Read grad.pdf text version

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago Welcome! We welcome the interest of prospective students in considering the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) for their graduate studies. The ECE Department offers graduate programs leading to Electrical and Computer Engineering degrees at the master's and doctoral levels. Consult these pages for current requirements, policies, and regulations. Major research areas in which graduate degrees are offered by the ECE Department include Bioelectronics and Biomimetics, Computer Engineering, Device Physics and Electronics, and Information Systems. More information about the ECE research areas and research labs can be found at the ECE Department's web site. Here is the list of the documents you can find on this site. TABLE OF CONTENTS Admission requirements Financial aid information Ph.D. degree requirements Ph.D. qualifying exam M.S. degree requirements Frequently Asked Questions Click here to download a copy of the complete document. If you are unable to find information that you are seeking, please contact the Student Affairs Office at: (312) 996-4325, (312) 413-2291, or (312) 996-6465 (fax). You may also send e-mail to [email protected]

Derong Liu, Director of Graduate Studies

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago On this page, you will find information about Application deadlines | Admission requirements | Application procedure | Frequently asked questions Applications for admission are individually evaluated by the Graduate Admissions Committee. A complete set of transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work is required before an application is evaluated for admission. Decisions on granting admission and awarding financial aid are based on criteria that include the overall academic record, strength of the undergraduate program, grade point average (GPA), Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores (required of all international applicants), letters of recommendation, and other information provided in the application. There are, however, no strict rules for decisions on admitting students. As a reference, all UIC students recently admitted with financial aid (fellowship, teaching assistantship, or research assistantship) had undergraduate GPAs higher than 3.6 on a 4.0 scale. The main consideration in admitting students is that the applicant's academic background and record should, in the judgment of the graduate admissions committee, show potential for success in graduate studies and research. At the discretion of the ECE graduate admissions committee, applicants to the Master of Science Program may be admitted on limited standing, and applicants to the Doctor of Philosophy Program can be admitted only on full standing status. The College of Engineering has a polciy that would not allow any Ph.D. students to transfer to M.S. program within the college. Deadlines for Graduate Admission The application deadlines are set by the Graduate College: Click here to see the deadlines. It is recommended that all application materials should be submitted by January 1 for admission in Fall semester of that year in order to get full consideration for financial aid. University fellowship nominations are due by the end of January and department financial aid decisions (TA/RA/TFW) are made about the middle of February to the middle of March. Graduate Admission - Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Prior Degrees: Applicants seeking admission to the Ph.D. program in the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) should have an M.S. degree in EE or CE, or in a related field, with substantial coursework in the chosen field of study. Applicants with a bachelor's degree in EE or CE or a related curriculum and an outstanding academic record are encouraged to seek admission directly to the Ph.D. program. GPA: For graduate admission to UIC, we consider only your GPA for the last 60 credit hours of course work at the undergraduate level. To be considered for Ph.D. admission, normally

you are required to have a GPA of 3.5/4.0 or higher. For master's admission, you should have a GPA of 3.2/4.0 or higher. We strongly recommend that you apply for our Ph.D. program if your GPA is higher than 3.5/4.0 since that will guarantee a consideration for financial aid. Note: the school from which you obtained your degrees will be a factor in our consideration. We may relax slightly the above requirements if you are from a top-ranked school in your country. An applicant with a master's degree is expected to have a GPA of at least 3.5 out of 4.0 in the master's program. Letters of Recommendation: Three letters of recommendation are required of all applicants for Ph.D. admission. Both original and the pre-formatted forms (included in the application package) are acceptable. They may arrive separately from other materials. TOEFL: International applicants who are not native speakers of English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for admission to ECE Department is 243 (equivalent to 590 on the paper based test). Applicants taking the TOEFL test should have ETS report the scores to institution code 1851. Applicants may request a TOEFL waiver if they have completed a minimum of two years of full-time transferable study at the secondary or collegiate level in a country where English is the primary language as well as the language of instruction, or if they have worked full time in the United States. Requests for a TOEFL waiver must be made in writing to the Office of Admissions and Records. An employment-based request for waiver must be accompanied with a letter from a supervisor certifying that the applicant has English proficiency. All foreign applicants from non-English speaking countries who seek financial aid in the form of Teaching Assistantship must pass the Test for Spoken English (TSE) or an equivalent university-sponsored test known as SPEAK test. The minimum required score is 50. This requirement is not satisfied by the TOEFL examination. International students are strongly encouraged to take the TSE test before coming to UIC. Students may also arrange and sign up to take the test at UIC before classes start. The SPEAK test schedule is available at http://www.uic.edu/depts/oaa/spec_prog/ita. GRE Requirement: General test scores of GRE are required of all international applicants for admission. Applicants with a bachelor's degree from an accredited US institution are not required to provide GRE scores. However if they feel that their performance in GRE will be strong enough to significantly enhance prospects for admission or financial aid, then they are encouraged to take the exam and have the scores reported. If an applicant, whether international or domestic, wishes to be considered for a University fellowship, then the applicant must have the General Test scores of GRE sent to UIC. Applicants are expected to have GRE General Test scores of at least 550 on the verbal part, 750 on the quantitative part, and 700 on the analytical part. Applicants taking the general test of GRE should have ETS report the scores to institution code 1851. Graduate Admission - Master of Science Prior Degrees: Applicants seeking admission to the M.S. program in the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) should have an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university in Electrical Engineering (EE) or Computer Engineering (CE) or in a related field. GPA: To be admitted with full standing to the M.S. program, an applicant is expected to have a Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.2 out of 4.0 in the final 60 semester hours (final 90 quarter hours) of undergraduate study. In addition, applicants should have completed

substantial coursework in the chosen field of study. Applicants with a bachelor's degree in EE or CE or a related curriculum and an outstanding academic record, with a GPA above 3.5/4.0, are encouraged to seek admission directly to the Ph.D. program. Limited Standing: At the discretion of the admissions committee, promising applicants who do not meet all of the requirements for full standing may be admitted on a limited standing status. Graduates of scientifically oriented curricula other than Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering must show substantial evidence of their ability to successfully complete the ECE graduate program. Depending on individual qualifications and academic history, such applicants will be required to complete one or more deficiency courses. Incoming graduate students are expected to have completed the equivalent of the undergraduate major sequence for EE or CE. Click here for list of EE undergraduate major sequence Click here for list of CE undergraduate major sequence Students with strong academic backgrounds who have not completed the equivalent of the major sequence of courses may be admitted on limited standing status. Ordinarily, this option is restricted to students who are missing at most two or three courses from the list of courses in the major sequence. Students who are admitted on limited standing will be required to complete a set of specific deficiency courses in order to be elevated to full standing graduate status. Students must remove their deficiency within their first year in the ECE graduate program, and must receive grades of A or B in these courses in order to continue in the graduate program. Applicants may also be admitted on limited standing status if the TOEFL score is low, or if the GPA is below the threshold. These students must meet the conditions specified in the admission letter. After fulfilling requirements to attain full standing the student should petition for a status change, from limited to full, prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate. It is the student's responsibility to submit a request for status change in the Student Affairs Office of the ECE Department. Applicants who plan to take only undergraduate deficiency courses should consider applying for admission either to the undergraduate program or as a non-degree student. Admission to non-degree status does not obligate the Graduate College or the ECE Department to later admit a student to a degree program. Only domestic students may be admitted, and only in exceptional circumstances, on non-degree status. TOEFL: See the TOEFL requirement for Ph.D. admission. GRE Requirement: See the GRE requirement for Ph.D. admission. Procedure to Apply for Admission to the ECE Graduate Program Please carefully follow the instructions below in order to avoid delays in the processing of your application. Applicants should adhere to the application deadlines. Step I: Submitting materials to Office of Admission and Records The UIC Office of Admissions and Records (OAR) is responsible for initial evaluation of all graduate student applications. Please submit the following materials directly to OAR: 1. Completed Graduate College application form and application fee. When applying to the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) graduate program M.S. applicants must use the curriculum code 2022 Ph.D. applicants must use the curriculum code 2222

