodservice skills. A South Carolina Vocational Competency Certificate is awarded. Several area colleges and universities award standing to students receiving certificates from this program. Students seeking the National Scholarship certification will be required to sign up for Work Based Learning their senior year to acquire their required hours of related work experience. CULINARY ARTS 1 CP 572000CD Units: 2 Grades: 10-11 Site: DCCTC The Culinary Arts program prepares students for basic entry-level employment in the food service industry. Students who enjoy working with food and are willing to study and practice the techniques of cooking will have greater success at employment upon completion. Culinary Arts 1 serves as the introduction to the study of food service. All aspects of the industry and potential careers, equipment use and upkeep, food preparation and service, food storage, ordering, work simplification and basics are covered in this program. Emphasis will be placed on sanitation, kitchen safety, proper use of utensils and equipment, and reading and preparing recipes. Students will receive practical and theoretical experiences so the competencies in each area will be obtained. Students may be required to furnish some food and supplies when needed. Students will be required to purchase a chef jacket. 53

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CULINARY ARTS 2 572100CD Units: 2 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts 1 Site: DCCTC Culinary Arts 2 is a course designed to provide students with the skills needed for employment in both entry level and semi-skilled positions in the Culinary Arts industry. The focus of training is to fulfill our area business needs for employees in restaurants, hotels, deli-bakeries, hospitals, child care facilities, retirement homes, public schools and colleges. Upon graduation, potential career opportunities include restaurant manager, caterer, chef, baker, or dietary aid. Students seeking postsecondary education are prepared to pursue further programs of study in culinary arts, pastry arts, hospitality management, or travel and tourism. S everal area colleges and universities award advanced standing to students receiving certificates from this program. HOSPITALITY & TOURISM WORK-BASED LEARNING 519000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Four credits required for a major in Hospitality & Tourism The components of Work Based Learning programs enable students to become aware of career options, explore career opportunities, and plan for post-secondary educational and career experiences. The program will provide students with a better understanding of relationships between rigorous and relevant education and employment success. Seniors who have completed four credits required for a major in the Hospitality & Tourism career cluster and desire work experience in a field related to their program may enroll in this course. Students should express their interest in enrolling in this work based learning experience to their teacher and counselor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites.

Law, Public Safety & Security Courses

LAW EDUCATION CP 333600CH Unit: ½ Grades: 9-12 This course is designed to provide students with the ability to become constructive participants in our legal system by providing them with a greater sense of justice, tolerance and fairness. The role of our legal system is given through a look at criminal law, juvenile justice, torts, consumer law, family law, housing law, individual rights, and liberties. EMERGENCY & FIRE MANAGEMENT SERVICES 1 (FIREFIGHTING) 651200CD Units: 2 Grades: 10-12 Site: DCCTC This course provides the basic skills necessary to get personnel operational and performing on the fire ground. Subjects include: firefighter orientation and safety; fire behavior; portable extinguishers; protective equipment; search and rescue; ladders, fire hose, ropes and knots; building construction; and fire prevention and public education. This course satisfies the intent of the OSHA standard for basic Firefighting. Successful completion of written and performance testing is required. EMERGENCY & FIRE MANAGEMENT SERVICES 2 (FIREFIGHTING) 651300CD Units: 2 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Emergency & Fire Management Services 1 Site: DCCTC This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to meet the National Firefighter Standards of NFPA 1001. Subjects include fire streams, interior fire control, forcible entry, ventilation, salvage, overhaul, water supply, wild land firefighting and communications. Successful completion of written and performance testing is required. LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, AND SECURITY WORK BASED CREDIT 659000CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Senior and completer of career and technology program at DCCTC Seniors who have completed a career and technology program at DCCTC and desire work experience in a field related to their completed program or desire to further enhance their skills may enroll in a Level 3 course. Students enrolled in Level 3 courses should express their interest in enrolling in Level 3 to their DCCTC instructor. Students desiring to work in a related field must provide their own transportation to work sites.

