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Allegany County Coordinated Public TransitHuman Services Transportation Plan

The Key to Community Mobility!

Prepared by: For:

Date:

Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network, Inc. United States Department of Transportation Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Transportation Task Force July 2007

PREFACE

The Allegany County Transportation Task Force has prepared the following plan to provide documentation of past and current efforts toward the creation of a public transit-human services transportation coordination plan, and to provide the outline for future efforts to improve community mobility and quality of life for the citizens of Allegany County. This Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan, hereafter referred to as the Plan, is specifically prepared to comply with the regulations of the Federal Transportation Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act- A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) mandate.

SAFETEA-LU mandates that projects for three specific Federal Transit Administration (FTA) programs be derived from a "locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services transportation plan". These efforts are being

conducted in counties across New York State and will be adopted by the local governments and submitted to the US Department of Transportation (USDOT).

Table of Contents

I. Introduction A. B. C. D. Problem Description Purpose of Allegany County Coordinated Transportation Plan Allegany County Transportation Task Force (ACTTF) History Allegany County Transportation Task Force (ACTTF) Mission/Vision

II.

Federal Transit Programs Legislation A. B. C. Legislation of Federal Transit Programs SAFETEA-LU Definitions of Federal Transit Programs affected by SAFETEA-LU Allegany County Federal Transit Programs directly affected by SAFETEA-LU

III.

Allegany County Demographic Profile A. B. General Description of Allegany County Population 1. 2. 3. 4. C. Total Population by Age Category Total Population Geographically by Age Category Population Trends Individuals with Disabilities

Socio-Economic Breakdown 1. 2. Income Levels Poverty Status, Geographic Concentration

D.

Educational Status 1. 2. Educational Institutions Educational Attainment

E.

Employment 1. Employment Status

F.

Vehicles 1. 2. Commuting to Work Vehicle Ownership

IV.

Research A. B. C. D. E. Needs Analysis Unmet Needs Analysis SWOT Analysis Concept Mapping Asset Mapping of Current Providers (Public and Private) 1. Inventory of Services and Resources a. b. c. F. Human Services Transportation Providers Public Transit Privately Owned Neighboring Counties Transportation Providers

Service Provider Operations and Capacity 1. 2. 3. 4. Vehicle Fleet Status and Evaluation Provider Interest in Coordination and Resource Sharing Volunteers GIS Mapping

G.

Consumer Perspective 1. 2. Consumer Survey Analysis Focus Groups

H.

Best Practice Models 1. 2. Coordinated Transportation Methods Coordination Planning Logic Models

V.

Developing the Mobility Plan A. B. Strategies for Development Core Elements of a Mobility Management Plan

VI.

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation A. B. Strategies for Implementation Logic Model and Measures for Monitoring and Evaluation

VII.

Allegany County Transportation Task Force A. B. Completed Activities Membership

VIII. Allegany County Transportation Workplan

IX.

Appendix

I. Introduction

Introduction

A.

Problem Description

For most of us, getting to work, getting to the doctor, or getting to church means getting in our car. But for many people, it's not that easy, there are often many challenges that individuals face when trying to "get a ride." It's not that we ­ governments, community organizations ­ haven't tried to help. Nearly every human service program recognizes that transportation is important. In fact, there are 62 federal programs that fund transportation services. And we ­ through our taxes and through our charitable contributions -are spending a significant amount of money in order to help. Ironically, for most people who need transportation help, the creation of more programs hasn't made getting around much easier! (Community Transportation Association) The rural nature of Allegany County makes it difficult for low-income residents without vehicles to obtain and maintain gainful employment, attend adult education programs, and readily access healthcare, human services programs, and retail stores to buy goods/services. Although many similar forces contribute to the continuation of rural and urban poverty, transportation is a considerably larger factor in cycles of rural poverty. Any person needing help and lacking a car or car insurance is affected, and these three factors are likely to coincide: "94 percent of welfare recipients do not own cars...close to 40 percent of all rural counties are not served by public transit systems, and 28 percent of rural counties have minimal transit service" (Stommes, Brown, & Houston, 2002). In Allegany County, NY, for instance, where in 2003 the unemployment rate was 0.5% higher than national average and the poverty rate was greater than national average by 2.3% ("USA counties"; "Allegany"), the Allegany County Transit system currently has six bus lines which have limited route and scheduling availability and additional transportation services are minimal. The solution is complicated by the fact that "since not many jobs are usually located in sparsely populated rural areas, and such locations are unlikely to have public transportation, this leaves residents there with little choice but to travel long distances to work" (Stommes, Brown, & Houston, 2002). In addition to the problems of helping people reach jobs or services, transportation issues have other impacts on the community's economy and, by extension, the local employment opportunities. Irregular public transport to and from more urban areas can deter industry, tourists and potential new residents from visiting or settling in an area. Furthermore, if people in the towns surrounding a community college, mall, or other consumer service are unable to reach and patronize such services, the service may last a while but could easily fall into bankruptcy (Stommes, Brown, & Houston, 2002). Should this problem not be addressed, the quality of life and economic condition of Allegany County will continue to suffer.

Introduction

B.

Purpose of Allegany County Coordinated Transportation Plan

The quality of life and economy in rural Allegany County depends on an efficient, effective, comprehensive, and coordinated multimodal transportation system that provides choices for the movement of people and goods and allows quick transfers between modes when and where they are needed. The need to maintain transportation linkages between rural and urban areas is very important to the economy, public health and safety, and the social structure of rural America. Coordinating transportation services takes careful, deliberate, proactive planning. In the planning process, local officials with a stake in successful transportation services come together to determine how the community's needs can best be met and how the skills and resources available to them can best be used to this purpose. Many commonly observed benefits from coordinated transportation services may include, but are not limited to the following: Lowered trip costs for travelers and for human service agencies Extended service hours, services to new areas or new communities and to more people More trips made by persons needing transportation Services more responsive to schedules, points of origin, and destinations of customers Greater emphasis on safety and customer service More door-to-door service More flexible payment and service options In May of 1999, the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) announced the Rural Transportation Initiative to ensure that rural areas and small communities share in the mobility, economic, and social benefits that many USDOT programs provide. The Initiative aims to increase the capacity of rural America to play a more integral role in planning and decision-making that shape transportation systems, and improve transportation safety in rural areas to reduce the incidence and severity of accidents and their associated costs. The Rural Initiative objectives include the following components:

· · · ·

Allow residents of rural areas and small communities access to the destinations and goods to attain their desired quality of life. Provide the transportation service that will afford rural areas and small communities the opportunity to reach their economic growth and trade potential. Enhance the social strength and cohesiveness of small communities and protect the natural environment of rural areas. Maintain the national security and border integrity necessary for the well-being of all Americans.

In February 2004, the Presidential Executive Order 13330 on the Coordination of Human Service Programs created an interdepartmental Federal Council on Access and Mobility to undertake collective and individual departmental actions to reduce duplication among federally-funded human service transportation services, increase the efficient delivery of such services and expand transportation access for older individuals, persons with disabilities, persons with low-income, children and other disadvantaged populations within their own communities. Recent federal regulations accentuate the timeliness and importance of this issue. Response by the New York State Department of Transportation emphasizes that a state-wide coordinated plan be developed by each of the sixty-two counties in New York State.

Introduction

The Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network, Inc. (AWSRHN) is committed to effectively coordinating local efforts in order to produce a coherent coordinated transportation plan. These efforts will help to increase people mobility, attract future funding opportunities, build strong community support through partnerships, and achieve greater operating efficiencies. AWSRHN was founded in 1994, and is an established, highly-visible rural health network comprised of service providers and community leaders in Allegany and Steuben counties. In 2006, AWSRHN applied and obtained its 501C3 Charitable Organization status. In the AWSRHN 2007 workplan, approved by the New York State Department of Health, Office of Rural Health, transportation was identified as a key issue to be addressed in order to impact quality of life, improve access to services and care, and increase cross-system collaboration via the Friendship House Community Resource Center. The Allegany County Transportation Task Force is a subcommittee of Friendship House Community Resource Center, working to achieve the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit ­Human Services Transportation Plan. This document will serve as a framework for action and will include activities and outcomes of the Allegany County Transportation Task Force. In addition, the document will serve as a reporting source as information and activities are completed, and the document is updated. All members of the Allegany County Transportation Task Force will have access to the document, as well as the Allegany County Legislators and the United States Department of Transportation.

Introduction

C.

Allegany County Transportation Task Force (ACTTF) History

The Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network, Inc. as the lead agency of the Friendship House Community Resource Center has established the mission of aligning services within the area to overcome identified barriers to social, psychological, physical health, education and behavioral health development. Friendship House integrates the energy of Allegany County's human service agencies, government agencies, academic arena, mental hygiene providers and healthcare services to establish a "one-stop" location for greater coordination of services. It is through the vision of establishing crosssystem collaborations to improve access to priority services, broaden networking opportunities, increase inter-agency referrals, expand opportunities for funding, and enhance case management services that the Allegany County Transportation Task Force was born. The precedent for successful collaboration building was set forth by the creation of the Adult Education and Employment Task Force. This Friendship House initiative, based on the Ohio Department of Education model, "For the Common Good" was initiated in 2005. Through the collaborative efforts of educational institutions, vocational programs, basic literacy and high school equivalency organizations, employment agencies, human service agencies, local business and industry the educational and employment needs of Allegany County residents are met through comprehensive planning sessions and outreach activities. The Allegany County Transportation Task Force is a collaboration of the Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network, Inc. hereafter referred to as ACTTF, and was assembled in January 2007. ACTTF inaugurated their efforts with the intent to create a Coordinated Human Service Transportation Plan, hereafter referred to as the Plan, using the combined methods of United We Ride and the Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services, TCRP Report 101, created by the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies. TCRP Report 101 Summary, "Many of us share a vision of improved mobility for all residents of rural communities. We look forward to a day of productive and cost-effective transportation services that enjoy a significant level of public support. However, many rural communities are still faced with meager transportation funding, multiple funding sources and service objectives, limited services, and inadequate public interest and transportation investments. Given this reality, the most intelligent strategy of the moment is to do the best we can with the resources that we have while still seeking more resources." Although the mandate calling for the creation of a locally-developed, coordinated public transit human service transportation plan was not recognized until the efforts of the Task Force had been conceptualized, ACTTF has been able to perform much of the groundwork for this Plan through the collaborative efforts of Transportation Providers, Human Service Agencies, Allegany County Officials, Faith-Based Organizations and Members at Large. The efforts of ACTTF will be positioned according to the following ACTTF Mission and Vision Statements.

Introduction

D.

Allegany County Transportation Task Force (ACTTF) Mission/Vision

Allegany County Transportation Task Force Mission Statement Mission: To identify the transportation needs of the transportation-disadvantaged as well as reduce gaps and duplication of services. By doing so it is our intention to develop a plausible, consumer-focused Coordinated Human Services Transportation Plan for Allegany County in collaboration with its neighboring counties.

Allegany County Transportation Vision Statement Vision: Through the development of a Coordinated Human Services Transportation Plan the transportation-disadvantaged will have greater access to healthcare, human services, employment, education, commerce, social, and community services. In addition, there will be an opportunity for increased transportation funding, cost efficiencies for programs and providers, and service quality improvements.

Introduction

II. Federal Transit Programs Legislation

Safe, Affordable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act, A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU)

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

A.

Legislation of Federal Transit Programs SAFETEAU-LU

Federal Interagency Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility Coordinated Human Service Transportation Planning Final Policy Statement Consistent with the requirements of the Executive Order and the statutory creation of a locallydeveloped, coordinated public transit human service transportation planning process established in the Safe, Affordable, Flexible, Efficient, Transportation Equity Act-A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), members of the Federal Interagency Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility (CCAM) adopt the following policy statement: "Member agencies of the Federal Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility resolve that federallyassisted grantees that have significant involvement in providing resources and engage in transportation delivery should participate in a local coordinated human services transportation planning process and develop plans to achieve the objectives to reduce duplication, increase service efficiency and expand access for the transportation-disadvantaged populations as stated in Executive Order 13330." NOTE: Significant involvement is defined as providing, contracting for and/or subsidizing individual transportation trips for individuals with disabilities, older adults, or people with lower incomes. Background Executive Order: Human Service Transportation Coordination "By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and to enhance access to transportation to improve mobility, employment opportunities, and access to community services for persons who are transportation-disadvantaged, it is hereby ordered as follows: A strong America depends on citizens who are productive and who actively participate in the life of their communities. Transportation plays a critical role in providing access to employment, medical and health care, education, and other community services and amenities. The importance of this role is underscored by the variety of transportation programs that have been created in conjunction with health and human service programs and by the significant Federal investment in accessible public transportation systems throughout the Nation. These transportation resources, however, are often difficult for citizens to understand and access, and are more costly than necessary due to inconsistent and unnecessary Federal and State program rules and restrictions. A broad range of Federal program funding allows for the purchase or provision of transportation services and resources for persons who are transportation-disadvantaged. Yet, in too many communities, these services and resources are fragmented, unused, or altogether unavailable. Federally assisted community transportation services should be seamless, comprehensive, and accessible to those who rely on them for their lives and livelihoods. For persons with mobility limitations related to advanced age, persons with disabilities, and persons struggling for self-sufficiency, transportation within and between our communities should be as available and affordable as possible.

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

The development, implementation, and maintenance of responsive, comprehensive, coordinated community transportation systems is essential for persons with disabilities, persons with low incomes, and older adults who rely on such transportation to fully participate in their communities." GEORGE W. BUSH, THE WHITE HOUSE, February 24, 2004. From this Executive Order in 2004 the Safe Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) requires that beginning in FY2007, projects funded under the following programs, will have a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human-services transportation plan. Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities - The goal of the Section 5310 program is to improve mobility for elderly individuals and individuals with disabilities throughout the country. Elderly Individual includes, at a minimum, all persons 65 years of age or older. Grantees may use a definition that extends eligibility for service to younger (e.g., 62 and older, 60 and over) persons. Individual With a Disability means an individual who, because of illness, injury, age, congenital malfunction, or other incapacity or temporary or permanent disability (including an individual who is a wheelchair user or has semi-ambulatory capability), cannot use effectively, without special facilities, planning, or design, public transportation service or a public transportation facility. JARC - Intended to provide employment and employment related transportation services to the low-income population in both rural and urbanized areas and reverse commute programs. New Freedom - Defined as public transportation services and public transportation alternatives beyond those required by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 that assist individuals with disabilities with transportation, including transportation to and from jobs and employment support services. Presidential Executive Order 13330 on the Coordination of Human Service Programs issued by the President on February 24, 2004, creates an interdepartmental Federal Council on Access and Mobility to undertake collective and individual departmental actions to reduce duplication among federally-funded human service transportation services, increase the efficient delivery of such services and expand transportation access for older individuals, persons with disabilities, persons with low-income, children and other disadvantaged populations within their own communities. As a first principle to achieve these goals, federally-assisted grantees involved in providing and funding human service transportation services to plan collaboratively to more comprehensively address the needs of the populations served by various Federal programs. In their report to the President on the Human Service Transportation Coordination, members of the Council recommended that "in order to effectively promote the development and delivery of coordinated transportation services, the Administration seek mechanisms (statutory, regulatory, or administrative) to require participation in a community transportation planning process for human service transportation programs. In August 2005, the President signed legislation consistent with this recommendation to reauthorize Federal public transportation and Federal highway programs that contained provisions to establish a coordinated human services transportation planning process. This legislation, the Safe, Affordable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act, A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), created a requirement that a locally-developed, coordinated public transit/human service planning process and an initial plan be developed by 2007 as a condition of receiving funding for certain programs directed at meeting the needs of older individuals, persons with disabilities and low-income persons.

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

The plan must be developed through a process that includes representatives of public, private and nonprofit transportation providers and public, private and non-profit human service providers and participation by the public. Complete plans, including coordination with the full range of existing human service transportation providers, are required by Fiscal Year 2008

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

B.

Definitions of Federal Transit Programs affected by SAFETEAU-LU

The following is a brief description of the three Federal funding programs that are covered by the mandate, which requires the plans such as the one presented here. (1) Section 5310 makes funds available to meet the special transportation needs of elderly persons and persons with disabilities. These funds are apportioned to the states annually by a formula that is based on the number of elderly persons and persons with disabilities in each state. The New York Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) administers the program in New York State. Capital assistance is provided on an 80 percent Federal, 20 percent local matching basis. Examples of capital expenses include, but are not limited to buses and vans. In New York State, private nonprofit agencies are eligible receive program funding, and must demonstrate that they coordinate services for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. (2) Section 5316 JARC is a formula grant program to provide funding for local governmental authorities and agencies, and non-profit entities that offer job access and reverse commute services to transport welfare recipients and low income individuals to and from jobs, training, and child care, and to develop transportation services for residents of urban centers and rural and suburban areas to suburban employment opportunities. Job Access grants may finance capital projects and operating costs of equipment, facilities, and associated, capital maintenance items related to providing access to jobs; promoting use of transit by workers with nontraditional work schedules; promoting use by appropriate agencies of transit vouchers for welfare recipients and eligible low income individuals; and promoting use of employerprovided transportation including the transit pass benefit program. For Reverse Commute grants, the following activities are eligible ­ operating costs, capital costs and other costs associated with reverse commute by bus, train, carpool, vans or other transit service. Eligible activities for JARC funding include late-night and weekend service, guaranteed ride home service, shuttle service; expanded fixed-route public transit routes; demand-responsive service; ridesharing and carpooling activities; transit related aspects of bicycling; local car loan programs that assist individuals in purchasing and maintaining vehicles for shared rides; marketing promotions for JARC activities; supporting the administration and expenses related to voucher programs; using Geographic Information System (GIS) tools and/or implementing Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS); integrating automated regional public transit and human service transportation information, scheduling and dispatch functions; deploying vehicle position-monitoring systems; and establishing regional mobility managers or transportation brokerage activities. The Federal/local share is 80/20 for capital projects which include mobility operations, and 50/50 for operating projects. In New York State, NYSDOT is responsible for the JARC program administration to rural areas such as Allegany County. NYSDOT will use a competitive selection process to award grantees. While New York State procedures and guidance for this program are not complete at the time of the creation of this Plan, it is anticipated that Counties will be eligible to apply to NYSDOT for JARC funds, and that NYSDOT will select projects to be funded based on ones that meet needs identified in locally developed Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plans such as this one.

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

(3) Section 5317 New Freedoms is a new Federal transit formula grant program to encourage services and facility improvements to address the transportation needs of persons with disabilities that go beyond those required by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Funds can be used for associated capital and operating costs to provide the new services. Examples of projects and activities that might be funded under the program include, but are not limited to: purchasing vehicles and supporting accessible taxi, ride-sharing, and vanpooling programs; providing paratransit services beyond minimum requirements (3/4 mile to either side of a fixed route), including for routes that run seasonally; making accessibility improvements to transit and intermodal stations; supporting voucher programs for transportation services offered by human service providers; and supporting mobility management and coordination programs among public transportation providers and other human service agencies providing transportation. The Federal share for the net project capital cost of a project may be up to 80 percent, and not more than 50 percent of the net operating cost of a project.

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

C.

Allegany County Federal Transit Programs directly affected by SAFETEA-LU

The Allegany County Federal Transit Programs directly affected by SAFETEA-LU are as follows: Section 5310 ­ Elderly Individuals and Persons with Disabilities Currently there are two transportation providers that are supported by funding under FTA Program Section 5310 for needed transportation services, or vehicles to provide the services, to Allegany County residents. Future projects to continue those needed services and replace those vehicles providing needed services were determined as part of this Plan to be important to the County. The two Allegany County organizations that currently have vehicles funded by the Section 5310 program: 1. Allegany Arc - The Allegany Arc provides transportation for individuals with disabilities. The transportation department is a NYSDOT approved contract carrier that consists of 7 fixed run bus routes. These routes serve most of Allegany County on a Monday through Friday service schedule. The Allegany Arc transportation department also provides service through contracts to organizations, which include health care services, human service agencies, and County funded programs. The department also provides shuttle services for County events such as the Allegany County Fair, Wellsville Balloon Rally, and Andover Maple Festival. The Allegany Arc provides approximately 75,000 rides annually; including 4500 contracted rides and travels over 335,000 per year. 2. Allegany Rehabilitation Associates, New Horizons ­ A coordinated system of transportation exists for consumers enrolled in programming.

Section 5316 ­ Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) Allegany County does not currently have transportation services supported by JARC funding.