in response to item 20 on the Graduate College application form. The application may be completed in one of three ways: Complete and submit the on-line application, OR Print a downloadable application (provide the requested information and documentation, and mail it directly to the UIC Office of Admissions and Records; note: Adobe Acrobat reader is required and a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader can be downloaded from Adobe's web site), OR Request a paper copy of the application from the ECE Student Affairs Office. 2. Official transcripts issued by the registrar(s) of all prior institutions attended, as well as any applicable standardized score reports (e.g., GRE, TOEFL). These should be delivered to OAR soon after the application is filed in order to avoid processing delays. 3. Completed Declaration and Certification of Finances (International applicants only). International applicants must complete and send to OAR a Declaration and Certification of Finances form. This may be done in one of two ways: Print a downloadable Declaration and Certification of Finances form, provide the requested information and documentation, and mail it directly to the UIC Office of Admissions and Records (OAR), OR Request a paper copy of the form from the ECE Student Affairs Office. Step II: Submitting supplementary materials to the ECE Department After the above application materials are submitted to Office of Admission and Records, applicants should submit supplemental materials, as appropriate, directly to the UIC Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1. Letters of recommendation: The ECE Department requires three letters of recommendation for all applicants to the Ph.D. program as well as applicants seeking financial aid. These letters should be written by people who are familiar with the applicant's academic work and who can assess the applicant's potential success in graduate studies and research. A downloadable Letter of Recommendation form may be printed and given to recommending persons to be mailed directly to the UIC Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 2. Specialization form: The ECE Department requires an applicant to choose one of the two major fields of study (computer engineering or electrical engineering) offered in the department before a decision for admission can be made. The choice is used to assess an applicant's preparation in the chosen field of study. A downloadable specialization form should be completed and mailed to the ECE Department. 3. Other supplemental materials: Any additional information about the applicant's candidacy for admission or consideration for financial aid may be provided, including resumes, statement of purpose, etc. These materials are not required for admission, but such materials will be considered in evaluating applications. 4. Application for financial aid: Click here for financial aid information. The above materials, as well as any correspondence with the ECE Department regarding graduate programs, should be sent to:

The University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (M/C 154) Attn: Student Affairs Office (1020 SEO) 851 S. Morgan Street Chicago, IL 60607-7053 USA Please do not send the graduate college application form, application fee, or transcripts to the above address. If you are unable to afford sending separate packages, send all material to OAR, from where the supplemental material will be forwarded to the ECE Department. Click here to see Frequently Asked Questions.

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago On this page, you will find information about Fellowship | Teaching assistantship | Research assistantship | Graduate assistantship | Tuition and fee waiver | Financial aid application procedure | Frequently asked questions Financial aid is always a major consideration for most applicants. It is available at UIC to incoming students in the form of assistantships, fellowships, and tuition and fee waivers. Application for financial aid (Application for Graduate Appointment), statement of purpose, and letters of recommendation should be sent to the ECE Department. Graduate college application form, application fee and transcripts should be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records. Please provide your email address with your application. Formats of Financial Aid There are several different forms of financial aid available to incoming graduate students. UIC University Fellowship is the most prestigious (and most competitive) form of financial aid. Nominations for University Fellowships are submitted by the ECE Department to the Graduate College by the end of January, which implies that your application must be complete and ready for processing by January 1 for Fall admission. Teaching Assistants (TAs) are responsible for grading and staffing laboratory sections of undergraduate ECE courses. Approximately 15 entering graduate students receive Teaching Assistantships each year. Decisions about the Teaching Assistant positions for new students for the Fall semester is made about the middle of February. For full consideration for a TA position, your application must be complete and ready for processing by the end of January. All foreign applicants from non-English speaking countries are required to pass the Test for Spoken English (TSE) or an equivalent test from our university known as SPEAK test. The minimum required score is 50. This requirement is not satisfied by the TOEFL examination. Research Assistants (RAs) assist faculty in funded research projects. Research assistantship is awarded by an individual faculty member. The decision is based on an applicant's qualifications and faculty's project needs. Strong candidates with research experience should contact individual faculty after they have been admitted. Prior to admission, faculty members do not have access to applicants' transcripts, recommendation letters, and other application materials. Graduate assistantships (GAs) are available on campus to continuing students. There are various sources at UIC including the medical school, the business school, the library, and other departments in the college of engineering that provide financial support to existing students. If you are interested in a GA position, pay attention to those annoucements on campus. Tuition and Fee Waivers (TFWs) are available on a competitive basis to new and continuing graduate students. Procedure to Apply for Financial Aid

The first step is to submit your application for admission following the procedure described in the Procedure to Apply for Admission to the ECE Graduate Program. After that, applicants seeking financial aid should complete the downloadable Application for Graduate Appointment and mail it to the ECE Department at UIC. It is suggested that applicants check all four forms of financial aid on the application form. Please note that all correspondence with the UIC Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering concerning graduate admissions should be sent to the following address: The University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (M/C 154) Attn: Student Affairs Office (1020 SEO) 851 S. Morgan Street Chicago, IL 60607-7053 USA Please do not send the of graduate college application form, application fee or transcripts to this address. If you cannot afford to send separate packages - send all the materials to OAR and they will forward the additional materials to us. This will avoid a lot of unnecessary delays. Click here to see Frequently Asked Questions.