Service & Leadership

PALMETTO YOUTH LEADERSHIP CP 339906CH Unit: ½ Grade: 11 339906CW Unit: 1 Prerequisites: Must be able to attend six day-long meetings during school hours and provide own transportation Palmetto Youth leadership is a course to promote leadership among young people who possess leadership characteristics but who have not had the opportunity to develop these attributes. The course will foster citizenship by exposing the participants to the infrastructure of a progressive Dorchester County. It will develop problem-solving skills and global thought by the student and educate others in our school community. Only six students will be accepted each year. Rising eleventh grade students will be selected for the course by submitting an application during the first week of school. In order to apply, parents must also sign an agreement that will allow the student to attend the County Core meetings in addition to the scheduled classes. Students must have insurance coverage. STUDENTS MAY NOT SIGN THEMSELVES UP FOR THIS COURSE.

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EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP 1 CP 339904CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisites: Hold a leadership position in the school or community Site: FDHS, SHS A major goal of our education system should be to promote good citizenship and develop leadership skills among students who demonstrate an affinity for this field. This course will instruct the student on what it means to be an effective leader and the characteristics that go hand in hand with this field. Instruction will focus on teaching leadership skills and offering students realistic opportunities in which they can put these skills to work. Students will have the opportunity to meet with leaders in the school and community and be involved in the decision-making process. The class is designed and recommended for class officers, student body officers, student government members, club officers and other students interested in becoming leaders. EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP 2 CP 339905CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Effective Leadership 1 Site: FHDS, SHS Leadership development is a responsibility of our schools. Students need to be involved in the school and community and hold positions of leadership. Many colleges and universities are looking for candidates who possess extensive leadership experiences in high school and/or the community. This course will be a continuation of Effective Leadership 1, where students will have the opportunity to apply skills learned in Effective Leadership 1 by meeting with leaders in the school and community and becoming more involved in the decision-making process. Instruction will focus on real-world applications of leadership skills, offering students realistic opportunities in which they can put these skills to work. Students will also develop leadership skills by addressing community needs through volunteer service. The class is designed and recommended for class officers, student body officers, student government members, link crew leaders, NHS members, club officers and other student's interested in becoming leaders.

NAVY JROTC Summerville High School

NAVY JUNIOR ROTC 1 CP 375101CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This is an elective course for students with an interest in naval and military subjects. Classroom instruction includes maritime geography, government, naval history, oceanography, and navigation. Additional training in military drill stresses self-discipline, respect for authority, and personal appearance. All uniforms, books, and training materials are provided free by the Navy. Participation in NJROTC requires compliance with Navy standards of grooming, to include regulation haircuts, being clean shaven and no earrings for males, wearing the uniform weekly, and acceptance of stringent standards of discipline. NAVY JUNIOR ROTC 2 CP 375201CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Completion of NJROTC 1 and recommendation of Instructor This is an elective course for students who have satisfactorily completed NJROTC 1. Classroom instruction includes naval history, meteorology, navigation, naval operations, and first aid. Additional training in military drill stresses leadership, self-confidence, and personal appearance. NAVY JUNIOR ROTC 3 CP 375301CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Completion of NJROTC 2 and recommendation of Instructor This is an elective course for students who have satisfactorily completed NJROTC 2. Classroom instruction includes naval history, astronomy, government, and sea power. Additional training in military drill stresses leadership, self-confidence, and personal appearance. NAVY JUNIOR ROTC 4 CP 375401CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Completion of NJROTC 3 and recommendation of Instructor This is an elective course in practical leadership for selected seniors who have satisfactorily completed NJROTC 3. Classroom experience involves the management of the NJROTC unit in its leadership positions and the training of cadets under the supervision of instructors. Emphasis is on the development of leadership, management ability, and self-confidence.

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AIR FORCE JROTC Fort Dorchester High School & Ashley Ridge High School

