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"The noblest question in the world is What Good may I do in It?"

Poor Richard's Almanac (1737)

Franklin & Marshall

C atalog

2007­2008

Inquiries for additional information should be forwarded to the following offices: OfficeofAdmission AlumniPrograms&Development CollegeCommunications OfficeofStudentAcademicAffairs OfficeoftheDeanoftheCollege OfficeofFinancialAid OfficeofthePresident OfficeoftheProvost&DeanoftheFaculty OfficeoftheRegistrar (717)291-3951 (717)291-3955 (717)291-3981 (717)291-3989 (717)291-4000 (717)291-3991 (717)291-3971 (717)291-3986 (717)291-4168

General information: Franklin&MarshallCollege P.O.Box3003 Lancaster,PA17604-3003 (717)291-3911

College web site: www.fandm.edu For questions about the admission process call: e-mail: (717) 291-3951 www.admission.fandm.edu Statement on Nondiscrimination

Franklin & Marshall College is committed to having an inclusive campus community, and as an Equal Opportunity Employer, does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices on the basis of gender, race or ethnicity, color, national origin, religion, age (40 and older), disability, family or marital status, or sexual orientation. The College does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, or national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other College-administered programs.

Franklin & Marshall College reserves the right to amend any administrative, academic, or disciplinarypolicyorregulationdescribedinthisCatalog,withoutpriornoticetopersonswho mighttherebybeaffected.Informationaboutexpenses,fees,andotherchargesappliestothe academicyear2007­2008.Allfeesandotherchargesaresubjecttochange.Theprovisionsof theCatalogarenottoberegardedasanirrevocablecontractbetweentheCollegeandthestudent orbetweentheCollegeandtheparentsofthestudent.Insofaraspossible,theinformationin thisbookiscompleteandaccurateasofthedateofpublication. Franklin & Marshall College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. ii

Table of Contents

MissionoftheCollege............................................................................................... v HistoryoftheCollege........................................................................................... v­vi IntegrationofAcademicandResidentialLearning............................................. vi­vii AcademicCalendar2007­2008/2008­2009....................................................... viii­x TheCurriculum(seeGraduationRequirementspage186).......................................1 GeneralEducation..............................................................................................2 First-YearSeminar..............................................................................................2 Foundations........................................................................................................2 . DistributionRequirement...................................................................................3 NaturalScienceRequirement.............................................................................3 Non-WesternCulturesRequirement................................................................... 4 LanguageStudiesRequirement..........................................................................4 WritingRequirement.......................................................................................... 5 TheMajor...........................................................................................................6 TheMinor...........................................................................................................6 Electives.....................................................................................................................7 InternationalandOff-CampusStudy...................................................................7­13 CourseOfferings.....................................................................................................14 FoundationsCourses..........................................................................................14­21 First-YearSeminarsandWritingCourses.........................................................21­26 . DepartmentandProgramOfferings...................................................................2­177

AfricanaStudies..............................27 AmericanStudies............................31 Anthropology..................................36 ArtandArtHistory.........................41 Astronomy (seePhysicsandAstronomy)....134 BiologicalFoundations ofBehavior.................................48 . Biology...........................................54 . Business,Organizations,and Society....................................59 . Chemistry........................................63 Classics...........................................66 ComparativeLiteraryStudies.........70 ComputerScience...........................71 EarthandEnvironment...................73 Economics.......................................81 English............................................85 French.............................................92 GermanandGermanStudies..........95 Government ....................................99 . History..........................................104 . InternationalStudies.....................111 Internship-for-Credit.....................115 Italian............................................115 Japanese(seeInternational Studies)....................................111 JudaicStudies...............................117 . Linguistics.....................................119 Mathematics..................................120 Music............................................124 . Philosophy....................................130 . Physics..........................................134 Psychology....................................138 PublicPolicy.................................143 ReligiousStudies..........................144 Russian..........................................149 Science,Technology, andSociety................................150 ScientificandPhilosophical StudiesofMind.........................154 Sociology......................................160 Spanish..........................................164 Theater,Dance,andFilm..............166 WomenandGenderStudies..........174

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EducationalSupportServices AcademicAdvising ........................................................................................178 . AdditionalEducationalOpportunitiesandResources............................178­180 CooperativeProgramsofStudy..............................................................181­182 AcademicPoliciesandProcedures AcademicHonesty..................................................................................183­184 DisruptionsoftheAcademicProcess.....................................................185­186 TheCourseCreditSystem..............................................................................186 GraduationRequirements.......................................................................186­191 HonorsListandDean'sList................................................................... 191­192 AcademicStandards...............................................................................192­194 CourseRegistrationandCredit ..............................................................194­199 . MajorsandMinors .................................................................................199­202 . AdditionalSpecialEducationalOpportunities.......................................203­207 EvaluationandGrades...................................................................................207­210 ExaminationProcedures.........................................................................211­212 TransferofCreditPolicies......................................................................212­217 Withdrawal,Leave,andReadmissionPolicies.......................................217­219 AssessmentofInstructionbyStudents...........................................................220 Computing............................................................................................. 220 ­222 AdmissiontotheCollege...............................................................................223­225 SelectionProcess............................................................................................ 223 CampusVisitandInterview............................................................................ 223 TypesofApplication...............................................................................224­225 FinancialAid ..........................................................................................225­228 . TuitionandFees.....................................................................................228­229 . Facilities.........................................................................................................230­235 AthleticsandRecreation.........................................................................235­237 FamilyEducationRightsandPrivacyAct..............................................237­242 AccommodationforDisabilities.............................................................242­243 CollegeDirectory TrusteesoftheCollege...........................................................................244­247 SeniorStaffoftheCollege.....................................................................247­248 . Faculty....................................................................................................248­263 FacultyEmeriti.......................................................................................263­266 AdministrativeOffices............................................................................267­277 SummerSessionCalendarfor2008..............................................................278­279 . CampusMap..........................................................................................................280 Index .........................................................................................................281­285

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The MISSIoN oF FraNklIN & MarShall ColleGe

Franklin & Marshall College is a residential college dedicated to excellence in undergraduateliberaleducation.Itsaimsaretoinspireinyoungpeopleofhighpromise anddiversebackgroundsagenuineandenduringloveforlearning,toteachthemto read,write,andthinkcritically,toinstillinthemthecapacityforbothindependent andcollaborativeaction,andtoeducatethemtoexploreandunderstandthenatural, socialandculturalworldsinwhichtheylive.Insodoing,theCollegeseekstofosterin itsstudentsqualitiesofintellect,creativity,andcharacter,thattheymaylivefulfilling livesandcontributemeaningfullytotheiroccupations,theircommunities,andtheir world.

The hISTory oF FraNklIN & MarShall ColleGe

Franklin&MarshallCollegeisoneoftheoldestinstitutionsofhigherlearninginthe UnitedStates.ItsrootsgobacktoFranklinCollege,foundedin1787withagenerous financialcontributionfromBenjaminFranklin.Theproductofapioneeringcollaboration betweenEnglish-andGerman-speakingcommunitiesinthemostethnicallydiverse regionofthenewnation,theCollegewaslaunchedbyleadersoftheLutheranand Reformed Churches with support from trustees that included four signers of the DeclarationofIndependence,threefuturegovernorsofPennsylvania,twomembers oftheConstitutionalConvention,andsevenofficersoftheRevolutionaryArmy.Their goalwas"topreserveourpresentrepublicansystemofgovernment,"and"topromote thoseimprovementsintheartsandscienceswhichalonerendernationsrespectable, greatandhappy." Marshall College, named after the great Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall,wasfoundedin1836inMercersburg,Pennsylvaniaunderthesponsorship of the German Reformed Church. It attracted a distinguished faculty that became nationallyknownasleadersofanintellectualmovementknownastheMercersburg Theology.In1853itmovedtoLancasterandformedFranklin&MarshallCollege. JamesBuchanan,fifteenthPresidentoftheUnitedStates,wasthefirstPresidentof theBoardofTrustees.Fromthetimeofitscentennial,theCollegecomplementedits strengthsintheclassicsandphilosophywithawidelyrespectedprograminscience. Then, in the 1920s, it added a program in business.The College's transformation continuedafterWorldWar IIwithgradualexpansionin size andacademic scope. Increasingly,studentsandfacultyweredrawnfromallregionsofthenationandthe world.CampusfacilitiesexpandedandtheCollegebecameprimarilyresidential.It becamecoeducationalin1969.TheconnectiontotheReformedChurch,laterpartof theUnitedChurchofChrist,wasseveredandtheCollegebecameasecularinstitution. Throughoutallofthesechanges,however,theCollegeremainedcommittedto"liberal learning."FriedrickRauch,thefirstpresidentofMarshallCollege,hadproclaimedin 1837,"Thefortuneofourlivesandourgovernmentdependsnotexclusivelyonuseful knowledgebutonourcharacterascitizens,andtoformthischaracterbycultivating thewhole[person]istheaimofeducationinthepropersense."

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Today,withapproximately2,000students,Franklin&MarshallCollegeproudly continuesitsdedicationtointellectualfreedomandcriticallearningasfundamental toademocraticsociety.Asitsmissionstatementaffirms,thismeansthatitexpects studentstoseeconnections,todiscovercommunity,andtounderstandthecentrality ofservicetothehumanendeavor.

The INTeGraTIoN oF aCadeMIC aNd reSIdeNTIal learNING

Franklin&MarshallCollegeoffersanintegratedlearningenvironmentwherestudents engagethevaluesoftheliberalartsboththroughthecurriculumandintheirlives outsidetheformalclassroom.ConsistentwiththeMissionStatementoftheCollege, facultyandadministrativeofficesplacestudentlearningatthecenteroftheirwork. Programsandactivitiesguideandsupportstudentsastheyexplorealoveoflearning, theskillsofcriticalthinking,theroleofcitizenshipintheirlives,andthevaluesof civility.TheCollegechallengesstudentstomakethemostoftheacademicprogram andothereducationalopportunitiesofferedbythisresidentialcampus,topractice mentalandphysicalwellness,andtodeveloptheirtalentsandinterestsaspartofan educatedandsociallyresponsiblecommunity. Thefaculty-ledCollegeHousesystemisthekeystoneofFranklin&Marshall's visionforintegratingacademicandresidentiallife.WhileaCollegeHouseisina literalsenseastudentresidence,itismorethanthis.CollegeHousesareledbysenior membersoftheFaculty,theDons,andbytheircolleagues,thePrefects,experienced academicandstudentlifeprofessionals.TheHousesfosteranenvironmentthatinvests studentlifewiththoughtfuldeliberationandintellectualexploration,habitsofthought andanalysisthatwillservestudentsthroughouttheirpersonalandprofessionallives. TheHousesarethemeetinggroundwherestudentscaninteractandnetworkamong theextendedCollegefamily.Together,FacultyDons,Prefects,andstudentscreate eventsthatbringfaculty,students,alumni/ae,distinguishedvisitors,andprofessional stafftogetherinformalandinformalsettingstoengageinlivelydiscussionsandsocial interactionsthatbreakthebarrierbetweenclassroomandstudentresidence. Uponmatriculation,allstudentsareassignedtomembershipinaCollegeHouse. AlthoughstudentsarenotrequiredtoliveintheHouseforallfouryears,thisaffiliation continues through the entire Franklin & Marshall experience and extends beyond graduation.MoststudentsentertheHouseSystemasamemberofaresidentialFirstYearSeminar.Theseseminarsintroducestudentstoskillsofcriticalreading,critical thinking,oralcommunication,andinformationliteracy.Atthesametime,thestudents livetogetherinthesameareaoftheCollegeHousemakingitpossiblefordiscussions ofsubstanceaboutideastomoveeasilybetweentheclassroomandtheresidential environment. WithinHouses,studentselectleaders,craftandenforcestandardsofbehavior, managetheirownsocialprograms,andresolvetheproblemsoflivingthatariseamong House residents. The governing structure of each House is based on the explicit acknowledgementthatstudentsareadultsandshouldcontrolmanyaspectsoftheir socialandresidentiallife.CollegeHousesarethereforealsoplaceswheretheartsof democracyarelearnedandleadershipisincubated. CollegeHousesexpresstheethosoftheCollege.CollegeHousesareconnected

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communitieswhereallstudentscanfindaplace.Creatinganenvironmentthatisneither exclusivelyacademicnorresidential,theHouseenvironmentissometimescalleda "thirdspace,"acomfortableandinvitinghybridofclassroomandresidencehallthat exceedsitsindividualparts.TheCollegeHousesmodelawayoflivingthatmakesfor arewardinglife:theysupportasociallandscapethatintegrateswork,play,acritical approachtonewideas,andthebeliefthateverymomentholdstheopportunityfor discoveryandpersonalsatisfaction. Thisemphasisonintegratingideasandresidentiallifeinformsmanyotherareasof thestudentexperience.Bothacademicandcareeradvisingaskstudentstothinkabout thevalueofaliberalartseducationandtheconnectionsamongtheliberalartsandthe worldofwork.Socialandco-curricularprogrammingemphasizesstudentinitiative in planning and organizing events. Students are encouraged to see themselves as citizensinformedbyanentrepreneurialspirit.TheCollegealsoprovidesopportunities forstudentstoexplorethemeaningoffaith,religion,andspirituality.Becauseofits commitmenttoeducatingthewholeperson,theCollegehasanumberofprograms thatemphasizehealthandwellness,includingpersonalcounseling,programsinthe residencehalls,varsityandintramuralsports,workshopsonhealthissues,andeducation aboutsubstanceabuseandsexualresponsibility.

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aCadeMIC CaleNdar 2007­2008

Fall SeMeSTer

August­Sept.24­28,Friday­Tuesday August28,Tuesday August29,Wednesday September28­30,Friday­Sunday October12,Friday October17,Wednesday October19­21,Friday­Sunday November20,Tuesday November26,Monday December7,Friday December8­11,Saturday­Tuesday December12,Wednesday December16,Sunday December16,Sunday NewStudentOrientation Convocation Fallsemesterclassesbegin,8a.m. FamilyWeekend Fallbreakbegins,4:30p.m. Fallbreakends,8a.m. HomecomingWeekend Thanksgivingrecessbegins4:30p.m. Thanksgivingrecessends,8a.m. Fallsemesterclassesend,4:30p.m. Readingdays Finalexaminationsbegin Finalexaminationsend Winterrecessbegins

The College notes that a number of religious holidays occur during the semester. Please consult the College web-based calendar for these dates.

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aCadeMIC CaleNdar 2007­2008

SPrING SeMeSTer

January22,Tuesday March14,Friday March24,Monday April27,Sunday May1,Thursday May2­5,Friday­Monday May6,Tuesday May10,Saturday May17,Saturday Springsemesterclassesbegin;8a.m. Springrecessbegins;4:30p.m. Springrecessends;8a.m. AwardsProgram Springsemesterclassesend;4:30p.m. Readingdays Finalexaminationsbegin Finalexaminationsend Commencement

The College notes that a number of religious holidays occur during the semester. Please consult the College web-based calendar for these dates.

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aCadeMIC CaleNdar 2008­2009

Fall SeMeSTer

August­September29­2,Friday­Tuesday NewStudentOrientation September2,Tuesday September3,Wednesday September26­28,Friday­Sunday October10­12,Friday­Sunday October17,Friday October22,Wednesday November25,Tuesday December1,Monday December12,Friday December13­16,Saturday­Tuesday December17,Wednesday December21,Sunday Convocation Fallsemesterclassesbegin,8a.m. FamilyWeekend HomecomingWeekend Fallbreakbegins,4:30p.m. Fallbreakends,8a.m. Thanksgivingrecessbegins,4:30p.m. Thanksgivingrecessends,8a.m. Fallsemesterclassesend,4:30p.m. Readingdays Finalexaminationsbegin Finalexaminationsend Winterrecessbegins

SPrING SeMeSTer

January20,Tuesday March13,Friday March23,Monday April26,Sunday April30,Thursday May1­4,Friday­Monday May5,Tuesday May9,Saturday May16,Saturday Springsemesterclassesbegin;8a.m. Springrecessbegins;4:30p.m. Springrecessends;8a.m. AwardsProgram Springsemesterclassesend;4:30p.m. Readingdays Finalexaminationsbegin Finalexaminationsend Commencement

The College notes that a number of religious holidays occur during the semester. Please consult the College web-based calendar for these dates.

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The Franklin & Marshall Curriculum

See GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS page 186.

The Franklin & Marshall curriculum combines a spirit of innovation with a strong sense of tradition. It encompasses elements that prepare students for the cross-disciplinary nature of knowledge in the twenty-first century while preserving the depth offered by disciplinary majors and the breadth associated with distributional requirements. The graduation requirements provide sufficient structure to ensure that students receive a general education in the liberal arts while offering enough choice to allow the construction of an individualized educational experience. Students construct their education by selecting courses in each of the three parts that compose the Franklin & Marshall curriculum: General Education, the Major, and Electives. General Education composes one part of the curriculum and includes Foundations, a Distribution requirement, and a Writing requirement. In Foundations courses, students examine broad questions and encounter ideas that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries. While completing their Distribution requirement, students become familiar with the traditional areas of the liberal arts; in addition, they develop competence in a foreign language through the Language Studies requirement and complete a course on a Non-Western Culture. Both Foundations courses and the Distribution requirement prepare students to deepen their intellectual experiences through their Majors. The Major constitutes an integral element of the College curriculum. During the second semester of the sophomore year, a student decides upon a concentration in an area of strong intellectual interest. Through the Major, the student gains a deep understanding of issues and methods of inquiry characteristic of one specific field. All courses used to satisfy any requirement must be taken for a regular grade. A significant part of the curriculum consists of Electives, through which students can investigate subjects of interest or disciplines that complement the major. Students are encouraged to elect a First-Year Seminar at the beginning of their education to develop skills in critical reading, critical writing, oral presentation, and use of learning resources. During the final two years, students may choose to complete a number of special educational opportunities including collaborations, off-campus and international study, internships for academic credit, and independent study projects. The College employs and is committed to a systematic assessment program for its curriculum. This program, under the auspices of the Office of Institutional Research, focuses on early determination of strengths and weaknesses and on planning to create strategies for improvement. The College typically communicates with students by the following methods: mail to their home or local address, mail to their campus box, or e-mail to their Franklin & Marshall account. It is expected that students will regularly monitor communications to these destinations.

GENERAl EDUCATION

General Education consists of Foundations, Distribution requirements (a Natural Sciences requirement, and one course each in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Non-Western Cultures), a Language Studies requirement, and the First-Year Writing requirement.

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR

The primary goal of the optional First-Year Seminar is to develop skills in critical writing, critical reading, oral presentation, and the use of learning resources. First-Year Seminars satisfy the First-Year Writing Requirement. The First-Year Seminar is designed to provide students with an experience that effectively integrates academic and residential life. Students who enroll in First-Year Seminars live together in one of the College Houses. Residents have the opportunity to share an important first semester academic experience. The program promotes an integration of the residence hall and the classroom that enhances both the academic success and personal growth of the residents. The First-Year Seminar can be a special educational experience for its participants. Each class is limited to 6 students. The courses allow students to explore in depth a major theme or concept. Committed to a discussion format, the seminars are writingintensive courses that emphasize the development of critical thinking, reading, and analysis. Additional support and guidance are provided by a Preceptor, an upperclass student who assists the seminar professor in teaching the course, as well as the staff of the associated College House. A list of current First-Year Seminars appears on pages ­6.

FOUNDATIONS

Free inquiry provides the foundation for a liberal arts education. Foundations courses seek to foster free inquiry in fundamental areas such as the individual, society, and the natural world. These courses focus on questions and ideas that are central to human thought, perception, expression, and discovery. In a collaborative process, students and faculty question assumptions and discover new insights in light of enduring intellectual standards. In Foundations courses, professors and students pursue topics through a series of perspectives emerging out of several academic disciplines. These courses incorporate a variety of strategies, such as the presentation of conflicting and complementary viewpoints, cross-cultural investigation, laboratory experimentation, problem-solving, and artistic performance. Through Foundations courses, students learn about different approaches taught at Franklin & Marshall College in a variety of departments. The skills learned in Foundations courses help students to sort through the barrage of claims and competing ideas in a free society. These skills include integrating and synthesizing information from different sources and using analytical reasoning to evaluate competing ideas and arrive at a reasoned position. By their nature, Foundations courses teach students how to gather, evaluate, and integrate knowledge in order to confront complex issues. In this way, Foundations courses help students prepare to contribute to their occupations, communities, and the world.

All students, during their first two years, must complete the Foundations requirement. For students matriculating in the fall of 006 or beyond, the requirement is to pass two regularly graded Foundations (FND) courses. A list of current Foundations courses appears on pages 4­.

DISTRIbUTION REQUIREMENT Traditional Areas of the liberal Arts

The primary goal of requiring that students distribute their courses among the traditional divisions of intellectual inquiry in the liberal arts is to ensure that they are familiar, at least at an introductory level, with the types of content studied in and methods used by those modes of inquiry. This requirement also helps students explore the natural, social, and cultural worlds in which they live. All students must satisfactorily complete a Natural Sciences requirement. In addition, they must pass at least one course credit in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Non-Western Cultures. They must also satisfy the Language Studies requirement and the First-Year Writing requirement. Courses that satisfy the Distribution requirement are designated as A (Arts), H (Humanities), S (Social Sciences), or NW (Non-Western Cultures). Courses that may be used toward the Natural Sciences requirement are designated N (Natural Sciences with a laboratory) or NSP (Natural Sciences in Perspective). All courses meeting the Distribution Requirement must be taken for a regular grade.

Natural Sciences Requirement

The goal of this requirement is to ensure that all students have at least minimal exposure to the natural sciences as part of their academic program. For students matriculating in the fall 006 semester or later, this requirement may be satisfied in either of two ways: . Passing two regularly graded Natural Sciences with lab (N) courses; or . Passing one regularly graded Natural Sciences with lab (N) course plus an additional course carrying the Natural Sciences in Perspective (NSP) designation. NSP courses include all three of the following elements: . NSP courses should help students to understand the role played by theory in the Natural Sciences. . NSP courses should help students to understand the role of evidence in developing and testing scientific theories and what constitutes acceptable evidence in the Natural Sciences. The courses should also help students understand how Natural Science deals with uncertainty and increase their ability to reason quantitatively. . NSP courses should help students to understand the goals of Natural Science and the role Natural Science plays in today's society, including questions Natural Science attempts to answer and questions that are outside the domain of the Natural Sciences. The courses also ask students to grapple with realworld situations in which policy decisions need to be made without complete understanding or complete certainty. The courses should also address ethical

conduct and uses of Natural Science. Note that a laboratory course may meet the criteria in this three-part definition. For students matriculating prior to the fall 006 semester, but no earlier than the fall 998 semester, the Natural Sciences requirement is satisfied by passing with a regular grade one Natural Sciences with lab (N) course.

Non-Western Cultures Requirement

The goal of the Non-Western Cultures requirement is to encourage students to develop an understanding of their membership in the world community. Students expand their critical perspectives of their own identities by gaining exposure to the ideas, arts, sciences, and social and political institutions of peoples outside European and European-settler societies. All students must pass, with a regular grade, one course in this area. Foundations courses and courses satisfying other requirements may also satisfy the Non-Western Cultures requirement. Students seeking to satisfy this requirement through an experience other than a Franklin & Marshall course may present a written proposal to the Associate Dean of the Faculty for approval. Courses that satisfy the Non-Western Cultures requirement are designated (NW) in the course listings for departments or programs.

language Studies Requirement

The goal of the Language Studies requirement is to ensure that students achieve a meaningful level of proficiency in a foreign language and develop an understanding of another culture. Competency in a foreign language helps students to develop an informed and thoughtful awareness of language as a system and facilitates their exploration of other cultural worlds. For students matriculating in the fall 007 semester or later, the requirement is to pass, with a regular grade, the third course in a foreign language sequence or to demonstrate equivalent proficiency through testing. In particular, this requirement is satisfied by: . Passing with a regular grade at least one course at the 00 or higher level taught in the student's non-native language; . Studying in a non-English speaking country and completing a course at the 00 level or above in a foreign language; . Scoring 4 or 5 in the Advanced Placement Exam in a Foreign or Classical Language; 4. Scoring 5 or higher in a Foreign Language Course via the International Baccalaureate; or 5. Placing into the fourth semester course or higher in the language sequence as taught at Franklin & Marshall through a placement exam administered by the appropriate Franklin & Marshall academic department. By completing and submitting a petition to the Committee on Academic Status, this requirement may be waived for international students from non-English speaking countries. International students should contact the Assistant Dean of International Programs to begin this process. Note that a student who tests out of this requirement for a particular language and then decides to enroll in the 0, 0, or 0 level (the

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first three semesters) of that language forfeits the waiver and must complete a foreign language through the 0 (third semester) level. For students matriculating prior to the fall 007 term, the Language Studies requirement is satisfied by: . Passing, with a regular grade, an introductory two-semester sequence in a college-level language at the College or a similar sequence approved by the Modern Language Council at another institution; . Passing, with a regular grade, two courses in linguistics; . Spending one regular Fall of Spring semester in an academic program including approved formal language study in a non-English-speaking country; or 4. Testing out of the requirement. Students matriculating prior to the fall 007 semester may test out of all or part of the Language Studies requirement by: . Receiving a score of 450 or above on College Board Foreign Language Achievement Test; . Receiving a score of or above on an Advanced Placement Exam in a Foreign Language; . Demonstrating, on a test to be determined by each language department, qualification to enter a second-year course in that language; or 4. Being admitted to Franklin & Marshall College as an international student from a non-English-speaking country. Note that a student (matriculated prior to the fall 007 semester) who tests out of this requirement for a particular language and then decides to enroll in the 0 or 0 level of that language forfeits the waiver and must complete a foreign language through the 0 level. Courses that satisfy the Language Studies requirement are designated (LS).

Writing Requirement

The goal of the Writing requirement is that graduates of Franklin & Marshall College should be capable and confident writers. To that end, instruction in writing progresses across the curriculum and throughout a student's career. . First-year students must, by the end of their second semester, pass a course in which writing skills are stressed. Passing one of the following courses with a regular grade satisfies the First-Year Writing requirement. · English 05, College Rhetoric · A First-Year Seminar · A course designated in the "Master Schedule of Classes" as fulfilling the Writing requirement. The First-Year Writing requirement may also be satisfied with a score of 4 or 5 on the AP English Language and Composition test. Transfer students who enter with sophomore status or higher are exempted from this part of the Writing requirement. . Students continue their development as writers through completion of Foundations courses. . Students complete the final phase of the Writing requirement through a course or courses specified by their major department. (See departmental or program listings for more information.)

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4. The First-Year Writing Requirement cannot be satisfied with a directed reading or tutorial. Courses designated as W (Writing) in the "Department and Program Offerings" section of the Catalog fulfill the First-Year Writing requirement.

ThE MAjOR

The goal of the major is that students acquire skills and investigate intellectual questions, methods, and issues in considerable breadth and increasing depth in a specific field or area. To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts degree, a student must complete a prescribed concentration of courses, referred to as the major. A major program must consist of at least eight required course credits and may not exceed 6 required course credits. All courses meeting major requirements must be taken for a regular grade; a student must earn a minimum of a .0 grade point average in those courses used by the major department to compute the major grade point average. A student may declare more than one major. A student who wishes to declare more than two majors must have the approval of the Associate Dean of the Faculty. Students may also satisfy the major requirement by designing a Special Studies major or a Joint major.

1. SpECIAl STUDIES MAjOR pROGRAM

Students design a Special Studies major in consultation with the Special Studies adviser and a primary and secondary adviser. The design must be intellectually coherent and include courses from three different departments. The major must be a genuine liberal arts major that could legitimately be offered at the College and must progress through higher levels of courses; an assemblage of introductory courses from three departments is not acceptable.

2. jOINT MAjOR

A Joint major is a concentration of courses from two departments/programs (at least one of which offers a major) and requires the approval of both departments and the Associate Dean of the Faculty. Each of the component majors must be represented by eight course credits. The regulations for admission to, and the maintenance of, an academic major at Franklin & Marshall College can be found in the section "Majors and Minors."

ThE MINOR

Students may choose to complete a minor. Minors, either disciplinary or crossdisciplinary, consist of six course credits. A student may officially declare one minor. Departments and programs which offer minors are: Africana Studies; Anthropology; Art; Astronomy; Chemistry; Classics; Comparative Literary Studies; Computer Science; Dance; Economics; English; Environmental Studies; Film and Media Studies; French;

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Italian; Geosciences; German; Greek; History; International Studies (includes Area Studies); Judaic Studies; Latin; Mathematics; Music; Philosophy; Physics; Psychology; Religious Studies; Russian; Science, Technology, and Society; Sociology; Theater; and Women and Gender Studies. Specific requirements for a minor are listed with each department's offerings. All courses meeting the Requirements for a minor must be taken for a regular grade. The regulations for admission to and maintenance of a minor can be found in the "Majors and Minors" section of the Catalog, pages 99­0.

ElECTIvES

Electives enable a student to pursue interests outside the major, to gain additional depth of knowledge in the major or a related field, and to explore unfamiliar areas of learning. Students are encouraged to elect a First-Year Seminar at the beginning of their education. During the final two years, students may choose to complete a number of special educational opportunities including collaborations, off-campus study, internships for academic credit, and independent study projects.

COllAbORATIONS

A goal of the Curriculum is to promote special educational opportunities for student involvement in fruitful collaborative efforts with some specific time commitment and outcome. These opportunities, which are encouraged but not required, help prepare students for a professional and civic environment that increasingly demands an ability to explore one's own contributions in relationship to other ideas, criticisms, and concerns. Furthermore, they often serve to link students' intellectual interests to opportunities and challenges that exist outside of conventional coursework. See "Additional Educational Opportunities" for more information.

INTERNATIONAl AND OFF-CAMpUS STUDY

STATEMENT OF phIlOSOphY

(adopted by the Off-Campus Study Committee of the Faculty in April 2004) Recognizing the global nature of contemporary society as well as the need for intercultural understanding, Franklin & Marshall College views international study as a valuable component of a liberal arts education. Study abroad promotes an increased understanding of the complexity of language and culture. It also constitutes a critical element of the College's commitment to build an increasingly international campus. Franklin & Marshall College therefore encourages its students to give serious consideration to study in another country. The College approaches international education as an integral part of the entire undergraduate experience. We view it not as a term away from campus, but as an

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encounter seamlessly connected with a student's entire education--before, during, and after the time spent off campus. Students planning foreign study will work closely with the Office of International Programs and with their academic advisers to select programs and courses of study that further their educational goals.

OpTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAl STUDY

The International and Off-Campus Study Faculty Committee has evaluated a wide-range of programs which are pre-approved for Franklin & Marshall students. Representing about two hundred sites in over sixty countries, this pre-approved list of programs includes those owned or run by Franklin & Marshall, exchange agreements with overseas universities, and partnerships with other program providers. In addition, in consultation with faculty members and the Associate Dean for International Programs, a student has the flexibility to apply to any program that fulfills the student's academic interests and satisfies the College's academic standards. Each academic department and program has included a list of frequently used international study options as part of their section of this Catalog. The College's curriculum also includes an innovative International Studies Program with a special relationship to international study. This program enables a cohort of students to broaden the experience of their various majors and see the subject from an international perspective. As part of the program, students must study outside the United States in a non-English-speaking environment (see pages 0­ for the International Studies program). Additional guidelines concerning international and off-campus study are found on pages 0­0. Following is a list of countries represented on the pre-approved list of programs: Sub-SaharanAfrica: Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda AsiaandthePacific: China, Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Mekong Delta, Mongolia, Nepal, Vietnam Europe: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland MiddleEastandNorthAfrica: Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Oman, Turkey LatinAmericaandtheCaribbean: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, British West Indies, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama Oceania: Australia, Fiji, New Zealand, Samoa

FRANklIN & MARShAll pROGRAMS AND pARTNERShIpS

Franklin & Marshall offers off-campus study experiences through its faculty and in partnership with the following U.S. program providers and overseas institutions.

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AdvancedStudiesinEngland Owned by Franklin & Marshall, the Advanced Studies in England program is administered in association with University College, Oxford University and draws its students from Franklin & Marshall as well as its other affiliate institutions (Boston College, Bucknell, Denison, Gettysburg, Hobart and William Smith, Mary Washington, Rochester, Skidmore, Washington & Lee, William and Mary, and Wells). It offers one- and two-semester study as well as a five-week summer session in fields including classics, creative writing, literature, history, politics, art history, philosophy, education, and gender studies. AmericanSchoolofClassicalStudiesatAthens The activities of the School, in which Franklin & Marshall College is a cooperating institution through the Central Pennsylvania Consortium (CPC), include six-week Summer sessions on Greek history, literature, and culture, with field trips to sites and museums in and beyond Attica. The faculty adviser is Dr. Ann Steiner of the Classics Department. Denmark'sInternationalStudyProgram DIS (affiliated with the University of Copenhagen), for which Franklin & Marshall College is a coordinating institution, offers instruction in English. Its programs include humanities and social sciences, international business, architecture and design, and biology. Most participants live with Danish families. Danish language instruction is optional. DIS offers study tours in Germany, Sweden, Russia, Belgium, and a number of Eastern European countries. The faculty adviser is Dr. Conrad Kasperson of the Business, Organizations, and Society Department. EuropeanCollegeofLiberalArts Franklin & Marshall has established a relationship with the European College of Liberal Arts in Berlin, Germany through which Franklin & Marshall students can take courses at ECLA during the summer. These courses are offered in English.

FACUlTY & MARShAll FACUlTY-lED pROGRAMS

F&MinParis This program, designed and directed by Professor Kerry Whiteside (Government), includes instruction in French language and culture as well as courses in international studies and government. Scheduled to run every fall semester, it is specially designed to engage sophomores in an international experience. See "International Studies." F&MSummerTravelCourses Every year several faculty develop summer courses that take place overseas. While several of these courses are offered every year (e.g. summer fieldwork in Classical Archaeology at the Poggio Colla Field School and Italian language immersion in Vicchio del Mugello, Italy), other offerings vary (e.g. summer of 006 study course in Mexico studying the July 006 Mexican Presidential election).

FRANklIN & MARShAll ExChANGE pROGRAMS

The College has entered into exchange agreements with the following overseas institutions: Bilkent University--Turkey; Bolzano University--Italy; Deakin

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University--Australia; Innsburck University--Austria; Lingnan University--Hong Kong; Tohoku Gakuin University--Japan; TransAtlantic Science Student Exchange Program--range of European countries. InstitutefortheInternationalEducationofStudents IES, of which Franklin & Marshall College is an affiliate, conducts one- or two-semester programs and Summer programs in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Australia. In most locations, students with sufficient knowledge of the language take courses directly in a foreign university. InstituteforStudyAbroad,ButlerUniversity Franklin & Marshall has entered into a partnership with The Institute for Study Abroad at Butler, which provides the administrative link for F&M students who wish to directly enroll in universities in Australia, England, Ireland, New Zealand, and Scotland. The Institute provides assistance with advising about appropriate choice of institution, pre-departure information, on-site orientation and ongoing support during the semester or year of study away. IntercollegiateCenterforClassicalStudiesinRome The Center, of which the College is an institutional member through the Central Pennsylvania Consortium (CPC), offers a one- or two-semester program in Greek and Latin literature, history, art, and archaeology, supplemented by field trips within Italy. Contact the Classics Department for more information. InternshipsinFrancophoneEurope This program, operated by an independent organization located in Paris, provides students with the option of a superior academic experience that incorporates seminars on European issues, a research project and an internship in government, politics, or the non-profit sector. Participation in the program requires advanced French language skills. Franklin & Marshall is the school of record for this program. SchoolforFieldStudies This program offers five centers, each focusing on site-specific environmental issues (Australia--Rainforest Restoration, Costa Rica--Sustainable Development, Kenya --Wildlife Management, Mexico--Conservation of Marine Mammals and Coastal Ecosystems, Turks and Caicos Islands--Marine Resource Management). SchoolforInternationalTraining The School for International Training provides focused semester-long programs in a range of countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East. The academic themes vary from site to site but include such topics as environmental studies, the arts, culture and identity, development studies, gender studies, middle eastern & Islamic studies, multicultural studies, peace and conflict studies, public health, and social justice. TheIsraelUniversityConsortium Franklin & Marshall, with the support of this consortium of four Israeli universities (Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, University of Haifa) offers direct enrollment opportunities at the four institutions. TheSwedishProgram Stockholm University and a consortium of American colleges and universities jointly

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sponsor this program. Located in the capital city of Stockholm, it provides students with an opportunity to study, in English, how Sweden has addressed political, social, artistic, and economic issues relevant to all advanced societies. Students may attend for one or two semesters and study film, literature, history, languages, philosophy, psychology, or biology. Students have the option of living with a Swedish family or in an apartment with Swedish university students and other American students participating in the program. Study visits and program excursions in Sweden occur throughout the semester.

OFF-CAMpUS STUDY WIThIN ThE UNITED STATES

Students can also elect to study off-campus within the United States for one or two semesters. The following programs and options have been approved for off-campus study within the United States. CentralPennsylvaniaConsortium Students may spend a semester or year in residence at nearby Dickinson College or Gettysburg College. Credit and fees remain the same as at Franklin & Marshall College. CPC offers students the opportunity to profit from areas of particular strength or unusual interest at the other institutions. Students may also take individual courses on an exchange basis. ColumbiaUniversity,"TheShapeofTwoCities:NewYork/Paris" This program permits juniors to study architecture, urban planning, historic preservation, and related fields in two of the world's most noteworthy cities. Prior introductory study in one of these fields is helpful, but there are no formal prerequisites. The faculty adviser is Dr. Richard Kent of the Art and Art History Department. DukeUniversityMarineLaboratory The Marine Laboratory, located on the Atlantic Ocean in Beaufort, North Carolina, is part of the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. Focused on the central nature of ocean studies to the resolution of global environmental problems, this program offers individual courses in oceanography, marine biology, marine biomedicine, marine biotechnology; coastal marine policy and management as well as independent research are available. Students study for a semester or summer. NationalTheaterInstituteattheEugeneO'NeillTheaterCenter, Waterford,Connecticut This one-semester program includes courses in acting, design, directing, movement, and play writing, taught by faculty from Yale School of Drama and other institutions, as well as workshops with visiting dramatists and field trips to performances in New Haven and New York. Credit is awarded through Connecticut College. The faculty adviser is Dr. Dorothy Louise of the Theater, Dance, and Film Department. SeaSemester This program, operated by the Sea Education Association, includes courses in oceanography, nautical science, and maritime studies. A six-week "shore component" takes place at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts and is followed by a six-week "sea component" onboard a 5-foot sailing vessel, specially outfitted for practical laboratory experience and research. The faculty adviser is Dr. Timothy Sipe of the Biology Department.

SemesterinEnvironmentalScience This program offered in the Fall semester by the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, focuses on environmental science and ecology. The purpose of the program is to instruct students in the basic methods and principles of ecosystems science in a manner that enhances and supplements existing curricula in natural and environmental sciences at participating colleges. The program is interdisciplinary, stressing team research and team study. The faculty adviser is Dr. Dorothy Merritts of the Earth and Environment Department. TheUrbanEducationSemester Administered by the Venture Consortium, which includes Bates, Brown, College of the Holy Cross, Franklin & Marshall, Syracuse, Swarthmore, Vassar, and Wesleyan, UES allows students from Consortium schools to spend a semester in New York City studying issues in urban education. UES combines supervised fieldwork in New York City schools with courses and advisement at the Bank Street College Graduate School of Education. Students from any major may participate in this program. WashingtonSemester This program, conducted by American University, Washington, D.C., allows specialized study in a number of areas, including American politics, foreign policy, justice, and journalism. Each program includes two seminars, an internship in a government agency or other organization, and an independent research project or a course at American University.

SUMMER TRAvEl, pROjECT, AND INTERNShIp AWARDS

The Margery Brittain Travel Award enables students to improve their foreign language ability through travel or study in a country whose language they have studied previously. DepartmentalSummerForeignStudyandTravelAwards These awards enable foreign study and travel by outstanding sophomores planning a major or in some cases a minor in each of six departments: Art, Classics, French, Italian, German and Russian, and Spanish. JohnKryderEvansSummerStudyAward This award honors the memory of Mr. Evans ', who served with distinction as a Trustee of the College from 940 to 980 and spent many years with General Foods Corporation. Candidates must demonstrate quality of character, personal and intellectual promise, and an enthusiasm for international experience. Preference is given to projects that reflect ethical or social concerns. CharlesJ.G.MayaudAwards These awards, given in honor of the late Professor Mayaud, Professor of French and long-time chair of the Department of French and Italian, enable students to carry out educational projects abroad. Candidates should demonstrate quality of character, personal and intellectual promise, and an enthusiasm for international experience. PaulA.Mueller,Jr.,SummerAwards Current sophomores are eligible to apply for the Paul A. Mueller, Jr., Summer Award

in order to pursue projects that foster personal growth, independence, creativity, leadership, and personal interests, in the United States or abroad. PennsylvaniaHistoricalandMuseumCommission The College generally sponsors two summer interns in paid local historical and museum work. Information is available from Career Advisement Services. SidneyWisePublicServiceInternshipProgram The Sidney Wise Public Service Internship Program honors the memory of Professor Sidney Wise, who was committed to providing for students first-hand experiences in government and guidance to alumni in the field. This ten-week summer program pays students a stipend to take full-time internships in national, state, or local government or in government-related non-profit agencies. Interested students should contact the Government department for further information. OtherDepartmentalSummerAwards The ArtStudyAward assists a studio art major in the summer after junior year, to pursue a formal internship experience. The HarryL.ButlerAward, honoring the late Professor Butler, for many years chair of the Department of French and Italian, assists educational travel by a high-achieving student of French. The AliceandRay DrumBritishIslesSummerTravelAward supports summer research in the British Isles, with preference to an English major. The HarryW.andMaryB.Huffnagle Endowment supports course work or research experience by biology majors at biological summer field stations in the U.S. or abroad. The MichelleKayalMemorial ScholarshipAwardenables a student majoring in biology to conduct research in the biological sciences. The KeckSummerInternships bring together students and faculty from twelve of the country's most outstanding undergraduate liberal arts institutions to pursue geoscience research with the support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The GeoffPywellMemorialPrize, created in memory of Geoff Pywell, member of the faculty in Theater, and of Joan Mowbray, secretary of the Department of Theater, Dance and Film, supports a rising sophomore or junior for summer study in acting or directing. The RussellSummerRussianStudyAward, given in honor of Thomas W. and Dorothy M. Russell, enables outstanding students of Russian to study Russian language and culture in Russia. The FranklinJ.Schaffner'42TheaterAward, in memory of the late Academy Award-winning director of numerous movies, television programs and plays, enables students to study British theater on location. The PeterS. andIreneP.SeadleGermanTravelAward supports a special project or internship in a German-speaking country by a rising senior who is a non-native speaker of German. More information on these awards is available from the relevant departments.

Course Offerings

FOUNDATIONS COURSES

An academic department or program may choose to consider a Foundations course as an elective for its major, but a Foundations course may not be the introductory course in the discipline.

FND100.(formerlyCCS155).Inventing"Aliens." What is it about the not-like-us that obsesses us to the point that our values, our existence and humanity are shaped by oppositions like "us versus them" ("men versus women," "human versus animal," "good versus evil")? These categories make the "not-us" a scary, ill-mannered and unsophisticated being from whom we need to distinguish ourselves. In this course we will analyze how otherness is "invented" in literature, the visual arts and popular culture. From the portrayal of the "other" by cavemen, to the science-fiction movie Aliens, we will examine the representation of "alien-ness" from an historical perspective. Our material will include commercials, films, documentaries, reality TV, novels, and theoretical readings. Diakité FND101P.(formerlyCCS105)MusicandCulture Explores basic questions about music and human beings--"What is music and why is music so important to us?" Begins by exploring music's function in human life, and then moves through a series of units that investigate musical origins, music's transformative powers, music and healing, and musical case studies. It concludes with a study of music and identity. Hurley-Glowa FND101T.(formerlyCCS150).TheMassinMusic. Leonard Bernstein wrote, "A work of art does not answer questions, it provokes them; and its essential meaning is in the tension between contradictory answers." We will assess this statement by examining musical settings of the Mass composed between 400 and the present, including Leonard Bernstein's Mass, a work that includes jazz, rock, blues, and other 0th-century styles. Foundational questions will include: how and to what extent can a piece of music reflect and provide commentary on the societal issues of its time? Wright FND101V.(formerlyCCS154).Groove:Time,Rhythm,andCulture. What is time? How do humans conceive of time and experience its passage? Are concepts of time universal or historically and culturally specific? These questions investigated from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with a particular emphasis on concepts of rhythm in music. Readings drawn from music theory, linguistics, physics, philosophy, and cognitive psychology. Considers problematic notions of temporality such as time travel, predestination, cause and effect, and the relationship between time and memory explored through short stories and films. Butterfield FND102.(formerlyCCS117).TheMeaningofMyth. Why are myths created? How do they reflect the psychology of their creators? How do they serve as a means of social control? What role to they play in modern culture? We will investigate these and many other questions in our search for the meaning and function of myth in ancient and modern societies. O'Bryhim FND103.(formerlyCCS119).LeavingtheWorldBehind:UtopianCommunities andOtherExperimentsinLiving. Social dreamers have for centuries imagined and sought to build communities better than those in which they lived. These communities have come to be called "utopian," following the lead of Sir Thomas More, the 6th-century English humanist. More was, of course, neither the first nor the last to

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articulate a vision of a better world. In this course we will explore utopian communities, both as they have been imagined by writers, planners, and social visionaries, and as they have been constructed by men and women seeking alternative ways of living. Along the way we will address a number of critical questions: What makes a community "utopian"? What drives individuals and groups to form such communities? How can we account for the successes and failures of their attempts? How do utopian communities balance the needs of individuals with those of the group? Discussion of these and related questions will allow us to reflect on the nature of community life in general and on the strengths and weaknesses of our own communities in particular. McRee FND104.(formerlyMSS131).SelfAcrossCultures. This course explores a few prominent concepts of selfhood from a number of different philosophical and religious traditions, mainly in Asia and Europe. It includes examination of ancient models of self and soul, e.g., in Hinduism, Buddhism, and ancient Greek philosophy, and comparison to modern and post-modern ideas on the self. McMahan FND108V.(formerlyCCS145).IdeologyandIdeologues. How do we make sense of the social and political world around us? Many of us--perhaps all of us--possess an ideology that not only helps us explain how society works, but prescribes for us a view of how society ought to work. All too often, however, this seemingly positive force can lead to negative consequences. Virtually all acts of barbarism and terror, for example, have been justified on ideological grounds. Drawing upon insights from political science, psychology, linguistics, sociology, anthropology, and philosophy (among other fields), this course is designed to help us understand how ideology operates--for good and ill. Medvic FND108T.(formerlyCCS146).CulturesinConflict:UnderstandingtheColdWar. This course will focus on the Cold War, examining both American and Russian perspectives. We will draw on history, political science, psychology, and literature as we seek to understand both what happened and why it happened. We will also examine the impact international conflict has on politics and culture within a country, especially as leaders seek to persuade the public that a conflict is legitimate and necessary. Gray FND109.(formerlyMSS151).LivingWell. One of the most important questions we face is quite simple: how ought we to live? Yet answering it requires thinking about some very difficult issues. What makes a life worthwhile? What is happiness, and how can we achieve it? We'll look at attempts to grapple with these problems from philosophy, various religious traditions, and literature. We'll also examine some of the emerging science of happiness in order to see if that might give us insight into the good life. Merli FND109R.(formerlyMSS155).PursuitofHappiness In this course, we will explore the nature of happiness. Our exploration will include examining historical understandings of happiness and traditional philosophic treatments of the subject. It will also consider competing contemporary conceptions of happiness and the variety of ways in which individuals today pursue this all-too-often elusive goal. Nesteruk FND111.(formerlyNTW108).EnergyIssuesinScienceandSociety. This course explores the basic science of energy, world energy use patterns, and some of the environmental and social consequences of energy use. Statistics on energy use and energy resources around the world are examined. The laws of physics which govern energy production and conversion are introduced and used to quantitatively discuss energy sources. The scientific principles of electricity generation and alternative energies are discussed in some detail. The course touches upon the interplay between science, public policy, and economics in dealing with energy issues. Fritz

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FND112.(formerlyNTW142).PhysicsofMovement.(NSP) This course will introduce and explore the principles of physics as they apply to coordinated human movement including walking, sports, martial arts, and primarily dance. It is a studio course, where experiential movement practice will serve to put the principles of physics into action. In turn, the physical theory will promote efficiency in movement, and enhance and expand understanding of moving in and being moved by the natural world. Lommen FND120.(formerlyCCS104).MortalityandMeaning. Something of a paradox emerges in thinking about human mortality. On the one hand, mortality reveals the frailty and temporary nature of human existence. On the other hand, this recognition of human frailty does not necessarily result in fatalism or despair. Rather, what emerges from these reflections is a desire to give some meaning to one's own life and, in turn, death. We will look at different responses to this question of mortality and meaning through the work of Homer, Lucretius, Seneca, Augustine, Condorcet, Darwin, Nietzsche, Hannah Arendt, and the art of Edvard Munch and Francis Bacon. Hammer FND122.(formerlyCCS142).CultureofChocolate. Chocolate: food of the gods, coinage for the Aztecs, beverage of French kings and fine ladies, snack for the American masses, welcoming gift from invading American GIs, obsession of the European elite, and motivation for child labor abuses in West Africa today. This course will examine the history of chocolate and its roles in many different cultures. We will draw on readings from anthropology, psychology, economics, film, and literature to inform our discussions. We will attempt to understand how the constant yet changing demand for chocolate has had an impact on civilization throughout time, and how our society today uses chocolate as a symbol of certain cultural values. And yes, we will even learn the correct way to savor chocolate confections! Yetter-Vassot FND123.(formerlyCCS156).Africa:TheIdea/ThePlace. This course examines Africa as a geographical/historical/cultural location, with wide ranging cultural, political and economic relations and impacts; as well as a construct of specific meanings and symbolic significance to a wide range of groups and individuals beyond the continent. It investigates the position of Africa in world history and its place in contemporary global relations, both in its own right and as a signifier of human connections and preoccupations, and exploitation in material and symbolic terms. Course materials will be drawn from historical, anthropological, literary, and aesthetic sources as well as social science. Visual and audio materials, and field trips will be used to complement literary references. Zein-Elabdin FND124.(formerlyCCS159).CorporateSocialResponsibility: CatchingtheCorporateConscience What is corporate social responsibility, both as a concept and as a societal discourse? First, we will explore various conceptions of CSR in academia, government, the nonprofit sector, and business practice. Is there a unitary concept or is CSR merely a catch-all term that captures many ideas? Second, we will consider theories and arguments about whether CSR is good, and what forms of CSR different social actors value. Whose arguments have the greatest internal consistency and greatest external validity? What are the assumptions underlying each argument? Third, we will examine CSR as a social and political movement, a uniquely American organizing principle directed against corporations rather than the state. What are the outcomes of CSR as a movement? How and for whom is CSR powerful? Proffitt FND125.(formerlyCCS161).PropagandaandGenocide. How can millions of people willingly participate in genocidal actions? What are the tools and techniques used in influencing the masses to commit acts of genocidal horror? This course looks at the construction of propaganda in various mediums that helped lead to the genocidal actions in Europe and Africa in the 0th Century. Influence techniques from the fields of Psychology, Sociology and

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Marketing will be explored, with particular emphasis placed on the Propaganda Ministry of Nazi Germany. Podoshen FND126.(formerlyMSS103).SelfinLifeandLiterature. In this course, we will study problems that literary writers and academic researchers encounter when trying to make sense of the concept of the "self." Is the "self" stable and constant over time, or is it in a state of continual change and flux? Do we discover an already fixed "self" within ourselves, or do we actively shape and form it? To address these and similar questions, we will read and discuss texts by psychologists, philosophers, and sociologists, as well as novels, dramas, stories, and poems by authors whose work has achieved international recognition, e.g., Robert Frost, Henrik Ibsen, Toni Morrison, Italo Calvino. Through discussions, writing assignments and in-class exercises, we will discover that the notions of the "self" in literature and academic disciplines are often interrelated in interesting and surprising ways. Bentzel FND129.(formerlyMSS137).PsychologyofHope. It may be argued that of all human emotions, none is more important than hope to human survival and development. In this Foundations seminar, we will draw upon a vast range of empirical, philosophical, artistic, and literary works in order to examine the multifaceted nature of hope. We are interested in exploring the many ways in which hope expresses itself, as well as in examining the biological, psychological, social, and aesthetic conditions under which hope seems most able to thrive. Penn FND131.(formerlyMSS153).SelfExpressioninArtandMusicofthe50s. The era of Bebop Jazz, Abstract Expressionism, Beat Poetry:cultural manifestations of the contrast of a national sense of prosperity and invincibility with the psychological tensions of the new atomic weaponry and cold war. A time of tremendous creativity, experimentation, racial tensions, and outright rebellion. Creators such as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonius Monk, Jackson Pollock, and Willem de Kooning are considered as a constellation of case studies that help us frame and try to answer questions such as: What is the nature and significance of self expression? Wright FND132.(formerlyMSS154).ImaginingWarandPeace. Survey of how war and peace have been represented as subjects in literature, art, music, film, and psychological/philosophical writings. Exploration of fundamental questions about depictions of war and peace with the aim to think more critically about the implicit agendas embedded in aesthetic representations. Texts to be considered include Homer's The Iliad, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Anthony Swofford's Jarhead. Other works by Bob Dylan, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Luther King, Jr. will be discussed. Classes mostly conducted around discussion, with a few lectures. Hartman FND134.(formerlyNTW106).ScienceandReligion:OriginsandDesign. An investigation into whether or not scientific and religious beliefs are compatible. The object will be to determine what attitudes toward scientific theories may reasonably be adopted, and, more generally, whether or not science presupposes a naturalistic view of the world. The focus will be on a careful, non-dogmatic examination of the foundations of evolutionary theory and theism. Murray FND136.(formerlyNTW115).ScienceRevolutions. The nature, causes, and structure of scientific revolutions in the physical sciences, including the Scientific Revolution from Copernicus to Newton; 8th-century Electricity and Chemistry; 9thcentury Atomic Theory, Electromagnetism, and Thermodynamics; and 0th-century Quantum and Relativity Theories. Critical examination of Thomas Kuhn's theory that these scientific revolutions follow the same broad pattern. Strick