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago This page is about Ph.D. degree requirements. Degree Requirements - Doctor of Philosophy Minimum semester hours required: 108 beyond the baccalaureate. Students admitted with prior master's degree in EE, CE, or a related field: Must complete a minimum of 28 hours of credit in graduate course work, 16 hours of which must be ECE course work at the 500 level excluding ECE 595, 596, 597, 598, 599. A Computer Engineering (CE) student may substitute up to 4 hours out of the 16 hours required 500 level ECE course work with 500 level CS course work (excluding CS 595, 596, 597, 598, 599), provided he/she takes the same number of credit hours at the 400 level in ECE. Examples. 1. Student #1: (EE or CE). 4 ECE 500 level courses (16 hours) + 3 other courses. 2. Student #2: (CE). 3 ECE 500 level courses + 1 CS 500 level course + 1 ECE 400 level course + 2 other courses. Any course that is nearly equivalent to one taken in master's program earlier will not earn Ph.D. credit. Credit earned in ECE 596 (Individual Study) may not be applied toward the Ph.D. degree. Candidates must earn ECE 599 credits of at least 44 hours beyond master's degree. A student admitted to the Graduate College with a prior master's degree will automatically receive 32 hours of credit toward their Ph.D. course work requirement. Student admitted directly after bachelor's degree in EE, CE, or related field: Must complete a minimum of 52 hours of graduate course work, 36 hours of which must be ECE course work with at least 24 hours at the 500 level excluding ECE 595, 596, 597, 598, 599. A CE student may substitute up to 8 hours out of the 24 hours required ECE 500 level course work with 500 level CS course work (excluding CS 595, 596, 597, 598, 599), provided he/she takes the same number of credit hours at the 400 level in ECE. Examples. 1. Student #1: (EE or CE). 6 ECE 500 level courses (24 hours) + 3 ECE 400 level courses + 4 other courses. 2. Student #2: (CE). 5 ECE 500 level courses + 1 CS 500 level course + 4 ECE 400 level courses + 3 other courses. A student may apply to receive an M.S. degree upon passing the preliminary examination provided that the coursework required for M.S. degree under course only option is completed. If any one of the Ph.D. degree requirements of passing the qualifying examination or passing the preliminary exam is not successfully completed, student may apply for transfer to the M.S. program for an opportunity to complete the M.S. degree requirements under the thesis option. Credit earned in ECE 596 (Individual Study) may not be applied toward the Ph.D. degree. Candidates must earn ECE 599 credits of at least 56 hours beyond bachelor's degree.

All doctoral students must: Perhaps it is sufficient to say that the student must pass within 5 semesters, and that the exams are given every April. Pass two areas of the Ph.D. qualifying exam within the first five semesters of enrollment of full-time study. The first attempt must be made in the first April after your first semester of enrollment. If a second attempt is needed, it must be made at the next consecutive exam date. Time spent on an approved leave of absence does not forestall the first attempt. Students with a GPA of less than 3.0/4.0 will not be permitted to appear for the qualifying examination. Pass an oral preliminary examination on the proposed dissertation research topic. This examination is administered by a faculty committee approved by the Graduate College and chaired by the student's advisor. Students must pass the preliminary examination one year prior to their final dissertation defense. Demonstrate a capacity for independent research on an original dissertation research topic within the major field of study. Research is performed under the supervision of an advisor and orally defended before a five member faculty committee approved by the Graduate College. The faculty committee must contain at least two ECE tenure-track faculty members. Ph.D. Qualifying Exam A student admitted to the Ph.D. program must pass two areas of a written qualifying examination within the first five semesters of enrollment in order to become a doctoral candidate. The first attempt must be made in the first April after your first semester of enrollment to allow for a second consecutive sitting. Qualifying exams are only offered during the Spring semester (first Friday of April). Master's students in ECE may petition to appear in the qualifying examination if they have completed at least one calendar year of residence and have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Students registered for the qualifying examination can obtain copies of the past two exams in Room 900 SEO. Solutions are not provided. Qualifying Examination Dates Sign up by the second Friday of March. Examination on the first Friday of April. Qualifying Examination Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Signal Processing Communications Controls Electromagnetics Solid State Electronics Computer Architecture Digital Systems & VLSI Design Algorithms & Data Structures

Click here for more information about the Ph.D. qualifying exam.

Preliminary Examination A Committee Recommendation Form, listing the committee members and their affiliations, must be submitted to the Graduate College three weeks prior to the exam date. If human subjects are involved, Institutional Review Board approval is required. If animals are involved, Animal Care Panel approval is required. The chair and advisor is the primary reader of the dissertation, and must be a full member of the UIC graduate faculty. The five member examining committee must include two UIC tenured faculty, one individual from outside the degree-granting program (either a graduate faculty member in another UIC department or college, or outside the university), and at least two ECE tenure-track faculty members. If the outside member is not a UIC graduate faculty member, his/her curriculum vitae must accompany the Committee Recommendation Form to demonstrate equivalent academic standards. The faculty committee must contain at least two ECE tenure-track faculty members. Graduate programs should strive for diversity in the composition of the preliminary examination committee. The appointment of one or two members from outside the degree-granting program or university is encouraged. The timing, content, and nature (written, oral, or both) of the preliminary examination is left to the discretion of the preliminary examination committee. The committee reports its recommendations (either pass or fail) in writing to the Dean of the Graduate College. A candidate may not be passed if more than one vote of fail is reported. The committee may require that specified conditions be met before the passing recommendation becomes effective. The Dean, on the recommendation of the committee, may permit a second examination. A third examination is not permitted. Failure to complete the degree requirements within five years of passing the preliminary examination requires a new examination. The Graduate College requires the preliminary examination be given after at least one calendar year of residence and one calendar year prior to the final dissertation defense. Registration Ph.D. candidates must register for at least zero credit hours each semester (excluding summer) after passing the preliminary examination until the final defense is made and the dissertation is submitted in compliance with department and Graduate College rules. Ph.D. candidates are not required to register for zero hours after they successfully defend their dissertation unless registration is required to maintain a specific status (i.e., assistantship, visa, or continued use of university facilities). Until the final defense is presented, all Ph.D. candidates must choose one of the following options: (A) Register for zero hours credit of ECE 599 thesis research every semester (excluding summer) until the degree is awarded OR (B) Pay a non-refundable dissertation fee each academic year in lieu of further registration. This fee is equal to twice the amount of tuition for zero credit (Range IV) at the time of payment. Students who elect this option are ineligible for student health insurance, library and laboratory privileges, computer facilities, ID card, and loan deferment. The student must also certify to the department that he or she will not use any University facilities throughout

the semester if option B is petitioned. Option A must be petitioned each semester. Option B must be petitioned every year. If a Ph.D. candidate successfully defends the dissertation and submits the final dissertation to the Graduate College after the semester deadline but prior to the fifth day of instruction of the next semester, the degree is conferred in the subsequent semester. Registration for that semester is not required. Time Limitation All doctoral candidates must complete the required course work and defend a dissertation within seven consecutive years, regardless of which option is selected. Students who fail to graduate within this time frame will be dismissed from the Graduate College for failure to progress. Credit Hours Required by the University of Illinois at Chicago At least 54 semester hours beyond the master's level or its equivalent must be taken at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Transfer Credit After admission to the Ph.D. program, students may petition to transfer a maximum of 9 semester hours earned outside the university. Transfer credit courses must be relevant to the program of study. A transcript showing the courses and grades must accompany the petition. A detailed outline of the courses, including information about the textbook and material covered, should be included. Students must also provide an official letter from the univer sity stating the courses were not used to satisfy any prior degree requirements. Students may only petition to transfer graduate credit that was not used to fulfill course work requirements of their prior Master's degree(s). Academic Probation A student's curriculum should be planned in cooperation with his/her advisor. All graduate students are required to maintain a 3.0/4.0 grade point average (GPA). The GPA calculation does not include seminar, independent study, and research courses (ECE 596 and 599). Graduate course work must by satisfied by a C grade or higher. If a student's GPA falls below 3.0, the Graduate College will issue a letter of warning and impose academic probation for a specified period of time. Failure to comply with the terms will likely result in expulsion from the Graduate College. A student on probation is ineligible for department awarded financial aid, recommendation letters for F-1 practical training, or graduation. Doctor of Philosophy Additional Regulations