Section 5317 ­ New Freedom Because Section 5317 ­ New Freedom is a new program there has been no previous projects funded for services in Allegany County.

The FTA Section 5311 program is an important funding component for current public transportation services in Allegany County. Future Section 5311 funding is important to funding both the operations and vehicle replacement (and meeting other capital needs) for the County. In addition, the Plan has identified actions that have already started the coordination effort among current transportation providers, and additional actions that would improve coordination of services if the actions can be funded. While the Plan is formalized at this point in order to meet the Federal mandate, in order to be effective it must be flexible in its implementation as new needs are identified and unanticipated coordination opportunities are identified or planned efforts refocused.

Federal Transit Programs Legislation

III. Allegany County Demographic Profile

Allegany County Demographic Profile

Demographic Profile A demographic profile is essential to establish a snapshot of Allegany County and understand the relationship between key indicators and the local transportation system. The Allegany County Transportation Task Force must consider the following facts when planning, implementing and evaluating the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan: · County Geography · Socio-Economic Status · Population Centers · Population Trends · Educational Status · Employment · Vehicle Ownership When feasible, the demographic profile will segment the identified priority populations; including but not limited to seniors, individuals with a disability, and those seeking employment. Neighboring county demographic information will be obtained recognizing the important role of cross-county coordination. The following section will detail Allegany County's demographic profile. Information will be continuously updated to acknowledge changes in the environment, track and trend indicators, and predict future population trends. The Allegany County Transportation Task Force will utilize the demographic profile to appropriately plan, design and evaluate/monitor its strategies within this Plan.

Allegany County Demographic Profile

A.

General Description of Allegany County

Allegany County is a rural county located along the Southern Tier of Upstate New York, with an area of 1,030 square miles. It is bordered by Cattaraugus, Wyoming, Livingston and Steuben counties in New York State, and by McKean and Potter counties in Pennsylvania. The county's estimated 2005 U.S. Census population, 50,602, remained essentially unchanged from the early 1970's, with a slight projected increase of 675 from the 49,927. Allegany County is ranked 49th out of 62 counties per population. The population density is 48.47 persons per square mile. Allegany County has twenty-nine townships and ten villages. Population concentrations are in the villages of Wellsville, Alfred, Cuba and Belmont. Due to the extensive size and rural nature of the county, transportation is a challenging issue for many living outside of the concentration areas. Opportunities for employment, quality childcare, health services, human service agency programs, educational advancement, recreation, shopping and commerce are limited due to the transportation disadvantaged.

County Population: 49,927 County Houses: 24,505 Land area: 1030.2 sq. mi. Water area: 4.2 sq. mi. Industries providing employment: Educational, health and social services (32.4%), Manufacturing (16.7%), Retail and trade (10.1%) Type of workers: Private wage or salary: 73% Government: 18% Self-employed, not incorporated: 8% Unpaid family work: 1%

Allegany County Demographic Profile

B. Population- Those identified as transportation disadvantaged include segmented portions of the population; including but not limited to seniors and children. To design and plan interventions to meet the needs of these priority populations, it is essential to recognize the county's population by age category. 1. Total Population by Age Category

The 2000 U.S. Census showed the median age of Allegany County residents to be 35.0 years, with the male to female ratio at slightly less than 1:1. Census data also shows that 30.3% of the population is 19 years of age or younger. From 1970 to present, there has been little change in the composition of this age group. A little over fifty-five percent (55.6%) of the population is age 20-64 and 14.1% is age 65 or older.

Total population SEX AND AGE Male Female Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 34 years 35 to 44 years 45 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 74 years 75 to 84 years 85 years and over Median age (years) 24,942 24,985 2,798 3,267 3,866 5,250 4,737 5,040 6,902 6,505 2,431 2,131 3,748 2,328 924 35.0 50.0 50.0 5.6 6.5 7.7 10.5 9.5 10.1 13.8 13.0 4.9 4.3 7.5 4.7 1.9 (X) 49,927 Percentages

Allegany County Demographic Profile

2.

Total Population Geographically by Age Category

Residence location by age category demonstrates those 65 and older populating areas along Interstate 86 and in the township of Wellsville. This is consistent for health and human service provisions; hospitals, doctors, social service, and long-term care facilities. According to the Allegany County Office for the Aging, 2005 Annual Report, Percent of Persons Over 65 Years: 2000 housing options significantly influence an elder's ability to maintain independence. 82% of Allegany County elders own their own homes. 6% (459) live in group quarters, and 11% (2,044) live alone.

Unlike the aging population, children under 5 years of age are not clustered according to geographic location. This will be an important element when reviewing maternal/child health indicators, and morbidity and mortality rates, i.e., transportation barriers, childcare issues and isolation.

Allegany County Demographic Profile

3.

Population Trends- Population trends provide a hypothesis of future population changes based on monitoring population shifts over time. ACTTF can utilize this data to monitor and predict priority population needs.

Population trends indicate that the population is stable, but with little growth. The data also indicates that the county's population is living longer. In 1970, the population age 65 and over totaled 5,113. By 1994, this number had increased 40%, to 7,159, and stayed close to that rate in 2000 with 7,000. A Snapshot of Allegany County, produced by MEDSTATE Market Expert, illustrates that the fastest growing age groups are people aged 25-44 and 45-64. According to the 2000 US Census, those 65 years of age and older are twice the number of those 5 and under; 12.4% to 6.8% respectively. Age Distribution

Age Group 0-14 15-24 25-44 45-64 65+ Total

2004 % of Total 8,801 17.9% 21.2% 10,407 11,304 23.0% 11,650 23.7% 6,990 14.2% 49,152 100.0%

2009 % of Total 8,553 17.4% 10,295 20.9% 10,750 21.9% 12,358 25.1% 7,220 14.7% 49,176 100.0%

USA 2004 % of Total 20.7% 14.2% 28.9% 23.7% 12.5% 100.0%

Allegany County Demographic Profile

4. Individuals with Disabilities- Individuals with disabilities are a priority population identified by the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan. ACTTF efforts must embrace those with self-care and mobility limitations when designing, implementing and evaluating the Plan.

DISABILITY OF CIVILIAN NONINSTITUTIONALIZED PERSONS Persons 16 to 64 years With a mobility or self-care limitation With a mobility limitation With a self-care limitation With a work disability In labor force Prevented from working

Source: US Census Bureau - 2000 Census

32,051 908 560 590 2,863 1,057 1,442

Allegany County Demographic Profile

C.

Socio-Economic Levels

Income levels and poverty are a contributing factor to those considered transportation disadvantaged. Costs of quality, safe vehicles, car insurance, rising costs of gasoline and the necessity to travel great distances for gainful employment, childcare and educational advancement are all inter-related. 1. Income Levels

Income levels in Allegany County are among the lowest in the state. The 2000 Census showed the county's per capita income as $14,975, with median household income at $32,106. The New York State median household income was $41,763 in 2000, while the national figure was $41,990. The percentage of residents living below 100% of poverty is 15.5%, is up from 13.3% in the 1990 Census. A total of 13.2% of New Yorkers live at or below the poverty level, while 11.3% nationally live at or below poverty level. The percentage of families with children under 5 years living in poverty is 23%, while the number of families with a female householder and no male present, and related children under 5 years living under poverty is 59.8% The total number of children living in poverty in Allegany County is 20.9% while the New York State rate is 19.1%., and the national rate is 16.2%.

INCOME IN 1999 Households Less than $10,000 $10,000 to $14,999 $15,000 to $24,999 $25,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $74,999 $75,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 to $199,999 $200,000 or more Median household income (dollars)

Source: US Census Bureau-2000 Census

Allegany County 18,056 2,190 1,739 3,118 2,725 3,380 2,974 1,177 529 79 145 32,106

% 100.0 12.1 9.6 17.3 15.1 18.7 16.5 6.5 2.9 0.4 0.8 (X

The Bureau of Economic Analysis shows a per capita income in Allegany County for 2002 of $19,925 which ranks us 62nd of the 62 counties and is only 56% of the state average per capita income of $35,805 and 64% of the national average income of $30,906. The Bureau also reported that the 1992-2002 average annual growth rate of total personal income was 3.2% for Allegany County, 4.2% for New York State and 5.2% nationally. This slowed growth rate contributes to our last place state ranking of per capita income in 2002.

Allegany County Demographic Profile

2.

Poverty Status, Geographic Concentration

As seen in the following charts and GIS mapping, families living in poverty also are those most geographically isolated and dependent upon quality transportation. POVERTY STATUS IN 1999 Families Percent below poverty level With related children under 18 years Percent below poverty level With related children under 5 years Percent below poverty level Below Poverty Level 1,287 (X) 1,020 (X) 462 (X) Percentages (X) 10.5 (X) 17.2 (X) 23.0

Percent of Families Below the Poverty Level 1999:2000

Allegany County Demographic Profile

D.

Educational Status

1. Educational Institutions- Educational institutions should be recognized as part of the local county transportation system providing transportation services to children, one of the priority populations identified in the Plan. Allegany County encompasses twelve public and three private school districts including: Public School Districts Private Schools

Andover Central School Alfred-Almond Central School Belfast Central School Bolivar-Richburg Central School Canaseraga Central School Cuba-Rushford Central School Fillmore Central School Friendship Central School Genesee Valley Central School Scio Central School Wellsville Central School Whitesville Central School

Houghton Academy Immaculate Conception School Center Point Christian Academy

In addition, Allegany County hosts three higher learning institutions including Alfred University, Alfred State College, and Houghton College; approximate enrollment reported at 2,400, 3,000 and 680 respectively, each with an internal transportation system for student use.

Allegany County Demographic Profile

2. Educational Attainment- The direct correlation between educational attainment and transportation is significant. Those seeking to advance their educational levels must have reliable transportation to attend GED classes, adult literacy programming, vocational training, and/or to achieve higher education degrees. The 2000 U.S. Census showed that 16,263 persons age three years or over were enrolled in school. Among these, 3.8% were in preschool, 59.2% were in Kindergarten through 12th grade, and 37% were in college. Educational attainment status was available on 30,010 people, 25 years and over, who had ever been enrolled in school. Of these, 16.8% have less than a high school diploma or equivalency degree, with 4.8% having less than a 9th grade education. Of those ever-enrolled in school, 27.4% have an advanced degree with the following breakdown, 10.2% have an Associate's Degree, 8.7% have a Bachelor's Degree and 8.5% hold a Graduate or Professional Degree. The high school dropout rate for Allegany County is 16.8%, while the New York State rate is 20.9%. As reported by the US Census Bureau Report, Educational Attainment in the United States: 2003 the average earnings in 2002 for the population 18 years and over were higher at each progressively higher level of education. This relationship holds true not only for the entire population but also across most subgroups defined by sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Similar educational attainment levels and poverty status are reflected in Allegany County in the following table.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Population 25 years and over Less than 9th grade 9th to 12th grade, no diploma High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college, no degree Associate degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree Percent high school graduate or higher Percent bachelor's degree or higher

30,010 100.0 1,450 4.8 3,591 12.0 11,897 39.6 4,859 16.2 3,057 10.2 2,620 8.7 2,536 8.5 83.2 (X) 17.2 (X)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Summary File 3, Matrices P18, P19, P21, P22, P24, P36, P37, P39, P42, PCT8, PCT16, PCT17, and PCT19

According to the Economic Characteristics listed in the 2000 Census 7,066 individuals were living below the poverty level equaling 15.5% of the total Allegany County population. The census also indicates that 56.4% of the population 25 years of age or older does not hold an educational degree higher than a high school diploma or it's or equivalency.

Allegany County Demographic Profile

E. Employment- Gainful employment is essential to self-efficiency. Transportation barriers to and from one's worksite may prohibit one from being hired or maintaining their employment status. As well, employers may be significantly impacted by workforce limitations due to transportation barriers negatively affecting recruitment and retention of quality employees. 1.

Subject EMPLOYMENT STATUS Population 16 years and over In labor force Civilian labor force Employed Unemployed Percent of civilian labor force Armed Forces Not in labor force Females 16 years and over In labor force Civilian labor force Employed Own children under 6 years All parents in family in labor force

Employment Status

Number Percent

39,335 23,645 23,621 21,494 2,127 9.0 24 15,690 19,828 10,797 10,792 9,974 3,254 1,970

100.0 60.1 60.1 54.6 5.4 (X) 0.1 39.9 100.0 54.5 54.4 50.3 100.0 60.5

Employed civilian population 16 years and over OCCUPATION Management, professional, and related occupations Service occupations Sales and office occupations Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations Construction, extraction, and maintenance occupations Production, transportation, and material moving occupations

21,494 6,727 3,778 4,596 407 2,112 3,874

100.0 31.3 17.6 21.4 1.9 9.8 18.0

INDUSTRY Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining Construction Manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Transportation and warehousing, and utilities Information Finance, insurance, real estate, and rental and leasing

813 1,356 3,588 510 2,176 866 461 505

3.8 6.3 16.7 2.4 10.1 4.0 2.1 2.3

Allegany County Demographic Profile

Subject Professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services Educational, health and social services Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation and food services Other services (except public administration) Public administration CLASS OF WORKER Private wage and salary workers Government workers Self-employed workers in own not incorporated business Unpaid family workers

Source: US Census Bureau ­ 2000 Census

Number 810 6,971 1,597 1,064 777 15,663 3,960 1,749 122

Percent 3.8 32.4 7.4 5.0 3.6 72.9 18.4 8.1 0.6

Allegany County Demographic Profile

F.

Vehicles- Individuals who require public transportation services may also be those who do not have access to or have ownership of a vehicle. Data pertaining to vehicle ownership may assist ACTTF to identify a target audience for marketing and research for public transportation services. Commuting to Work Number 21,021 14,922 2,461 156 2,433 195 854 21.8 Percent 100.0 71.0 11.7 0.7 11.6 0.9 4.1 (X)

1.

Subject COMMUTING TO WORK Workers 16 years and over Car, truck, or van ­ drove alone Car, truck, or van -- carpooled Public transportation (including taxicab) Walked Other means Worked at home Mean travel time to work (minutes)

Source: US Census Bureau ­ 2000 Census

2.

Vehicle Ownership Subject Number 24,505 1,536 6,466 7,430 2,577 Percent 100.0 8.5 35.9 41.3 14.3

Total housing units VEHICLES AVAILABLE None 1 2 3 or more

Source: US Census Bureau ­ 2000 Census

Allegany County Demographic Profile

IV. Research

Research

Research In order to fully understand the issues and influences that transportation has on the quality of life in Allegany County and to successfully design, implement, and evaluate the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan, the Allegany County Transportation Task Force will apply a systematic, multifaceted approach to its research. ACTTF will conduct both primary and secondary research, gathering both quantitative and qualitative data, and act upon its findings accordingly. Qualitative research involves an in-depth understanding of human behavior and the reasons that govern human behavior. Qualitative research appears in words rather than numbers and is useful for collecting information about feelings and impressions. Quantitative is designed to count and measure knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; yields numerical data that is analyzed statistically. Secondary research involves obtaining, synthesizing, and analyzing existing data about the problem statement and/or the population it effects. Secondary research will include, but not limited to: · Published literature and journal articles, · Public and private transportation provider annual reports · Legislation and policy reviews · Local Community Needs Assessments Primary research is the process of collecting one's own data, from designing the method of data collection through analysis and reporting on the new information. Primary research will include, but is not limited to: · Current local transportation system analysis · Focus Groups · Community Surveys · In-depth Interviews · Concept Mapping · SWOT Analysis The following section will detail the various research strategies and methodologies that the Allegany County Transportation Task Force will conduct to complete this phase of the Plan. As research is conducted, supplemental information will be added to the report.

Research

A.

Needs Analysis

A preliminary needs analysis was performed by ACTTF during the Transportation Stakeholders Meeting attended by 35 representatives from the following sectors: Health and Human Services, Allegany County Government, Local Government, Allegany County Transportation Providers, Representatives from Steuben and Yates County Transportation Planning and Allegany County Planning. During this meeting two activities were performed. Concept Mapping identifying the impact of a Coordinated Transportation System (Appendix Concept Mapping) and Needs analysis for the ideal coordinated transportation system (Appendix Visioning Session). From these activities the need for a coordinated transportation plan was most supported by its cost effectiveness, increase in services, economic benefits and possible funding opportunities. Eight workgroups were comprised to identify key elements for inclusion in the ideal coordinated transportation system. In addition to the continuation of the Allegany County Transportation Task Force serving as a guiding force along with needs for funding for the activities of data collection, analysis and management of the plan and application there of, the workgroups concluded the following needs for the transportation system. The elderly followed by those either employed or seeking employment were supported as having the highest ranked need for transportation services. Medical and social needs of consumers should be met followed by the needs of employees and those seeking educational services. Seven of the eight workgroups concluded that increased quality of service should be the primary focus to promote increased ridership of public systems. Finally, each of the workgroups concluded that the system would require a financial sustainability plan along with brains and vision for management.

Research

B.

Unmet Needs Analysis

The continued funding of replacement vehicles for Allegany ARC and ARA as needed are the highest priority need identified for FTA (5310) programs. The continuation of those services are significant elements in meeting the transportation service needs of Allegany County residents faced with mental or physical disabilities. Allegany County's existing public transit service also provides a significant level of transportation service to County residents. The current levels of FTA and NYSDOT funding are critical to maintaining those services. The Plan assumes that current funding of replacement vehicles and operating assistance levels funded by the FTA and NYSDOT (not from the Section 5310, 5311, and 5316 programs) continues to be available. A preliminary unmet needs analysis (Appendix Unmet Needs) was performed by ACTTF. Surveys were completed by 13 Human Service Agencies as to their consumers unmet transportation needs. The three highest indicated needs are as follows: 85% Lack of access due to geographic location; 69% Lack of services available to needed areas; and 69% Limitations of service times. One of the most significant populations identified with unmet needs to date has been residents living in remote areas as well as those seeking employment and higher education services. Funding to expand those services may be needed in the near future. ACTTF will collect more thorough data pertaining to consumers unmet needs from additional sources via surveys and focus groups. Target populations to be accessed include but are not limited to: Public Transit users, Non Public Transit users, Employers, and Senior Citizens. GIS mapping of existing transit service will be utilized to give further detail as to service area duplication that has potential to be reduced as well as geographical gaps in service areas.

Research

C.

SWOT Analysis: Strengths, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat

A SWOT Analysis is a strategic planning tool used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or in a business venture. It involves specifying the objective of the business venture or project and identifying the internal and external factors that are favorable and unfavorable to achieving that objective. SWOT is defined as: * Strengths: attributes of the organization that are helpful to achieving the objective. * Weaknesses: attributes of the organization that are harmful to achieving the objective. * Opportunities: external conditions that are helpful to achieving the objective. * Threats: external conditions that are harmful to achieving the objective

The Allegany County Transportation Task Force conducted a SWOT Analysis* on May 3, 2007 with key stakeholders with the following results:

Strengths · Use of Friendship House is free, accessible, and well established as a resource center · Adult Education Task Force · Recent research conducted by some Task Force members · Online resources and models from other successful rural transportation projects, i.e. the Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services. · Formal partnerships with local human service agencies · Wheels for Work and Allegany County Transit programs · The Federal funding/grants already in existence in addition to research at the Federal level to support the development of rural transportation programs, i.e. Job Access Reverse Commute (JARC); the Low Income Car Ownership clearinghouse (LICO) and the CAR Act (Creating Access to Rides) of 2005 Opportunities · Support from educational institutions · Expanding partnerships/bringing in key stakeholders · Experienced grant writers amongst task force members · Increased transportation funding · Increased trip cost efficiencies for programs and providers · Expanded travel · Service quality improvement Weakness · Limited resources · Task Force still in its infancy (Forming/Norming) stage · Some key players/stakeholders are missing · Reliable funding and sustainability · Confusing regulations in applications for funding and partnership

· · · · · ·

· · · ·

Threats Turfism Bureaucracy Lack of motivation/commitment Lack of leadership "Spatial mismatch of labor supply and demand" (Summers, 1986) Outreach to individuals who may be reluctant to use public transport because of the associated stigma Program by program variations in elig for services Billing, accounting, recordkeeping and reporting Funding issues, including differing matching ratios and funding cycles Service regulation such as prohibitions on crossing local or state boundaries

* See the "Research Section" of the Work Plan ­ SWOT Analysis; for next steps.

Research

D.