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FND137.(formerlyNTW119).HistoryofSpaceandTime. This course traces the development of views on space and time, from classical Greece to the modern theory of space and time, relativity. Students will gain a conceptual understanding of relativity as well as use algebra to work out detailed problems. We will discuss some of the revolutionary aspects of relativity such as black holes, the warping of space, time travel, and the big bang. We will explore the philosophical implications of relativity, how our modern view of space and time has changed our view of the world, and how it has influenced society, literature, and art. Stubbins FND141(formerlyCCS162).ChallengingAuthority:RebelsandRabble-Rousers. What do we do when authority and ethics collide/conflict? When do we act out and express our convictions and when do we "go with the flow"? As human beings, to what or whom are we actually responsible? Under what circumstances do we obey laws, leaders, rules, and cultural norms? What cultural forces limit our choices or make choices for us? Through the study of a wide range of literary, scientific and theoretical texts, we attempt to decipher these fundamental problems of human existence. Moreno FND144.(formerlyCCS125).AmericainBlackandWhite. Most of us can use the word "race," but can we agree on its meaning? What is it, and where does it come from? Race, like any socially constructed idea, is constantly changing. This course explores how blackness and whiteness have been invented and reinvented. We will pay particular attention to the 0th century. Anthony FND148.(formerlyCCS129).MastersandDisciples:EducationAcrossCultures. In this course, we will discuss what it means to be educated, as this is understood in several traditions across the world. While education always involves the acquisition of certain skills, it always also aims at forming a specific kind of human being, who would not be possible without the educational process. It is this underlying image of who human beings are, as well as the ways devised to arrive at them, that we will explore. We will focus extensively on the master-disciple relationship, as this is a key part of the process in almost all traditions. But we will explore all kinds of questions stemming from that relationship. What is considered valid knowledge? How do you know you have attained it? What are the obstacles in one's path? To what degree does education simply reproduce the social norms and to what degree is it meant to create a distance toward them? Aronowicz FND149.(formerlyNTW131).LifeonMars. Is there life on Mars? This important issue will be addressed by examining the origins and evolution of Mars, and by comparing it to the geological and biological evolution of the Earth. From Lowell's observations in the 890s to exciting new discoveries by NASA's Mars Pathfinder and Global Surveyor missions, our understanding of the red planet is increasing, but many questions remain. Perhaps human exploration of Mars will provide the answers and at the same time increase our appreciation of the uniqueness of planet Earth. A. de Wet FND151.(formerlyCCS163).WhatWorkIs. Work is necessary for survival. However, many modern societies work well beyond what is needed to provide for material existence and suffer from hurried and stressed working environments. The decoupling of work from the provisioning of necessities suggests that work is about culture. This course explores the anthropological, sociological, economic, and philosophical dimensions of the activity deemed work. It explores the role of technology, social organization, religion, class, and consumerism on work effort, forms of work, and consequences of working. The course also explores reactions against dominant cultural norms concerning work. Brennan FND152.(formerlyMSS127).OnHumanNature. The question of human nature--what we are like by nature, how we have become what we are, and what ways of life are natural to us--is the most foundational of all questions in the humanities and

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social sciences. In addition, it is foundational to our system of law and government, to our relations with others, and to our sense of what a good society and good human life would look like. This course will examine the question of human nature from a variety of perspectives--religious, philosophical, and biological--and will explore what is at stake in each in terms of its understanding of what constitutes a good life and a good society. (Not open to students who have taken CCS ). Kaye FND162.ProgressandItsCritics. This course begins with a question: why should we expect life to better tomorrow than it is today? The idea of progress is embedded in Western life and thought; it informs our politics, economic decisions, educational pursuits, religious beliefs, and personal relationships. We take progress for granted. Even if we are cynical about the future, we still believe our children's lives should be more prosperous, easier, and fulfilling than ours. Why is this? On what grounds do we hold these expectations? Is progress a natural thing? Does if make us freer? We will begin our exploration of progress by considering its historical roots in the Renaissance, Age of Exploration, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. Much of our time will be taken up with the words and actions of contemporary critics. Who are these people, and why do they oppose what most of us believe is progress in diverse areas such as medicine, technology, consumer culture, education, and human rights? Deslippe FND164.(formerlyCCS144).UnwrappingChristmas. Neither interrogation nor celebration of Christmas. Situates this multiform contemporary event in two millennia of winter solstice celebrations. Imagines the modern Christmas as a hybrid entity with a complex genealogy, one that embraces a diversity of pagan and Christian customs. What cultural needs does Christmas address? Perhaps fundamental human preoccupations like fear, expectation, rebirth, and community. Texts include the Biblical Infancy Narratives, Handel's Messiah, Martha, and Love Actually. Battistini FND165.(formerlyCCS139).HumanRightsforAll? This Foundations course will explore the issue of human rights, human wrongs, and social justice in a global context. In the spirit of Foundations inquiry, this course will attempt to address several big questions, including: What are human rights? What is the best way to enforce human rights? What obligations come with human rights? What are some of the egregious human wrongs over the centuries? Should all humans have equal rights? How does social justice relate to human rights? Dicklitch FND166.(formerlyMSS135).ForbiddenKnowledge. Should there be, and are there, limits set on what we may know? What makes certain knowledge "dangerous"? Examination of myths and stories of forbidden knowledge and those things "we're better off not knowing." Exploration of the supposed consequences of forbidden knowledge or of asking certain questions. Two hours lecture/discussion plus one hour oral presentation per week. J. Anderson FND167.(formerlyNTW143).ApplicationsofChemistrytotheEnvironment.(NSP) This course is designed, through a series of practical hands-on projects, to explore properties of matter and their relationship to models in chemistry as well as chemical phenomena and their relationship to a scientific view and understanding of the environment. The weekly modules will cover such topics as acid-base properties and states of matter (solid, liquid, gas). Topics relevant to public policy will include case studies related to toxicology and to "global warming." Leber FND168.(formerlyNTW124).Plants,Food,andPeople. Humans depend on plants for many needs, such as food, medicine, and shelter. Present-day agricultural systems enable the earth to support a population that now exceeds six billion people, but there are serious concerns about continuing malnutrition and about the environmental and social impacts and the sustainability of these systems. Genetically-modified crops are the culmination of thousands of

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years of human alteration of plants and may help us solve some of the problems of feeding the world's people. Evaluating the benefits and risks of these new crops requires a multidisciplinary approach. An important theme is human nutrition, considering both the undernutrition and the overnutrition that now threaten the health of children and adults in both developed and developing nations. Pike FND180.FoundationsAntiquity. This course is the first part of a two-course sequence ("Foundations Antiquity--Foundations Modernity").This two-semester sequence of courses is designed to offer students a chance to complete the Foundations requirement in a way designed to provide an overview of some of the major developments of the intellectual heritage of Western Civilization concentrating on the foundational idea of society, human nature, ethics, and religion. "Foundations Antiquity" begins with the civilizations of the ancient Near East (Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the biblical world), proceeds to the worlds of ancient Greece, Rome, and early Christianity, and concludes with the Medieval West (including texts relating to the encounters of Jews, Christians, and Muslims). Students who enroll for this course will also be enrolled in spring semester for the second part of this course ("Foundations Modernity") taught by Professor Bastian of the Anthropology department. Bastian FND182.Art,Perception,andMeaning. This course focuses on a fundamental question in 0th century philosophy of art: What is the nature of the relationship between spectator's aesthetic and interpretive responses to artworks? In order to evaluate this issue we will investigate what it is to engage with a work of art aesthetically and examine the influence of contemporary research in cognitive science on theories of painting, music, dance, and film. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of cognitive science, evaluate some basic issues in aesthetics and art criticism, and explore the variety of ways researchers in the humanities and the natural sciences can collaborate in the study of human nature. Seeley FND184.House. A house fulfills a basic human need for shelter, yet houses are much more than that. The tremendous variety of different houses shows not only that there are many ways to meet the need for shelter, but also that a house represents beliefs and commitments that extend far beyond this simple utilitarian function. The values to which houses give shape are personal, social and cultural. This course asks: What kinds of needs does a house fulfill? Why do houses take on such varied and particular forms and configurations? What can we learn about people and human society by looking at houses? In short, how do houses meet fundamental human needs and desires? Clapper FND185.ImpactofReproductiveTechnology. This course will examine how reproductive technology has altered the way humans create and view family. Advances in medicine and manufacturing in the past century have produced unprecedented levels of control in preventing or producing offspring. What are the modern ways to make a baby? How have these options altered our views of family planning and parenting? What is the effect on the legal, social, and spiritual standing of the child (or potential child)? How does the impact of modern reproductive practices vary with different religions and cultures? Moore FND187.AnimalWelfare. Can you imagine what it's like to be a cow? A goldfish? A laboratory mouse? Although we know little about the experience of being non-human, we use and care for animals in a variety of contexts: as pets, in zoos, on farms, and in laboratories. How can we determine whether the care we are providing is good enough? Over the course of the semester, we will develop an idea of how we think animals should be treated by exploring relevant religious, scientific, philosophical, literary, popular, and political materials. Bashaw FND188.TheoriesofColorandPerspective. Both a practical and intellectual examination of two of the central constellations of ideas and

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phenomena in the visual arts. Beginning with a grounding in the historical contexts and traditions of pictorial space and color. Followed by the planning and execution of several exercises and projects which explore some of the possibilities of these two vast topics along with their interaction. Peterson FND189.AndeanandAmazonianNaturesandCultures. How do environments and human cultures mutually influence one another? How can we tell the difference between natural landscapes and those modified by humanity? The Andes and the Amazon house globally significant cultures, resources, and ecosystems. Whereas the former is renowned for its ancient civilizations, the latter is thought to be one of the world's last wildernesses. However, each has undergone extensive human transformation of forests, grasslands, landforms, and waterways. The unique ecosystems of these two regions have in turn generated cultural adaptations. Study of the Andes and the Amazon enables us to understand how societies at different times and in different settings construct the boundary between nature and culture, and how local cultures and larger political economies drive changes to the land. Maxwell FND190.TragedyandtheTragic. In origin tragedy is essentially a descriptive term for a peculiar literary genre that developed in ancient Athens during the fifth century BC. Tragedy has come to mean much more. In addition to readings and discussions of Greek tragedies themselves, this course will include an examination of major contributions to an understanding of the tragic by ancient and modern thinkers whose ideas, while incorporating a variety of disciplinary approaches, were based on an interpretation of Greek tragedy. Aside from the tragedians, readings include Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Hegel, Nietzsche, Freud, Girard. Biles

FAll 2007 FIRST-YEAR SEMINARS AND WRITING COURSES

AMS100.IntroductiontoAmericanStudies. An interdisciplinary course that attempts to explain how the United States became a modern nation. Drawing upon the arts, humanities, and social sciences, this course investigates the interplay of national identity, middle-class culture, race, ethnicity, and gender from the nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Schuyler AMS170.RightsandRepresentations. This seminar focuses on the social, legal and political controversies surrounding representation in American history and contemporary culture. It offers students an introduction to free speech rights as well as the history of censorship in the United States, with particular focus on issues of race and gender. The class will explore several explosive moments in which groups of Americans objected to their depiction in popular culture. Key questions are: When and how do representations hurt people? How are rights to free speech balanced with the equal protection in American law? Kibler ANT125.GreatMysteriesofthePast. In this course you will unravel some of the most intriguing mysteries in archaeology. Through a critical evaluation of several case studies, you will learn to separate fact from fantasy and science from pseudoscience. Through such an examination we will discuss how knowledge is constructed and how to assess the strengths of competing hypotheses. Some of the enigmatic case studies that we will explore and debate include the stone statues of Easter Island, the megalithic monuments at Stonehenge, the Nazca lines of Peru, the moundbuilders of North America, Aztec cannibalism, and the Egyptian pyramids. Levine

ART126.HowIdeasBecomeForm. How does an artist get an idea and then go about making something that conveys that idea visually? This course will consider the creative process through both conceptual and material approaches. Students will read theoretical essays about the nature of artistic inspiration; participate in group discussions; keep a written/visual journal; and critique popular ideas about "artistic genius." There will also be an opportunity for at least two, hands-on sculptural projects: one in wood and one in metal. Makwymowicz CHM111B,C&D.GeneralChemistryI:TheStructureandCompositionofMatter. Designed both as a background for further courses in chemistry and as a terminal course for interested non-science students. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and the structure of matter in bulk. Relationship between properties and structure stressed throughout. Laboratory work deals with the separation and identification of substances. Yoder, Leber CLS/ART140B.ClassicalArtandArchaeology. An introductory survey of the major artistic and architectural monuments of ancient Greece and Rome, from the Dark Ages, ca. 00 B.C.E., through the reign of Constantine., 7 C.E. This course emphasizes the use of archaeological methods to reconstruct the past and features slide lectures and a field trip to a major museum. Meyers ECO130.MarxianPoliticalEconomics. Marx's philosophy of history and analysis of capitalism as a type of economic system. Topics include the theory of value/price and exploitation, relations between class on the one hand and race and gender on the other, the theory of economic crises, the concepts of ideology and commodity fetishism, and the role of the state in capitalist society. The course will also consider the concept of socialism in light of the collapse of the Soviet model. Callari ENG/AMS107.AmericanDreams. In this first-year seminar, we will explore the varied meanings of the American dream, a concept that seems as familiar as the words "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." But looking more closely, we come to realize that the American dream can mean different things to different people. For some, it means achieving financial success; for others, gaining personal freedom. As we will see, these differing definitions sometimes contradict one another. One individual's pursuit of happiness can impinge on the liberty--even the life--of another. In this seminar we will examine a variety of creative works, texts from such writers as Benjamin Franklin, Booker T. Washington, Kate Chopin, and E.L. Doctorow. These readings will provide a perspective on the many dreams that have been associated with the United States and an opportunity to reflect on what has become of them. Frick ENG/WGS167.FromCourtshiptoHook-Up:Dating,MatingandRomancefrom18th CenturytoPresent. This course will examine the interrelation among love, history, and literature. How do cultural and historical differences affect experiences and understandings of dating and mating rituals? How does "love" change over time and place? How does literature account for, manifest, and challenge these historical changes? The course explores how ideas about courtship have changed primarily between the eighteenth century and today, starting with a discussion of "courtly love" and how it influenced our own views of romance. Our readings will include Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Jane Austen, and Edith Wharton. We'll trace the influence of these traditions in works by contemporary writers such as Nick Hornby and Helen Fielding--which emphasize the contemporary dating dilemma, "What to do? What not to do?"--and in films and selected TV programs. The course divides itself into units on "Forbidden Desire," "Marriage and Power," "Sexuality and Fidelity," and "Love and Changing Society." In the process we'll be exploring a little bit of the history of Western thought about gender relations, domestic ideology, masculinity, femininity, and the political and economic implications of our ideas about beauty, sex, and love. Moreno

ENV/STS172.TheGreatWatersheds. The course will investigate two watersheds. It will investigate the Delaware and the Chesapeake (including their big rivers, the Susquehanna Potomac, etc). The course will examine the watershed's history, science, origins, and socioeconomics. The near- and far-afield environmental issues--which are very different. The class will bring a great diversity of issues to the table in terms of the laws that protect them, the people that live (and don't live) there, the science that is always occurring, especially along the Chesapeake (e.g. oysters, very current), and the politics that provide very different levels on environmental safeguards to each waterbody. Pepino GEO/ENV114A.Earth,EnvironmentandHumanity. An investigation of the earth with emphases on the opportunities available to and the constraints upon humankind arising from properties of the earth, and on the effects of human activities on the natural environment. The structure and character of the earth; natural hazards; the role of humans in changing the face of the earth; surface and ground water use and management; the generation and degradation of soils; energy resources; human wastes. Laboratories will examine the principles behind geologic environmental problems and local, national and global environmental problems and issues. Williams GEO/STS115.Evolution:PatternsandProcessofChangeinNature. A general concept of evolutionary change; the spontaneous emergence and historical development of complex, organized systems in nature. Evolution and the nature of time. Comparative study of the varied processes responsible for directional change in the universe, the solar system, the history of the Earth and its crust, the evolution of living organisms, and the development of human cultures. Time scales of change. Thomas GER170.TeutonicorDemonic:BeyondGoodandEvilinGermanLiteratureandThought. In this class, we will study how a number of German writers have challenged us to rethink the relationship between good and evil in their philosophical and literary works. We will use Nietzsche's philosophical work Beyond Good and Evil to give more critical readings of masterpieces like Goethe's Faust, Richard Wagner's operas in the "Ring" cycle, Theodore Storm's novella "The White Horse Rider," Heinrich Mann's The Loyal Subject, and Herman Hesse's Demian. This class is taught in English and the works will be read in English translation. Bentzel GOV100C&D.AmericanGovernment. This seminar is an introduction to the political structures, policy processes, and public policies in the American political system. The seminar will focus on national government, with attention to the role of the states in the federal system. The course will explore the exercise of power and accountability for its use in a democratic system, the relationship between choice of procedures and electoral and policy outcomes, and analysis of competing notions of the public good in contemporary policy debates. Stephenson, Friedrich HIS/AMS153.RaceandEthnicityinAmericanHistory. While this first-year seminar will emphasize topics in the history of African Americans and the changing relations between whites and African Americans over the past 400 years, the course will also examine, for comparative purposes, the experiences of Jewish immigrants who arrived in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Students will have an opportunity to read closely both primary and secondary sources, and to bring historical, sociological, and psychological perspectives to bear on the issues of race and ethnicity in America. Stameshkin HIS/WGS171.WarandGenderinModernEurope. This course will focus on the experiences of European men and women in the First and Second World Wars. Through literature, film, propaganda, and other primary sources, we will explore the shifts in masculine and feminine identities occasioned by total war. Men as soldiers, victorious or defeated;

women as workers, mothers, and nurses: These are some of dominant images open for examination. By tracing their evolution into the postwar eras, when gender "normality" was reconstructed, we will address larger questions concerning the societal roles of men and women. Mitchell HIS/AMS175.CivilWarFiction. As soon as the American Civil War began, popular media circulated fictions about its causes, battles, and heroes. This seminar will take these fictions--whether they appear in songs, poetry, graphic art--or fiction as a source for analyzing what different generations have had to say about the war and its issues. Plan on at least one class trip to a battlefield or museum. Stevenson MAT170.MathematicsandArt. Perspective drawing (drawing in one-point or many-point perspective) makes two-dimensional pictures seem three-dimensional. The reason for this realism lies in the geometry of similar triangles. Perspective drawing and perspective geometry will be the main topics of this course; from there we will read Flatland and explore how to go from two dimensions, to three dimensions, and into four dimensions. The course will finish with fractals and chaos theory. Although we will visit museums and do lots of drawing in this class, students do not need prior art experience. Students should feel comfortable working with simple algebraic equations: for example, they should be able to solve 6/(x+) = 5/0 to get x = . Crannell MUS104.MusicandStage. A study of the conventions of the musical stage: how music functions as a vehicle for dramatic action in stage works based on differing theories of drama. At the core of the course are video recordings of operas and lighter works (operettas, musical comedies, etc.) by composers as varied as Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Britten, Gershwin, Bernstein, Sondheim, and Picker. No prerequisites. Wright MUS107.Composing. Various aspects of the compositional process will be examined both through the study of composers' writings and works and the creation of several short original pieces for various instrumentations. Ability to read music required. Carbon PHI170.Zeno'sParadoxes. Not quite ,500 years ago, Zeno argued that motion is impossible, and he came up with four challenging arguments to prove it under any conceivable understanding of space or time as continuous or discrete. Of course we all know that motion is possible, but that's what creates the paradox: Zeno's arguments for this absurd conclusion seem utterly convincing, and philosophers, mathematicians, and physicists have been struggling ever since to overcome them. In order to understand what's wrong with these arguments, we must re-examine our ordinary assumptions about the nature of space, time, and even numbers. The result will be a fascinating mix of philosophy, math (including set theory, numbers theory, and transfinite arithmetic), and just a bit of contemporary physics. Helm PHI171.Bioethics. What is biomedical ethics? Biomedical ethics is a branch of applied ethics dedicated to the evaluation of ethical issues surrounding medical practice. For instance, what is the nature of normal function? Is it a biological or a cultural concept? How do the answers to these questions affect our medical judgments? Does the possibility of neuropharmacological enhancement change these answers? In the course we will discuss these issues along with questions about the ethical foundations of human subjects research, the nature and ethics of genetic screening, informed consent and the physicianpatient relationship, the definition of death, and the ethics of stem cell research and cloning. The goal of the class is twofold: to introduce students to the fundamental concepts that frame sound medical practice; and to illustrate the types of philosophical problems that confront practitioners in rapidly changing, technologically flexible medical fields. Seeley

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PHI175.TheEmergenceofPhilosophyinAncientGreece. What distinguishes philosophy from other disciplines? Is it a special set of questions, or a difference in methods of inquiry? To answer these questions, we will study the emergence of philosophy as a distinct discipline in Ancient Greece, with emphasis on Athens, the birthplace of philosophy as we know it. How do philosophers such as Socrates, Plato and Aristotle separate what they do from the work of poets, priests, historians, playwrights, mathematicians, natural scientists, orators and politicians? What, for them, is the essence of philosophy? Franklin PHY171.FromQuarkstoQuasars. This course will investigate fundamental physical interactions from the smallest, most elementary particles, quarks, to some of the most distant objects in the universe, quasars. The course will focus on how we measure, infer, and describe the existence, motion, and interactions of these objects. Connections will be made to current research as well as groundbreaking experiments and theories from the past. Larochelle RST170.LiteratureofExile. While the theme of exile can be found in literature across the ages and across the continents, it has particular relevance to the 0th century, which witnessed unprecedented dislocation of peoples, either as a result of war, oppressive political regimes or extremely harsh economic circumstances. This seminar will focus on how this dislocation is expressed in works of contemporary fiction, autobiography, and essays. Our main purpose will be to read each author's text closely and to reflect both in orally and in writing about what these authors have to say. Aronowicz RST178.Religion,theBeatsandPostwarAmerica. In the mid-940s, before writing the obscenity-laden manifestos that would earn them fame, opprobrium, and the group label the "Beat Generation" artists such as William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, and Allen Ginsberg had begun a collaborative project of literary and spiritual development, what they termed the "new vision." This course will examine the history of this development within the context of the changing religious climate of post-World-War II America. It will use the example of the Beats to explore two different but intimately related phenomena the capacity of the imagination to create a religious world out of the most mundane and secular of experiences and the historical conditions of postwar America that privileged personal experience as an arbiter of religious truth. In addition to reading the literature, journals, and correspondence of the major Beat writers, we will also examine other source materials from Supreme Court cases and sermons to sociological studies and documentaries about the atomic age that illumine the religious volatility of this particular period in American history. Lardas Modern SPA/WGS174.LatinaWriters:BetweenTwoWorlds. In this course we will read short stories, poems, novels, and essays by contemporary Latina writers. We will explore the representation of the female experience within the tensions that exist between the two different worlds in which "Latinas" have grown up and/or live as adult women. We will read authors from different backgrounds (Mexican, Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, among others). Tisnado STS/ENV117B.TheEnvironmentandHumanValues. Study of historical and modern attitudes toward nature; human use of nature's resources; the effects of the growth of science and technology on human uses of and attitudes toward the environment; and modern humans' ability to substantially alter the environment (e.g., by altering global temperature). Key concepts addressed include the nature of human population growth, the notion of "limits to growth," and the difficulty of managing the use of common pool resources. Maxwell

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TDF/ART168.StagetoScreen. This seminar explores the process of transforming plays and dances designed for live stage performance into movies--a process not unlike turning poems into paintings, inasmuch as it involves a different medium and a whole other language of expression. The course involves both hands-on production experience and studies in theory and analysis. Eitzen TDF171.SoloPerformance. The politics and poetics of solo performance, considered through readings, discussion, and practice. How does a lone individual on stage produce a specific mode of theatricality? How do issues of subjectivity, race, gender, and sexuality animate and influence such performance? We will write and theorize about several solo performance artists and we will create original 0-minute solo performance pieces, based on explorations of storytelling, automatic writing, and other techniques. Silberman TDF172.HowtoReadaFilm. An introduction to such aspects of film studies as film analysis, film history, and theory. Focus will be on technical and narrative analysis that will entail a close viewing of film. Course work fosters critical viewing, requiring keen analytic skills and good visual memory. From this work, students will be able to develop a systematic and convincing interpretation of the film and to articulate this analysis in a well-constructed and persuasive essay. Grotell WGS/AMS173.Franklin'sCollegeandBeyond. Colleges were excellent windows through which to view aspects of the larger culture." (David W. Robson, Educating Republicans: The College in the Era of the American Revolution, 1750­1800). The rich history of American higher education from the colonial period into the 9th century provides a fascinating way to examine larger historical issues. What role did religion and politics play in the founding of American colleges? What were Benjamin Franklin's and other important early Americans, thoughts about education? What did a college education mean for men during this time? for women? What influenced the curriculum of 8th and 9th C. colleges and universities? Did students have any "rights"? What place did the establishment of Franklin College (the "Franklin" in F&M) in 787 have in the overall growth of higher education in America? How and why did Franklin College and Marshall College become Franklin & Marshall College in 85? In this course, through discussion, debate, writing, and class presentations, we will answer these questions and more. John

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AFRICANA STUDIES

Department and Program Offerings

KEY TO ABBREvIATIONS

(A) Arts(Distributionrequirement) (H) Humanities(Distributionrequirement) (S) SocialSciences(Distributionrequirement) (N) NaturalScienceswithLaboratory(Distributionrequirement) (LS) LanguageStudiesrequirement (NSP) NaturalScienceinPerspective (NW) Non-WesternCulturesrequirement (W) Writingrequirement Note:Courseswith"7"inthemiddle(forexampleENG179,AFS370)arespecial topicscourses;titlesandcoursenumbersmayvaryfromsemestertosemester.

AFRICANA STUDIES

Professor Misty L. Bastian, Chair Misty L. Bastian Douglas A. Anthony Patrick Bernard (on leave 2007­2008) Susan Dicklitch Katherine McClelland Carla Willard (on leave 2007­2008) Eiman Zein-Elabdin Boubakary Diakité Van Gosse Susan Hurley-Glowa Professor of Anthropology Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of Government Associate Professor of Sociology Associate Professor of American Studies Associate Professor of Economics Assistant Professor of Francophone Studies and French Assistant Professor of History Assistant Professor of Music

AfricanaStudiesisaninterdisciplinaryprogramcombiningthestudyofAfricaandthe AfricanDiaspora,includingtheAfricanAmericanexperience.Severaldisciplinescontribute toAfricanaStudiesatF&M,amongthemAmericanStudies,Anthropology,Economics, English,Government,History,Music,ReligiousStudies,andSociology. A major in Africana Studiesconsistsoftencourses:AFS/AMS150;AFS/HIS241and 242;AFS/AMS/ENG256or257;AFS/HIS331or332;AFS350;AFS490;andthreeelectivesfromalistofapprovedcourses,includingbutnotlimitedtothefollowing:AFS/GOV 326;AFS/AMS/ENG256;AFS/AMS/ENG257;AFS/ANT267;AFS/ANT269;AFS/HIS 331;AFS/HIS349;AFS/SOC360;andAFS/ENG/WGS488.Prospectivemajorsshould takenotethatseveraloftheseelectiveshaveprerequisites(e.g.,introductorylevelcourses inanthropology,economics,orsociology),suchthatthenumberofcoursesnecessaryto completetheAFSmajormayexceedten.

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AFRICANA STUDIES

A minor in Africana Studies consistsofsixofthefollowingcourses:AFS/AMS150,HIS 241and242,AMS/ENG256or257,HIS331or332,AFS350.Inaddition,theelectives listedaftertherequiredcoursesmaybeofinteresttostudentsinthisarea. Forfurtherinformation,studentsshouldconsulttheAfricanaStudiesProgramChair. RecentAfricanaStudiesProgramstudentshavestudiedabroadinGhana,Kenya,South Africa,andGuyana. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehome departmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

CORE COURSES

150. Introduction to African American Studies. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 ThedevelopmentoftheUnitedStatesasaglobalandmultiracialsociety.Topicscanincludethe transatlanticslavetradeinthe18thand19thcenturies;PanAfricanism,massmediaintheAfrican Diaspora;theHarlemRenaissance,andCivilRightsmovement.Same as AMS 150. Staff 241. History of North and West Africa. (NW) (S) Fall 2008 ThiscourseintroducesmajorthemesinthehistoryofNorthandWestAfricafromancientEgypt throughthepresentcrisisinSudan.EmphasisfallsonWestAfricanpoliticalandsocialformations, domesticandtrans-Atlanticslavesystems,notionsofidentity,theroleofIslam,andtheriseand fallofcolonialism.Studentsuseprimarysourcestoexplorehistoricalproblems.Finalunitexplores recenteventsinSudan.Same as HIS 241. Anthony 242. History of East and Southern Africa. (NW) (S) Fall 2007 ThiscourseintroducesmajorthemesinthehistoryofEast,Central,andSouthernAfricafromthe BantumigrationthroughtheRwandangenocide.Emphasisfallsonsocial,political,andreligious changeinpre-colonialAfrica,andresistancetoslaveryandcolonialism.Studentsuseprimarysources toexplorehistoricalproblems.Finalunitexploresthelegacyofcolonialisminthe1994Rwandan genocide.Same as HIS 242. Anthony 256. African American Literature 1. (H) Fall 2007 Significantwritersfromthecolonialperiodthroughthe19thcenturyarestudiedtoestablishthe Blackliterarytraditioninthedevelopingnation.Same as AMS/ENG 256. Bernard 257. African American Literature 2. (H) Fall 2007 SelectedwritersfromtheHarlemRenaissancethroughtheBlackAestheticsmovementcomposethe modernBlackliterarytraditioninAmerica.Same as ENG/AMS 257. Staff 331. African American History 1. (S) Spring 2008 IntroductiontohistoricalexperiencesofAfricanAmericansfromtheearly1500suntiltheAmerican CivilWar.EmphasisontheculturalandsocialworldsfromwhichAfricanAmericanscameinthe 17thand18thcenturiesandhowtheysoughttorecreatethoseworldsontheplantationsandinthe townsoftheAmericanSouth.Alsoexaminestheestablishmentoffreeinstitutionsandthestruggle forfreedom.Same as HIS 331. Pearson 332. African American History 2. (S) Offered in 2007­2008 ExaminesthewiderangeofAfricanAmericanpoliticalthoughtandsocialmovementsthathave transformedcontemporaryAmericansociety.FocusesontheideasandstrategiesembracedbyAfrican AmericansastheysoughtequalityandjusticefromReconstructiontothepresentday.Same as HIS 332. Gosse

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AFRICANA STUDIES

349. Modern South Africa (NW) (S) Spring 2008 Withanemphasisonthe20thcentury,thiscourseexplorestheemergenceofSouthAfrica'smulti-racial society.MajorthemesincludeAfricanstatesystems,Europeanimmigrationandconquest,Africans' individualandcollectiveresponsestowhitedomination,andchanginggenderroles.Studentsuse historicaldocuments,film,andfictioninadditiontosecondaryreadings.Discussionisanimportant componentofcoursegrade.Same as HIS 349. Anthony 350. The African Intellectual and the Legacy of Colonialism. (Africana Studies Seminar) (S) Spring 2008 TheseminarexaminestheresponsesofleadingAfricanthinkerstocolonialismanditsaftermath,with emphasisonNorth,West,andEastAfrica.Studentsread/viewanddiscussworksbyFanon,Djebar, Nkrumah,Sembene,Ngugi,Appiahandotherkeythinkers,andcompleteanindividualresearch project.Prerequisites:HIS241or242orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as HIS 350. Anthony 490. Independent Study. Every Semester IndependentresearchdirectedbytheAfricanaStudiesstaff.Requiredofallmajors;ordinarilytobe undertakenintheFallsemesterofthesenioryear. Staff

ELECTIvE COURSES

106. History of the Blues. (A) Fall 2007 BlueshistoryfromitsoriginstotheBluesRevivalofthe1960s.EmphasisontheDeltabluestradition ofCharleyPatton,RobertJohnson,andMuddyWaters.Additionaltopicsinclude:oralformulaic composition;politicsofraceandsexintheblues;thebluesasa"secularreligion";themusicbusiness;appropriationsofbluesstyleinjazzandrock;andtheongoingfunctionofthebluesasacore signifierof"blackness"inAmericanculture.Noprerequisites.Same as MUS 106. Butterfield 169. Caribbean Literature. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Anintroductionto20th-centuryCaribbeanliterature,thiscourseexploresissuesoflanguage,diaspora, andculturalidentity.Coursematerialsincludefiction,nonfiction,poetry,anddrama.Same as ENG 169. Abravanel 203. Introduction au Monde Francophone. (H) (NW) Every Fall Selections from Francophone literature will be read, performed, and discussed in their cultural context.Avarietyofexercisesaredesignedtodeveloporalandwrittenskills,andtocompletea thoroughone-semestergrammarreviewattheintermediatelevel.Prerequisite:placement. Same as FRN 203. Diakité 213. Black American Film. (S) AnintroductiontofilmstudiesusingblackfilmasagenreofHollywoodandindependentfilm.CoverstheworkofOscarMichauxthroughthe"blaxploitation"filmsofthe1970sandbeyond.Explores filmsassocialcommentaryintheirparticularhistoricalcontexts.Particularattentionisgiventoscreen analysisofsegregation,sexuality,classdifferences,andmore.Same as AMS/TDF/WGS 213. Staff 216. Introduction to the Harlem Renaissance. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 AnintroductoryexaminationofthemajorwritersoftheHarlemRenaissance.Wewillreadsome oftherepresentativetextsandanalyzehowtheyengagedimaginativelythecultural,political,and aestheticconcernsofthemovement.Same as ENG/AMS 216. Staff 250. Witchcraft and Sorcery in a Global Context. (S) Fall 2007 Inthiscoursewewillconsiderhowthecategories"witchcraft"and"sorcery"havebeenusedin anthropology,bothtodescribemysticalacts(particularlymysticalattacks)andasanethnographic metaphortodiscussthepressuresofcommunallifeforindividuals.Coursecontentwillconsistof, butnotbelimitedto,witchcraftandsorceryasa"socialstraingauge,"witchcraftandsorceryas expressionsofsymbolicpower,thegenderednatureofwitchcraftandsorcery,aswellaswitchcraft

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AFRICANA STUDIES

andsorceryunderconditionsofwestern-stylemodernity.Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionof theinstructor.Same as ANT/RST/WGS 250. Bastian 260. Music of the African Diaspora. (A) (NW) Fall 2007 AnexplorationofAfricanDiasporamusicculturesintheAmericas,CapeVerde,andtheCaribbean. InadditiontoinvestigatingtheexpressionofAfricanismsinmusicalstyles,wewillstudyhowissues ofethnicity,sexuality,religion,sociopoliticalmovements,andliteraturearereflectedinthelocal musicaltraditions.(Abilitytoreadmusicrequired.)Same as MUS 260. Hurley-Glowa 267. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (NW) (S) Fall 2009 SocialandhistoricalpracticesofvariousAfricancultures,withaspecialemphasisonsub-Saharan groups.Topicsconsideredwillincludetheintersectionsbetweenpoliticaleconomy,performances, religion,art,andpopularmediaonthecontinent.Prerequisite:ANT100.Same as ANT/WGS 267. Bastian 281. Political Economy of Africa. (S) (NW) Offered in 2008­2009 AbroadideaofeconomicandsocialconditionsinAfricaandthefactorsthatinfluenceeconomic developmentintheregion,powerstructures,andprocessesofchange.Historicalanalysisofprecolonialsystemsofproductionandexchange,andmodificationsintroducedduringtheEuropean colonialperiod.Examinationofmajorcurrenteconomicandpoliticalproblemssuchasfoodproduction,externaldebt,andtheroleofthestate.Reflectiononthequestionofeconomicdevelopment. Prerequisites:ECO100and103,orpermissionofinstructor.Same as ECO 281. Zein-Elabdin 326. African Politics. (NW) (S) Fall 2008 Anexplorationofthesocio-economicandpoliticalchallengesfacingSub-SaharanAfricasinceindependence.Thiscoursewillfocusspecificallyontheprospectsforsocio-economicdevelopmentand democracyinSub-SaharanAfrica,withaninvestigationintoforeignaid,corruption,andNEPAD. (PreviouslyGOV245.)Prerequisite:GOV223. Same as GOV 326. Dicklitch 349. Modern South Africa (NW) (S) Spring 2008 Withanemphasisonthe20thcentury,thiscourseexplorestheemergenceofSouthAfrica'smulti-racial society.MajorthemesincludeAfricanstatesystems,Europeanimmigrationandconquest,Africans' individualandcollectiveresponsestowhitedomination,andchanginggenderroles.Studentsuse historicaldocuments,film,andfictioninadditiontosecondaryreadings.Discussionisanimportant componentofcoursegrade.Same as HIS 349. Anthony 360. Race and Ethnic Relations (S) Spring 2009 Studyofintergrouprelations,withanemphasisonprocessesofracial/ethnicstratification,assimilation,andculturalpluralism.FocusisonAmericansociety,pastandpresent.Topicsincludethe developmentandchangeofrace/ethnicidentities,intergroupattitudes,racialideologies,immigration, education,andtheintersectionofracewithsocialclassandgender.Prerequisite:Soc100.Same as SOC 360. McClelland 364. Francophone Literatures and Cultures. (H) Fall 2007 AnintroductiontothehistoryandcultureofatleasttwoareasofFrancophonie,suchasQuebec, theCaribbean,theMaghreb,andWestAfrica.Explorationofthecultural,linguistic,andpolitical interactionsbetweenFranceandotherFrancophonecountriesthroughliteraryworks,films,andother materials.Same as FRN 364. Diakité 430. Selected Studies in African History. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 Readingsandresearchinselectedtopicsofthepolitical,social,andculturalhistoryofAfrica.See relevantdepartmentalofferingsforprerequisites.Recenttopicsinclude"AfricansandApartheid" and"SlaveryinAfrica."Same as HIS 430. Anthony 491. Directed Reading. Every Semester AcontinuationofindependentresearchdirectedbytheAfricanaStudiesstaff.Prerequisite:AFS 490.

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AFRICANA STUDIES­AmERICAN STUDIES INTERDISCIPLINARY TOPICS COURSES (ALSO ELECTIvES)

StudentsmayalsoselectelectivesfortheAFSmajorandminorfromtopicscoursesofferedbythe followingdepartments:AmericanStudies,Anthropology,Economics,English,Government,History, JudaicStudies,Music,Psychology,ReligiousStudies,andSociology.Topicscoursestakeninthese departmentswillcounttowardtheAFSmajoronlyiftheyprimarilyaddressissuessurroundingAfrica andtheAfricanDiasporaandarealternativelydesignated"AFS."

AmERICAN STUDIES

Professor David Schuyler, Chair David Schuyler Louise L. Stevenson Dennis Deslippe Carla Willard (on leave 2007­2008) M. Alison Kibler John Lardas Modern Eliza Reilly Patricia Justice Levin Barbara John Louise Barnett Thomas Daniels Thomas R. Ryan Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities and American Studies Professor of History and American Studies Associate Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Associate Professor of American Studies Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies and Director, Center for Liberal Arts and Society Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Adjunct Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Research Associate of American Studies Research Associate of American Studies Research Associate of American Studies Affiliated Faculty Patrick Bernard (on leave 2007­2008) Michael Clapper Mary Ann Levine Edward Pearson Amelia Rauser Robert Battistini Matthew Butterfield (on leave Spring 2008) Van Gosse Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of Art History Associate Professor of Anthropology Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of Art History Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of Music Assistant Professor of History

AmericanStudiesatFranklin&MarshallCollegeseekstofosterinstudentsanunderstandingandappreciationofAmericanculturalandsocialdevelopmentwithattentionto themultiplenarrativesoftheAmericanpast.Facultystrivetoaccomplishthisthrough course offerings, individual interactions with students, and advising. The American StudiesProgramteachesstudentstoreadcritically,toarticulateideasclearly,toconduct researchandtowriteeffectively.Itexpectsstudentstodeveloptheseabilitieswithinan interdisciplinarycurricularframeworkthatrequiresthemtoencounterdiversepeoples,

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AmERICAN STUDIES

typesofculturalexpression,andpatternsofsocialinteraction.Studentsareinvolvedin researchandinternshipopportunitiesinthelocalcommunityaswellasinmoretraditional scholarship.TheAmericanStudiesDepartmentiscommittedtotheadvancementofthese goalsthrougheffectiveteachingandactivescholarshipbyitsfaculty.AmericanStudies preparesstudentsforawiderangeofcareers,includingeducation,museums,media,and publicrelations. A major in American Studies consistsofelevencourses:AMS100;threecourseschosen fromAMS150,203,300,and320;AMS350;AMS489;andfiveotherelectivecourses selectedfromthelistofapprovedcourses.Ofthesefiveelectivecourses,atleastonemust beinAmericanartsandliterature,andoneinsocialscience;atleastthreeofthesefive mustbehousedindepartmentsotherthanAMS,butnomorethantwoofthesefivecourses maybefromasingledepartment. ThewritingrequirementintheAmericanStudiesmajorismetbycompletionofthenormal coursesrequiredtocompletethemajor.Majorsintendingtoentergraduateorprofessional studiesshouldseethechairpersonforparticularcoursesnecessaryordesirabletoprepare foradvancedstudy.Othercourses,suchasforeignlanguagesand/orquantitativeskills, mayberequiredforstudentswishingtopursuegraduatework. MajorsinAmericanStudieshavestudiedinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:AdvancedStudiesinEngland,Bath;Queen'sUniversityBelfast,Ireland;UniversityofNew SouthWales, Sydney,Australia; International Study program, Copenhagen, Denmark; Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel; IES programs in Dublin, London, and La Plata, Argentina;andAmericanUniversityWashingtonSemester. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. Introduction to American Studies. (S) Every Semester AninterdisciplinaryintroductiontoAmericanidentity.Examinesexpressionsofnationalidentityin artsandpopularculture.Paysparticularattentiontorace,ethnicity,andgenderfromthe19ththrough theearly20thcenturies. Staff 107. American Dreams. (H) (W) Fall 2007 Afirst-yearseminarthatinvestigatesthevariedculturalmeaningsoftheAmericanDream.Examines theclassicdefinitionofsuccessasexpressedinthewritingsofBenjaminFranklin,HoratioAlger, Jr.,andBookerT.Washington.Explorescompetingdefinitions,aswellascritiques,ofAmerica's culturalmythologiesofsuccess.Syllabushasincludedliteraryandpopularfictionandnon-fiction byE.L.Doctorow,BarbaraEhrenreich,RichardNixon,NormanVincentPealeandfilmsbyRobert AltmanandMichaelMoore. Same as ENG 107. Frick 150. Introduction to African American Studies. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 ThedevelopmentoftheUnitedStatesasaglobalandmultiracialsociety.Topicscanincludethe transatlanticslavetradeinthe18thand19thcenturies;PanAfricanism,massmediaintheAfrican Diaspora;theHarlemRenaissance,andCivilRightsmovement.Same as AFS 150. Staff 203. American Religions. (H) Every Fall HistoricalandinterpretativestudyoftraditionsimportantintheNewWorld,includingNativeAmericanandAfricanAmericanreligions,Judaism,Catholicism,Protestantism,Americancivilreligion, Islam,andHinduism.Discussionofculturalcontact,AfricanslaveryandBlackchurches,theGreat

32

AmERICAN STUDIES

Awakening,nativismandimmigration,newreligiousmovements,theimpactoftechnology,mass media,andfeminism.AfinalsectionofthecoursecallsattentiontocontemporaryformsofAmerican culturalreligion.Same as RST 203. Lardas Modern 213. Black American Film. (S) AnintroductiontofilmstudiesusingblackfilmasagenreofHollywoodandindependentfilm.CoverstheworkofOscarMichauxthroughthe"blaxploitation"filmsofthe1970sandbeyond.Explores filmsassocialcommentaryintheirparticularhistoricalcontexts.Particularattentionisgiventoscreen analysisofsegregation,sexuality,classdifferences,andmore.Same as AFS/TDF/WGS 213. Staff 216. Introduction to the Harlem Renaissance. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 AnintroductoryexaminationofthemajorwritersoftheHarlemRenaissance.Wewillreadsome oftherepresentativetextsandanalyzehowtheyengagedimaginativelythecultural,political,and aestheticconcernsofthemovement.Same as AFS/ENG 216. Staff 238. Dance on the American Musical Stage. (A) Fall 2009 Alecture-survey,supplementedbystudioexperiences,ofmusicalstagedancinginAmericafrom thecolonialperiodtothepresent.Dancestylescoveredincludeacrobatic,ballet,ballroom,exotic, folk,jazz,modern,andtap.Same as TDF 238. Brooks 251. Modern American Drama. (A) Fall 2008 AliteraryandtheatricalexaminationofrepresentativeAmericandramafromtheRevolutiontothe present,emphasizingdevelopmentssince1920.ThefocusofthisstudyisonhowandwhyAmericans havebeendepictedonstageastheyhave,andthepowerfuleffectthisrangeofdepictionshashadon AmericanidentityandtheAmericanimagination.Same as ENG/TDF 251. Staff 256. African American Literature 1. (H) Fall 2007 Significantwritersfromthecolonialperiodthroughthe19thcenturyarestudiedtoestablishthe Blackliterarytraditioninthedevelopingnation. Same as AFS/ENG 256. Bernard 257. African American Literature 2. (H) Fall 2007 SelectedwritersfromtheHarlemRenaissancethroughtheBlackAestheticsmovementcomprisethe modernBlackliterarytraditioninAmerica.Same as AFS/ENG 257. Staff 260. Archaeology of North America. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 A surveyofNativeAmericanpeoplesinCanadaandtheUnitedStatesfromtheirarrivalonthis continentover12,000yearsagototheirencounterswithEuropeans.Throughtheuseofaregional approachtothestudyofindigenouspeoples,we willsurveyNativeAmericanpeoplesfrom theArctic, NorthwestCoast,Southwest,andNortheast.ByuncoveringthediversityofNativeAmericanlifeways inthepast,thiscourseprovidesthefoundationforunderstandingtherichheritageofcontemporary NativeAmericanpeoples.Prerequisite:ANT100or102orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ANT 260. Levine 261. North American Indians of the Eastern Woodlands. (NW) (S) Spring 2009 Asurveyof thepastandpresentdiversityofindigenouspeoplesintheEasternWoodlandsofthe UnitedStatesandCanada.Thefocusison theprehistoricarchaeologyoftheregion,theconsequences ofEuropeancolonizationonnativegroups,andthestrugglesandachievementsofindigenouspeoples today.Anexaminationof issuesrangingfromthecontroversythatsurroundstheinitialsettlement oftheEasternWoodlandsbyNativeAmericanstocontemporarydebatesonfederalrecognitionand sovereignty.Prerequisite:ANT100or102.Same as ANT 261. Levine 265. Hispanic Cultures of the U.S. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 The border between Mexico and the United States has become a loaded political symbol. This courseisabouttheSpanish-speakingpeoplewhohavecrossedthisborderorhadthebordercross theirancestorsfollowingthetreatyofGuadalupeHidalgoin1848,whichmarkedtheendofthe Mexican-AmericanWar.WeshallexaminethereasonsinsideandoutsideoftheUnitedStatesfor themassivemigrationacrossthisborderfromMexicoandCentralAmerica. Prerequisite:ANT100 orpermissionoftheinstructor. Same as ANT 265. Taggart

33

AmERICAN STUDIES

280. American Landscape. (S) Spring 2008 An interdisciplinary study of theAmerican landscape as it has evolved over centuries of human habitation.Examinesthreemainthemes:thedomesticatedanddesignedlandscapeofthemid-19th century;thecrusadetopreservenatureandtheestablishmentofnationalandstateparksinthelate 19thandearly20thcenturies;andthesprawling,seeminglyformlessautomobile-dominatedlandscape ofthelate20thcentury.Same as ENV 280. Schuyler 300. The Urban Experience. (S) Fall 2007 AninterdisciplinaryapproachtotheevolutionofAmericanmetropolitanareasasphysicalspaces andsocial-culturalenvironments.Topicsincludetheeconomyofcities,urbanpoliticsandcultural conflict,immigration,cityplanning,suburbanization,andthemodernmetropolis. Schuyler 320. Women in American Society and Politics since 1890. (S) Spring 2008 AninterdisciplinarystudyofthevariouswayswomenhaveparticipatedinAmericansocietyand politics.Topicsincludethesuffragemovement,modernmodesofpoliticalparticipation,andthe NewDealandWorldWarII.Criticalanalysisofthemeaningoffeminismandspecialattentionto thepost­1945period. Same as HIS/WGS 320. Stevenson 350. Studying the American Experience. (S) Spring 2008 Anexaminationoftheprincipalmethodsandparadigmsusedinconceptualizing,researching,and writinginAmericanStudies.Usuallycompletedinthejunioryear.Topicsvary. Schuyler 365. New American Wave: Films and Filmmakers 1968­1975. (A) Fall 2009 Examinationofsomeofthemostsignificantfilmsof thelate1960s,when theinfluenceoftheHollywoodstudioswaned,and agroupoftalentedfilmmakers,influencedbyliberatingmovementsin EuropeancinemaandthesocialandpoliticalupheavalinAmerica,emergedtocreatea"newAmerican cinema."Courseworkincludes closeanalysis,criticaltheory,andhistoricalresearch.Prerequisite: TDF165orTDF267orpermissionofinstructor.Same as TDF 365. Staff 391. Directed Reading. Tutorial.Topics adapted to the knowledge and interests of the individual student.Admission by consentoftheinstructor. 401. From Wilderness to Environmentalism. (S) Spring 2009 Aninvestigationofattitudestowardthenaturalenvironmentfromahistoricalperspective,andthe evolutionfromconservationtocontemporaryenvironmentalconcerns.Thiscoursepaysparticular attentiontoplaces--theHudsonRiverValleyandYosemite,forexample--aswellastoideasand attitudes.Same as ENV 401. Schuyler 420. Selected Studies in the Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States. (S) ReadingsandresearchinselectedtopicsofAmericanintellectualandculturalhistory.Recentseminars include"BooksandReading"and"AmericanCulture:1860­1880." Staff 489. Senior Seminar. (S) Acapstoneorintegrativeseminar.Topicsvary. 490. Independent Study. Every Fall

TOPICS COURSES TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

BlackPlaywrights RightsandRepresentations. FranklinCollegeandBeyond. AmericanSpiritualities. Slaveryinthe21stCentury. U.S.inGlobalContext. AmericanMasculinities. WomenandPopularCulture.

34

AmERICAN STUDIES APPROvED COURSES FOR AmERICAN STUDIES ELECTIvES

ThecourseslistedbelowhavebeenapprovedasAmericanStudieselectivesbytheAmerican StudiesCommittee.Theyhavebeenselectedonthebasisofbeingself-consciousabout theirAmericansubjectmatterasaproblemorissueorbecauseofthequestionstheyraise aboutAmericanidentity.Othercoursesthatmeetthesecriteria,suchastopicscourses, maybeapprovedbytheChairpersonofAmericanStudies.Studentsshouldbeawarethat someofthesecourseshaveprerequisites.

ARTS AND HUmANITIES

AMS--OtherelectiveAmericanStudiescourses,ifappropriate. ART243.AmericanArt. ENG206.AmericanTraditionI. ENG207.AmericanTraditionII. ENG208.AmericanTraditionIII. ENG252.AmericanNovel. ENG263.ContemporaryAmericanNovel. ENG461­489.Author'sseminars,whereappropriate. MUS105.Jazz. MUS106.HistoryoftheBlues MUS112.AmericanMusic. PHI317.20th-CenturyAmericanPhilosophy.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

AMS--OtherelectiveAmericanStudiescourses,ifappropriate. ECO310.LaborEconomics. ECO330.PublicFinanceandSocialChoice. GOV203.AmericanPoliticalTradition. GOV210.AmericanPresidency. GOV211.UrbanGovernment. GOV230.ForeignPolicyAnalysis. GOV231.NationalSecurityPolicy. GOV312.TheCongress. GOV313.TheBureaucracy. GOV314.AmericanConstitution. GOV315.CivilRightsandCivilLiberties. GOV370,470.TopicsinAmericanPolitics. HIS331,332.AfricanAmericanHistory. HIS345.RecentAmericaSince1945. HIS409,411.SelectedStudies/SocialandPoliticalHistory. HIS420.SelectedStudies/IntellectualandCulturalHistoryoftheUnitedStates. STS383.HistoryofAmericanScienceandTechnology. SOC210.Class,StatusandPower. SOC330.SociologyofMedicine. SOC350.SociologyofGender. SOC360.RaceandEthnicRelations. SOC420.SociologyofEducation.