Prior Publication of Research Findings Students engaged in research are encouraged to publish certain findings that are later incorporated into the final dissertation. In such cases, appropriate acknowledgment of the earlier publication should be included in the final dissertation. The Graduate College encourages such publication, but the dissertation may not be published in its entirety before all degree requirements, including the defense of the dissertation, have been completed. Format Guidelines Thesis and dissertation format guidelines are described in detail in a Thesis Manual published by and available in the Graduate College. The defended and approved dissertation must be submitted to the department for a format check one week prior to the deadline set by the Graduate College. Final Dissertation Defense Upon completion of the dissertation, the candidate must orally defend the work before a committee. A new Committee Recommendation Form must be filed, listing the dissertation title and committee members. The committee composition requirements of the final defense committee are the same as the preliminary exam committee, except that the appointment of one member from outside the degree-granting program is mandatory. The chairperson (advisor) is considered the primary reader of the thesis. A second and/or third member of the committee may also be designated as "readers." The committee vote is Pass or Fail. A candidate may not be passed if more than one vote of Fail is reported. Dissertation Committee Composition The advisor is considered the primary reader of the dissertation. The dissertation committee is appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College on the recommendation of the student's department. Committee Recommendation Forms are available in Room 900 SEO and must be filed at least two weeks prior to the exam date. Five member composition of the committee is as follows: One chair, considered the primary reader of the dissertation and full member of the UIC graduate faculty; At least two UIC tenured faculty members; At least two ECE tenure-track faculty members; At least one member must be from outside the degree-granting program, either graduate faculty from other UIC departments or colleges or outside the university. If the outside member does not come from UIC faculty, they must demonstrate equivalent academic standards. The outside member's curriculum vitae must accompany the Committee Recommendation Form. Click here for a summary guide to the ECE Ph.D. graduation procedure and requirements. Click here to see Frequently Asked Questions.

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago A Guide to the ECE Ph.D. Graduation Procedure and Requirements 1. Select an advisor (with his/her consent) for your thesis work. The thesis advisor does not need to be the one to whom you were originally assigned upon entering the graduate program. Any departmental faculty at the rank of Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor may act as an advisor. 2. Pass the written Ph.D. Qualifying Examination. 3. Clearly identify a dissertation area and in consultation with your advisor select a committee. Your advisor will obtain their approval. Provide the committee with a copy of your dissertation prospectus and with your advisor arrange a mutually acceptable date for your Preliminary Oral Examination. Your advisor must submit the Committee Recommendation Form to the Graduate Coordinator (900 SEO) at least three weeks prior to the scheduled examination date; he/she will forward it to the Graduate College. 4. The Graduate College will return an Examination Report form to the student affairs office and will send letters through the Graduate Coordinator for your committee members. After the examination, your advisor will return the completed Examination Report to the Coordinator who will forward it to the Graduate College. 5. Under the advisor's direction, complete your dissertation, registering for at least 44 (52) hours of ECE 599 if you have (do not have) a prior Master's degree. (See dissertation guidelines in the Graduate College Thesis Manual available from the Graduate College.) If you are required to maintain a minimum number of hours of course work, you may register for more hours of ECE 599 but a maximum of 44/52 will be credited toward your degree. Consult the UIC graduate catalog for regulations on continuous registration. It is strongly recommended that you keep your entire committee appraised of your progress, and consult them periodically for guidance in their areas of specialization related to your dissertation research. 6. When your dissertation is completed, provide your committee with a copy of your dissertation and arrange a mutually acceptable date for your Ph.D. dissertation defense. Your advisor must submit the Committee Recommendation form and current curriculum vitae of the outside member (if the member is from outside UIC) to the Coordinator at least three to four weeks prior to the scheduled examination date; he/she will forward it to the Graduate College. 7. The Graduate College will return an Examination Report form and two Thesis Certificates of Approval forms to the Graduate Coordinator with letters for your committee members. After the examination your advisor will return the completed Thesis Certificate of Approval forms and the Examination Report to the Coordinator who will get the signatures from the head of the department and return them to you. 8. After your thesis has been defended and approved by the committee, it must be submitted to the student affairs office for final format approval. The office will review the format and notify you of any needed corrections. Please note that the Graduate College is quite rigorous in its check of the format. Students are strongly advised to follow the guidelines in the Graduate College Thesis Manual. 9. On the assumption that you will complete all your requirements by the end of the semester, complete the Apply to Graduate/Pending Degree List (Graduation Request form) and the Ph.D. Graduation Checklist. 10. Make an appointment with your advisor and bring the completed forms. Request your advisor to obtain your file from the Graduate Coordinator. At this meeting, it is your responsibility to demonstrate to your advisor that you have completed all of the requirements necessary for your graduation, pending successful completion of work in progress. If there are any remaining petitions to file, such as a request for an extension

11.

12.

13.

14.

of the time limit for graduation or transfer credits, this is the time to file them. Obtain your advisor's signature on the Apply to Graduate/Pending Degree List and on the Ph.D. Graduation Checklist. Submit the Apply to Graduate/Pending Degree List, and the Ph.D. Graduation Checklist to the Student Affairs Office (900 SEO) by the published deadline. Apply to Graduate/Pending Degree List will be forwarded to the Graduate College by the Student Affairs Office. The Ph.D. Graduation Checklist will be retained in your file. Submit the Apply to Graduate/Pending Degree List form to the Student Affairs Office by Friday of the eighth week of classes. The Graduate College is very strict about this deadline; if the form is not submitted by that date, you will not graduate that semester. Please consult the current timetable for any changes in these deadlines. It is your responsibility to know the Graduate College deadlines, which are published each semester in the timetable. Deadline for submitting defended and formats approved Ph.D. dissertation to the Graduate College is Friday of the tenth week of classes. Schedule to defend your dissertation a week prior to this deadline, so that you have ample time for format check and last minute changes. At that time you must also provide the department with a copy of your dissertation. Please consult the current timetable for any changes in these deadlines. It is your responsibility to know the Graduate College deadlines, which are published each semester in the timetable. Contact the Graduate Coordinator at Student Affairs Office (Room 900 SEO), call at 312.413.2291, 312.996.4325 or email at [email protected], during the last two weeks of classes to see if there are any remaining difficulties with your graduation forms. It is your responsibility to contact the Graduate Coordinator; this is an extremely busy period and he/she will not have the time to search you out.