Concept Mapping

Dr. William M.K. Trochim, Cornell University, defines concept mapping as a type of structured conceptualization that can be used by groups to develop a conceptual framework that can guide evaluation or planning. In the typical case, Dr. Trochim establishes that six steps are involved:

The Allegany County Transportation Task Force has started to initiate Concept Mapping*, along with the additional research strategies outlined and described within this document, to help identify and establish a conceptual framework for its Coordinated Human Service Transportation System. A Key Stakeholders meeting was held on June 18, 2007 with representatives from all sectors of Allegany County. The results of the meeing will be used in the Concept Mapping Process. * See the "Research Section" of the Work Plan ­ Concept Mapping; for next steps.

Research

E.

Asset Mapping of Current Providers 1. Inventory of Services and Resources

In order to identify the multitude of community assets currently existing in Allegany County; ACTTF will conduct a Transportation Services Inventory to examine the three key components of the transportation system; human services transportation providers, public transit, privately owned, and neighboring counties transportation providers. This exercise will allow ACTTF to review the strengths existing in Allegany County in relation to transportation services. This information will assist in the development of the plan's design, implementation and on-going evaluation. Asset mapping: · Focuses on effectiveness and strengths of current services and the community · Builds interdependencies · Identifies means people and/or organizations can give of their talents, skills and resources · Seeks to empower communities to address critical issues Once we know the full breadth of people, organizational, and institutional resources that exist in the community, we can then move in the direction of identifying gaps in the current transportation system. Thus, as priorities "needs" are uncovered, we have excellent information about the rich pool of people and groups available to elicit for ACTTF membership. Currently, the following transportation providers have been identified through preliminary research: Human Services Transportation Providers ACCORD Corporation · Head Start · Early Head Start · Wheels to Work Program Allegany County Office for the Aging Allegany County Arc Allegany County Department of Social Services Allegany Rehabilitation Associates (ARA) Home Care & Hospice Salvation Army Public Transit/ Privately Owned Allegany ACT Neighboring Counties Transportation Providers American Cancer SocietyFinger Lakes Region

Faith in ActionSteuben County Hornell Area Transit (HAT) Veterans' Administration

As future transportation providers are identified or services are modified, information will be updated to the Transportation Services Inventory list in the Plan.

* See the "Research Section" of the Work Plan ­ Asset Mapping; for next steps.

Research

Human Services

Transportation Providers

Research

Allegany Arc 240 O'Connor Street, Wellsville, New York 14895 585-593-5700 Website: www.alleganyarc.org Email: [email protected] Allegany Arc The Allegany Arc provides transportation for individuals with disabilities. The transportation department is a NYSDOT approved contract carrier that consists of 7 fixed run bus routes. These routes serve most of Allegany County on a Monday through Friday service schedule. The Allegany Arc transportation department also provides service through contracts to organizations, which include health care services, human service agencies, and County funded programs. The department also provides shuttle services for County events such as the Allegany County Fair, Wellsville Balloon Rally, and Andover Maple Festival. The Allegany Arc provides approximately 75,000 rides annually; including 4500 contracted rides and travels over 335,000 per year.

Research

Allegany County Community Opportunities and Rural Development ACCORD Corporation Head Start and Early Head Start PO Box 573, 84 Schuyler Street, Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7605 Website: www.accordcorp.org Head Start and Early Head Start Allegany County Community Opportunities and Rural Development (ACCORD) Corporation is a nonprofit community action agency serving Allegany, Cattaraugus, and Wyoming Counties for over 35 years. ACCORD provides Head Start and Early Head Start services to children and families in Allegany County. Head Start is a comprehensive child development program for at risk children and families, which includes home and center based educational components; mental health and disabilities services; health and nutrition services; and family and community partnership services. ACCORD operates center-based programs in agency owned centers in Wellsville and Friendship and school based centers in Bolivar, Cuba, Genesee Valley, Rushford and Wellsville and serves families from across the county in the home based program option. The Head Start and Early Head Start programs consider student transportation between home and the center sites as an integral part of the program to assist in meeting family needs. ACCORD owns and operates a total of nine buses used to transport children to and from center based programs as well as to transport children and their families to socialization events, field trips, policy council meetings and parent committee meetings.

Research

Allegany County Community Opportunities and Rural Development ACCORD Corporation Wheels to Work Program PO Box 573, 84 Schuyler Street, Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7605 Website: www.accordcorp.org Wheels to Work A vehicle loan to assist TANF or TANF qualified individuals with the purchase of a vehicle essential for transportation to their workplace. Maximum loan is $3300. Current funding from the NYS Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance allows for 12 loans to be made in Allegany and 12 loans in Cattaraugus County. Community Solutions for Transportation funding by the Allegany Department of Social Services allows for an additional eight loans to be made to Allegany County residents. Applicants must be able to meet the following criteria and attend three seminars on car maintenance, personal finances, and safe driving. Wheels for Work Eligibility criteria: United State citizen or qualifying TANF alien; Resident of New York State; TANF or TANF qualified individuals (income less than 200 percent of poverty level); Employed and in need of a vehicle for transportation to work; Pregnant woman or minor child in the household or non-custodial parent; Loan repayment ability.

Research

Allegany County Department of Social Services County Office Building, 7 Court Street, Belmont, New York 14813 877-629-8104 Website: www.alleganyco.com Allegany County Department of Social Services All Medicaid applicants/recipients will receive notification regarding medical transportation at the time of application and recertification. DEFINITIONS Should definitions be required for terms not included below, the source for such definitions should be the Section 505.10 of the Social Services Regulations. Advance notice for transportation is required at least two business days (before 2 p.m.) in advance of a Medicaid service. When this advance notice cannot be given, such as in an urgent care situation, the ACDSS Medical Transportation Unit (MTU), attempt to arrange transportation, but cannot guarantee the ability to do so. In general, an intake will not be processed with less than two business day's notice; urgent care appointments are an exception. Eligible recipients are people who are Medicaid eligible at the time of the request. Provisional coverage does not constitute Medicaid eligibility. The need for transportation must be established via the Intake Form. Allegany County Medicaid nursing home residents are deemed eligible for transportation services. If an applicant is determined to be ineligible for transportation services, ACDSS will send a locally designed denial notice. In unusual circumstances in which an applicant appears to be Medicaid eligible and the need for medical treatment is extreme, the Department may deem a person eligible for transport prior to the actual date of determination. (Examples of extreme medical need include dialysis, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.) All such decisions are made on a case-by-case basis and require the express approval of appropriate Department supervisory staff. Emergency ambulance transportation means the provision of ambulance transportation for the purpose of obtaining hospital services for a recipient who suffers from a severe, life-threatening, or potentially disabling condition that requires the provision of emergency medical services while the recipient is being transported. Emergency transportation is usually obtained through a 911 call. Emergency medical services mean the provision of initial urgent medical care including, but not limited to the treatment of trauma, burns, and respiratory, circulatory, and obstetrical emergencies. Medicaid services are those services that are eligible for Medicaid reimbursement. If an individual provider is eligible for but refuses to accept Medicaid payments, the service will still be considered a Medicaid service. Medicaid will NOT pay for trips to grocery stores, court-ordered evaluations, social model day care for adults, day care for children, visitation with family members, AA meetings, TASA related services, employment and training programs, HLA blood testing for paternity, etc. If there is any question about a destination, consult the ACDSS Medical Transportation unit. Non-emergency ambulance transportation means the provision of ambulance transportation for the purpose of obtaining necessary medical care or services to a recipient whose medical condition requires transportation by an ambulance service. The ordering medical professional makes this determination.

Research

Non-emergency medical transportation means all trips that do not require emergency care and are not the result of an accident or emergent illness. This may include transportation provided in a range of vehicles, such as private automobile, bus, taxi, or ambulance service. Prior approval means the specific approval of the ACDSS Medical Transportation Unit for medical transportation. Such approval may be requested and/or provided either for individual, specific appointments, or blanket approval for a number of appointments. All medical transportation must have prior approval, except in cases documented as bonafide emergencies. Routine, service area requests are defined as timely requests for non-emergency medical transportation within Allegany County and contiguous counties, or Buffalo, Rochester, or Erie, PA. Service area means Allegany and the contiguous counties (Steuben, Wyoming, Livingston, Cattaraugus, Potter, and McKean counties). Also included are Buffalo, NY, Rochester, NY, and Erie, PA. Urgent care includes illnesses or injuries for which emergency care is not required, but in which a person should be seen by a medical practitioner at the earliest possible convenience. This includes visits scheduled on the same or next day due to sickness. ACDSS or its agent will verify the date and time that the appointment was made with the medical practitioner. GENERAL OPERATIONAL INFORMATION All medical transportation, except for bonafide emergency, requires prior approval by the ACDSS MTU. This prior approval includes verification of Medicaid eligibility and determination of mode of transport. Possible modes of transportation include but are not limited to: ambulance/stretcher transport, wheelchair transport, taxi, fixed route bus, other provider, provider and private vehicle. Medical transportation on weekends, evenings, and holidays is limited and requires administrative approval. Transportation to and from Medicaid services must receive prior approval by the staff from the ACDSS MTU, whose staff will review and approve or deny routine service area requests (see definition). When a Medicaid recipient requires emergency (see definition) ambulance transportation from the hospital to another facility, hospital staff will make arrangements for such ambulance transportation, with the bill for this service sent directly to ACDSS. Again, emergency transports do not require prior approval. The same information is required as in any request and must be verified by the hospital personnel. All air transport requests and billings will be reviewed by administration. If hospital or nursing home staff make arrangements for ambulance transport for non-emergency situations without prior approval from ACDSS, the hospital or nursing home making the arrangements is responsible for payment for this service. TRIPS ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICAID REIMBURSEMENT Medicaid incurs responsibility for payment only for trips made to and from a Medicaid service (see definition).

Research

In addition, ACDSS MTU will generally only assume responsibility for trips within the service area (see definition). Trips outside this area require a written statement from the referring physician that the medical service is not available within the service area. Recipients who choose to travel outside the service area without such documentation and prior approval are personally responsible for the costs of this transportation. ACDSS is responsible to assure that recipients can access medical services, but not necessarily to pay for the transportation. The costs of Medicaid transportation will be covered under the following conditions. · Transportation will be arranged for MA recipients who provide advance notice (see definition) and receive prior approval (see definition). All appointments must be confirmed on a doctor's pre-printed prescription pad, with the date and time of appointment noted. This documentation must be submitted to the transportation provider on the return trip. Failure to provide documentation of the medical appointment will result in the Medicaid recipient being charged for the cost of the trip, regardless of mode of transport. Transportation provided may include any or all of the following: - Fixed route bus. Ambulatory Medicaid recipients are expected to walk up to one-mile to/from their home or their Medicaid service provider to access a fixed route bus. Exceptions to this one-mile rule are made on a case-by-case basis. ACDSS MTU - Curb-to-curb service. Medicaid recipients living beyond one mile from a fixed route bus will be eligible for curb-to-curb service from their homes. The same is true for Medicaid recipients who are traveling to service providers' offices that are more than one mile from a fixed route bus. This special pick up/drop off may be provided by detour of a fixed route bus, taxicab, or by other special arrangement for this purpose. If a Medicaid recipient owns a car that is licensed, registered, and road-worthy, (s) he is expected to use this vehicle for medical transportation. Similarly, if the recipient has regular and consistent access to private transportation, (s)he is expected to use this for medical transportation. The Transportation Provider MA recipients who transport themselves will be eligible for reimbursement by DSS MTU, under the following terms and conditions. Requests for reimbursement must be made directly to DSS MTU, and must be accompanied by the following: - Confirmation of each appointment on a doctor's pre-printed prescription pad, with the date and time of appointment noted. - Completed ACDSS voucher. There will be no reimbursement for the first 100 miles traveled in any given calendar month. After the first 100 miles, reimbursement will be made at 20 cents per mile from the MA recipient's residence to the service provider and back, plus parking and tolls as documented by receipt, OR the cost of public transportation for such trip, whichever is the lower cost. All vouchers must be mailed to: Allegany County Department of Social Services Medical Transportation Unit 7 Court Street Belmont, NY 14813-1077 Payment will be mailed from ACDSS.

·

·

· ·

·

Research

When MA recipients must travel in excess of 55 miles (one way) to a medical service, it is possible to receive reimbursement directly from ACDSS for other related expenses. Such requests must be approved in advance by ACDSS, and are limited to the items detailed below. These costs may be paid for the MA recipient, his/her required attendant (one attendant), or his/her member of the immediate family providing transportation. Receipts must be submitted to ACDSS along with the request for payment. · Meals: Breakfast $2.50 maximum Lunch $3.50 maximum Dinner $5.00 maximum · Lodging: As determined on a case-by-case basis. In order to ensure timely transportation to obtain prescriptions (medications and/or durable medical equipment), Medicaid recipients are expected to use a pharmacy or other provider close to either the doctor's office or their homes. Recipients are expected to ask the doctor to phone in a prescription at the time of the appointment; this will help protect against unnecessary transportation delays. ARRANGING FOR MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION The ACDSS MTU is solely responsible for prior approvals of medical transportation. If a request for medical transportation is received by staff in the Temporary Assistance or Child Support unit, the person needing the transportation should be directed to call the Medical Transportation Unit. If a Caseworker or Senior Caseworker in the Services unit receives a request for medical transportation, the worker receiving the request should document as much information as possible, and submit that information to the Medical Transportation Unit for approval/denial and transmission to a provider. The ACDSS MTU will verify Medicaid eligibility via the WMS system prior to approving medical transportation. (Eligibility for other services does not guarantee MA eligibility.) Last minute urgent care appointments must be discussed with a manager for consideration of approval. Although CDSS MTU will attempt to arrange for transportation to and from such appointments, there is no guarantee that such arrangements will be made. Recipients may be asked to reschedule non-emergency appointments to coincide with other planned transports. The ACDSS MTU will assist with this when necessary. Medical transportation providers will wait up to five minutes for any rider. If a rider delays more than five minutes, we will assume that the ride is no longer needed. We require a doctor's statement stating the medical reason for an attendant to accompany. Should an MA recipient have any limitations that may affect his/her ability to travel, those limitations must be made known at the time that transportation is requested. This includes requests for an aide or attendant (one aide/attendant per recipient). Children under 16 years of age must have written parental consent to ride unattended. We require a doctor's statement stating the medical reason for an attendant to accompany.

Research

Blanket Approvals If a blanket approval is granted, documentation must be maintained of the start and end dates. Blanket approvals may be authorized for a maximum of six months. The documentation must also indicate the type(s) of service(s) covered by the blanket approval, for example: ARA, dialysis, physical therapy, or cancer treatment. It is the MA recipient's responsibility to contact DSS MTU regarding transportation arrangements for the approved service(s) during the approval period. Medical appointments not noted as included in the blanket approval require per-appointment approval. (Example: John Jones has a blanket approval for participation at ARA. He needs to see a dentist. He must call the ACDSS MTU and receive a separate approval for transportation to/from the dental appointment. ) Blanket approvals are generally only granted for such ongoing, regularly scheduled medical appointments as the types noted above. Requests for a wider variety of medical care require the express approval of the ACDSS MTU. If a recipient abuses a blanket approval (e.g. no shows), the person's blanket approval will be rescinded, and (s) he will revert to per-appointment approval. Confirmation and Cancellation All Medicaid recipients must call the ACDSS MTU, between 2:00 and 4:00 pm the day before a scheduled trip to confirm the appointment and verify pick up and return times (see Steps to Arrange for Transportation below). Failure to confirm the appointment in this manner cancels the ride. Recipients must also call the ACDSS MTU to cancel any ride if they are unable to take a scheduled trip. In limited instances, such as dialysis patients, the Transportation Coordinator will notify the recipient that (s) he does not need to confirm each trip, but rather only confirm changes or cancellations. If a recipient does not have a telephone, or otherwise has a legitimate reason for not being able to confirm an appointment, this must be stated at the time of requesting transportation. The Transportation Coordinator on a case-by-case basis will make determinations. If an exception has been made for a recipient that allows him/her to not call to confirm the appointment, and (s) he subsequently abuses the privilege by not being available for the appointment, the privilege may be revoked. Recipients who fail to meet their ride as confirmed must discuss the no show with an approved ACDSS staff as outlined below. No Shows and Other Problems To help ensure wellness among Medicaid recipients, strong positive relationships between the ACDSS and medical practitioners, and cost effectiveness for the medical transportation providers, it is important for Medicaid recipients to follow through on all scheduled appointments. The ACDSS has therefore instituted a policy to encourage this follow through and eliminate no shows. Similarly, to protect other Medicaid recipients, transportation providers, and other interested parties, it is important for all Medical transportation users and providers to conduct themselves in a safe and responsible manner during all transports. Examples of unsafe and irresponsible behavior include but are not limited to: use of profanity or other offensive language, verbally or physically threatening a driver or rider, language or behavior of a sexual nature toward a driver or rider, and any criminal behavior. Further, on occasion, despite reasonable precautions, physical accidents that actually or potentially result in injury occur.

Research

For the purposes of this section, all of the above problems will be referred to as incidents. The procedures that follow will be used in the handling of incidents. ACDSS reserves the right to skip any step(s) in this procedure in response to a more serious incident. 1st incident · Transportation Provider provides ACDSS with a written incident report. · If a rider problem, ACDSS sends standard letter, reinforcing follow through and informing the recipient that future incidents will require a face-to-face discussion with ACDSS staff. · If a provider problem, the ACDSS MTU discusses problem with provider, including plan to avoid future problems. 2nd incident · Transportation Provider provides ACDSS with a written incident report. · If a rider problem, ACDSS contacts recipient (by phone, if possible) scheduling face-to-face interview. Interview discussion includes importance of appropriate behavior while receiving medical transportation and outcomes of failure to comply. Recipient receives written notice at time of interview. · If a provider problem, ACDSS MTU meets with the provider, requiring a written corrective action plan. · Date of interview must be documented. 3rd incident · Transportation Provider provides ACDSS with a written incident report. · If a rider problem, ACDSS requires face-to-face meeting with recipient prior to any more medical transportation trips. Meeting again stresses importance of appropriate behavior, and outcomes of failure to comply. Notice includes Fair Hearing information. · If a provider problem, ACDSS MTU sends provider notification of cancellation of qualifications. Trips Outside the County Most travel to Buffalo, Rochester, Gowanda, and other cities outside Allegany County will be limited. Travel to each of these cities will be arranged a maximum of two days per week. Medicaid recipients are required to make their appointments in these areas on the days that transportation is scheduled to them; if the recipient is unable to schedule his/her appointment on one of those two days, (s) he must discuss this with the ACDSS MTU. The need for additional transportation will be made on a case-bycase basis. We need a statement, preferably via fax, from the recipient's physician stating the medical reason why the patient cannot be treated in our common marketing area. Trips will be made to Buffalo and Rochester on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and to Gowanda on Mondays and Wednesdays. Transportation Providers will make trips to these cities each of the noted days, based upon documented need. Riders traveling to these more distant locales will travel as a group, and should therefore be prepared for meal times, extended wait times, etc. These schedules are subject to modification.

Research

Steps Needed in Arranging Transportation 1. Medicaid recipient seeking medical transportation contacts ACDSS MTU for prior approval at least two business days in advance of appointment. ACDSS MTU will complete an Intake Form. 2. Based on information provided on the Intake Form and their experience with the recipient and his/her location, the ACDSS MTU determines if the recipient can take a fixed route bus or needs special arrangements, making those special arrangements when needed. 3. Medicaid recipient calls the ACDSS MTU between 2:00 and 4:00 pm on the business day before transport to confirm the trip and obtain information about pickup and return times. Steps Needed in Arranging Own Transportation 1. Medicaid recipient contacts the ACDSS MTU for prior approval at least two business days in advance of the appointment. 2. ACDSS MTU completes Intake Form and provides needed vouchers and related forms. 3. Medicaid recipient mails completed forms to ACDSS MTU at the end of month for reimbursement.

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Allegany County Office for the Aging 17 Court Street, Belmont, New York 14813 585-268-9390 or 1-866-269-9390 Email: [email protected] Website: www.alleganyco.com Allegany County Office for the Aging OFA provides expert information, assistance and services for Allegany County residents 60 years of age and older and their caregivers. Services include nutrition, in-home services, housing assistance, benefits assistance, transportation, referrals and advocacy. OFA receives federal funding under the Older Americans Act and state funding through the New York State Office for the Aging. Local matching funds are provided by Allegany County and generated partly by donations and participant contributions. The OFA operates a volunteer transportation service program with 75 volunteers. Transportation is provided to medical appointments, grocery stores, pharmacies and banks. Volunteers are reimbursed at the I.R.S. rate, a total of $20,580. In 2006 volunteers provided 3,701 rides to 134 people giving 2,780 hours of service. The OFA also contracts with Allegany Arc to provide rides to the Wellsville Community Center for senior participants.