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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY

Professor Mary Ann Levine, Chair James M. Taggart (on leave 2007­2008) Misty L. Bastian Michael S. Billig Mary Ann Levine Simon Hawkins (on leave Fall 2007) Monica Cable M. Jill Ahlberg Yohe James A. Delle Justin Jennings Lewis Audenreid Professor of History and Archaeology Professor of Anthropology Professor of Anthropology Associate Professor of Anthropology Assistant Professor of Anthropology Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology Visiting Instructor of Anthropology Research Associate of Anthropology Research Associate of Anthropology

Thestudyofanthropologyleadstoaknowledgeoftheworld'scultural,social,andbiologicaldiversityinthepastandpresent.Althoughthefocusofsuchknowledgeistheentirety ofthehumanexperience,studentsofanthropologyapplytheircomparativeperspective toreflectupontheirownlives,beliefs,andtaken-for-grantedassumptions.Inthissense, anthropologyprovidesastrongfoundationfor"theexaminedlife,"aSocraticidealthatis oneofthefoundinginspirationsoftheliberalarts. Anthropology,thestudyofhumanity,isuniqueamongacademicdisciplinesinbeingsimultaneouslyasocialscience,anaturalscience,andoneofthehumanities.Asonenoted anthropologisthasremarked:"Anthropologyisthemostscientificofthehumanitiesand themosthumanisticofthesciences." Althoughitistruethatmanyanthropologistsspendmuchoftheirtimestudyingandwriting aboutthe"smallpicture"--aremotevillage,asinglearchaeologicalsite,aparticularmyth --itisalsotruethatthedisciplineisconcernedwiththebiggest,mostgeneral,picture. Generalquestionsaboutthe"natural"rolesofparents,themeaningofwork,thefunction ofritual,andtheoriginsofinequalityaretypicallyanthropological.Allanthropologists, nomatterwhattheirtheoreticalpersuasionsortopicalspecializations,affirmthevalueof holism,viewingallaspectsofhumanthoughtandactionasinterrelated.Thisholisticoutlook isperfectlyconsistentwiththenatureandgoalsofliberaleducationinthemodernworld. Notonlydoestheanthropologymajorprovideastrongbackgroundincriticalthinking, analysis,andwriting,buttheanthropologygraduatealsogenerallycomesawaywitha broadappreciationforglobaldiversityandadeepsympathyforourfellowhumans. TheFranklinandMarshallanthropologymajorseekstobalancethelearningoffactual content,theoreticalanalysis,andactualempiricalresearchineitherculturalanthropologyorarchaeology.Ourmajorslearnaboutanthropology,buttheyalsoexperiencewhat itmeanstodoanthropology. A major in Anthropologyconsistsoftencourses:100,102,200;oneculture-areacourse; two300-levelcourses;410(forthosemainlyinterestedinsocialanthropology)or411(for thosemainlyinterestedinarchaeology);andthreeelectives.Weencouragestudentswho intendtopursuegraduatestudyinsocialanthropologytotake310asoneoftheirelective courses.WealsoencourageourmajorstoexpandtheprojectsbegunintheirMethodscourse (410or411)intofull-scaleIndependentStudiesprojectsbaseduponoriginalfieldresearch. Studentsshoulddiscussresearchopportunitieswiththeirdepartmentaladviserspriortothe

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ANTHROPOLOGY

springsemesteroftheirjunioryear.ThewritingrequirementintheAnthropologymajoris metbycompletionofthenormalcoursesrequiredtocompletethemajor. A minor in Anthropologyconsistsof6coursesinthedepartment:100;102;onecultureareacourse;one300-levelcourse;andtwoelectives. MajorsintheDepartmentofAnthropologyhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprograms inrecentyears:TGUExchangeProgramatTohokuGakuinUniversity,Sendai,Japan; Boston University Program,Archaeological Field School, Menorca, Spain; School for InternationalTraining;InstitutefortheInternationalEducationofStudents;Councilon InternationalEducationalExchange.SeetheInternationalandOff-CampusStudySection ofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. Social Anthropology. (S) Every Semester Anexaminationoffundamentalcategoriesandpracticesinsocialanthropology,givingspecialattentiontoanthropologicalmethodologies,basicformsofsocialorganization,andthewayshuman beingsgenerateparticularsocialmeaningsthroughtheiraesthetic,economic,religious,andpolitical activities. Bastian, Billig, Cable, Hawkins, Taggart 102. Introduction to Archaeology. (S) Every Semester Anintroductorysurveyofhistoricand prehistoricarchaeologythat examineshowknowledgeabout thepastiscreated,debated,andsometimesabused.A surveyof worldprehistoryfromtheearliest hominidsthroughtheriseofthefirst"civilizations"toexposetherangeofvariationinpasthuman socialandpoliticalorganization.Providesa globalandcomparativeapproachto betterunderstand andappreciate thisdiversity.Aswelearnaboutthemessagesandlessonsthatarchaeologyhasto offer,weshouldbegintothinkcriticallyaboutourownsocietyandreflectonthepossibilitiesforits improvement. Levine 125. Great Mysteries of the Past. (S) (W) Fall 2007 Throughacriticalevaluationofseveralcasestudies,youwilllearntoseparatefactfromfantasyand sciencefrompseudoscienceasyou unravelsomeofthemostintriguingmysteriesinarchaeology.We willdiscusshowknowledgeisconstructedandhowtoassessthestrengthsofcompetinghypotheses. SomeoftheenigmaticcasestudiesthatwewillexploreanddebateincludethestonestatuesofEaster Island,themegalithicmonumentsatStonehenge,theNazcalinesofPeru,and themoundbuildersof NorthAmerica Levine 170­179. Topics in Anthropology. (S) Lecturecoursesorseminarsontheoreticalorethnographicsubjectsofcurrentinterest. 190. Independent Study. 200. Anthropological Theory. (S) Every Fall The history of anthropological thought up to the present.The meaning and purpose of thinking theoretically. This course serves as the prerequisite to most 300-level courses inAnthropology. Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor. Billig 205. Archaeometry: Natural Sciences as Applied to Archaeology. (N) Spring 2008 Applicationofmethodsfromthenaturalsciencestostudyofarchaeologicalenvironmentsandartifacts.Scientificprinciplesunderlyingtechniques;applicationtoarchaeologicalproblems.Major topicsinclude:datingmethods;analysisandcharacterizationofartifacts;locationofsitesandfeatures

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ANTHROPOLOGY

withinsites;paleoenvironmentandpaleoecology.(Prerequisite:onearchaeologycourseandonelab sciencecourse,orpermissionoftheinstructor)Same as GEO 205. Sternberg 212. Language, Power and Society. (S) Spring 2009 Languagehascaptivatedscholarsfortheinsightsitprovidesintohumanbehaviorandinteractions. Throughlanguageweunitewithsome,whiledifferentiatingfromothers.Understandinglanguageis crucialtounderstandingculture.Thiscourseprovidesasurveyoftheusesoflanguageinanthropology,investigatinghowpeopleuselanguagetodefinethemselvesandtheworldaroundthem,andhow languagecommunicatesfarmorethanthecontentofwords.Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionof theinstructor. Hawkins 215. Women in Society. (S) Spring 2008 Howgenderrolesaffectwomen'sparticipationinpolitical,ritual,economic,andothersocialrelations.Thecoursematerialswillincludedetailedethnographicworkonspecificsocietiesandwill maintainatheoreticalperspectiveinformedbycontemporarygenderstudies.Prerequisite:ANT100. Same as WGS 215. Bastian 234. Population. (S) (NSP) Fall 2008 Introductiontopopulationstudiesfocusingonthedemographyofmodernsocieties.Topicsinclude causesandeffectsofrapidpopulationgrowth,changingmortalityandfertility,urbangrowth,age/sex composition,andspatialdistribution.Whilebasicdemographicanalysiswillbecovered,emphasis willbeonthesocioculturalcontextofpopulationprocesses.Prerequisites:ANT100orSOC100or ECO100orENV114orENV117orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ENV/STS 234. Billig 245. The Folktale. (S) Fall 2008 Asoralstories,folktalesrevealtwowaysofbeinghuman.Oneistohavefeelings,andtheotheris toorganizeemotionalexperienceinnarrativeform.Thiscourseaimstounderstandhowwomenand menorganizetheiremotionalexperiencesinfolktalesaccordingtotheirplaceinhistory,theirculture, andtheirpersonalexperience.Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor. Taggart 250. Witchcraft and Sorcery in a Global Context. (S) Fall 2007 Considershowthecategories"witchcraft"and"sorcery"havebeenusedinanthropology,todescribe mysticalacts(particularlymysticalattacks)andasethnographicmetaphortodiscusspressuresof communallifeforindividuals.Coursecontentconsistsof,butnotlimitedto,witchcraftandsorcery asa"socialstraingauge,"witchcraftandsorceryasexpressionsofsymbolicpower,genderednature ofwitchcraftandsorcery,andwitchcraftandsorceryunderconditionsofwestern-stylemodernity. Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as AFS/RST/WGS 250. Bastian 259. Cultures of the Middle East. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Spring 2008 Thiscourseexaminessomeoftheculturesintheregion,usingethnographies,films,andliterature, toprovideanin-depthunderstandingofpeople'slivedexperiences.Themeswillincludereligion, gender,andnationalism.Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor. Hawkins 260. Archaeology of North America. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Spring 2008 A surveyofNativeAmericanpeoplesinCanadaandtheUnitedStatesfromtheirarrivalonthis continentover12,000yearsagototheirencounterswithEuropeans.Throughtheuseofaregional approachtothestudyofindigenouspeoples,we willsurveyNativeAmericanpeoplesfrom theArctic, NorthwestCoast,Southwest,andNortheast.ByuncoveringthediversityofNativeAmericanlifeways inthepast,thiscourseprovidesthefoundationforunderstandingtherichheritageofcontemporary NativeAmericanpeoples.Prerequisite:ANT100or102orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as AMS 260. Levine 261. North American Indians of the Eastern Woodlands. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Spring 2009 Asurveyof thepastandpresentdiversityofindigenouspeoplesintheEasternWoodlandsofthe UnitedStatesandCanada.Thefocusison theprehistoricarchaeologyoftheregion,theconsequences ofEuropeancolonizationonnativegroups,andthestrugglesandachievementsofindigenouspeoples

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ANTHROPOLOGY

today.Anexaminationof issuesrangingfromthecontroversythatsurroundstheinitialsettlement oftheEasternWoodlandsbyNativeAmericanstocontemporarydebatesonfederalrecognitionand sovereignty.Prerequisite:ANT100or102.Same as AMS 261. Levine 263. Indians of Mexico. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Fall 2008 Theaimofthiscourseistounderstandthehistoryandthecultureofthegreatindigenousculturesof Mexico.ThefocusisontheNuhuas(Aztecs)andMayans,whobuiltthegreatancientcivilizations, enduredcenturiesofcolonialdomination,andstillmanagedtoholdontotheirlanguageandtheir cultureintothe21stcentury.Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor. Taggart 265. Hispanic Cultures of the U.S. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Spring 2008 The border between Mexico and the United States has become a loaded political symbol. This courseisabouttheSpanish-speakingpeoplewhohavecrossedthisborderorhadthebordercross theirancestorsfollowingthetreatyofGuadalupeHidalgoin1848,whichmarkedtheendofthe Mexican-AmericanWar.WeshallexaminethereasonsinsideandoutsideoftheUnitedStatesfor themassivemigrationacrossthisborderfromMexicoandCentralAmerica. Prerequisite:ANT100 orpermissionoftheinstructor. Same as AMS 265. Taggart 266. The Philippines. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Spring 2009 Anexaminationof Philippinesocietyandculturewithinhistoricalcontexttodiscoverhowtheunique blendofnativeandforeignelementsplaysoutincontemporarylife.Readingsincludeethnographic casestudies,fiction,andmonographsonvariousaspectsofPhilippinehistoryandsociety.Prerequisite: ANT100. Billig 267. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Fall 2009 SocialandhistoricalpracticesofvariousAfricancultures,withaspecialemphasisonsub-Saharan groups.Topicsconsideredwillincludetheintersectionsbetweenpoliticaleconomy,performances, religion,art,andpopularmediaonthecontinent.Prerequisite:ANT100. Same as AFS/WGS 267. Bastian 269. Cultures of the World. (S) Fall 2007 Anintensiveexaminationofaparticularculturaltraditionfromtheanthropologicalperspective.The coursemayberepeatedforcreditifadifferentcultureisexaminedinthetwodifferentofferings. Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor. Staff 270­279. Topics in Anthropology. (S) Lecturecoursesorseminarsontheoreticalorethnographicsubjectsofcurrentinterest. 290. Independent Study. 325. Hunter-Gatherers. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 Forninety-ninepercentofourexistenceonthisplanet,ourspecieshasmadeitslivingbyhunting andgathering;untilabout10,000yearsago,huntingandgatheringwasahumanuniversal.Tounderstandthediversityofthiswayoflife,wewillcriticallyreadanumberofaccountsderivedfrom ethnographyandarchaeologytoexposethetremendousrangeofvariationoflifewaysdevelopedby foragingpeoplesintheAmericas, Africa,Australia,andAsia.Prerequisite:ANT102andANT200 orpermissionoftheinstructor. Levine 330. Anthropological Studies of Religion. (S) Fall 2009 Thiscoursetakesaccountofvariousaspectsofreligiousandritualpractice,usingmaterialfromboth contemporaryandclassicethnographies.Topicsofspecialinterestforthecoursewillinclude,butnot belimitedto:cosmologicalconstructions;initiation;possession;commensality;magic;witchcraft andsorcery;ritualaesthetics;andperformance.Prerequisite:ANT200.Same as RST 330. Bastian 340. Anthropology of Wealth and Poverty. (S) Spring 2009 Anthropologicalapproachestotherelationshipbetweeneconomyandsociety,includingintensive readingsoftheoreticalandempiricalliterature.Topicsinclude:thenatureofrationality;Marxist andnon-Marxistpoliticaleconomy;thenatureandroleofproductionandexchange;class-conflict;

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ANTHROPOLOGY

colonialism;andthemakingoftheThirdWorld.Prerequisite:ANT200orpermissionoftheinstructor. Billig 345. Transitions to Capitalism. (S) Fall 2007 Theoreticaldebates,historicalanalyses,andethnographicstudiesabouttheriseofmarketexchange, privateproperty,andthecapitalistmodeofproduction.Anthropologicalperspectivesonthenature, origins,andcultureofcapitalism.Prerequisite:ANT200orpermissionoftheinstructor. Billig 360. Language and Culture. (S) Spring 2008 Thiscoursefocusesonthemesthatexplorethelinkbetweencultureandlanguage,includingthe processesoflanguagechange,differentvisionsofliteracy,andtherelationshipoftechnologyto language.Italsoaddressesmoretheoreticalconcerns,suchaslanguageideologyandpowerand resistance.Readingsvaryfromdenselytheoreticaltorichlyethnographic.Prerequisites:ANT200 orpermissionoftheinstructor. Hawkins 365. Queens, Goddesses, and Archaeology. (S) Fall 2007 Asurveyof howarchaeologistsexaminegenderandinterprettherolesofwomeninancientsubsistenceeconomies,politics,andreligions.Toachievethisgoalwewilldiscusstherolesofwomen inegalitarianandstratifiedsocietiesandexploretheactionsandstatusofbothhigh-rankingand everydaywomenintheancientworld.Prerequisites:ANT100,ANT102,ANT200,orpermission oftheinstructor.Same as WGS 365. Levine 370­379. Topics in Anthropology. (S) Lecturecoursesorseminarsontheoreticalorethnographicsubjectsofcurrentinterest. 390. Independent Study 410. Anthropological Methods. (S) Every Fall Apracticuminanthropologicalfieldwork,includingexercisesinparticipantobservation,interviewing,framingaresearchquestion,analysisandinterpretationofdata.Prerequisite:ANT200. Hawkins 411. Archaeological Methods. (S) Fall 2008 Thiscoursewillprovidestudentswithhands-ontraininginarchaeologicalfieldandlaboratorymethods.Inthefirsthalfofthesemester,participantswilltraveltoalocalfieldsiteandlearntechniques ofarchaeologicaldatarecovery,includingsurvey,mapping,andexcavation.Inthesecondhalfof thecourse,thefocuswillbeonlabanalysis,includingtheprocessingandinterpretationofartifacts recovered during the field component of the course. Special attention will be given to computer techniquesapplicabletoarchaeologicalanalysis.Studentsshouldexpecttospendtimeoutdoorsand todedicateatleastoneortwoweekenddaystofieldtrips. Levine 470­479. Topics in Anthropology. (S) Lecturecoursesorseminarsontheoreticalorethnographicsubjectsofcurrentinterest.Prerequisite: onecoursefromthe200level. 490. Independent Study. SeniorlevelindependentstudydirectedbytheAnthropologystaff.Permissionofchairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

GlobalFashion.

40

ART AND ART HISTORY

ART AND ART HISTORY

Professor Jun-Cheng Liu, Chair Linda S. Aleci Michael Clapper Richard K. Kent Jun-Cheng Liu Virginia Maksymowicz James C. Peterson Amelia Rauser William Hutson Scott Wright Carol Hickey (Spring 2008 only) Christine Welch (Summer only) Dorothy Thayne Associate Professor of Art History Associate Professor of Art History Associate Professor of Art History Associate Professor of Art Associate Professor of Art Associate Professor of Art Associate Professor of Art History Jennie Brown Cook and Betsy Hess Cook Distinguished Artist-in-Residence Visiting Assistant Professor and Artist-in-Residence of Art Senior Adjunct Instructor of Architecture Adjunct Instructor of Photography Visiting Scholar of Art

TheDepartmentofArtandArtHistoryeducatesstudentsinthepracticeandprocessesof makingart,andinthehistoricalanalysisofart.Weseethisendeavorasanessentialvisual complementtothetraininginverbalandnumericalanalysisandproductionofferedin otherareasoftheCollegecurriculum. TheDepartment'sprograminstudioartconcentratesontheplanningandproductionof visualworksthatuseformalandexpressiveelementssuchascomposition,shape,form, line,tone,textureandcolor.Beyondthedesignandexecutionoftheseworks,weguide studentsthroughtheprocessesofapplyingcriticalanalysisandanticipatingtheworks' ultimateintellectualandemotionalcommunication. Ourarthistoryprogramexaminesaestheticallyconsideredobjectswiththegoalofcomprehendingboththeobjectsthem-selvesandthesocialconcernsthattheyembody.We strive to develop students' ability to appreciate the technical accom-plishment, artistic decision making, and expressive effect of works of art.Yet art is not created only for aestheticpurposes;itisacompellingvisualizationofvaluesandprioritiesimportantina particulartimeandplace.Wethereforealsoteachstudentstounderstandthewaysthatart encapsulatesandpromotessharedbeliefs. Studentswhomajororminorinartelecteitheranarthistoryorastudioconcentration.The majorconsistsoftencoursesineitheroftwopossiblecombinations,asfollows:

STUDIO ART

Tencoursesarerequiredforthestudioartmajor: Eightcorecoursesarerequired: Art114; Oneintroductorycourseinsculpture(Art116orArt170); Onecourseinphotography(digitalorchemical)orcomputerart; OnecourseinAsianart,eitherArt105orArt200; Art222;

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ART AND ART HISTORY

Onecourseinmodernarthistory(Art241,251,orAmericanart); Onecourseinadvanceddrawing,figuredrawing,ormultiples; Art460,theadvancedseminarinstudioartpractices. In addition, students will choose two electives with which they can deepen their studyinarthistory,createanareaofspecialfocuswithinstudioart,orinvestigate coursesofinterest.Facultyadvisorswillhelpstudentsconstructacoherentcluster ofcoursesfortheareaofspecialfocus;coursesinotherdepartmentsmayalsobe appropriateaspartofthiscluster.Somepossibleareasoffocusinclude:advanced painting;advancedsculpture;designandtheenvironment;architecture/urbanism;and technologyandimage-making. AllstudioartmajorsarerequiredtopresenttheirworkintheSeniorExhibitionatthePhillips Museum.Preparationfortheexhibition,guidedandevaluatedbyArtmajoradvisorsand theprofessorteachingtheArt460StudioCapstonecourse,includesanon-creditportfolio reviewinthefallsemesterandtherequiredcapstonecourseinthespring. Thewritingrequirementformajorsconcentratinginstudioartismetbyearningaminimum of"C"inArt241,Art251,Americanart,orinoneseminarofferedbythedepartment.

ART HISTORY

Tencoursesarerequiredforthearthistorymajor: Sevencorecoursesarerequired: Art103; Art105; Art114; Classics140; Art231; Onecourseinthemodernperiod(Art241,245,251,HistoryofPrintmaking,or Americanart); Art461,theadvancedseminarinarthistory. Inaddition,studentswillchoosethreeelectiveswithwhichtheycandeepentheir studyofstudioart,createanareaofspecialfocuswithinarthistory,orinvestigate courses of interest.At least one of these three electives must be at the 300-level. Facultyadvisorswillhelpstudentsconstructacoherentclusterofcoursesforthe areaofspecialfocus;coursesinotherdepartmentsmayalsobeappropriateaspartof thiscluster.Somepossibleareasoffocusinclude:Asianart;earlymodernart;19thcenturyart;Americanart;architecture/urbanism;artandarcheology;andtechnology andimage-making. Thewritingrequirementformajorsconcentratinginarthistoryismetbyearningaminimumgradeof"C"inoneseminarofferedbythedepartment. Theminorconsistsofsixcourses,asfollows:

THE STUDIO mINOR

Twocourses: Art114; Onecourseinmodernarthistory(Art241,251,orAmericanart).

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ART AND ART HISTORY

Plusfourothercoursesinstudioart,choseninconsultationwithanadviser,withat leastoneatorabovethe300-level.

THE ART HISTORY mINOR

Threeintroductorycourses: Art103; Art105; Art114. Plusthreeothercoursesinarthistory,choseninconsultationwithanadviser,withat leastoneatorabovethe300-level. *Note:Requirementsoutlinedaboveareapplicabletomajorsandminorsbeginningwith theclassof2009.Studentsfulfillingrequirementsunderthedepartment'soldcurriculum shouldconsulttheirfacultyadvisors. TobeconsideredfordepartmentalhonorsinArtandArtHistory,graduatingseniors,besidesmeetingtheCollege'sgeneralrequirementsforhonors,mustcompleteasubstantial project,usuallyevolvingfromafallsemestercourseorindependentstudyandcontinuinginanindependentstudyinthespring.Studentsinterestedinpursuingdepartmental honorsshouldconsultwiththeiracademicadviserandobtainacopyofthedepartment's detailedguidelines. MajorsintheDepartmentofArtandArtHistoryhavestudiedabroadinthefollowing programsinrecentyears:ButlerUniversityPrograms;F&MSummerSessioninBath; IESMadrid,Spain,andUniversityofLondon;TempleUniversityinRome. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

A. STUDIO COURSES

114. Introductory Drawing. (A) Every Semester Thefundamentalsofdrawing--stilllife,landscape,portraitandfigure--usingtraditionalandexperimentaltechniques.Therelationshipofthemethodandtechniquestoartisticexpression. Staff 116. Introductory Sculpture. (A) Spring 2008 Anintroductiontohowideasandmeaningcanbetransmittedthrough3-dimensionalformsandmaterials,andtothebasicprocessesinvolvedinthecreationofthesculpturesthatconveythoseconcepts. Materialsincludeclay,wood,metal,andmixedmedia;techniquesincludemodeling,carvingand fabrication(basiccarpentryandwelding).Theworkofsculptors,bothhistoricalandcontemporary, willbeexaminedanddiscussed. Maksymowicz 118. Introduction to Architectural Design. (A) Every Spring Studiocoursetofocusonelementsofdesignandideapresentation.Designofnewbuildings,adaptive reuseofexistingbuildings,solarinfluencesondesign,siteplanning,interiordesign,andhistorical referencewillbeconsideredasbackgroundforassignedprojects.Presentationwillincludedrawings andmodels.Nopriorknowledgeofdraftingisnecessary. Hickey 126. How Ideas Become Form. (A) (W) Every Fall Howdoesanartistgetanideaandthengoaboutmakingsomethingthatconveysthatideavisually?

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ART AND ART HISTORY

Thiscourseconsidersthecreativeprocessthroughbothconceptualandmaterialapproaches.Students readtheoreticalessaysaboutthenatureofartisticinspiration;participateingroupdiscussions;keep awritten/visualjournal;andcritiquepopularideasabout"artisticgenius."Therewillalsobeanopportunityforatleasttwohands-onsculpturalprojects:oneinwoodandoneinmetal. Maksymowicz 200. Chinese Brush and Ink Painting. (A) (NW) Fall 2007 AnintroductiontotraditionalChinesepaintingandartofChinesecalligraphywithemphasisona varietyoftraditionalandmodernChinesepaintingtechniquesthroughdifferentsubjectmatterssuch asbird-and-flowerpaintingandlandscapepainting.Thecoursewillalsoexplorethepracticalaspects oftheartofChinesecalligraphyandsealcarving,andtheirrelationshiptoChinesepainting. Liu 214. Figure Drawing. (A) Spring 2008 Anintermediate-levelinvestigationofthehumanfigureinawiderangeofmedia,includinggraphite, charcoal,pastel,ink,acrylic,andoilpaint.Dualemphasisisplacedontheformalandexpressive aspectsofthesubject,andstudentswillworkbothfromlifeandfromconceptualandimaginative bases.Prerequisite:ART114. Peterson 216. Digital Photography I. (A) Spring 2008 Emphasizesmakingwellthought-outartisticstatementswiththecamera.Digitalphotographyoffersmanyofthesamepracticesfoundintraditionalphotography,fromcamerasettingswithdepth offield,ISOspeeds,andoptimalexposure,toreadingnaturalandartificiallight.Concentrationon potentialforaestheticenhancement,manipulation,andstorageinthedigitaldarkroomaswellas considerationofslidesofmasterphotographsandthedifferentgenresandapproachesavailableto theartistphotographer.Doesnotsupplycompleteinformationonallaspectsofdigitalphotography ornewcommercialphotographicmedia.Prerequisite:ART114orpermissionofinstructor. Wright 222. Painting. (A) Fall 2007 Anintroductiontooilpaintingtheoryandpracticewithastrongemphasisoncolor,delineationof formandspace,lightandshadow,surfaceandtexture,composition,andpersonalexpression.Prerequisite:ART114orpermissionoftheinstructor. Wright 224. Introductory Computer Art. (A) Fall 2007 Abeginning-levelstudiocourseinwhichtheMacintoshcomputerandbasicgraphicssoftwarewill beusedtointroducethestudenttotherevolutionarynewprocessesofthinkingaboutandmakingimagesgeneratedbythistechnology.Relationshipswithtraditionaldrawingandothertwo-dimensional mediawillbeemphasized.Prerequisite:ART114. Peterson 226. Introduction to Photography. (A) Summer Only Designedtoteachthestudentthefundamentalsof"photographicseeing,"toacquainthimorherwith importanthistoricandcontemporarypractitionersoftheart,andtoprovidebasictechnicalskills requiredtoexpose,process,andprintusingblackandwhitephotographicmaterials. Welch 228. Scene Design. (A) Every Fall Emphasizesthedesignprocessandthevisualidea,andanalyzesdesignsanddesigners.Students preparemodelsandrenderingsofassignedproductions.Same as TDF 228. Whiting 230. Papermaking and Casting. (A) Fall 2007 Designedtointroducestudentstoboththehistoryandtheprocessesinvolvedinhandpapermaking. Basictechniquesforpullingsheetsofpaper,designingbooks,buildingplastermolds,castingpulp positives,andfreehandbuildingwillbeexplored.Theworkofvisualartistsworkinginthemedium willbeexaminedanddiscussed.Studentsdesigntheirownfinalprojectsthathavethepotentialfor interfacingwithavarietyofotheracademicdisciplines.Prerequisite:ART114orART116orART 170,orpermissionofinstructor. Maksymowicz 322. Advanced Painting. (A) Fall 2008 Anexplorationoftechnicalandexpressiveskillswithcomplexpaintingandmixed-mediatechniques.

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ART AND ART HISTORY

Thiscoursewillalsodevelopcriticalthinking,aestheticvalues,andanawarenessofcontemporary issuesinpaintingandtheirrelationshiptoindividualstudentwork.Prerequisite:ART222. Liu 362. Narrative Video Workshop. (A) Spring 2008 Anintensiveworkshopincinematicstorytelling.Studentseachdevelopashortscreenplayinfour weeks.Theclassisthendividedintoteamsofthreeorfour,eachofwhichproducesandpost-produces ashortmoviebasedononeofthesescreenplays.Thiscourserequiresanunusualamountofoutsideof-classwork.Priorexperienceintheater,creativewriting,orvideoproductionisrecommended. Studentsmaytakethiscoursetwice.Same as TDF 362. Grotell 363. Film Theory Seminar. (A) Fall 2007 Advancedseminardevotedtoapplyingclassicalandcontemporaryfilmtheorytoparticularproblems andmovies.Topicvariesfromtermtoterm.Recenttopicsincludemelodrama,gender,andemotion; filmcomedy;filmmusic;andthenatureofnonfiction.Same as TDF 363. Grotell 364. Community Media Lab. (A) Every Semester Spring 2008 Anintensivevideoproductionworkshop,focusingondocumentaryasameansofcommunitybuilding andgrass-rootsactivism.Studentsworkinsmallgroupstoproduceshortdocumentaries,frequently withacommunitypartner.Thetopicorfocusofthecoursevariesfromtermtoterm.Studentsmay takethiscoursetwice.StudentsarestronglyencouragedtotakeTDF165beforethiscourse.Same as TDF 364. Grotell 462. Studio Capstone Course. (A) Every Spring Designedtoguideadvancedmajorandminorstudentsconcentratinginstudioartthroughacritical examinationofwhattheyhaveaccomplishedinrecentsemestersandwhattheirdirectionandgoals arefortheforeseeablefuture.Emphasisonproductionofsubstantialandchallengingnewworkwithin acoherentdirectionandchoiceofmediaaswellasresearchintothewidercontextofpromotingand exhibitingworkasafutureprofessional.Prerequisite:permissionofinstructor. Staff 270­278, 370­378, 470­478. Studio Topics. Specialstudioofferings,varyinginsubject.Maybetakenmorethanoncefordifferentsubjects. Permissionofinstructor. 490. Independent Study in Studio Art. (A) IndependentstudydirectedbytheStudioArtstaff.Prerequisite:Permissionofthechairperson.

STUDIO TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

Experimental Media. Sculpture in the Environment.

B. COURSES IN ART HISTORY

Art103isnormallyopenonlytofreshmenandsophomores.

103. Introduction to Western Art. (A) Every Semester Anintroductiontomajormonuments,institutions,andmethodologiesofartinthewest,fromthe classicalperiodtothepresent.Whilethecoursespansmorethan2000years,wewillfocusonapproximately25artworksasin-depthcasestudiesforourexploration,carefullyreconstructingnot onlytheirconditionsofcreationandpatronage,butalsotheirsocial,political,andculturalcontexts. Thecoursealsointroducesimportantart-historicalmethodsandlaysafoundationforfuturestudy inarthistory. Staff 105. Introduction to Asian Art. (A) (NW) Every Semester AnintroductiontothevisualcultureofEastAsia(ChinaandJapan),includingaunitonIndianBuddhistart.Thecourseexaminesasmallnumberoftopicswithanaimtointroducebasicarthistorical methodthroughtheclosestudyofkeymonuments. Kent

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ART AND ART HISTORY

140. Classical Art and Archaeology. (A) Every Fall SurveyofthemajorartisticandarchitecturalmonumentsofancientGreeceandRome,fromthe DarkAges,1100B.C.,throughthereignofConstantine,337A.D.Thiscourseemphasizestheuse ofarchaeologicalmethodsareexploredtoreconstructthepastandfeaturesslidelecturesandafield triptoamajormuseum.Same as CLS 140. Meyers 231. Art and Architecture of the Italian Renaissance. (A) Fall 2007 AnexaminationofthechangesinartisticproductioninItalyfromca.1300totheSackofRome in1527.Specialconsiderationisgiventotheinterplayofcultural,economic,and politicalforces createdbyurbanization,andtheemergenceofcity-statesalongsidefeudalterritoriesontheItalian peninsula. Aleci 233. Art of the Renaissance in Northern Europe. (A) Spring 2008 Painting,sculpture,andthegraphicartsintheNetherlandsandGermanyduringthe15thand16th centuries.Emphasisisplacedontheemergenceofstartlingnewformsofnaturalismduringtheperiod andtheirrelationshiptoreligiousbeliefs,commerce,andchangingsystemsofpatronage. Aleci 337. Reformation/Counter-reformation. (A) Spring 2008 AnexaminationofthepoliticalanddoctrinalconflictsbetweentheRomanCatholicChurchandthe "reformed"religionsofnorthernEurope,andtheirimpactonartandarchitectureofGermanyandthe Netherlandsduringthe16thand17thcenturies.Thefollowingtopicsareemphasized:iconoclasm(the destructionofimages),newformsoficonographyandchurcharchitecture,andthetransformationof visualcultureinemergingProtestantstates.Prerequisite:Priorcourseinarthistoryrecommended. Aleci 241. 18th- and 19th-Century Art. (A) Fall 2009 AsurveyofEuropeanartfrom1750to1900,includingsuchmovementsasNeoclassicism,Romanticism,andImpressionismandsuchartistsasConstable,Delacroix,andVanGogh.Wewillconsiderart, architectureanddecorativeartsintheirhistoricalandculturalcontexts,examiningsuchthemesasthe significanceoflandscapeinanindustrializingworld,theculturalcompetitionofWorld'sFairs,and thefashionforOrientalism.Prerequisite:Noprerequisite,butArt103isstronglyrecommended. Rauser 245. The History of Photography: The First One Hundred Years. (A) Spring 2009 Anexaminationofthefirstonehundredyearsofthemediumfromitsinventiontothedocumentary photographyproducedundertheFarmSecurityAdministrationinthelate1930s.Emphasiswillbe placedontherelationshipofphotographytotheartsofpaintingandliterature,aswellasoncontextualizingphotographsasdocumentsofscientificinvestigation,ethnographicresearch,socialhistory, andpersonalexpression.Prerequisite:Stronglyrecommendedthatstudentshavehadatleastoneart historycourse.Same as TDF 245. Kent 251. 20th Century Art. (A) Spring 2008 Achronologicalsurveyofpainting,sculpture,andarchitectureinEuropeandtheUnitedStatesfrom thelate19thcenturytotheendofthe20thcenturywithanemphasisonmodernism.Thecourse concentratesonmajorartisticmovements,studyingtheirvisualfeatures,conceptualbasis,relation toartistictradition,andculturalcontext. Clapper 267. Film History. (A) Every Spring Anintroductiontodoinghistorywithmovies.Treatsmoviesfromthe1890stothe1960s.Providesan overviewoftheevolutionofpopularmoviesandofinfluentialartisticandrhetoricalcounter-currents, includingnationalfilmmovements,experimentalcinema,anddocumentary.Same as TDF 267. Grotell 281. Sages and Mountains: History of Classical Chinese Painting. (A) (NW) Spring 2009 Anintroductionto themostimportantgenresandthemesinChinesepaintingfromroughlythemidfourthtotheendofthe14thcentury.Specialattentionwillbegiventothe illustrationofnarrativeand lyricpoetry,theriseofmonumentallandscapepainting,theidealofreclusion,thepaintingtheoryof

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ART AND ART HISTORY­ASTRONOmY

scholars,imperialpatronage,Ch'an(Zen)Buddhistpainting,andthedynamicinteractionbetween paintingandcalligraphy. Kent 383. Landscape in Chinese Poetry, Painting, and Gardens. (A) (NW) Spring 2008 AnexaminationofthemostenduringthemeinboththeliteraryandvisualartsofChinafromthe Handynastytothemodernperiod.Anintroductoryunitexplores the philosophicalfoundationsfor laterculturaldevelopment.Thecoursetheninvestigatesthethemeoflandscapeasitisexpressed inliterature(especiallypoetry)andpainting,aswellashowthesetwoartsinformedthemakingof gardens.Prerequisite:ART105,ART281orpermissionoftheinstructor. Kent 431. Politics of Gender in Contemporary Art. (A) Spring 2009 Anadvancedseminarexaminingthechallengesposedbythemodernpoliticalmovementoffeminism totraditionalwaysofthinkingabout,lookingat,andmakingart.Emphasisisplacedonworkmade duringthelast3decadesofthetwentiethcentury.Questionsconsideredincludethefeministchallenge totheculturalstereotypeof"Artist";women'seffortstodefinea"female"aesthetic(or,istheresuch athing?);thefeministcritiqueofvisualrepresentation.Prerequisite:ART103orpermissionofthe instructor.Same as WGS 431. Aleci 461. Methods in Art History. (A) Every Fall Anadvancedcourseintendedprimarilyforjuniorandseniorarthistorymajors,structuredarounda singleartist,genre,orthemetogainanin-depthunderstandingofthevariousmethodsarthistorians useintheirresearchandwriting.Prerequisite:Permissionoftheinstructor. Staff 271­279, 371­379, 471­479. Art History Topics. Specialarthistoryofferings,varyinginsubject.Maybetakenmorethanoncefordifferentsubjects. Permissionofinstructorrequired. 491. Independent Study in Art History. (A) IndependentstudydirectedbytheArtHistorystaff.Prerequisite:Permissionofthechairperson.

ART HISTORY TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

18th-CenturyArtSeminar. AmericanArt. ArtinLondonandParis1850­1900. CuratorialPractices.

(See Physics and Astronomy)

ASTRONOmY

47

BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAvIOR

BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAvIOR

Professor Robert N. Jinks, Chair D. Alfred Owens Kirk Miller Carl S. Pike Roger K.R. Thompson (on leave 2007­2008) Charles J. Heyser Robert N. Jinks Michael L. Anderson Daniel R. Ardia Meredith J. Bashaw Joseph T. Thompson Rachel Blaser Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology B.F. Fackenthal, Jr. Professor of Biology Harry W. and Mary B. Huffnagle Professor of Biology Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biological Sciences Associate Professor of Psychology Associate Professor of Biology Assistant Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Biology Assistant Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Biology Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

Behaviorismanifestinthefunctionofneurons,thecellsthatcomprisethenervoussystem. Thenetworksofafewtomanymillionneuronsthatunderliethesimpleandcomplex behaviors exhibited by humans and animals are shaped by biological, environmental, ecological,evolutionary,social,andpsychologicalinfluences.Todevelopanunderstandingofthecomplexinteractionsamongthesefactorsthatgeneratenormalandabnormal behavioralstates,criticalthinking,reading,andwritingskillsacrossdisciplinaryboundaries arerequired.TheBiologicalFoundationsofBehaviorProgramisofferedjointlybythe departmentsofBiologyandPsychology.Itpresentsstudentstheopportunitytocomplete aninterdisciplinarymajorwithafocusoneitheranimalbehaviororneuroscience. Neuroscienceisanintegrativedisciplinethatutilizesknowledgeandtoolsfrombiology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and psychology to study the nervous system across severallevelsofanalysisfrommoleculestothebehaviorofindividualorganisms.Despite theamazingadvancesthathavebeenmadeinneurosciencetodate,thehumanbrainisa frontierthatwe'veonlybeguntochart.Understandinghowitworks,howtoprotectitfrom disease,andhowtofixitwhenitbecomesdamagedordiseasedisoneofhumankind's greatestchallenges. AnimalBehavior­Behaviorisafundamentalpropertyofalllivingthings.Indeed,whether animalssurviveandreproduceoftendependsonhowtheybehave.Studyingindividualvariationinbehaviorcanrevealtheroleofnaturalselectioninshapingbehavior.Comparative researchwithmanyspeciesprovidesanimalmodelsforstudyingdevelopment,sensation, perception,lifehistoryevolution,reproductivebehavior,learning,andcognitionaswell asprovidingabroadercontextforbetterunderstandingtheinfluencesaffectinghuman behaviorandthemind.Inaddition,studyinghowindividualsbehaveinresponsetovaryingenvironmentalconditionscanhelppredicteffectsofclimatechangeandthefateof populations.Conservationeffortsandresourcemanagementdependuponecologicaland evolutionarystudiesoftherelationshipbetweenanimalbehaviorandtheenvironment. TheNeuroscienceandtheAnimalBehaviormajorsbeginwithcorecoursesinbiology, chemistry, physics, and/or mathematics, that create a solid foundation upon which to begintheresearch-intensivecourseworkthatfollows.Followingcornerstonecoursesat theintroductorylevelinneuroscienceandbiopsychology,Neurosciencestudentschoose electivecoursesinneuroscienceandrelatedareas.Afterfoundational,research-intensive

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traininginanimalbehavior,AnimalBehaviorstudentsselectfromaseriesofcoreand electivecoursesinanimalbehavior.TheNeuroscienceandtheAnimalBehaviormajors eachculminatewithcapstoneresearchexperiences,typicallythroughindependentstudy, thatmaybedefendedforhonorsinthemajorduringthesenioryear. A major in Neurosciencerequiresthecompletionof15courses: Biology Core(twocourses) BIO110.PrinciplesofEvolution,Ecology,andHeredity. BIO220.PrinciplesofPhysiologyandDevelopment. Physical Sciences and Mathematics Core(sixcourses) CHM111,112,211,212;PHY111;MAT109 Fundamentals of Neuroscience(twocourses) BFB240.Neuroscience. BFB302.Biopsychology. Research Methods and Statistics(onecourse) PSY230.ExperimentalDesignandStatistics. or BIO210.Biostatistics. Area Studies Electives(Threecoursesdistributedacross atleasttwoareasarerequired;onemustincludealab.) Area 1:NeuralandPhysiologicalMechanisms BFB301.SensationandPerception. BFB330.AdvancedNeurobiology.(BWR) BFB341.Neurochemistry.(BWR) BFB343.FunctionalHumanNeuroanatomy.(BWR) BIO326.ComparativePhysiology. BFB375.CognitiveNeuroscience. BFB375.CollaborativeResearchinNeuroscience. BFB376.PhysicalBiology. PSY487.CollaborativeResearchinBiologicalPsychology. Topics courses in neuroscience, physiology, or perception may serve asArea 1 coursesuponapprovaloftheBFBChair. Area 2: Behavioral and Cognitive Processes BFB250.AnimalBehavior. BFB306.EvolutionofMindandIntelligence. BFB310.ConditioningandLearning. BFB373.BehavioralEcology. PSY304.DevelopmentalPsychology. PSY305.CognitivePsychology. PSY480.CollaborativeResearchinComparativeCognitionandBehavior. PSY481.CollaborativeResearchinDevelopmentalPsychology. PSY483.CollaborativeResearchinHumanCognition. PSY485.CollaborativeResearchinHumanPerceptionandAction. TopicscoursesinbehaviororpsychologymayserveasArea2coursesuponapprovaloftheBFBChair.

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Area 3: Cellular and Molecular Approaches BFB341.Neurochemistry.(BWR) BIO230.CellBiology. BIO305.Genetics. BIO306.DevelopmentalBiology.(BWR) BIO334.Biochemistry. BIO332.MolecularBiology. BIO335.AdvancedMolecularBiologySeminar. BIO371.TopicsinCellBiology. Topicscoursesincellandmolecularbiology/biochemistrymayserveasArea3 coursesuponapprovaloftheBFBChair. Advanced Research(Requiredofallstudents.Takeoneofthefollowing.) BFB390.DirectedResearchinAnimalBehaviororNeuroscience. BFB490.IndependentResearchinNeuroscienceorAnimalBehavior, orapprovedBiology"BWR"laboratory course, orapprovedPsychology"Collaborative Research"course,includingPSY360. Anareastudiescoursemaynotbedouble-countedasanadvancedresearchcourse andvice versa. A major in Animal Behaviorrequiresthecompletionof15courses: Biology Core(twocourses) BIO110.PrinciplesofEvolution,Ecology,andHeredity. BIO220.PrinciplesofPhysiologyandDevelopment. Physical Sciences and Mathematics Core(threecoursesfromamongthefollowing) CHM111,112,211,212 PHY111,112 MAT109,110,116,216, 323 CPS150,210,260 ECO410 PSY360 Research Methods and Statistics(onecourse) PSY230.ExperimentalDesignandStatistics. or BIO210.Biostatistics. Fundamentals of Behavior(fourcourses) BFB250--AnimalBehavior(required) Oneof: BFB306.EvolutionofMindandIntelligence. BFB373.BehavioralEcology. Oneof: BFB240.Neuroscience. BFB302.Biopsychology. Oneof: BFB301.SensationandPerception. BFB372.ConditioningandLearning. PSY373.EmbodiedCognition. Area Studies Electives(Requiredofallstudents.Fourcourses,withnomorethan twocourseschosenfromanyonearea.StudentswithpermissionoftheBFBProgram

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ChairmaysubstitutenomorethanoneareaelectivecoursewithonesemesterofBFB 390or490.) Area 1: Mechanisms of Behavior.Coursesthatemphasizetheneural,endocrine, andphysiologicalbasisofbehaviorandcognition. BFB240.Neuroscience. BFB302.Biopsychology. BFB330.AdvancedNeurobiology.(BWR) BFB341.Neurochemistry.(BWR) BFB375.CognitiveNeuroscience. BFB375.CollaborativeResearchinNeuroscience. BFB487.CollaborativeResearchinBiologicalPsychology. BIO334.Biochemistry. TopicscoursesinneuroscienceorbiochemistrymayserveasArea1coursesupon approvaloftheBFBChair. Area 2: Organismal and Comparative Approaches.Courseswithanemphasison functionalorganizationandintegrationwithinindividualorganisms. BFB301.SensationandPerception. BFB306.EvolutionofMindandIntelligence. BFB343.FunctionalHumanNeuroanatomy. BFB310.ConditioningandLearning. BFB373.BehavioralEcology. BFB376.PhysicalBiology BFB480.CollaborativeResearchinComparativeCognitionandBehavior. BIO326.ComparativePhysiology. BIO327.VertebrateAnatomy. PSY485.CollaborativeResearchinHumanPerceptionandAction. TopicscoursesinbiologyorpsychologymayserveasArea2coursesuponapproval oftheBFBChair. Area 3: Ecological and Population Perspectives. Courses with an emphasis on ecologicalfactorsprimarilyatthepopulationlevel. BIO323.EcologicalConceptsandApplications.(BWR) BIO325.MarineEcology. BIO336.Evolution. PSY373.EmbodiedCognition. Topicscoursesinecology,environmentalstudies,orecologicalpsychologymay serveasArea3coursesuponapprovaloftheBFBChair. Area 4: Cognate Studies.ThesecoursescomplementcoursesfromAreas1-3,and oftenserveasapre-orcorequisiteforotheradvancedcourses. BIO230.CellBiology. BIO305.Genetics. BIO306.DevelopmentalBiology. BIO322.Microbiology. BIO332.MolecularBiology. BIO371.TopicsinCellBiology. PSY304.DevelopmentalPsychology. PSY305.CognitivePsychology. PSY307.PersonalityPsychology.

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PSY308.Psychopathology. PSY309.SocialPsychology. InArea4,studentsmay,withpermissionoftheBFBChair,electtotakeacourse abovetheintroductorylevelinacognatearea(e.g.,Anthropology,Environmental Studies,Philosophy,andComputerScience). Advanced Research(Requiredofallstudents.Takeoneofthefollowing.) BFB390.DirectedResearchinAnimalBehaviororNeuroscience. BFB490.IndependentResearchinBFB. or, approved Biology course with investigative/collaborative research required (BIO323­342). or, approved "Collaborative Research" course in Psychology (PSY 360, 480­ 488). Anareastudiescoursemaynotbedouble-countedasanadvancedresearchcourse and vice versa. TobeconsideredforhonorsinBFB,graduatingseniors,inadditiontomeetingtheCollege's generalrequirementsforhonors,mustpossessacumulativeGPAinthemajorof3.33or greater,andcompletenolessthantwosemestersofindependentresearchinneuroscience oranimalbehavior.Normally,prospectivehonorsstudentswillenrollintwosemesters ofBFB490. ThewritingrequirementintheBiologicalFoundationsofBehaviormajorismetbycompletionofthenormalcoursesrequiredtocompletethemajor. Theindicationastowhenacoursewillbeofferedisbasedonthebestprojectionofthe BFBProgramCommitteeandthedepartmentsofBiologyandPsychologyandissubject tochange. MajorsintheBiologicalFoundationsofBehaviorProgramhavestudiedabroadinthe followingprograms:ArcadiaUniversityProgram;ButlerUniversityProgram;Schoolfor FieldStudies,Nairobi,Kenya;LaSuerteBiologicalFieldStation,CostaRica;Australian NationalUniversity;andmanyothers. A list of regularly offered courses follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

240. Neuroscience. (N) Every Spring Principlesofnervoussystemfunctionfromthemolecularthroughtheorgansystemlevelasillustrated bythevertebratesandinvertebrates.Approximatelyonehalfofthecoursewillcoverbasiccellular principlesofnervoussystemorganization,development,andphysiology.Theremaininglectureswill considertheroleoffunctionally-identifiedneuralnetworksinbehaviorcontrol.Prerequisite:BIO 220orBFB/PSY302.Same as BIO/PSY/SPM 240. Jinks 250. Animal Behavior. (N) (BWR) Every Fall Anintegrativeapproachtoanimalbehaviorfromtheperspectivesofethology,behavioralecology, and comparative psychology. The structure, function, development, and evolution of behavioral adaptationsincludingforagingandpredation,communication,socialorganization,andreproductive strategies.Observationalandexperimentalresearchrequired.Prerequisites:BIO110,andpermission oftheinstructor.Corequisite:eitherBIO210orPSY230. Same as BIO/PSY250. Blaser

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301. Sensation and Perception. Every Spring Reviewofphenomenaandresearchonsensoryprocessesandtheirroleinperception.Readingsand discussionwillexamineevidencefrombehavioral,psychophysical,andphysiologicalresearch,and considerimplicationsforexplanationsarisingfromthemechanistic,cognitive,computational,and naturalistictheoreticalperspectives.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230or BIO210.Same as PSY/SPM 301. Owens 302. Biopsychology. (N) Every Fall Behavioralandmentalprocessesasviewedfromabiologicalperspectivewithparticularemphasis upontheroleofneurochemicalandendocrinefactorsincentralnervoussystemfunction.Topicscoveredwillincludereproductionandgender,chemicalsensesandingestion,emotion,learning,sleep, andpsychopathology.Aneuropharmacologicalapproachtothestudyofthenervoussystemwillbe emphasized.Prerequisite:PSY100orBIO110orpermission.Same as PSY/SPM 302. Heyser 306. Evolution of Mind and Intelligence. Spring 2009 Whatisintelligentbehavior,whatisitfor,andhowdiditevolve?Wewillattempttoanswerthese questionsandunderstandthenatureanddevelopmentofMindfromacomparativeperspective.We willdosobyinvestigatinglearning,perception,memory,thinking,andlanguageinanimalsandhumans.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:Oneof:PSY100, PSY301,PSY302,PSY303,PSY304,PSY305,BIO240,BIO250,orPHI338,orpermission. Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as PSY/SPM 306. R. Thompson 310. Conditioning and Learning. Every Fall Anintroductiontotheprocessbywhichhumanandanimalbehaviorchangesasafunctionofexperience.Examinesbasicmechanismsforlearning(includinghabituation,sensitization,andclassical andoperantconditioning)andexploresthescientificandpracticalapplicationofthesemechanisms toexplainandpredictbehavior.Discussestheextenttowhichlearningmechanismsareconsistent acrossspecies,andhowthephysiology,naturalenvironment,andsocialsystemsofindividualspecies interactwithbasiclearningprocessestoproducedifferentbehavioraloutcomes.Same as PSY 310. Bashaw 330. Advanced Neurobiology. (N) (BWR) Fall 2008 Advancedissuesinneurosciencewillbeexploredfromacomparativeperspectiveinthislecture/seminar hybrid.Themajorsensorymodalitieswillbestudied--fromstimulustransductiontoperception--as modelsofneuralprocessing.Currentresearchincellular,systems-level,integrative/behavioral,and cognitiveneurosciencewillbeemphasized.Laboratoryincludesanindependentresearchproject in sensory neurobiology defined, proposed, pursued, and disseminated by small research teams. Prerequisite:BIO/BFB240orBIO230andpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BIO 330. Jinks 341. Neurochemistry. (N) (BWR) Fall 2008 Anintroductiontoneurochemistryfocusingoncellularandmembraneneurochemistry,intercellular andintracellularsignaling,andneuronalandwhole-brainmetabolism,withstudent-drivenspecial topicsindevelopment,disease,and/orbehavior.Currentresearchintheseareaswillbeemphasized throughstudentseminars.Laboratoryincludesaresearchprojectinneurochemistrydesigned,proposed,pursued,anddisseminatedbysmallresearchteams.Prerequisite:BIO/BFB240orBIO230 orBFB302,andpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BIO 341. Jinks 343. Functional Human Neuroanatomy. (BWR) Fall 2007 Thisseminarutilizesaproblem-solvingapproachtolearningneuroanatomybyrelatingstructure tofunctionandfunctionaldisordersusingdatafromcarefullydocumentedclinicalcases.Seminar meetingswillincludestudent-ledclinicalcasepresentations,analysisofclinicallocalization,analysis ofassociatedneuroimaging,anddiscussionofclinicalcourseandprognosis.Thecoursewillculminatewithaclass-widedebateonthebiologicalbasisofthemind.Non-traditionalwritingwillbe emphasized.Prerequisite:BIO/BFB240orBFB/PSY302andpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BIO 343. Jinks

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371­379. Topics in Animal Behavior or Neuroscience. (e.g.,BFB372:ConditioningandLearning;BFB373:BehavioralEcology;BFB375:Collaborative ResearchinNeuroscience). 390. Directed Research in Animal Behavior or Neuroscience. 480. Collaborative Research in Comparative Cognition and Behavior. (N) Every Spring Comparativeperspectivesandapproachestothestudyofselectedtopicsdrawnfromcognitiveand developmental psychology, cognitive ethology, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience, cognitive science,andbehavioralprimatology.Researchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210,oneof PSY250,301,302,303,304,305,306;ORoneofBIO250,330,379;ORoneofBFB250,301, 302,306,330,379;ORpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as PSY/SPM 480. Blaser 487. Collaborative Research in Biological Psychology. (N) Spring 2008 Theneurophysiologicalandstructuralbasisofbehaviorwithemphasisonmotivationandlearning, includingtheuseofpsychopharmacologicalmethods.Theroleofendocrineandmetabolicprocesses intheregulationofbehaviorisintegratedwithconsiderationsofstructure.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210;PSY302orBIO/BFB240orpermission.Same as PSY 487. Heyser 490. Senior Independent Research. Independentresearchunderthedirectionofeitherbiologyorpsychologyfaculty.Permissionofthe BFBprogramchairpersonandsupervisoryfacultymember.