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago This page is about the Ph.D. qualifying exam. General regulations | Examination rules | Appeals | Qualifying exam areas Click here to download the Ph.D. qualifying exam application form. General Regulations Class registration (minimum zero hours) is required to take the qualifying examination. Students must be admitted to the ECE graduate (Ph.D. or Master) program on a full standing status with the Graduate College in order to appear for the qualifying examination. Students who pursue a Ph.D. degree part-time are required to appear for the qualifying exam in the semester following registration of 24 Ph.D. semester credit hours (including independent study courses and ECE 599). This requirement is equivalent to two semesters of full time course work. Master's students in ECE may petition to appear in the qualifying examination if they have completed at least one calendar year of residence and have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Students are required to pass area examinations in two areas. Students may sit for the qualifying exam a maximum of two times. Second attempts must be made in next consecutive offering of the examination. Students who pass any area of the examination during the first attempt are not required to re-take that area in the subsequent examination. Students may elect to take one or two area examinations at each sitting of the examination. Students must register for the examination in Room 900 SEO three weeks prior to the examination date. You must specify the areas at the time of registration. Students who fail to pass two areas after their second sitting or fail to appear when required will be expelled from the graduate program. Each area of the examination lasts two hours. Areas of the examination are based on upper-level undergraduate and beginning graduate level materials. Exam questions are based on a publicly announced list of required topics and suggested reading materials, rather than specific ECE courses. Examination Rules and Regulations Students are to remain in the examination room during the 15 minute intervals between examination periods.

Students are to leave their notes and other reading material at a designated place in the examination room before the start of the examination. Students will not have access to this material during breaks. All examinations are closed book. Students are permitted to bring a scientific calculator and no programmable calculators are allowed. Cell phone use in the examination room is not allowed. The order of the papers is determined by the Director of Graduate Studies prior to the exam date. It will be revealed on the exam date by the faculty and staff supervising the examination. Students are required to return their examination paper, answer book, and scratch paper at the end of each examination period. Any student who leaves the examination room unescorted will not be allowed to return and complete the remainder of the examination. Each student is assigned a code number for the qualifying examination. She or he must not write his/her name or social security number anywhere on the examination paper, answer book, or other papers used in the examination. The code number is the only form of identification that should appear on any testing materials. Each student's area examination will be judged as having passed or failed, and a numeric score reported. Area subcommittees must provide the results of the area examinations within ten calendar days of the examination to the Director of Graduate Studies. Two weeks after the examination, the Graduate Committee reviews the exam results for the purpose of maintaining approximate uniformity across content areas. The Graduate Committee will modify content area subcommittee pass/fail decisions in extreme cases only. The Director of Graduate Studies notifies students of the examination results on the first business day following the Graduate Committee meeting. A letter will be sent to the student's current address. Appeals Appeals related to the grading or results of the exam should be made by the student's advisor to the Director of Graduate Studies. The DGS will present the appeal to the Graduate Committee for reconsideration and possible re-evaluation.

Qualifying Examination Areas

Signal Processing | Communications | Controls | Electromagnetics | Solid State Electronics | Computer Architecture | Digital Systems & VLSI Design | Algorithms & Data Structures Qualifying Examination Dates Sign up by the second Friday of March. Examination on the first Friday of April.

SIGNAL PROCESSING Major topics: 1. Signals and systems: Continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems, linearity, time-invariance, stability, causality, frequency domain description, continuous-time and discrete-time Fourier transform (CTFT and DTFT), discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and its applications, fast Fourier transform (FFT), linear and circular convolution, sampling of continuous-time signals, sampling theorem and relation between CTFT and DTFT, sampling rate conversion - interpolation and decimation. 2. z-transform and filter design: z-transform and properties, system function, stability analysis, digital filter design and realization, infinite-duration and finite-duration impulse response (IIR and FIR) filter properties and design, linear convolution using DFT in FIR filter implementation. 3. Random signals: Random variables, expectations, random vectors, discrete-time random signals (random sequences) and application to discrete-time systems, stationarity of random sequences, autocorrelation and power spectral density of random sequences, spectral factorization. 4. Optimum processing of signals: Optimum signal estimation, minimum mean squared error estimation, discrete-time Wiener filters, linear prediction and algorithms. Courses helpful in the exam area: ECE 417: Digital Signal Processing II (Fall) ECE 418: Statistical Digital Signal Processing (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 310, ECE 317, and ECE 341. Typical references: 1. A. V. Oppenheim, R. W. Schafer, and J. R. Buck, Discrete-Time Signal Processing, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1999. 2. J. G. Proakis and D. Manolakis, Digital Signal Processing: Principles, Algorithms and Applications, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1996. 3. A. V. Oppenheim, A. S. Willsky, and S. H. Nawab, Signals and Systems, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1997. 4. D. Graupe, Time Series Analysis, Identification and Adaptive Filtering, 2nd Edition, Kreiger Publishing, 1989. 5. S. Kay, Fundamentals of Statistical Signal Processing, Vol. 1: Estimation Theory, Prentice Hall, 1993. 6. S. K. Mitra, Digital Signal Processing: A Computer-Based Approach, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2006. COMMUNICATIONS Major topics: 1. Probability and random processes: Basic probability, random variables, expectations, moment-generating functions, transformation of random variables, random processes, Gaussian random process, stationarity (wide-sense, strictly, and cyclo- stationary processes), correlation, power spectral density, representation of bandpass processes,

ergodicity, MMSE (Wiener) filtering. 2. Fourier analysis and analog communication: Fourier series, Fourier transforms, time averages, amplitude modulation, frequency modulation, reception in noise in analog communication systems. 3. Digital communication systems: Sampling, pulse code modulation, binary and M-ary modulation, signal space representations, optimum reception of signals, probability of error calculation. 4. Source coding and basic information theory: Quantization, Huffman coding, entropy of discrete sources, discrete channel mutual information, channel capacity. Courses helpful in the exam area: ECE 432: Digital Communications (Fall) ECE 530: Random Signal Analysis (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 311 and ECE 341. Typical references: 1. J. G. Proakis, Digital Communications, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2001. 2. A. Papoulis and S. U. Pillai, Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes, 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2002. 3. B. P. Lathi, Modern Digital and Analog Communications, 3rd Edition, Oxford University Press, 1998. 4. S. Haykin, Communication Systems, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2000. 5. J. G. Proakis and M. Salehi, Communication Systems Engineering, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2002. CONTROLS Major topics: 1. Causality; time invariance; linearity; superposition principle; Laplace transform; transfer function; block diagrams; impulse response; frequency response; steady state response; transient response; convolution; BIBO stability; Routh-Hurwitz criterion; Nyquist criterion; root-locus methods; Bode plots; feedback control. 2. z-transform; z-transform analysis of discrete-time control systems; sampled-data systems; zero-order hold and first-order hold. 3. Stability analysis; state variable description of continuous and discrete time systems; matrix algebra; state-space representation of systems; state variable description; linear operators; impulse response matrix; time domain solution of linear matrix differential and difference equations. 4. Controllability; observability; reducible and irreducible realizations; state feedback; state observers; Lyapunov stability. Courses helpful in the exam area: ECE 451: Control Engineering (Fall) ECE 550: Linear Systems Theory and Design (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 310 and ECE 350.