Air Force Junior ROTC is a citizenship program for high school students in the ninth through twelfth grades. AFJROTC encourages its students to get involved in their local communities to produce well-informed and helpful citizens. Each year's Aerospace Science course work relates to a different theme, examples are: Aviation History, the Science of Flight, Space Exploration, Astronomy, Survival and Management. In addition, cultural studies allow cadets to see the world through many different perspectives. Leadership Education offers cadets many opportunities to shape their character. Cadets learn about character development, elements of good citizenship, effective communications, the importance of choosing a career path, specific career paths, how to apply for financial aid and college and many others. Students also participate in extracurricular and social activities such as field trips, drill and saber teams, honor guard, honor society, orienteering, model rocketry, formal social events, helping in the local community, and attending Summer Leadership Schools. Cadets learn first aid, leadership, team building, making decisions, problem solving, and fitness. All uniforms, books, and training materials are provided free by the Air Force. All Air Force JROTC cadets will comply with Air Force standards of grooming, wearing the uniform weekly, and acceptance of strict standards of discipline. AFROTC does not require cadets to enter the military but it does provide the avenue of entering the military with advanced rank or competing for Air Force Scholarships. AEROSPACE SCIENCE/LEADERSHIP EDUCATION 1 CP 375100CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Aerospace Science is an elective for students with an interest in aviation and/or learning about the use of air power throughout history. A Journey into Aviation History chronicles man's early attempt at flight in ancient times, through the Wright Brothers' historical flight and the use of airpower in each of our major wars through Operation Desert Storm. The Leadership Education portion introduces cadets to the Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) program providing a basis for progression through the rest of the AFJROTC program while instilling elements of good citizenship. It contains sections on cadet and Air Force organizational structure; uniform wear; customs, courtesies, and other military traditions; health and wellness; fitness; individual selfcontrol; military drill, respect for authority, leadership and citizenship. AS/LE1 meets the requirements for the PE requirement for a SC diploma, or as an elective credit. AEROSPACE SCIENCE/LEADERSHIP EDUCATION 2 CP 375200CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Aerospace Science/Leadership Education 1 CP This course is for students who have successfully completed AS/LE 1 or one year of Army, Navy or Marine Corps JROTC at another high school. In the AS 2 portion of the course, students will learn about the aerospace environment, principles of aircraft flight and navigation. Leadership Education 2 stresses communication skills and cadet corps activities. Cadets are heavily involved in learning how to communicate effectively, understand groups and teams, prepare for leadership, solve conflicts and problems, and personal development. Written reports and speeches compliment the academic materials. Cadet corps activities include holding positions of greater responsibility in the planning and execution of corps projects. AS/LE 2 cadets will help lead cadet activities and set the example for AS/LE 1 students, especially in the areas of self-discipline and personal appearance. ADVANCED AEROSPACE SCIENCE/LEADERSHIP EDUCATION 2 CP 375201CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Aerospace Science/Leadership Education 1 CP An advanced leadership class is also available for students in grades 10-12 who have completed one year of JROTC and have the approval of the SASI. Students in this class will receive formal instruction on advanced leadership techniques and team dynamics. In addition, students will receive additional instruction on formal military ceremonies, advanced drill techniques, and flag honors. Qualified cadets will be awarded the Academy Modeling of Aeronautics (AMA) Wings. Advanced Leadership 2 pre-approved students will be placed among first-year cadet classes in cadet Non Commission Officer (NCO) positions and complete a leadership practicum as their curriculum. Cadets will also complete portions of the AS/LE 2 curriculum. AEROSPACE SCIENCE/LEADERSHIP EDUCATION 3 CP 375300CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Aerospace Science/Leadership Education 2 CP or 2 years of JROTC experience The Exploration of Space examines our Earth, the Moon and the planets, the latest advances in space technology, and continuing challenges of space and manned space flight. An Introduction to Astronomy explores the history of astronomy to include prehistoric astronomy, the early ideas of the heavens. The size and shape of the earth are discussed as well as the distance and size of the Sun and Moon. Other topics such as astronomy in the Renaissance and Isaac Newton and the birth of astrophysics and the growth of astrophysics are explored. Leadership Education 3 gives cadets critical information about life after high school with units on applying for college including financial aid; the job search process including applications, resumes, and interviews; personal financial management; and possible federal, aerospace, and military careers.