BIOLOGY

Professor Carl S. Pike, Chair Richard A. Fluck Kirk Miller Carl S. Pike Ira N. Feit Kathleen L. Triman Peter A. Fields (on leave 2007­2008) Janet M. Fischer (on leave 2007­2008) Robert N. Jinks Mark H. Olson (on leave 2007­2008) Timothy W. Sipe Daniel R. Ardia Clara S. Moore Joseph T. Thompson Debra W. Frielle Nicole E. Heller Pablo D. Jenik Pavithra Vivekanand Elizabeth Rice D. Holmes Morton Erik G. Puffenberger Kevin A. Strauss Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biology B.F. Fackenthal, Jr. Professor of Biology Harry W. and Mary B. Huffnagle Professor of Biology Professor of Biology Professor of Biology Associate Professor of Biology Associate Professor of Biology Associate Professor of Biology Associate Professor of Biology Associate Professor of Biology Assistant Professor of Biology Assistant Professor of Biology Assistant Professor of Biology Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology Adjunct Research Professor of Biology Adjunct Research Associate Professor of Biology Adjunct Research Associate Professor of Biology

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David R. Bowne Edith L. Gallagher Research Associate of Biology Research Associate of Biology

Thestudyofbiologyfurnishesinsightsintoourspecies,ourselves,andtheworldofwhich weareapart.Wehumanshaveafascinationforotherorganismsandtheveryphenomenon oflife.Biologyprovidesusthetoolstoaddressquestionsrangingfromhowtheseorganisms functionatthemolecularleveltohowtheyinteractattheecologicallevel.Biologyisan exciting,expandingdisciplineofferingabroadandadvancingfrontierbetweentheknown andtheundiscovered,withavarietyofsub-disciplinesthatspanthemoleculartoorganismal toecologicallevelsofunderstanding.Itisagatewaytodiverseandsatisfyingcareers,and itprovidesinsightsandwaysofthinkingcriticaltoeachindividualinsociety. TheBiologyDepartmentatF&Mismadeupofdiverseandbroadly-trainedfacultymemberswhoseresearchinformstheirteaching.Asbefitsbiology'splaceinthecontemporary world,coursesandresearchprovidelinkstomanyotherdisciplines,includingchemistry, psychology,physics,mathematics,environmentalscience,andpublicpolicy.Thedepartment participatesinseveralinterdisciplinaryprograms:BiochemistryandMolecularBiology, BiologicalFoundationsofBehavior(NeuroscienceandAnimalBehavior),Environmental Science,andEnvironmentalStudies. ThecentralgoaloftheBiologycurriculumistoprovidestudentswiththeessentialresearch andanalyticalthinkingskillsneededbypracticingbiologistsand,indeed,byallcitizensin ademocraticsociety.Criticalreadingofjournalarticlesisanimportantfeatureofcourses. Beginninginintroductorycourses,laboratoryandactivitiesofteninvolvestudent-designed investigativeprojects.Inmoreadvancedcoursesstudentshaveaccesstostateoftheart instruments,andmayspendtheentiresemesterconductingaresearchproject.Inaddition to learning todesign,conduct, and analyze scientific research,studentslearnessential communication skills as the convey their results in written, spoken, and poster form. Theseactivitiesleadmanystudentstointensiveresearchexperiencesduringthesummer oracademicyear,underthementorshipoffacultymembers. FranklinandMarshall'sbiologyprogram,withrequiredandelectivecoursesinbiology aswellascoursesinmathematics,chemistry,andphysics,providesstudentswithafirm scientificfoundationandenoughflexibilitytoaccommodateindividualinterests.Therange oftheseinterestsisreflectedinthemanypathsbiologymajorsfollowaftergraduation, withorwithoutfurthereducation. A major in Biology consists of fifteen courses. Nine are core and elective courses in Biology:Biology110,220,230,305;andfiveelectives.Atleastthreeoftheelectives mustbetakenatFranklin&Marshall.Atleastfouroftheelectivesmusthavealaboratory component.Thefifthelectivemaybeanon-labseminar.IndependentStudy(Biology390 or490)islab-basedandmaycountforuptotwoofthefiveelectives.DirectedReadings (Biology391)maycountforuptoonenon-labelective.Thesixadditionalrequiredcourses areChemistry111,112,and211;Physics111;Mathematics109;andBiology210(with permission,Psychology230orbothMathematics221and322maybesubstitutedfor Biology210). Biology110,220,andsometimes230areprerequisitestomosthigher-numberedcourses. MostcoursesaboveBiology230requirepermissionoftheinstructor. ThewritingrequirementintheBiologymajorismetbycompletionofoneelectivewith awritingcomponent.RegularcoursessatisfyingthewritingrequirementintheBiology

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BIOLOGY

majorareBiology250,306,308,309,310,323,324,325,326,330,332,335,340,341, 342,343,345,390,and490.Sometopicscoursesfrom370­379alsofulfillthewriting requirementintheBiologymajor.(BWRdesignatescoursesfulfillingtheBiologywriting requirement.) A major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biologyincludesfivebiologycourses(Biology110,220,230,305,and334),sixchemistrycourses(Chemistry111,112,211,212, 321,and432),andtwoelectivesfromBiologyand/orChemistry.Theelectivesmustbe chosenfromthefollowinglistofcourses:BiologicalFoundationsofBehavior490;Biology240,306,307,308,309,322,324,326,332,341,sometopicscoursesfrom370­379, 390,and490;orChemistry221,222,322,384,390,and490.Onlyonesemesterofan independentstudycourse(390or490)maycountasanelective,andnoneoftheelectivesmaybeacoursewithoutalaboratory.RequiredrelatedcoursesarePhysics111and Mathematics109and110.BiochemistryandMolecularBiologymajorsmaynotdeclare aminorinChemistry. TheBiologicalFoundationsofBehaviormajoroffersconcentrationsinNeuroscienceand AnimalBehavior. MajorsintheDepartmentofBiologyhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recent years:Arcadia University Programs, University of London, University College, London, England and Guadalajara, Mexico; Butler University Programs, Australian NationalUniversity,Canberra,UniversityofNewSouthWales,Sydney,Australia,and UniversityofQueensland,Brisbane,Australia;SchoolforFieldStudies,Baja,Mexico andNairobi,Kenya;SEASemester,WoodsHole,Massachusetts;SchoolforInternational Training,Quito,EcuadorandZanzibar,Tanzania;TASSEP(TransAtlanticScienceStudent ExchangeProgram),UniversityofStrathclyde,Glasgow,Scotland.SeeInternationaland Off-CampusStudysectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. A list of regularly offered courses follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

110. Principles of Evolution, Ecology, and Heredity. (N) Every Spring AnintroductiontoMendeliangenetics,micro-andmacro-evolutionaryprocesses,theoriginand diversification of life on earth, and ecological patterns and processes at organismal, population, community,andecosystemlevels. Ardia, N. Heller, Sipe 210. Biostatistics. Every Semester An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics from the perspective of the life sciences. Theemphasiswillbeonresearchdesignandontheuseofgraphicalandcomputationalmethodsin interpretingandcommunicatingresults.ThiscoursesatisfiesthestatisticsrequirementintheBiology majorcurriculum.Prerequisite:BIO110. Miller 220. Principles of Physiology and Development. (N) Every Fall Anintegratedstudyofcells,wholeorganisms,andtheinteractionsbetweenorganismsandtheir environments.Thephysiologicalandanatomicalsolutionstothephysicalandchemicalchallenges facedbyplantsandanimals.Mechanismsbywhichasinglecelldevelopsintoacomplex,multicellularorganisminwhichgroupsofcellsperformspecializedtasks.Lecturetopicsintegratedwitha laboratorythatemphasizesindependentresearchprojects.Prerequisite:BIO110. Moore, Pike, J. Thompson

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230. Cell Biology. (N) Every Spring Astudyoflifeatthecellularlevelthroughinvestigationofthefunctionsandpropertiesofthemolecularcomponentsofcells.Topicswillinclude:thephysicalandchemicalprinciplesgoverning biomoleculesandtheirassembly,thestructureandfunctionofsub-cellularsystems,energygeneration,cellmotility,andinformationflowfromDNAtoprotein.Theethicalimplicationsofcurrent researchtechniqueswillalsobediscussed.Prerequisite:BIO220. Feit, Frielle, Vivekanand 240. Neuroscience. (N) Every Spring Principlesofnervoussystemfunctionfromthemolecularthroughtheorgansystemlevelasillustrated bythevertebratesandinvertebrates.Approximatelyonehalfofthecoursewillcoverbasiccellular principlesofnervoussystemorganization,development,andphysiology.Theremaininglectureswill considertheroleoffunctionally-identifiedneuralnetworksinbehaviorcontrol.Prerequisite:BIO 220orBFB/PSY302.Same as BFB/PSY/SPM 240. Jinks 250. Animal Behavior. (N) (BWR) Every Fall Anintegrativeapproachtoanimalbehaviorfromtheperspectivesofethology,behavioralecology, and comparative psychology. The structure, function, development, and evolution of behavioral adaptationsincludingforagingandpredation,communication,socialorganization,andreproductive strategies.Observationalandexperimentalresearchrequired.Prerequisites:BIO110,andpermission oftheinstructor.Corequisite:eitherBIO210orPSY230. Same as BFB/PSY250. Blaser 305. Molecular Genetics. (N) Every Fall Moleculargenetics,geneexpression,regulationofeukaryoticdevelopment,tumorviruses,oncogenes andcancer.Prerequisite:BIO230. Jenik, Triman 306. Developmental Biology. (N) (BWR) Spring 2008 Anexplorationofthedevelopmentalmechanismsthatallowsinglecellstodivideanddifferentiate intocomplex,multicellularorganisms.Thecommonprocessesthatunderliedevelopmentinanimals willbeexaminedthroughhistoricalperspectives,modelexperimentalorganisms,andcurrentresearch andtechnologies.Laboratorieswillfocusonexperimentaldesignusinginvertebrateandvertebrate developmentalsystems.Prerequisite:BIO305andpermissionoftheinstructor. Moore 309. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. (N) (BWR) Spring 2009 Thebasiclifeprocessesofplants,particularlywaterandsolutetransport,membranefunction,photosynthesis,andnitrogenmetabolism.Considerationofcellularandbiochemicalaspects,alongwith physiologicalecology.Corequisite:BIO230andpermissionoftheinstructor. Pike 310. Experimental Design in Biology. (BWR) Fall 2008 Anexplorationofthechallengesandrewardsofexperimentationinbiology.Inthisseminar,we willusecasestudiestoillustratethebasicprinciplesofexperimentaldesign,includinghypothesis generation,assigningtreatments,replication/pseudoreplication,confoundedvariables,andstatistical power.Casestudieswillbechosentorepresentawiderangeofsub-disciplinesofbiology,including biomedicalresearch.Prerequisites:BIO210,220andpermissionoftheinstructor. Fischer 322. Microbiology. (N) Fall 2007 Cytology,metabolism,taxonomy,phylogeny,development,andecologicalrelationshipsofmicrobiallife.Emphasisoninsightsintolifeprocessesingeneral.Laboratoryincludestraininginbasic microbiologicaltechniques.Prerequisites:BIO230andpermissionoftheinstructor. Feit 323. Ecological Concepts and Applications. (N) (BWR) Fall 2007 Interactionsoforganismswiththeirenvironmentandhowtheseinteractionsareinfluencedbyhuman activities.Specialemphasisisplacedonprinciplesofpopulation,community,andecosystemecology.Classexercisesanddiscussionsinvolvecriticalevaluationofcurrentresearchandapplications ofecologicalconceptstoconservationandmanagement.Mostlabsarefield-oriented,includingan overnighttriptothePoconos.Prerequisites:BIO220andpermissionoftheinstructor. N. Heller

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BIOLOGY

325. Marine Biology (N) (BWR) Fall 2008 Applicationofecologicalprinciplestomarineenvironments.Structuralandfunctionaladaptations ofmarineorganisms;andemphasisontheinteractionsofindividuals,populations,andcommunities withphysical,chemical,andgeologicalprocessesintheocean.Includesanalysisofprimaryscientific literature,fieldandlaboratorystudies,andindividualresearchprojects.Prerequisite:BIO220and permissionoftheinstructor. Fields 326. Comparative Physiology (N) (BWR) Fall 2008 Physiologicaladaptationofanimalstotheenvironment,focusingonrespiratory,circulatory,digestive,andmusculoskeletalsystems,andontheeffectsofvariationinoxygen,temperature,andthe availabilityoffoodandwater.Prerequisite:BIO220andpermissionoftheinstructor. Miller 327. Vertebrate Anatomy. (N) Fall 2007 Comparativeanatomyofvertebrateswithemphasisonthefunctionalandevolutionarysignificance ofthedifferencesinstructureofthevariousvertebrateclasses.Laboratoriesinvolvethedissection ofthreerepresentativevertebrateanimals.Prerequisite:BIO220andpermissionoftheinstructor. Miller 330. Advanced Neurobiology. (N) (BWR) Fall 2008 Advancedissuesinneurosciencewillbeexploredfromacomparativeperspectiveinthislecture/seminar hybrid.Themajorsensorymodalitieswillbestudied--fromstimulustransductiontoperception--as modelsofneuralprocessing.Currentresearchincellular,systems-level,integrative/behavioral,and cognitiveneurosciencewillbeemphasized.Laboratoryincludesanindependentresearchproject in sensory neurobiology defined, proposed, pursued, and disseminated by small research teams. Prerequisite:BIO/BFB240orBIO230andpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BFB 330. Jinks 332. Molecular Biology (N) (BWR) Spring 2008 Theroleofnucleicacidsandproteinsinbiologicalprocesses.Currentmodelsfortheorganization, expression,andregulationofgenesinprokaryotesandeukaryoteswillbediscussed.ThelaboratorywillemphasizetheuseofmolecularapproachesandrecombinantDNAmethodsinbiological research.Prerequisite:BIO305andpermissionoftheinstructor. Jenik 334. Metabolic Biochemistry. (N) Spring 2008 Thecoursefocusesonmajormetabolicpathwaysandtheirregulation,withemphasisonfluxof metabolitesandenergythroughoutthecell.Topicsalsoincludeintegrationofmetabolicprocesses; protein synthesis, modification and degradation; and diseases of metabolism. Presentation and discussionofcurrentprimaryliteratureisakeycomponentofthecourse.Thelaboratoryincludes techniquescommonlyusedinbiochemistryandmolecularbiology.Prerequisites:BIO230,CHM 211,andpermissionoftheinstructor. Staff 335. Advanced Molecular Biology Seminar. (BWR) Spring 2009 Molecularapproachestothestudyoffourspecializedtopics,includingcircadianrhythms,bioinformatics,telomerase,andatopicselectedbystudentsarecoveredbyreviewofcurrentprimary literature.Classmeetingsareorganizedasdiscussionsandstudentpresentations.Prerequisite:BIO 305andpermissionoftheinstructor. Staff 336. Evolution. (N) Fall 2007 Astheunifyingprincipleofbiology,evolutionintegrateslevelsofbiologicalorganization,witha focusonbiologicalchangesovertimeandtheevidenceofthesharedevolutionaryhistoryofalllivingthings.Topicsincludespeciation;extinction;populationprocessesofselectionandadaptation, genomicsandthemolecularbasisofevolution;evolutionarydevelopmentalbiology;sexualselection;lifehistoryevolution;andtheapplicationofevolutiontomedicine.Prerequisite:BIO110and permissionoftheinstructor. Ardia 340. Plant Ecology. (N) (BWR) Fall 2007 Anexplorationofplantecology,organizedbyfourappliedthemes:globalatmosphericchange;air pollutionandaciddeposition;deer-forestinteractions;andinvasivespecies.Classeswillinvolve

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BIOLOGY­BUSINESS, ORGANIzATIONS AND SOCIETY

lectures, primary literature discussions, field trip discussions, and seminars by invited speakers. Thelaboratoryincludeslocalandovernightfieldtrips.Prerequisite:BIO110andpermissionofthe instructor.Same as ENV 340. Sipe 341. Neurochemistry. (N) (BWR) Fall 2008 Anintroductiontoneurochemistryfocusingoncellularandmembraneneurochemistry,intercellular andintracellularsignaling,andneuronalandwhole-brainmetabolism,withstudent-drivenspecial topicsindevelopment,disease,and/orbehavior.Currentresearchintheseareaswillbeemphasized throughstudentseminars.Laboratoryincludesaresearchprojectinneurochemistrydesigned,proposed,pursued,anddisseminatedbysmallresearchteams.(Prerequisite:BIO/BFB240orBIO230 orBFB302,andpermissionoftheinstructor.)Same as BFB 341. Jinks 343. Functional Human Neuroanatomy. (BWR) Fall 2007 Thisseminarutilizesaproblem-solvingapproachtolearningneuroanatomybyrelatingstructure tofunctionandfunctionaldisordersusingdatafromcarefullydocumentedclinicalcases.Seminar meetingswillincludestudent-ledclinicalcasepresentations,analysisofclinicallocalization,analysis ofassociatedneuroimaging,anddiscussionofclinicalcourseandprognosis.Thecoursewillculminatewithaclass-widedebateonthebiologicalbasisofthemind.Non-traditionalwritingwillbe emphasized.(Prerequisite:BIO/BFB240orBFB/PSY302andpermissionoftheinstructor.)Same as BFB 343. Jinks 391. Directed Reading. ExplorationofachosentopicinbiologywithreadingdirectedbyamemberoftheBiologyDepartmentstaff.MaycountasaseminarelectivetowardtheBiologymajor.Permissionofchairperson required. 390 and 490. Independent Study. (BWR) IndependentresearchdirectedbytheBiologystaffateitherthejunior(390)orsenior(490)level.May countasalaboratoryelectivetowardtheBiologymajor.Permissionofchairpersonrequired.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

AdvancedTopicsinCellBiology. CollaborativeResearchinNeuroscience. MedicalGeneticsandthePlainPeople. PhysicalBiology.

BUSINESS, ORGANIzATIONS AND SOCIETY

Professor Jeffrey Nesteruk, Chair Alan S. Glazer (on leave Spring 2008) Conrad J. Kasperson Jeffrey Nesteruk (on leave Spring 2008) Martha K. Nelson Brian D. Steffy Linda C. Forbes Jeffrey S. Podoshen Henry P. and Mary B. Stager Professor of Business Professor of Management Professor of Legal Studies Associate Professor of Business Associate Professor of Organization Studies Assistant Professor of Organization Studies Assistant Professor of Marketing

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BUSINESS, ORGANIzATIONS AND SOCIETY

W. Trexler Proffitt, Jr. Mary MacAusland Gerald P. Madden G. Alfred Forsyth Steven P. O'Day Assistant Professor of Organization Studies Visiting Instructor of Business, Organizations, and Society Visiting Professor of Business, Organizations, and Society Adjunct Assistant Professor of Business, Organizations, and Society Adjunct Assistant Professor of Business, Organizations, and Society

Amaximumofseventy-five(75)studentsfromanyclassmaydeclareamajorinBusiness, Organizations,andSociety. AmajorinBusiness,Organizations,andSocietyisappropriateforstudentswhoareinterestedinstudyingbusinessandorganizationalphenomenawhetherornottheyintend tohavecareersinbusiness.Theprogramemphasizescriticalthinkingandanalysisrather thanmemorizingtechniques.Ithelpsstudentslearn"howtothink"aboutalternativeapproachestoresolvingissues,notsimply"howtodo"problems,althoughthereareskill components within the program. Multidisciplinary approaches to problem solving are stressedbyexaminingorganizationalissuesfromavarietyofperspectives. Thecoursesaredesignedtohelpstudentsdevelopabroadunderstandingoforganizations andtheirrolesinsociety.Studentsareexposedtomanymanagementphilosophies,processes,andstyles,aswellasthedynamicinterfacebetweentheoryandpractice.Theyare requiredtocompletefourcurricularcomponents:anentrycourse;abreadthrequirement composedofeightcourses;athree-course,individually-designedinterdisciplinarycluster thatprovidestheopportunitytodevelopdepthofunderstandinginoneareaoforganizationalactivity,suchasmanagement,finance,marketing,humanresources,organizational ethics,orinternationalbusiness;anda"capstone"course. A major in the Department of Business, Organizations, and Societyconsistsofthe followingcourses:BOS200,215,224,250ortheequivalent,324,332,341,360,and 480;andEconomics100.Inaddition,students,inconsultationwiththeiradvisers,select threecourseswhichprovidedepthofanalysisinanareaoforganizationalstudy.Atleast oneofthethreecoursesmustbefromoutsidetheDepartmentandallmustbeabovethe 200level. Studentswithaninterestinbusinessshouldseriouslyconsiderstudyingabroad.Courses takenabroadcan,inmany cases,beusedtofulfillthedepthrequirement.Studentsplanning to study abroad should consult with a member of the Department early in their sophomoreyear.MajorsintheDepartmentofBusiness,Organizations,andSocietyhave studiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:IESProgramsinMilan,Italyand Barcelona,Spain;SyracuseUniversityinFlorence,Italy;ButlerUniversityprogramsin London,England;andDenmark'sInternationalStudiesProgram(DIS).SeeInternational andOff-CampusStudysectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. The writing requirement in the Business, Organizations, and Society major is met by completionofthenormalcoursesrequiredtocompletethemajor. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange.

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BUSINESS, ORGANIzATIONS AND SOCIETY

Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

200. Organizing in the 21st Century: Theories of Organization. (S) Every Semester Providesabroadstudyofthechangingrole,structure,functions,andpracticesofcommerce,work, andorganization,includingtrendsinorganizationalstrategy,structure,andhowdifferentinstitutional forms interact with and influence one another. Encourages students to explore the emergence of organizationsasameansofcoordinatingwork,marketexchange,infrastructure,andsustainability. Notopentofirst-yearstudents. Podoshen, Steffy 215. Organizational Behavior. (S) Every Semester Multidisciplinarystudyoftheformalorganization.Topicsincludeconceptsandtheoriesrelatedto howindividuals,groups,andstructuralattributesinfluencetheperformanceoforganizations.Prerequisite:BOS200. Forbes, Kasperson 224. Accounting for Decision Making. (S) Every Semester Accountingconcepts,standards,andproceduresinvolvedinincomedeterminationandasset,liability, andowners'equitymeasurementandreporting.Emphasisontheroleofaccountinginformationin investmentdecisions.Prerequisite:BOS200. Glazer, Nelson 250. Quantitative Methods. (S) Every Semester Givesstudentsthetoolsnecessarytoengageinresearchaswellastheabilitytoreadandunderstand theresearchdonebyothers.Includesanexplorationofthescientificmethod,theoryconstruction, hypothesisdevelopment,andstatisticaltestsusedtoevaluatethem.Focusisonissuesinthesocial sciences,particularlybusinessorganizations. Forsyth 316. Human Resources Management. (S) Every Semester Traditionalareasandresponsibilitiesofpersonnel/humanresourcesmanagement.Compliancewith federal regulation of the workplace; planning, selection, and staffing; training and development; performanceappraisal;compensation;laborhistory;andlaborrelations.Prerequisite:BOS215and 250. Steffy 324. Analysis and Control Systems. (S) Every Semester Explorationofcurrentcostingsystemsandtheroleofcostsinperformancemeasurement,budgeting, andmanagerialdecision-making.Examinationofcostbehaviorandtheuseofcostanalysistools. Extensiveuseofcasesindiscussionofcostmanagementtopicsincludingtargetcostingandpricing decisions in decentralized operations, outsourcing, activity-based costing and budgeting, flexible manufacturing,andenvironmentalandqualitycosts.Prerequisite:BOS224. Nelson 325. Financial Reporting and Analysis. (S) Offered in 2008­2009 Thiscourseexplorestheuseofgenerallyacceptedaccountingprinciples(GAAP)infinancialreports andhowwellthoseprinciplesreflecttheunderlyingeconomicrealityofanorganization.Students willalsogainexperienceanalyzingactualfinancialreportsandotherpubliclyavailableinformation inordertoassessanorganization'searnings,financialposition,andcashflows.Prerequisites:BOS 224and360. Glazer 332. Law, Ethics, and Society. (S) Every Semester Explores thenatureofindividualobligationandprofessionalaccountabilityinourcomplex,commercialsociety.Wewillbeginbyexaminingtheminimalsocialexpectationsembodiedinlegaldoctrines andprinciples.Wewillthenturntoexploreourbroadersocialresponsibilitiesbydrawinguponthe normsandvaluesnecessaryforavibrantcivilsociety.Theaimistogainaricherunderstandingof howtoleadmorallysatisfyingandcivicallyengagedprofessionallives. Nesteruk 335. Business and the Natural Environment. (S) Spring 2008 Widespreadconcernforacleanerenvironmentandsustainablepracticeshasputnewdemandson

61

BUSINESS, ORGANIzATIONS AND SOCIETY

business.Explorationofphilosophical,theoretical,strategic,andpolicyissuesfacingorganizations inrelationtothenaturalenvironment.Same as ENV 335. Forbes 341. Marketing. (S) Every Semester Integrated,analyticalapproachtomacro-andmicro-marketingandmarketingmanagement.Problemsandcasestudiesareusedtoanalyzemarketingopportunities,strategicplanningofprofitand not-for-profitorganizationsinaccordancewithasocietalmarketingconcept.Opentojuniorsand seniorsonly.Prerequisite:BOS200. Kasperson, Podoshen 360. Finance. (S) Every Semester Theoreticalconceptsandanalyticaltechniquesofcorporatefinance.Topicsincludemanagementof workingcapital,capitalbudgetingandcostofcapital,andcapitalstructureplanning.Opentojuniors andseniorsonly.Prerequisites:BOS224andECO100. Staff 361. Securities Analysis. (S) Every Fall Formulation of investment policies for individuals, firms, and institutions; analysis of securities; operationofthesecuritiesmarkets.Prerequisite:BOS360. Staff 363. Portfolio Management. (S) Every Semester StudentsresponsiblefortheStudent-ManagedInvestmentFund,aportfoliooffinancialassetsthatis partoftheCollege'sendowmentfunds.Studentsuse financeandinvestmenttheoriesandpractices introducedinthebusinessfinanceandinvestmentcoursesand examinehowotherfieldsofbusiness contributetomoreinformedinvestmentdecision-making.Prerequisites:BOS361andpermission oftheinstructor.One-halfcreditawardedpersemesterformaximumoftwosemesters. Staff 391. Directed Readings. (S) Every Semester Explorationofaspecifictopicinorganizationstudiesthroughreadingschosenanddirectedbya memberoftheDepartmentofBusiness,Organizations,andSocietyfaculty.Permissionofchairperson isrequired. Staff 370­379, 470­479. Topics in Business, Organizations, and Society. (S) Every Semester Studyofspecificaspectsofbusinessandothertypesoforganizations.Topicsarechangedfromyear toyear.Permissionofinstructorusuallyrequired. Staff 480. Issues Facing Organizations in the 21st Century. (S) Every Spring Thiscourseisthe"capstone"experienceformajors.Variouscoursesectionsuseadifferentmultidisciplinary "theme."All sections require that students undertake a semester long project as the culminationoftheiracademicprogram.Projectsmaybeindividualorgroupbased.Contemporary issuesareusedtocreatediscussionanddebate.Permissiontoenrollisdeterminedbythestudent's adviserandtheinstructor. Staff 490. Independent Study. (S) Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbytheBusiness,Organizations,andSocietystaff.Permissionofchairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

ConsumerPsychology. MergersandAcquisitions.

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CHEmISTRY

CHEmISTRY

Professor Phyllis A. Leber, Chair Claude H. Yoder Phyllis A. Leber Kenneth R. Hess Richard S. Moog Ron Musselman (on leave Fall 2007) Marcus W. Thomsen Scott A. Van Arman (on leave 2007­2008) Scott H. Brewer Edward E. Fenlon Ryan A. Mehl Jennifer A. Morford Conrad L. Stanitski Curtis R. Hare Adiel Coca Charles A. Dana Professor of Chemistry Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Chemistry Professor of Chemistry and Health Professions Adviser Professor of Chemistry Professor of Chemistry Professor of Chemistry Associate Professor of Chemistry Assistant Professor of Chemistry ssistant Professor of Chemistry Assistant Professor of Chemistry Assistant Professor of Chemistry Visiting Professor of Chemistry Visiting Associate Professor and Research Associate of Chemistry Visiting Instructor of Chemistry

Chemistryisthestudyofmatterandthechangesitundergoesasdeterminedbythepropertiesofatoms,moleculesandmacromolecules.Asalltheuniverseiscomposedofmatter,chemistryiscentraltoallsciencesandisessentialtothestudyandunderstandingof physical,geological,andbiologicalphenomena.Becauseofitsplaceamongthesciences chemistryisinherentlyinterdisciplinaryandattractsstudentstoitsstudyfromabroad rangeofrelatedinterests.ChemistrymajorsattheCollegehavetheopportunitytoexplore majorsubdisciplinesofchemistryandtostudyattheinterfaceofchemistrywithother sciences.Allstudentsofchemistryenrichtheirlivesthroughanincreasedunderstanding ofthephysicalworldaroundthemandanenhancedbasisonwhichtomakeimportant decisionsascitizensinatechnologicalsociety. IntheliberalartscontextthechemistrymajoratFranklin&MarshallCollegeisledby facultywhoarecommittedtohelpingthestudent"learnhowtolearn."Inadditiontoacquiringanunderstandingofthebasicconceptsofchemistry,majorshonetheskillsnecessary forcriticalandanalyticalthinkinganddeveloptheirabilitytocommunicateobservations anddiscoveriesthroughtheprintedandspokenword. Throughcoursework,chemistrymajorsgainanunderstandingoftransformationsandreactionsattheatomic,molecular,andmacromolecularscales,theenergeticsassociatedwith thosechanges,andtheanalyticaltechniquesusedtostudythem.Throughresearchsuch understandingisdeepenedandenrichedwithimmersioninthemethodologyofscientific discoveryandthecreativeprocess.Thecriticalthoughtprocesses,analytical,communicationandcreativeskills,andtheconfidenceandindependenceengenderedbythechemistry majorallowstudentstopursueawidevarietyofopportunitiesbeyondgraduation. A major in chemistry consistsofaminimumof15credits,includingatleast10credits inchemistry.Requiredare: Chemistry111,112,211,212,221,222,321 Physics111,112;Mathematics109,110 OnecreditinChemistrynumbered420-439

63

CHEmISTRY

The traditional chemistry major may be completed with the following course requirements: Chemistry322 Twoadditionalcreditsinchemistryoroneadditionalcreditinchemistryandoneoutside chemistryapprovedbythedepartment.ApprovedcoursesincludeBiology240,3-5, 332,334;EarthandEnvironment321;Mathematics111;Physics222,223. Abiochemistrydegreeoptioninthechemistrymajormodeledaftertherequirementsofthe AmericanChemicalSocietymaybecompletedwiththefollowingcourserequirements: Chemistry331and432 Biology230 Onecreditof390or490 Oneadditionalcreditofchemistryoronecreditoutsidechemistryapprovedbythe department.ApprovedcoursesincludeBiology240,3-5,332,334;EarthandEnvironment321;Mathematics111;Physics222,223. Chemistry390or490isencouragedbutnomorethanonesuchcreditmaybeapplied towardtherequirementsforthemajor. A minor in chemistryrequiresChemistry111and112plusfouradditionalchemistry credits. Tobeconsideredforhonorsinchemistrythestudentmustbenominatedbytheresearch mentoronthebasisofworkdoneinthesummerprecedingthesenioryearandtheCHM490. Criteriatobemetincludeanunusualcommitmentoftimeandeffort,resultsthatarepublishableandarelikelytohavebeenpresentedatascientificmeeting,independentcontributionstotheprojectfromthestudent,awellwrittenthesisthatconformstodepartmental guidelines,andasuccessfuldefenseoftheprojectbeforeafacultycommittee. Chemistrymajorshavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears: TASSEP(TransAtlanticScienceStudentExchangeProgram): UniversityofStrathclyde,Glasgow,Scotland TrinityCollege,Dublin,Ireland UniversityJosephFourier,Grenoble,France ButlerUniversityProgram: UniversityofNewSouthWales,Sydney,Australia UniversityofSheffield,England A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehome departmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

111. General Chemistry I: The Structure and Composition of Matter. (N) Every Fall Designedbothasabackgroundforfurthercoursesinchemistryandasaterminalcourseforinterestednon-sciencestudents.Atomicstructure,chemicalbonding,molecularstructure,intermolecular forces,andthestructureofmatterinbulk.Relationshipbetweenpropertiesandstructurestressed

64

CHEmISTRY

throughout.Laboratoryworkdealswiththeseparationandidentificationofsubstances. Hess, Moog, Stanitski, Yoder, Staff 112. General Chemistry II: Chemical Reactions. (N) Every Spring Theprinciplesunderlyingchemicaltransformations:stoichiometry;ratesofreaction;equilibrium, metathetical,acid-base,andoxidation-reductionreactions.Laboratoryworkdealingwiththeseparationandidentificationofsubstances.Prerequisite:CHM111. Brewer, Hess, Mehl, Morford, Stanitski, Staff 211. Organic Chemistry I: Structure, Rates, and Mechanisms. (N) Every Fall Structureandbondingprinciplesassociatedwithcarboncompounds,fundamentalreactiontypes withemphasisuponmechanisms.Structuredeterminationbasedontheoryandapplicationofinfrared spectroscopy,protonandcarbon-13nuclearmagneticresonancespectroscopyandmassspectrometry. Laboratoryworkrequiredincludesseparation,identificationandsynthesisofcompounds.Prerequisite: CHM112. Fenlon, Thomsen, Staff 212. Organic Chemistry II: Reactions of Carbon Compounds. (N) Every Spring Reactionsofcarboncompoundsasafunctionoftheirmolecularstructureswithemphasisonmechanismsandtheuseofthesereactionsinsynthesisofcarboncompounds.Laboratoryworkinvolving analysisandsynthesisofvariouscompounds.Prerequisite:CHM211. Fenlon, Leber, Thomsen, Staff 221. Chemical Analysis. (N) Every Fall Fundamentalprinciplesofchemicalanalysisincludingsolutionequilibria,acid-basetheory,complexationreactions,andelectrochemistry.Samplingandexperimentaldesign;interpretationandanalysis ofexperimentalresults.Laboratoryworkincludesintroductiontocommoninstrumentalmethodswith applicationsdrawnfromfieldssuchasbiochemistry,environmentalchemistry,forensicchemistry, andpharmaceuticalanalysis.Prerequisite:CHM112. Morford 222. Inorganic Chemistry: Structure and Stability. (N) Every Spring Periodicrelationships.Acid-baseconcepts.Structure,bonding,andstabilityofmaingroupcompounds. Thecrystalfieldmodelandcoordinationcompounds.Descriptivechemistryofmaingroupelements andtransitionmetals.Symmetryandintroductiontogrouptheoryanditsapplications.Prerequisites: CHM112. Yoder 321. Thermodynamics and Kinetics. (N) Every Fall Kineticmoleculartheoryofgases.Propertiesofrealandidealgases.Kineticsandmechanismsof reactions;theoriesofreactionrate.Thelawsofthermodynamics,spontaneityandequilibrium,systems ofvariablecomposition,phaseequilibria,phasediagrams.Idealsolutionsandcolligativeproperties. Laboratoryworkrequired.Prerequisites:CHM112,MAT110,PHY111. Brewer 322. Structure and Bonding. (N) Every Spring Anintroductiontoquantumchemistryandspectroscopyofatomsandmolecules,includingbonding theories.Applicationsofmolecularmodelingandgrouptheorytoatomicandmolecularstructure andspectroscopy.Prerequisites:CHM211orCHM222;MAT110,PHY112. Moog 331. Introductory Biochemistry Every Spring Adescriptionofthechemicalpronciplesofbiochemistryenablingonetounderstandhowthedevelopingdisciplinewillimpactfuturescientificrersearch.Introductiontothemoleculardetailof moleculesinthecellservingtodefinebiologicalmacromolecules,theirfunctionsandreactivity.A descriptionofthemeansbywhichlivingorganismscarryoutchemicalreactionswithunparalleled efficiencyandspecificity.Prerequisite:CHM212. Mehl 370­379. Topics in Chemistry. Studyofspecializedareasofmodernchemistry.Prerequisite:CHM212andpermissionofinstructor. Staff

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CHEmISTRY­CLASSICS

390. Directed Studies of Chemical Problems. Directedstudyofaone-semesterproject.Permissionofinstructorrequired.Astudentmaynotuse thiscoursetosatisfyamajorrequirementinadditiontoCHM490. Staff 411. Physical Organic Chemistry Spring 2008 Mechanisms of thermal and photochemical organic reactions with emphases on thermochemical andkineticanalyses,linearfreeenergyrelationships,isotopeeffects,acid-basetheory,bondingand molecularorbitaltheory.Useofthechemicalliteraturetoinvestigatereactionsmechanismsandmajor topicsinorganicchemistry.OpenonlytoseniorchemistrymajorsPrerequisites:CHM212,CHM 321.Pre-orco-requisites:CHM222,CHM322.Opentoseniorchemistrymajors. Thomsen 432. Advanced Biochemistry Every Fall Discussionofthecurrentlimitationstoproteinstructureanalysisandthecomplexchemicalreactionsinbiologicalprocesses.Extensiveuseofthescientificliteraturetounderstandhowalteringa protein'schemicalstructureaffectsitsfunction.Inlectureandlaboratoryportionsofthecoursethe moleculardetailofproteinstructureislinkedtotheireffectivenessascatalysts.Prerequisites:CHM 321,CHM212andeitherCHM331orBIO334. Mehl 470­-479. Topics in Chemistry. Studyofadvancedspecializedareasofmodernchemistry.Opentoseniorchemistrymajors. Staff 490. Independent Study. Independentstudyextendingovertwosemesters.Coursecreditearnedeachsemester.Permissionof chairpersonrequired. Staff

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

EnvironmentalChemistry.

CLASSICS

Professor Shawn O'Bryhim, Chair Ann Steiner Shawn O'Bryhim Zachary P. Biles Alexis Q. Castor (on leave 2007­2008) Gretchen E. Meyers Michael Clark Athanassios Vergados Eugene Borza Dean Hammer Shirley Watkins Steinman Professor of Classics Associate Professor of Classics Assistant Professor of Classics Assistant Professor of Classics Assistant Professor of Classics Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics Research Associate of Classics Research Associate of Classics

TheDepartmentofClassicsprovidesinstructioninGreek,Latin,ancienthistory,andclassicalartandarchaeology.Classicsisaninterdisciplinaryareastudiesprogram,applying theapproachesofhumanistsandsocialscientiststothehistory,art,language,literature, philosophy, religion, social structures, economy, everyday life, and government of the ancientMediterranean.Classicsstudentslearnhowtoweighandassimilateinformation from a variety of media and disciplines in order to become productive and thoughtful citizensofarapidlychangingworld.

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CLASSICS

AstudentmaymajorinGreek,inLatin,orinClassicalArchaeologyandAncientHistory. A major in GreekconsistsofsixcoursesaboveGreek102,twoLatincourses,Classics 113,andClassics140.Forconsiderationfordepartmentalhonors,successfulcompletion ofLatin202isordinarilyrequiredofthosewhomajorinGreek. A major in LatinconsistsofsixcoursesaboveLatin102,twoGreekcourses,Classics 114,andClassics140.Forconsiderationfordepartmentalhonors,successfulcompletion ofGreek202isordinarilyrequiredofthosewhomajorinLatin. A major in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History consists of 12 courses.The requiredcoursesareClassics113,114,120or130or230,and140,andatwo-semester sequenceofeitherancientGreekorLatin.Inaddition,eachstudentmusttakeatotalof threeupper-levelseminarsinancientarchaeology(Classics476­477andClassics478­479) andinancienthistory(Classics421andClassics422),takingeithertwoinarchaeology ortwoinhistory.Theremainingthreerequiredcoursesmaybeselectedfromamongthe offeringsintheClassicsdepartmentincludingGreek,Latin,and,withtheapprovalof theClassicsdepartment,fromamongcoursessuchasancientphilosophyandclassical politicaltheoryofferedbyotherdepartments.Forconsiderationfordepartmentalhonors inClassicalArchaeologyandAncientHistory,successfulcompletionofLatin202orone 300-levelGreekcourseisordinarilyrequired. ThewritingrequirementintheClassicsmajorsismetbycompletingthecoursesrequired forthemajors. A student in Classics may minor in Greek or Latin, or in ClassicalArchaeology and AncientHistory. 1. TheminorinGreek:sixcoursesinGreek. 2. TheminorinLatin:sixcoursesinLatin. 3. TheminorinClassicalArchaeologyandAncientHistoryconsistsofsixcourses: Classics113,Classics114,Classics120or130or230,Classics140,Classics421 or422,andClassics476­477or478­479. MajorsintheDepartmentofClassicshavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:CollegeYearinAthens;Studentshavealsoparticipatedinadepartmental programinItaly. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandissubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

COURSES IN ENGLISH

Designatedas"Classics,"thefollowingcoursesrequirenoknowledgeofGreekorLatin, unlessotherwiseindicated.

113. The History of Ancient Greece. (S) Every Spring AncientGreecefromtheBronzeAgetothedeathofAlexandertheGreatintheMediterraneanand NearEasterncontext.Studentsarealsointroducedtotheproblemsandmethodsofhistoricalinquiry. Same as HIS 113. Clark

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CLASSICS

114. The History of Ancient Rome. (S) Every Fall ThetransformationfromtheRepublictoPrincipate,andthecollapseoftheempireareexplored. Studentsarealsointroducedtotheproblemsandmethodsofhistoricalinquiry.Same as HIS 114. Clark 140. Classical Art and Archaeology. (A) Every Fall SurveyofthemajorartisticandarchitecturalmonumentsofancientGreeceandRome,fromthe DarkAges,1100B.C.,throughthereignofConstantine,337A.D.Thiscourseemphasizestheuse ofarchaeologicalmethodsareexploredtoreconstructthepastandfeaturesslidelecturesandafield triptoamajormuseum.Same as ART 140. Meyers 210. History of Ancient Philosophy. (H) Fall 2007 TheoriginanddevelopmentofthemajorthemesofGreekphilosophyfromtheMilesiansthrough Aristotle.Same as PHI 210. Franklin 353. Summer Fieldwork in Classical Archaeology. (H) 1.5 credits Summer2008 Hands-ontraininginarchaeologicalfieldmethods,includingexcavationtechniqueandpreparationof afieldnotebook.StudentsworkforsixweeksattheEtruscansiteofPoggioColla,partoftheMugelloArchaeologicalProject,co-sponsoredbyFranklin&Marshall,SouthernMethodistUniversity, andtheUniversityMuseumoftheUniversityofPennsylvania.Prerequisites:CLS114or140and permissionoftheinstructor. Meyers, Steiner 421. Selected Studies in Greek History. (S) Fall 2009 Acloseexaminationofaparticularperiod,place,orindividualinancientGreekhistory.Seminar topicsinclude"AlexandertheGreat"and"ArchaicGreece."(Prerequisite:CLS/HIS113.)Same as HIS 421. Castor 422. Selected Studies in Roman History. (S) Fall 2007 Acloseexaminationofaparticularperiod,place,orindividualinancientRomanhistory.Seminar topicsinclude"ImperialWomen:PowerBehindtheThrone,""TheRiseofRome,"and"TheRoman Empire."Prerequisite:CLS/HIS114.Same as HIS 422. Clark

GREEK

101. Elementary Ancient Greek I. IntroductiontothegrammarandsyntaxofClassicalGreek. Every Fall Biles

102. Elementary Ancient Greek II. Every Spring ContinuesthestudyofthebasicgrammarandsyntaxofClassicalGreek.Prerequisite:GRK101or placement. Biles 201. Introduction to Greek Prose. (LS) Every Fall Reviewofprinciplesofgrammarandsyntaxthroughcompositionexercisesandintroductoryreadings ofauthenticGreekprose.Prerequisite:GRK102orplacement. Clark, Castor 311. Greek Historians.* (H) Spring 2009 AnexaminationofthehistoricalwritingsofHerodotusandThucydideswithemphasisontranslation, interpretation,evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. Castor 312. Greek Oratory.* (H) Spring 2010 An examination of theAthenian orators Lysias and Demosthenes with emphasis on translation, interpretation,evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. Castor 314. Greek Lyric Poetry.* (H) Fall 2010 AnexaminationofselectedArchaiclyricpoets(e.g.Archilochus,Sappho,Alcaeus,Alcman),with emphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. Biles

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CLASSICS

315. Greek Comedy.* (H) Fall 2009 AnexaminationofacomedyofAristophaneswithemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluating scholarship,andresearch. Biles 316. Greek Tragedy.* (H) Fall 2008 AnexaminationofatragedyofSophocleswithemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluating scholarship,andresearch. Biles 317. Greek Novel.* (H) Fall 2011 AnexaminationofLongus'Daphnis and Chloewithemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. Biles 320. Greek Philosophy.* (H) Spring 2011 An examination of a Platonic dialogue with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship,andresearch. Staff 321.Greek Epic* (H) Fall 2007 AnexaminationofHomer'sIliadwithemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluatingscholarship, andresearch. Biles *Repeatablebypermissionofdepartment.

LATIN

101. Elementary Latin I. Every Fall IntroductiontothebasicgrammarandsyntaxofClassicalLatin.Normallyopenonlytostudents whohavehadnopriorexperienceintheformalstudyofLatin. Meyers, Vergados, O'Bryhim 102. Elementary Latin II. Every Spring ContinuesandcompletesthestudyofthebasicgrammarandsyntaxofClassicalLatin.Prerequisite: LAT101orplacement. Meyers, Vergados, O'Bryhim, Biles 201. Introduction to Latin Prose. (LS) Every Fall IntroductiontoLatinproseincorporatingareviewofformsandstructures.Successfulcompletion ofthecoursesignifiesthatthestudenthasmasteredtheelementsofLatinandispreparedtobegin thestudyofRomantexts.Prerequisite:LAT102orplacement. O'Bryhim 202. Introduction to Latin Poetry. (H) Every Spring IntroductiontoLatinpoetrywiththegoalofdevelopingspeed,facilityinmeter,andinterpretation. Prerequisite:LAT201orplacement. O'Bryhim 311. Latin Historians.* (H) Fall 2007 AnexaminationofthehistoriesofTacituswithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluating scholarship,andresearch. Biles 312. Latin Oratory.* (H) Spring 2009 AnexaminationofthespeechesofCicerowithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluating scholarship,andresearch. Staff 315. Latin Comedy.* (H) Fall 2008 AnexaminationofthecomediesofPlautuswithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluating scholarship,andresearch. O'Bryhim 316. Latin Tragedy.* (H) Fall 2009 AnexaminationofthetragediesofSenecawithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluating scholarship,andresearch. Staff 318. Latin Satire.* (H) Fall 2010 An examination of the satires of Horace, Persius, and Juvenal with an emphasis on translation, interpretation,evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. O'Bryhim

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CLASSICS­COmPARATIvE LITERARY STUDIES

319. Latin Letters.* (H) Spring 2010 AnexaminationofthelettersofCicero,Pliny,andFrontowithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation,evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. Staff 320. Latin Philosophy.* (H) Spring 2011 AnexaminationofthephilosophicalworksofCicerowithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation, evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. Staff 321. Vergil.* (H) Spring 2008 AnexaminationofselectedbooksofVergil'sAeneidwithanemphasisontranslation,interpretation, evaluatingscholarship,andresearch. O'Bryhim 381. Plato. (H) Spring 2009 AnintensivetreatmentofsomeofthemajorphilosophicalthemesinselecteddialoguesofPlato. Prerequisite:PHI210.Same as PHI 381. Franklin *Repeatablebypermissionofdepartment.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

IntroductiontoGreekPoetry. AcceleratedLatin. ClassicalMyth. AncientLiteraryCriticisminGreek. PerformingRomanComedy. TheAncientRomansinItaly(SummerTravelCourse).

COmPARATIvE LITERARY STUDIES

Professor Lina Bernstein, Chair

TheminorinComparativeLiteraryStudiesinvestigatesthedevelopmentofliteratureinan internationalandhistoricalcontext.Inthisprogram,studentsstudyfoundationalworksof literaturefromavarietyofhistoricalperiodsandnationaltraditionsinordertounderstand thediversewaysinwhichliteraryprocessesunfoldindifferentsocialmilieusandtheinterrelationshipsamongdifferentliterarytraditions.Thestudyofgenres,periods,andthemes acrossdiverseculturespromotes"liberaleducation"initstruestsense,byenablingstudents toseebeyondtheparochialconstraintsofanysingleliterarytradition. Sinceantiquity,humanityhasproducedliterarydocumentsthatserveasarepositoryof knowledgeandwisdom,offeringustheopportunitytoreflectonthehumanexperience. Inadditiontoinspiring,literatureenablesustoseethewaysinwhichotherculturesare likeourown,sincewecandiscernintheirliteraturesbasiccommonalitiesofformand themethatgroundandsustainallpeoplesfromotherwisediversecultural,aesthetic,and linguisticbackgrounds. Thestudyofliteraryworksoffersarichfieldofstudyforscholarsfromabroadrangeof academicdisciplines.Becauseliteraturehasalwaysservedasbothoutletandinspiration forartists,historians(andmakersofhistory),socialthinkers,andmusicians,understandingliteraturepreparesstudentsinthehumanities,socialsciencesandnaturalsciencesto participateactivelyintheglobalexchangeofideas.

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COmPARATIvE LITERARY STUDIES­COmPUTER SCIENCE

A minor in Comparative Literary Studiesconsistsofsixcourses.Oneoftheseisthe requiredcorecourse,LIT201IntroductiontoComparativeLiteraryStudies.Theother fiveareelectives;atleasttwoofthesemustbeatthe200levelorhigher. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

LIT 201. Introduction to Comparative Literary Studies. (H) Fall 2007 Studyofliteratureasacommonhumanenterprisefromancienttimestothepresentday,acrosslinguisticandnationalboundaries.Developmentofvocabularyandconceptsfortheanalysisofliterary genres,themes,andhistoricalperiodsofliterarydevelopment.Focusonliterarytextsfromvarious eras,cultures,andlanguages.ReadingswillbeinEnglish. Staff

APPROvED COURSES FOR ELECTIvES

ThecourseslistedbelowhavebeenapprovedasComparativeLiteraryStudieselectives. Othercourses,suchastopicscourses,maybeapprovedbyLinaBernstein,chairpersonof ComparativeLiteraryStudies.Studentsshouldbeawarethatsomeofthesecourseshave prerequisites.

PHI 380. Philosophy and Literature. RST 100. Hebrew Classics in Translation. RUS 214. Russian Novel from Pushkin to Tolstoy (19th Century). RUS 216. Literature and Politics in Soviet Russia (20th Century). TDF 105. World Theater to 1700. TDF 106. World Theater 1700­1945. Spring 2009 Every Fall Fall 2008 Spring 2009 Every Fall Every Spring

COmPUTER SCIENCE

Professor Barbara E. Nimershiem, Chair Jay M. Anderson J. Brian Adams Richard S. and Ann B. Barshinger Professor of Computer Science Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Thestudyofcomputerscienceincludes,butisnotlimitedto,computerprogramming.We studyhowcomputersareorganized,howtheycarryouttheiroperations,howtheystore andtransmitinformation,andhowwecontrolandinteractwiththem. Computersciencesharescommonexperiencesandparadigmswithmathematics,neuroscienceandphysicalsciences,butitisalsousefultolanguagesandliteratureandart.The computerisnowdeeplyembeddedinourcultureandsociety,whichmeansthatitsuse andabuseisaculturalandsocialconcern. Acomputerscienceminorwillunderstandwhatcomputerscando,candoeasily,andcan dowithdifficulty;willbeabletowritecomplexcomputerprograms;willunderstandthe

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COmPUTER SCIENCE

connectionbetweenthecomputerandhisorherownfieldofinterestandbeabletoapply computersciencetothatfield. A minor in Computer Scienceconsistsofsixcourses:ComputerScience150,210,260, and261;plustwochosenfromthefollowing:ComputerScience338,365,368,370,480, and490,Mathematics237,and339,Philosophy244,255,344,and355,andPsychology 360.SeealsothesectionsonAcademicTechnologyServicesandComputing. Minors in Computer Science have studied abroad in the following programs in recent years:ArcadiaUniversityProgram,UniversityofLondon,UniversityCollegeLondon, England; Butler University Programs, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland andUniversityofNewSouthWales,Sydney,Australia;TASSEP(TransAtlanticScience StudentExchangeProgram),L'UniversitéPaulSabatier,Toulouse,France. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

150. Introduction to Computer Science. Every Semester Organized problem-solving using the Java language. Computer programming, with emphasis on algorithmdevelopment.Prerequisite:twelfth-grademathematicsorMAT105. Staff 210. Intermediate Computer Programming. Every Spring Programmingthegraphicaluserinterface;arapidsurveyoftheJavaprogramminglanguage;eventdrivenprogramming;exceptionhandling;programmingmultiplethreads;multi-mediaprogramming. Prerequisite:CPS150. Adams 260. Data Structures and Algorithms I. Every Fall Stacks,queues,linkedlists,andtheirapplicationtoorganizingandstoringdatainacomputer;analysis ofalgorithmefficiency;recursion.Prerequisite:CPS150. Anderson 261. Data Structures and Algorithms II. Every Spring Trees,graphsandnetworks;furtheranalysisofalgorithmsandtheirefficiency.Prerequisite:CPS 260. Adams 270­279. Topics in Computer Science. Intermediatelevelcourses. 280. Operating Systems. Spring 2007 Thedesignofsoftwaretomanagecomputingresources,especiallyprocessmanagement,memory management,andfilemanagement.Datastructuresandalgorithmsforoperatingsystems,especially forresolvingconflictsbetweenprocessescompetingforresources.Inter-processcommunication. Designofahierarchicalfilesystem.PracticalexamplesfromtheAppleMacintoshandUNIXoperatingsystem.Prerequisite:CPS150,260. Anderson 291. Directed Reading. ReadingdirectedbytheComputerSciencestaff.Permissionofchairperson. 338. Computational Mathematics. Fall 2007 Numericalanalysisasimplementedoncomputers.Polynomialandrationalapproximations,numerical differentiationandintegration,systemsoflinearequations,matrixinversion,eigenvalues,firstand secondorderdifferentialequations.Prerequisites:CPS150,MAT229.Same as MAT 338. Adams 365. Computer Graphics. Fall 2008 Graphicsinoneandtwodimensions:thewindow-viewporttransformation,drawingpoints,lines,

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COmPUTER SCIENCE­EARTH AND ENvIRONmENT

andrectangles;clippingandmasking;polygonsandarea-fill.Graphicsdevicesforinputandoutput anddevice-independentgraphicsprocedures.Three-dimensionalgraphics,includinghiddenlineand surfaceremovalandperspective.Prerequisites:CPS150,260. Anderson 370­379. Topics in Computer Science. StudyofspecializedareasofComputerScience. 390. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbyComputerSciencestaff.Permissionofchairperson. 391. Directed Reading. ReadingdirectedbytheComputerSciencestaff.Permissionofchairperson. Readingsinsoftwareengineeringandsoftwaredesign;thedevelopmentofalarge-scalesoftware project.Openbypermissionofinstructor. 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbyComputerSciencestaff.Permissionofchairperson. 491. Directed Reading. ReadingdirectedbytheComputerSciencestaff.Permissionofchairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

Curves. TutorialinSoftwareDesign.

EARTH AND ENvIRONmENT

Professor Roger D. K. Thomas, Chair Stanley A. Mertzman Roger D. K. Thomas Carol B. de Wet (on leave 2007­2008) Dorothy J. Merritts Robert S. Sternberg Andrew P. de Wet Robert C. Walter Zeshan Ismat Keely B. Maxwell James E. Strick Christopher J. Williams Richard V. Pepino Earl D. Stage and Mary E. Stage Professor of Geosciences John Williamson Nevin Professor of Geosciences Professor of Geosciences Professor of Geosciences Professor of Geosciences Associate Professor of Geosciences Associate Professor of Geosciences Assistant Professor of Geosciences Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Director, Program in Public Policy

OurhometheEarth,isacomplex,dynamicsystem.Itchangesfromdaytodayandfrom yeartoyear,fromoneiceagetothenextandfromeontoeon,inmanydifferentways. Somechangesarecyclical,othersarequiteunpredictable.Weneedtounderstandthese processes,especiallyastheyareincreasinglyaffectedbyhumanaction.Theyinfluence ourhabitat,towhichwemustcontinuallyadapt.Theycontrolthetreasuryofresources, richbutfinite,onwhichwerely. StudyoftheEarthdrawsonalltraditionaldisciplines.Geoscientistsinterpretfieldobserva73

EARTH AND ENvIRONmENT

tionsandlabdatausingprinciplesofchemistry,physicsandconceptsuniquetogeology. TheylinkprocessesthatoperatewithinandatthesurfaceoftheEarth.Environmental scientistsfocusontheimpactofhumanaction,onwaysinwhichEarthsystemsrespond whentheyaredisrupted.Thesescientistsevaluateandsolveawiderangeoftechnological problems.Environmentalmanagersandpolicy-makersaddressthesameissuesintheir cultural, economic and political contexts.As we learn how the Earth works, we must developthemeansandthepoliticalwilltomanageitappropriately. AtFranklin&Marshall,threemajorsareavailabletostudentswhowishtoexplorethese concerns:Geosciences,EnvironmentalSciences,andEnvironmentalStudies.Eachmajor hasitsowncoreofintroductorycourses,withsufficientoverlapamongthemthatstudents canembarkonthisfieldwithoutimmediatelychoosingonemajororanother.Later,students takemorespecializedcoursesingeosciences,mid-levelcoursesinseveralsciences,or coursesinenvironmentalpolicyanditscultural,historicalcontext.Eachmajorprogram includesadvancedcourses,opportunitiestoengageinresearchwithmembersofthefaculty, andanintegrative,capstonecourse.Manyopportunitiesandsignificantfinancialsupport areavailableforstudentstostudyinthefield,intheircourses,onextracurricularfieldtrips, thoroughavarietyofresearchprograms,andwhilestudyingabroad. Thescopeofopportunitiesopentograduatesofthisprogramisverybroad.Manyownor areemployedbybusinessesengagedinenvironmentalconsulting,managementofwater resources, environmental law, and the energy industry (oil, gas and coal). Others are teachinginhighschools,collegesanduniversities,orworkinginvariousbranchesofthe federalgovernment.But,thisisaliberalartsprogram.Ithasservedasagoodlaunching padforsystemsanalystsandfinanciers,forveterinarians,writersandrealtors,andforat leastonecomposerofclassicalmusic. A major in Geosciencesconsistsoftencourses:onecourseselectedfromGeosciences 110,114or118,followedbyGeosciences221,353,and480.Geosciences353canbe takenduringthesummerafterthesophomoreorjunioryear.Studentsselectsixadditional coursesabovethe100-levelfromtheGeosciencesofferings.Studentsplanningtopursue graduate studies or professional employment in the geosciences should take as many coursesaspossiblefromthegroupMathematics109,110,111,and229;Physics111, 112;Chemistry111,112.ThewritingrequirementintheGeosciencesmajorismetby completionofGeosciences480. A minor in Geosciencesconsistsofsixcourses,includingonecourseselectedfromGeosciences110,114,or118,followedbyGeosciences221andfourGeosciencescourses atthe200,300,or400levelselectedinconsultationwiththedepartmentchair.Aminor shouldfocusuponaparticularareaofthegeosciencessuchassurficialprocesses,paleobiology,geophysics,tectonics,petrology/geochemistry.Nomorethanthreecoursesfrom thestudent'smajorcanalsocounttowardstheGeosciencesminor. A major in Environmental Scienceconsistsofsixteencourses:ninecoresciencecourses (threefromBiology,threefromChemistry,andthreefromGeosciences),twoscienceelectives(fromBiology,Chemistry,orGeosciences,whichmayincludeanindependentstudy course),twoquantitativeand/orfieldskillscourses,twoenvironmentandsocietycourses, andoneupper-levelintegrativeseminar.ThewritingrequirementintheEnvironmental SciencemajorismetbycompletionofENV454. ThespecificrequirementsfortheEnvironmentalSciencemajorare:Biology110,220,323; Geosciences114,226,344;Chemistry111,112,221;Environment117;andEnvironment

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454.Thetwoelectivestocompletethemajormayinclude:Biology323,340;Geosciences 221;Environment235;Chemistry211,212,222;a490courseassociatedwitheitherBiology,Geosciences,Environment,orChemistry;orotherapprovedcourses.Twocoursesfrom thefollowinggroupofquantitativeorfieldskillscoursesarerequired:Geosciences250, Biology210,Geosciences353oranotherapprovedstatisticsorfieldcourse.Inaddition, onecourseisrequiredfromtheenvironmentandsocietygroupincludingEnvironment 216,American Studies 280 and 401, English/Environment 260, Business/Environment 335,Economics/Environment240,oranotherapprovedcourse. There is no minor in Environmental Science. FacultyaffiliatedwiththeEnvironmentalSciencecurriculuminclude:ProfessorsHessand Morford(Chemistry);ProfessorsSipe,Fischer,andOlson(Biology). A major in Environmental Studiesconsistsoftwelvecourses,eightcoursesintheEnvironmentalStudiescore,andfourelectives.Therequiredcorecoursesare:Environment/STS 117,216and454,Biology110,Environment114;onecoursefromthefollowinggroup: Environment226,344;Biology323,oranotherapprovedcourse;andtwocoursesfrom Economics103,Government100,orAmericanStudies280.Fouradditionalcoursesmay be selected from the following group: Economics/Environment 240, Government 200, 305,343,Business/Environment335,English/Environment260,AmericanStudies300, AmericanStudies/Environment401,STS/Environment312,Environment490,orother approvedcourses.Nomorethanoneelectivecancomefromthegroup:Geosciences/Environment250,Economics210,Biology210,orPsychology230.Thewritingrequirement intheEnvironmentalStudiesmajorismetbycompletionofENV454. A minor in Environmental Studiesconsistsofsixcourses,includingEnvironment/STS 117;twocoursesinenvironmentalpolicy/humanenvironment(selectedfromEnvironment 216,Economics/Environment240,AmericanStudies/Environment280or401,STS/Environment312,andtopicscoursesapprovedbytheEnvironmentalStudiesCommittee); twolaboratorycourses(Biology110orGeosciences/Environment114andoneofthe following:Biology323,325,340;Geosciences/Environment226,250;andapprovedtopics courses);andeitherENV454orENV490.Someofthesecourseshaveprerequisites(see relevantdepartmentallistings).Nomorethanthreecoursesfromthestudent'smajorcan alsocounttowardstheEnvironmentalStudiesminor. FacultyaffiliatedwiththeEnvironmentalStudiescurriculuminclude:ProfessorSchuyler (AmericanStudies);ProfessorMueller(English);ProfessorZein-Elabdin(Economics);ProfessorForbes(Business,Organizations,andSociety);ProfessorKarlesky(Government). TobeconsideredforHonorsinanyofthedepartment'sthreemajors,studentsmustmeet theCollege'sgeneralrequirementsforhonors.Theseincludeasignificantbodyofcourse workinthedepartment'scurriculum;nominimumgradepointaverageisspecified. MajorsinENEhavestudiedabroadinseveralprogramsinrecentyears,including:Arcadia UniversityProgram,UniversityofAberdeen,Scotland,UniversityofLimerick,Ireland; ButlerUniversityPrograms,UniversityofMelbourne,Australia,UniversityCollegeCork, Ireland,andUniversityofAuckland,NewZealand;CIEE,UniversityofAmsterdam,Netherlands;BostonUniversityProgram,RethinkingGlobalization;SEASemesteratWoods Hole;KansaiGaidaiUniversity,Japan.SeeInternationalandOff-CampusStudysection ofthecatalogforfurtherinformation.