Typical references: 1. B. C. Kuo and F. Golnaraghi, Automatic Control Systems, 8th Edition, John Wiley, 2002. 2. R. C. Dorf and R. H. Bishop, Modern Control Systems, 10th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005. 3. G. F. Franklin, J. D. Powell, and M. L. Workman, Digital Control of Dynamic Systems, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1998. 4. P. J. Antsaklis and A. N. Michel, Linear Systems, McGraw-Hill, 1997. 5. C. T. Chen, Linear System Theory and Design, 3rd Edition, Oxford University Press, 1998. 6. K. Ogata, Discrete Time Control Systems, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1995. ELECTROMAGNETICS Major topics: 1. Static and dynamic fields, Poisson's and Laplace equations, Maxwell's equations in time and frequency domains, potentials, and solutions to Helmholtz equation. 2. Waves and wave propagation, scattering and diffraction, power and energy. 3. Microwave circuits, transmission lines, simple waveguide structures, impedance matching, and microwave circuit elements. 4. Antennas radiation, antenna parameters, simple antennas and radiating elements, and antenna arrays. Courses helpful in the exam area: ECE 421: Introduction to Antenna Engineering (Fall) ECE 520: Electromagnetic Field Theory (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 322. Typical references: 1. W. L. Stutzman, Antenna Theory and Design, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 1997. 2. C. A. Balanis, Advanced Engineering Electromagnetics, Wiley, 1989. 3. A. Ishimaru, Electromagnetic Wave Propagation, Radiation and Scattering, Prentice Hall, 1991. 4. R. F. Harrington, Time-Harmonic Electromagnetic Fields, Wiley, 2001. 5. R. E. Collin, Foundations of Microwave Engineering, 2nd Edition, Wiley-IEEE, 2000. 6. P. A. Rizzi, Microwave Engineering: Passive Circuits, Prentice Hall, 1988. SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS Major topics: 1. Quantum Mechanics: Schrodinger's equation; Heisenberg's principle; solving Scrodinger's equation in quantum wells with finite and infinite barrier heights (1-dimensional solution); Fermi distribution; typical bandstructures for direct and indirect bandgap materials. 2. Semiconductors: Crstyal structures; lattice parameter; bandgap; density of states; effective density of states; carrier distribution; resistivity; conductance; Hall effect;

mobility; intrinsic and extrinsic carrier concentration; Fermi level; equilibirum and non-equilibrium; generation-recombination processes; continuity equation; Poisson's equation; optical processes in semiconductors; radiative and non-radiative recomination; steady state and transient; drift current; diffusion current. 3. P-N Junctions: Step junctions; graded junctions; band profile; depletion width; depletion approximation; built in potential; forward and reverse bias; diffusion length; lifetime; diffusion coefficient; drift and diffusion currents; current-voltage relationship; quasi Fermi levels; depletion and diffusion capacitance. 4. Bipolar Junction Transistors: Concept of emitter, base and collector; band profile; uniform and graded doping in base region; base transit time; emitter injection efficiency; base transport factor; DC current gain (common emitter mode); device configurations (common base, common emitter, common collector); Ebers-Moll model; current-voltage relationship; active, cut-off, reverse active and saturation regions of operation; small signal model. 5. MOSFETs: Fundamentals of MOS capacitor; accumulation, depletion and inversion regions; capacitance-voltage characteristics (C-V); high frequency and low frequency C-V characteristics; threshold voltage; effects of oxide charges (fixed, interface, mobile) on MOS characteristics, MOSFET, current-voltage relationship, saturation and linear regions of operation; transconductance gain; small signal model; short channel effects. Courses helpful in the exam area: ECE 448: Transistors (Fall) ECE 540: Semiconductor Device Physics (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 346. Typical references: 1. B. Streetman and S. Banarjee, Solid State Electronic Devices, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2006. 2. R. Pierrent, Semiconductor Device Fundamentals, Prentice Hall, 1996. 3. S. M. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 1981. COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE Major topics: 1. Instruction set designs: ISA classification, addressing modes, operands and operations. 2. Pipelining and superscalar designs: Basic issues in pipelining, out-of-order execution techniques including scoreboarding and Tomasulo algorithms, branch prediction techniques, and multi-threading techniques. 3. Memory hierarchy designs: Cache organizations, cache performance, DRAM memory, and virtual memory systems. 4. Multiprocessor architecture: Taxonomy of parallel architectures, cache coherence. 5. Interconnection networks. 6. I/O devices and peripherals: Basic I/O issues such as DMA and interrupts, RAID systems. 7. Performance evaluation metrics: Execution time, CPI, throughput, and speedup. Courses helpful in the exam area:

ECE 466: Advanced Computer Architecture (Fall) ECE 569: High Performance Processors and Systems (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 267 and ECE 366. Typical references: 1. J. Hennessy and D. Patterson, Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, 3rd Edition, Morgan Kaufmann, 2002. 2. D. Culler, J. P. Singh, and A. Gupta, Parallel Computer Architecture: A Hardware/Software Approach, Morgan Kaufmann, 1998. DIGITAL SYSTEMS & VLSI DESIGN Major topics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Combinational logic minimization techniques. Finite state machine (FSM) synthesis (Moore, Mealy). Synthesis and analysis of synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. State minimization and state assignment techniques. Logic design using MUXs, decoders, registers, shift registers, and PLAs. Clocking issues: Clock methods, period determination, skew and jitter, and types of timing - edge triggered, two phase timing, and pulsed timing. Introduction to IC building blocks: Semiconductor devices, and CMOS inverter. Static and dynamic circuit implementation techniques. VLSI circuit design issues of latches, flip-flops, and registers. Basic concepts of integrated circuits implementation strategies: Custom, semi-custom, cell-based, and array-based design approaches.

Courses helpful in the exam area: ECE 465: Digital Systems Design (Spring) ECE 467: Introduction to VLSI Design (Fall) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as ECE 265. Typical references: 1. V. P. Nelson, H. T. Nagle, B. D. Carroll, and J. D. Irwin, Digital Logic Circuit Analysis and Design, Prentice Hall, 1995. 2. J. Wakerly, Digital Design: Principles and Practices, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2006. 3. J. M. Rabaey, A. Chandrakasan, and B. Nikolic, Digital Integrated Circuits: A Design Perspective, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2003. 4. N. H. E. Weste and D. Harris, CMOS VLSI Design: A Circuits and Systems Perspective, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 2005. ALGORITHMS & DATA STRUCTURES Major topics: 1. Algorithms analysis techniques: Correctness and complexity, proving techniques,

NP-completeness. 2. Algorithm design approaches: Recursion, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy methods, and solution searching methods. 3. Applied algorithms: Sorting, searching, graph computations, and string matching. 4. Complex data structures: Lists, stacks, queues, sets, hash tables, trees, heaps, and graphs. Courses helpful in the exam area: CS 401: Computer Algorithms I (Fall) ECE 566: Parallel Processing (Spring) In addition students are expected to be familiar with basic material covered in prerequisite courses such as CS 201 and CS 202. Typical references: 1. T. H. Cormen, C. E. Leiserson, and R. L. Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, McGraw-Hill, 1990. 2. M. A. Weiss, Data Structures & Algorithm Analysis in C++, 2nd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999. 3. A. Grama, G. Karypis, V. Kumar, and A. Gupta, Introduction to Parallel Computing, 2nd Edition, Addison Wesley, 2003.