Research

HomeCare & Hospice Transportation Services 118 North Main Street, Wellsville, New York 14895 585-593-7600 or 1-800-464-7015 Email: [email protected] Website: www.communitycarewny.org HomeCare & Hospice HomeCare & Hospice Transportation (HomeBound Wheels) is an assisted non-emergency medical transportation service, which serves the Genesee, Wyoming, Cattaraugus, and Allegany County areas. They currently have contracts in force with the Cattaraugus County Department of Social Services and with Private Pay individuals. Present vehicle inventory includes: two station wagons and one wheelchair accessible van for transporting patients/clients. All drivers are Certified Home Health Aides. Hours of operation vary based on patient/client need. Transportation for patients/clients is provided to distances as far away as Jamestown, Buffalo, Rochester, and all points between. In order to transport an individual, they must require assistance to and from their home to the vehicle. The only transport allowed is to medically necessary appointments such as physician visits, dental visits, therapy visits, and etc. The NYSDOT only allows for transport of persons receiving other services (i.e. LPN, Home Health Aide, Personal Care Aide, or Home Attendant) in the wheelchair accessible van. Transportation to any individual who meets the other criteria is available in one of the two station wagons. Charges for services are as follows: Wagon $22.03 flat rate + $1.11 per loaded mile Van $25.43 flat rate + $1.18 per loaded mile Prices include all travel time and any assistance needed from pick-up location to point of service. Aide wait time, if required (patient requires attendant after arrival at point of service) $15.00 per hour.

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Salvation Army PO Box 549, 25 East Pearl Street, Wellsville, New York 14895 585-593-2640 Email: [email protected] Website: www.salvationarmyusa.org Salvation Army Transportation available to youth enrolled in Kids Café After School Nutritional Program: Tues and Wed from Wellsville Elementary

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Public Transit/ Privately Owned

Transportation Providers

Research

Allegany County Transit (ACT) 268-5680 or 1-800-284-2415 Email: [email protected] Allegany County Transit Allegany County Transit (ACT) is provided under contract by a private operator, First Transit, Inc. Transfer service to Hornell Area Transit is available through Allegany County Transit (ACT). Extended service coverage provided through the transfer option allows Allegany County residents to access the Steuben County area. ACT also makes available transfers in Belmont to Shortline Bus System to take passengers to the Elmira Binghamton area. Allegany County Transit is a mass public transportation system consisting of fixed route services and route deviation services. All services are available to the general public. Fixed route services travels throughout Allegany County Monday through Friday. Transportation is available to Cattaraugus County on fixed route service and to Steuben County via transfer with Hornell Area Transit. A.C.T. will link with Shortline in Belmont to take passengers to the Elmira Binghamton area. Fixed Route service fares are $1.00 per boarding and $0.50 for senior citizens (over 60 years old) and disabled. Exact fares are required. Agencies and others may decide to use tokens instead of cash for their clients, in this case, $1.00 and $0.50 tokens can be purchased through A.C.T. and dispersed to riders by the agency who purchased them. Monthly passes are available for fixed route services for only $30.00 per month with unlimited rides. Riders must present pass to driver while boarding. Call A.C.T. to obtain passes. Passes must remain in the riders possession during entire trip. Time points are indicated in the schedules. Potential passengers may "Flag" or motion to the regular route A.C.T. drivers for a ride. Drivers will stop at any location that is safe to do so. You must be visible to the driver. If we don't see you, the driver will continue on his/he route. (Drivers on Medicaid runs will not stop for regular route customers.) Riders requiring mobility aides (wheelchairs) should call the A.C.T. office 24 hours ahead of their appointment to ensure timely service. Route Deviation is when the driver deviates off their fixed route up to ¾ of a mile to embark passengers at their door. The fare for this service is $2.00 per boarding and requires the rider to call the A.C.T. office.

Table 1 - ACT Property System Characteristics

System Allegany County Transit, ACT Annual Ridership N/A Basic Coverage Belmont, Fillmore, Friendship, Olean, Whitesville, Alfred, Wellsville, Angelica, Belfast, Scio, Caneadea, Houghton, Rushford, Black Creek, Little Genesee, Ceres, Bolivar, Allentown, Alfred Station, Andover, Bolivar, Richburg, Cuba, Friendship, Belvidere, Whitesville, Hallsport, Stannards, Shongo, and Short Track (Allegany County)

General info: Appendix Routes: Appendix

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Neighboring Counties

Transportation Providers

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American Cancer Society Lakes Region 1400 Winton Road North, Rochester, NY 14609-5896 (800) 227-2345 Website: www.cancer.org American Cancer Society Transportation assistance with cancer related appointments. Fee: None

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Faith in Action Steuben PO Box 117, 20 Broadway, Hornell, New York 14843 (607) 324-1138 Email: [email protected] Website: www.fiavolunteers.org Faith in Action Primarily assist the frail, elderly and disabled (60+ years of age) who have no other means to get transportation. Transportation services are offered door-to-door. Services are provided by volunteer drivers who use their own vehicles. Volunteers offer any transportation assistance that helps individuals continue living independently (medical, nutritional, and limited social needs.) Service Area: Western Steuben/Eastern Allegany Counties

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Hornell Area Transit (607) 324-7910 Website: www.hatrides.com Email: [email protected] Hornell Area Transit Hornell Area Transit operates 5 routes, four of which operate on Saturday- times of service vary with each route but basically run from 6 or 8 AM to 4:30-6:30 PM. The Alfred route serves both colleges and the downtown Village of Alfred, thus allowing for transfers to and from the Allegany County Transit (ACT). This affords the passenger opportunities to travel within 2 counties via the various public transportation systems available. Our schedules are available for downloading from hatrides.com. Monthly and Student passes are available for purchase. A detailed description of the transit operator and its service coverage is provided in Appendix.

System Hornell Transit Area Annual Ridership 116,542 Basic Coverage Alfred State, Town of Alfred, Alfred University (Allegany Co.), Canaseraga, City of Hornell, Village of Arkport, Town of Hornellsville, Almond, Town of Avoca, Village of Bath, Village and Town of Canisteo, Village and Town of Cohocton, Village and Town of Wayland (Steuben County)

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VA Medical Center, Bath 76 Veterans Avenue, Bath, New York 14810 (607) 664-4000 Website: www.va.gov/visns/visn02 VA Medical Center Disabled American Vets: Riders do not need to be disabled vets in order to use the services. Two weeks notice is requested. No oxygen or wheelchairs and patients must be able to enter/exit van by self. Transportation by volunteer drivers is available to the Bath VA from Elmira, Corning, Bath, Wellsville & Hornell. From Elmira, Corning, Bath: (607) 734-0583; From Wellsville, Hornell: (607) 664-4780. Patient Transportation Assistance: Provides transportation for VA Medical Center Patients traveling to and from scheduled appointments at VA Health Care Facilities throughout upstate NY. (Van rides and special mode transportation for veterans with special travel needs.) Patients must have a scheduled appointment and may be subject to VA travel eligibility guidelines.

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F.

Service Provider Operations and Capacity 1. Vehicle Fleet Status and Evaluation

In a coordinated setting, maintaining accurate and timely information on vehicle fleets is important in order for all coordination participants to be confident about the reliability and safety of the coordinated services system being provided. Further, especially during the initial coordination efforts, accurate information on all vehicles available for service delivery in relation to service requirements is necessary. ACCTF will create a common form that all participating organizations and other transportation service providers will complete. The form will include but is not limited to the following information for each organization providing direct transportation service: · Organization contact information: name, mailing address, phone, fax, contact person and email address · Types of Transportation service provided (fixed, rail, paratransit, on demand) · Eligibility requirements or prohibitive for ridership · Provision of service defined as direct or contracted · General fleet characteristics - for each vehicle the following information will be collected: - Manufacturer - Model - Year - Purchase price - Sources of funding (local, state, federal) - Odometer reading - Date of reading - Type of vehicle (automatic, van, light transit, transit) - Physical length of vehicle - Seating capacity ­ seated and wheelchair - Rating of operating condition (excellent, good, fair, poor) - Year of scheduled replacement - Additional features Broader considerations within the inventory survey will also be considered such as: · Use characteristics of vehicles (days and times of use) · Availability of vehicles for sharing among organizations · Opportunities for sale and re-use of older vehicles in lighter duty circumstances · Support of volunteer or small community programs

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2.

Provider Interest in Coordination and Resource Sharing

Additional information will be gathered through the use of one on one interviews and surveys to collect information pertaining to transportation service providers potential interest in the following coordination efforts specific to resource sharing: · Pooling of financial resources · Joint use, pooling or sharing of vehicles among agencies · Purchasing of vehicles cooperatively · Centralized fueling of vehicles · Centralized maintenance services for vehicles · Centralized scheduling of passenger trips · Contracting to purchase transportation service vs. continued to operation · Contracting to provide transportation service to other agencies needing service

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3.

Volunteers

Volunteers can save money for transportation agencies and can provide services that would not otherwise be available. Individuals whose travel needs may be poorly served by traditional transit and paratransit operations may be served through the use of volunteers. Funding and other resources need to be scaled to specific plans for volunteer involvement. Areas to be considered for data collection include but are not limited to: · Availability (current or future) · Public interest · Recruitment · Training · Local conditions · Size of geographic area to be covered · Level of travel demand · Transportation reimbursement · Liability concerns · Driver incentives Many transportation services have successfully used volunteers. Some of the larger and more successful efforts include those in Riverside County, California and Portland Oregon. The Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project (TRIP) complements public transportation services and will be investigated along with other logic models for application of expanded volunteer transportation services.

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4.

GIS Mapping System

A geographic information system (GIS) is a system for capturing, storing, analyzing and managing data and associated attributes which are spatially referenced to the earth. In the strictest sense, it is a computer system capable of integrating, storing, editing, analyzing, sharing, and displaying geographically-referenced information. A database model of a network of roads and related features is a form of GIS data that is used for vehicle navigation systems. Such a map database is a vector representation of a given road network including road geometry (segment shape), network topology (connectivity) and related attributes (addresses, road class, etc). Geographic Data Files (GDF) is an ISO standard for formulating map databases for navigation. An Automotive navigation system will combine map-matching, GPS coordinates, and Dead Reckoning to estimate the position of the vehicle. The map database is also used for route planning and guidance, and possibly advanced functions involving active safety, driver assistance and location-based services. GIS Mapping may assist in the development of a Coordinated Transportation Plan through the following means: 1) Current Transportation System Assessment and Analysis- by overlaying current public and private transportation routes, gaps in routes and duplication in services may be discovered. By overlaying current public and private transportation routes with current utilization rates and priority demographic population bases can assist in the restructuring of transportation routes for greater mobility and utilization. 2) Consumer Transportation Navigation; i.e. Route Planning and Guidance- through an internet or phone-base system, consumers may better plan transportation routes according to travel needs; i.e. time of routes, potential route connections for greater access, etc. GIS Mapping is included in technology opportunities under Research and Mobility Plan in the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan.

Research

G.

Consumer Perspective 1. Consumer Survey Analysis

Community Surveys will be distributed through community events and via Allegany County Transportation Task Force members; including but not limited to public transportation providers, private transportation providers, health and human service agencies, government agencies, adult education providers, and those serving priority populations; seniors, individuals with disabilities, and those seeking employment. Although sampling will not be conducted on a random basis; a broad mix of respondents will represent a extensive range of perceptions from across county zip codes and demographics. Sample survey tools from the United We Ride Tool Kit will be identified and reviewed by ACTTF members to determine the appropriateness for local needs. Survey questions may be added when appropriate. Sample survey tools are included in this section. Using SPSS software, summary statistics will be calculated from the responses of the survey questions. AWSRHN personnel and ACTTF members will complete data analysis. A Consumer Survey Report will be drafted and presented to ACTTF to assist in the planning, implementation and evaluation process. * See the "Research Section" of the Work Plan ­ Consumer Survey Analysis; for next steps.

Research

2.

Focus Groups

Methodology Focus Groups are a qualitative data research technique where the group is defined in terms of purpose, size, composition, and procedures. The purpose of this study will be to listen and gather data about how people feel or think about a coordinated transportation system; including "Doers" defined as those who currently utilize public/private transportation and "Non-Doers" defined as those who do not utilize public/private transportation. Representatives from priority populations will be targeted for focus group research; including seniors, individuals with disabilities, and the unemployed. Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network, Inc. will recruit participants utilizing contact information from ACTTF members. Audience screening will be conducted upon participant registration to guarantee that participants met the defined criteria; (1) Allegany County resident, (2) Doer vs. NonDoer, and (3) representatives from the priority populations. Recruitment will be conducted in three steps: Step 1: Formal Invitation Step 2: Follow-up Personal Phone Call Step 3: Confirmation Letter To better accommodate participants' schedules, focus groups will offered at various times of day; including early morning, late morning, early afternoon, late afternoon, and evening sessions. Refreshments will be offered at each site and groups will be conducted in a relaxed, non-threatening environment to create a comfortable, conducive atmosphere for sharing ideas and experiences. In addition, focus groups will be offered on assorted days of the week; attempting to overcome any barriers for participation; i.e. work schedule, etc. Questioning Routes will be carefully designed to stimulate thought-provoking conversation, reviewed for clarity, and sequenced for flow and will be consistent throughout the Focus Groups, allowing for comparisons and contrasts. Each focus group will be digitally recorded. Transcripts and comprehensive notes will be created from the recordings. Focus Group data will be analyzed using the Long-Table Approach, which will allow the information to be studied; identifying themes and categorizing results. A full-report, including important quotes and recommendations will be provided to ACTTF for planning and evaluation/monitoring process. *See the "Research Section" of the Work Plan ­ Focus Groups; for next steps.

Research

H.

Best Practice Models 1. Coordinated Transportation Methods

Several case studies specific to applied coordinated transportation methods in rural communities are available through the United We Ride ­ Framework for Action as well as the Transit Research Board of the National Academies Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 101: Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services Additional information is available from The Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility, CCAM. Through their efforts a database has been designed to provide case study information of useful practices identified to be highly effective in meeting three service provision goals: increased efficiency, simplified access, and reduced duplication. Of this available information ACTTF will research further the logic models of applied coordination based on data research and analysis.

Research

2.

Coordination Planning Logic Models

Coordination activities have been implemented in various ways across the various states. Several common elements of success emerged from examining the results of each of these coordination efforts. The ideas/actions/items that have proven to be effective and essential components of the coordination process and could be applied are found within the following reports, supported by the Department of Transportation, which will be referred to throughout the coordination process. United We Ride ­ Framework for Action The Framework for Action is a comprehensive evaluation and planning tool to help state and community leaders and agencies involved in human service transportation and transit services, along with their stakeholders, improve or start coordinated transportation systems following the Goals set forth below: United We Ride Action Plan Implementing the Executive Order on Human Service Transportation GOAL 1: EDUCATION and OUTREACH To develop an education plan for coordinated human service transportation resulting in enhanced customer access at the local level for individuals with disabilities; older adults; and individuals with lower incomes. GOAL 2: CONSOLIDATED ACCESS To simplify access to transportation services and to enhance customer service through the development of a comprehensive and coordinated transportation system. GOAL 3: REGULATORY BARRIERS To reduce restrictive and duplicative laws, regulations, and programs related to human service transportation at the Federal level. GOAL 4: COORDINATED PLANNING To ensure comprehensive planning for the coordination of human service transportation for individuals with disabilities, older adults, and persons with lower incomes. GOAL 5: COST ALLOCATION To standardize cost allocation processes. GOAL 6: USEFUL PRACTICES To document successful strategies in coordinating human service transportation at the Federal, State, Tribal, and Local levels.

Research

Transit Research Board of the National Academies Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 101: Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services This report examines strategies and practices used to coordinate rural transportation services and identifies model processes used for local coordination efforts in rural communities. It is designed to enhance the abilities of rural communities to apply the benefits of coordination to their localities. The Toolkit made coordination easier by providing information, instructions and examples of lessons learned ­both do's and don'ts ­ from actual implementation experiences. The coordination process has a number of well-defined steps, stages or building blocks. These are similar to those described in transportation planning handbooks, in marketing and in operations research. The goals set forth are as follows: GOAL 1: Initiate the Improvement Process Form a working group, move forward GOAL 2: Analyze Existing Conditions Collect data; understand issues, needs and circumstances; define local conditions GOAL 3: Establish focus and Direction Agree on the problem, develop consensus, set direction GOAL 4: Design alternative Courses of Action Develop alternative coordination strategies and service designs GOAL 5: Assess Alternative Options Select the best coordination service option to implement GOAL 6: Implement the Preferred Choice Formulate action plans and implement coordinated transportation services GOAL 7: Evaluate and Improve the System(s) Review and evaluate progress; reconfigure services and strategies as neccessary

Research

V.

Developing the Mobility Plan

Developing the Mobility Plan

A.

Strategies for Development

The Plan has identified actions that have already started the coordination effort among current transportation providers, and additional actions that would improve coordination of services if the actions can be funded. While the Plan is formalized at this point to meet the Federal mandate, in order to be effective it must be flexible in its implementation as new needs are identified and unanticipated coordination opportunities are identified or planned efforts refocused. The Allegany County Transportation Task Force has made a good start with this plan. The task force is organized and has set goals, and the Plan has been endorsed by the Allegany County Board of Legislators. The first steps to be completed include: data collection and analysis, identification of duplicate services, as well as identification of consumer needs via focus groups and surveys. Upon completion of this integral piece of the Plan ACTTF will progress with addressing more integral parts of the coordination process such as organizational framework, expanded opportunities for funding transportation services to meet the needs of Allegany County residents and methodology for Allegany County and neighboring county coordination to reach fruition. The mobility plan may include but is not limited to including the following items: · · · · · · · · · · · Identification of the needs of the community or communities and all relevant interest groups Identification of unmet needs; from there determining which services will best meet those needs Tailor services to meet the identified needs of the community Offer the public, community and agencies involved in coordination efforts a set of products and services of true value Involve the public Establish systems that are easy to administer Approach coordinated transportation like a business paying particular attention to cost effectiveness Leverage funding Clearly define what services will be provided in contracts and when applicable, clearly demonstrate cost savings Focus on improved data collection and reporting allowing all parties to understand the full cost and service implications of their transportation decisions. Focus on the benefits that should be achieved

Particular attention will be given to coordination issues identified through preliminary data collection as follows. Further collaboration with surrounding counties transportation efforts is apparent for improving regional transit coordination. Continued integration of the Department of Social Services (DSS) and Allegany County Transit into the coordination efforts has also been recognized. While there is no known opposition to coordination efforts, these entities have limitations guided by decisions made through County negotiations. Endorsement by the Allegany County Board of Legislators may ease with these coordination efforts. Other than Allegany ARC it is not clear if any of the recognized Human Service agencies that serve clients only could coordinate services. The specifics of these circumstances are not known at this time. Centralized ride dispatch maybe a coordination improvement but logistics and funding is an issue that concerned transit operators, county officials and human service agencies alike. The issue of impartial ride assignment and the payment for services that goes with the ride are issues that will take time and cooperation to resolve if that objective is to be achieved.

Developing the Mobility Plan

Key local level success strategies to be considered during the mobility planning process include the following items: · Invest sufficient time to find out the best way to set up and implement the system to provide quality service · Work with individuals and agencies that are committed to coordination transportation and have access to funding · Be realistic · Build trust among coalition members, search for consensus · Identify the pros and cons of coordination · Look for alternatives to overcoming roadblocks · Establish a transportation advisory committee with persons and agencies who share a common goal of meeting local transportation needs for their constituencies · Generate support from local officials · Work closely with local decision makers to respond to changing markets and new opportunities · Cultivate partnerships establishing strong relationships with agencies identifying clear roles and responsibilities · Ensure that participating agencies are fully vested in the program · Secure funding to cover initial needs and to expand services once the initial funds are spent · Maintain an ability to adapt to changing needs and conditions Applying these strategies will lead to coordinated activities of a large number of different agencies that provide or sponsor transportation services.

Developing the Mobility Plan

B.

Core Elements of a Mobility Management Plan

INFORMATION BELOW IS AN EXCERPTION FROM THE MSAA FOUNDATION RESEARCH FINAL REPORT

Core Elements of a Proposed Traveler Management Coordination Center (TMCC) The core functions of an ITS-enhanced TMCC would likely include many of the elements presented in Figure 1 below.