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ADVANCED AEROSPACE SCIENCE/LEADERSHIP EDUCATION 3 CP 375201CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Aerospace Science/Leadership Education 2 CP Pre-approved cadets will be placed among first, second, and third-year cadet classes in cadet officer or NCO positions and complete a leadership practicum as their curriculum. Cadets will also complete portions of the AS/LE 3 curriculum. AEROSPACE SCIENCE 4 (LEADERSHIP) CP 375405CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 3 CP and SASI approval This course is for selected cadets who have completed three years of AFJROTC in an exemplary manner and will fill limited leadership positions in the Corps of Cadets. Pre-approved students will be placed among first, second, and third-year cadet classes in officer positions and complete a leadership practicum as their year-long curriculum. AEROSPACE SCIENCE 4 (LEADERSHIP/SURVIVAL) CP 375401CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Aerospace Science 2 or Aerospace Science 3 and SASI approval This course is for selected cadets who have completed their 2 nd and or their 3rd year of ROTC in an exemplary manner. LEADERSHIP: Cadets will become members of Key and Support Staff and hold officer and enlisted positions for specific contracted positions within the unit. Both staffs will manage unit activities to include daily operations. Each cadet will complete a staff leadership and management practicum. SURVIVAL: As members of this class, cadets will also have a focus on survival for group skills needed to survive in an outdoor environment. Students will obtain the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to successfully perform fundamental tasks needed for survival. Curriculum includes first aid seeking food/shelter, and how to navigate using a map and compass. Additionally, cadets' training will include filed training exercise including two overnight training exercises. AFJROTC CADET OFFICER LEADERSHIP SCHOOL 375403CH Unit: ½ Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Aerospace Science 1 and Instructor selection This course prepares JROTC cadets for leadership roles within the cadet wing. It is conducted at The Citadel during the summer with a student population of about 250 from 15-18 different schools. The instruction is provided by AFJROTC instructors from the represented schools. The course is a high-intensity training environment consisting of physical training, classroom academics, drill, parade practice, room inspections, uniform inspections, and competitive sports. Upon completion, cadets will understand the importance of time management, how to get along with others, how to be a follower and a leader, and what it takes to be successful in a group. There are a limited number of slots available, and cadets must be selected to participate.

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ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE ENGLISH 309903CH Unit: ½ Grades: 11-12 309903CW Unit: 1 This course is required for those students who have not passed the HSAP Exam. This course will focus on improving students' interpretive and comprehension reading skills and/or strengthening structure, content and mechanical writing skills. ENGLISH ESSENTIALS CP 309900CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 This course will focus on the standards that are addressed on the HSAP Exam. Students are identified and placed in the course by performance on standardized tests and performance in English 1. ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE MATH 319901CH Unit: ½ Grades 11-12 319901CW Unit: 1 This course is required for those students who did not pass the HSAP Exam. This course will focus on the five major mathematical strands: number and operation, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis/probability. MATH ESSENTIALS 319902CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-10 The purpose of this course is to provide preparation for the HSAP Exam with emphasis on reading and problem solving in real world applications utilizing technology when appropriate. Students are identified and placed in the course by performance on standardized tests and performance in prior mathematics courses. AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE 309926CW Unit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 2 This course will provide students with an overview of the African-American literary tradition and an appreciation for the significant contributions made by African-Americans in literature. Students in this course will engage closely with literary and cultural texts from various genres and eras so as to identify how African-American artists, authors, and playwrights make use of vernacular forms in their works. An interdisciplinary approach will employ a range of secondary sources, including African-American literary theory and to locate this rich body of literature within historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will complete individual and group projects, readings and assignments with specific emphasis on developing and enhancing better reading, writing, technology, and analytical skills along with participating in extra curricular activities. READING POWER 309923CW Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 1 or a recommendation from English 1 teacher This course is designed to help students practice reading purposefully and to help students increase their skills in remembering what they read. This course is aimed at increasing reading power, refining reading and study habits, and developing vocabulary. The class focuses on during-reading strategies, reading comprehension, test-taking strategies, and exposing students to a wide variety of readings using self-selected young adult literature, not textbooks. CONTENT LITERATURE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 1 309932CW Unit: 1 Grade: 9 Prerequisites: Must meet eligibility for the ESOL Program This course is designed for ESOL students of all English Proficiency levels. It will focus on the regular classroom curriculum of ninth grade following South Carolina's standards. The emphasis will be on content area concepts and vocabulary in the sciences, mathematics, social studies, and English. CONTENT LITERATURE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 2 309922CW Unit: 1 Grade: 10 Prerequisites: Must meet eligibility for the ESOL Program This course is designed for ESOL students of all English Proficiency levels. It will focus on the regular classroom curriculum of tenth grade following South Carolina's standards. The emphasis will be on content area concepts and vocabulary in the sciences, mathematics, social studies, and English. Course will include preparation for the HSAP exam. CONTENT LITERATURE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 3 309934CW Unit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: Must meet eligibility for the ESOL Program This course is designed for ESOL students of all English Proficiency levels. It will focus on the regular classroom curriculum of eleventh grade following South Carolina's standards. The emphasis will be on content area concepts and vocabulary in the sciences, mathematics, social studies, and English. Course will include preparation for the HSAP exam. 58