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago This page is all about Master of Science degree. Master of Science students may elect either a thesis or a course only option. No other options are available. A student must complete (i) 36 credit hours of graduate course work and thesis research under a thesis option, or (ii) 40 credit hours of graduate course work under a course only option. Degree Requirements - Master of Science (course only option) Complete 40 credit hours of graduate course work, including a minimum of 32 hours of ECE graduate course work at 400 or 500 level. Complete at least four 500 level ECE courses (minimum 16 semester hours), including no more than one 594 course and excluding seminar, individual study, project or thesis research courses (ECE 595, 596, 597 and 598). Up to 8 hours of non-ECE graduate course work, completed with prior department approval, may be applied toward the M.S. degree. A Computer Engineering (CE) student may substitute up to 4 hours out of the 16 hours required 500 level ECE course work with 500 level CS course work (excluding CS 595, 596, 597, 598, 599), provided he/she takes the same number of credit hours at the 400 level in ECE. Examples. 1. Student #1: (EE or CE). 4 ECE 500 level courses (16 hours) + 4 ECE 400 level courses + 2 other courses. 2. Student #2: (CE). 3 ECE 500 level courses + 1 CS 500 level course + 5 ECE 400 level courses + 1 other course. Individual Study (ECE 596) credits obtained after the Summer 1999 term do not count toward fulfilling M.S. degree requirements. Students who receive financial aid from the ECE Department at any time during their enrollment in the M.S. program are expected to complete degree requirements under the thesis option. Degree Requirements - Master of Science (thesis option) Complete 28 credit hours of graduate course work, including a minimum of 24 hours of ECE graduate course work at 400 or 500 level. Complete at least three 500 level ECE courses (minimum 12 semester hours), including no more than one 594 course and excluding seminar, individual study, project or thesis research courses (ECE 595, 596, 597 and 598). Up to 4 hours of non-ECE graduate course work, completed with prior department approval, may be applied toward the M.S. degree. A Computer Engineering (CE) student may substitute up to 4 hours out of the 12 hours required 500 level ECE course work with 500 level CS course work (excluding CS 595, 596, 597, 598, 599), provided he/she takes the same number of credit hours at the 400 level in ECE. Examples. 1. Student #1: (EE or CE). 3 ECE 500 level courses (12 hours) + 3 ECE 400 level courses + 1 other course. 2. Student #2: (CE). 2 ECE 500 level courses + 1 CS 500 level course + 4 ECE 400 level courses.

Complete 8 credit hours of thesis research (ECE 598). A final thesis should be completed in compliance with ECE Department and Graduate College regulations and deadlines. No more than 8 hours of ECE 598 may be applied toward the degree. Master Thesis Guidelines 1. Select an advisor from the ECE or affiliated department faculty. All ECE assistant, associate and full professors are eligible to serve as primary or secondary advisors. Discuss thesis proposals and expectations. 2. Under your advisor's direction, conduct your thesis research, registering for at least 8 hours of ECE 598. If you are required to maintain a minimum number of hours of course work, you may register for more hours of ECE 598, but no more than 8 hours will be credited toward your degree. Consult the UIC graduate catalog for continuous registration regulations. 3. Complete the Apply to Graduate/Pending Degree List (Graduation Request Form) by the published deadline. 4. Select a thesis committee with your advisor, and obtain their approval to serve on your committee. Provide your committee members with a copy of your thesis and arrange a mutually acceptable date for your thesis defense. Submit the Committee Recommendation Form to the Student Affairs Office (Room 900 SEO) at least three weeks prior to the scheduled thesis defense date. 5. The Graduate College will generate an Examination Report form and two Thesis Certificates of Approval (red bordered forms), which will be given to your thesis advisor prior to the defense date. After the defense, obtain the three forms and see the Graduate Coordinator in Room 900 SEO. 6. Submit the defended and corrected thesis to Student Affairs Office (Room 900 SEO) at least one week prior to the Graduate College deadline for a format approval. She/he will review the format and notify you of any needed corrections in 24 hours. Please refer to Thesis Manual of the Graduate College as a guide line for the format. 7. File any final petitions (i.e., request for a time extension or transfer of credits) and M.S. thesis checklist (obtain the advisor's signature on this checklist) and submit it to Student Affairs Office (Room 900 SEO). 8. Submit the two watermarked copies of your thesis, envelopes, Examination Report, and Certificates of Approval to the Graduate College by the published deadline. Submit a duplicate copy to Room 900 SEO (regular paper is acceptable). 9. Return all borrowed equipment and keys to Room 1020. Academic Performance A student's curriculum should be planned in cooperation with his/her advisor. All graduate students are required to maintain a 3.0/4.0 grade point average (GPA). The GPA calculation does not include seminar, independent study, and research courses (ECE 595, 596, 597, and 598). Graduate course work must be satisfied with a C grade or higher. If a student's GPA falls

below 3.0/4.0, the Graduate College will issue a letter of warning and impose academic probation for a specified period of time. Failure to comply with the terms will likely result in expulsion from the Graduate College. A student on probation or limited standing is ineligible for department awarded financial aid, recommendation letters for F-1 practical training, or graduation. Time Limitation All degree requirements must be completed within five years of initial registration in the degree program. Different time allowances apply to students on time-limited visas. Students who fail to graduate within five years will be dismissed from the Graduate College for failure to progress. Registration M.S. students who have completed all course credit requirements, except the thesis requirement, are not required to register during regular semesters. Registration (of zero credit hours) is required if a student plans to use any university facilities. Students on a time-limited visa must petition to register for zero hours every semester (excluding summer) until they graduate. Details are available in the Office of International Services. Credit Hours Required by the University of Illinois at Chicago At least 24 hours of graduate work required for the M.S. degree must be earned as a degree candidate at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Transfer of Credit Hours After admission to the M.S. program, students may petition to transfer a maximum of 9 semester hours earned outside the university. Transfer credit courses must be relevant to the program of study. A transcript showing the courses and grades must accompany the petition. A detailed outline of the courses, including information about the textbook and material covered, should be included. Students must also provide an official letter from the university stating the courses were not used to satisfy any prior degree requirements. Non-degree to degree students may petition up to 12 semester hours of credit earned at UIC. Only relevant graduate level courses in which a grade of A or B was earned will be considered. Click here to see Frequently Asked Questions.

Graduate Program Information Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Chicago Frequently asked top 10 questions about UIC's graduate programs in ECE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Should I choose CE or EE? Should I apply to Ph.D. program or Master's program? What are the factors in admission and financial aid decisions? How to calculate my GPA? When do I expect to hear from you about my application? What is my chance of getting financial aid? What is the work load for students receiving financial aid? How many years of financial aid do I expect to get? How should I select which courses to take if I am a Ph.D. student? How should I select which courses to take if I am a Master student?