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EARTH AND ENvIRONmENT

A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationastowhenacoursewillbe offeredisbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandmaybesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

GEOSCIENCES

110. The Dynamic Earth. (N) Every Semester Compositionanddistributionofearthmaterials;examinationofinternalearthprocessesandtheir relationshiptomountain-buildingandplatetectonics;surficialprocessesandenvironmentalproblems. Fieldtrips. Staff 114. Earth, Environment, and Humanity. (N) Every Semester InvestigationoftheEarthwithemphasisonopportunitiesandconstraintsonhumanactivitiesarisingfromitsproperties.StructureandprocessesoftheEarth;naturalhazards;theroleofhumans inchangingthefaceoftheEarth;surfaceandgroundwateruseandmanagement;formationand degradationofsoils;energyresources;humanwastes.Laboratoriesfocusonprinciplesinvolvedin local,national,andglobalenvironmentalproblemsandtheirresolution.Fieldtrips.Same as ENV 114. Staff 115. Evolution: Patterns and Process of Change in Nature. (NSP) Every Year Thegeneralconceptofevolutionarychange:spontaneousemergenceandhistoricaldevelopmentof complex,organizedsystemsinnature.Evolutionandthenatureoftime.Energyandtheemergenceof orderfromchaos.Comparativestudyofprocessesresponsiblefordirectionalchangeintheuniverse, thesolarsystem,theEarthanditscrust,theevolutionoflivingorganisms,andthedevelopmentof humancultures.Timescalesofchange.Same as STS 115. Thomas 118. Introduction to Oceanography. (N) Spring 2009 World's oceans and our interactions with them. Origin of ocean basins and seawater. Origin of submarinetopographicfeaturesandsediments.Oceanfloorspreadingandplatetectonics.Origin, distributionandinfluenceofoceancurrents.Coastalprocessesandcoastlines.Marineecosystems. Biological,energyandmineralresourcesoftheoceans. Staff 205. Archaeometry: Natural Sciences as Applied to Archaeology. (N) Spring 2008 Applicationofmethodsfromthenaturalsciencestostudyofarchaeologicalenvironmentsandartifacts.Scientificprinciplesunderlyingtechniques;applicationtoarchaeologicalproblems.Major topicsinclude:datingmethods;analysisandcharacterizationofartifacts;locationofsitesandfeatures withinsites;paleoenvironmentandpaleoecology.Prerequisite:onearchaeologycourseandonelab sciencecourse,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ANT 205. Sternberg 221. History of the Earth. (N) Every Spring Geologictime,principlesofhistoricalgeology.PhysicalevolutionoftheEarth.Patternsofchange incontinentsandoceans;reconstructionofancientenvironments.Originandevolutionoflife;its influenceontheoceans,theatmosphere,andtheEarth'scrust.Fieldtrips.Prerequisite:GEO110or 114or118. Mertzman, Thomas 226. Surface of the Earth. (N) Fall 2008 Studyoflandformdevelopment.Rolesofsurficialprocessescontrolledbyclimateandtectonics,rock characteristics,andtime.Specialemphasisonmasswastage,surfaceandgroundwater,glaciation, wind,andcoastalprocessesinlandscapedevelopment.Terrainanalysisusingtopographicmapsand aerialphotographs;fieldtrips.Relationshiptoenvironmentalproblems.Prerequisite:GEO110or 114or118.Same as ENV 226. Merritts 231. Structural Geology. (N) Fall 2007 Folding,flowage,andfaultingoftherocksoftheEarth'scrust.Relatedcausesandmechanicsof

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mountainbuilding.Mappingandinterpretationofthesefeaturesinthefield.Prerequisite:GEO110 or114or118. Ismat 237. Physics of the Earth. (N) Fall 2008 Principlesofphysicsasappliedtounderstandingfeaturesandpropertiesofthesolidearth.Gravity,seismology,geomagnetismandpaleomagnetism,heatflow;geophysicalsurveys.Laboratory. Prerequisite:GEO110or114or118. Same as PHY 237. Sternberg 250. Environmental Resources and Geographic Information Systems. (N) Spring 2008 IntroductiontomethodsofanalysisofcontemporaryenvironmentalissuesthatrelyonuseofGeographicInformationSystems(GIS)forassessment,understanding,andsolutions.GISusesavariety oftypesofdigitaldata,includingremotesensingimagery,togeneratecomputermapsoftopography, landuse,vegetationcover,soiltype,andresourcesforareasassmallasBakerCampusandaslarge astheAmazonBasin.Same as ENV 250. A. de Wet 321. Mineralogy. (N) Fall 2007 Crystallographyandcrystalchemistry;physicalandchemicalproperties,stability,andoccurrenceof commonminerals,withemphasisonthecommonrock-formingsilicates.Laboratorystudiesinclude crystalsymmetry,mineralexaminationinhand-specimen;introductiontothepolarizingmicroscope. Prerequisite:CHM111. Mertzman 322. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. (N) Spring 2008 Origin,occurrence,andinterpretationofigneousandmetamorphicrocks;interpretationandapplicationofexperimentalphaseequilibriaandelementarythermodynamics.Laboratory:examinationand interpretationofigneousandmetamorphicrocks,textures,andmineralassemblagesinhand-specimen andthin-section.Prerequisite:GEO321. Mertzman 324. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. (N) Spring 2009 Geologicframework,environmentofdeposition,anddynamicsofsedimentsandsedimentaryfeatures;petrologyandpetrographyofsedimentaryrocks;interpretationsderivedfromexaminationof sedimentaryfeaturesandrocksequencesinthefield.Prerequisite:GEO221. C. de Wet 344. Global Change/Natural Resources. (N) Fall 2007 Explorationofvariablesinvolvedinglobalchange,rangingfromnaturaldriversofchangetohumanity'sdirecteffectsongeochemicalcyclesandbiologicalcommunities.Aportionofthecoursedeals withclimatechange.TheglobalimpactofhumansontheEarth'snaturalresourcesissurveyedina scientificframework.Possiblewaysinwhichhumansmightmitigatetheseimpactsareaddressed. Prerequisites:ENV/GEO114orBIO110orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ENV 344. Williams 353. Summer Field Course. Every Summer Lithologic,stratigraphic,andstructuralgeologicexaminationofclassicalareas;preparationofreportsandgeologicmapsontopographicandaerialphotographicbasemapsinareasofsedimentary, metamorphic,andigneousrocks;examinationofminerallocalities.Approvedcoursesareoffered byotherinstitutionsandacceptedforcreditwithgrade.Thegradeearnedinthiscoursewillcountin Franklin&MarshallGPAcalculations,regardlessofwhetheritisbeingtakenasarequiredcourse foramajororminorornot.Maybetakenforoneortwocoursecredits.Prerequisite:permissionof departmentchair. Staff 384. Changing Views of the Earth, 1650­1850. (S) Fall 2008 AVeryWreckofaWorld:speculativecosmologies,descriptivenaturalhistory,andtheoriginsof ascienceoftheEarth.TheageoftheEarthandour"PlaceinNature":afallfromgrace,limitless horizonsandtheVictoriancommitmenttoprogress.Nationalandsocialoriginsofthescienceand scientists.RelationofnewgeologicalconceptstotheIndustrialRevolutionandcontemporarycultural themes,includingtheirexpressioninthearts.Prerequisite:permissionofinstructor.Same as STS 384. Thomas

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433. Paleontology. (N) Fall 2007 Thenatureoffossils.Analysisofgrowthandvariationinfossilassemblages.Systematicmethods. Reconstruction of the modes of life of extinct organisms. Paleoecology, paleobiogeography and biostratigraphy.Fossilrecordofevolutionarypatternsandinferredprocessesinthehistoryoflife. Laboratory,fieldtrips.Prerequisite:GEO221orpermissionofinstructor. Thomas 438. Tectonics. Spring 2008 Globaltectonics:seismological,geothermal,geomagneticandgeochronologicalevidenceofcrustal andmantlehistoryandprocesses;mantlebulkpropertiesandconvection;platetectonics;seafloor spreading;applicationofplatetectonicstocontinentalmasses;tectonicmodels.Prerequisite:GEO 231. Ismat 480. Senior Seminar (Geology of North America). Spring 2008 AnexplorationofkeyproblemsofcontemporaryinterestintheEarth'sgeologichistory.TopicsaddressedhaveincludedtheoriginandstabilizationoftheNorthAmericancratonandthemagmatic, stratigraphic,andstructuralhistoriesoftheCordilleranandAppalachianorogenicbelts.Prerequisite: seniorstandinginGeosciences. Thomas 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheGeosciencesstaff.Permissionofchairperson.

ENvIRONmENTAL STUDIES/SCIENCE

114. Earth, Environment, and Humanity. (N) Every Semester InvestigationoftheEarthwithemphasisonopportunitiesandconstraintsonhumanactivitiesarisingfromitsproperties.StructureandprocessesoftheEarth;naturalhazards;theroleofhumans inchangingthefaceoftheEarth;surfaceandgroundwateruseandmanagement;formationand degradationofsoils;energyresources;humanwastes.Laboratoriesfocusonprinciplesinvolvedin local,national,andglobalenvironmentalproblemsandtheirresolution.Fieldtrips.Same as GEO 114. Staff 117. The Environment and Human Values. (S) Every year Studyofhistoricalandmodernattitudestowardnature;humanuseofnature'sresources;effectsof thegrowthofscienceandtechnologyonhumanusesofandattitudestowardtheenvironment;and theabilityofmodernhumanstosubstantiallyaltertheenvironment(e.g.,byalteringglobaltemperature).Keyconcepts:humanpopulationgrowth;thenotionof"limitstogrowth";andthedifficulty ofmanagingtheuseofcommonpoolresources.Same as STS 117. Strick, Maxwell 172. The Great Watersheds. Spring 2008 Investigationoftwomajorwatersheds:theDelawareandtheChesapeake(includingtheSusquehanna andPotomac).Examinationoftheirhistories,science,origins,andsocioeconomics,includingnear andfara-fieldenvironmentalissues--whichareverydifferent,thelawsthatprotectthem,thepeople thatlivethere,thesciencethatisbeingdone(especiallyalongtheChesapeake,e.g.oysters),and politicsthatprovideverydifferentlevelsofenvironmentalsafeguardstoeachbodyofwater.Same as STS 172. Pepino 216. Environmental Policy. (S) Every Fall Surveyshowfederal,state,andlocalregulationsseektoprotecthumanhealthandtheenvironment. Introducesframeworksformanagingwastesandprotectingairquality,waterquality,andhabitats. Reviews policy tools, including economic incentives, penalties, and legal obligations. Reviews policyevaluation,focusingonfederalstatutes,thelegislativeprocessthatcreatesthem,theroleof thejudiciary,andthesuccessofenvironmentallawinchangingpractices. Maxwell 226. Surface of the Earth. (N) Fall 2008 Studyoflandformdevelopment.Rolesofsurficialprocessescontrolledbyclimateandtectonics,rock characteristics,andtime.Specialemphasisonmasswastage,surfaceandgroundwater,glaciation,

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wind,andcoastalprocessesinlandscapedevelopment.Terrainanalysisusingtopographicmapsand aerialphotographs;fieldtrips.Relationshiptoenvironmentalproblems.Prerequisite:GEO110or 114or118.Same as GEO 226. Merritts 234. Population. (S) Fall 2008 Introductiontopopulationstudiesfocusingonthedemographyofmodernsocieties.Topicsinclude causesandeffectsofrapidpopulationgrowth,changingmortalityandfertility,urbangrowth,age/sex composition,andspatialdistribution.Whilebasicdemographicanalysiswillbecovered,emphasis willbeonthesocioculturalcontextofpopulationprocesses.Prerequisites:ANT100orSOC100or ECO100orENV114orENV117orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ANT/STS 234. Billig 235. Endangered Species. Fall 2008 Basicprinciplesofconservationbiologyandecologywillbeusedtoexamineglobaleffortstoconserve threatenedandendangeredspecies.Studentswillbeexposedtoarangeofinterdisciplinarymethods andapproachesusedinconservationbiology,andwillexplorespecificdomesticandinternational casestudies.Prerequisite:ENV/STS117orpermissionoftheinstructor. Staff 240. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. (S) Fall 2007 Asurveyofenvironmentalandnaturalresourceissuesineconomictheoryandpolicy.Historyofthe environmentalmovementandenvironmentaldebates;theoryofnaturalresourceallocation,natural resource issues; theory of environmental management--for example, externalities, public goods, andcommonproperty.Topicscoveredwillincludepollution,resourcedepletion,andglobalclimate change.Prerequisites:ECO100and103,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ECO 240. Zein-Elabdin, White 250. Environmental Resources and Geographic Information Systems. (N) Spring 2008 IntroductiontomethodsofanalysisofcontemporaryenvironmentalissuesthatrelyonuseofGeographicInformationSystems(GIS)forassessment,understanding,andsolutions.GISusesavariety oftypesofdigitaldata,includingremotesensingimagery,togeneratecomputermapsoftopography, landuse,vegetationcover,soiltype,andresourcesforareasassmallasBakerCampusandaslarge astheAmazonBasin.Same as GEO 250. A. de Wet 260. Nature and Literature Fall 2007 Readingsfromavarietyoftraditions,periods,disciplines,andgenrestodiscoverdiverseassumptions aboutnatureandhumanity'srelationtoit.ReadingsfrombothWesternandnon-Westerncultures, thoughwithemphasisontheBritishandEuro-Americantraditions.Suchbroadexplorationacross vastdividesoftimeandcultureshouldnotonlyteachusaboutvariedunderstandingsofnaturebut alsoencourageself-consciousnessasweformourownconceptionsofwhatnatureisandhowwe oughtbesttointeractwithandinit.Same as ENG 260. Mueller 280. American Landscape. (S) Spring 2008 An interdisciplinary study of theAmerican landscape as it has evolved over centuries of human habitation.Examinesthreemainthemes:thedomesticatedanddesignedlandscapeofthemid-19th century;thecrusadetopreservenatureandtheestablishmentofnationalandstateparksinthelate 19thandearly20thcenturies;andthesprawling,seeminglyformlessautomobile-dominatedlandscape ofthelate20thcentury.Same as AMS 280. Schuyler 312. Environmental History. (S) Spring 2009 Examinationofvariousapproachestoenvironmentalandecologicalhistory.Focusesonwaysinwhich thephysicalandbiologicalworldhaveaffectedhumanhistoryandonwaysinwhichhumansocial andpoliticalorganization,economicactivities,culturalvalues,andscientifictheorieshaveshaped ouralterationandconservationofnature.Selectedcasestudiesfromenvironmentalandecological history,withemphasisonthe17ththroughthe20thcenturies.Same as STS 312. Strick 313. Nuclear Power, Weapons, and Waste Disposal. (S) Spring 2008 Developmentofnucleartechnology,beginningwiththeatomicbombeffortsofWWII.Thecourse dealsfirstwiththetechnologyitself,aswellaswiththewaysinwhichitwasembeddedinanddrove

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Americanandinternationalpolitics,includingthearmsraceandtheColdWar.Includespostwar developmentofciviliannuclearpowerreactors,creationoftheAtomicEnergyCommission,andthe nationaldebateovernuclearpowerandwastedisposalmethods.Same as STS 313. Strick 335. Business and the Natural Environment. (S) Spring 2008 Widespreadconcernforacleanerenvironmentandsustainablepracticeshasputnewdemandson business.Explorationofphilosophical,theoretical,strategic,andpolicyissuesfacingorganizations inrelationtothenaturalenvironment.Same as BOS 335. Forbes 340. Plant Ecology. (N) Fall 2007 Anexplorationofplantecology,organizedbyfourappliedthemes:globalatmosphericchange;air pollutionandaciddeposition;deer-forestinteractions;andinvasivespecies.Classeswillinvolve lectures,primaryliteraturediscussions,fieldtripdiscussions,andseminarsbyinvitedspeakers.The laboratorywillincludelocalandovernightfieldtrips.Prerequisites:BIO110,BIO220,andpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BIO 340. Sipe 344. Global Change/Natural Resources. (N) Fall 2007 Explorationofvariablesinvolvedinglobalchange,rangingfromnaturaldriversofchangetohumanity'sdirecteffectsongeochemicalcyclesandbiologicalcommunities.Aportionofthecoursedeals withclimatechange.TheglobalimpactofhumansontheEarth'snaturalresourcesissurveyedina scientificframework.Possiblewaysinwhichhumansmightmitigatetheseimpactsareaddressed. Prerequisites:ENV/GEO114orBIO110orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as GEO 344. Williams 371. Comparative Environmental Politics. Spring 2009 Analysisofenvironmentalproblemdefinitionandpolicysolutionsindifferentcountries,withparticularfocusonthedevelopingworld.Effectsofpoliticaldriversofairandwaterpollution,land coverchange,andbiodiversityconservation.Influenceofpoliticalstructures,powerrelations,cultural values,ecologicaldynamics,andsocialinteractionsonenvironmentalpolitics.Rolesofnationaland multilateralinstitutions,NGOs,andcivilsocietyinpolicydebates.Outcomesofmulti-stakeholder negotiationsoverenvironmentalgovernanceofglobalcommons,includingNorth-Southdisputes. Prerequisites:ENV117orGOV100. Maxwell 372. Environmental Law. Spring 2008 OverviewofcurrentU.S.environmentallaws,beginningwiththeNationalEnvironmentalPolicyAct (1969).Originandoperationofmajorenvironmentallawsthatsafeguardpublichealthandprotect theenvironment,includingCleanAirandWaterActs,SafeDrinkingWaterAct,andlegislationdevelopedtoaddresshazardouswaste,includingToxicSubstanceControlAct,ResourceConservation andRecoveryAct,andCommunityRight-to-KnowAct(EPCRA).Thecoursefocusesontheoriginal legislationandwaysinwhichpoliticalandeconomicpressureshaveledtoamendmentschanging theintentoftheselaws.Same as GOV 372. Pepino 401. From Wilderness to Environmentalism. (S) Spring 2008 Aninvestigationofattitudestowardthenaturalenvironmentfromahistoricalperspective,andthe evolutionfromconservationtocontemporaryenvironmentalconcerns.Thiscoursepaysparticular attentiontoplaces--theHudsonRiverValleyandYosemite,forexample--aswellastoideasand attitudes.Same as AMS 401. Schuyler 454. Environmental Problems. (N) Every Spring Readings,lectures,discussionsandstudentpresentationsaddresscriticalissuesunderpinningmodern environmentalproblems.Primaryliteraturespecifictosomeoftheseproblemsisemployed.Working withinthisframework,studentsapplytheiraccumulatedknowledgeofenvironmentalstudiesand sciencetopropose,conductandwriteupasemesterlongresearchprojectexploringalocal,regional orglobalenvironmentalproblem. Williams 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheEarthandEnvironmentstaff.(Permissionofchairperson)

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Professor Brian A'Hearn, Chair Antonio G. Callari Alan S. Caniglia Sean Flaherty Brian A'Hearn David M. Brennan (on leave 2007­2008) Eiman Zein-Elabdin Utteeyo Dasgupta Gillian Hewitson Roger White J. Jeffrey Zink Sigmund M. and Mary B. Hyman Professor of Economics Professor of Economics Professor of Economics Associate Professor of Economics Associate Professor of Economics Associate Professor of Economics Assistant Professor of Economics Assistant Professor of Economics Assistant Professor of Economics Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics

Economicshasvariouslybeensaidtobeconcernedwith: theallocationofscarceresourcesamongcompetinguses asociety'ssocialrelationsofproduction,distribution,andconsumption theinstitutionsthroughwhichhumanshaveorganizedtheirprovisioning Inlinewiththesevarieddefinitions,thestudyofeconomicscanbepursuedusingamathematicalapproach,ahistoricalapproach,and/oraninstitutionalandsociologicalapproach. Independentlyoftheparticulardefinitiontowhichtheyareattracted,well-preparedeconomicsstudentswillhavefamiliaritywith,andbeabletodrawon,allthreeapproaches. TheEconomicscurriculumatFranklinandMarshallCollegeprovidesstudentswithopportunitiestostudythedisciplineacrossthevarietyofapproachesand/ortopursuedepth inanyapproach.Thesequenceofintroductorycoursesexposesstudentstobothorthodox andheterodoxthemesandapproaches,whilethesequenceofintermediatelevelcourses emphasizesthecoreanalyticaltechniquesusedinorthodoxandheterodoxabstractand appliedtheoreticalwork.Electivesofferstudentstheopportunitytoexplorebothtopical andtheoreticalspecialareasofinterest. Thestudyofeconomicsencompassesawidevarietyofmodelsandtopicsthatattempt toexplainvarioussocialphenomena,includingtheoperationofmarkets,thedistribution ofincome,macroeconomicfluctuations,economicgrowth,internationaleconomicrelations,therolesofclass,culture,gender,andrace,andtheecologicalimpactsofeconomic activity.Agoodliberalartseconomicseducationwillinvolvestudentsininterdisciplinary explorations.Economicsmajorsare,therefore,encouragedtoenrollincoursesinother departmentsandinterdisciplinaryprogramssuchashistory,anthropology,government, womenandgenderstudies,andearthandenvironment.Economicsmajorsarealsoencouragedtopursueopportunitiestostudyabroad,wheretheyarelikelytocementtheir understandingoftheculturalcontextandnatureofeconomiclife. A major in Economics consists of aminimumoftencourses,includingatleastseven coursestakenatFranklinandMarshallCollege.Requiredare: Economics100and103 Economics201,205,207 Economics210orMathematics216. atleasttwocourseswithadesignationof300orabove.

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ThewritingrequirementinEconomicsismetbycompletionofthenormalcoursesrequired tocompletethemajor. StudentswhoarecontemplatinggraduateworkinEconomicsareadvisedtoundertake adequatepreparationinMathematics--normallyMathematics109,110,and111(Calculus I,II,III),Mathematics216and316(ProbabilityandStatisticsI,II),andMathematics229 (LinearAlgebraandDifferentialEquations). TobeconsideredforhonorsinEconomics,graduatingseniorsmustmeetthefollowing conditions: have carried out independent research during the Senior year resulting in a high caliber thesis deemed to be deserving of "honors" by an appropriately composed HonorsCommittee; haveanEconomicsGPAof3.5andaCollegeGPAof3.0atthebeginningofthe honorsprojectandatthetimeofgraduation; havecompletedalltherequiredEconomicscourses(Economics100,103,201,205, 207,and210orMathematics216)bytheendoftheirJunioryear;theDepartment maywaivethisrequirementinspecialcases. EconomicsMajorshavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:University CollegeLondon(UK),TohokuGakuin(Japan),AmericanUniversityinCairo(Egypt), SyracuseUniversityProgram(Italy,Spain),BostonUniversityInternationalHonorsProgram(Brazil,France,India,Mexico,NewZealand,SouthAfrica,UK).SeeInternational andOff-CampusStudysectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. A minor in Economicsconsistsofsixcourses:Economics100and103,plusfourother approved by the Department, at least, three of which will normally be at the 200 (or higher)level. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. Introduction to Economic Principles. (S) Every Semester Introduction to micro- and macroeconomics. Neoclassical models of economic behavior, market structures, and aggregate economic performance. Topics include: supply and demand analysis; consumerandbusinessbehavior;marketstructures(competition,monopoly,oligopoly)andfailures: inflationandunemployment;governmentfiscalandmonetarypolicies. Staff 103. Introduction to Economic Perspectives. (S) Every Semester Introductiontoeconomicinstitutions,history,andcompetingparadigmsandideologiesineconomics. Conservative,liberal,andradicalperspectives;orthodoxandheterodoxeconomictheories.Topics include:theroleofcultural,legal,economic,andpoliticalinstitutions;class,gender,andrace;wealth andpoverty;andtheenvironment. Staff 130. Marxian Political Economy. (S) Fall 2007 Marx's analysis of capitalism as an economic, social, and historical system.Areas covered are: marketeconomiesandalienation;exploitationandclassconflicts;theworking`class';competitive andmonopolistictendenciesofcapitalism;capitalistaccumulationandeconomiccrises;theroleof thestate;colonialism,imperialism,andglobalization.Particularattentionwillbepaidtothecon-

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temporaryrelevanceofMarx'stheory.Studentsarealsointroducedtotheproblemsandmethodsof criticalinquiry. Callari 201. Macroeconomics (S) Every Semester Aggregateeconomicactivity:anexaminationofthefactorsthatinfluenceitslevel,stability,andrate ofgrowth.Consumption,savings,investment,fiscalandmonetarypolicy,andinternationaltradeand financeasinfluencesonthelevelofprices,output,employment,andincome.Prerequisites:ECO 100and103. A'Hearn 205. Microeconomics. (S) Every Semester Theanalyticalfoundationsofneoclassicalpricetheory:theoryoftheconsumer;theoryofthefirm; marketstructureandefficiency;factormarketsandincomedistribution;generalequilibrium.Prerequisites:ECO100and103. Flaherty, White, Dasgupta 207. Value and Distribution. (S) Every Semester Theanalyticalfoundationsofheterodoxeconomictheories.Theoreticalcritiquesofandalternatives toorthodoxtheoriesof:"factor"pricingandthedistributionofincome;macroeconomicdynamicsof growthandstability;theneutralityandexogeneityofmoney;gendered(andnon-market)economic relations.Prerequisites:ECO100and103. Callari, Zein-Elabdin 210. Economic Statistics. (S) Every Fall Anintroductiontostatisticalconceptsandtechniquesasusedineconomics.Topicsincludedescriptivestatistics,sampling,probability,estimation,confidenceintervals,hypothesistests,andregression analysis.Prerequisites:ECO100and103.(ECO210iswaivedasarequirementfortheeconomics majorforstudentswhohavecompletedMAT216) Brennan, A'Hearn 231. Money and Banking. (S) Offered in 2008­2009 CommercialandcentralbankingintheUnitedStates,including:FederalReserveresponsibilityfor influencingeconomicactivity;theroleofmoneyindeterminingthelevelofnationalincomeand prices;andthenatureoftheinternationalmonetarysystem.Prerequisite:ECO100and103 Staff 240. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. (S) Fall 2007 Asurveyofenvironmentalandnaturalresourceissuesineconomictheoryandpolicy.Historyofthe environmentalmovementandenvironmentaldebates;theoryofnaturalresourceallocation,natural resource issues; theory of environmental management--for example, externalities, public goods, andcommonproperty.Topicscoveredwillincludepollution,resourcedepletion,andglobalclimate change.Prerequisite:ECO100and103,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ENV 240. Zein-Elabdin, White 244. Women in the Economy. (S) Fall 2007 Ananalysisoftheroleswomenandmenhavehistoricallyplayedandcontinuetoplayintheeconomy, bothwithinandoutsideofthelabormarket.Topicsincludethehistoricalconditionsunderwhich dominantgenderidealsemerged,thevalueofunpaidworkandnationalaccounting,occupational segregationandlabormarketdiscrimination.Economicandinterdisciplinaryapproachesareused. Prerequisite:ECO100and103,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as WGS 244. Hewitson 248. History of Economic Thought. (S) Fall 2008 Economicthoughtfromantiquitytothepresent.Schoolsofthoughtcoveredare:economicthought innon-marketsocieties;Mercantilistthoughtoninternationaltradeandnationaleconomicpolicies; theinventionofEconomicsasascience;classicaleconomics;Marxianeconomics;themarginalist school;Veblenandinstitutionalism;Keynesianeconomics;neoclassicaleconomics;thenewclassical economics;feministandheterodoxeconomics;developmenteconomics.Prerequisites:ECO100and 103,orpermissionoftheinstructor. Callari 264. Introduction to International Economics. (S) Fall 2007 Introductionofkeyconceptstodescribeandanalyzeinternationaleconomiclinkages.Analysisof internationaltransactionsinvariousmarketsincludinggoodsandservices,capital,labor,andfor-

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eignexchange.Coretopicsinclude:reasonsforandbenefitsfrominternationaltrade;exchangerate developments;benefitsandrisksofinternationalcapitalflows;globalization;liberalization;regional integration;anddevelopment.Empiricalapproachwithintroductionofcoretheoreticalconceptsand policyperspectives.Prerequisite:ECO100. White 265. Globalization: History of the International Economy. (S) Spring 2008 Globalizationinhistoricalperspective,withprimaryfocusonthelate19thandearly20thcenturies. Topicscoveredincludeinternationalmigration,capitalflows,exchangerates,internationaltrade, financialcrises,andthepoliticalandeconomicdeterminantsofinternationaleconomicpolicy.Prerequisite:ECO100.Same as HIS 265. A'Hearn 281. Political Economy of Africa. (S) (NW) Offered in 2008­2009 AbroadideaofeconomicandsocialconditionsinAfricaandthefactorsthatinfluenceeconomic developmentintheregion,powerstructures,andprocessesofchange.Historicalanalysisofprecolonialsystemsofproductionandexchange,andmodificationsintroducedduringtheEuropean colonialperiod.Examinationofmajorcurrenteconomicandpoliticalproblemssuchasfoodproduction,externaldebt,andtheroleofthestate.Reflectiononthequestionofeconomicdevelopment. Prerequisites:ECO100and103,orpermissionofinstructor.Same as AFS 281. Zein-Elabdin 282. Women, Culture, and Development. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 Roleofgenderindifferentculturesacrossnon-industrializedworldandimpactofeconomicdevelopmentonpositionofwomenandgenderrelationsinthesesocieties.Women'scontributiontoeconomic andsocialchangeandtheextenttowhichconventionalmethodsofanalysisindevelopmenteconomics canbeappliedtotheirsituations.Examinationofthedevelopmentofthe"ThirdWorldwoman"in thedevelopmentliterature.Prerequisite:ECO100and103,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as WGS 282. Zein-Elabdin 291. Directed Readings. Every Semester TutorialforstudentswhohavenotyetcompletedECO201,205,207,and210.Studentswhohavea specialinterestmayarrangeatutorialwithafacultymember.Enrollmentisconditionaloninstructor's permission. 335. Economic Development. (S) (NW) Fall 2007 Theoriesofeconomicgrowthanddevelopment.Historicalandpoliticalcontextoftheemergenceof the"lessdeveloped"worldandtheprojectofinternationaldevelopment.Structureandperformance of"lessdeveloped"economies.Currentmajorpolicyissuesincludingagriculture,industry,technology,foreigninvestment,andinternationaltradeanddebt.Prerequisite:ECO201,orpermissionof theinstructor. Zein-Elabdin 364. Advanced International Economics. (S) Spring 2008 Examinationofadvancedtopicsininternationaleconomics.Introducestheoreticalstructuresand modelsrelatingtointernationaltradeandinternationalfinance.Evaluatesassociatedempiricalliterature.Coretopicsincludemacroeconomicpolicyandcorrespondinginternationalimplications, capitalmobilityandcapitalcontrols,theeffectsofinternationalfactorflows,optimumcurrencyareas, coordinatedcentralbankpolicy,tradepolicyformulation,regional/preferentialtradeagreements, labormarketeffectsoftradeliberalization,workers'rights/childlabor/forcedlabor,andtherolesof internationalorganizations.Prerequisite:ECO264. White 391. Directed Reading. (S) Every Semester TutorialforstudentswhohavecompletedECO201,205,and207.Studentswhohaveaspecial interest may arrange a tutorial with a faculty member. Enrollment is conditional on instructor's permission. 410. Econometrics. (S) Spring 2008 Anintroductiontostatisticalanalysisofeconomicdata,withabalanceoftheory,applications,and originalresearch.TheClassicalLinearRegressionModeliscoveredindetail,alongwithtypical departuresfromitsassumptionsincludingheteroscedasticity,serialcorrelation,andnon-stationar-

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ity.Furthersubjectscanincludeinstrumentalvariables,limiteddependentvariables,andadvanced time-seriestopics,dependingontimeandstudentinterest.Prerequisites:ECO210orMAT216. A'Hearn, White 430. Researching the Local Economy. (S) Every Semester Ongoingresearchprojectonlocal(LancasterCity,County,andregion)economicissuesandtrends. Studentschoosefromspecifictopicsonwhichtoconductsupervisedresearch.Permissionofinstructorrequired. Callari, Flaherty 490. Independent Study. Every Semester IndependentresearchdirectedbytheEconomicsstaff.Permissionoftheinstructor.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

EconomyofCities. IndustrialOrganization. EconomicsofStrategy.

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Professor Judith C. Mueller, Chair Jeffrey C. Steinbrink Anthony J. Ugolnik Padmini Mongia Patricia A. O'Hara (on leave 2007­2008) Patrick S. Bernard (on leave 2007­2008) Tamara A. Goeglein Judith C. Mueller Genevieve Abravanel (on leave 2007­2008) Robert Battistini Katie Ford Nicholas Montemarano Alice Drum Kabi Hartman Julie Keenan Amy Moreno Kerry Sherin Wright Daniel Frick Jorg Homberger John DelliCarpini Deborah Linder Alumni Professor of English Literature and Belles Lettres Dr. Elijah E. Kresge Professor of English Professor of English Professor of English Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of English Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of English Visiting Professor of English and Women and Gender Studies Visiting Assistant Professor of English Visiting Assistant Professor of English Visiting Assistant Professor of English Director of the Writers House and Adjunct Assistant Professor of English Director of the Writing Center, Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of English Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of English Adunct Assistant Professor of English Adjunct Instructor and Research Associate of English

TheEnglishmajoratFranklin&MarshallCollegeoffersstudentsachoicebetweentwo complementary tracks, one emphasizing literary study, the other creative writing. We requiremajorsineithertracktohavesomeexperienceinbothareas.Studyingliterature andpracticingcreativewritingdevelopinusobviousskills--skillsofreading,writing,

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analysis,creativityandcriticalthinking--buttheyalsoenableustoengagewiththerich diversityofhumanexperience. Sincewecannotseparatelanguageorliteraturefromtheirculturalandintellectualcontexts, theliteraturecomponentoftheEnglishmajoratFranklin&Marshalloffersasubstantial historicalbase,withcorecoursesontopicsinthetraditionalperiodsofBritishandAmerican literature.Additionally, students take thematic courses in subjects like "Caribbean Literature,""NatureandLiterature,""ModernWarNarratives,"and"LiteraryLosers,"as wellasupperlevelseminarsinauthorsortopicsthatbuildonthehistoricalcore. Thetrackincreativewritingjoinsthepassionforlanguageandimaginativewritingwith the study of literature. It is built upon the premise that reading widely and deeply in literature,includingcontemporaryliterature,isessentialtobecomingaskilledcreative writer:inotherwords,thatthebestwritersarealsoavid,engagedreaders.Studentswho chooseaconcentrationincreativewritingpracticethecraftofwritingpoetry,fiction,and nonfictioninworkshopsettingswherewritingisvaluedasaseriousartform.Themajor culminatesinanadvancedcreativewritingworkshopinwhichstudentscompletecreative thesesinthegenreoftheirchoice.Thecreativewritingmajorisagatewaytoalifelong loveandappreciationofwords. Literaturemajorsalsotakeatleastonecourseincreativewriting.Allstudents,through theirownattemptstowritecreatively,candevelopanappreciationforhowthegreatworks they study in their literature courses might have been created. English majors in both trackscometoappreciatetherigorthatbothdisciplines--literarycriticismandcreative writing--entail. Englishmajorshaverichresearchopportunitiesbeyondtherequirementsofthemajorthrough independentstudyandHackmansummerresearchscholarships,whichengagestudentswith thescholarlyactivitiesoftheirprofessors.Theyalsohaveopportunitiesforinvolvementin arangeofextra-curricularactivities:attendingreadingsbyandmeetingnumerousvisiting writers,participatingineventsattheWritersHouse,helpingtoplantheEmergingWriters Festival,orwritingfororstaffingoneoftheCollege'sliterarypublications. Englishmajorsarehighlyvaluedfortheirabilitiestothinkandwrite.ThestudyofEnglish isnotjustgoodpreparationforacareer,however.Itfostersanengagementwiththebig questionsofliving--questionsaboutlanguage,meaning,andvalue.Itfostersself-reflectionandgreaterawarenessofthenaturalandsocialworldsinwhichwelive.Moreover, studyingEnglishliteraturegivesusapurchaseonhownarrativesandmetaphorsworkso thatwecaninterpretanddeploythemwiselyandevenre-makethemforourowntime, withitsenormouschallengesanddemands. A major in Englishconsistsofthefollowingelevencourses:three"StudiesinPre-1800 Literature"courses(English201,202,203,206,256);three"StudiesinPost-1800Literature"courses(English204,207,208,210,257);onecreativewritingcourse(English 225,381,382,383,384);twoseminars;andtwoelectives(atleastoneofwhichmustbe atthe200level). A major in English with a concentration in Creative Writingconsistsofthefollowing elevencourses:two"StudiesinPre-1800Literature"courses(English201,202,203,206, 256);two"StudiesinPost-1800Literature"courses(English204,207,208,210,257); onecontemporaryliteraturecourse(English227,271,275);oneseminar;threecreative

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writingcourses(English225,381,382,383,384);oneadvancedcreativewritingcourse (English480);oneelective. A minor in Englishconsistsofthefollowingsixcourses:two"StudiesinPre-1800Literature"courses(English201,202,203,206,256);two"StudiesinPost-1800Literature" course(English204,207,208,210,257);oneelective;oneseminar. ThewritingrequirementintheEnglishmajorismetbycompletionofthenormalcourses requiredtocompletethemajor. Studentsareurgedtoconsultwithdepartmentaladvisersaboutappropriatecourseswithin thedepartmentandinrelatedfields. MajorsintheDepartmentofEnglishhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:ButlerUniversityProgram,Galway;UniversityofLondon;Universityof WesternAustralia;AdvancedStudiesinEngland,Bath;HebrewUniversity,Jerusalem; AmericanUniversityCenterofProvence;NorthernIllinoisUniversityProgram,Prague; SweetBriarJuniorYearinSpainProgram. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

REQUIRED mAJORS COURSES IN BRITISH AND AmERICAN LITERATURE

201, 202, 203, 206, 256. Studies in Pre-1800 Literature. (H) Every Semester ThesecoursesexamineselectedissuesandideasinthetraditionsofBritishandAmericanliterature inthehistoricalperiodsbefore1800.ENG201coversBritishLiteraturefromtheMedievalPeriod; ENG202examinesBritishLiteraturefromtheRenaissance;ENG203treatsBritishLiteraturefrom theRestorationandthe18thCentury;ENG206treatsAmericanLiteraturefromitsbeginningsthrough the1830s;ENG256examinesAfricanAmericanLiteraturefromthecolonialperiodthroughthe19th Century. Staff 204, 207, 208, 210, 257. Studies in Post-1800 Literature. (H) Every Semester ThesecoursesexamineselectedissuesandideasinthetraditionsofBritishandAmericanliterature inthehistoricalperiodsafter1800.ENG204coversBritishliteratureinthe19thcentury;ENG207 coversAmericanLiteraturefromthefoundingoftheRepublictotheCivilWar;ENG208extends fromtheCivilWarthroughWorldWarII.ENG210treats20thCenturyliteraturewritteninEnglish; ENG257examinesAfricanAmericanLiteratureofthetwentieth-century. Staff

ELECTIvES

107. American Dreams. (H) (W) Fall 2007 Afirst-yearseminarthatinvestigatesthevariedculturalmeaningsoftheAmericanDream.Examines theclassicdefinitionofsuccessasexpressedinthewritingsofBenjaminFranklin,HoratioAlger, Jr.,andBookerT.Washington.Explorescompetingdefinitions,aswellascritiques,ofAmerica's culturalmythologiesofsuccess.Syllabushasincludedliteraryandpopularfictionandnon-fiction byE.L.Doctorow,BarbaraEhrenreich,RichardNixon,NormanVincentPealeandfilmsbyRobert AltmanandMichaelMoore. Same as AMS 107. Frick 166. Faith Narratives. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Thiscoursefocusesonnarrativeswrittenbythosewholiveinservicetoafaithcommitment:priests,

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monks,nuns,rabbis,andministers.Someofthenarrativesareseriousandimpassioned;someare comicandsatirical;someareinprose(fictionandnonfiction)andsomearepoetry.Allarewritten inanAmericanorEuropeancontext. Ugolnik 169. Caribbean Literature. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Anintroductionto20th-centuryCaribbeanliterature,thiscourseexploresissuesoflanguage,diaspora, andculturalidentity.Coursematerialsincludefiction,nonfiction,poetry,anddrama.Same as AFS 169. Abravanel 212. Shakespearean Literature. (H) Spring 2008 EmphasisonliteraryanalysisofShakespeare'spoetryanddramaandontheirplaceinliteraryhistory. Keenan 216. Introduction to the Harlem Renaissance. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 AnintroductoryexaminationofthemajorwritersoftheHarlemRenaissance.Wewillreadsome oftherepresentativetextsandanalyzehowtheyengagedimaginativelythecultural,political,and aestheticconcernsofthemovement.Same as AFS/AMS 216. Staff 227. Reading and Writing about Place. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Theplaceswhereweliveandvisitshapeourpersonal,cultural,andnationalidentities.Effective writingaboutplaceenablesustoseewithnewanddeeperinsightsbothourselvesandtheplaces weinhabit.Readingsincludecontemporarywritingsthatusedescriptionsofplacetoexpressvalues includingtravelnarrative,memoir,socialandpoliticalcommentary,naturewriting,andjournalistic reportage.Studentswillwritebothresponsepapersandcreativenonfictionessaysaboutplace. O'Hara 231. Women Writers I. (H) Spring 2008 AstudyoftheexperiencesofwomenaspresentedinselectedBritishandAmericanliteraturefromthe MiddleAgesthroughthe19thcentury,aspresentedfromavarietyofculturalperspectives.Wewill considervariousreadingsofthetexts,includingthosethatemphasizefeministtheoryandhistorical context.Amongothers,wewillbereadingJaneAusten,AphraBehn,AnneBradstreet,theBrontës, GeorgeEliot,andMaryWollstonecraft.Same as WGS 231. Hartman 233. Women Writers II. (H) Fall 2007 AstudyofthechangingworldofAmericanandBritishwomeninthe20thcenturyasportrayedby womenwriters.Thecriticalemphasiswillbeonfeministtheoryandthepolitical,social,andcultural backgroundofthetimes.Amongothers,wewillreadworksbyMargaretAtwood,ToniMorrison, SylviaPlath,AdrienneRich,AnneSexton,EdithWharton,andVirginiaWoolf.Same as WGS 233. Drum, Hartman 242. Men in Literature. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Thiscourseusesliteratureandgendertheoryinastudyofmaleoralandwrittennarrative.Wewill lookattextsand"bodylanguage"infourareasofmaleself-identification:bodyimage,warnarrative,contactsport,andsexualidentity.Studentsarerequiredtowritepapers,keepajournal,andtake exams.Thereisarequirementthatallstudentsundertakeamonitoredprogramofweighttraining andphysicalchallengetoachieveaspecificgoal. Ugolnik 250. Contemporary Fiction. (H) Spring 2008 Anexaminationofthecurrentstateoffiction.Wewillread,writeabout,anddiscussarguablyimportant shortstorycollections,mostpublishedwithinthepastdecade,inanattempttoexplore,andperhaps name,someofthepredominantconcernsandformalinnovationsoftoday'sshortstorywriters. Montemarano 251. Modern American Drama. (A) Fall 2008 AliteraryandtheatricalexaminationofrepresentativeAmericandramafromtheRevolutiontothe present,emphasizingdevelopmentssince1920.ThefocusofthisstudyisonhowandwhyAmericans havebeendepictedonstageastheyhave,andthepowerfuleffectthisrangeofdepictionshashadon AmericanidentityandtheAmericanimagination. Same as AMS/TDF 251. Staff

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256. African American Literature 1. (H) Fall 2007 Significantwritersfromthecolonialperiodthroughthe19thcenturyarestudiedtoestablishthe Blackliterarytraditioninthedevelopingnation. Same as AFS/AMS 256. Bernard 257. African American Literature 2. (H) Fall 2007 SelectedwritersfromtheHarlemRenaissancethroughtheBlackAestheticsmovementcomprisethe modernBlackliterarytraditioninAmerica.Same as AFS/AMS 257. Staff 260. Nature and Literature. (H) Fall 2007 Readingsfromavarietyoftraditions,periods,disciplines,andgenrestodiscoverdiverseassumptions aboutnatureandhumanity'srelationtoit.ReadingsfrombothWesternandnon-Westerncultures, thoughwithemphasisontheBritishandEuro-Americantraditions.Suchbroadexplorationacross vastdividesoftimeandcultureshouldnotonlyteachusaboutvariedunderstandingsofnaturebut alsoencourageself-consciousnessasweformourownconceptionsofwhatnatureisandhowwe oughtbesttointeractwithandinit.Same as ENV 260. Mueller 270. 18th-Century Novel. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Canthehistoryofthenovelbeunderstoodasanevolutionaryprocess?Imaginetheearly19thcentury asthemomentwhenoneofmanypossible"novels"slaughtereditscompetitorsintheliterarymarket:themodelofAusten,Dickens,andBalzacisstillwhatmanyreadersexpectfroma"novel."But whatofthepriorcentury--theperiodoffrantichybridizationandrecombinationinwhichanunruly menagerieoftextualfaunascamperedacrosstheculturallandscape?Imaginealionwiththree(different)headsandsevenandahalflegs--ora1797novelthatcomprisesapicaresque,atheological debate,anencyclopedicaccountofAlgiers,acomedyofmanners,aparodyofcontemporary"pulp" fiction,ascathingcritiqueofOrientalism,andaneloquentabolitionistappeal.Thebiologicalexample ispurefantasy--buttheliteraryonedescribesacoursebook.Ourreadingwillincludecanonical works(Defoe,Richardson,Fielding,Sterne)aswellasspecimensexhumedfromthevastgraveof forgottentexts. Battistini 275. Contemporary Poetry. (H) Asurveyofcontemporarypoetsandpoeticsfrom1970tothepresent. Offered in 2008­2009 Ford

315. Introduction to Literary Theory. (H) Spring 2008 AsJonathanCuller,"Theoryoffersnotasetofsolutionsbuttheprospectoffurtherthought.Itcalls forcommitmenttotheworkofreading,ofchallengingpresuppositions,ofquestioningtheassumptionsonwhichyouproceed."Studentsinthiscoursewillbeintroducedtotheoreticalschoolsand conceptsthatshapethestudyofliteratureandthepracticeofliteraryanalysis.Studentsenrollingin thiscourseshouldhavetakenatleastonecollege-levelliteraturecourse.Recommendedforstudents consideringgraduatestudiesinEnglish. Mueller, Mongia

WRITING COURSES

Writingcourses,towhichadmissionisonlybypermissionoftheinstructor,arelimited toenrollmentsofnomorethanfifteenstudents.

105. College Rhetoric: Selected Topics. (H) (W) Every Semester Readingsinselectedtopics.Writingassignmentscloselylinkedtothereadingswillexplorerhetorical strategiesandthewritingprocess:planning,drafting,revising,andeditingessays.Useanddocumentationofoutsidesources.Recenttopicsinclude:ComingofAgeinAmerica,TheHard-Boiled Detective,andMakingItinAmerica. Staff

CREATIvE WRITING COURSES

225. Introduction to Creative Writing. (A) Every Semester Ageneralintroductiontothemodesandmeansofwritingpoetry,fiction,andcreativenon-fiction

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withanemphasisonwritingexercisesandrevision.Studentswillbeintroducedtotheworkshop methodofcritiquingstudentwriting. Sherin Wright, Montemarano, Ford 381. Writing Fiction. (A) Fall 2008 Aworkshopforstudentswhohavefoundfictionwritingasatisfyingmeansofself-expressionandwho nowarereadytoraisetheirworktoahigherlevel.Studentswillwriteandsignificantlyrevisetwo ormoreshortstories.Whatwereadinthisclass--studentworkaswellascontemporarypublished fiction--wewillreadaswriters,meaning:withextremeattentiontocraft.Weshallconcernourselves withthemanychoiceswritersmakeandtheeffectsofthesechoices.Wewillpracticewritingdazzling sentences.Permissionoftheinstructorrequired. Montemarano 382. Writing Poetry. (A) Spring 2008 Aworkshopfocusedongeneratingandcriticizingstudentpoetry.Weeklypoetryassignmentswillbe accordingtosubjectmatter(theelegy,thepoliticalpoem,thelovepoem,etc.),lyricism,andexperimentsinform.ArichselectionofweeklyreadingsofAmericanandworldpoetrywillbeourguide asweworktowardsfurthermasteryofpoeticcraft.Thesemesterwillculminateinaportfolioof studentwork.Studentsofallmajorsareencouragedtotakethecourse.Permissionoftheinstructor required. Ford 383. Dramatic Writing. (A) Fall 2008 Thewritingofshortplaysunderclosesupervision.Permissionoftheinstructorrequired.Same as TDF 383. Silberman 384. Writing Nonfiction. (A) Fall 2007, Spring 2008 Forconfidentwritersreadytofindtheirvoicesinagenrethatclaimstotellthetruthwithoutmakingit up.Assignmentscenteronpiecessuitedfortoday'smagazines,newspapers,andonlinepublications: opinionpieces,memoir,restaurantandmoviereviews,editorials,travelsketches,investigativereports. Readingsfromcontemporarynonfictionwriters,somechosenbytheclass.Emphasisonreading andrespondingtoeachother'swork.Goodwriters,includingnon-majors,welcome.Permissionof instructorrequired. Steinbrink 480. Advanced Creative Writing Workshop. (A) Spring 2008 Thisisanadvancedworkshopforwritersoffiction,poetry,nonfiction,ordrama.Eachstudentwill usethesemestertofinishwriting,revising,andorganizingacreativewritingthesis--abodyofthe student'sbestwork.Participantswillreadanddiscusstheirownandeachother'stheses-in-progress. Studentswillbeexpectedtoreviseandtightenindividualpoemsorstories,toshapetheirtheses,and tounderstandtheaestheticchoicestheyaremaking.Eachstudentmustwriteanintroductiontohis orherthesis.Thecoursewillculminatewithathesisdefensewiththeinstructor.Permissionofthe instructorrequired. Montemarano, Goodman

SEmINARS

Every semester

Seminars,towhichstudentsareadmittedonly bypermissionoftheinstructor,arelimited toenrollmentsofnomorethanfifteenstudents.Seminarsexaminevarioustopics,issues, andauthors.

Chaucer and his Contemporaries. (H) Fall 2007 AseminarreadingoftheworkofGeoffreyChaucerinthelightofhistimesandliterarysources. ThefocuswillbeoncharacterizationandnarrativevoiceinhisCanturbury Tales,andonthewayin whichhedepartsfrom,aswellasadheresto,theconventionsofcourtlylove.Studentscanexpect frequentpresentationsandshortpapers.ReadingandcitationswillbeintheoriginalMiddleEnglish, forwhichstudentswillreceiveinstruction. Ugolnik Contemporary Indian Fiction. Fall 2007 AchronologicalsurveyofIndianFictioninEnglishasithasdevelopedoverthelast50years.Beginningwiththewriterscalled"Anglo-Indian,"thebulkofthecourseisdevotedtowritersofthe

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last20yearssuchasSalmanRushdie,AmitavGhosh,andArundhatiRoy.Attentionisalsopaidto thecategorieswherebyIndianliteratureinEnglishismarketedinIndiaandtheUS/UK.Permission required. Mongia Land and the Self. Fall 2007 Exploringtheexplorers:AnexplorationofthesignificanceofburgeoningcolonialismforChristian adventurersandthosetheymeet.Readingswillbemanyandvarious,inordertoenrichourunderstandingofworldsincollision,oftheselfmeetingwiththeother.Althoughourperspectivewillbe toalargedegreethatoftheexplorers,andthuseuro-centric,wewillalsoconsiderbothsidesofthe coin:theexperiencesofthecolonized,theexplored.Permissionrequired. Keenan Swift, Blake, and Satire. (H) Spring 2008 AseminarontheworkofJonathanSwift(1667­1745)andWilliamBlake(1757­1827),satiristswho standatoppositeendsofthe18thcentury.Blake--radicalrevolutionaryandvisionary--addressesmany ofthesamequestionsthatsoconcernthefarmoreconservativeSwift.Amongourchiefobjectives inourstudyofSwiftwillbetounderstandandenjoytheradicalplayofironythatcharacterizeshis satire.WewillexaminebothBlake'svisualartandhispoetry,thoughwithemphasisonthelatter. Mueller Herman Melville. (H) Spring 2008 Moby-Dick,thequintessentialacademicnovel:`importance'alwaysconceded,butneverreadwithout coercion.Suchacruelfateforthismostdangerousandsubversivebook!WewillreadMoby-Dickin thespiritofmyuncletheship-builder,who,beforebeingburiedwithhiscopy,toldmetoskipcollegeandjustreadMoby-Dicktherestofmylife.ExpectalsoTypee,Redburn,Benito Cereno,Billy Budd;influences;andaNewEnglandsea-port. Battistini Virginia Woolf. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 Inheressay"ModernFiction,"VirginiaWoolfwrote,"letusrecordtheatomsastheyfalluponthe mindintheorderinwhichtheyfall,letustracethepattern,howeverdisconnectedandincoherentin appearance,whicheachsightorincidentscoresupontheconsciousness."Thispropositionreflects Woolf'sturnfromrealismtoamoderniststyledevotedtointeriority,impressionism,wordplay,and whatshecalled"breakingthesentenceandthesequence."Atthesametime,Woolf,anardentfeminist, wrotecompellinglyaboutthepoliticsandcultureoftheearly20thcentury.Thiscoursewillconsider Woolf'smajorworksalongsideexcerptsfromthelettersanddiaries,chartingherformalinnovations aswellashersocialcritique.Throughanexaminationofliterarycriticism,wewillexplorethemain tendenciesinWoolfstudies,includinggenderstudies,psychoanalyticcriticism,newhistoricism, deconstruction,narratology,postcolonialstudies,andculturalstudies.Permissionoftheinstructor required. Same as WGS 467. Abravanel Victorian Nightmares. (H) Offered in 2008­2009 InthisseminarweexplorethebaddreamsthatscaredtheVictoriansevenastheyenjoyedvastlyimproveddaytimelivesmadepossiblebyunprecedenteddevelopmentsintechnologyandindustry.What gaverisetothosepolitical,domestic,andsexualanxietiesthathauntVictorianliterature?Readings fornightmaresaredrawnfrom19th-centuryBritishliterature,science,anthropology,andeconomics. Webeginwithaportraitgrowingoldintheatticandclosewithavampireflyinginthebedroomat night.Inbetweenweencounterallmannerofthingswhatwentbumpinthenight.Permissionofthe instructorrequired. O'Hara 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheEnglishstaff.Seechairpersonforguidelinesandpermission.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

BaseballinLiterature. ContemporaryPoetry. CourtshiptoHook-Up.