Traveler Management Coordination Center (Physical)

Database

Contains data to support business processes: Funding, Eligibility Requirements, Fare Structure, etc

Data Dictionary

Contains definition of terms specific to Transit Services

Core Functions

Tracking

Connection Protection Asset Visibility Security

Fare Management

Invoicing Eligibility Fare Collection and Payment

Booking Scheduling

Figure 1: Core Components of a Potential Traveler Management Coordination Center

Developing the Mobility Plan

These components include the following: · Core Functions: These are the core functional elements, they include: o Tracking/Communication System Connection Protection Subsystem: minimizes traveler disruption at transfer points and facilities. Asset Visibility Subsystem: supports both scheduling activities and the provision of real-time arrival and progress information to travelers. Safety and Security Subsystem: provides facility, vehicle and passenger safety via equipment such as on-board cameras and collision detection, panic buttons, facility cameras, and automated activation of information and lights. o Fare Payment and Management System Eligibility Subsystem: automatically determines eligibility requirements and supports or denies service requests. Fare Collection and Payment Subsystem: automatically deducts fare payment based on passenger eligibility for program subsidies. Invoicing Subsystem: automatically allocates costs across programs based on preagreed formulae, develops invoicing reports, and minimizes preparation time and errors. o Booking System: e.g., reservations; allows access through a variety of means including 211/511, web, etc. However, must contain at least some options for human interface o Scheduling and Dispatching System: optimizes asset utilization and minimizes customer wait and travel time. o Traveler Information System Database: repository to support business processes. Includes information on funding, eligibility requirements, fare structures, customer information, etc. Data Dictionary: allows translation between systems and sub-systems and ultimately between and among funding agencies and transit provider systems.

·

·

The elements represented in Figure 1 simply represent a core set of functionalities. Actual implementation of a TMCC requires defining the relationship of this system relative to the customer, the transportation providers, and the funding agencies. Subsequent sections of this document explore potential definitions of these relationships, including consideration of both a physical and virtual approach.

Developing the Mobility Plan

1.1

Option #1 ­ Physical Center

The first option considered for a full-scale deployment of a TMCC was a physical system as depicted in Figure 2. Such a system was envisioned and advocated by the transportation provider stakeholder group. It includes actual tangible resources, a physical location, and its own dedicated staff. A participating transit agency or another entity could provide operations and maintenance functions. This concept has been used in Europe, where it is referred to as a Travel Dispatch Centre.

Funding Agency A

Funding Agency B

Funding Agency C

Traveler Management Coordination Center (Physical)

Individual Systems AVL, CAD, etc.

Database

Contains data to support business processes: Funding, Eligibility Requirements, Fare Structure, etc

Data Dictionary

Contains definition of terms specific to Transit Services

Individual Systems AVL, CAD, etc.

Core Functions

Provider A

Connection Protection

Tracking

Asset Visibility Security

Provider B

Fare Management

Invoicing Eligibility

Operations Booking Scheduling

Fare collection and payment

Operations

Customer

Figure 2: Proposed Traveler Management Coordination Center (Physical Solution)

Major elements of this potential system include: · TMCC ­ Remains as described above in Section 1.1. · Customer ­ Rather than interfacing with individual agencies, the customer now interfaces with a central entity or trip planner. This is similar to what is being proposed in the Oregon State-Wide Trip Planner. Interaction can occur through standard phone, 511 or 211 to human or IVR, internet, web enabled cell phone, PDA, etc. Experience (for example in the Reno-Tahoe evaluation) has shown that in addition to any automated system, users should be provided the option of reaching a human attendant. Subsequent to booking and scheduling a trip, the customer can utilize the TMCC to make changes to their planned itinerary or to receive real-time arrival information.

Developing the Mobility Plan

·

·

Transportation Providers ­ Under this model, transportation providers would be able to focus solely on operations. Interaction with other providers, with funding agencies, and with customer bookings would occur through the TMCC. Passenger pick-ups, routing decisions, and scheduling would be processed by the TMCC and provided to the transportation providers in real-time. Providers would continue to monitor their assets (where capable) and seamlessly provide this information back to the TMCC. Eligibility decisions would be made by the TMCC and invoices would be automatically produced. Funding Agencies ­ Funding agencies interact solely with the TMCC. Agencies provide standards, which are updated as necessary. Centralized billing invoices are produced by the TMCC. Strengths of the Physical Approach

1.1.1

A physical approach for deploying a TMCC affords a number of benefits to customers, transportation providers, and funding agencies. Among the potential benefits that would be largely unique to a physical approach (as opposed to a virtual approach) are the following: · Provides one-stop shopping for the customer. This is particularly useful in situations involving chained trips when the customer must deal with different transportation providers for different trip purposes. Brings all agencies to same technological level. By centralizing advanced features such as scheduling, invoicing and eligibility, all participating agencies may benefit from these services without the need to make their own investments in this area. One caveat of course is that the individual providers would remain responsible for purchasing and operating any in-vehicle equipment. Relieves transportation providers of the burden and infrastructure requirements previously necessary to manage client bookings and scheduling. Transportation services are provided as an integrated system with mutual-aid support and improved asset utilization. Having a physical center can assist in streamlining customer eligibility screening process across (hopefully) all human service transportation programs. Weaknesses of the Physical Approach

·

· · ·

1.1.2

Some of the weaknesses or potential drawbacks of a physical approach as opposed to a virtual approach are as follows: · There is a potential reduction in personalized services. Many transit agencies pride themselves on the interaction and relationship of their booking staff with their customers. Smaller agencies dealing with a limited client base are likely to offer more personalization than would a larger, integrated booking system. This potential loss of the "personal touch" was raised as a potential concern in a number of the discussion groups. A physical approach is likely to be expensive. Such an approach would require the construction of a physical infrastructure, training of staff, etc. It is anticipated that these costs would be off-set by savings in moving to an integrated system. Start-up costs for a physical system would be greater than for a virtual solution.

·

Developing the Mobility Plan

·

·

Requires an extensive institutional paradigm shift. While the transportation providers that participated in the discussion groups seemed open to such a radical shift towards a centralized booking, tracking, and billing service, it is likely that such a change would require significant institutional, legal, and cultural changes. The length of time necessary to pursue a physical solution would most likely be considerably longer than for a virtual solution.

Given these potential weaknesses, the research team felt it important to consider virtual approaches for TMCC deployment also. These virtual approaches are discussed in the following sections.

Developing the Mobility Plan

1.2

Option #2a ­ Virtual Approach (with centralized hardware)

Under a virtual deployment of a TMCC, there would be no need for an extensive physical infrastructure or any new operating agencies. Depending on the sub-option selected, centralized hardware components (save a reference database) may not be necessary. Development of a virtual approach could involve a number of different components depending on the degree of decentralization desired. For the purposes of this study, we have developed a potential solution that includes the use of centralized, shared hardware (Option 2a) and a solution that, at the other extreme, would require no centralized hardware, with the exception of a reference database (Option 2b). The first of these options (2a ­ With Centralized Hardware) most closely relates to the previously discussed physical architecture. A potential solution for this option is presented in figure 3.

Funding Agency A

Funding Agency B

Funding Agency C

Traveler Management Coordination Center (Physical)

Individual Systems AVL, CAD, etc.

Database

Contains data to support business processes: Funding, Eligibility Requirements, Fare Structure, etc

Data Dictionary

Contains definition of terms specific to Transit Services

Individual Systems AVL, CAD, etc.

Core Functions

Provider A

Connection Protection

Tracking

Asset Visibility Security

Provider B

Fare Management

Invoicing Eligibility

Operations Booking Scheduling

Fare collection and payment

Operations

Customer

Figure 3: Proposed Traveler Management Coordination Center (Virtual Approach ­Centralized Hardware)

Developing the Mobility Plan

Major elements of this approach are as follows: · Core Functions ­ The core TMCC does not require an extensive physical structure or staff. Core functions, however, are still maintained in a central location. This central location might be a separate entity or at any one of the transportation providers or funding agencies. With no staff, the core TMCC is no longer responsible for booking operations. · Customer ­ Interacts primarily with one or more transit agencies, but can access information and book trips with multiple agencies through a single provider. Can still interact directly with the virtual TMCC to obtain real-time arrival information. Transportation Providers ­ Now interact directly with customers for both operations and booking functions. Continue to interact with other providers and funding agencies through TMCC. Also, transit providers have more flexibility to accept suggested scheduling options that may involve other agencies. Rather than acting as a cog in a fully integrated system, transportation providers may initially operate in a peer-to-peer permissive system. That is, scheduling requests to support other providers are made as suggestions and must be explicitly agreed to. Such a peer-to-peer form of operations has been successfully used in other ITS applications such as inter-jurisdictional traffic signal coordination. Funding Agencies - Continue to primarily interact through the TMCC, but now must contact individual agencies for any follow-up inquiries or required clarifications on bookings.

·

·

Developing the Mobility Plan

1.3

Option #2b ­ Virtual Approach (No Centralized Hardware)

Figure 4 represents another option for a virtual system of TMCC deployment and operations. This scenario represents the most de-centralized of all three options considered and is the furthest from the physical approach described in 1.1. Major elements of this option are as follows: · Core Functions ­ All core functions with the exception of a centralized data dictionary and communications network reside within the individual transit providers. · · Customer ­ Interacts only with transit providers. Transportation Providers ­ Maintain all core business functions, but coordinate with one another and with funding agencies through a streamlined communications network.

·

Funding Agencies - Coordinate with transit agencies using a common data dictionary and interface.

Figure 4: Proposed Traveler Management Coordination Center (Virtual Approach ­ No Centralized Hardware)

Developing the Mobility Plan

1.3.1

Strengths of Virtual Approach

Regardless of the particular sub-option selected, the virtual approach to TMCC deployment and operations presents a number of unique benefits over the physical approach discussed previously. These benefits include: · Lower deployment cost. With little or no physical infrastructure and no initial staff start-up costs, a virtual approach would be expected to be less expensive than the physical approach. · Quicker implementation. In a related fashion, it would be anticipated that initial deployment and operation of the virtual approach could be accomplished much sooner than under the physical approach. · A virtual approach facilitates an incremental deployment. This was a desired requirement of the technology vendor stakeholders participating in the MSAA foundation research discussion groups. · Supports a peer-to-peer permissive mutual-aid operating philosophy. This has proven to be an effective tool in building early trust between newly integrated partners and overcomes many institutional concerns and barriers. · Maintains personalized service offered by individual agencies. · Allows for mutual support to handle surge capacity. With multiple booking agents at multiple operations, providers could (in theory) provide mutual-aid support for booking and customer support in the same fashion that they might for actual operations. 1.3.2 Weaknesses of Virtual Approach

Some of the weaknesses that are unique to the virtual approach are: · Potential diminishing of opportunities for institutional integration. By allowing a peer-to-peer permissive operation, providers may be less inclined to integrate services and provide mutual-aid support. Potential increase in challenges afforded by proprietary systems. Because scheduling systems (and potentially other software applications) are maintained by individual providers, the virtual system may be faced with the challenge of systems that cannot easily communicate with one another. Maintains inefficiencies in multiple booking agencies.

·

·

Developing the Mobility Plan

VI. Implementation &

Monitoring/Evaluation

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

A.

Strategies for Implementation

Stages and considerations of the implementation of the mobility plan will be set forth based on the plan itself. An important element to the continuation of existing transportation service as well as the implementation of continued coordination efforts is the funding of FTA Section 5311 to the existing public operating system and capital needs. If that Section 5311 funding is assumed, the FTA Section 5310 funding of replacement vehicles for Allegany Arc and Allegany Rehabilitation Associates is the priority identified for the purposes of this Plan. If additional funding is available, ACTTF has also identified the need for the following items integral to coordination of services: · · Enhanced technology including but not limited to: GIS Mapping Software to coordinate existing and new public rider services through the data collection process. It is not determined at this point if all the dispatch function for the County will be centrally located through a mobility manager. If a central dispatch through the creation of a Mobility Manager position is identified as the approach to provide the public with transit information and referral to transportation services and assist with further coordination efforts, funding to support such a position as well as for dispatching software and services to coordinate existing and new public rider services will be required. Increased involvement by, and coordination with, County DSS, Allegany County Transit is needed. The Allegany specific coordination committee should consider\define the potential transportation needs that could be funded by the FTA Section 5317 New Freedoms program and FTA Section 5316 JARC. Creation of a marketing program (and identify State or federal monies to fund) for all the transit services in the County to give the various services a common identity and improve residents awareness of the services available.

· ·

·

Common strategies to be considered for operating and managing the services within a mobility plan include: · Listening to both customers and providers · Utilization of a lead coordination agency and a functioning mobility manager · Creation and delivery of safe, personalized and accessible door-to-door service · Maximization of services · Mobilize an effective volunteer network · Create a strong commitment to training · Develop a clear and comprehensive policy manual · Identify what state and Federal regulations will affect the volunteer program · Market the service · Establish sound managerial and business systems and procedures · Retain legal expertise and develop formal contract with participating agencies · Recognize and take advantage of opportunities that present themselves with the emergence of new programs and funding sources · Document and disseminate institutional knowledge The use of these strategies is proven for effective coordination with continued success.

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

B. Logic Model and Measures for Monitoring and Evaluation To ensure continued success of a coordinated system ongoing monitoring and evaluations will be performed by the appointed mobility manager and ACTTF jointly. Specific measurements will be difficult to pin point until the plan has been fully developed. Below is information pertaining to the United We Ride Logic Model & Measures January 2007. This information will be held with high regard when formatting specific monitoring and evaluation methods and outcomes. United We Ride Logic Model & Measures January 2007 Introduction Leaders in communities and states across the country have greatly improved mobility for millions of people over the last several decades. The shift away from providing rides to managing mobility is driving the success of fully coordinated transportation systems. Successful strategies coordinate human service agencies that provide transportation with public and private transit providers and involve stakeholders, advocates and clients. The attached Logic Model and Measures are designed as a technical assistance tool to help communities and states move their work forward (University of Wisconsin, 2005; W.K. Kellogg Foundation, 2004). This tool is designed to assist in the difficult work of coordinating systems and blending efforts across service delivery systems at the national, state, and community levels. These tools join the "Framework for Action" as a means of supporting local and state efforts. The Framework for Action is a comprehensive evaluation and planning tool designed to help state and community leaders and agencies involved in human service transportation and transit services, along with their stakeholders, assess and plan for coordinated transportation systems. The Framework for Action was developed by an "expert panel" in 2003. It focuses on a series of core coordination elements (such as working together, needs assessment, putting customers first, funding adaptations, technology, and moving people efficiently) to help groups in states and communities of all sizes assess their needs and plan their coordination efforts. The Framework for Action is actually two tools: one for communities and another for states. It is available at www.unitedweride.gov The Logic Model and Measures were also developed by an "expert panel" following input of myriad stakeholder and advocacy organizations. The expert panel is also finalizing a Matrix that is designed to take the Framework for Action to the next level by providing communities and states with tools to take concrete action and identify their progress along the way. These tools build on the same core elements as the Framework and assist in defining where a community or state is on the road to building a fully coordinated comprehensive transportation system. An overall logic model (shown below) is used to illustrate the work in building a coordinated system, and outlining the system changes and accomplishments that will occur along the way.

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

Logic Model Logic models are a widely used tool for program planning and change management. Logic models are useful because they provide a representation of the theory of change behind a program or initiative. There are varied approaches to the use of logic models, and no single best approach. Nevertheless the key concepts of most logic models involve inputs, outputs, outcomes and arrows that show the relationships between the elements in the model. For the purposes of consistency and continuity, the United We Ride Logic Model has adopted the following definitions (although they may differ slightly from other logic models used at the federal, state or community level). Situation The conditions, causes, circumstances, factors, laws, regulations, issues, etc. that need to change in order to achieve the desired result. Inputs Inputs are resources that an organization takes in and then processes to produce the desired result. Resources are the human, organizational, community and financial capital needed to accomplish the work. It is important to note that inputs will likely be affected by the assumptions and forces that influence organizations, stakeholders and others at the coordination table. Examples of related inputs for United We Ride include federal programs and funding, technology, and training. Outputs Outputs are activities, processes, events, tools, actions or technologies that are a deliberate part of implementing a program. Outputs are what are done with the resources, and they are intended to bring about the desired result. They are quantifiable strategies that may involve many types of tactics or work, often accounted for by their number. An example of an output would be the use of the Framework for Action to conduct a needs assessment and planning process. Outputs are frequently misunderstood to indicate success. However, if the outputs aren't directly associated with achieving benefit, they are not indicators of success. If outputs are accomplished, they should result in initial indicators of progress. It is important to note that outputs will also affected by the assumptions and influences of organizations, stakeholders and others at the coordination table. Examples of United We Ride related outputs include action plans, transportation services, and pedestrian access. Indicators Indicators are initial markers of success toward achieving the desired result. Indicators should represent a positive impact on the knowledge, awareness, skills, attitudes, decisions, behaviors, etc. of the target population (such as consumers or policy makers) or on system components (such as staff skill or change in levels of leadership). They are a result of the outputs and lead to measurable short-term change in the community or state. Indicators can be affected by a variety of external factors and influence, outside the control of those involved in the coordination effort (e.g. the resignation of a key leader). Examples of United We Ride indicators include number of partnerships, numbers of rides, and level of satisfaction with services.

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

Outcomes Outcomes are the positive changes in the community or state as a result of the indicators. Outcomes are the specific and measurable changes that will occur because of outputs and indicators. Changes may be in practice, policy, condition, action, service, operation, status, etc. Outcomes are a measurement of change in the short-term and should be designed to lead to long-term change (result). Most logic models measure short-term outcomes in a 4-6 year timeframe. Examples of United We Ride outcomes include communities with coordinated transportation systems or simplified point of access. Result The result is the intended longer-term, macro change that will occur in community and states systems because of the inputs, outputs, indicators and outcomes. Most logic models measure results in a 7-10 year timeframe. United We Ride related outcomes focus on increased mobility and accessibility.

United We Ride Logic Model

Inputs Situation

Transportation Needs of Target Populations Inadequate Capacity to Meet Needs Inadequate Awareness of Resources · · · · · · · 62 Federal Programs Funding Technology Consumers Travel Training Driver Training Needs and Resource Assessment .

Outputs

· · · · Action Plans Trainings Rides for Consumers Different Types of Transportation Services Pedestrian Access Technology Use

Indicator s

Gauge of Progress In: Number of Agencies Participating Number of Rides provided in coordinated system Number of Individuals reporting greater satisfaction

Outcome s

Measurable Change In: Communities with coordinated transportation systems Communities with simple point of access Customer satisfaction

Result

· ·

Increased mobility, accessibility and ridership through the integration of transportation services and resources.

·

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

UNITED WE RIDE Cross Cutting Performance Measures

Overall Desired Impact Goal: Greater ability to autonomously participate in all aspects of life through increased access to transportation services for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes. The way communities will reach this long-term goal is to provide easier access to more rides with higher customer satisfaction in service quality for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes.

Definition/Description: Access to transportation for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with limited incomes is critical for their physical, social, economic and psychological well-being. Transportation helps individuals to more actively participate in work, school, health, play, and other community activities. The interface between transportation, housing, health, and employment is a critical aspect of community life. As an expression of public policy--transportation provides equal access to services and opportunities in order to participate in all aspects of life. Improved access to transportation will lead to a decreased dependence on government funded service and enable people to live independently, participate in the community, contribute to society, and have an overall enhanced quality of life. To achieve this goal, United We Ride has developed three measures, an efficiency measure, an effectiveness measure and a quality measure.

Three short term goals and commensurate outcomes measures support the longer term impact goal: Goal 1: MORE RIDES FOR TARGET POPULATIONS FOR THE SAME OR FEWER ASSETS.

Measure 1: Increase the # of rides for the same or fewer assets for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes. (Efficiency outcome)

Definition: PM 1: To increase the number of communities and states reporting the use of shared resources (e.g., staff, equipment, funding, etc) between different agencies and organizations so that they can provide more rides for more people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes **. Potential Related Indicators 1.1: Increase the number of individuals employed in a senior staff position to manage and coordinate all aspects of human service transportation for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes between multiple agencies and organizations.