RESEARCH AND GENERAL ELECTIVES (continued)

CONTENT LITERATURE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 4 309935CW Unit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Must meet eligibility for the ESOL Program This course is designed for ESOL students of all English Proficiency levels. It will focus on the regular classroom curriculum of twelfth grade following South Carolina's standards. T he emphasis will be on content area concepts and vocabulary in the sciences, mathematics, social studies, and English. Course will include preparation for the HSAP exam. SAT/ACT PREPARATION VERBAL 401100CQ Unit: ¼ SAT/ACT PREPARATION MATH 415000CQ Unit: ¼ Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: Geometry; Algebra 2 or concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2 This course will help prepare the student to take the SAT and ACT test, which are required by all colleges as part of their entrance requirements. The course will focus on verbal and writing skills (reading and English), math skills, vocabulary development and test-taking strategies. DRIVER EDUCATION CP 370100CH Unit: ½ Grades: 10-12 Prerequisite: STUDENTS MUST HAVE A LEARNER'S PERMIT This course introduces the students to fundamentals of good driving. The course consists of 30 hours of classroom work, 3 hours in the simulators, and 3 hours of actual behind-the-wheel driving. A $35 fee will be charged for this course. Students will be required to show their driver permit on the first day of class. Those students who do not have a permit will not be allowed to remain in the course. Students must commit to a full semester for this course. INTOLERANCE AND THE HOLOCAUST 339905CH Unit: ½ Grades: 9-12 This course will examine a number of issues related to the human tragedy of genocide that took over nine million innocent lives. Similar atrocities in Cambodia and Bosnia will also be studied. The major focus of the course will be to closely examine human behaviors that are associated with these tragic events. An underlying theme throughout the course will be the need to practice tolerance in order to avoid such tragedies in the future. LOWCOUNTRY HISTORY CP 339910CH Unit: ½ Grades: 9-12 Lowcountry History is an overview course which investigates the geography and history of the surrounding Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester areas as they fit into the political, economic, and social fabric of United States history in general. This investigation is done through class lectures, guest speakers and class projects to enhance the knowledge of the Lowcountry and its place in history. MORALITY, ETHICS, AND RELIGION 339912CH Unit: ½ Grades: 9-12 This course begins with a careful examination of a personal decision-making process that students can then use to deal with ethical issues. After establishing a solid foundation for dealing with moral ambiguity, the class examines how moral codes operate in modern society. Finally, students explore the moral, ethical, and spiritual contributions of major religions. It is important to note that class discussion, sharing points of view in a trusting and open setting, and a willingness to explore various methods of research are important components of the course. WORK BASED LEARNING/SCHOOL TO WORK 379983CW Unit: 1 Grades: 11-12 This course is for students interested in career exploration in order to gain a better understanding of the relationship between rigorous and relevant education and employment success. The Career Development Office of Dorchester District Two provides internships for students who are interested in gaining exposure and experiences in a career field. Students are screened by grades, attendance, and discipline. Students enrolled in Career and Technology Education (CATE) completer programs will not be able to participate in this initiative since they will have the opportunity to enroll in work based learning programs within their cluster/major of study. Opportunities in this program may be paid or non-paid. Students should meet with their counselor to share their career plans and be sure they have time in their schedule to enroll in work based learning. Students must be able to accrue a minimum of 180 hours to earn one high school credit. A maximum of two credits may be earned during high school. A student may not enroll in two work based learning courses during the same semester.