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FaithNarratives. ModernWarNarrative. RevengeTragedies. ScienceFiction.

FRENCH

Professor Lisa Gasbarrone, Chair Lisa Gasbarrone L. Scott Lerner (on leave 2007­2008) Cindy Yetter-Vassot Boubakary Diakité JoAnn Piotrowski Julie Roy Professor of French Associate Professor of French and Italian Associate Professor of French Assistant Professor of Francophone Studies and French Visiting Instructor of French French Teaching Assistant

The study of French opens the door to many diverse cultures around the globe, from FranceitselftootherFrench-speakingcountriesandregionsinEurope,NorthandWest Africa,Quebec,theCaribbean,AsiaandthePacificandIndianOceans.Frenchprovides usefullinkstomanypartsoftheworldandtomanyareasoftheliberalartscurriculum. Students interested in the arts, in government and business, in global public health or environmentalstudies,andininternationalstudiesacrossthedisciplines,benefitfromthe practicalskills,theculturalknowledgeandawareness,andtheintellectualconnections thatstudyingFrenchcanprovide. TheFrenchDepartmentofferslanguagecoursesforbeginnersaswellasthosewhowant tobuildontheirknowledgeofFrench.Theintroductory-levelcoursesstresscommunicativecompetencyandtheacquisitionoflistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskills.The intermediatecoursesreinforceandextendthoseskillsthroughaninteractiveexploration ofcontemporaryFrenchandFrancophoneculture,usingavarietyofauthenticelectronic andprintsources. ThecorecoursesoftheFrenchDepartment(203,305,and306)serveasanintroduction toourmajorandasabridgefromtheintermediatetoadvancedlevelsofourprogram. ThesecoursesprovidestudentswithabroadintroductiontotheFrancophoneworldandto theimportantauthors,eventsandideasthathaveshapedFrenchhistoryfromtheMiddle Agestothepresentday.AdvancedcoursesinFrenchareorganizedaroundaliterarygenre, asingleauthor,oranimportantquestionortheme.Advancedcoursesemphasizecritical reading and analysis, research, writing and oral presentation skills, and cross-cultural knowledgeandunderstanding. Mostofourmajorsandminorsspendasemesteroryearabroad,studyinginParis,Nantes, Strasbourg,Aix-en-Provence,orothercitiesinFrance.Inrecentyears,somestudentshave gonetootherFrench-speakingpartsoftheworld,includingWestAfricaandMadagascar. Westronglyrecommendthisimmersionexperiencetoallofourstudents,believingthat travelaloneisnotenoughtolearnaboutothercultures.Youneedtolive,work,relax,and evendreaminFrenchtoacquirethelanguageandappreciatetheculturefully. A major in French consistsofaminimumoftencoursesbeginningatthelevelofFrench 203orhigher.Majorswhoplaceatthe200-levelorlowernormallycomplete203,305,

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306andsixelectives.Majorswhoplaceatthe300-levelnormallycomplete305,306,and sevenelectives.ElectivesinthemajorincludeFrench205andallcoursesofferedatthe 300-level.French481,aresearch-intensiveseminar,isrequiredofallseniors. StudentsmajoringinFrenchwhoenrollinFrenchcoursesabroadmaytransferuptotwo coursesforcredit(persemester)asupper-levelelectivesinthemajor.Studentsminoring inFrenchmaytransferatotaloftwoFrenchcoursestakenabroadforcredittowardsthe Frenchminor. Inconsultationwiththeirdepartmentadviser,Frenchmajorsmaytakeuptotwoelectivesoutsidethedepartmentinacognatearea.Thesemightincludecoursesinanother language,inlinguistics,history,arthistory,music,anthropology,internationalpoliticsor economics,InternationalStudies,AfricanaStudies,orWomenandGenderStudies.All studentsworkcloselywithadepartmentadvisertoensurethecoherenceandintegrityof theirmajorcourseofstudy. A student minoring in French maybeginatanylevelandmustcompletesixcoursesin sequencestartingfromthepointofplacement.AFrenchminormayincludeonecourse inEnglish,subjecttotheapprovalofthedepartment. The writing requirement in the French major is met by completion of French 305 or 306. MajorsandminorsinFrenchhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecent years:InternshipsinFrancophoneEurope(IFE)inParis;IESCenterandUniversityof Nantes;IESCenterandUniversityofParis;HoodCollegeProgramattheUniversityof Strasbourg;ColumbiaUniversityprogramatReidHall,Paris;theAmericanUniversity CenterofProvenceinAix-en-ProvenceandinMarseille;SweetBriarCollegeProgram inToursandParis. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

COURSES IN FRENCH

101. Elementary French I. Every Fall Forstudentswithnopreviousexperiencewiththelanguage.Anintroductiontogrammar,pronunciation,andculture,withemphasisondevelopingcommunicativeskills.Noprerequisite. Piotrowski 102. Elementary French II. Continuationof101.Prerequisite:FRN101orplacement. Every Spring Piotrowski

201. Intermediate French I. (LS) Every Fall ReviewandexpansionofFrenchlanguageskills.Emphasisonbasiclanguagestructures,withpracticeintheactiveapplicationoftheseskillstotheoralandwrittenproductionofFrench.Traditional reviewofgrammarissupplementedbyuseofcurrentaudio,video,anddigitalauthenticmaterials. Prerequisite:FRN102orplacement. Yetter-Vassot 202. Intermediate French II. (H) Every Spring ContinuationofFRN201.Perfectionoforal,aural,andwrittenlanguageskills,plusanintroduction toFrenchreadingstrategies.Courseworkmayincludeproductionofaudioand/orvideocassettesin

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French,individualandgroupworkintheLanguageResourceCenter,andtheexplorationoflanguage sitesontheWorldWideWeb.Prerequisite:FRN201orplacement. Yetter-Vassot 203. Introduction au Monde Francophone. (H) (NW) Every Fall Selections from Francophone literature will be read, performed, and discussed in their cultural context.Avarietyofexercisesaredesignedtodeveloporalandwrittenskills,andtocompletea thoroughone-semestergrammarreviewattheintermediatelevel.Prerequisite:placement.Same as AFS 203. Diakité 205. Intensive French Conversation: Selected Subjects. (H) Every Spring Thiscourseisdesignedtoimproveskillsinoralexpressionandauralcomprehension.Emphasis isoninformedconversationandvocabularyacquisition,basedonshortreadingspertainingtothe themeoftheselectedsubject.Subjectsmayinclude"FrenchCinema,""WomeninFrance,""French Institutions,"or"FrenchMusic."Prerequisite:FRN202or203orplacement. Diakité 305. France in the Age of Tradition: Introduction to French Studies until 1789. (H) Every Spring AbroadoverviewofFrenchcivilizationfromtheMiddleAgestothe18thcentury,throughrepresentativeliteraryworksandotherculturalmaterials(painting,architecture,music,film).Oraland writtenassignments,alongwithselectivegrammarreview,aredesignedtoimprovestudents'language proficiency.Prerequisite:FRN203orplacement. Gasbarrone, Yetter-Vassot 306. Revolution and Reaction: Introduction to French Studies 1789­1968. (H) Every Fall AbroadoverviewofFrenchcivilizationfromtheRevolutiontotheFifthRepublic,throughrepresentativeliteraryworksandotherculturalmaterials(painting,architecture,music,film).Oraland writtenassignments,alongwithselectivegrammarreview,aredesignedtoimprovestudents'language proficiency.Prerequisite:FRN202,203orplacement. Diakité 340. Contemporary French Civilization. (H) Spring 2008 CenteredoncontemporaryFrancefromthebeginningoftheFifthRepublicin1958tothepresent, thiscourseexaminestheinstitutionsandeventswhichhaveshapedcontemporaryFrenchsociety. Topicscoveredincludesocialstructures,economicsituation,politics,immigration,education,the arts,everydaylife,traditions,andtheFrenchmindset.Groupwork,films,andcomputer-basedprojectsusingInternetresourcesarefeatured.Thiscoursemayincludeaservice-learningcomponentin whichstudentsteachFrenchinlocalschools.Prerequisite:FRN305or306. Yetter-Vassot 364. Francophone Literatures and Cultures. (H) Spring 2008 AnintroductiontothehistoryandcultureofatleasttwoareasofFrancophonie,suchasQuebec, theCaribbean,theMaghreb,andWestAfrica.Explorationofthecultural,linguistic,andpolitical interactionsbetweenFranceandotherFrancophonecountriesthroughliteraryworks,films,andother materials.Prerequisite:FRN305or306.Same as AFS 364. Diakité 366. Folk Tales and Fairy Tales in French. (H) Spring 2009 DrawingonfolktalesfromAfrica,Quebec,andtheCaribbean,aswellasclassicfairytalesfrom France,wewillraisequestionsaboutthenatureofstorytellingandthefunctionofpopulartalesin aculture.Wewillexaminethetalesfromavarietyofperspectives,borrowingfrompsychology,anthropology,andliterarycriticismtoformourinterpretations.Thispopularliteraturewillalsoserveas anintroductiontothehistoryandcultureofvariouspartsoftheFrench-speakingworld.Prerequisite: FRN305or306. Gasbarrone French 368. Fashion as a Reflection of French Society. (H) Fall 2008 AcourseonFrenchfashionasaliteraryandculturalphenomenon.Wewilllookatliteraryrepresentationsoffashionasweconsidertheimplicationsoffashionasasystemofmeaning.Wewill tracethehistoryofhautecoutureandexamineitsroleasaproductfor"culturalexportation".Using literarytexts,film,fashionmagazines,andinternetsources,wewillattempttodiscoverwhyfashion issooftenconsidered"French",andwewillconsiderthenatureoftherelationshipbetweenFrench fashionandsocietyinthe21stcentury. Yetter-Vassot

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FRENCH­GERmAN AND GERmAN STUDIES

370. Topics in French Literature, Language, or Civilization. 381. Seminar: Advanced French/Francophone Studies. (H) Every Fall AseminaronasingleaspectofFrenchorFrancophoneculture:awriter,genre,theme,ormovement, seeninhistoricalandculturalcontext.RecentcoursesincludeVictorHugo;L'ErosetlaTradition française;LesHommes,lesFemmesetlePouvoirauSiècledesLumières;Maienlittératureeten film.Topicfor2007:L'Enfanceetl'enfant. Opentojuniorswhopetitionthedepartmenttoenroll. Yetter-Vassot 391. Directed Readings in French. (H) Every Semester TutorialforstudentswhohavecompletedFRN305or306andoneotherFrenchcoursenumbered aboveFRN307.Studentswhohaveaspecialinterestmayarrangeatutorialwithafacultymember. Enrollmentisconditionaloninstructor'spermission. 481. Seminar: Advanced French/Francophone Studies. (H) Every Fall AseminaronasingleaspectofFrenchorFrancophoneculture:awriter,genre,theme,ormovement, seeninhistoricalandculturalcontext.Prerequisite:atleastonecoursebeyondthe305-306level. RecentcoursesincludeVictorHugo;L'ErosetlaTraditionfrançaise;LesHommes,lesFemmesetle PouvoirauSiècledesLumières;Maienlittératureetenfilm.Topicfor2007:L'Enfanceetl'enfant. ForSeniorsOnly. Yetter-Vassot 490. Independent Study. Every Semester Thestudentpursuesanin-depthinvestigationofatopicofspecialinterest,underthedirectionof anadviser.AvailableinthesenioryearasaSeniorResearchProject.Prerequisite:Permissionof chairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

QuébecinLiteratureandFilm.

GERmAN AND GERmAN STUDIES

Professor Lina Bernstein, Chair Cecile C. Zorach Curtis C. Bentzel Karen J. Campbell Professor of German Associate Professor of German Associate Professor of German

ThestudyofGermannotonlyprovidesthebroadeningoflinguisticandculturalawareness thatwillaccompanythelearningofanyforeignlanguage,butalsoexposesstudentstothe culturalcontributionsoftheGerman-speakingcountriestoWesternandworldcivilization. GermanranksfirstinWesternEuropeinthenumberofnativespeakers,primarilyinGermany, AustriaandSwitzerland,andamongthetoptenlanguagesspokenworldwide.Ourmajors haveenteredfieldsasdiverseasteaching,law,business,andmedicineandhaveusedtheir masteryofthelanguagetoworkinthosecountries,whilestudentsfromotherdisciplines havetakencoursesinGermanforpersonalenrichment,forgraduateschoolqualification, orsothattheycanconductresearchorstudyinaGerman-speakingcountry. TheintroductorycoursesintheGermanlanguageatthe100and200level,aswellasthe 301-302sequence,developtheskillsinlistening,speaking,reading,writingandcultural competencythatwillallowstudentstostudyGermantexts,films,andothermediainthe originallanguage.The341,342,343sequenceprovidesanoverviewofGermancultural

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historyfromtheMiddleAgestothepresentday.The400-leveladvancedseminarsallow studentstostudyintensivelymajorperiods,authors,andthemesoftheGermancultural tradition.GermanmajorscompletetheircourseworkexclusivelyinGerman,whileGerman StudiesmajorswhohavenotyetcompletedGerman301and302canenrollinEnglish languagesectionsofthecoursesaboveGerman341orincludeintotheirmajorprogram coursesinotherdepartmentsthattreattopicsfromtheculturalhistoryoftheGermanspeakingcountries. A major in Germanconsistsofninecourses,withtheoptiontopursueoneoftwotracks: amajorinGermanStudies;orinGermanLanguageandLiterature.(Inthelistofrequirementsbelow,"E"indicatesthatreadingsandlectures/discussionareintheEnglishlanguage; "G"indicatesthatreadingsanddesignatedlecture/discussionareintheGermanlanguage. MajorsinGermanStudieswillhavetheoptiontopursuethe"E"track,whilemajorsin GermanLanguageandLiteraturearerequiredtopursuethe"G"track.) RequiredcoursesareGerman301,302,andtwocoursesfromthe341­342­343series. StudentschoosingtheGermanStudiestracktaketwoadditionalcoursesfromthefollowing: 401/2,340,370­379(EorG);and2fromthe400-level(EorG).Studentschoosingthe LanguageandLiteraturetracktakeGerman340andthreecoursesfromthe400Gseries; oneofthesewillbeanIndependentStudyproject,usuallyundertakeninthesenioryear. A minor in German Language and Literatureconsistsofsixcourses:twocoursesfrom German202,301and302;onecoursefromthe341­342­343series;andthreecourses fromGerman340,401/2and470­489. A minor in German Studies consistsofsixcoursecredits:twocoursecreditschosen fromGerman202,301,302,401,and402;andfourcourseschosenfromGerman340, 341,342,343,German470­479,German482,483,484,and485.GermanStudiesminors havetheoptionofsubstitutingHistory355forGerman343.Inaddition,oneothercourse fromadepartmentotherthanGermanmaycounttowardtheGermanStudiesminorwith thepermissionofthedepartmentchairperson. Prospectiveminorsshouldconsultwiththedepartmentchairregardingeitherminor,includingthechoiceofthe"G"or"E"versionsofsomeelectives. ThewritingrequirementintheGermanmajorismetbycompletionofGerman301and one400-levelseminar. MajorsintheDepartmentofGermanhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:HeidelbergCollegeprograminHeidelberg,Germany;IESBerlin;Middlebury Collegeprogram,Johannes-GutenbergUniversität,Mainz,GermanMillersvilleUniversity program,PhilippsUniversität,Marburg,GermanySeeInternationalandOff-CampusStudy sectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. A list of frequently offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeofferedisbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

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Allreadings,lectures,anddiscussionsinthesecoursesareinEnglish.Therearenoprerequisites.

170­179. Topics in German Literature and Civilization. (H) AnexaminationofselectedcontributionsofGermanculturetotheWesterntradition. Fall 2007 Bentzel

COURSES IN GERmAN LANGUAGE

101. Elementary German I. Every Fall ForstudentswithnoknowledgeofGerman.IntroductiontobasicgrammarandvocabularyofcontemporaryidiomaticGermanwithequalemphasisonspeaking,writing,reading,andauralcomprehension.Audioandvideo exercises,simplereadings,shortcompositions,conversationaldrills. Zorach 102. Elementary German II. ContinuationofElementaryGermanI.Prerequisite:GER101orplacement. Every Spring Zorach

201. Intermediate German I. (LS) Every Fall Reviewofbasicgrammaranddevelopmentofvocabulary.Readingofshortstories.Development oforalcommunicativeskillsthroughindividualandgroupassignments.Prerequisite:GER102or placement. K. Campbell 202. Intermediate German II. (H) Every Spring Presentationofandpracticewithmoresophisticatedgrammaticalprinciplesandvocabulary.IntroductiontothecivilizationofGermany,Austria,andSwitzerlandthroughliteraryandjournalistictexts. ExtensiveworkinspeakingandwritingGermantoimprovestyleandwordusage.Prerequisite:GER 201orplacement. K. Campbell 301. German Conversation and Composition. (H) Every Fall Varioustopicsfromcontemporarylifeandlettersfurnishthematerialforthiscourse.Frequentoral reports,writtenessays,andgroupprojects.Prerequisite:GER202orplacement. Bentzel 302. German Civilization and Culture. (H) Every Spring Develops material from German 301 with emphasis on more sophisticated syntax, idioms, and vocabulary. Reading includes a short novel. Audio-visual material features unedited, colloquial speech. Bentzel

COURSES IN GERmAN CULTURE AND CIvILIzATION

ThefollowingcoursesaretaughtinEnglishwithaspecialGsectionforallGermanmajors andminors.StudentsintheGsectionwillreadsomeoftheassignedmaterialinGerman andwillparticipateinonealternateweeklydiscussioninGerman.Inconsultationwith theinstructor,eachstudentwillchooseeithertheGorEsection.

341 G/E. Early German Culture and Literature. (H) Fall 2008 IntroductiontomajorintellectualandartisticachievementsofGermancivilizationfromtheearly MiddleAgestotheendoftheEnlightenment.Emphasizestheinterrelationshipamongtheartsagainst thebackgroundofpolitical-historicaldevelopments.Prerequisite:GER202or301. Campbell 342 G/E. Modern German Culture and Literature. (H) Fall 2007 IntroductiontointellectualandculturalcurrentsinGermancivilizationfromtheEnlightenmentto thepresent,emphasizingtheartsinthecontextofhistoryandphilosophy.Readingsincludeexcerpts fromsuchthinkersasKant,Hegel,Marx,Freud,andEinsteinaswellaspoetryandshortfictional works.Prerequisite:GER202or301. Campbell

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343 G/E. 20th-Century German Culture. (H) Spring 2008 Introductionto20th-centuryGermanculturefromtheWilhelmineerathroughtheWeimarRepublic, theThirdReich,thedivisionofGermany,theEconomicMiracleandtheColdWar,andReunification. Examineswhathasitmeanttobe"German"inthe20thcenturyusingvariousmediaandvarious genres.Note:StudentselectingthiscourseforthemajororminormaysubstituteHIS355. Staff

ForthefollowingcoursesreadingsanddiscussionsareinGerman.Papersandexamsare inGermanorEnglishasappropriate.

370­379 G. Topics in German Civilization and Culture. Atopicofspecialinteresttostudentsafterconsultationwiththefaculty.TopicsincludeTheHeritage ofPotsdamandWeimar,HistoryofGermanCinema,IssuesofContemporaryWestGermanCulture, TheEast-WestSplit.Prerequisite:GER202or301. Staff

COURSES AND SEmINARS IN GERmAN LITERATURE

Generalprerequisiteisatleastonecoursefromthe300series. Thesubjectandemphasisforaseminarmayvaryeachtimeitisoffered;therefore,with permission from the departmental chairperson, students may take each seminar more thanonce.StudentsmajoringinGermanStudiesmayelecttheEoption,writingpapers inEnglish.StudentsmajoringinGermanLiteraturechoosetheGoption,completingall writinginGerman.

340. Introduction to the Study of Literature. (H) Introductiontothebasicvocabularyfor discussionofliterature.Coversfourmajorgenresandtheir accompanyingsubgenres:Lyricpoetry(andotherpoeticmodes);drama(comedyandtragedy);narrative(NovelleandErzählung);andessay.Conceptsfrommetrics,rhetoric,andgenretodiscover specificqualitiesofthetexts.Prerequisite:German202or305. 482. German Literature and Thought before Classicism. (H) Coursewillfocusononepre-Classicalperiod:MiddleAges,Renaissance-Reformation,Baroque, orEnlightenment. 483. German Classicism. (H) Studyofthe writingsofGoethe,Schiller,Holderlin,Herder,WilhelmvonHumboldt,andothersin variousgenres(drama,Novelle,Lyric,epic,essay). 484. 19th Century German Literature and Thought. (H) Examinationof onetopic,genre,orperiod,e.g.,Romanticism,HeineandYoungGermany,poetic realism,theNovelle,drama,literatureandthevisualarts. 485. 20th Century German Literature and Thought. (H) Examinationof atopic,genre,periodorauthor,e.g.,TheArtistandSociety,LiteratureofExile,East GermanLiterature,LyricPoetry,Expressionism,Kafka,Brecht. 470­479 G/E. Topics Seminar in German Literature and Thought. Aspecialcomparativeproblemthatspansthecenturies,genres,orcultures.Offeredupondemand. 490 G. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheGermanstaff.Permissionofthechairperson.

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GOvERNmENT

GOvERNmENT

Professor Dean C. Hammer, Chair Robert C. Gray Dean C. Hammer Joseph J. Karlesky D. Grier Stephenson, Jr. Kerry H. Whiteside Matthew M. Schousen Susan Dicklitch Robert J. Friedrich Stephen K. Medvic (on leave Spring 2008) Jennifer D. Kibbe (on leave Fall 2007) Jun Saito Katherine A. Gordy Stanley J. Michalak Lawrence F. Stengel James G. Shultz Berwood A. Yost The Hon. and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government John W. Wetzel Professor of Classics and Professor of Government The Hon. and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government Charles A. Dana Professor of Government Clair R. McCollough Professor of Government Professor of Government Associate Professor of Government Associate Professor of Government Associate Professor of Government Assistant Professor of Government Assistant Professor of Government Visiting Assistant Professor of Government The Hon. and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government, Senior Adjunct Emeritus Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Government Senior Adjunct Instructor of Government Adjunct Instructor of Government

TheGovernmentmajorisdesignedtoprepareandenrichstudentsfortheirprofessional livesandtheirroleasactivecitizensandleaders.Thedepartmenthasalongtraditionof bothencouragingitsmajorstothinkconceptuallyaboutpoliticsandtoimmersethemselves in their political environment through internships, civic activism, study abroad, andservicelearning. StudentsinGovernmentstudytheprocessesbywhichsocietiesmakecollectivedecisions, explorethetheoreticalandethicalfoundationofpoliticalaction,raisecriticalquestions aboutthenatureanduseofpower,andexaminehowsocietiesandinternationalsystems attempt to address basic problems of liberty, equality, and order.As a complement to courseworkinthemajor,studentsdevelopskillsinlanguage,economics,mathematics, orphilosophy. A major in Governmentconsistsof9coursesinGovernmentanda3courseCognate. Requirements are: Government100; Government130; Government222or223; Government241or242; Government250; 3electives,ofwhichatleast2mustbeatthe300levelorabove; 1upperlevelGovernmentseminar(takenatFranklin&Marshall) Also requiredisthecompletionof1ofthefollowingCognates:

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Philosophy(100or122plus2coursesatthe200levelorabove); Mathematics(any3coursesnotcounting105or116); ForeignLanguage(3coursesinanewlanguageor3coursesbeginningwherethe studentisplaced); Economics (100, 103, plus a 200-level course that is approved in advance by the GovernmentChair);or onefullsemesterofstudyabroadatacollegeapprovedprogram. ProspectivemajorsareencouragedtobeginplanningfortheMajorbythefirstsemesterof theirsophomoreyear.Todeclareamajor,studentsmusthavetakenatleastoneGovernment courseandhavetakenorbeplanningtotakeoneCognatecoursebythefirstsemesterof junioryear.Government250shouldbecompletednolaterthanthefirstsemesterofthe junioryear. Forstudentsconsideringstudyabroad,pleasecontacttheGovernmentAcademicCoordinatorinthefirstsemesterofyoursophomoreyearforinformation.Youshouldalsocontact theOfficeofInternationalPrograms. ForstudentscompletingtheGovernmentmajor,MAT116,MAT216,BIO210,ECO210, BOS250,PSY230orSOC302maybesubstitutedforGOV250. Studentsmusttakeatleast6oftheirGovernmentcoursesatFranklinandMarshall,includinganupperlevelseminar.Designatedfirst-yearseminarsmaycountasGovernment courses. TobeconsideredforhonorsinGovernment,studentsmusthaveamajorGPAofatleast 3.30attheendoftheirseventhsemester,completeatwo-semesterIndependentStudy projectanddefenditinanoralexam.Theprojectmustincludeanoriginalargumentthat isplacedinthecontextofotherscholarship.Anawardofhonorswillbemadebythe committeeforprojectsthatdemonstrateoriginality,intellectualengagement,anddepth ofunderstandingofthetopic. Pleasenoteaswell,thatthenumberingsystemforGovernmentcoursescorrespondsto the following subfield divisions: x00-x19 (American Politics); x20-x29 (Comparative Government); x30-x39 (International Relations); x40-x49 (Political Theory); x50-x59 (PoliticalResearch). MajorsinGovernmenthavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:ParliamentaryInternshipProgram(InstituteforStudyAbroad,ButlerUniversity);Advanced StudiesinEngland,Bath;Oxford(InstituteforStudyAbroad,ButlerUniversity);F&M inParis;IES(programsinEurope,China,andLatinAmerica). A list of regularly offered courses follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. American Government. (S) Every Semester PoliticalpowerwithintheframeworkofAmericannationalgovernment.Currentgovernmentaland politicalproblemsareexplored. Staff

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GOvERNmENT

130. International Politics. (S) Every Semester Thetheoryandpracticeofinternationalpolitics;themajoractorsintheinternationalsystemand theirvariousobjectives;theinterplayofpowerandprincipleindiplomacy;thecausesofwarandthe prospectsforpeace.Theoreticalprinciplesareillustratedwithcasestudiesfromvarioushistorical periodswithemphasisonthemajorconflictssinceWorldWarI.(PreviouslyGOV103) Kibbe, Saito 200. Understanding Public Policy. (S) Every Spring Focusongovernmentactivityinavarietyofpublicpolicyareas,thestructuralandpoliticalcontexts ofdebatesoveralternativepolicystrategies,andapproachestounderstandingpublicpolicy.Policy areasexaminedincludethenationalbudgetandentitlements,scienceandtechnology,andeducation. (PreviouslyGOV215)Prerequisite:GOV100. Karlesky 222. Comparative Politics of Developed Countries. (S) Every Spring ThetheoryandmethodofcomparativepoliticswithemphasisonEurope.Thecourseanalyzesthe governmentandpoliticsofBritain,France,Russia,andatleastoneadditionalcountry.Emphasisis placedoncomparativeanalysisofthestructureandprocessofpoliticsintwotypesofindustrialized nations:establisheddemocraciessuchasBritainandFrance;andtransitionalpoliticalsystemssuch asRussia.(PreviouslyGOV104.) Gray 223. Comparative Politics of Developing Countries. (NW) (S) Every Spring The scope and nature of social and political change in the so-called "Third World." Examines democratictransitions,thenatureofstateandsocietyrelations,andeconomicreformsinthe"Third World";debatesonhumanrightsanddevelopmenttrade-offs,prospectsforrevolutionarychange, andwhatdemocracymeansfornon-Westernsocietiesareallcriticallyanalyzed.(PreviouslyGOV 240.) Dicklitch 241. Classical Political Theory. (H) Every Fall ExaminesimportanttextsinclassicalGreekandRomanpoliticalthought,includingthewritings ofPlato,Aristotle,andotherrelevantauthors.Topicsincludedemocracy,theethicaldimensionsof politics,thenatureofjustice,theobligationsofcitizenshipandleadership,andthemaintenanceof ahealthyrepublic. Hammer, Whiteside 242. Modern Political Theory. (H) Every Semester Examines thepoliticaltheoriesofHobbes,Locke,Rousseau,Marx,andonecontemporarythinker, withemphasisonalternativeviewsofthesocialcontract,liberalism,andradicalism.(Previously GOV221) Gordy, Whiteside 250. Political Research. (S) Every Semester Empiricalinvestigationinpoliticalscience;scientificinquiryinpoliticalscience;problemsoflogicalinduction;selectingandformulatingaresearchproblem;functionsandtypesofresearchdesign; analysisofdata,bothqualitativeandquantitative.Primarilyforgovernmentmajors;shouldbecompletednolaterthanfirstsemesterofjunioryear.Prerequisite:GOV100,or130,or222or223. Friedrich, Medvic, Schousen, Yost 302. Urban Government. (S) Every Fall Variouspatternsoflocalgovernmentandpolitics.Specialattentionisgiventometropolitanareas, intergovernmentalrelationships,andpresentdaypolicyproblems.(PreviouslyGOV211.)Prerequisite: GOV100. Shultz 305. Public Policy Implementation. (S) Fall 2008 Focusonnationalgovernmentbureaucracyintheimplementationofpublicpolicy,includingexplorationoftheroleofbureaucraciesincontemporarypoliticaldebate,organizationaltheoryinthe problemsofgoverning,andadministrativepoliticsandadministrativedueprocess.(PreviouslyGOV 313.)Prerequisite:GOV100.) Karlesky 308. The American Presidency. (S) Fall 2007 EvolutionofthePresidencytoanofficethatisthefocalpointofpoliticsandleadershipintheAmerican

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politicalsystem.Emphasisontheconstitutionalandpoliticalrolesplayedbythechiefexecutivein shapingpublicpolicy.(PreviouslyGOV210.)Prerequisite:GOV100. Schousen 309. The Congress. (S) Spring 2009 TheinformalandformalinstitutionsandprocessesoftheUnitedStatesCongress,withspecificattentiontoselectedpublicpolicyissues.(PreviouslyGOV312.)Prerequisite:GOV100. Schousen 310. Campaigns and Elections. (S) Fall 2008 ExploresthestructureofAmericancampaignsandelections,includingthenominationprocessand generalelections.Givesspecialattentiontotheelementsofthemoderncampaign,includingcampaign finance,research,polling,advertising,andmediause.Prerequisite:GOV100. Medvic 311. Citizen Politics. (S) Fall 2007, Fall 2008 Howandwhyordinarycitizensparticipate,individuallyandcollectively,inAmericanpoliticsand whatdifferenceitmakes.Topicsincludeelectionsandvoting,politicalpartiesandinterestgroups, unconventionalparticipation,theinstitutionalandlegalcontextforparticipation,andtheimpactof participationonpublicpolicy.Specialattentiontocontemporarypoliticalissuesandcontroversies, suchasthedeclineofciviccultureandracially-basedredistricting.(PreviouslyGOV225.)Prerequisite:GOV100. Friedrich 314. The American Constitution. (S) Every Fall ExaminestheSupremeCourtasapoliticalinstitutionandcustodianofthegovernmentalsystem. Prerequisite:GOV100. Stephenson 315. Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. (S) Every Spring ExplorescivilrightsandlibertiesintheAmericansystem,withemphasisoncurrentproblemsand recentCourtdecisions.Prerequisite:GOV100. Stephenson 317. Trial Courts and the Justice System. (S) Every Spring Examinescourtsatthetriallevel,includingorganizationofthejudiciary,theselectionofjudges,the relationshipbetweenthepublicandthecourts,andtheroleoftrialcourtsinadministeringjusticein differentcontexts.Prerequisite:GOV100. Stengel 318. Media and Politics. (S) Fall 2007 Examinestheinterrelationshipbetweenthemassmedia(includingprint,broadcast,andnewmedia), publicopinion,andAmericanpolitics,givingparticularattentiontowaysinwhichthemediaand publicopinionbothhelpinfluenceandareinfluencedbythepoliticalprocess.(PreviouslyGOV214.) Prerequisite:GOV100.Same as TDF 318. Medvic 326. African Politics. (NW) (S) Fall 2008 Anexplorationofthesocio-economicandpoliticalchallengesfacingSub-SaharanAfricasinceindependence.Thiscoursewillfocusspecificallyontheprospectsforsocio-economicdevelopmentand democracyinSub-SaharanAfrica,withaninvestigationintoforeignaid,corruption,andNEPAD. (PreviouslyGOV245.)Prerequisite:GOV223.Same as AFS 326. Dicklitch 328. Evil vs. Good: The Struggle for Human Rights. (S) Every Fall Are humans inherently evil--driven to commit human rights abuses for power, money, love, or revenge?Howcanweexplaintheatrocitieshumanscontinuetocommitagainsthumans?Thisclass willbedevotedtounderstandingwhatarehumanrights,whyhumanrightsabusesoccur,andwhat canbedonetocurbfuturehumanrightsabuses.(PreviouslyGOV375.)Prerequisites:Gov242,or Gov241orGov223. Dicklitch 330. Foreign Policy Analysis (S) Every Spring ExploreshowUSforeignpolicyismade.Examinestherolesplayedbytheforeignaffairsbureaucracy,Congress,publicopinion,themedia,andindividualpolicymakersinshapingforeignpolicy, andthenappliesthatinformationinanalyzingpastandpresentforeignpolicydecisions.(Previously GOV230.)Prerequisite:Gov130. Kibbe

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331. National Security Policy. (S) Every Fall AmericannationalsecuritypolicysinceWorldWarIIwithspecialattentiontopresidentialdecisions touseforce.Othertopicsincludehumanitariancrises,internationallawaffectingnationalsecurity, ethicalperspectivesontheuseofforce,causesofwar,andcurrentproblemsfacingtheUnitedStates. (PreviouslyGOV231.)Prerequisite:GOV130. Gray 332. International Organization (S) Spring 2009 ExaminestheUnitedNationsandotherinternationalorganizations.Attentionispaidtocollaboration amongnationsasanalternativetotheconventionalapproachfocusingoncompetitionandrivalry. Prerequisites:GOV103and104. Saito 343. American Political Tradition. (S) Every Spring Thetextsandideasthathaveshapedtheideologicalbasisofpoliticalinstitutionsandtheroleof governmentinAmericanlife.Examinesfoundingprinciplesandhowtheseprincipleshavebeen challengedbytheforcesofindustrialization,urbanization,andimmigration,andbytheemergence ofissuesofraceandgenderinpoliticaldiscourse.(PreviouslyGOV203.)Prerequisite:GOV100. Hammer, Medvic 372. Environmental Law. Spring 2008 OverviewofcurrentU.S.environmentallaws,beginningwiththeNationalEnvironmentalPolicyAct (1969).Originandoperationofmajorenvironmentallawsthatsafeguardpublichealthandprotect theenvironment,includingCleanAirandWaterActs,SafeDrinkingWaterAct,andlegislationdevelopedtoaddresshazardouswaste,includingToxicSubstanceControlAct,ResourceConservation andRecoveryAct,andCommunityRight-to-KnowAct(EPCRA).Thecoursefocusesontheoriginal legislationandwaysinwhichpoliticalandeconomicpressureshaveledtoamendmentschanging theintentoftheselaws.Same as ENV 372. Pepino 373. Public Health Research: Pregnancy Outcomes in American Women. (S) Spring 2008 Thisinterdisciplinaryseminarwillexplorewomen'shealthandpregnancyoutcomethroughthelenses ofbothscienceandsocialanalysis.Inadditiontoreadinganddiscussiononinfluencesonpregnancy outcomes,studentswillexamineresultsofsurveysofAmishwomeninLancasterCounty,AfricanAmericanandHispanicwomeninLancasterCity,andwomenofchild-bearingageincentralPA. ThiscourseissupportedbyfundsfromthePADeptofHealth.(Anycoursethatincludesmethods ofdataanalysisorpermission.) Same as PUB/STS/WGS 373. Miller 391. Directed Reading. (S) Explorationofachosentopicingovernment,withreadingdirectedbyGovernmentdepartmentstaff. Assignmentsaretypicallyshortanalyticalpapers.Permissionofchairperson. 425. Seminar: Human Rights/Human Wrongs. (NW) (CBL) (S) Every Spring Whatisa"well-foundedfearofpersecution"?WhodeservestoliveintheU.S.?Students,inteamsof twowillworkwithapoliticalasylumseeker,underthesupervisionofPIRC(PennsylvaniaImmigrationResourceCenter)anon-profitlegalorganization.Theteamswillcompileevidence,testimony, detaineeaffidavits,andalegalbriefthatwillbeusedinimmigrationcourt.(PreviouslyGOV430.) (Permissionoftheinstructorrequired.) Dicklitch 445. Seminar: Hannah Arendt: Terror, Identity, Politics (S) Fall 2007 SeminarexploringthelifeandworkofHannahArendt,whoremainsoneofthemostcontroversialand importantpoliticalthinkersofthe20thcentury.ExamineshowherpersonalexperienceasaJewish émigréextendedtoanexplorationofidentity,toacritiqueofcontemporarycultureandpolitics,and toarevivedsenseofpoliticsthatemphasizeshumandistinctivenessratherthananonymousgroup processes. Hammer 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheGovernmentstaff.Permissionofchairperson.

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270, 370, 470. Topics in American Politics. ExplorationofspecificaspectsofAmericanpolitics.Topicswillvaryfromyeartoyear.Prerequisite: GOV100;GOV250mayberequiredforcertaintopics. 271, 371, 471. Topics in Public Law. Explorationofspecificaspectsofpubliclaw.Topicswillvaryfromyeartoyear.Prerequisites:GOV 100andpermissionoftheinstructor. 272, 372, 472. Topics in Comparative Politics. Anexplorationofspecificaspectsofcomparativepolitics.Topicswillvaryfromyeartoyear.Prerequisites:GOV222or223. 273, 373, 473. Topics in International Relations. An exploration of specific aspects of international relations.Topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisite:GOV130. 274, 374, 474. Topics in Political Theory. Closereadingofleadingtextsinpoliticalphilosophy;readingsvaryfromyeartoyear.Prerequisite: GOV241or242. Hammer, Whiteside 275, 375, 475. Research Topics in Government. Aseminardesignedtogivestudentsexperienceinresearchingspecificproblemscurrentlyunder discussioninthepoliticalscienceliterature.Topicswillvaryfromyeartoyear.Prerequisite:GOV 250orconsentoftheinstructor.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

InternationalRelationsofEastAsia. LatinAmericanRevolutionarySociety. PoliticsofEastAsia. Seminar:Clinton/Bush/AmericanForeignPolicy. Seminar:HealthPolicy. Seminar:AmericanForeignPolicy:ThenandNow. FrenchGovernmentandPolitics.(offeredinParis)

HISTORY

Professor Maria D. Mitchell, Chair Louise Stevenson Douglas A. Anthony Benjamin McRee Maria D. Mitchell Ted Pearson Abby M. Schrader Eric S. Zolov Van Gosse Matthew Hoffman (on leave Fall 2007) Richard Reitan Federica Francesconi Kathleen Brown Guillaume de Syon Irwin F. Gellman Professor of History Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of History Assistant Professor of History Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and History Assistant Professor of History Adjunct Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and History Research Associate of History Research Associate of History Visiting Scholar of History

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HISTORY

Nancy Khalek FlorenceMae Waldron Philip Zimmerman Research Associate of History Research Associate of History Research Associate of History

AmajorinHistoryprovidesstudentswithabroadunderstandingoflong-termhistorical trendsinintroductory-levelcourses;adeepknowledgeofregions,countries,andissues atthe300level;anappreciationforhistoriographyandunderstandingoftheapproaches thathistorianstaketothestudyofhistoryinthemethodologycourse;andguidancein applyingallthreecomponentsofthemajor,aswellashonetheirresearch,presentation, andwritingskillsatthe400level.TheHistoryDepartmentiscommittedtoensuringthat itsstudentsemergefromF&Mwithawell-roundedHistoryeducationthatincorporates strongemphasisonregionaldistribution.Itisalsocommittedtothegoalsofinternationalizingthecurriculumandtothisendencouragesitsmajorsandminorstostudyforeign languagesandpursueacademicworkoffcampus,andparticularlyabroad. A major in historyconsistsoftencourses: ThesecoursesmustincludeHistory360(HistoryWorkshop:MethodsandPractice),which shouldbetakennoearlierthanspringofthesophomoreyearandnolaterthanfallofthe senioryear;twoseminarsoroneseminarandoneIndependentStudyCourse(History490) takenduringthejuniorandsenioryears;andatleastthreeadditionalcoursesatthe300-or 400-level,onlyoneofwhichmaybeaDirectedReadingsCourse(History390).Astudent maycountonecoursetakenoutsideofthedepartmenttowardsthemajorinhistorywith priorapprovalbyhis/heradviser.Thiscoursemustbeatthe300-or400-level.History majorsmustfulfilladistributionalrequirementbytakingtwocoursesineachofthefollowingareas--UnitedStates(designatedU),European(designatedE),andWorld(Latin American,African,andAsian)(designatedW)history--twoofwhichmustbedesignated pre-modern(designatedPM).Inmostcases,majorsmusttakeatleast5historycourses atFranklin&Marshall. A minor in history consistsofatleast6courses.ThesecoursesmustincludeHistory360 (HistoryWorkshop:MethodsandPractice),whichshouldbetakennoearlierthanspring ofthesophomoreyearandnolaterthanfallofthesenioryear;oneseminar;andtwoadditionalcoursesatthe300-level.Historyminorsmustfulfilladistributionalrequirement bytakingonecourseintwoofthefollowingareas--UnitedStates(U),European(E),and World(LatinAmerican,African,andAsian)history(W)--oneofwhichmustbedesignated pre-modern(PM).Inmostcases,minorsmusttakeatleast4historycoursesatFranklin &Marshall. StudentsshouldconsultwiththeiracademicadviserortheHistoryDepartmentChairfor questionsconcerningrequirementsforthemajor/minor. ThewritingrequirementintheHistoryMajorismetbycompletionofthenormalcourses requiredforthemajor. Historymajorsareadvisedthatcommandofatleastoneforeignlanguageisimportantfor thosewhoplantodograduateworkinhistory. MajorsintheDepartmentofHistoryarestronglyencouragedtostudyoff-campusand abroad because personal familiarity with foreign cultures is increasingly useful in an ever more interconnected world. Students interested in off-campus study should meet withtheiracademicadviserortheHistoryDepartmentchairpersonasearlyaspossible. Typically,studentswillreceiveHistorycreditatthe200-or300-levelforcoursesthat

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HISTORY

theytakeabroad;thesecourseswilloftenfulfillotherdistributionalrequirementsinthe Pre-modern,European,orWorldareasandcredittransferforthesecoursesisveryeasilyaccomplished.Thosestudentsconsideringstudyabroadduringtheirjunioryearare stronglyurgedtotaketheHistoryWorkshop(HIS360)bythesecondsemesteroftheir sophomoreyearattheCollege. MajorsintheHistoryDepartmenthavestudiedabroadandoff-campusinthefollowing programsinrecentyears:AdvancedStudiesinEngland,Bath,England;HoodCollege program,Strasbourg,France;SarahLawrenceCollegeprogram,OxfordUniversity,England;SchoolforInternationalTraining,CapeTown,SouthAfrica,Zanzibar,Tanzania; American University, Washington Semester program; Syracuse University programs inFlorence,ItalyandMadrid,Spain;andIESprogramsinSalamanca,Spain;London, England;andVienna,Austria. TobeeligibleforconsiderationforhonorsinHistory,studentsmusthaveagradepoint averageofnolessthan3.3inthemajorandmustcompleteasignificantresearchproject thatisdeemedoutstandingbythereviewboardconstitutedbythestudentandhisorher adviser.StudentsinterestedinstandingforhonorsinHistoryareencouragedtoconsult withtheDepartmentChairpersonasearlyaspossible. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

SURvEY COURSES

Coursesinthisgroupareopentoallstudents.Eitherhalfofatwo-semestersequencemay betakenaloneforcredit.

113. The History of Ancient Greece. (S) Every Spring AncientGreecefromtheBronzeAgetothedeathofAlexandertheGreatintheMediterraneanand NearEasterncontext.Studentsarealsointroducedtotheproblemsandmethodsofhistoricalinquiry. Same as CLS 113. Clark 114. The History of Ancient Rome. (S) Every Fall ThetransformationfromtheRepublictoPrincipate,andthecollapseoftheempireareexplored. Studentsarealsointroducedtotheproblemsandmethodsofhistoricalinquiry. Same as CLS 114. Clark 153. Race and Ethnicity in American History. (S) (W) Fall 2007 First-yearseminaremphasizingtopicsinAfricanAmericanhistoryandchangesoverthepast400 yearsandexaminingforcomparativepurposes,theexperiencesofJewishimmigrantstotheU.S. ofthelatenineteenth,earlytwentiethcenturies.Readingsinprimaryandsecondarysources,and historical,sociological,andpsychologicalperspectivestobearontheissuesofraceandethnicityin America. Stameshkin 171. War and Gender in Modern Europe. (S)(W) Fall 2007 ExplorationoftheexperiencesofEuropeanmenandwomenintheFirstandSecondWorldWars. Throughliterature,film,propaganda,andotherprimarysources,thecourseexaminestheshiftsin masculineandfeminineidentitiesoccasionedbytotalwar. Mitchell 215. The Middle Ages. (S) (E) (PM) Fall 2007 ThehistoryofwesternEuropefromthedeclineoftheRomanEmpiretothebeginningofthe16th

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century.Emphasizestraditionalthemessuchasmonasticism,thedevelopmentoffeudalrelations,and theconflictbetweenchurchandstateaswellasothertopics,includingpopularreligion,theimpact ofdisease,andthelifeofthepeasantry. McRee 217, 218. Early Modern Europe. (S) (E) (PM) Spring 2008 (HIS 217 only) FirstsemestertracesthedevelopmentofRenaissanceideasandpoliticalinstitutions,followedbya considerationofthereligiousandsocialchangesinwesternEuropedownto1648.Topicsexplored includeRenaissancehumanism,thegrowthofmonarchicalpower,andtheProtestantReformation. SecondsemesterfocusesontheperiodofFrenchpredominanceandthecausesandresultsofthe FrenchRevolution,andendswithaconsiderationoftheEraofNapoleon. McRee, Schrader Fall 2008 (HIS 221), Spring 2008 (HIS 222) First semester covers the development of centralized states, the Enlightenment, the--French and Industrialrevolutions--onEuropeansociety,nationalism,Liberalism,socialism,theemergenceof genderedspheres,modernracism,andthedynamicsofimperialconquest.Secondsemestercovers thedeclineoftheliberalsynthesisfemaleemancipation,communism,fascism,thetwoworldwars, theHolocaust,decolonization,theColdWar,1968,andEuropesince1989. Mitchell, Schrader, Staff 225, 226. History of Russia. (S) Fall 2007 (HIS 225) (E) (PM), Spring 2008 (HIS 226) (E) FirstsemesterexaminesRussianhistoryfromMuscoviteperiodthroughearly20thcentury,emphasizinginteractionofstateandsociety,andhowsocial,political,economic,andculturalevents influencedtsaristpolicies,imperialexpansion,andeffortstoreformandrevolutionizeRussianlife. SecondsemestercoversmajorhistoricaldevelopmentsinRussiaandtheSovietUnionfromrevolutionaryeraof1905tothepresent.Tracesevolutionofnewpolitical,social,andculturalidentities, andre-formulationanddismantlingofoldonesduringtheSovieteraandbeyond. HIS 231 Fall 2008 (W) (PM), HIS 232 Spring 2008 (W) SurveyofLatinAmericafrompre-Conquesttimestothepresent.FirstsemesterbeginswithhistoricalbackgroundsofindigenoussocietiesaswellasSpainandPortugalbefore1492,followedby examinationoftheconquestandcolonialperiodthroughindependence.Secondsemesterfocuses oncomparativehistoryandpoliticaleconomy,U.S.-LatinAmericanrelations,andculturalforces. AfocusoncasestudiesiscomplementedbyanexaminationofbroadpatternsofchangeinLatin Americaasawhole. Zolov 237. The United States from Colonies to Nation. (S) (U) Offered in 2007­2008 TracesdevelopmentofNorthAmericafromtheEuropeanencounterwiththecontinentin1490sto endofAmericanCivilWar.Examinessettlement,freeandunfreelaborsystems,andtheregion's indigenouspeoples;explorescauses,events,andconsequencesoftheAmericanRevolutionandthe riseandwestwardexpansionofthenewrepublic,andconcludesbytracinggrowingtensionsbetween northandsouth,reform,theoutbreakoftheCivilWaranditsimmediateconsequences. Pearson, Gosse 238. Modern America, from Reconstruction to Reagan. (S) (U) Offered in 2007­2008 ThiscoursetracestheriseoftheUnitedStatessincetheCivilWar,asanurban,industrialsociety markedbydeepracialandethniccleavages.Besidesstudyingmovementsandlegalstrugglesfor equality,itexaminesAmerica'sroleasaworldpower,frominterventioninLatinAmericathrough twoworldwars,theColdWar,andVietnam.Studentscanexpecttouseprimarydocumentsand engageindebates.Prerequisites:HIS237or331,orinstructor'spermission. Gosse, Stevenson 241. History of North and West Africa (NW) (S) (WH) Fall 2008 IntroductiontomajorthemesinthehistoryofNorthandWestAfricafromancientEgyptthrough thepresentcrisisinSudan.EmphasizesWestAfricanpoliticalandsocialformations,domesticand trans-Atlanticslavesystems,notionsofidentity,theroleofIslam,andtheriseandfallofcolonial231, 232. History of Latin America. (NW) (S) 221, 222. Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries. (S) (E)

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ism.Studentsuseprimarysourcestoexplorehistoricalproblems.Finalunitexploresrecentevents inSudan. Same as AFS 241. Anthony 242. History of East and Southern Africa (NW) (S) (WH) Fall 2007 IntroductiontomajorthemesinthehistoryofEast,Central,andSouthernAfricafromtheBantu migrationthroughtheRwandangenocide.Emphasizessocial,political,andreligiouschangeinprecolonialAfrica,andresistancetoslaveryandcolonialism.Studentsuseprimarysourcestoexplore historicalproblems.Finalunitexploresthelegacyofcolonialisminthe1994Rwandangenocide. Same as AFS 242. Anthony 251. East Asian Cultures 1. (NW) (S) (W) (PM) Fall 2007 HistoricalintroductiontovariousculturesofEastAsia,fromancientarcheologicalrecordstoearly seventeenthcenturywithgeographicalfocusontheregionencompassingpresent-dayChina,Korea and Japan. Provides students with basic literacy in key developments in EastAsian history and encouragesstudentstocriticallyassessthishistorythroughthethemesofcultureandprogress.No priorbackgroundonEastAsiaisrequired. Reitan 252. East Asian Cultures 2. (NW) (S) (W) Spring 2008 ProvidesanintroductiontotheculturesofEastAsia(China,Japan,andtoalesserextentKorea)from theseventeenthcenturytothepresentthroughthemesofidentity,change,andconflict.Throughout, wewillfocusourattentionnotonlyondiplomaticeventsandonthethoughtandactionsofeliteor dominantgroups,butalsoonthosemarginalizedonthebasisofrace,class,religion,genderandso forth. Reitan 253. Jewish History 1: Jews of East and West Through the Middle Ages. (NW) (S) (E) (PM) Fall 2007 IntroductiontoJewishhistory,beginningwithfirstcenturiesoftheCommonEraandcontinuingto endof17thcentury.ExaminescentralthemesandpatternsinJewishhistory.Readingsconsistof narrativeaswellasdocumentaryhistorieswithdiscussionofdifferenttheoreticalapproachestothe writingofJewishhistory. Same as JST/RST 253. Hoffman, Staff 254. Jewish History II: Jews in the Modern World. (S) (E) (NW) Spring 2008 IntroductiontoJewishlifeinthemodernerafromlate18thcenturyEmancipationandEnlightenmentthroughthepresent,tracingthetransformationsofJewishlife.Broadhistoricalsketchesare combinedwithclosereadingsofparticulartexts,movements,andthinkerstofleshoutthecontours anddynamicsoftheJewishexperienceintheModernworld.MajoreventsofJewishhistoryof20th century(theHolocaust,foundationoftheStateofIsrael,andmassmigrationofEuropeanJewsto theAmericas)areexaminedthroughsecondaryandprimarysources.Same as JST/RST 254. Hoffman 265. Globalization: History of the International Economy. (S) Spring 2008 Globalizationinhistoricalperspective,withprimaryfocusonthelate19thandearly20thcenturies. Topicscoveredincludeinternationalmigration,capitalflows,exchangerates,internationaltrade, financialcrises,andthepoliticalandeconomicdeterminantsofinternationaleconomicpolicy.Prerequisite:ECO100.Same as ECO 265. A'Hearn 316. Tudor-Stuart England. (S) (E) (PM) Spring 2008 English history from the coming of the Tudors in 1485 to the "Glorious Revolution" 1688­89. Particularattentionwillbedevotedtothereligiousreformationsofthe16thcentury,thecivilwar andpoliticalupheavalsofthe17thcentury,andtheeffectsthatbothdevelopmentshadonthelives ofEnglishmenandwomen. McRee 320. Women in American Society and Politics since 1890. (S) Spring 2008 AninterdisciplinarystudyofthevariouswayswomenhaveparticipatedinAmericansocietyand politics.Topicsincludethesuffragemovement,modernmodesofpoliticalparticipation,andthe NewDealandWorldWarII.Criticalanalysisofthemeaningoffeminismandspecialattentionto thepost­1945period. Same as AMS/WGS 320. Stevenson

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331. African American History 1. (S) (U) Spring 2008 IntroductiontohistoricalexperiencesofAfricanAmericansfromtheearly1500suntiltheAmerican CivilWar.EmphasisontheculturalandsocialworldsfromwhichAfricanAmericanscameinthe 17thand18thcenturiesandhowtheysoughttorecreatethoseworldsontheplantationsandinthe townsoftheAmericanSouth.Alsoexaminestheestablishmentoffreeinstitutionsandthestruggle forfreedom.Same as AFS 331. Pearson 332. African American History 2. (S) (U) Offered in 2007­2008 ExaminesthewiderangeofAfricanAmericanpoliticalthoughtandsocialmovementsthathave transformedcontemporaryAmericansociety.FocusesontheideasandstrategiesembracedbyAfrican AmericansastheysoughtequalityandjusticefromReconstructiontothepresentday.Same as AFS 332. Gosse 339. Civil War and Reconstruction. (S) (U) Offered in 2007­2008 Interdisciplinarycourseasksstudentstoinvestigatethecauses,events,resultsoftheAmericanCivil War,anditsenduringimpactonAmericanlife.Theclassusuallytakesoneall-daytriptobattlefields. Noprerequisite,althoughsomebackgroundin19th-centuryhistoryishelpful. Stevenson 345. America since 1945. (S) (U) Spring 2008 Considerationofquestions:howdidthelongColdWarshapeAmericanculture?Howdowedefine "theSixties"?Whataretheeffectsofthecontinuingrevolutioninconsumption?Whyhaveraceand ethnicitycontinuedtodominatepoliticaldiscourse?Wastherea"sexualrevolution"?Havethepast thirtyyearsconstituteda"post-Vietnam"America?Hastherebeenaconservativerealignment?What happenedtothemiddleclass,andwhoisworkingclassnow?Coursepresumesfamiliaritywiththe basichistoryofAmericaduringtheColdWar,1945­1989.Prerequisites:HIS238,332,orinstructor's permission. Gosse 349. Modern South Africa (NW) (S) (WH) Spring 2008 Withanemphasisonthe20thcentury,thiscourseexplorestheemergenceofSouthAfrica'smulti-racial society.MajorthemesincludeAfricanstatesystems,Europeanimmigrationandconquest,Africans' individualandcollectiveresponsestowhitedomination,andchanginggenderroles.Studentsuse historicaldocuments,film,andfictioninadditiontosecondaryreadings.Discussionisanimportant componentofcoursegrade.Same as AFS 349. Anthony 350. The African Intellectual and the Legacy of Colonialism Spring 2008 TheseminarexaminestheresponsesofleadingAfricanthinkerstocolonialismanditsaftermath,with emphasisonNorth,West,andEastAfrica.Studentsread/viewanddiscussworksbyFanon,Djebar, Nkrumah,Sembene,Ngugi,Appiahandotherkeythinkers,andcompleteanindividualresearch project.Prerequisites:HIS241or242orpermissionoftheinstructor. Same as AFS 350 (Africana Studies Seminar). Anthony 355. Modern Germany. Fall 2008 Focuses on continuities and ruptures in German society during the Second Empire, theWeimar Republic,NationalSocialism,thecompetingRepublics,andthe(unified)FederalRepublicofGermany.MajorquestionsGermanindustrialandstateformation;gender,class,andreligiousidentities; theimpactoftotalwar;economicandpoliticalcrisis;therootsofdictatorshipanddemocracy;the organizationofgenocide;andEuropeanunity. Mitchell 360. History Workshop: Methods and Practice. Every Semester Trainsstudentsinthemethodologyandpracticeofhistory,inpreparationforseminarresearchand readingandthescholarlypracticeofhistory.ThetwoprincipalobjectivesoftheHistoryWorkshop are"historiographicalliteracy"(areasonablycomprehensivegraspofhistoricalapproaches,methodologies,andschoolsofanalysis)andlearningthe"mechanicsofdoinghistory"(howtoresearch andwritehistory,includingethicalandpracticalissuesofarchivalworklibraryandwebuse,the mechanicsofcitation,andmore).Classescenteroncriticalanalysisofreadings,textualinterpretation ofprimarydocuments,andlibraryactivities.Opentoallstudents,butpriorityisgrantedtomajors

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andminors.Shouldbetakennoearlierthanspringofthesophomoreyearandnolaterthanfallof thesenioryear. Zolov, Schrader, Staff 370­379. Topics in History. Offered in 2007­2008 Surveyleveltopicsinhistory.Topicsvaryfromyeartoyear.Someofthesecourseshaveprerequisites (seerelevantdepartmentallistings).Amongothercourses,theHistoryDepartmentintendstooffer thefollowingin2007­2008:"GildedAgeinAmericanHistory"(Fall2007),"ImperialAggressionin ModernChina(Fall2007),"JewishPerspectivesonJesusthroughtheAges(Spring2008),"Cinema andtheAmericanJewishExperience"(Spring2008),LatinAmericainthe1960s(Spring2008), Ireland,theUS,andtheWorld(Spring2008). 391. Directed Readings. Tutorial.Topics adapted to the knowledge and interests of the individual student.Admission by consentoftheinstructor.