1. Should I choose CE or EE? We offer Ph.D. degree in ECE and Master of Science degre in ECE. Students need to choose between CE and EE when they apply to our department. If you have a background in CE, it is natural that you choose graduate study in CE. If you have a more EE related background, then you should choose graduate study in EE. However, some may prefer to have a change in graduate study. You should make sure that you have adequate background (required course work) and sufficient preparation for the field of graduate study you choose to apply for. Your chance of getting admitted will be reduced if you cannot show adequate background and sufficient preparation. 2. Should I apply to Ph.D. program or Master's program? For graduate admission to UIC, we consider only your GPA for the last 60 credit hours of course work at the undergraduate level. To be considered for Ph.D. admission, normally you are required to have a GPA of 3.5/4.0 or higher. For master's admission, you should have a GPA of 3.2/4.0 or higher. We strongly recommend that you apply for our Ph.D. program if your GPA is higher than 3.5/4.0 since that will guarantee a consideration for financial aid. 3. What are the factors in admission and financial aid decisions? Our admission as well financial aid decisions are made according to the following factors: Your GPA Your ranking in your class/school The strength of the program/school from which you received your degree(s) Your publication record (where available) Your GRE and TOEFL (when required) Letters of recommendation Personal statement and cv. 4. How to calculate my GPA?

GPA (grade point average) is calculated as your total quality points divided by the total credit (semester) hours. Here is an example. Assume that you have taken the following courses: Course 1: 3 credit hours, you got C (pass); Course 2: 2 credit hours, you got B (good); Course 3: 3 credit hours, you got B (good); Course 4: 3 credit hours, you got A (excellent); Course 5: 4 credit hours, you got A (excellent); Course 6: 5 credit hours, you got A (excellent). *** Note some schools may also use A-, B+, B, B-, C+,C,C-, etc. Your total number of hours is 20=3*3+2+4+5. The quality points for each course are calculated as number of hours times the scale used. Most schools use A=4, B=3, C=2, and D=1 while others use A=5, B=4, etc. For the above example, if we use A=4, B=3, C=2, and D=1, we have: Course 1: 3 credit hours, C=2 (pass); your quality points=6; Course 2: 2 credit hours, B=3 (good); your quality points=6; Course 3: 3 credit hours, B=3 (good); your quality points=9; Course 4: 3 credit hours, A=4 (excellent); your quality points=12; Course 5: 4 credit hours, A=4 (excellent); your quality points=16; Course 6: 5 credit hours, A=4 (excellent); your quality points=20. The total point you have achieved is 69=6*2+9+12+16+20. Thus, your GPA is 3.45=69/20. Since we have chosen A=4, now you can say that your GPA is 3.45/4.0. That is what we use at UIC. Note: This is what we use for universities in China: 85 to 100 -> A 75 to 84 -> B 60 to 74 -> C 0 to 59 -> E Note: This is what we use for universities in India: 73 to 100 -> A 53 to 72 -> B 33 to 52 -> C 0 to 32 -> E 5. When do I expect to hear from you about my application? Here is what you can expect from us: February 1 - May 10: Research assistantship awards. Last week in January: Fellowship nominations. First week in March: Fellowship and teaching assistantship awards. March 1 - March 31: M.S. admissions.

It is very important that we have your correct email address so that we can contact you for financial aid offers and I-20 form. 6. What is my chance of getting financial aid? Our policy is that we will only offer financial aid to full-time Ph.D. students. Only in a few exceptional cases, financial aid will be offered to Master's students. We offer Fellowships, TAs, RAs, and TFWs to new and existing Ph.D. students. Your chance of getting financial aid will be significantly improved if you can show a strong potential of research accomplishments (e.g., prior publications, prior degrees from reputable universities). It is very important that we have your correct email address so that we can contact you for financial aid offers. 7. What is the work load for students receiving financial aid? Fellowship holders are not require to do any work. Teaching assistantship recipients are required to work for 10-20 hours as a lab/teaching assistant. Research assistantship recipients are required to work for 10-20 hours on a research projects under the supervision of a professor. Graduate assistantship recipients are required to work for 10-20 hours on campus for other departments. Tuition and fee waiver recipients are not required to do any work. In all cases of financial aid, there are requiremnents for minimum number of course credit hours to be registered. 8. How many years of financial aid do I expect to get? Our past data have shown that our Ph.D. students typically spend 4-5 years in the department before they finish and defend their Ph.D. dissertations. Your financial aid will be guaranteed for 4-5 years if you are a good Ph.D. student who can produce satisfactory research results. The support you may get will be a combination of fellowship, TA, RA, and GA. The combination may vary depending on your advisor. 9. How should I select which courses to take if I am a Ph.D. student? If you have a prior Master's degree, you are required to take 7 courses. A minimum of 4 out the 7 courses must be ECE 500 level courses. If you do not have a prior Master's degree, we require you to take 13 courses. A minimum of 9 out the 13 courses must be ECE courses and a minimum of 6 of them must be ECE 500 level courses. Always talk to your Ph.D. advisor about course selections. As a Ph.D. student, each semester, you can take 2-3 ECE 400/500 level courses plus 0-8 credit hours of ECE 599 (Ph.D. Thesis Research). The courses you take in your first two semesters should be decided based on your areas of choice for your Ph.D. qualifying exam (Note: The exam will be in your second or third semester). We have a list of recommended courses for Ph.D. qualifying exams posted on the web. Course selections are primarily based on your needs of Ph.D. qualifying exam and future Ph.D. dissertation research. Again, always talk to your Ph.D. advisor about course selections. Students should make sure that non-ECE graduate course work would count for graduation credit. Courses in some departments, such as IDS, are generally not accepted for ECE credit. ENGR 400-403 do not count for ECE credit. Most of the non-ECE courses taken by ECE students are in CS, Physics, Mathematics, and Statistics. Credit is allowed only if these courses are at 400 or 500 level and these course are neither cross-listed with ECE courses nor do they have substantial overlap in course material with ECE courses. Additional restrictions may apply. For instance, some 400-level courses in other departments may be at a level comparable to ECE courses at 300-level or below, e.g. CS 450 (ECE 333) or Stat 401 (ECE 341) and these will not be accepted for credit. Students may be

allowed to take courses in other Engineering departments, e.g., robotics-related courses in MIE, at the recommendation of the advisor. 10. How should I select which courses to take if I am a Master student? Course only option: (1) you are required to take 10 courses. (2) Among these 10 courses, 8 of them must be ECE 400/500 level courses. (3) At least 4 of these courses must be ECE 500 level courses. (4) Up to 2 graduate courses can be taken outside the ECE Department (approval required) or can be transferred from other university. (5) There are no other restrictions. (6) Talk to your advisor if you do not understand these answers. Thesis option: (1) you are required to take 7 courses. (2) Among these 7 courses, 6 of them must be ECE 400/500 level courses. (3) At least 3 of these courses must be ECE 500 level courses. (4) Up to 1 graduate course can be taken outside the ECE Department (approval required). (5) You need to talk to your advisor for your courses selection to see which courses are more useful to your Master's thesis research.

Information

30 pages

Find more like this

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

18336


You might also be interested in

BETA
46752_chem_cvr.indd
Nurse Practice Act - Nursing, Florida Board of
ChemE_AR01.qxd
430-9578_MIA_MPArev