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

1.2: Increase the number of agencies and funding sources by community or state participating in a coordinated human service transportation system. 1.3: To increase the number of coordinated human service transportation plans that are developed and implemented between multiple agencies at the state and local levels. (The indicator at the local level is the development and implementation of the plan; the potential national measure is the increase in the numbers of such plans). 1.4: To increase the number of rides for persons who are older, people with disabilities and individuals with limited incomes. **Note: Communities and/or States implementing measures should consider collecting baseline data as appropriate. Selected measures may be included in studies conducted at the national level.

Goal 2:

SIMPLIFY ACCESS

Measure 2: Increase the # of communities with easier access to transportation services for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes. (Effectiveness outcome) Definition: PM 2: To increase the number of communities (e.g., urban, rural, other) which have a simplified point of access*-coordinated human service transportation system for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes so that they can have easier access to transportation services**. Potential Related Indicators 2.1: Increase the number of agencies, service providers and funding sources participating in a simplified point of access* to transportation services for consumers. 2.2: Increase the types of modes (e.g., bus, paratransit, taxi, volunteer, etc) included in a simple point of entry system implemented at the local level. 2.3: Increase the numbers of individuals with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and persons with limited incomes accessing transportation services within a simplified point of entry -coordinated human service system.

* Note: Simplified point of access is defined as an easy and single entry point for consumers who are accessing transportation services regardless of the target population, funding agency, transportation provider, or type of transportation service being provided. **Note: Communities and/or States implementing measures should consider collecting baseline data as appropriate.

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

Goal 3:

INCREASE CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Measure 3: Increase the quality of transportation services for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes (Customer Satisfaction outcome) Definition PM3: To increase the level of customer satisfaction reported in areas related to the availability, the affordability, the acceptability, and the accessibility of transportation services for people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes**. Potential Related Indicators 3.1: Increase the % of people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes who feel that transportation services are more available. 3.2: Increase the % of people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes who feel that transportation services are more accessible. 3.3: Increase the % of people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes who feel that transportation services are more affordable. 3.4: Increase the % of people with disabilities, older adults, children and youth, and individuals with lower incomes who feel that transportation services drivers are more courteous and helpful.

**Note: Communities and/or States implementing measures should consider collecting baseline data as appropriate. Additionally, achievable benefits as below noted by the Concept Mapping exercise facilitated during the Transportation Stakeholders Meeting will be considered as possible outcome criterion. Achievable Benefits - Benefits of a Coordinated Transportation system as recognized in the Transportation Stakeholders Meeting Concept Mapping · · · · · · · · · · · More Cost effective Reduce or eliminate duplication of services Cheaper per mile per passenger Promote economic activity-get consumers to stores Encourage businesses and employers to come into Allegany County Increase quality of life for Allegany County residents-able to go to stores, attend church/place of worship, access health care, and community programs/social events with independence Support employment and job retention-able to get to work at other hours-evenings and weekends, keep job Have a more reliable workforce-saves businesses money for re-training costs Access to educational programs-colleges, local agencies, GED programs, training programs, BOCES/adult education programs- which can increase employment Better access to quality child care Keep appointments and utilize local services-WIC clinics (use farmers market vouchers)

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Bus stop signs with route numbers, bus schedules, bus stop shelters-more information available regarding bus routes Could have negative affect on neighboring counties by keeping more dollars and utilization of services in county May allow for increased outreach to neighboring counties Increases choices for residents-increases competition Might increase local spending at businesses if county system is in place Increase attendance from outside areas to local social events-ex. Balloon Rally, Community festivals Transportation special events planning-shuttle buses to help parking and congestion issues Clear, easy to read bus schedules and information Easier for the consumers to access transportation if services are coordinated-provide travel training for consumers-educate users Useable and friendly service Increase moral for residents-freedom to make choices-decrease limitations-good impact on mental health Encourage youth to remain in county by increasing options/choices Decrease cost to agencies and providers if there is a sharing of resources-drivers training, maintenance Opportunity for additional grant funds that can be accessed as a joint system Increase summer school attendance-public school systems do not provide transportation to summer school classes-classes could be coordinated with the bus schedule/transportation schedule More practical system-increased mobility to different areas in county Businesses could look at flex schedules to coordinate with transportation schedules Improve other counties transportation systems-would have to look at their transportation system Private transportation providers could benefit-ambulance services, taxis Decrease improper use of ambulance/emergency services Provide accessibility to community events Increase advertisements for the transportation system Students could use transportation system to get to school-reduce cost to schools, increase availability for late buses for after school activities Increase use of technology to coordinate system-dispatch, LED signs Maximizes existing resources Continuing forum to address ongoing issues-shared responsibility Consumer needs to have a voice There is currently a stigma with the system-education/training would reduce

Transportation access seven days a week

Implementation & Monitoring/Evaluation

VII. Allegany County Transportation Task Force

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

A.

Completed Activities

The Allegany County Transportation Task Force has completed the following integral steps toward the creation of a Coordinated Human Service Transportation Plan: 1. Allegany County Transportation Task Force planning sessions on January 25, March 29 and May 3, 2007: (Refer to Meeting Minutes Appendix) Organizations participating in ACTTF: Allegany County Transit, Allegany ARC, ACASAPPAC, Allegany County Department of Social Services Temporary Assistance, ACCORD Child Care Services, Allegany Rehabilitation Associates Inc., Healthy Families Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties, Southern Tier Traveling Teachers, Allegany County Employment and Training, Allegany County Office for the Aging, HomeCare & Hospice, ACCORD Wheels to Work Program, ACCORD HeadStart, Wellsville Alliance Church, Houghton College Student Body, Houghton College Faculty, Public at large

2.

Workshops, Training and Presentations attended or facilitated on behalf of ACTTF: May 2, 2007 - Transportation Routing and the Elderly presented by St. Bonaventure University: Attended by Penny Cavanaugh, Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network May 8, 2007 - Spring 2007 Rural Roundtable presented by New York State Department of Transportation: Attended by Penny Cavanaugh, Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network and Dean McKnight, Allegany ARC May 18, 2007 - Overview Presentation to Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network Board of Directors, facilitated by Penny Cavanaugh, Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network. Board Members in attendance represent the following organizations: Cornell University Cooperative Extension, Allegany/Steuben Offices of Community Service, Allegany County Department of Health, Bath Area Hope for Youth, Inc., Jones Memorial Hospital, Steuben County Community Services, Steuben County Department of Social Services, Family Service Society Inc., Healthy Families Steuben, Alfred University, Hornell Area Concern for Youth, Allegany Rehabilitation Associates, Literacy Volunteers of Allegany County, Allegany ARC, Steuben County Public Health, Allegany County Department of Social Services, Wellsville Manor, Allegany County Office for the Aging May 22, 2007 - Overview Presentation to Key Allegany County Officials and Planning Representatives, facilitated by Penny Cavanaugh and Carrie Whitwood, Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network: Attended by John Foels, Director, Allegany County Development May 24, 2007 - Coordinated Planning Meeting: Attended by John Margeson, Allegany County Administrator, and Chuck Jessup, Allegany County Comprehensive Planning Committee Chairman, Penny Cavanaugh and Carrie Whitwood, Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

June 5, 2007 - Schuyler/Steuben Planning Session: Attended by Penny Cavanaugh, Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network June 18, 2007 - Transportation Stakeholders Meeting ­facilitated by Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network on behalf of ACTTF. 35 attendees as follows: S. Belmont, Director, ACCORD Child Care Services; W. Brown, director, ACCORD Economic Development Zone; P. Cavanaugh, Friendship House Site Coordinator, AWSRHN; D. Cimineri, Transportation Director, Yates County; A. Corwin, Hornell Area Transit; B. Dibble, Allegany County Legislator; J. Dickerson, Transportation Services, ACCORD HeadStart; B. Ellis, Community Planning; H. Evans, Program Manager, AWSRHN; J. Foels, Director, Allegany County Development; D. Gleason, CCTM, Steuben Area Rides; A. Glover, SNAP, Southern Tier Traveling Teachers; D. Hackett, AWSRHN; B. Hall, Allegany County Legislator; J. Henry, Transportation Supervisor, New Horizons; Nellie Hoops, Village of Friendship; D. Horan, Allegany County Medical Transportation Services; L. Lee, Director, Literacy Volunteers of Allegany County; E. Lowry, Discharge Planning, Jones Memorial Hospital; D. McKnight, Transportation Manager, Allegany ARC; S. Miletti, Rail Coordinator-Region 6, Dept. of Transportation; L. Oyer, Aging Services Technician, Allegany county Office for the Aging; K. Porter, Alfred University; D. Pullen, Allegany County Legislator; J. Reel, NYS Dept. of Transportation; R. Reynolds, Coordinator, Children with Special Needs; R. Scott, Director of Temporary Assistance, Allegany County; M. Simons, Outreach Coordinator, Healthy Families; J. Smith, Heritage Aflame Ministries; C. Whitwood, Director, AWSRHN; J. Tucker, Allegany County Emergency Services; M. Babchak, Executive Deputy Director, ACCORD; T. Brush, Wheels to Work, ACCORD; B. Tompkins, Allegany County Sheriff; S. Wright, PPAC Community Coordinator June 20, 2007 - Proposal to Allegany County Ways and Means Committee for support in submission for endorsement by Allegany County Board of Legislators ­ (Approved) June 21, 2007 ­ Presentation to Allegany County Comprehensive Planning Committee for Inclusion in Allegany County Comprehensive Plan facilitated by John Foels, Director, Allegany County Development July 7, 2007 - Draft of plan complete July 9, 2007 - Presentation of draft plan to key stakeholders July 18, 2007 - Presentation of plan to the Allegany County Ways and Means Committee July 23, 2007 - Presentation to the Allegany County Board of Legislators

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

B.

Membership The Allegany County Transportation Task Force has established an open door policy for membership and participation. The reflections below do not indicate the total of those who have been invited to participate but only those who have chosen to respond with interest. Two categories of membership have been established to indicate either an active role in ACTTF activities or as an informed participant. Although ACTTF anticipates membership to evolve as activities progress its current members are as follows: Active Members:

Name Lynn Oyer Monica Simons Joni M. Faulkner Tom Brush Harris Fitch Dean McKnight Shawnee Wright Tami Ayers Aimee Glover Sue Belmont Michelle Hollier Sally Dougherty Mike Brady Rada Biedakiewicz Karen Henderson Anne Corwin Bob Ellis Bill Hall Organization Office for the Aging Healthy Families of Allegany County HomeCare & Hospice ACCORD Wheels to Work Program Allegany County Transit Allegany Arc Allegany County Alcohol and Substance Abuse, PPAC Community at large Southern Tier Traveling Teachers, Inc. ACCORD Child Care Resource Referral Kinship Youth and Family Services ARA Wellsville Alliance Church Allegany County Employment and Training Center Houghton College Student Body Hornell Area Transit Allegany County Area Planning Allegany County Board of Legislators

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

John Reel Dave Pullen Don Horan Rose Scott Lisa Lee Deb Gleason John Foels Sherry Miletti Marlene Babchak Lynn Graves Karen Daugherty

NYSDOT Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Medical Transportation Services Director of Temporary Assistance Allegany County Department of Social Services Literacy Volunteers of Allegany County, Inc. Steuben Area Rides Allegany County Director of Development Rail Coordinator, Region 6, NYSDOT ACCORD Corporation ACCORD HeadStart Houghton College Faculty

Informed Members:

Douglas D. Burdick William G. Dibble Dwight R. Fanton Theodore L. Hopkins Karl D. Kruger Michael J. McCormick Timothy O'Grady Brent L. Reynolds Daniel Russo Norman G. Ungermann, Jr. Curt Crandall Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Chairman, Allegany County Board of Legislators

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

Ronald B. Truax Glenn R. Benson John Margeson Deborah DiNoto Cheri Clark Mike Burke Theresa Moore Assemblyman Joseph M. Giglio Charles Jessup William Piatt H. Kier Dirlam Ann Feightner Thomas Lecceadone John House Jim Gorman Bill Tompkins John Tucker Lindy White Pastor Joe Smith Richard Reynolds Ellen Lowry Hannah L. Young, Psy.D.

Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Board of Legislators Allegany County Administrator Genesee Community College at Arcade Adult Educational Opportunity Center Community at Large - Angelica Allegany County Department of Health New York State Assembly Allegany County Planning committee NYSDOT GIS Specialist, Village of Wellsville Cattaruagus County Office for the Aging Cattaruagus County Department of Social Services Southern Tier Traveling Teacher, Inc. First Transit Allegany County Sheriff Allegany County Emergency Services Allegany Rehabilitation Associates Heritage Aflame Ministries Allegany County Children with Special Needs Coordinator Jones Memorial Hospital Rural Justice Institute at Alfred University

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

Dave Prete Lori Ballengee Renee Johnson Mike Damiano Belinda Clark Larry Jonak Dawn Hermann Wendell Brown Deb Cimineri Bill Dibble Joe Henry Nellie Hoops Dawn Kelley-Cowher, MS

Rural Area Health Education Center Allegany County Department of Health Adecco Employment Services Allegany County Community Services ACCORD HeadStart BOCES Allegany County Employment and Training Center ACCORD, Economic Development Yates County Transportation Allegany County Board of Legislators New Horizons Transportation Supervisor Village of Friendship Town Board Allegany County Alcohol and Substance Abuse

Allegany County Transportation Task Force

VIII. Allegany County Transportation Workplan

Workplan

VIII. Allegany County Transportation Work Plan This work plan is an initial step-by-step guide that describes the technical activities that must be conducted to achieve the overall goal of developing a local Coordinated Transportation Plan; entitled the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan. As activities are refined by the Allegany County Transportation Task Force, addendums to this work plan will be updated to better define using SMART Outcome Objectives. SMART objectives are defined as:

· · · · ·

Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Time-specific

A well-defined work plan will allow the Allegany County Transportation Task Force to examine the detailed list of all tasks and sub-tasks necessary to complete the specific scope of work. As the work plan is completed, updates to the Allegany County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan will be distributed to the Allegany County Transportation Task Force membership for review and approval.

Workplan

Objective:

SWOT Analysis

Time Frame ACTTF members will be identified and 5/3/07 invited to a SWOT Analysis session addressing the Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats of: - current county transportation system - the concept of a local coordinated transportation plan - current ACTTF environment and influences Expected Outcome Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Completed. 12 Attendees participated in the SWOT Analysis session.

Activities Step 1- Identify and engage community representatives to participate in a SWOT Analysis; including but not limited to ACTTF members.

Step 2- Sort issues/factors

Ideas generated through the initial 5/3/07 brainstorming session will be categorized as Strengths, Weakness, Threats and Opportunities. SWOT Chart will be created to visualize this process.

Facilitator will work with attendees to 6/18/07 determine which statements are relevant and realistic to the current transportation environment, while clearly defining issues/factors that may be ambiguous. SWOT Analysis Worksheet will be analyzed 7/15/07 to eliminate duplicated statements and set priorities to the most imperative; up to five issues/factors per category.

AWSRHN ACTTF

Completed. SWOT Chart developed.

Step 3- Sort issues by relevance and reality

AWSRHN ACTTF

Completed. Relevant and realistic statements determined and placed on SWOT Chart.

Step 4- Reduce issues/factors to eliminate duplications and set priorities

AWSRHN ACCTF

Completed. Priority issues and factors identified in each SWOT category.

Workplan

Objective:

Concept Mapping

Activities Step 1- Preparation 1a. Selecting the Participants

Time Frame 1a. Key Stakeholders will be identified and 6/18/07 invited to attend a Transportation Stakeholders' Meeting. Those in attendance represented all sectors of Allegany County including, but not limited to: · Allegany County Officials · Legislators · Department Heads · County Administrator · Public Transportation Providers · Private Transportation Providers · Health & Human Service Providers · Mental Health · Public Health · Hospitals · Alcohol & Substance Abuse · Economic Development · Neighboring County Transportation Providers · Adult Education Providers · Town and Village Officials · Faith Leaders · Law Enforcement Officials

Expected Outcome

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Completed. 35 Attendees participated in the Concept Mapping exercise; including 4 County Legislators, NYSDOT and representatives from Yates and Steuben counties.

Step 1- Preparation 1c. Rating System

A rating system will be implemented at a 8/30/07 follow-up meeting to help ACTTF identify priorities for implementation and evaluation.

An unbiased facilitator will conduct the 6/18/07 Concept Mapping exercise with familiarity with the process. Statements generated will be recorded in real-time to allow key stakeholders the opportunity to verify quotes/thoughts and visualize statements.

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 2- Generation of Statements

AWSRHN ACTTF FacilitatorDr. Karen Porter

Completed. attached

List of statements are

Workplan

Step 3- Structuring of Statements 3a. Sorting of Statements Step 3- Structuring of Statements 3b. Rating of Statements

All statements will be sorted to verify

7/15/07

AWSRHN ACTTF

The following rating scale will be utilized by 8/30/07 ACTTF to rate the statements generated through the concept mapping exercise. Rate Definition

AWSRHN ACTTF

1 2 3 4 5

Step 4- Representation of Statements

Unrelated/Unrealistic Related, but not a priority/Unrealistic Neutral Related/Priority/Realistic High Priority/Very Realistic

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 5- Interpretation of Maps 5a. The Statement List Step 5- Interpretation of Maps 5b. The Cluster List Step 5- Interpretation of Maps 5c. Naming the Cluster Step 5- Interpretation of Maps 5d. The Cluster Map Step 5- Interpretation of Maps 5e. The Point Rating Map

Utilizing outcomes in Step 3b, the following 9/15/07 products will be drafted: -Statement Map -Cluster Map -Point Rating Map -Cluster Rating Map ACTTF will review the original Statement 9/15/07 List with the associated rating system.

AWSRHN ACTTF

ACTTF will review the cluster analysis list 9/15/07 with the associated rating system.

AWSRHN ACTTF

ACTTF and AWSRHN will name the clusters 9/15/07 according to themes and categories.

AWSRHN ACTTF

ACTTF and AWSRHN will identify how 9/15/07 statements were grouped by cluster analysis.

AWSRHN ACTTF

ACTTF and AWSRHN will overlay the 9/15/07 cluster map with the associated rating system.

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Step 5- Interpretation of Maps 5f. The Cluster Rating Map Step 6- Utilization of Maps 6a. For Planning

ACTTF and AWSRHN will overlay the 9/15/07 cluster map with average ratings.

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 6- Utilization of Maps 6b. For Evaluation

ACTTF and AWSRHN will review concept 10/1/07 mapping exercise results to help develop the Allegany County Coordinated Public TransitHuman Services Transportation Plan. ACTTF and AWSRHN will utilize the Ongoing concept mapping exercise results to evaluate and monitor activities and progress within the Allegany County Coordinated Public TransitHuman Services Transportation Plan.

AWSRHN ACTTF

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective:

Consumer Surveys

Activities Step 1- Review sample consumer surveys Step 2- Consumer Survey printing and distribution

Expected Outcome ACTTF members will review sample survey tools from the United We Ride Tool Kit and amend appropriately for local needs.

Time Frame 10/15/07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress

Consumer survey bids will be conducted 10/15/07for printing costs. Surveys will be 12/30/07 distributed at community events and via ACTTF members.

Step 3- Data collection and data entering

Consumer surveys will be collected and 1/30/08 entered into the SPSS software program for analysis. Step 4- Consumer Survey Consumer surveys will be analyzed and a 2/15/08analysis and reporting draft report will be provided to ACTTF Ongoing members for review and comment. A final consumer survey report will be presented to ACTTF members and will assist in future planning, implementation and evaluation process.

AWSRHN ACTTF AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective:

Focus Groups

Activities Step 1- Focus Group Design

Expected Outcome

Step 2- Development of Questioning Routes

At least six focus groups, targeting up to twelve attendees/session, will be scheduled across Allegany County; maximizing information from various geographic locations, priority populations, including three "Doers" and three "Non-Doers" sessions. Questioning Routes will be developed by 9/15/07 AWSRHN and reviewed by ACTTF members to verify content, clarity, flow and consistency. Community representatives will be identified and recruited for Focus Groups through ACTTF members. Incentives will be identified and purchase/gathered. Individuals will be recruited using a three step approach: -Formal Invitation -Follow-up Personal Phone Calls -Confirmation Letters Focus Groups will be facilitated and digitally recorded at various locations throughout Allegany County. Comprehensive notes will be recorded at each session for group approval. Transcripts will be produced to be utilized for analysis. Focus Group data will be analyzed using the Long-Table Approach, identifying themes and categorizing results. A Focus Group report will be drafted and presented to ACCTF members to be used for planning and evaluation.