HISTORY SEmINARS

History 360 is a prerequisite or co-requisite for seminar enrollment. Some seminars have other prerequisites(seerelevantdepartmentlistings).Historyseminarsareopentoallstudents,although majors,minors,seniors,andjuniorshaveprioritywhenenrolling. 400. Selected Studies in Medieval History. (S) (E) (PM) Fall 2007 Readingsandresearchonselectedtopicsinmedievalsocialandpoliticalhistory.Recentseminars include"Plague,Famine,War,andtheEndoftheMiddleAges"and"MedievalUrbanLife,""Heretics,Saints,andSinners." McRee 403. Selected Studies in Modern European History. (S) (E) Offered in 2007­2008 Readingsandresearchinselectedaspectsofthepolitical,social,andculturalhistoryofModern Europe.Recentseminarsinclude"GenderinModernEurope,""SocialDisciplineandSocialDeviance:TheConstructionofModernEuropeanSubjectivity,""TheFrenchRevolution,""ThePolitics ofMemory,""HumanRightsandCivilRights,"and"UrbanHistory."Someofthesecourseshave prerequisites;seerelevantdepartmentalofferings. Schrader, Mitchell 407. Aspects of Latin American History. (NW) (S) (WH) Spring 2008 Readingsandresearchinproblemsinthepolitical,economic,social,andculturalhistoryofLatin America.Recentseminarsinclude"Nation,State,andViolenceinLatinAmerica,""LatinAmerica inthe1960s,"and"U.S.-LatinAmericanRelations."Someofthesecourseshaveprerequisites;see relevantdepartmentalofferings. Zolov 409, 410, 411. Selected Studies in the Social and Political History of North America. (U) Fall 2007­Spring 2008 ReadingsandresearchinthesocialandpoliticalhistoryofNorthAmerica.Recentseminarsinclude "TheAmerican South," "ColonialAmerica," "TheAmerican Revolution," "TheAtlanticWorld," "Colonies,Conquests,andEmpiresintheNewWorld,""TheRadicalTraditioninPennsylvania," "BlackPoliticsandBlackPower,"and"LocalHistory." Someofthesecourseshaveprerequisites (seerelevantdepartmentalofferings). Gosse, Pearson, Stevenson, Staff 408, 420. Selected Topics in the Cultural and Intellectual History of the United States. (H)(U) Offered in 2008­2009 Recenttopicsinclude:"Lincoln"and"NationalDiscourse." Stevenson 421. Selected Studies in Greek History. (S) Fall 2009 Acloseexaminationofaparticularperiod,place,orindividualinancientGreekhistory.Seminar topicsinclude"AlexandertheGreat"and"ArchaicGreece."Prerequisite:CLS/HIS113.Same as CLS 421. Castor 422. Selected Studies in Roman History. (S) Fall 2007 Acloseexaminationofaparticularperiod,place,orindividualinancientRomanhistory.Seminar

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topicsinclude"ImperialWomen:PowerBehindtheThrone,""TheRiseofRome,"and"TheRoman Empire."Prerequisite:CLS/HIS114.Same as CLS 422. Clark 430. Selected Studies in African History. (NW) (S) (WH) Spring 2008 Readingsandresearchinselectedtopicsofthepolitical,social,andculturalhistoryofAfrica.See relevantdepartmentalofferingsforprerequisites.Recenttopicsinclude"AfricansandApartheid" and"SlaveryinAfrica."Same as AFS 430. Anthony 450. Selected Studies in East Asian History. (NW) (S) (WH) Fall 2007 Readingsandresearchinselectedtopicsofthesocial,political,andculturalhistoryofEastAsia. Recentseminarsinclude"WomenandGenderinChineseHistory,""MemoriesofEmpire."Same as WGS 450. Reitan 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbymembersoftheHistorystaff.Permissionofchairpersonrequired.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Professor Cecile C. Zorach, Director Advisory Committee Michael Billig Lisa Gasbarrone Kathy Triman Cecile C. Zorach Patrick Bernard (on leave 2007­2008) Eric Zolov Jennifer D. Kibbe (on leave Fall 2007) Professor of Anthropology Professor of French Professor of Biology Professor of German Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of History Assistant Professor of Government Japanese Language Ken-Ichi Miura Yukie Mammoto Yuriko Ujike Mariko Nakade-Marceau Director of the Japanese Language Program Adjunct Instructor and Japanese Language Fellow Drill Instructor of Japanese Visiting Scholar of Japanese

ThemissionoftheInternationalStudiesProgramistouniteacohortofstudentswho,both individuallyandincollaborationwithoneanother,willbroadentheexperienceoftheir variousmajorprogramsinordertoseetheirsubjectfromaninternationalperspectiveand toimmersethemselvesinthelanguageandcultureofanon-English-speakingcountry. ThroughthisprogramFranklin&MarshallCollegehopestobuildamoreinternationallyfocusedcurriculumtopreparestudentsforfuturestudy,careers,andlifeintheincreasingly unborderedcommunityofthe21stcentury.TheInternationalStudiesProgramofferstwo minors:oneinInternationalStudiesandoneinAreaStudies. A minor in International Studiesrequiresthatastudent:(1)takeIST200,typicallyin thefreshmanorsophomoreyear;(2)proposeacoherentprogramof fourspecificcourses (ofwhichnomorethantwocanoverlapwithcoursesinthemajor)focusingonaparticular

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geographicalortopicaltheme; (3)studyforatleastonesemesteroutsidetheUnitedStates inanon-Englishspeakingenvironment,including(wherefeasible)doingcourseworkor researchinthelocallanguage;(4)achieveanapprovedlevelofproficiencyinaforeign language; and (5) complete IST 489. In addition, while not required, an international internshipishighlyrecommended. A minor in Area Studiesrequiresastudenttotakesixcoursesonagivengeographical area,ofwhichatleast2mustbeatthe300levelorabove,selectedinconsultationwitha facultymemberspecializinginthatarea.TheDirectoroftheInternationalStudiesProgram willreferinterestedstudentstoanappropriateadviser,inconsultationwithwhomthestudentwilldevelopalistofappropriatecourses.Theminordeclarationformmustinclude signatures of chairpersons of departments offering the courses included in a student's programandthesignatureoftheDirectoroftheInternationalStudiesprogram.Topicsfor whichthereisnoexistingminorhousedinaregulardepartmentorprogramareappropriateforthisminor,whichwouldtakeitsnamefromthegeographicalareaofitsemphasis, forexample,African,Chinese,EuropeanUnion,Francophone,Italian,Iberian,Japanese, MiddleEastern,orLatinAmericanStudies.Anareastudiesminorcouldincludecourses inalanguageotherthanEnglish,althoughordinarilynomorethanfourwillbeforeign languagecourses.IST200and489couldbeapartofthisminor,butarenotrequired.Study Abroadandlanguageproficiencyarestronglyrecommendedbutnotrequired.ForGerman StudiesandRussian/SlavicStudies,seethelistingsundertheDepartmentofGermanand Russian.ForcourselistingsinJapaneselanguage,seebelow.ForHebrewlanguagesee JudaicStudies.ForAfricanaStudies,seethelistingsinthatprogram. Inadditiontotheminor,theInternationalStudiesProgramoffersaconcentration.RequirementsfortheconcentrationarethesameasfortheInternationalStudiesminorexceptthat theconcentrationrequiresonlytwocoursesinadditiontoIST200andIST489.Thesetwo coursescanbeeitherinsideoroutsidethestudent'smajorandareexpectedtocoherewith andbringasignificantinternationaldimensiontothestudent'schosenmajor. RecentstudentscompletingtheInternationalStudiesconcentrationhavestudiedabroadin Italy,Spain,Germany,China,Switzerland,Argentina,DominicanRepublic,andFrance. Specificprogramsinclude:SchoolforInternationalTraining,Granada,Spain;Syracuse UniversityPrograminRome,AmericanUniversityCenterofProvenceinMarseille, Council onInternationalExchangeprograminShanghai. A list of regularly offered course follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

200. Introduction to International Studies (S). Every Spring Interdisciplinarycourserequiredforstudentswith anInternationalStudiesminororconcentration. ThroughcoordinatedlecturesbyF&Mfacultyandguestspeakers,studentswillconsiderissuesof development,securityandterrorism,humanrights,foodandresourcemanagement,andpublichealth inthelightofvariousinternationalinstitutions.Gradingwillbebasedonregularquizzesandshort memosonreadings,afinalexam,andaresearchpaper.(NW) Bastian, Billig, Callari, Kibbe, Fluck, Gasbarrone, Zolov, Strick, Zorach 250. Model U.N. Thisisahalf-creditcourseinwhichstudentsreviewthehistory,practices,andproceduresofU.N.

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organizationandpreparetoparticipateinanationalmodelU.N.conference,suchasthoseatUniversityofPennsylvaniaandUniversityofChicago.Studentsmaytakethiscoursetwiceforcredit. Staff 489. International Studies Seminar. (S) Every Fall ThiscapstoneseminarforInternationalStudiesseniorsisalsoopentootherseniorswithpermission oftheinstructor.Thecoursewillbeorganizedaroundacoresetofreadingsononebroadinternational topic,inFall2007,GlobalCities.Studentswilldefineanindividualizedresearchprogram,buildingon theirpreviouscourseworkinInternationalStudies,sharereadingsandfindingswithfellowseminar students,andproduceafinalpaperandoralpresentation.Prerequisite:IST200.(NW)Gasbarrone

ARABIC LANGUAGE

Franklin&MarshalloffersfourcoursesinArabiclanguageinstruction.Thetimingof thecourseofferingspermitsstudentstomovethroughthesequenceinfourconsecutive semesters.

171. Beginning Arabic I. Fall 2008 (offered in alternate years) IntroductiontotheArabiclanguageinaculturalcontext,withemphasisonlistening,speaking,reading andwritingskills,includingthewritingsystem.ForstudentswithnopriorknowledgeofArabic. Staff 172. Beginning Arabic II. Spring 2009 (offered in alternate years) Continueddevelopmentoflistening,speaking,readingandwritingskillsinArabicwithinacultural context. Staff 271 Intermediate Arabic I Fall 2009 (offered in alternate years) ThesecondyearArabiccoursecontinuesandbuildsontheskillsandmaterialspresentedinBeginningArabicII.Ittakesa4-skillsapproachwithemphasisonlistening,speaking,readingandwriting.AstudentteachingassistantprovidedthroughtheFulbrightExchangeProgramwillworkwith theinstructortoexpandstudents'exposuretoboththelanguageandthecultureofArabic-speaking countries.Prerequisite:IST172orplacementbyinstructor. Staff 272 Intermediate Arabic II Fall 2010 (offered in alternate years) ThecoursecontinuesIntermediateArabicI.Prerequisite:IST271. Staff

JAPANESE LANGUAGE

FranklinandMarshalloffersfouryearsofJapaneselanguageinstruction,withmoreadvanced studyavailableonatutorialbasis.ManystudentsofJapanesealsoparticipateinoursummer andsemesterstudyabroadprogramsatTohokuGakuinUniversity,Sendai,Japan. AnAreaStudiesminorinJapanesemaybearrangedwithProfessorCecileZorach,DirectorofInternationalStudies.

101. Elementary Japanese I. (NW) Every Fall Introduction to contemporary Japanese language through cultural context. Developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including mastery of the Hiragana and Katakana Japanese writingsystemsandintroductiontoKanjicharacters.Forstudentswithnoprevioustraininginthe language. Miura 102. Elementary Japanese II. (NW) Every Spring Continuedpracticeinlistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsofcontemporaryJapanesein culturalcontext.FurtherdevelopmentofreadingandwritingKanjicharacters.Prerequisite:JPN101 orpermissionofinstructor. Miura

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201. Intermediate Japanese I. (NW) (LS) Every Fall DevelopmentofcontemporaryJapaneselistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsattheintermediate­lowlevelthroughculturalcontext,includingcontinuedpracticeinreadingandwriting Kanjicharacters.Prerequisite:JPN102orpermissionofinstructor. Mammoto 202. Intermediate Japanese II. (NW) (H) (LS) Every Spring ContinueddevelopmentofcontemporaryJapaneselistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsat theintermediatelevelinculturalcontext,includinghandlingavarietyofinformalandformalsituations.FurtherpracticeinreadingandwritingKanjicharacters.Prerequisite:JPN201orpermission ofinstructor. Mammoto 301. Upper Intermediate Japanese I. (NW) (H) Fall 2007 Developmentoflistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsattheupperintermediatelevelof contemporary Japanese in cultural context, including handling a variety of informal and formal situations,andcontinuedpracticeinreadingandwritingKanjicharacters.Prerequisite:JPN202or permissionofinstructor. Miura 302. Upper Intermediate Japanese II. (NW) (H) Spring 2008 Continueddevelopmentoflistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsattheupperintermediate levelofcontemporaryJapaneseinculturalcontext,includinghandlingavarietyofinformaland formalsituations,aswellasfurtherpracticeinreadingandwritingKanjicharacters.Prerequisite: JPN301orpermissionofinstructor. Miura 401. Upper Intermediate Japanese III. (NW) (H) Fall 2007 Developmentoflistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsattheupper-intermediatetoadvanced levelofproficiencyincontemporaryJapaneseinculturalcontext,includinghandlingavarietyof informalandformalsituations,andcontinuedpracticeinreadingandwritingKanjicharacters.Introductionofsomeauthenticaudio-visualandreadingmaterials.Prerequisite:JPN302orpermission oftheinstructor. Miura 402. Upper Intermediate Japanese IV. (NW) (H) Spring 2008 Developmentoflistening,speaking,reading,andwritingskillsattheupper-intermediatetoadvanced levelofproficiencyincontemporaryJapaneseinculturalcontext,includinghandlingavarietyof informalandformalsituations,aswellasfurtherpracticeinreadingandwritingKanjicharacters. Furtherpracticeinhandlingsomeauthenticaudio-visualandreadingmaterials.Prerequisite:JPN 401orpermissionoftheinstructor. Miura

Tutorials at more advanced levels may be arranged with the Director of the Japanese languageprogram.

TRAvEL COURSES FRANCE TRAvEL COURSE

273. Cross-perceptions: Europe-U.S.A. (Fall 2007, offered only at "F&M in Paris") ThisseminarexamineshowEuropeansandAmericanvieweachother--andhowthosediffering perceptionsrevealcontrastingvaluesregardingsuchmattersastheplaceofcompetitionandsecurity inlife,thedevelopmentofaestheticjudgment,andthenatureofindividualism. Whiteside

JAPAN TRAvEL COURSE

210. TRAVEL: Japanese Studies at Tohoku Gakuin University. (Summer Travel Course) (NW) Every Summer Franklin&MarshallCollegeoffersaMay­JuneProgramwhichincludespre-departuresessionson theFranklin&Marshallcampus;threeweeksofclassesatTohokuGakuinUniversity,duringwhich studentslivewithJapanesefamilies;fieldtrips;

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INTERNSHIP-FOR-CREDIT­ITALIAN

INTERNSHIP-FOR-CREDIT

TheInternship-for-Creditrubricisusedforinternshipexperiencesmeetingthecriteria listedunder"SpecialEducationalOpportunities"onpage204­205oftheCatalog.

IFC 299. Internship-for-Credit at the 200 level. IFC 399. Internship-for-Credit at the 300 level. IFC 499. Internship-for-Credit at the 400 level. StudentsinterestedinInternships-for-CreditexperiencesshouldconsultKateHunter,AssistantDirectorofEmployerOutreachandLifeAfterCollegeProgram,intheCareerServicesOffice.

ITALIAN

Professor Alan S. Caniglia, Interim Chair L. Scott Lerner (on leave 2007­2008) Giovanna Faleschini Lerner Anna Maria Bertini-Jones Jessica Cappellini Associate Professor of French and Italian Assistant Professor of Italian Visiting Instructor of Italian Italian Assistant

ThestudyofItalianatFranklin&Marshallisrootedinamodernliberalartseducation, bringingtogetherhumanistictraditionandglobalsociety.TheminorinItalianisdesigned togivestudentsasolidknowledgeofthelanguageandacriticalunderstandingofthe literary,cinematic,andartistictraditionsofItaly.Thecoursesofferedwithintheprogram provideopportunitiesforstudentstorefinethecriticalthinking,readingandwritingskills thatwillservethemthroughouttheirprofessionallives.Smallclassesallowstudentsto workcloselywithfacultyinaninformalatmospherethatencouragesindividuallearning. Eachcourseincludesadditionalindividualandsmall-groupsessionswithagraduateItalian teachingassistantwhoisanativespeakerofthelanguage.CoursesareconductedinItalian andstudentsaregivenopportunitiestopracticethelanguageoutsideofclass. GraduatesofthedepartmentofItalianarewellpreparedtopursuecareersinavariety of fields.The rigorous study of Italian language structure helps develop the analytical andcriticalthinkingskillsnecessarytosucceedinmanydifferentprofessions.Courses inliteratureandcivilizationfosterskillssuchaslogicalthinking,coherentwriting,and persuasiveargumentation,whiletheabilitytounderstandandcommunicateinanother languagerequiresadvancedcommunicationskillswhichareeasilytransferabletofulfillingcareers--ininternationalaffairs,museumsandauctionhouses,teachingandresearch, andart.StudentsfrequentlycombineItalianwithanotherconcentrationinmedicineand thehealingarts,business,oranotherfield. A minor in ItalianconsistsofItalian110,111,210,310,360,and410oranequivalent seriesofsixcoursesapprovedbythedepartmentchairperson.A"Certificatodicompetenza"isawardedtostudentswhodonotpursueaminorinItalianbutcompleteItalian 110,111,210,and310,oranequivalentseriesoffourcoursesinItalianapprovedbythe departmentchairperson,withnogradebelowC-.StudentswhohavecompletedItalian 310ortheequivalentmaycounttowardtheminoroneItaliancourseconductedinEnglish,

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providedthataportionoftheworkiscompletedinItalianandpendingtheapprovalof thedepartmentchair. Franklin&MarshallhasitsownsummerstudyabroadprograminTuscany,offeringcourses inIntermediateItalian(Italian210,310)andindependentstudies.StudentsofItalianhave studiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:MiddleburyCollege,Florence; IESMilan;NewYorkUniversity,Florence;DickinsonCollege,Bologna;SyracuseUniversity,Florence,andothers. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement. AllcoursesaretaughtinItalianunlessindicatedothrwise.

110. Elementary Italian I. Every Fall TheaimofthiscourseistodevelopbasiclanguageskillsinItalian,includingspeaking,listening comprehension,readingandwriting,withparticularemphasisoncommunication.Thecoursealso providesanintroductiontocontemporaryItalyanditsartistic,literary,cinematicandculinarytraditions. G. Lerner, Bertini-Jones 111. Elementary Italian II. Continuation of Italian 110. Prerequisite:Italian110orplacement. Every Spring G. Lerner, Bertini-Jones

210. Intermediate Italian Language and Culture 1. (LS) Every Fall and Summer AcontinuationofthestudyoftheItalianlanguage,emphasizingspeaking,listening,reading,and writing.Combinescomprehensivegrammarreviewwithmorein-depthstudyofItalianculture,based onfilms,shortstories,poems,andsongs.Prerequisite:ITA111orplacement. G. Lerner, Bertini-Jones 310. Intermediate Italian Language and Culture 2. (H) Every Spring and Summer Further developmentoflanguageskillswithincreasedemphasisonanalyticthinkingandwriting. ExaminationofItalianculturebasedonfilms,shortstories,songsandarias,andpoems.Completes presentationofprincipalgrammaticalstructuresbeguninprevioussemester.Prerequisite:ITA210 orplacement. 360. Italian Literary and Cultural Studies 1. From the Risorgimento to the Present. (H) Every Fall and Summer ProvidesabroadoverviewofmodernItaliancultureandhistoryandincludesstudiesinthe20thcenturyshortstory(Verga,Pirandello,Calvino,Levi)andcinema(Visconti,Benigni,Giordana). AdvancedstudyofspokenandwrittenItalianandselectedtopicsingrammar.Prerequisite:ITA310 orplacement. G. Lerner 410. Italian Literary and Cultural Studies 2. (H) Spring 2009 StudiesinclassicalItalianpoetryandprose(authorshaveincludedDante,Boccaccio,Manzoni,Collodi,PirandelloandD'Annunzio).AdvancedspokenandwrittenItalian,selectedtopicsingrammar. Prerequisite:ITA360. G. Lerner

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

DanteAttraversoLaCultureItaliana.(H) CinemaItalianoEArtiVisive.(H)

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JAPANESE LANGUAGE­JUDAIC STUDIES

JAPANESE LANGUAGE

(See International Studies)

JUDAIC STUDIES

Professor Maria D. Mitchell, Chair Annette Aronowicz Stephen Cooper (on leave 2007­2008) David Freidenreich Matthew Hoffman (on leave Fall 2007) Federica Francesconi (Fall 2007 only) Daniela Tomer Nessia Shafransky The Robert F. and Patricia G. Ross Weis Professor of Judaic Studies and Professor of Religious Studies Associate Professor of Religious Studies Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and History Adjunct Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and History Adjunct Instructor of Hebrew Visiting Scholar of Judaic Studies

TheJudaicStudiesprogramisdesignedtointroducestudentstothereligion,history,and literatureoftheJewishpeopleandtotheirinteractionswiththeotherpeoplesamongwhom theyhavelived.IntheWesternworld,Jewishthoughthasbeenfoundationaltoourcommon culture,yettheexperienceoftheJewishpeople,likethatofotherexcludedminorities,has oftendivergedprofoundlyfromthatofthemajority.ThestudyofJudaismandofthevarietiesofJewishexperiencecanthusbebothacomplement,andacorrective,toanycourseof studyexaminingthehistoryandcultureofEurope,theMiddleEast,NorthAfrica,andthe Americas.Theprogramforminorsprovidesacomprehensiveintroductiontothereligious, cultural,andpoliticaltraditionsofJewishlifefromitsoriginstopresentday. A major in Judaic StudiesmaybearrangedthroughtheSpecialStudiesProgramdescribed inthiscatalog.Ajointmajorconsistsof8JudaicStudiescoursesinadditiontodesignated coursesfromanydepartment/programofferingamajor.Atleast2oftheJudaicStudies coursesmustbeHebrewlanguage. A minor in Judaic Studiesconsistsofsixcourses:JST112;oneofthefollowingcourses: 252,254;oneofthefollowingcourses:212,253,273;threeelectives,twoofwhichcan beHebrewlanguageandatleastoneofwhichmustbeanupper-divisionseminarorindependentstudy.Atleastonecourse(excludingJST112)mustbetaughtbyHISfaculty; atleastonecourse(excludingJST112)mustbetaughtbyRSTfaculty.Minorsmusttake atleast4coursesatFranklin&Marshall.TobeconsideredforhonorsinJudaicStudies, graduatingseniors,inadditiontomeetingtheCollege'sgeneralrequirementsforhonors, mustcompleteanddefendathesisofhighquality. MinorsintheJudaicStudiesProgramhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:AdvancedStudiesinEngland,Bath;HebrewUniversity,Jerusalem,Israel; Ben-GurionUniversity,Be'erSheva,Israel.Otherrecommendedprogramsincludethe UniversityofHaifa,TelAvivUniversity,andCETAcademicPrograms(ThreeCulturesin SpainandMorocco;JewishStudiesinPrague).SeeInternationalandOff-CampusStudy sectionoftheCatalogforfurtherinformation.

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A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochanges. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

COURSES IN mODERN HEBREW LANGUAGE

101, 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew I and II. (NW) 101. Every Fall; 102. Every Spring IntroductiontothebasicstructuresandvocabularyofModernHebrew,oralandwritten. Tomer 201, 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew III and IV. (LS) (NW) (H for 202) 201. Every Fall; 202. Every Spring Furtherdevelopmentoforal,reading,andwritingskillsinModernHebrew. Tomer

JUDAIC STUDIES COURSES

212. Israelite Religion and the Origins of Judaism. (H) (NW) Every Fall StudyofthewritingsoftheHebrewBible.SeekstounderstandthehistoricaldevelopmentofIsrael inthebiblicalperiodandthereligiousformsofthoughtandpracticethataroseduringthistime.Same as RST 212. Freidenreich 233. Religion in 20th-Century Jewish Literature. (H) Fall 2008 Readingsofwell-known20thcenturyJewishshortstorywriters,novelists,andpoets.Inanerain whichmanypeople,includingmanyoftheauthors,thoughttheyweremovingawayfromreligion, religiousquestionsandimageryremainnonethelessprevalent.Whatarethesequestions?Howdoes thefictionreflectandrespondtotheupheavalsofthetime?Same as RST 233. Aronowicz 252. Modern Jewish Thought. (H) Fall 2009 StudiesJewishthinkersfromtheEnlightenmenttothepresent,throughtheirphilosophicalwritings, politicalessays,religiousreflections,andfiction.ThechiefquestionwashowtomaketheJewish traditionadaptorrespondtothemodernWesternStateandtomodernWesternculture.Thisisacourse abouttheJewsandtheWest.Towhatdegreeisthereharmony?Towhatdegreeisthereconflict? Same as RST 252. Aronowicz 253. Jewish History 1: Jews of East and West Through the Middle Ages. (NW) (S) (E) (PM) Fall 2007 IntroductiontoJewishhistory,beginningwithfirstcenturiesoftheCommonEraandcontinuingto endof17thcentury.ExaminescentralthemesandpatternsinJewishhistory.Readingsconsistof narrativeaswellasdocumentaryhistorieswithdiscussionofdifferenttheoreticalapproachestothe writingofJewishhistory. Same as HIS/RST 253. Hoffman, Staff 254. Jewish History II: Jews in the Modern World. (S) (E) (NW) Spring 2008 IntroductiontoJewishlifeinthemodernerafromlate18thcenturyEmancipationandEnlightenmentthroughthepresent,tracingthetransformationsofJewishlife.Broadhistoricalsketchesare combinedwithclosereadingsofparticulartexts,movements,andthinkerstofleshoutthecontours anddynamicsoftheJewishexperienceintheModernworld.MajoreventsofJewishhistoryof20th century(theHolocaust,foundationoftheStateofIsrael,andmassmigrationofEuropeanJewsto theAmericas)areexaminedthroughsecondaryandprimarysources.Same as HIS/RST 254. Hoffman 340. Jews in the Greco-Roman World. (H) Spring 2009 FocusesonJewsandJudaismduringperiodofprofoundchangesaftertheconquestofAlexanderthe GreatthatwerekeytodevelopmentofmodernJudaismandChristianity.SurveysvarietyofJewish writingfromtheperiod:historical;philosophical;apocalyptic;andexegetical.Thesetexts,including

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DeadSeascrolls,willbereadincombinationwithmodernscholarlyworkstreatingJewishlifeand historyoftheperiod. Same as RST 340. Cooper 490. Independent Study. Every Semester Thestudentpursuesanin-depthinvestigationofatopicofspecialinterest,underthedirectionofan adviser.PleaseseetheChairwithanyquestions.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

IntroductiontoJudaism:ClassicalTexts.

LINGUISTICS

Professor Kimberly M. Armstrong, Chair Kimberly M. Armstrong Associate Professor of Spanish

StudentsmatriculatingpriortotheFallof2007maysatisfytheLanguageStudiesrequirementbypassingtwocoursesinLinguistics. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

101. Introduction to Linguistics (LS) (H) Fall 2007 Throughcoursereadings,classdiscussions,problemsolvingandgroupwork,studentswillexplore thecorecomponentsofhumanlanguage:speechsounds,wordformation,sentencestructure,and meaning.Providesnumerousopportunitiesforstudentstousetheoreticalknowledgeandapplyit toanalyzingthestructureofotherlanguages.ExaminesthehistoryanddevelopmentoftheEnglish language. Armstrong 120. Sociolinguistics. (LS) (H) Spring 2009 Anexplorationoftherelationshipbetweenlanguageandsociety.Specialattentionwillbepaidto languagevariation(dialects,creoles,andpidgins)andlanguageinsociety(multilingualism,slang, languageprejudice,andgender).Readings,films,discussionsandgroupworkwillpreparestudents forfieldworkonlinguisticbehavior. Armstrong

LESS FREQUENTLY OFFERED COURSES

130.AppliedLinguistics.(LS) 210.RomanceLinguistics.(LS)

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mATHEmATICS

mATHEmATICS

Professor Barbara E. Nimershiem, Chair Arnold D. Feldman Jay M. Anderson Annalisa Crannell Robert Gethner Alan Levine Barbara E. Nimershiem Iwan Praton Wendell Ressler (on leave 2007­2008) J. Brian Adams Michael P. McCooey Steven J. Tedford John Carter John Grosh Carmie L. and Beatrice J. Creitz Professor of Mathematics Richard S. and Ann B. Barshinger Professor of Computer Science Professor of Mathematics Professor of Mathematics Associate Professor of Mathematics Associate Professor of Mathematics Associate Professor of Mathematics Associate Professor of Mathematics Assistant Professor of Computer Science Assistant Professor of Mathematics Assistant Professor of Mathematics Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Thestudyofmathematicsisahallmarkofenlightenedsociety,asithasbeenformillennia. Mathematicshelpsusunderstandourworldandourselves,anditisfun. Mathematicsisoneoftheoldestoftheliberalarts.Thestudyofmathematicshasbeenused forcenturiestotrainstudentstothinkclearlyandcreatively.Mathematicalapplications enlightenotherdisciplinesandinformsociety. Mathematical thought requires curiosity, creativity, discipline, and logic. As students progressthroughthemathematicscurriculum,theyareexpectedtobecomeincreasingly adept at developing conjectures, constructing correct proofs and refuting weak ones, creatingandusingmathematicalmodelstodescribephysicalphenomena,workingwith abstractstructures,andclearlycommunicatingresults. A major in MathematicsrequirescompletionofMathematics109,110,111,211,and 229; Mathematics 330 and 331; one course from Mathematics 323, 329, 337, 339, or othercoursesinmathematicalmodelingasofferedbythedepartment;onemathematics coursenumbered400orhigher,otherthan490or491;andsufficientelectivessothatthe totalnumberofmathematicscoursestakenbeyondMathematics111isnine.Oneofthe electivesmaybechosenfromPhysics226,Economics410,Philosophy244,Chemistry 321,Psychology360,or,withapprovalofthedepartment,othermathematicallyintensive courses;100-levelcoursesmaynotbeusedaselectivesfortheMathematicsmajor. ThewritingrequirementinMathematicsismetbythecompletionofMathematics211. A student planning to major in Mathematics should take Mathematics 211 as soon as possible,nolaterthanthefirstsemesterofthejunioryear.Astudentplanningtomajorin Mathematicsandstudyabroadshouldcomplete211beforegoingabroad. Wesuggestthefollowingguidelinesforcourseselection: Students intending to pursue graduate study in mathematics should take Mathematics 442,446,490,andComputerScience150.Wealsorecommendstudyingatleastoneof French,German,andRussian.

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ProspectiveteachersofsecondaryschoolmathematicsshouldtakeMathematics216,316, 445,andComputerScience150. StudentsinterestedinactuarialscienceorstatisticsshouldtakeMathematics216,316,323, and338,andComputerScience150.WealsorecommendtakingcoursesinEconomics andinBusiness,Organizations,andSociety. StudentsplanningtoenterotherfieldsofappliedmathematicsshouldtakeMathematics 323,329,337,338,339,and442.Knowledgeofprobability,statistics,andcomputerscienceisessentialinmanyareasofappliedmathematics. A minor in mathematicsmaybecompletedinoneoftwotracks.The"theoreticalmath track" consists of Mathematics 109, 110, 111, and 211; and two courses chosen from Mathematics330,331,442,445,446,orothertheoreticalcoursesasdesignatedbythe department.The"appliedmathtrack"consistsofMathematics109,110,and111;and threecoursesfromMathematics216,229,316,323,329,337,338,339,orothermodeling coursesasdesignatedbythedepartment. MajorsintheDepartmentofMathematicshavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprograms inrecentyears:UniversityofAdelaide,Adelaide,Australia;NationalUniversityofIreland, Galway,Ireland;UniversityofAuckland,Auckland,NewZealand;EuropeanOrganization forNuclearResearch(CERN),Geneva,Switzerland;SarahLawrenceCollegeProgram: Oxford University, Oxford, England; Sweetbriar College JuniorYear in France, Paris, France. See the International and Off-Campus Study section of the catalog for further information. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

105. Preparation for College Mathematics. Every Fall Introductorylogicandalgebra,elementaryfunctions:polynomial,rational,trigonometric,exponential, logarithmic.Prerequisite:Permissionofthedepartment.Notforcredittowardthemathematicsmajor orminor. Feldman 109. Calculus I. Every Semester Introductiontothebasicconceptsofcalculusandtheirapplications.Functions,derivatives,andlimits;exponential,logarithmic,andtrigonometricfunctions;thedefiniteintegralandtheFundamental TheoremofCalculus.Prerequisite:Twelfth-grademathematicsorMAT105. Staff 110. Calculus II. Every Semester Techniquesofintegration,applicationsofintegration,separablefirst-orderdifferentialequations, convergencetestsforinfiniteseries,Taylorpolynomials,andTaylorseries.Prerequisite:MAT109 orpermissionofthedepartment. Staff 111. Calculus III. Every Semester Vectors and parametric equations; functions of two variables; partial and directional derivatives; multipleintegrals;lineintegrals.Prerequisite:MAT110orpermissionofthedepartment. Staff 116. Introductory Statistics with Applications. Every Spring Probability,randomvariables,dataanalysis,estimationtechniques,hypothesistests,correlationand regression,analysisofvariance,contingencytables,exploratorytechniques.NotforcreditafterMAT 216.Prerequisite:MAT109.Notforcredittowardthemathematicsmajororminor. Staff

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211. Introduction to Higher Mathematics. Every Semester Acoursedesignedasatransitionfromcalculustoadvancedmathematicscourses.Emphasisondevelopingconjectures,experimentation,writingproofs,andgeneralization.Topicswillbechosenfrom numbertheory,combinatoricsandgraphtheory,polynomials,sequencesandseries,anddynamical systems,amongothers.Prerequisite:MAT111. Staff 216. Probability and Statistics I. Every Semester Introductiontosinglevariableprobability.Randomvariables.Binomial,geometric,Poisson,exponentialandgammadistributions,amongothers.Countingtechniques.Estimationandhypothesis testsonasingleparameter.Prerequisite:MAT110. Staff 229. Linear Algebra and Differential Equations. Every Semester Systemsoflinearequationsandmatrices,vectorspaces,lineartransformations,determinants,eigenvaluesandeigenvectors,nthorderlineardifferentialequations,systemsoffirstorderdifferential equations.Prerequisite:MAT111. Staff 237. Discrete Mathematics. Spring 2009 Basicsettheory,combinatorics(thetheoryofcounting),finitedifferenceequations,andgraphtheory withrelatedalgorithms. Tedford 270­279. Selected Topics. Intermediatelevelcourses. 291. Directed Reading. ReadingdirectedbytheMathematicsstaff.Permissionofchairperson. 316. Probability and Statistics II. Every Spring ContinuationofMAT216.Multivariatedistributions.Estimationandhypothesistestsformultiple parameters.Regressionandcorrelation.Analysisofvariance.Prerequisites:MAT111,MAT216. Tedford 323. Stochastic Processes. Spring 2009 Propertiesofstochasticprocesses,Markovchains,Poissonprocesses,Markovprocesses,queueing theory.Applications of stochastic modeling to other disciplines. Prerequisites: MAT 111, MAT 216. Levine 325. Number Theory. Fall 2008 Propertiesofthenaturalnumbersandintegers:divisibility,primes,numbertheoreticfunctions,Diophantineequations,congruences,quadraticreciprocity,additivenumbertheory,unsolvedproblems. Prerequisite:MAT211. Ressler 329. Fourier Series. Spring 2008 Fourierseries,orthogonalseries,boundaryvalueproblems,applications.Prerequisite:MAT229. Staff 330. Abstract Algebra. Every Spring Algebraicsystemsandtheirmorphismsincludingsets,functions,groups,homomorphisms,factor groups,rings,andfields.Prerequisite:MAT211. Staff 331. Introduction to Analysis. Every Fall Anintroductiontotheideasandprooftechniquesspecifictomathematicalanalysis.Realnumbers, sequences,limits,derivatives,integrals,infiniteseries,cardinality;othertopicsaschosenbyinstructor.Prerequisite:MAT211. Gethner 337. Mathematics for Optimization. Spring 2008 Discrete,deterministicmodelsofinteresttothesocialsciences.Linearprogramming,duality,simplex method,sensitivityanalysis,convexsets.Selectionsfrom:assignment,transportation,networkflow, nonlinearprogrammingproblems.Prerequisite:MAT229. Levine

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338. Computational Mathematics. Fall 2007 Numericalanalysisasimplementedoncomputers.Polynomialandrationalapproximations,numerical differentiationandintegration,systemsoflinearequations,matrixinversion,eigenvalues,firstand secondorderdifferentialequations.Prerequisites:CPS150,MAT229.Same as CPS 338. Adams 339. Mathematical Models. Fall 2008 Anintroductiontotheartofcreatingandanalyzingdeterministicmathematicalmodels.Modelsof physical,biological,andsocialphenomena.Topicsvarywithinstructor;examplesarepredator-prey interactions, spread of epidemics, arms races, and changes in global temperature. Mathematical techniquesincludephase-planeanalysisofsystemsofdifferentialequations,andfunctioniteration. Prerequisite:MAT229. Levine 370­379. Selected Topics. AdvancedAlgebra,AdvancedMultivariableCalculus,MeasureTheory,AlgebraicTopology,History andDevelopmentofCalculus. 375. Topics in Algebra. CoursesofanalgebraicnaturesuchasRingTheory,AdvancedLinearAlgebra,andAlgebraicNumber Theory,thatcanbetakeninplaceof,orinadditionto,MAT330tosatisfythemajorrequirements. Mayberepeatedwithpermissionofdepartment.Prerequisite:MAT211. 390. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheMathematicsstaff.Permissionofchairperson. 391. Directed Reading. ReadingdirectedbytheMathematicsstaff.Permissionofchairperson. 442. Complex Analysis. Spring 2009 Functionsofonecomplexvariable:analyticfunctions;mappings;integrals;powerseries;residues; conformalmappings.Prerequisite:MAT331 Staff 445. Geometry. Fall 2008 Selectionsfrom:advancedsyntheticgeometry;groupsoftransformations;affinegeometry;metric geometry;projectivegeometry;inversivegeometry.Prerequisite:MAT330. Nimershiem 446. Topology. Fall 2007 Anintroductiontotopologicalspacesandcontinuousfunctions.Prerequisite:MAT330.Corequisite: MAT331. McCooey 470­479. Selected Topics. Studyofadvancedspecializedareasofmathematics. 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheMathematicsstaff.Permissionofchairperson. 491. Directed Reading. ReadingdirectedbytheMathematicsstaff.Permissionofchairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

CombinatorialGames. NonstandardAnalysis.

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mUSIC

Professor John Carbon, Chair (Fall 2007) Professor Bruce Gustafson, Chair (Spring 2008) Bruce Gustafson (on leave Fall 2007) John Carbon Matthew Butterfield (on leave Spring 2008) Susan Hurley-Glowa Gwynne Geyer Brian Norcross William Wright Doris Hall-Gulati Michael Jamanis Elizabeth Keller Douglas Albert Tabitha Easley Devin Howell Kimberly Kelley Jerry Laboranti Jr. Ning Mu Elizabeth Pfaffle Christina Reitz (Fall only) Andrew Walls Mark Yingling Staff Geoffrey Deemer Emily Noël Rosemary Siegrist Charles A. Dana Professor of Music Professor of Music Assistant Professor of Music Assistant Professor of Music Artist in Residence, Voice Instrumental Conductor Choral Conductor Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Clarinet Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Violin Senior Adjunct Instructor of Music, Piano Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Trumpet Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Flute Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Double Bass Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Bassoon Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Saxophone, Jazz Ensemble Conductor Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Viola Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Horn Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Low Brass Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Percussion Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Violoncello Adjunct Instructor of Music, Oboe Artist-Teacher, Voice Artist-Teacher, Piano

Thestudyofmusiccanbedividedintofourinter-relatedapproaches:thecreationofmusic (composition), the re-creation of music (performance), understanding music's systems (musictheory),andunderstandingmusic'sstylisticandsocietalcontexts(musichistory andculture).Eachoftheseareasdrawsontechniquesandperspectivesthatareafocusin otherapproachestomusic.Musicalcomposition,forexample,isnotanentirelyintuitive process,butmakesuseofknowledgegainedthroughthestudyofmusictheory.Similarly, performanceismostprofoundwhenitisinformedbyanunderstandingofthecontextfor awork'sstyle.Andthehistoryofmusicalstyleismyopicwithouttakingintoaccountthe cultureinwhichastyledeveloped. TheMusicDepartmentofferscoursesinalloftheseareasthatareopentostudentswith noformalbackgroundinmusic.Allofitsensemblesareopentotheentirestudentbody, andsomeprivatelessonsareofferedatthebeginninglevel;therearealsocoursesinmusictheoryandinmusichistoryandculturethatarespecificallyorientedtostudentswith littleornopreviousbackgroundinmusic.Atthesametime,therearemanyofferingsfor studentswhohavealreadymademusicanimportantelementoftheirlives. Manystudentschoosetocompleteamajororminorinmusic,whetherornottheyintend toundertakeamusicalcareer.Studentsgoingtomedicalschool,forexample,haveoften chosentomajorinmusic,knowingthattheywantalifelonginvolvementinmusicasan

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avocation.Ontheotherhand,studentswhohavechosentogotograduateschoolinmusicor enterthemusicindustryhavefoundthattheirpreparationthroughthemusicmajorprogram hadpreparedthemwell.Twomusic-minorprogramsalsoofferanorganizationtothestudy ofmusicthatgoesbeyondasinglecourseorparticipationinasingleensemble. A major in Musicconsistsofelevencoursecredits: Four creditsinmusictheory(Music222,223,224[half-credit],225[half-credit], 323) Four creditsinmusichistoryandculture(Music229,230,231, and 430) Twoelectivesabovethe100levelchosenfromthetheoryand/ormusichistoryand cultureareas SeniorProject(Music490)independentstudy Studentsintendingtomajorinmusicshouldbeginthetheorysequencebythebeginning ofthesophomoreyear.AllstudentsareadvisedtotakeMusic224with222,and Music 225with223. StudentsmajoringinmusicareexpectedtoparticipateinoneoftheCollege'schoralor instrumentalensemblesforatleastfoursemesters. ThewritingrequirementintheMusicmajorismetbycompletionofMusic430. A general minor in musicconsistsofsixcoursecredits: Threeinmusictheory(Music222,223,224[half-credit],and225[half-credit].StudentsareadvisedtotakeMusic224with222,andMusic225with223). Twoinmusichistoryandculture(Music230,and231or101). Oneelectiveselectedwiththeapprovalofthedepartmentchair.Thiselectiveshould beaone-creditadvancedcourse(abovethe100level)andmaynotincludestudioor ensemblecourses. A performance minor in musicconsistsofsixcoursecredits: Oneandone-halfinmusictheory(Music222,224[half-credit].Studentsareadvised totakeMusic224with222). Twoinmusichistoryandculture(Music230,and231or101). Twoandone-halfperformancecreditsselectedinconsultationwiththedepartmentchair. Ideally,theperformancecreditsshouldincludecoursesselectedfrombothensembles andstudiolessonsgivenattheCollege.Ifsuchdiversificationisnotpossible,thechair mayrecommendanotherperformance-orientedcourse(suchasconducting). Amaximumoffourtransferredcreditsfromanotherinstitutionmaybecountedtowardthe major,andofthesenomorethanonemaybeatorabovethe300-level.Twotransferred creditsmaybecountedtowardtheminor.Furtherdetailsabouttransferredcreditscanbe obtainedfromthechairofthedepartment. MajorsintheDepartmentofMusichavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecent years:IESprogramsinMilan,ItalyandVienna,Austria. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandissubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social

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Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

COURSES IN mUSIC HISTORY/CULTURE AND THEORY

100. Fundamentals. (A) Every Semester Afirstcourseinmusicforstudentswithlittleornoformaltrainingorbackground.Emphasison basicmusicianship,includingkeyboardorientationandtheabilitytoreadandsingsimplemelodies intrebleandbassclefs,inbothmajorandminormodes,andinavarietyofmeters.Additionaltopics includethenotationofpitchandrhythm,scales,keysignatures,timesignatures,intervals,triads,and basicscorenavigation.Nomusicalbackgroundisrequired. Butterfield, Wright 101. Introduction to Music. (A) Every Spring SurveyofWesternartmusicdesignedtodevelopperceptivelistening,withemphasisonthestudyof rhythmic,melodic,andharmonicorganization,color,texture,andform.Nomusicalbackgroundis required. Gustafson, Hurley-Glowa 102. Introduction to World Music. (A) (NW) Every Fall Surveyofmusicfromaglobalperspectivewithemphasisonthestudyofmusic'srelationtoculture. Includescross-culturalcomparisonofmusic'srhythmic,melodic,andharmonicorganization,inadditiontocolor,texture,andform.FeaturescasestudiesfromAfrica,theAmericas,Europe,andAsia. Nomusicalbackgroundrequired.StudentswhoalreadyreadmusicshouldenrollinMUS229.) Hurley-Glowa 104. Music and Stage: First-Year Seminar. (A)(W) Every Fall Astudyoftheconventionsofthemusicalstage;howmusicfunctionsasavehiclefordramaticaction instageworksbasedondifferingtheoriesofdrama.Atthecoreofthecoursearevideorecordingsof operasandlighterworks(operettas,musicalcomedies,etc.)bycomposersasvariedasMozart,Verdi, Wagner,Britten,Gershwin,Bernstein,Sondheim,andPicker.Nomusicalbackgroundrequired. Wright 105. Jazz Spring 2009 Theoriginofjazz,fromitsrootstothepresentdaywithemphasisonstylisticdistinctions.Considers AfricanandEuropeancontributions,bluestypes,NewOrleansjazz,HarlemStride,Swing,bebop, cooljazz,hardbop,freejazz,fusion,neo-classical,andacidjazz,touchingonmostmajorfigures andtheircontributions.Eachstylisticperiodstudiedfromaneconomicandsociologicalviewpoint withemphasisonform,texture,improvisation,harmony,rhythm,andtimbre. Butterfield 106. History of the Blues Fall 2007 BlueshistoryfromitsoriginstotheBluesRevivalofthe1960s.EmphasisontheDeltabluestradition ofCharleyPatton,RobertJohnson,andMuddyWaters.Additionaltopicsinclude:oralformulaic composition;politicsofraceandsexintheblues;thebluesasa"secularreligion";themusicbusiness;appropriationsofbluesstyleinjazzandrock;andtheongoingfunctionofthebluesasacore signifierof"blackness"inAmericanculture.Same as AFS 106. Butterfield 107. Composing: First-Year Seminar. (A)(W) Every Fall Variousaspectsofthecompositionalprocesswillbeexaminedboththroughthestudyofcomposers' writingsandworksandthecreationofseveralshortoriginalpiecesforvariousinstrumentations. Abilitytoreadmusicrequired. Carbon 215. Composition. (A) Spring 2008 Fundamentalsofmusicalcompositionbasedonappropriatemodels.Projectsforsoloinstrument, voice, or small ensembles will emphasize individual elements of music: form; rhythm; melody; harmony;andtexture.Prerequisite:MUS100,MUS222,orpermissionoftheinstructor. Carbon 222. Theory 1: Basic Harmony and Form. (A) Every Fall Beginningwithareviewoffundamentals,thecoursecoversharmonizationinfourparts,voice-lead-

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ing,modulation, andthecompositionofshortbinarypiecesorvariations.Prerequisite:MUS100or permissionoftheinstructor;shouldbetakenconcurrentlywithMUS224. Carbon, Butterfield, Wright 223. Theory 2: Advanced Harmony and Form. (A) Every Spring Chromaticharmonicpractices,includingenharmonic modulationsandalteredchords.Composition andanalysis ofrondoorsonataforms.Prerequisite:MUS222; shouldbetakenconcurrentlywith MUS225. Carbon, Butterfield 224. Musicianship 1. (A) Every Fall Thecoursedevelopsear-trainingandkeyboardskillsbywayofmelodic,harmonic,andrhythmic dictation,sight-singing,andbeginningharmonizationatthekeyboard.Prerequisite:Permissionof theinstructor;shouldbetakenconcurrentlywithMUS222(one-halfcredit). Butterfield, Wright 225. Musicianship 2. (A) Every Spring AcontinuationofMusic224.Additionaltopicsincludemodulationandscorereading.(Prerequisite: MUS224 andpermissionoftheinstructor;shouldbetakenconcurrentlywithMUS223(one-half credit). Butterfield, Wright 229. Music in Cultural Perspective. (A) (NW) Every Spring Astudyofthenotionandroleofmusicinselectedmusiccultures.Afterexploringkeyconcepts associatedwithmusic'suniversalfunctions,thecoursewillstudyrhythm,melody,timbre,texture, harmony, form, and transmission from a cross-cultural perspective. Prerequisite:Ability to read music. Hurley-Glowa 230. Music History 1: Antiquity to 1750. (A) Every Fall WesternartmusicfromearlyGregorianchantthroughthefloridartoftheBaroqueperiod.Includes themajorstylisticdevelopmentsasfoundintheworksofJosquin,Monteverdi,Bach,Handel,and othercomposers.Prerequisite:Abilitytoreadmusic. Reitz 231. Music History 2: 1750 to Present. (A) Every Spring ThestylisticdevelopmentofWesternartmusicintheClassical,Romantic,andModerneras.Selected worksfromeacheraarethefocalpointofthestudy.Prerequisite:Abilitytoreadmusic. Gustafson, Hurley-Glowa 232. Composer Seminar. (A) Spring 2008 Theoeuvreofasignificantcomposer.Studyincludesharmonicandstructuralanalysisofmajorworks. Prerequisite:MUS101,MUS 230,orMUS 231,orpermissionoftheinstructor. Gustafson 260. Music of the African Diaspora. (A) (NW) Spring 2008 Anexploration ofAfricanDiasporamusicculturesintheAmericas,CapeVerde,andtheCaribbean. Inadditiontoinvestigating theexpressionofAfricanismsinmusicalstyles,wewillstudyhowthe issuesofethnicity,sexuality,religion,sociopoliticalmovements,andliteraturearereflectedinthe localmusicaltraditions.Prerequisite:Abilitytoreadmusic.Same as AFS 260. Hurley-Glowa 323.Theory 3: Chromatic and Post-Tonal Vocabularies (A) Fall 2008 Analyticalstudyoftherhythmic,harmonicandformalpracticesofDebussy,Stravinsky,Bartók, Schoenberg,Messiaenandothercomposersofthelastcentury.Includesatonalandserialmusic, withanintroductiontosettheory.Compositionofshortpiecesusingcoursematerials.Prerequisite: MUS223orpermissionoftheinstructor. Carbon 430. Music Criticism. (A) Spring 2008 A seminar studying various genres of writing about music including musical diaries, analyses, musicologicalessays,programnotes,andreviewsofperformances.Majorworksbeingperformed inNewYorkCityoroncampusprovidethecentralrepertoryfortheseminar.Satisfiesthewriting requirementinthemusicmajor.Prerequisites:MUS230,MUS231,MUS222,orpermissionofthe instructor. Gustafson

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490. Independent Study. Independentstudydirectedbythemusicstaff.Permissionofthechairperson. Every Semester

COURSES IN mUSIC PERFORmANCE

240. Conducting. (A) Every Spring Developsskillsin conducting,including scorestudy,conductinggestures,auraldiscriminationskills, and rehearsalstrategies.Finalprojectistorehearseandconductaperformanceofalargecollege ensemble. Courseincludesanindividualweekly lessonandtwoweekly masterclasses.Prerequisite: permissionoftheinstructor.Mayberepeatedforcredit. Norcross

One-halfcreditforparticipationinthefollowingperformingensemblesisaccumulatedover anyconsecutivetwo-semestersequenceandisawardedattheendofthesecondsemester ofparticipation;studentswhowishtoreceivecreditshouldenrollinthe100-levelcourse inthefirstsemesterofparticipationandthe200-levelcourseinthesecond.