59

RESEARCH AND GENERAL ELECTIVES (continued)

STUDENT VOLUNTEER 379901CH Unit: ½ Grades: 11-12 Prerequisites: Selection Process; proof of insurance coverage 379901CW Unit: 1 The student volunteer program provides students with an opportunity to become actively involved in the community through volunteer work. Students must provide their own transportation if volunteering off campus. Students will meet with the coordinating teacher at the beginning of the semester for classroom instruction. Students may volunteer during their Student Volunteer class period or off campus during or after school hours. Students must complete five hours of volunteer service per week. Punctuality and regular attendance will be monitored. Reports from the supervisor will be completed on a monthly basis. A maximum of two credits (one per year) may be earned during high school. A student may not enroll in two work based learning courses during the same semester.

60

SPECIAL SERVICES

RESOURCE CLASSES

Resources services are provided to students in accordance with their individual needs and their IEP requirements. Strategies courses qualify as elective credit and students must also meet the graduation requirements for a South Carolina High School Diploma. AFFECTIVE STRATEGIES Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Skills are taught so that students can deal positively with stressful and conflicting situations. Behavior management techniques will be practiced, giving students tools to enable them to make life decisions. REFERENCE AND STUDY SKILLS Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Goals of reading, math, and written expression will be addressed as students are given the opportunity to make effective use of reference materials, study skills, and learn effective learning strategies. Texts from other courses may be utilized for some lessons. STRATEGIES IN ENGLISH Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course will provide remedial help in the areas of basic reading, reading comprehension, written expression, and exit exam skills. It also provides instruction and reinforcement of higher-level English skills necessary to be successful in mainstreamed English classes if deemed appropriate by the IEP. STRATEGIES IN MATH Unit: 1 Grades: 9-12 This course will provide remedial help in basic mathematical operations, reasoning, and exit exam skills. It also provides instruction and reinforcement of higher-level math skills necessary to be successful in mainstreamed math classes if deemed appropriate by the IEP.

SELF-CONTAINED CLASSES

The InVest Employability Program serves students with special needs who are pursuing the Dorchester School District Two Diploma. This program offers high quality experiences and academic instruction that will provide maximum opportunity for the student to acquire meaningful employment opportunities upon graduation. Life Skill courses taken qualify as electives and do NOT apply towards the South Carolina High School Diploma. 9th Grade

English Matematics Social Science PE/ROTC Computer Science Career Technology Education Electives

Life Skills Career & Technology 1 Life Skills English 1 ­ Language Life Skills Math 1 (Pre-Algebra/Basics) Life Skills Soc/Science 1 ­ Health/Bio & Civics

10th Grade

Life Skills English 2 - Language

11th Grade

12th Grade

Life Skills English 4 ­ Career Readiness Life Skills Math 4 (Career Readiness)

Life Skills English 3 ­ Career Readiness Life Skills Math 2 Life Skills Math 3 (Geometry) (Career Readiness) Life Skills Soc/Science 2 Life Skills ­ Phys/Environmental Soc/Science 3 - US Science & Civics History/Govt/Econ PE 1 or ROTC Life Skills Career & Technology 2 1 or 2 electives Life Skills Career & Technology 3 2 electives

Life Skills Computer Literacy Life Skills Career & Technology 4 2 electives

61

SPECIAL SERVICES (continued)