Time Frame 9/15/07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 3- Recruitment Strategies

10/15/07

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 4- Focus Groups Facilitation

10/15/0712/15/07

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 5- Analysis & Reporting

2/15/08

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective:

Asset Mapping

Activities Step 1- Identify current transportation service providers and resources

Expected Outcome ACTTF members will identify current transportation providers and create a Transportation Services Inventory in three categories: - Private Transportation Providers - Public Transportation Providers - Alternative Transportation Resources ACTTF members will continue to identify transportation providers within the three categories and update/modify the Transportation Services Inventory list as need needed. ACTTF members will utilize the Transportation Services Inventory data in future analysis (GIS Mapping strategies) to develop, implement and evaluate/monitor the Plan.

Time Frame 6/18/07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Information collected for: 2 Private 5 Public 4 Alternative Resources

Step 2- Identify additional transportation service providers and resources

Ongoing

AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 3- Utilize Asset Mapping Exercise information to design, implement and evaluate/monitor the Plan.

Ongoing

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective:

Demographic Profile

Activities Step 1 - Key indicators

Expected Outcome

Step 2 - Analyze data

Step 3 - Tracking and Trending data

Step 4 - Monitoring and Evaluation

ACTTF members will identify key indicators that correlate and impact on transportation services; i.e.: · Socio-economic levels · Population · Education status · Employment levels · Vehicles ACTTF members will analyze demographic 9/15/07 data to establish key areas of impact and priority population centers; including but not limited indicators identified in Step 1, as well as additional data as it is gathered. ACTTF will continue to monitor and track Ongoing key indicators to monitor and evaluate the Plan, re-establish population priorities, and edit the Plan accordingly. ACTTF will utilize demographic data to Ongoing demonstrate the effectiveness of the Plan through its monitoring and evaluation process; detailed further in this document.

Time Frame 7/15/07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Baseline demographic data was identified and gathered for analysis.

AWSRHN ACTTF

AWSRHN ACTTF

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective:

Vehicle Fleet Status and Evaluation

Activities Step 1- Complete Inventory of Transportation Services

Expected Outcome ACTTF members will identify current transportation providers; including: · Human Services Transportation Providers · Public Transit/Privately Owned · Neighboring Counties Transportation Providers

Time Frame 7/18/07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Preliminary data collection as shown in the Plan Chapter IV. Research

Step 2- Review Best Practice ACTTF members will research "Fleet 9/15//07 surveys/evaluation instruments Status and Evaluation" survey templates

AWSRHN ACTTF

and/or questioning routes via Best Practice Models previously identified

Step 3- Implement "Fleet Status and Evaluation" Research. ACTTF members will conduct written and/or 12/15/07 personal phone interviews with transportation services providers utilizing the "Fleet Status and Evaluation" template. Step 3- Analyze and report ACTTF members will analyze the research Ongoing "Fleet Status and Evaluation" findings of the "Fleet Status and Evaluation" research findings. data. Findings will be used when designing, implementing and evaluating the Plan. AWSRHN ACTTF

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective: Best Practice Models

Activities Step 1- Identify Best Practice Models for creating a Coordinated Transportation Plan. Expected Outcome ACTTF members will identify at least two Best Practice Models, evidence-based with similar determinants of impact and community resemblances, i.e. demographic profiles and priority populations. Time Frame 7/18/07 Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF Outcomes/Milestones/Progress · United We Ride-Framework for action · Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services, TCRP Report 101

Step 2- Review Best Practice ACTTF members will review Best 9/15/07 Model theories. Practice Models; including the theory of

AWSRHN ACTTF AWSRHN ACTTF AWSRHN ACTTF

behavioral and systematic changes.

Step 3- Research Best Practice Models results. Step 3- Select Best Practice Model(s) for designing, implementing and evaluating the local Plan. ACTTF members will review Best Practice 12/15/07 Model appraisals; i.e. journal articles. ACTTF members will choose one select Ongoing theory or multiple theories from the Best Practice Models to assist in designing, implementing and evaluating the local Plan.

Workplan

Objective:

Volunteers

Activities Step 1- Complete Inventory of Transportation Services

Expected Outcome ACTTF members will identify current transportation providers; including: · Human Services Transportation Providers · Public Transit/Privately Owned · Neighboring Counties Transportation Providers

Time Frame 618//07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Preliminary data collection as shown in the Plan Chapter IV. Research

Step 2- Identify transportation ACTTF members will develop 9/15/07 service providers who utilize supplementary questions regarding volunteers volunteer services to be used while

AWSRHN ACTTF

conducting "Fleet Status and Evaluation" research.

Step 3- Implement "Fleet Status and Evaluation" Research, including questions on volunteers. ACTTF members will conduct written and/or 12/15/07 personal phone interviews with transportation services providers utilizing the "Fleet Status and Evaluation" template, including questions on volunteer services if agencies indicate they utilize volunteer services. ACTTF members will analyze the research Ongoing findings of the "Fleet Status and Evaluation" data, including data obtained from the supplemental volunteer questions. Findings will be used when designing, implementing and evaluating the Plan. AWSRHN ACTTF

Step 3- Analyze and report "Fleet Status and Evaluation" research findings, including data obtained from supplemental volunteer questions.

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

Objective:

GIS Mapping

Activities Step 1- Complete Inventory of Transportation Services

Expected Outcome ACTTF members will identify current transportation providers; including: · Human Services Transportation Providers · Public Transit/Privately Owned · Neighboring Counties Transportation Providers

Time Frame 6/18/07

Responsible Party AWSRHN ACTTF

Outcomes/Milestones/Progress Preliminary data collection as shown in the Plan Chapter IV. Research

Step 2- Assess current Identify potential data for transportation 2/15/08 transportation system utilizing system analysis utilizing the GIS Mapping the GIS Mapping System System, including but not limited to the

AWSRHN ACTTF

following:

Overlay transportation route information from fixed route providers to identify gaps, needs, and duplications in service routes. · Overlay transportation route information with utilization data and population centers. Step 3- Analyze data and make ACTTF members will review findings to 2/15/08 recommendations for system make recommendations for transportation changes system changes to improve utilization and access of fixed route transportation services. Step 3- Continue to gather data ACTTF members will analyze the research Ongoing for input into the GIS Mapping findings of the GIS Mapping to assist in System designing, implementing and evaluating the Plan. ·

AWSRHN ACTTF

AWSRHN ACTTF

Workplan

IX. Appendix

Appendix

Appendixes Allegany County Transportation Task Force Meeting Minutes ­ January 25, 2007 Allegany County Transportation Task Force Meeting Minutes ­ March 29, 2007 Allegany County Transportation Task Force Meeting Minutes ­ May 3, 2007

Unmet Needs Survey (June 2007) Concept Mapping Session (June 18, 2007) Visioning Session (June 18, 2007)

Allegany County Public Transportation Service Area (GIS Map) ACT General Information ACT Fixed Bus Route #1 ACT Fixed Bus Route #2 ACT Fixed Bus Route #3 ACT Fixed Bus Route #4 ACT Fixed Bus Route #6

HAT Transit Guide

Appendix

Friendship House Community Resource Center

A program of the Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network

Transportation Task Force Meeting

Date: January 25, 2007 Recorded by: P. Cavanaugh Time: 10:00 a.m. Location: Friendship House Present: L. Oyer, M. Simons, J. Faulkner, T. Brush, H. Fitch, J. Dickenson, T. Ayers, A. Glover, P. Cavanaugh, D. Hackett Next Meeting: TBA

Topic Call to Order Introductions

Discussion Meeting called to order at A. Glover, STTT, has recognized a high need for transportation services within the clientele she serves through her employability program with STTT. This coupled with the needs indicated through tracking at the Friendship House acted as a catalyst for the formation of the Transportation Task Force. Each agency/program that was present gave an over view of their currently available services.

Recommendations & Conclusions Information only A. Glover, STTT, will act as the facilitator for the Transportation Task Force

Responsibility & Due Date Information only

Identification of Available Services

It is recommended that an inventory be taken of each programs currently available services detailing service type, eligibility and any other pertinent information. Further investigation will be made to address these issues.

P. Cavanaugh will disburse a survey of services form to be completed by each agency/program detailing this information.

Consumer Demographic

It was indicated there was a need to address child safety regarding car seat use and availability during public transportation as well as a medical transportation system that is more cost effective in relationship to barriers for phone confirmation

Appendix

of appointments and handicap access to transportation and assistance during transportation of such clientele. Utilization and Comprehension of Services Low literacy rates create barriers to client understanding and access to public transportation through the ACT bus as well as other forms of transportation. Gaps pertaining to all demographics were discussed in great length. H. Fitch indicated that there has been consumer training provided through agencies to reduce the barriers to client access. The ACT staff is also available for client consultation in mapping routes. Additional consumer education is still needed. It is recommended that an inventory be taken by P. Cavanaugh will begin individual programs/agencies of their consumers surveying agencies/programs to unmet needs in order to get a thorough collection accumulate this data. of data. In addition, the agencies will be asked to list the barriers they face as an agency in addressing these needs as well as resources that would allow them to address the consumers unmet needs or expand their services. (Ex: finances, justification of route expansion, lack of county contracts to provide services to eligible consumers). A complete overview of the items listed above needs to be compiled. Financial resources have been identified as an immediate barrier to both consumer and agency and must be investigated. Confirmation was given by those present that there was a great advantage to working collaboratively in this project. Meetings of the Task Force therefore will continue.

Identified Gaps in Service

Action Plan

Many areas of need were identified.

Meeting adjourned: 11:30 a.m.

Appendix

Friendship House Community Resource Center

A program of the Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network

Transportation Task Force Meeting

Date: March 29, 2007 Recorded by: P. Cavanaugh Time: 10:00 a.m. Location: Friendship House Present: L. Oyer, J. Faulkner, T. Brush, H. Fitch, J. Dickenson, D. McKnight, S. Wright, T. Ayers, A. Glover, M. Brady, K/ Henderson, K. Daugherty, R. Biedakiewicz, P. Cavanaugh Next Meeting: May 3, 2007 1:30 at Friendship House

Topic Call to Order Introductions Review of Minutes Discussion Meeting called to order at Information only. Recommendations & Conclusions Information only Motion to approve by H. Fitch, All in favor. Minutes approved. Responsibility & Due Date Information only

Problem Statement

A social marketing plan is being developed by A. Glover. The problem statement (Attached) was reviewed. This social marketing plan will continue to be developed as a tool for organization and possible funding. This plan emphasizes "Social Change". K. Henderson, a Houghton College Sociology Student, presented a research paper along with a PowerPoint presentation.

All collaborators are asked to assist in the development of this plan. Electronic communication with Task Force collaborators will be used to gain insight, perspectives and data concerning the development of the plan. Paper and PowerPoint attached.

A. Glover and P. Cavanaugh will continue developing this plan with the assistance of Task Force collaborators.

Market Research

Friendship House is collecting data pertaining to transportation services already in place as well as unmet needs. S. Wright indicated that PPAC will have results of a survey with additional transportation information at the next meeting. Investigation of funding for the collaborative efforts as well as

NYSDOT conference Update

Appendix

D. McKnight updated the collaborators on the conference. He

An Executive Order set forth by President Bush in 2004 (Attached) calls for Human Service

will be attending a NYSDOT conference on a quarterly basis.

Transportation Coordination. Beginning in FY 2007 the Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users requires that projects funded under the Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities, JARC, and New Freedom programs have a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services transportation plan.

logic models will be investigated. The progress of the Transportation Task Force will be indicated as Allegany Counties "Good Faith Efforts" to initiate a Coordinated Transportation Plan at future NYSDOT conferences.

Rural Community Transportation Services Development Models

Models indicated in the PowerPoint will be investigated.

Included will be United We Ride, LICO and others. AWSRHN has ordered the Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services to assist with the development of this plan. Collaborators are asked to respond with their own agenda as well as suggest a common Mission and Vision Statement. Upon review a final Mission/Vision will be set forth. A sample Mission Statement is attached for review. Those already providing transportation services will be invited to attend a separate meeting as "Key Stake Holders" to address issues pertaining to the logistics of coordinating their efforts.

Mission/Vision Statement Objectives/Goals

A review of the "For the Common Good" Collaborative description (Attached) was reviewed. Although each collaborator will have their own agenda/objective for participation a common Mission and Vision are needed to maintain priority focus for a common goal. In order to maintain the Task Force as a true collaborative Ad-Hoc Committees will be created on as needed basis for development of the plan.

Ad-Hoc Committees

Meeting adjourned: 11:30 a.m.

Appendix

Friendship House Community Resource Center

A program of the Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network

Transportation Task Force Meeting

Date: May 3, 2007 Recorded by: P. Cavanaugh Time: 10:00 a.m. Location: Friendship House Present: R. Scott ­ ACDSS, A. Mosher ­ ACCORD CCRR, L. White ­ ARA, C. Whitwood ­ AWSRHN, E. Green ­ Allegany ARC, M. Simons ­ Healthy Families, H. Fitch - ACT, D. McKnight ­ Allegany ARC, S. Wright ­ ACASA, PPAC, A. Glover - STTT, R. Biedakiewicz - ACETC, P. Cavanaugh ­ Friendship House Next Meeting: TBA

Topic Call to Order Introductions Review of Minutes ACTTF Overview An overview of the efforts of the task force was submitted for approval. The Toolkit for Rural Community Coordinated Transportation Services has been received. Discussion Meeting called to order at Information only. Recommendations & Conclusions Information only Motion to approve by H. Fitch, All in favor. Minutes approved. Suggestions were made to include descriptions of the three programs affected and the clientele they serve. This toolkit will be used in conjunction with the United We Ride model. It was suggested that an outline of the goals set forth by the DOT as well as an outline of the steps involved with creating a coordinated plan will ease with understanding. Preliminary stake holders have been identified. A meeting of all stake holders will be held to provide information as well to enable the facilitation of concept mapping. P. Cavanaugh had an initial meeting with J. Foels, Allegany County IDA, to discuss the task force initiative. An overview meeting is being set with J. Foels, J. Margeson and C. Crandall. P. Cavanaugh will make revisions. (revised version attached) Responsibility & Due Date Information only

Rural Community Transportation Services Development Models

P. Cavanaugh will create and forward.

Market Research

Identification of key stakes holders

Each member of the Task force is asked to assist with dissemination to those who they believe may have a vested interest and forward their contact information to P. Cavanaugh for invitation to a Stake Holders meeting.

Appendix

Services provided by Federal Transportation programs (attached)

This matrix of identified transportation funding may be of assistance in identifying stake holders.

Task Force members are asked to review the attached matrix in an effort to ensure identification of all possible stake holders. Contact information should be forwarded to P. Cavanaugh.

Advisory Committee

The creation of an advisory committee including representatives from each sector and/or relating to each issue was presented. This will be revisited at a later date. Preliminary data has been collected through the efforts of a Friendship House volunteer. Complete and specific data collection will be a time consuming process. Mechanisms for collecting this data are available in both the Toolkit and United We Ride models. PPAC will have results of a survey with additional transportation information by May 10th. P. Cavanaugh attended a presentation of St. Bonaventure students who had rerouted a bus route to better meet the needs of the community. GIS mapping was identified as a useful tool for integrating information to assist with the coordination efforts. P. Cavanaugh has initiated conversations with representatives from Cattaraugus and Steuben Counties concerning their progress and collaboration. A meeting of the NYSDOT will be held on May 8th in Watkins Glenn.

Data Collection

Bogoni Center

Additional Research

D. McKnight will forward information to P. Cavanaugh. Arrangements to attend will be made. A. Glover will create a mission statement and submit for approval. Each Task Force member is asked to make

Mission/Vision Statement

Brainstorming of ideas for mission and vision.

It was agreed that the name of the Task Force will be Allegany County Transportation Task Force, ACTTF, referenced as ACTIVE to indicate that we are an active Task Force. The word ACCELERATE

Appendix

will be used to define the core values of the Task Force.

suggestions for the completion of core values. (attached)

Ad-Hoc Committees

Ad-hoc committees will be created on an as needed basis.

Meeting adjourned: 11:30 a.m.

Appendix

Allegany County Transportation Task Force Unmet Needs Survey June 2007

Total Surveys completed ­ 13 Surveys completed by the following Human Service Agencies: Center for Family Unity, Allegany Council of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Southern Tier Travailing Teachers, Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES, Alfred State College Center for Community Education and Training, ACCORD Corporation Victim Services, Allegany County Employment and training Center, Kinship Youth and Family Services, Allegany County Office for the Aging, American Cancer Society Seven Lakes Region, Healthy Families Allegany, ACCORD Corporation HeadStart, Allegany County Stop DWI Youth Court Program

1) Lack of knowledge/understanding of the services available due to literacy and/or comprehension level: Yes ­ 4 (30%) No ­ 1 (8%) Unanswered ­ 8 (62%) a) The public transportation schedules are difficult for clients to follow and understand b) Lack of awareness concerning available services c) This definitely a high need d) Lack of knowledge/understanding makes it difficult for consumers to understand letters they get from DSS, the bus schedule for ACT, etc. 2) Lack of access due to geographic location: Yes ­ 11 (85%) No ­ 0 (0%) Unanswered ­ 2 (15%) a) Many consumers live in rural areas that are 3 or more miles from the nearest ACT bus stop b) Most often families live out of town c) Medical transport provided by American Cancer society for cancer treatment in the Rochester area is difficult to arrange be/c of the challenge of finding volunteer drivers in Allegany County d) No transportation to the bus stops ­ 2 to 3 miles from stop e) Office for the Aging is unable to provide transportation to the following geographic areas: Buffalo, Rochester, and Sayre f) People up in isolated areas, on back roads, up in the hills etc. Often 2-5 miles from the pick up spots g) If clients live away from the main transportation routes they often cannot get a return trip back 3) Lack of access due to handicap or disability: Yes ­ 4 (31%) No ­ 2 (15%) Unanswered ­ 7 (54%) a) Office for the Aging cannot transport elderly in wheelchairs and unable to walk b) If consumers live off the main transportation route it is difficult for them to access the public transportation system c) Some consumers are unable to walk necessary distance to bus pick up d) Many families are limited by disabilities 4) Lack of safe transportation for baby/child: Yes ­ 5 (39%) No ­ 2 (15%) Unanswered ­ 6 (46%) a) Some of the NYWorks consumers have this barrier b) Lack of car seats, difficulty in carrying car seats and children to bus stop c) Lack of car seats

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5) Lack of services available to needed areas: Yes ­ 9 (69%) No ­ 0 (0%) Unanswered ­ 4 (31%) a) Gap of 6-7 miles between ACT and Wyoming County Transit b) Lack of service to Olean and Belmont BOCES Centers c) Lack of service Cuba and Olean d) Reports of difficulty with Alfred-Almond area and northern regions of the county e) Bus runs seem limited in Friendship, Bolivar, Richburg, Short Track, and Fillmore areas f) All of Allegany County g) Sometimes it is difficult to find volunteer drivers in specific areas h) Allegany County is too far away from metropolitan areas providing cancer services for volunteers to drive 6) Limitations of service times: Yes ­ 9 (69%) No ­ 0 (0%) Unanswered ­ 4 (31%) a) Bus doesn't run when needed b) ACT bus schedule is not always available c) Bus times not amenable to programs schedules, Long waits for buses to return people home. People "hang out" 2-3 hours until next schedule bus. People arrive late for appointments because bus schedule or have to arrive 2-3 hours early. People often complain that the bus never came or it didn't stop to pick them up. d) Public transportation schedules often do not meet employment needs for round trip transportation e) Service is not condusive for the Boces classes that run at 8:00am ­ 11:00am and from 12:00pm ­ 2:30pm. f) No service available during the evening or weekends for consumers to get to/from 2nd and 3rd shifts g) No evening service is available h) Because of the lack of service during the mid part of the day class attendees have a lay over of several hours before transportation is complete to their home Additional comments: · Many clients do not have a license or a car · Many clients have cars that are unsafe to drive · Office for the Aging cannot utilize their volunteers to provide transportation to beauty salons · American Cancer Society has very few volunteer drivers in Allegany County · Due to lack of service Youth Court consumers must be transported by Youth Court Employees to and from court and community service sites in their personal vehicles · Several Safety Net Assistance Program consumers need Driver Education Instruction as well as lack funds to obtain their permit/license. Most do not have a license and have no access to vehicle or someone to assist them in getting to/from a job, especially 2nd and 3rd shift work because no public transport service is available at those times. SNAP participants are not eligible for Wheel to Work funds. · Transportation outside of Wellsville is difficult. Times for pick up and drop off are inconvenient at times. Also, some clients have to find rides to the pick up spot because they do not live en route.