AFFECTIVE STRATEGIES This course is designed for students with behavioral objectives on their IEPs. Students will gain skills to deal positively with stressful situations. LIFE SKILLS COMPUTER LITERACY Grades: 9-10 Students will receive instruction and practice in keyboarding, proper use of emails, and internet research. Emphasis will be on career related terminology and applications. LIFE SKILLS CAREER & TECHNOLOGY 1 & 2 Grades: 9-10 Students will complete interest inventories to select career cluster. Student's strengths will be determined by individual assessments. Instructional topics may include the 16 career clusters, learning styles, self-advocacy, conflict resolution, interviewing, and driver's education. Students will participate in community based experiences for career awareness/exploration along with volunteering activities and job shadowing. Students entering with Individual Graduation Plans (IGPs) from 8th grade will update plans as they are affected by interest, training, and skill levels. LIFE SKILLS CAREER & TECHNOLOGY 3 & 4 Grades: 11-12 Students will build on skills and interest determined by interest inventories and individual assessments. Students will participate in community based experiences, work-based learning, job shadowing, and mock interviews. Instructional topics may include career goals, self-advocacy in the work place, conflict resolution, and personal money management. Older students preparing for graduations will participate in work-based learning to develop skills to be gainfully employed. LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH 1 & 2 Grades: 9-10 Students in this class receive two periods of instruction daily using the Language! Program. The students will gain skills in phonemic awareness, principles of phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH 3 & 4 Grades: 11-12 Instruction is further individualized according to the IEP. Some students may require continuation of the Language! Program while others may move into the Career Readiness. LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH 9 Students in this class receive two periods of instruction daily using the Language! Program. The students will gain skills in phonemic awareness, principles of phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. LIFE SKILLS ENGLISH 9-12 Students in this class receive one period of instruction daily using the Language! Program. The students will gain skills in analysis of text, reading process, comprehension, communication and writing. Instruction is further individualized according to the IEP. Eleventh and twelfth graders will focus language skills as they apply to employment. For eleventh and twelfth graders, Career Readiness instruction and assessments, such as Work Keys and Winsoft, will be accessible to students to support employment. LIFE SKILLS MATH 1 & 2 Grades: 9-10 Students will gain skills in numbers and operations, measurements and geometry, data analysis, and pre-algebra. Instruction is further individualized according to the IEP. 9 th and 10th grade instruction will help prepare students for the HSAP during their second year of high school by emphasizing the use of calculators in math application. LIFE SKILLS MATH 3 & 4 Grades: 11-12 For eleventh and twelfth graders, Career Readiness instruction and assessments, such as Work Keys and Winsoft, will be accessible to students to support employment.

62

SPECIAL SERVICES (continued)

LIFE SKILLS MATH 9-12 Students will gain skills in numbers and operations, measurements and geometry, data analysis, and pre-algebra. Instruction is further individualized according to the IEP. Ninth and tenth grade instruction will help prepare students for HSAP testing during the second year of high school. Instruction beyond tenth grade will focus on work application of math skills. Career Readiness instruction and assessments for eleventh and twelfth graders such as Work Keys and Winsoft will be accessible to students to support employment. LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE/SOCIAL STUDIES 1 Grade: 9 Students will receive instruction in Health Science/Biology to include nutrition, safety with foods, personal hygiene, health practices, family and parenting skills, personal and occupational safety. Students will receive instruction in Civics to include citizenship, Law, and Geography as it applies to local geography and history. LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE/SOCIAL STUDIES 2 Grade: 10 Students will receive instruction in Environmental/Physical Science. Topics may include diversity of life, energy, pollution, weather, conservation, among others. Civics will include a more global emphasis with topics including current events, world history, and world geography and how global issues affect all citizens and require a responsibility. LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE/SOCIAL STUDIES 3 Grade: 11 Students will receive instruction in US Civics. Topics may include current events, US History, US Geography, government, and economics. LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE/ SOCIAL STUDIES 9 Students will receive instruction in Health Science to include nutrition, safety with foods, cooking, personal hygiene, health practices, family and parenting skills, personal and occupational safety. Students will receive instruction in Civics to include citizenship, law and geography. LIFE SKILLS SCIENCE 10 Students will receive instruction in Environmental Science. Topics may include diversity of life, energy, pollution, weather, and conservation among others. LIFE SKILLS SOCIAL STUDIES 10 Students will receive instruction in Global Civics. Topics may include current events, world history, and world geography. LIFE SKILLS SOCIAL STUDIES 11 Students will receive instruction in US Civics. Topics may include current events, US History, US Geography, government, and economics. LIFE SKILLS VOCATIONAL 9-10 Students will complete interest inventories to select career clusters. Student's strengths will be determined by individual assessments. Instructional topics may include the 16 career clusters, learning styles, self-advocacy, conflict resolution, interviewing, and driver's education. Students will participate in community based experiences for career awareness/exploration along with volunteering activities and job shadowing. Students entering with Individual Graduation Plans (IGPs) from 8th grade will update plans as they are affected by interest, training, and skill level. LIFE SKILLS VOCATIONAL 11-12 (CATE) Students will build on skills and interest determined by interest inventories and individual assessments. Students will participate in community based experiences, work-based learning, job shadowing, and mock interviews. Instructional topics may include career goals, self-advocacy in the workplace, conflict resolution, and personal finance management. Older students preparing for graduation will participate in work-based learning to develop skills to be gainfully employed.

63

NOTES

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NOTES

65

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