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Transportation Allegany County Transportation Stakeholders Agenda

The key to community mobility!

June 18, 2007 10:00am ­ 3:00pm Crossroads Commerce & Conference Center 6087 NYS Route 19 North, Belmont, NY 14813

10:00-10:15a.m. 10:15-11:15a.m.

Registration and Introductions Coordinated Public Transit/ Human Services Transportation Plan (Final Policy Briefing) Mr. John Reel, New York State Department of Transportation Break Concept Mapping- Allegany County Coordinated Transportation Plan Facilitated by Karen Porter, Alfred University Lunch (provided) Visioning Session: Allegany County Transportation Plan Facilitated by Penny Cavanaugh, FH Site Coordinator Visioning Session Outcomes Next Steps

11:15-11:30a.m. 11:30-12:30p.m.

12:30-1:00p.m. 1:00-2:00p.m. 2:00-2:45p.m. 2:45-3:00p.m.

A collaborative of the Allegany/Western Steuben Rural Health Network

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Transportation Stakeholders Meeting Concept Mapping- June 18, 2007 How will a Coordinated Human Service Transportation System affect Allegany and its neighboring counties? More Cost effective Reduce or eliminate duplication of services Cheaper per mile per passenger Promote economic activity-get consumers to stores Encourage businesses and employers to come into Allegany County Increase quality of life for Allegany County residents-able to go to stores, attend church/place of worship, access health care, and community programs/social events with independence Support employment and job retention-able to get to work at other hours-evenings and weekends, keep job Have a more reliable workforce-saves businesses money for re-training costs Access to educational programs-colleges, local agencies, GED programs, training programs, BOCES/adult education programs- which can increase employment Better access to quality child care Keep appointments and utilize local services-WIC clinics (use farmers market vouchers) Bus stop signs with route numbers, bus schedules, bus stop shelters-more information available regarding bus routes Could have negative affect on neighboring counties by keeping more dollars and utilization of services in county May allow for increased outreach to neighboring counties Increases choices for residents-increases competition Might increase local spending at businesses if county system is in place Increase attendance from outside areas to local social events-ex. Balloon Rally, Community festivals Transportation special events planning-shuttle buses to help parking and congestion issues Clear, easy to read bus schedules and information Easier for the consumers to access transportation if services are coordinated-provide travel training for consumers-educate users Useable and friendly service Increase moral for residents-freedom to make choices-decrease limitations-good impact on mental health Encourage youth to remain in county by increasing options/choices Decrease cost to agencies and providers if there is a sharing of resources-drivers training, maintenance Opportunity for additional grant funds that can be accessed as a joint system Increase summer school attendance-public school systems do not provide transportation to summer school classes-classes could be coordinated with the bus schedule/transportation schedule More practical system-increased mobility to different areas in county Businesses could look at flex schedules to coordinate with transportation schedules Improve other counties transportation systems-would have to look at their transportation system Private transportation providers could benefit-ambulance services, taxis Decrease improper use of ambulance/emergency services Provide accessibility to community events Increase advertisements for the transportation system Students could use transportation system to get to school-reduce cost to schools, increase availability for late buses for after school activities

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Increase use of technology to coordinate system-dispatch, LED signs Maximizes existing resources Continuing forum to address ongoing issues-shared responsibility Consumer needs to have a voice There is currently a stigma with the system-education/training would reduce Transportation access seven days a week

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Transportation Stakeholders Meeting Visioning Session June 18, 2007 Key Elements needed in the Ideal Coordinated Transportation System.

Eight workgroups were comprised during the Stakeholders Visioning Session with the following results:

Customers the system would serve. 1 (13%) Transportation disadvantaged 8 (100%) Elderly 5 (63%) Those with limited income 7 (88%) Employees 1 (13%) Commuters 6 (75%) Youth 4 (50%) Children 1 (13%) Medicaid medical needs 1 (13%) Daycare services 1 (13%) Prenatal/Childcare Consumers 5 (63%) Every one of all ages 1 (13%) Those who fall into the cracks 1 (13%) Amish 1 (13%) Mennonites 1 (13%) Non Medicaid disabled 1 (13%) Non Medicaid (medical needs) 2 (25%) Higher education students 1 (13%) Rehab and dayhab consumers 1 (13%) Single Moms 1 (13%) Grandparents raising children 1 (13%) Those in more isolated areas 1 (13%) The disabled

Methods that should be used to verify who those consumers are. 6 (75%) Surveys 1 (13%) Public meetings 5 (63%) Focus groups 5 (63%) Fliers 2 (25%) School students 2 (25%) Newspaper 1 (13%) Laundromats 2 (25%) Grocery stores 2 (25%) Fairs/expos 1 (13%) Service club agencies 1 (13%) Data from Dept. of Labor, Hospitals, Medical offices, Employers, workers, school systems, clergy, DSS, OFA, ACCORD, Amvets, Legions, Vets Coordinator, town and village Boards, Catt/Alleg WIB

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Travel needs the system should meet. 5 (63%) Shopping 6 (75%) Education 7 (88%) Medical 6 (75%) Employment 7 (88%) Social 5 (63%) Recreation 5 (63%) Spiritual 6 (75%) Libraries 1 (13%) Commuting 4 (50%) Personal care 1 (13%) Coordinated bus schedule for ease of use 1 (13%) Flexible shifting of service and schedules 1 (13%) Dependability for Consumers 1 (13%) School Needs 1 (13%) Airport shuttle

Criteria that should be used to determine expansion of services. 8 (100%) Unmet needs ­ (Trial and error that is communicated, Customer feedback, What is being used, What is being requested) 1 (13%) Coordinate schedules and see where gaps are 1 (13%) Target people in remote areas 1 (13%) Employer/Employee based needs 1 (13%) Population density vs. ridership

Methods that would increase ridership. 2 (25%) Reduction of Stigma ­ (Make it look smart and good to ride the bus 7 (89%) Improved Quality and Customer service 6 (75%) Park and ride program 7 (88%) Employers buy in to transportation (Employer subsidized ride to work) 1 (13%) Coordinate with other agencies 1 (13%) High gas prices evokes ridership 3 (38%) Marketing (PSA, Public Education) 1 (13%) One call center 1 (13%) User-friendly schedules 1 (13%) Improve communication 1 (13%) Improve access to service (Let the public know where to call) 1 (13%) Better shelters with seating capacity and lavatories 1 (13%) Increase safety 1 (13%) Promote to youth 1 (13%) Promote environmental benefits 1 (13%) Promote tourism 1 (13%) Offer educational FREE ride 1 (13%) Access needs 1 (13%) Task Force/Stakeholders need to "Ride the Ride"

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The structure of this system should include the following: 4 (50%) One center for calls which then refers to appropriate provider, clearinghouse 4 (50%) County Coordinated 1 (13%) Develop an hourly rate for transportation 1 (13%) Utilize ARC 1 (13%) Transportation Commission appointed by local government ­ (Comprised of Programs that provide transportation, Consumer advocates, Programs that benefit, Employment and training, Legislators, Local government) 2 (25%) Mobility Management 1 (13%) Grants ­ Local, State, Federal 1 (13%) Consumer subsidized funding 1 (13%) Creative solutions 1 (13%) Look at what other counties have done - Copy Steuben County 1 (13%) Continue to have a Task Force/Advisory Board 1 (13%) Follow TCRP 101 Report

The system should operate as follows: 1 (13%) Based on a coordinated study 3 (38%) Look at other models 3 (38%) Hire a coordinator 1 (13%) With Open communication 1 (13%) Reevaluate and reassess continuously 1 (13%) Collaboration

· Resources needed to run the system. 6 (75%) Brains 6 (75%) Vision 8 (100%) Financial Sustainability 1 (13%) Commission from riders 1 (13%) Fundraising 1 (13%) Cost/benefit 1 (13%) Grants 1 (13%) Paid advertising on buses to subsidize costs 1 (13%) Consumer education and interest 1 (13%) Technology

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Allegany County Transit General Information A.C.T. public transportation services will run Monday through Friday. A.C.T. links with Shortline at Crosby's Mini Mart in Belmont, BONA and OATS Shuttle in Olean, and HATS in Alfred. First time passengers! We recommend that you call A.C.T. prior to you trip. No smoking, eating, or drinking on A.C.T. vehicles. No pets (except for service animals). Children 4 and under ride for free and must be accompanied by a paying adult ( limit 2 children per adult). Monthly passes must be shown to driver while boarding the bus. A.C.T. does not provide emergency transportation (ambulance). If you have an emergency call 911! Tokens and Fares must be given to driver or placed in farebox, while boarding the bus (exact change). Buses are equipped for riders using wheelchairs. Premium may be applied for customized services and billing. Each bus carries A.C.T. bus schedules: schedules can also be obtained at convenient locations throughout Allegany County. A.C.T. is not responsible for lost or stolen items. Contact A.C.T. for instructions on how to use Allegany County's public transportation system and for current bus schedules. If drivers are required to secure items brought on to the bus or if items are occupying a seant, a $1.00 on top of the fare will be charged. This rule does not apply to mobility devices. It always helps to tell your driver your destination. For your safety, please keep conversation with the driver limited, and try to keep noise level down. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00am to 5:00 pm. A.C.T. IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. Applications can be obtained at A.C.T. or Allegany County Employment and Training Center in Belmont, NY Monday through Friday. Our buses have a bluestripe. More than one person requesting a route deviation to the same location, WILL BE CHARGED PER PERSON FOR THE DEVIATION. Most industry and services are available via fixed routes throughout Allegany County. Call A.C.T. office for more information. If you miss the bus or the bus is full, including wheelchair stations, check schedule for the next available bus going to your destination. Drivers are on a schedule and cannot turn around to get you! Inclement weather, traffic and other variables such as route deviations and wheelchair loadings may affect route times. Call A.C.T. when in doubt. If you plan on riding the bus on a complete loop without getting off- you will be charged accordingly. Can't get to your destination? Transfers may be available--call A.C.T. for more information. Most Colleges, Universities, Vocational and Health Facilities in Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties are available with fixed route service. Olean routes travel North Union, West State, Constitution and Wayne Street. Other streets are also available, call A.C.T. office for details. Please be courteous in the use of cell phones on our buses.

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Allegany County Transit Fixed Bus Route #1 North Regional (Belmont- Fillmore-Olean-Wellsville) TOWN Belmont Scio Wellsville Scio Belmont Belfast Caneadea Houghton Fillmore Caneadea Belfast Angelica Belmont Belmont Angelica Short Tract Fillmore Houghton Rushford Caneadea Belfast M,W, F Co.Rt.17&41 T, Th Rt.305 Black Creek Cuba Olean NO SERVICE STOP American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion Lot Town Park Town Hall BP Academy/ College Sugar Creek Town Hall Town Park Grange BOCES American Legion Lot American Legion Lot BOCES Grange Flag Stop Sugar Creek Academy/ College BP Public Library Town Hall Town Park Manor-- Call ahead To Black Creek To Black Creek Flag Stop Erin Isles Apts. Gallman Brothers Mall 11: AM TO 12:15 PM A.M. 6:30 6:38 6:46 6:48 6:56 7:04 7:15 7:22 7:25 7:26 7:31 7:58 8:04 8:14 8:20 8:28 8:39 8:42 8:51 9:06 9:14 9:20 9:22 9:46 9:55 10:01 10:03 TOWN Olean Olean Ceres Little Genesee Bolivar Allentown Wellsville Scio Belmont Angelica Belfast M,W,F 17&41 T, Th Rt. 305 Black Creek Cuba Rushford Fillmore Houghton Caneadea Belfast Belmont STOP Walmart Mall Post Office Post Office Library Post Office ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion Lot BOCES Grange Town Park Manor ­ Call ahead To Black Creek To Black Creek Flag Stop Erin Isle Gallman Brothers Library Sugar Creek Academy/ College BP Town Hall Town Park American Legion Lot P.M. 12:15 12:30 12:45 12:53 12:58 1:07 1:30 1:32 1:40 1:48 1:54 2:00 2:10 2:12

2:20 2:28 2:32 3:00 3:16 3:28 3:30 3:34 3:41 4:00

10:12 10:22 10:26 11:00

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TOWN Belmont Scio Wellsville

STOP

Allegany County Transit Fixed Bus Route #2 Tri-Area Regional (Belmont- Alfred-Olean) TOWN STOP

PM 4:20 4:42 4:47 4:57 5:06 5:19 5:24 5:26 6:16 6:18 6:26 6:34 6:44 7:00 7:15 7:30 7:37 7:45 7:53 8:02 8:05 8:15 8:25

PM

American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid Scio The Store Belmont American Legion Lot Alfred Adm. Bldg- State W. Univer. & W. Main Alfred Sta. Post Office Andover Maier's Market Wellsville Rite Aid ArrowMart Scio The Store Belmont American Legion Lot Court House BOCES Scio The Store Wellsville ArrowMart Rite Aid Bolivar Road Allentown Post Office Richburg Call Ahead Bolivar Manor Little Genesee Post Office Ceres Post Office Olean Walmart 12:05 12:15 12:25 12:27 12:37 12:45 1:05 1:07 1:10 1:27 1:43 1:44 1:53 2:20 2:25 2:30 2:38 2:46 2:48 2:55 3:04 3:12 3:17 3:22 3:26 3:50 Olean Ceres Little Genesee Richburg Bolivar Allentown Wellsville Mall Post Office Post Office Call Ahead Library Post Office Coats St. ArrowMart Rite Aid 5:30 to 6:16 pm Rite Aid ArrowMart Post Office Manor Post Office Walmart Mall Gallman Bros. Crosby's American Legion The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion

NO SERVICE

Wellsville Allentown Bolivar Little Genesee Olean Cuba Friendship Belmont Scio Wellsville Scio Belmont

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Allegany County Transit Fixed Rt. 3 West Regional (Belmont-Friendship-Olean)

TOWN

Belmont Scio Wellsville

STOP

American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion Lot Truck Stop Crosby's Miller & Brandes

AM

6:10 6:18 6:26 6:28 6:36 6:45 6:50 6:59 7:05 7:12

TOWN STOP

Belvidere Angelica Belmont Truck Stop Grange BOCES American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid

NO SERVICE 12:52 to 1:20

AM

12:10 12:20 12:28 12:33 12:43 12:51 12:52 PM 1:20 1:22 1:28 1:36 1:41 1:50 1:56 2:03 2:05 2:30 3:00 3:36

Scio Belmont Belvidere Fiendship

Scio Wellsville

Cuba

Olean

Erin Isle Apts. Via Cuba Hospital Gallman Brothers Walmart Mall Erin Isle Apts. Gallman Brothers Miller & Brandes Crosby's Truck Stop American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid Wlsv Shopping Cent. Post Office Manor Post Office Post Office Walmart Mall Gallman Brothers Erin Isle Apts. Miller & Brandes Crosby's

Wellsville 7:15 7:45 8:15 8:45 8:48 9:00 9:06 9:12 9:22 9:30 9:55 9:58 10:02 10:10 10:18 10:26 10:36 11:00 11:20 11:45 11:47 11:55 11:59 Scio Belmont Belvidere Friendship Cuba

Cuba Friendship Belvidere Belmont Scio Wellsville

ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion Lot Truck Stop Crosby's Miller & Brandes Erin Isle Apts. Via Cuba Hospital Gallman Brothers Walmart Mall Gallman Brothers Via Cuba Hospital Erin Isle Apts. Miller & Brandes Crosby's Truck Stop

Olean Cuba

Allentown Bolivar L'le Genesee Ceres Olean Cuba Friendship

Friendship Belvidere

3:38 3:46 3:52 4:01

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Allegany County Transit Fixed Rt. #4 East Loop (Belmont-Whitesville-Alfred-Wellsville) TOWN Belmont Scio Wellsville Whitesville Hallsport Stannards Wellsville Andover Alfred Station Alfred STOP American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid Whitesville Grocery Flag Stop Level Acres ArrowMart Rite Aid Maier's Market Post Office A.S.C.- Admin. Bldg W. Univ. & Main St. Maple Apts. Court House American Legion Lot 8:06 TO 8:20 AM AM 6:05 6:13 6:21 6:22 6:41 6:51 7:01 7:09 7:11 7:28 7:40 7:43 7:45 7:47 8:05 8:06 TOWN Belmont Scio Wellsville Hallsport Whitesville Shongo Stannards Wellsville Andover Alfred Station Alfred STOP American Legion The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid Flag Stop Whitesville Grocery Flag Stop Level Acres ArrowMart Rite Aid Maier's Market Post Office A.S.C. Admin. Bldg W. Univ. & Main Maple Apts. American Legion PM 4:00 4:08 4:16 4:18 4:26 4:36 4:46 4:55 5:03 5:05 5:20 5:30 5:34 5:36 5:38 5:55

Belmont

Belmont

NO SERVICE

Belmont Scio Wellsville Whitesville Shongo Stannards Wellsville Andover Alfred Station Alfred

Belmont

NO SERVICE

American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid Whitesville Grocery Flag Stop Level Acres ArrowMart Rite Aid Maier's Market Post Office A.S.C. Admin. Bldg. W. Univ. & Main St. Maple Apts. Court House American Legion Lot

10:27 TO 4:00 PM

8:20 8:28 8:36 8:38 8:56 9:08 9:17 9:30 9:32 9:50 10:01 10:06 10:07 10:10 10:26 10:27

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Allegany County Transit Fixed Route #6 North/South Express (Belmont-Angelica-Belfast-Short Track-Wellsville)

TOWN Belmont Scio Wellsville STOP American Legion Lot The Store Rite Aid ArrowMart Coats St. Post Office Manor Post Office Walmart Mall Flag Stop Manor Call Ahead Flag Stop ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store AM 5:20 5:30 5:40 5:43 6:00 6:10 6:20 6:30 7:00 7:10 7:30 7:35 7:45 8:00 8:02 8:12 NO SERVICE Belmont Scio Wellsville Scio Belmont Scio Wellsville Scio Belmont Belfast Belmont Scio Wellsville NO SERV Wellsville Scio Belmont Scio Wellsville

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TOWN Belmont Scio Wellsville Loop

Allentown Bolivar Little Genesee Olean Little Genesee Bolivar Richburg Allentown Wellsville Scio

STOP American Legion The Store ArrowMart Johnson St. Apts. Rite Aid Giant Wlsv Woods/Carp.Com Brookhaven Northern Lights Pl. Alfred Tech. Campus Gardner Heights Highland Health Manor Hills Wlsv. Shopping Cen. Riverwalk ArrowMart 2:23 TO 3:08 PM

PM 1:15 1:23 1:31 1:33 1:37 1:40 1:45 1:49 1:55 2:03 2:06 2:10 2:15 2:16 2:18 2:23

BOCES American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion Lot Town Park Rt. 26 American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid ICE 10:34 TO 11:20 ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store BOCES American Legion Lot The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid

8:22 8:27 8:37 8:47 8:49 8:59 9:08 9:16 9:24 9:26 9:34 9:42 10:01 10:16 10:24 10:32 10:34 AM 11:20 11:22 11:30 11:42 11:48 11:58 12:08 12:10

Wellsville

Scio Belmont Angelica Short Tract Fillmore Houghton Belfast Belmont

PM RETURN ArrowMart Riverwalk Wlsv. Shopping Cen. Manor Hills Highland Health Gardner Heights Alfred Tech. Campus Northern Ligthts Pl. Brookhaven Wlsv. Woods/ Carp. Com Giant Rite Aid Johnson St. Apts. ArrowMart Rite Aid Riverwalk Tractor Supply The Store American Legion Grange Flag Stop Sugar Creek Academy/College/BP Town Park Crosby's

3:08 3:13 3:15 3:16 3:21 3:25 3:28 3:37 3:42 3:46 3:51 3:54 3:58 4:00 4:05 4:10 4:13 4:23 4:33 4:43 4:58 5:15 5:25 5:40 6:02

Scio Belmont Belfast

The Store American Legion Lot Town Park Rt. 26

12:20 12:30 12:56

Scio Wellsville Scio Belmont

American Legion The Store ArrowMart Rite Aid The Store American Legion

6:04 6:12 6:20 6:22 6:30 6:38

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HAT Transit Guide- Available in Separate PDF Attachment

Page 27 of 27

Information

Microsoft Word - IX.Appendix.doc

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