150, 250. The Franklin & Marshall College Chorus. Every Semester Alargechoralgroupofapproximatelyeightysingersthatconcentratesonthemasterpiecesofthe choralrepertory,bothacapellaandwithorchestra.Tworehearsalsperweek. Prerequisite:Permission ofthedirector. Wright 151, 251. The Franklin & Marshall Chamber Singers. Every Semester A selectvocalensembleof twenty-foursingersselectedbyaudition.Repertoryincludesmusicfrom awiderangeofmusicalstylesandtimeperiods.Inadditiontoon-campusperformances,thegroup embarksonannualtours.Tworehearsalsperweek. Prerequisite:Permissionofthedirector. Wright 152, 252. The Franklin & Marshall Orchestra. Every Semester Afullorchestrawithapproximatelyseventyperformersfocusingonmasterpiecesoftheorchestral repertoire.Tworehearsalsperweek.Prerequisite:Permissionofthedirector. Norcross 153, 253. The Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Every Semester Alargeensembleforwoodwinds,brass,andpercussionistswithapproximatelyfiftyperformers. Repertoryrangesfrommasterworksoftheconcertbandtraditiontonewworkswrittenforwind ensemble.Tworehearsalsperweek. Prerequisite:Permissionofthedirector. Norcross 154, 254. The Philharmonia. Every Semester The elite chamber orchestra and chamber wind ensemble with approximately thirty performers. Repertoryincludesworksforfullsmallorchestraaswellasjuststringsandjustwinds.Tworehearsalsperweek.Prerequisite:PermissionofthedirectorandmemberofeithertheFranklin&Marshall OrchestraorTheSymphonicWindEnsemble. Norcross 155, 255. The Jazz Ensemble. Every Semester Performsmusicfrombigbandtoprogressivejazz.Prerequisite:Permissionofthedirector. Laboranti

Inadditiontothecredit-bearingcoursesabove,faculty-directed,non-creditperformance opportunitiessuchasoperaworkshopandthepepbandarealsoapartofmusicallifeat theCollege. Studiolessonsreceiveone-halfcreditpersemester,andmayberepeated.

280 A. Flute. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinFlute.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Easley

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280 B. Oboe. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinOboe.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. 280 C. Bassoon. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinBassoon.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Deemer Kelley

280 D. Clarinet. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinClarinet.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Hall-Gulati 280 E. Saxophone. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinSaxophone.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Laboranti 281 A. Trumpet. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinTrumpet.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. 281 B. Horn. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinHorn.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. 281 C. Low Brass. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinLowBrass.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. 282 A. Violin. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinViolin.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. 282 B. Viola. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinViola.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. 282 C. Cello. Privatelessonsandmasterclassin`Cello.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Albert Pfaffle Walls Jamanis Mu Staff

282 D. Double Bass. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinDoubleBass.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Howell 283 Percussion. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinPercussion.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Yingling 284 A. Piano. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinPiano.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Keller

284 B. Harpsichord. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinHarpsichord.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Gustafson 285. Voice. PrivatelessonsandmasterclassinVoice.Admissionbyauditionwiththeinstructor. Geyer

TheMusicDepartmentalsooffersprivatenon-creditlessonsforafeeintheaboveareas throughits"Artist/TeacherProgram."Studentswithafinancialaidpackagemayrequest theStudentAidOfficetotakethisfeeintoaccountintheiraidaward.

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PHILOSOPHY

Professor Stephan A. Käufer, Chair Michael J. Murray Glenn Ross (on leave Spring 2008) Bennett W. Helm Stephan A. Käufer Lee Franklin David Merli William Seeley Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities and Philosophy Dr. Elijah E. Kresge Professor of Philosophy Professor of Philosophy Associate Professor of Philosophy Assistant Professor of Philosophy Assistant Professor of Philosophy Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Mostphilosophyfitsintooneoffourlooseandoverlappinggroups.Thefirststudiesaction: Whatshouldwedoandhowcanwegetourselvestodoit?Thisgroupincludesethics, andsocialandpoliticalphilosophy.Asecondgroupstudiesthenatureandreliabilityof ourknowledge.Hereyou'llfindepistemology,andphilosophyofscience.Athirdgroup investigatesthenatureoftheworldandtheself:Whatdoesitmeanforsomethingtoexist? Whatdistinguishesthingsfromtheirproperties?What(besidesabodyandasocialsecurity number)isaperson?Thisgroupincludesmetaphysicsandthephilosophyofmind.Afourth groupanalyzessymbolicsystemsthroughwhichhumansrepresentmeaningtothemselves andtoeachother.Thesearestudiedinlogicandthephilosophyoflanguage. Youcouldeasilynarrowthesefourfieldstotwo,orexpandthemtoseventeen.Philosophy hasnosingletopic,butatthesametimeeverypartofphilosophyisconnectedwithevery otherincountlessways.Itishardtotalkaboutwhatthereisintheworldwithoutalso analyzinghowwecanknowaboutit,sometaphysicsandepistemologyoftenoverlap. Some claim that without language humans can't know anything, so epistemology and philosophyoflanguagecometogether.Ifyouwanttostudywhypeopleactthewaythey do,you'lldrawonethicsaswellasphilosophyofmind;thetwomergeinmoralpsychology.Andsoforth.Philosophyalsoanalyzesthesocialandhistoricalconditionsthatmake itpossibletoasksuchquestionsinthefirstplace.Philosophy,therefore,alwaysincludes astudyofitsownhistory. ThePhilosophyprogramatFranklinandMarshallaimstoacquaintstudentswithallof theseareasofphilosophybyexaminingthegreathistoricaltraditionsinphilosophyaswell asabroadrangeofcontemporaryissuesandtopicsinphilosophy.Inaddition,studentsare encouragedtocultivateskillsincriticalthinkingandphilosophicalargumentwiththegoal ofhelpingthemtobecomeparticipantsinthephilosophicalenterprise.Lowerdivision coursesintheDepartmentaimtoprovidestudentswithabroadbackgroundinthehistory ofphilosophyandcontemporaryproblemsinphilosophy,whileupperdivisioncoursesseek toengagestudentsindiscussionconcerningcuttingedgescholarshipinthefield.Thework ofphilosophymajorsculminatesinthesenioryearwhenstudentscomposeaseniorthesis inthecontextoftheSeniorResearchSeminar.Majorshavethefurtheroptionofexpanding seniortheseswiththegoalofpresentingtheprojectforDepartmentalHonors. A major in Philosophy consistsoftencourses.Fiveofthesearerequired:Philosophy 210;213;220;244;and498.Theremainingfivecoursesareelectives,withthefollowing restrictions:(a)nomorethanoneoftheseelectivescanbenumberedbelow200;and(b) atleasttwooftheseelectivesmustbenumberedabove300.Majorsshouldaimtotake Philosophy210,213,220,and244assoonaspossible.

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TheDepartment'sprogramheavilyemphasizescriticalthinking,logicallycorrectreasoning,andclear,concisewriting.ThewritingrequirementinthePhilosophymajorismet bycompletionofthenormalcoursesrequiredtocompletethemajor. A minor in PhilosophyrequiressixPhilosophycourseswhichmustinclude:(a)both Philosophy220and244;(b)eitherPhilosophy210or213;and(c)threeotherPhilosophy electivesthatareapprovedbythechairpersonordesignee.Minorsshouldaimtotake Philosophy220,244,andeither210or213assoonaspossible. MajorsintheDepartmentofPhilosophyhavestudiedabroadoroff-campusinthefollowing programsinrecentyears:UniversityofNewHampshire,CambridgeUniversity,Cambridge, England; Heidelberg, Germany; Sarah Lawrence College Program, Oxford University, Oxford,England;SchoolforFieldStudies,BritishWestIndies;SEASemester,Woods Hole,Massachusetts;SweetBriarCollegeJuniorYearinSpainProgram,Seville,Spain; SeeInternationalandOff-CampusStudysectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. Introduction to Philosophy. (H) Every Year Examination of traditional philosophical problems of method, knowledge, the nature of reality, religiousbelief,andethics. Staff 122. Introduction to Moral Philosophy. (H) Every Year Survey ofattemptstounderstandthenatureandsignificanceofmoralthought.Theorieswillbeassessedinpartinlightofcurrentcontroversies,whichmayincludecapitalpunishment,affirmative action,andthelimitsofstateauthority. Merli 170­179. Special Topics. (H) Anintroductory-levelcourseonatopicchosenbytheinstructor.Topicchangesfromyeartoyear. Maybetakenmorethanonce. 210. History of Ancient Philosophy. (H) Every Fall TheoriginanddevelopmentofthemajorthemesofGreekphilosophyfromtheMilesiansthrough Aristotle.Same as CLS 210. Franklin 212. Medieval Philosophy. (H) Spring 2009 AsurveyfromAugustinetoOckham,emphasizingtheadaptationbythemedievalsofpaganphilosophytotheirownpurposesandtheimpactofmedievalphilosophyonthethoughtoftheearly modernperiod. Franklin 213. 17th and 18th Century Philosophy. (H) Every Spring AsurveyofmaincurrentsinWesternphilosophyfromDescartesthroughKant,emphasizinghow thefiguresreplacedtheintellectualfoundationsofthemedievalworldwithassumptionsheavily influencedbytheScientificRevolution. Murray 218. Nietzsche. (H) Fall 2007 In-depthstudyofNietzsche'sthoughtthroughclosereadingofhismajorwritings.Wewillfocuson literaryandphilosophicalaspectsofhiswritings. Käufer 220. Moral Theory. (H) Every Spring Acarefulstudyofclassictextsinmoralphilosophy,withanemphasisonquestionsaboutthefoundationsofethicsandtheobjectivityofmoraljudgment. Merli

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223. Biomedical Ethics. (H) Every Year Ethicalissuesrelatedtodevelopmentsinbiologyandmedicine,includingpopulationcontrol,genetic engineering,andtheallocationofmedicalresources.Same as STS 223. Merli 235. Reason and Religion. (H) Fall 2007, Fall 2009 Surveyofbothperennialandcontemporarytopicsinthephilosophyofreligion,suchas,arguments fortheexistenceofGod,theproblemofevil,thecoherenceofdivineattributes,andtheconsistency offreedomandforeknowledge.Topicsapproachedusingbothclassicalandcontemporarytexts. Murray 244. Symbolic Logic. (H) Every Fall Deductivereasoning,emphasizingprimarilysymbolic;somediscussionofissuesinthephilosophy oflogic. Ross 250. Philosophy of Mind. (H) Every Spring Ageneralintroductiontothephilosophyofmind,addressingfourkeyphilosophicalissues:thenature ofpsychologicalexplanation;themind-bodyproblem;thepossibilityofartificialintelligence;and thenatureofpersons.Prerequisite:onecourseinphilosophyorpsychology.Same as SPM 250. Helm 255. Mobile Robotics. (H) Every Spring Canwebuildintelligentmachines?We'llattempttoanswerthisquestionbyexaminingboththe philosophicalandtheoreticalbackgroundofartificialintelligenceandresearchintomobilerobotics. Wewillalsobuildourownrobotssoastoprovidepracticalexperienceinformingouranswersto thisphilosophicalquestion.Same as SPM 255. Helm 270­279. Special Topics. (H) Anintermediate-levelcourseonatopicchosenbytheinstructor.Topicchangesfromyeartoyear. Maybetakenmorethanonce. 317. 19th-Century Continental Philosophy. (H) Fall 2008 CloseexaminationofthetwomostimportantandinfluentialviewsoftheGermanidealisttradition: Kant'scriticalphilosophyandHegel'shistoricistreactiontoit. Käufer 318. 20th-Century Analytic Philosophy. (H) Fall 2009 Asurveyoftheanalytictraditionin20th-centuryAngloAmericanphilosophyinwhichphilosophical problemsareunderstoodtobesolvedordissolvedbyalogicalanalysisoflanguage. Ross 319. 20th-Century Continental Philosophy. (H) Spring 2009 Closeexaminationofthekeytextsofphenomenologyandhermeneutics.Wewillstudywritingsfrom Heidegger,Gadamer,Habermas,andothers. Käufer 331. Free Will. (H) Spring 2008, Spring 2010 Anexaminationofcontemporarytheoriesconcerningthenatureoffreechoice.Specialattentionis giventothenatureofmoralresponsibilityandtherelationshipbetweenfreechoiceanddeterminism. Prerequisites:PHI100,150,orpermissionofinstructor. Same as SPM 331. Murray 335. Epistemology. (H) Fall 2007, Spring 2009 Investigationofsomeissuesincontemporaryepistemology,includingthecompetinganalysesofthe conceptofjustification,thecaseforskepticism,andtheanalysisoftheconceptofknowledge. Ross 336. Metaphysics. (H) Fall 2008, Spring 2010 Metaphysicsaskswhatthemostgeneralfeaturesoftheworldare,whythereisaworldthathasthose features,andhowwehumanbeingsfitintothatworld.Examplesoftopicstobeconsideredinclude: Isthereareal,physicalworldoutsidethemind?Whatisthenatureoftime?Whatisrequiredfor thingstopersistthroughtime?Whatisthenatureofcausation?Whydoesanythingatallexist?Have wefreewill? Murray, Ross

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337. Philosophy of Natural Science. (H) Every Year Thegoals,methods,assumptions,andlimitationsofnaturalscience.Specialattentionwillbepaidto thephilosophyofpsychology,cognitivescience,andevolutionarybiology.Same as STS/SPM 337. Chemero, Ross, Seeley 355. Possibility of Artificial Intelligence. (H) Spring 2008 Acriticalanalysisoftheprogressandprospectsofattemptstobuildintelligentmachines.Prerequisites:PHI244andPHI/SPM250;orpermissionofinstructor.Same as PSY/SPM 355. Chemero 360. Concept of a Person. (H) Fall 2007, Fall 2009 Acarefulexaminationofwhatitistobeaperson,asanautonomousmoralagentwhoselifecanbe meaningful,andofwhatdistinguishespersonsfromthe"lower"animals.Same as SPM 360. Helm 361. Moral Psychology. (H) Fall 2008 Moralpsychologyisthestudyofhumanmoralagency.Assuch,itisconstrainedby,andmustcohere with,thefactsabouthumanpsychology;butitsprimaryfocusisonhumangood,anevaluativenotion. Centralquestionsinclude:Whatarereasonsandwhatroledotheyplayinaction?Whatischaracter andhowisitrelatedtovirtue?Whatisfreewill,canwehaveit,andhowdowebestexplainweaknessofthewill?Same as SPM 361. Helm 370­379. Special Topics. (H) Anintermediate-oradvanced-levelcourseonatopicchosenbytheinstructor.Topicchangesfrom yeartoyear.Maybetakenmorethanonce. 380. Philosophy and Literature. (H) Spring 2009 Examinestopicsattheintersectionofliterarytheoryandphilosophyoflanguage,including:interpretationandmisinterpretation,author'sintention,contributionofthereader,metaphor,fiction.Readings fromE.D.Hirsch,Gadamer,Derrida,Davidson,Rorty,Eco,Fish,andothers Käufer 381. Plato. (H) Spring 2009 AnintensivetreatmentofsomeofthemajorphilosophicalthemesinselecteddialoguesofPlato. Prerequisite:PHI210.Same as CLS 381. Franklin 382. Aristotle. (H) Spring 2008 AnintensivetreatmentofsomeofthemajorphilosophicalthemesinselectedwritingsofAristotle. Prerequisite:PHI210. Franklin 470­479. Topics Seminar. (H) Acloseexaminationatanadvancedlevelofaproblemchosenbytheinstructor.Topicchangesfrom yeartoyear.Maybetakenmorethanonce. 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbythePhilosophystaff.Permissionofthechairpersonrequired. 498. Philosophical Research. Every Fall Intensiveresearchandwritingonatopicofthestudent'schoicecarriedoninaseminarsetting. Includesseveraloralpresentationsbyeachstudent.Permissionofinstructorisrequired. Staff

TOPICS COURSES TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

Existentialism.

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PHYSICS AND ASTRONOmY

Professor Linda S. Fritz, Chair Gregory S. Adkins Linda S. Fritz Calvin Stubbins Fronefield Crawford III J. Kenneth Krebs Scott M. Lacey Christie L. Larochelle Andrea N. Lommen Ned S. Dixon Elizabeth Praton William G. and Elizabeth R. Simeral Professor of Physics Professor of Physics Professor of Physics Assistant Professor of Astronomy Assistant Professor of Physics Assistant Professor of Physics Assistant Professor of Physics Assistant Professor of Astronomy and Director of Grundy Observatory Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics Adjunct Assistant Professor of Astronomy

ThreemajorsareofferedwithinthedepartmentofPhysicsandAstronomy:Physics;Astrophysics;andAstronomy. Physicsisthestudyofhowobjectsinteract,move,andchange.Itcoversobjectsassmall assub-atomicparticles,suchasquarks,toaslargeastheuniverse.Itisinherentlyanexperimentalendeavor.Thestartingandendingpointsarethedataandobservations.From experimentsandobservationswedevelopfundamentaltheoriesthatallowustoexplain phenomenaascommonplaceastheflightofabaseballtoasexoticasanelectrontraveling ataspeedclosetothespeedoflight. Courses within the department seek to help students develop a deep understanding of fundamental concepts, problem-solving skills, oral and written communication skills, experimentalskills,andtheabilitytoworkindependentlyaswellaswithothers.Theskills learnedinstudyingphysicstranslatewelltomanyfieldsandcareers. Recentphysicsmajorshavegoneontograduateschoolinphysics,astrophysics,astronomy, and engineering, to medical school, and to careers ranging from teaching high school physicstoworkingonWallStreet. Thedepartmentparticipatesindual-degreeprograms,inwhichstudentsreceiveaBAfrom theCollegeandaBSinengineeringfromthepartnerinstitution,withCaseWesternReserve, ColumbiaUniversity,PennsylvaniaStateUniversity,RensselaerPolytechnicInstitute,and WashingtonUniversity.Studentsinterestedinanyoftheseprogramsareurgedtodiscuss themwiththeDepartmentChairandtheDual-DegreeEngineeringadviserearlyinthe planningoftheiracademicprograms. StudentsconsideringamajorinphysicsorastrophysicswouldnormallytakePhysics111 andMathematics109or110intheirfirstsemester,andPhysics112andMathematics 110or111intheirsecondsemester.Howeverstudentshavesuccessfullycompletedthese majorsfollowingotherpaths. Tobeconsideredfordepartmentalhonors,inadditiontomeetingtheCollege'sgeneral requirements,agraduatingseniormusthaveanexcellentrecordinrequiredcoursesand completeatwo-semesterindependentstudyproject.

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A major in Physics consistsofthirteencourses: Physics111,112,222,223,226,333,334,344,and364; Mathematics109,110,111,and229 A minor in Physicsconsistsofsixcourses: Physics111,112,223oranapprovedsubstitute;226;333;andoneadditionalPhysics courseabovethe100-level. Theastrophysicsmajorfocusesonphysicalprinciplesastheyareappliedtothestudyof thecosmos.Thegoalistopromoteanunderstandingofadiversearrayofextraterrestrial phenomenaintermsofthefundamentalphysicsprinciplesonwhichthisunderstanding isbased.Thesephenomenarangefromtheverysmall,suchasthereactionsbetweensubatomicparticlesthatpowerstars,totheverylarge,includingtheexpansionandevolution oftheuniverseitself.Theastrophysicsmajoremphasizesthesameunderstandingoffundamentalphysicalconceptsandskillsasthephysicsmajor,andbothmajorsprovidethe necessarygroundingandbackgroundforadvancedstudyinthesciences. Studentsinterestedinacareerinastronomyshouldcompleteanastrophysicsmajor,ora physicsmajorwitha100levelandatleastone200astronomycourseaselectives. A major in Astrophysicsconsistsoffifteencourses: Physics111,112,222,223,226,333,334; Physics344or364or336; Astronomy110or120; Astronomy210or220or230; Astronomy240or390; Mathematics109,110,111,and229. Theastronomymajorrepresentsabalancebetweenconceptual,mathematical,andhistoricalunderstandingsofastronomy.Studentsgainanunderstandingofthestructuresinthe universeonmanylengthscalesandanappreciationformodernastronomicalmethods andresults.Astudentwithamajorinastronomycouldgoontoacareerasascience museumcuratororplanetariumdirector,acareerinteaching,acareerinsciencejournalismorpublicpolicy,ormoregenerallytoanycareerinvolvinganappreciationofmodern scientificmethods. A major in Astronomyconsistsoftencourses: Physics111,112,222,223; Astronomy110or120; Anyfiveofthefollowing:Astronomy210,220,230,240,either386or387,390; A minor in Astronomyconsistsofsixcourses: Astronomy110or120;220;andanyfourofAstronomy210,230,240,370,386, 387,390,or490. Majors and minors in the Department of Physics andAstronomy have studied abroad inthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:ArcadiaUniversityprogramsinItaly;Butler UniversityprogramsinAustralia,England,Ireland,NewZeeland,andScotland;TASSEP

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(Trans-AtlanticScienceStudentExchangeProgram);UniversityofSantiago,Chile;UniversityofArizonaprograminRussia. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

PHYSICS

111. Fundamental Physics I. (N) Every Semester Firstsemesterofatwo-semestersequencethatinvestigatesthephysicallawsgoverningthebehavior ofparticlesandsystems.PHY111alwayscoversNewtonianmechanics.Additionaltopics,suchas specialrelativity,thermodynamics,andwavephenomenaarecoveredatappropriatetimesduring thesequence.Corequisite:MAT109. Staff 112. Fundamental Physics II. (N) Every Semester Second semester of a two-semester sequence that investigates the physical laws governing the behaviorofparticlesandsystems.PHY112alwayscoverselectromagnetism,optics,atomic,and nuclearphysics.Additionaltopicssuchasspecialrelativity,thermodynamics,andwavephenomena arecoveredatappropriatetimesduringthesequence.Prerequisites:PHY111.Corequisite:MAT 110. Staff 222. Electronics. (N) Every Spring Basicelectronicconcepts,devices,andcircuits,d.c.anda.c.circuittheorywithemphasisonequivalent circuitmodels.Designandanalysisofpowersupplies,amplifiers,andoscillators.Laboratorywork withinstrumentsandcircuits.Prerequisites:PHY112. Krebs 223. Modern Physics. (N) Every Fall Topicsincludespecialrelativity,vibrationsandwaves,kinetictheory,basicquantummechanics, quantumstatistics,andselectionsfromatomic,molecular,solidstate,nuclearandhighenergyphysics,orastrophysics.Thecourseincludesemphasisondevelopmentoflaboratory,dataanalysis,and mathematicalskills.Prerequisite:PHY112orpermissionofinstructor. Adkins 226. Analytical Mechanics. Every Spring Newton's laws applied to particles: rectilinear motion; simple, damped, and driven oscillations; gravitation and central forces; Lagrange's equations and the Hamiltonian; non-inertial frames of reference;anddynamicssystemsofparticles.Prerequisites:PHY111.Corequisite:MAT229. Stubbins 237. Physics of the Earth. (N) Fall 2008 Principlesofphysicsasappliedtounderstandingfeaturesandpropertiesofthesolidearth.Gravity,seismology,geomagnetismandpaleomagnetism,heatflow;geophysicalsurveys.Laboratory. Prerequisite:GEO110or114or118. Same as GEO 237. Sternberg 333. Electric and Magnetic Fields. Every Fall TopicsincludeCoulombforce,electrostaticfieldandpotential,Gauss'sLaw,dielectrics,Ampère's Law,Faraday'sLaw,magneticpropertiesofmatter,Maxwell'sequations,andelectromagneticradiation.Prerequisites:PHY226andMAT111. Lacey 334. Mathematical Methods of Physics. Every Fall Mathematicaltechniquesimportantinanalyzingphysicalsystems;topicsincludeFourierseries;series solutionsofdifferentialequationswithapplicationssuchasSchrödinger'sequationandelectrostatic potentialtheory;partialdifferentialequations,withmulti-dimensionalapplicationstoelectrostatic potentials, the heat flow and wave equations, Poisson's equation, and electromagnetic radiation. Corequisite:PHY333orpermissionoftheinstructor. Larochelle

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344. Quantum Mechanics. Every Spring Basicpostulatesofquantummechanics;waveequationinoneandthreedimensions;non-degenerate,degenerate,andtime-dependentperturbationtheory;thehydrogenatom.Prerequisite:PHY333. Corequisite:PHY334orpermissionoftheinstructor. Krebs 364. Experimental Methods of Physics. (N) Every Fall Designedtofamiliarizestudentswithequipmentandproceduresusedinaresearchlaboratory.Experimentswillillustrateprinciplesinvolvedinatomic,molecular,andsolid-statephysics.Computer interfacingofapparatususingLabVieworsimilarsoftwarewillbeintroduced.Prerequisite:PHY 222.Corequisite:PHY333. Krebs 431. Statistical and Thermal Physics Spring 2008 Physicalconceptsandmethodsusedindescribingthebehaviorofsystemsconsistingoflargenumbers ofparticles.Statisticalmechanicsandthermodynamicsdiscussedfromaunifiedpointofview.Connectionbetweenthemicroscopiccontentofthetheoryandthelawsofthermodynamicsdeveloped. Prerequisite:PHY226orpermissionoftheinstructor. Staff 442. Condensed Matter Physics. Spring 2009 Development of concepts and methods for understanding the behavior of solids. Semiconductor physics.Laboratoryprojectsrelatedtothephysicsofsolidsandapplications.Prerequisites:PHY 333orpermissionoftheinstructor. Larochelle 490. Independent Study. Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbythePhysicsstaff.Permissionofthedepartmentchairisrequired.

ASTRONOmY

110. Introduction to the Solar System. (N) Spring 2008 Developmentofplanetaryastronomyfromancienttimestomoderntimes,includingstudiesofthe originofthesolarsystem,theoriginandevolutionofplanetarysurfaces,thenatureofasteroidsand comets,theinterplanetarymedium,andthesearchforplanetarysystemsaroundotherstars.Weekly laboratorymeetingsattheObservingDeck,Planetarium,orComputerClassroom. Staff 120. Introduction to Stars and Galaxies. (N) Fall 2007 Theoriginandevolutionofstarsandstellarsystems,including:theinterstellarmedium;starformation; supernovae;blackholesandneutronstars;starclusters;thestructure,origin,andevolutionofgalaxies;andtheoriginoftheuniverse.WeeklylaboratorymeetingsattheObservingDeck,Planetarium, orComputerClassroom. Crawford 210. Solar System Astrophysics. Spring 2008 Characteristicsandhistoriesofplanetarysurfaces,atmospheres,andinteriors,interactionwiththeSun andthesolarwind,orbitalmechanics,propertiesofcomets,asteroids,andmeteors,formationofthe solarsystem,searchforotherplanetarysystems,andsearchforextraterrestriallifeandintelligence. Prerequisite:AST110orAST120,orbothPHY111andPHY112.Pre-orcorequisite:MAT109 orpermissionofinstructor. Crawford 220. Stellar Astrophysics. Fall 2007 Astrophysicsofstars,includingtheSun,propertiesofnormalstars,stellarinteriors,starformation andevolution,andstellarkinematics.Prerequisite:AST110orAST120,orbothPHY111andPHY 112.Pre-orcorequisite:MAT109orpermissionoftheinstructor. Lommen 230. Galaxies and Modern Cosmology. Fall 2008 Stellardynamicsandgalacticstructure,propertiesofnormalgalaxies,galaxyformation,theHubble flowandcosmicdistancescales,activegalaxiesandquasars,galaxyclustersandlarge-scalestructure oftheuniverse,cosmicbackgroundradiation,andinflationary"bigbang"cosmology.Prerequisite: AST110orAST120,orbothPHY111andPHY112.Pre-orcorequisite:MAT109orpermission oftheinstructor. Staff

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240. Observational Astronomy. (N) Spring 2009 Principlesandtechniquesofastronomicalobservations,including:coordinatesystemsandtransformations;telescopesandrelevantopticalphysicsprinciples;photometric,spectroscopic,andimaging instruments;reductionofphotometricdataincludingerroranalysisandpropagation;observingprojects withthecampustelescopesandtheNURO0.8mtelescopeinFlagstaff,Arizona.Prerequisite:AST 110or120,orbothPHY111and112.Pre-orcorequisite:MAT109orpermissionofinstructor. Staff 386. Changing Concepts of the Universe. (NSP) Spring 2008 Historicalexaminationofprimitiveandearlycosmologiestopresent-daytheoriesoftheorganization, extent,andnatureoftheuniverse.EarlyGreekastronomytopresent-day"bigbang"theory.Useof simpleastronomicalinstrumentstoreproduceobservationsofearlyastronomers.Notalaboratory course.Same as STS 386. Lommen 387. Archeoastronomy. Spring 2009 Fundamentalastronomyofancientcultures:StonehengeandotherstoneringsinEnglandandEurope;circlesandtemplesintheAmericas,AsiaandAfrica;time-keepingandcalendars;predictionof seasonsandeclipses.Methodsofanalysis:motionsofcelestialbodies;useofplanetarium,celestial globes,andgrids;surveyingofsites.Notalaboratorycourse.Same as STS 387. Praton 390, 490. Independent Study. Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbytheAstronomystaff.Permissionofthedepartmentchairisrequired.

PSYCHOLOGY

Professor John B. Campbell, Chair D. Alfred Owens Roger K. R. Thompson (on leave 2007­2008) John B. Campbell (on leave Fall 2007) Anthony Chemero Jack F. Heller Charles J. Heyser Michael L. Penn Michael L. Anderson Meredith Bashaw Krista M. Casler Rachel Blaser Carol L. Wilson Jane M. Litwak Clipman James Geer Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biological Sciences Professor of Psychology Associate Professor of Psychology and Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind Associate Professor of Psychology Associate Professor of Psychology Associate Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Psychology Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology Research Associate of Psychology

Psychologystudiesmindandbehaviorinhumansandnon-humananimals.Ittestshypothesesusingsystematicobservationsofbehaviorinexperimental,field,computermodeling, andself-reportsettings. Webelievethatthebestwaytocommunicatethisempiricalapproachisbyparticipating init,sostudentslearnandapplypsychologicalmethodsinourcourses.Ourcurriculum addressescurrentpsychologicaltheoriesthatapplytoawiderangeofphenomena,butit

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PSYCHOLOGY

alsoshapesstudentstoemployvariousapproachestotheempiricalanalysisofsuchtheories. Duringthisprocess,studentsdevelopanalytical,research,quantitative,andcommunicationskills.Ourempiricalorientationalsoleadsstudentstoparticipateincollaborativeand independentresearchexperiencesunderthementorshipofourfaculty. Questionsaboutbehaviorcanbeaddressedatmultiplelevelsofcomplexity(e.g.,neural, cognitive,andcontextual)andfrommultipleperspectives(e.g.,learning,perceptual,developmental,andsocial).Ourcurriculumembodiesthesemultipleconceptualapproaches, asreflectedindiversecourseofferingsaswellasourparticipationintheBiologicalFoundationsofBehaviorandScientificandPhilosophicalStudiesofMindinterdisciplinary programs. A major in Psychologyconsistsoftencourses: Psychology100,230,and489; TakefiveAreaStudiescourses.Atleastonecoursemustbefromeachoftheareas below.(Itmaybepossibletosubstitutearelated,non-introductorycoursewithpermissionofastudent'sadviser). Perception and Physiological Psychology PSY301.SensationandPerception. PSY302.Biopsychology. Development and Cognition PSY304.DevelopmentalPsychology. PSY305.CognitivePsychology. Personality, Social, and Psychopathology PSY307.PersonalityPsychology. PSY308.Psychopathology. PSY309.SocialPsychology. Evolution and Adaptation PSY306.EvolutionofMindandIntelligence. PSY310.ConditioningandLearning. PSY373.EmbodiedCognition. TaketwoCollaborativeResearchcourses(Psychology250,360,480,481,482,483, 484,485,486,487,and488). Jointmajorsmaybedevelopedwithseveraldepartmentswithpermissionoftherespective departmentchairpersons.StudentswithaspecialinterestintheBiologicalFoundations ofBehaviormayelectthatmajorwithaconcentrationineitheranimalbehaviororneuroscience.StudentswithaspecialinterestintheScientificandPhilosophicalStudiesof Mindmayelectthatmajor. ThewritingrequirementinthePsychologymajorismetbycompletionofthenormal coursesrequiredtocompletethemajor. TherequirementforaminorisanysixcoursesinPsychology. MajorsintheDepartmentofPsychologyhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:UniversityofLondon;UniversityofGlasgow,Scotland;NUI,Galway,Ireland; SchoolforInternationalTraining,Nairobi,Kenya;UniversityofQueensland,Brisbane, Australia;UniversityofOtago,NewZealand;IESProgram,Vienna,Austria.

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A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. Introductory Psychology. (N) Every Semester Anexperimentalandconceptualanalysisoftheprocessesoflearning,thinking,andperception,and thebiologicalbasesofbehavior.Therelationshipsofthesetobehavioraldevelopment,socialbehavior,andmorecomplexphenomenaofpersonalityformationandabnormalbehaviorareundertaken. Requiredlaboratoryworkinvolvesinvestigationofthevariousprocessesinanimalsandhumans. Staff 230. Experimental Design and Statistics. Every Semester Descriptiveandinferentialstatistics.Researchdesignasreflectedinstatisticalmethods.Analysis ofvariancedesignsforindependentgroupsandforrepeatedmeasurements.Statisticalpowerand comparisontechniques.Requiredlaboratorywillfocusondesignandmethodology.Prerequisite: PSY100orBIO110. Bashaw 240. Neuroscience. (N) Every Spring Principlesofnervoussystemfunctionfromthemolecularthroughtheorgansystemlevelasillustrated bythevertebratesandinvertebrates.Approximatelyonehalfofthecoursewillcoverbasiccellular principlesofnervoussystemorganization,development,andphysiology.Theremaininglectureswill considertheroleoffunctionally-identifiedneuralnetworksinbehaviorcontrol.Prerequisite:BIO 220orBFB/PSY302.Same as BFB/BIO/SPM 240. Jinks 250. Animal Behavior. (N) Every Fall Anintegrativeapproachtoanimalbehaviorfromtheperspectivesofethology,behavioralecology, and comparative psychology. The structure, function, development, and evolution of behavioral adaptationsincludingforagingandpredation,communication,socialorganization,andreproductive strategies.Observationalandexperimentalresearchrequired.Prerequisites:BIO110,andpermissionofinstructor.Corequisite:eitherBIO210orPSY230,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BFB/BIO 250. Blaser 270­279, 370­379. Special Topics in Psychology. Anexaminationofasingleproblemareaofpsychologyreceivingattentioninthecurrentliterature. Permitsin-depthanalysisofasingle,importantpsychologicalphenomenon.Admissionbyconsent ofinstructor. 290, 390. Research in Psychology. Alaboratoryorotherscholarlyindependentresearchprojectconductedunderthesupervisionofa facultymemberfromthedepartment.Prerequisite:permissionofchairperson.

AREA STUDIES COURSES

301. Sensation and Perception. (N) Every Spring Reviewofphenomenaandresearchonsensoryprocessesandtheirroleinperception.Readingsand discussionwillexamineevidencefrombehavioral,psychophysical,andphysiologicalresearch,and considerimplicationsforexplanationsarisingfromthemechanistic,cognitive,computational,and naturalistictheoreticalperspectives.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230or BIO210.Same as BFB/SPM 301. Owens 302. Biopsychology. (N) Every Fall Behavioralandmentalprocessesasviewedfromabiologicalperspectivewithparticularemphasis upontheroleofneurochemicalandendocrinefactorsincentralnervoussystemfunction.Topicscoveredwillincludereproductionandgender,chemicalsensesandingestion,emotion,learning,sleep,

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andpsychopathology.Aneuropharmacologicalapproachtothestudyofthenervoussystemwillbe emphasized.Prerequisite:PSY100orBIO110orpermission.Same as BFB/SPM 302. Heyser 304. Developmental Psychology. Every Fall Anexaminationoftherelativecontributionsofnatureandnurtureonchildren'sbehavioral,cognitive, and perceptual development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Topics include thedevelopmentoflanguage,concepts,intelligence,socialization,motorabilities,andemotional understanding,withdiscussioninformedbycurrentandclassicprimaryreading. Researchactivities andanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY 230orBIO210.Same as SPM 304. Casler 305. Cognitive Psychology. Every Fall Thiscourseprovidesanoverviewofhumancognitiveprocesses.Topicscoveredincludeknowledge acquisition,memory,conceptformation,textprocessing,thinking,problemsolving,anddecision making.Wewillcompareseveralapproachestothestudyofcognition,andwewillexamineand evaluatebothclassicandcontemporarytheoryandresearch.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210. Same as SPM 305. M. Anderson 306. Evolution of Mind and Intelligence. Spring 2009 Whatisintelligentbehavior,whatisitfor,andhowdiditevolve?Wewillattempttoanswerthese questionsandunderstandthenatureanddevelopmentofMindfromacomparativeperspective.We willdosobyinvestigatinglearning,perception,memory,thinking,andlanguageinanimalsandhumans.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:Oneof:PSY100, PSY301,PSY302,PSY303,PSY304,PSY305,BIO240,BIO250,orPHI338,orpermission. Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as BFB/SPM 306. R. Thompson 307. Personality Psychology. Every Spring Thiscourseprovidesanevaluativeandcomparativeoverviewofmajormodelsofpersonalityselected to illustrate psychodynamic, trait, cognitive, humanistic, physiological, and learning approaches. Thecoursewillemphasizethetestabilityofthemodelsandtheirconnectionwithcurrentresearch. Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission. Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as SPM 307. J. Campbell 308. Psychopathology. Every Spring Thiscoursewillserveasanintroductiontodescriptiveandtheoreticalapproachestothestudyof psychopathology. In addition to the study of disease-related processes, special emphasis will be placedupondevelopinganunderstandingofthosebiological,psychological,andsocialconditions thatareessentialforhealthypsychosocialfunctioningacrossthelifespan.Prerequisite:PSY100or permission.Same as SPM 308. Penn 309. Social Psychology. Every Spring Thiscourseinvolvesthestudentinexplorationofsomeofthebasictopicsinexperimentalapproaches tosocialpsychology,suchascognitiveandmotivationalperspectivesonsocialphenomena,therole ofaffectandemotioninsocialaction,andcurrentusesoftheconceptofself.Issuesexploredinthis contextincludeself-affirmationprocesses,regulationofsocialaction,andtherelationshipbetween affect,cognition,andaction.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite: PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as SPM 309. Wilson 310. Conditioning and Learning. Every Fall Anintroductiontotheprocessbywhichhumanandanimalbehaviorchangesasafunctionofexperience.Examinesbasicmechanismsforlearning(includinghabituation,sensitization,andclassical andoperantconditioning)andexploresthescientificandpracticalapplicationofthesemechanisms toexplainandpredictbehavior.Discussestheextenttowhichlearningmechanismsareconsistent acrossspecies,andhowthephysiology,naturalenvironment,andsocialsystemsofindividualspeciesinteractwithbasiclearningprocessestoproducedifferentbehavioraloutcomes.Same as BFB 310. Bashaw

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355. Possibility of Artificial Intelligence. (H) Spring 2008 Acriticalanalysisoftheprogressandprospectsofattemptstobuildintelligentmachines.Prerequisites:PHI244andPHI/SPM250;orpermissionofinstructor.Same as PHI/SPM 355. Chemero 373. Embodied Cognition. Every Spring Inthiscoursewewillstudyintelligencebyfocusingonperceptionandactionintheenvironment. Tothisend,wewillfocusonecologicalpsychology,robotics,artificialneuralnetworks,andsimulatedevolution.Althoughstudentswillbeexpectedtobuildsimplerobotsandworkwithcomputer models,nobackgroundknowledgeofengineeringorcomputingwillbeassumed.(Knowledgeof programmingisnotrequired)Prerequisite:PSY100.Same as SPM 373. Chemero 374. Cross-Cultural. Cross-CulturalPsychologyservesasanintroductiontotherelationshipsamongculturalprocesses, humanconsciousness,humanhealthandhumandevelopment.Prerequisite:PSY100. Penn

RESEARCH COLLABORATION COURSES

480. Collaborative Research in Comparative Cognition and Behavior. (N) Every Spring Comparativeperspectivesandapproachestothestudyofselectedtopicsdrawnfromcognitiveand developmental psychology, cognitive ethology, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience, cognitive science,andbehavioralprimatology.Researchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210,oneof PSY250,301,302,303,304,305,306;ORoneofBIO250,330,379;ORoneofBFB250,301, 302,306,330,379;ORpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BFB/SPM 480. Blaser 481. Collaborative Research in Developmental Psychology. (N) Every Spring Anoverviewofmethodsforconductingresearchwithchildren,withanemphasisonethicsofworkingwithchildparticipants.Currentempiricalandtheoreticalissuesindevelopmentalpsychologyare addressedthroughliteraturereviewandgroupresearchprojects.Topicsreflectingstudentinterests are considered. Laboratory research required. Prerequisites: PSY 230 or BIO 210; PSY 304, or permission.Same as SPM 481. Casler 482. Collaborative Research in Social Psychology. (N) Every Fall Selectedtopicsinexperimentalsocialpsychology.Emphasisonexperimentalmethods.Traditional areasofsocialpsychologyandtopicsthatreflectstudentresearchinterestareconsidered.Laboratory researchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230;PSY309,orpermission. Wilson 483. Collaborative Research in Human Cognition. (N) Every Spring An in-depth consideration of selected empirical and theoretical issues in cognitive psychology. Emphasisisonrecentliteraturecoveringbasicresearchincognitivepsychology,cognitiveneuroscience,andcomputationalneurosciencemodeling,includingsuchtopicsasattentionandresource allocation,representation,conceptformation,memory,andtopicsreflectingresearchinterestsof participatingstudents.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210;PSY/SPM 305,orpermission.Same as SPM 483. M. Anderson 484. Collaborative Research in Personality. (N) Every Fall Selectedempiricalandtheoreticaltopicsfromthecontemporaryliteratureinpersonalitypsychology withemphasisonmeasurementissuesand comparativeanalysesofmajormodelsandtaxonomies. Topicsthatreflectstudentresearchinterestswillbediscussed.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210;PSY/SPM307,orpermission. J. Campbell 485. Collaborative Research in Human Perception and Action. (N) Every Fall Contemporaryresearchandtheoriesoftheinterrelationsofperceptualandmotorprocesses.Content willbedrawnfromtheliteraturesofexperimentalpsychology,neurophysiology,andhumanfactors. Animal models and computational algorithms will be considered when applicable, with primary emphasisonimplicationsforhumanperformance.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY 230orBIO210;PSY301,orpermission.Same as SPM 485. Owens

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487. Collaborative Research in Biological Psychology. (N) Spring 2008 Theneurophysiologicalandstructuralbasisofbehaviorwithemphasisonmotivationandlearning, includingtheuseofpsychopharmacologicalmethods.Theroleofendocrineandmetabolicprocesses intheregulationofbehaviorisintegratedwithconsiderationsofstructure.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210;PSY302orBIO/BFB240orpermission.Same as BFB 487. Heyser 488. Collaborative Research in Psychopathology. (N) Every Fall Anupper-level,research-basedseminarthatexploresnormative,healthy,andabnormalpsychosocial developmentacrossthelifespan.Studentsareassistedtoundertakeindividualorgroupresearch projectsusingavarietyofmethods--includingbothquantitativeandqualitativeapproaches.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210;PSY308,orpermission. Penn

CAPSTONE COURSE

489. History and Philosophy of Psychology. Every Fall ThehistoricaloriginsofcontemporarypsychologyinEuropeanphilosophy,physiology,andbiology, andsubsequentdevelopmentoftheschoolsofstructuralism,functionalism,Gestalt,behaviorism,and psychoanalysis.Emphasisonidentifyingthegoals,implicitassumptions,andpotentialcontributions ofscientificpsychology.Prerequisite:Seniorpsychologymajorstatusorpermissionofinstructor. Same as SPM/STS 489. M. Anderson, Owens

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

490. Senior Independent Research. IndependentstudyunderthedirectionofthePsychologystaff.Permissionofchairpersonrequired.

PUBLIC POLICY

Professor Richard V. Pepino, Director, Public Policy Program Public Policy Committee: Matthew Schousen Linda Forbes Jerome Hodos Jennifer Kibbe (on leave Fall 2007) James Strick Professor of Government Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies Assistant Professor of Sociology Assistant Professor of Government Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society and Earth and Environment

ThePublicPolicyprogramisdesignedtoprovideanalyticskillsandsubstantiveknowledge tohelpstudentsaskquestions,determinethedimensionsofsocietalproblems,andevaluate alternative solutions toresolvemultifacetedpolicyissues.ThestudyofPublicPolicyis availabletostudentsasaJointMajor,wherethePublicPolicyCoreformsonecomponent andatleasteightadditionalcourses,determinedbyanexisting academicdepartmentthat offersitsownmajor,formthebalanceoftheprogram.Pre-approvedJointMajorprograms arecurrently availablewithinBusiness,Organizations,andSociety;Economics;Sociology;andGovernment.StudentswishingtocombinePublicPolicyinaJointMajorwith another existingprogramshouldcontactthedepartment chairpersontoseekapprovalfor

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anappropriatelistofatleast8offeringsthataredesignedtomeetdepartmentandstudents needs.TheusualrulesforJointMajorsapplyinthecaseofallPublicPolicyprograms. StudentswithaJointMajorinPublicPolicymaystudyabroadinadirectexchangeprogram withtheUniversityofGlasgow. PublicPolicystudentshavestudiedabroadoroff-campusinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:SchoolforFieldStudies,Cairns,Australia;WashingtonSemesterProgram, AmericanUniversity,Washington,D.C.Theparticipatingdepartmentswillworkwithjoint majorcandidatestoidentifyinternshipsinthepublicandprivatesectorsthatwillenhance theireducationalexperiencesthroughon-sitelearningopportunities.

PUBLIC POLICY CORE (PPC): 8 COURSES

ECO100.IntroductiontoEconomicPrinciples.(S) ECO103.IntroductiontoEconomicPerspectives.(S) GOV100.AmericanGovernment.(S) PHI122.IntroductiontoMoralPhilosophy.(H) or PHI223.BiomedicalEthics.(H) ECO201.MacroeconomicsI.(S) ECO205.MicroeconomicsI.(S) GOV200.UnderstandingPublicPolicy.(S) Statistics/MethodsCourseinDepartmentofJointMajor

373. Public Health Research: Pregnancy Outcomes in American Women. (S) Spring 2008 Thisinterdisciplinaryseminarwillexplorewomen'shealthandpregnancyoutcomethroughthelenses ofbothscienceandsocialanalysis.Inadditiontoreadinganddiscussiononinfluencesonpregnancy outcomes,studentswillexamineresultsofsurveysofAmishwomeninLancasterCounty,AfricanAmericanandHispanicwomeninLancasterCity,andwomenofchild-bearingageincentralPA. ThiscourseissupportedbyfundsfromthePADeptofHealth.(Anycoursethatincludesmethods ofdataanalysisorpermission.)Same as GOV/STS/WGS 373. Miller 384. Urban Education. (S) Spring 2008 Acommunity-basedlearningcourseanalyzingissuesfacing urbanschoolsfromasociologicalperspective,withparticularattentiontotheroleofrace,class,andgenderatboththemacroandmicro levels.Othertopicsincludeteachers,schoolsasorganizations,thesocialpsychologicalperspective onlearning,thepoliticsofcurriculaandinstruction,accountabilityandothercontemporaryreform movements.Studentsareexpectedtointegrateandapplytheirknowledgethroughworkinalocal school.Prerequisite:SOC100.Same as SOC 384. McClelland

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Professor David L. McMahan, Chair Annette Aronowicz Stephen Cooper (on leave 2007­2008) David L. McMahan Nancy Khalek John Lardas Modern The Robert F. and Patricia G. Ross Weis Professor of Judaic Studies and Professor of Religious Studies Associate Professor of Religious Studies Associate Professor of Religious Studies Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

David Freidenreich Daniel Washburn Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

ThedepartmentofReligiousStudiesiscommittedtoexploringandanalyzinginanonsectarianwayavarietyofreligioustraditionsembeddedinmyth,ritual,art,ethics,doctrine, philosophy,literature,asceticismandothersocialpractices.Thestudyofreligionengages thelimitsofhumanbeingsastheyhavemultifariouslyexpressedthem:intheiraudacious explanationsoftheinvisible,theimmaterial,andthetranscendental;intheextremityof theirpracticesandbeliefs;intheordinarywaysinwhichtheyconfronttheoverwhelming presenceofviolence,suffering,anddeath;intheemotivetermstheyprovidetoexplainthe significanceofthepastandthefuture;andintheconstantstruggletocometotermswith themselvesandothers.Theseactivities,whetherexplicitlyidentifiedasreligiousornot, representthepersistentgrapplingofhumanbeingswithwhatdifferentculturesthroughout worldhistoryhavearticulatedasbeyondandmorethanthehuman.Thishumanengagement withthevariouslyformulatedmore-than-humanOther,thisengagementmanifestingitself variouslyinmanyarenasofcultures,istheobjectoftheacademicstudyofreligion.As such,thefielddemandsaninterdisciplinaryapproachdrawingonthemethodologiesnative tothehumanitiesandsocialsciencesaswellasonthetheoreticalapproachesdeveloped specificallyinthestudyofreligion. A major in Religious Studiesconsistsoftencourses.Requirements:RST111,113or 212,122,and203,and420.Atleastthreeoftheremainingfivecoursesmustbe200or 300levelcourses.Independentstudiesareencouragedbutnotrequired. A minor in Religious Studiesconsistsofsixcourses.Requirements:RST111,onecourse inAsianreligions,onecourseinAmericanreligions,either212or113,oneelective,and 420. ThewritingrequirementintheReligiousStudiesmajorismetbycompletionofthenormal coursesrequiredtocompletethemajor. StudentsinterestedintakingcoursesatLancasterTheologicalSeminarycansometimes dosowiththepermissionoftheReligiousStudieschair(consulttheruleson"Exchange Opportunities"inthelatterpartofthiscatalogforfurtherdetails). Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeofferedisbasedonthebestprojectionofthe departmentandcanbesubjecttochange. MajorsintheDepartmentofReligiousStudieshavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:HebrewUniversityinJerusalem;IESinParisandVienna;Antioch BuddhistStudiesinJapan;UniversityofGhana.SeeInternationalandOff-CampusStudy sectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. A list of regularly offered courses follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

111. Introduction to Religious Studies. (H) Every Fall Asksthequestion:"Whatisreligion?"andprovidesavarietyofanswersbylookingbothatrepre-

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sentativereligiousdocumentsfromawidearrayoftraditionsandattheoriesaboutreligioninthe West. Aronowicz 113. Introduction to Christianity: The New Testament. (H) Every spring ExplorestheoriginanddevelopmentofChristianity,fromitsJewishrootsinthelifeandteachings ofJesusofNazarethtothemiddleofthesecondcenturyC.E.,concentratingonacarefulandcritical readingofearlyChristianwritingswithparticularattentiontothosewhichultimatelycametobe includedintheNewTestament. Washburn 114. Introduction to Islam. (H) (NW) Every Fall StudiesthehistoricaloriginsanddevelopmentofIslaminlightofthesourcesthatshapedit.Explores themesincludingthecentraldoctrinesofIslamasderivedfromtheQur'anandtraditions(sunna), genderandthefamily,thedevelopmentofIslamiclaw(shari'ah),Shi'ism,thegrowthofMuslim theologyandphilosophy,mysticism(Sufism),andpoliticalandsocialissuesamongcontemporary Muslims. Khalek 122. Introduction to Asian Religions. (H) (NW) Every Fall HistoricalandthematicsurveyofthemajorreligioustraditionsofAsia,concentratingonthemore influentialtraditionsofIndia,China,Japan,andTibet.Coversselecttraditionsofancientandmodern formsofHinduism,Buddhism,Confucianism,andTaoism.Focusesondoctrine,myth,andritualin particularculturalandhistoricalcontexts. McMahan 203. American Religions. (H) Every Fall HistoricalandinterpretativestudyoftraditionsimportantintheNewWorld,includingNativeAmericanandAfricanAmericanreligions,Judaism,Catholicism,Protestantism,Americancivilreligion, Islam,andHinduism.Discussionofculturalcontact,AfricanslaveryandBlackchurches,theGreat Awakening,nativismandimmigration,newreligiousmovements,theimpactoftechnology,mass media,andfeminism.AfinalsectionofthecoursecallsattentiontocontemporaryformsofAmerican culturalreligion.Same as AMS 203. Lardas Modern 212. Israelite Religion and the Origins of Judaism. (H) (NW) Every Fall StudyofthewritingsoftheHebrewBible.SeekstounderstandthehistoricaldevelopmentofIsrael inthebiblicalperiodandthereligiousformsofthoughtandpracticethataroseduringthistime.Same as JST 212. Freidenreich

RELIGION AND CULTURE

232. Religion and Politics. (H) Fall 2008 BeginswithChristianclassics,St.Augustine,Calvin,andtheirvisionoftherelationofChristianityto theStateortothepursuitofpowerandwealth.Movestothelastfewcenturies,inwhichaChristian visionhasbeenchallengedbythinkerssuchasRousseauandNietzsche.Courseendswithreadings fromcontemporaryperiod,inwhichtheplaceofChristianityinthepublicsphereisagainshifting. Aronowicz 250. Witchcraft and Sorcery in a Global Context. (S) Fall 2007 Considershowthecategories"witchcraft"and"sorcery"havebeenusedinanthropology,todescribe mysticalacts(particularlymysticalattacks)andasethnographicmetaphortodiscusspressuresof communallifeforindividuals.Coursecontentconsistsof,butnotlimitedto,witchcraftandsorcery asa"socialstraingauge,"witchcraftandsorceryasexpressionsofsymbolicpower,genderednature ofwitchcraftandsorcery,andwitchcraftandsorceryunderconditionsofwestern-stylemodernity. Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as AFS/ANT/WGS 250. Bastian 330. Anthropological Studies of Religion. (S) Fall 2009 Thiscoursetakesaccountofvariousaspectsofreligiousandritualpractice,usingmaterialfromboth contemporaryandclassicethnographies.Topicsofspecialinterestforthecoursewillinclude,butnot belimitedto:cosmologicalconstructions;initiation;possession;commensality;magic;witchcraft andsorcery;ritualaesthetics;andperformance.Prerequisite:ANT200. Same as ANT 330. Bastian

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359. Modern Religious Thinkers: Pascal, Kierkegaard, and Rosenzweig. (H) Fall 2007 Focusesonthreethinkerswhorethoughtthemeaningoftheirrespectivereligioustraditions­Catholicism,Protestantism,Judaism­inwaysthatweretoinfluencenotonlytheirrespectivecommunity butalsohowwethinkaboutreligioningeneral.Allthreechallengedwhatwemeanbyreligion. Aronowicz

AREA STUDIES JUDAISm

233. Religion in Twentieth-Century Jewish Literature. (H) Fall 2008 Readingsofwell-known20thcenturyJewishshortstorywriters,novelists,andpoets.Inanerain whichmanypeople,includingmanyoftheauthors,thoughttheyweremovingawayfromreligion, religiousquestionsandimageryremainnonethelessprevalent.Whatarethesequestions?Howdoes thefictionreflectandrespondtotheupheavalsofthetime?Same as JST 233. Aronowicz 252. Modern Jewish Thought. (H) Fall 2009 StudiesJewishthinkersfromtheEnlightenmenttothepresent,throughtheirphilosophicalwritings, politicalessays,religiousreflections,andfiction.ThechiefquestionwashowtomaketheJewish traditionadaptorrespondtothemodernWesternStateandtomodernWesternculture.Thisisacourse abouttheJewsandtheWest.Towhatdegreeisthereharmony?Towhatdegreeisthereconflict? Same as JST 252 Aronowicz 253. Jewish History I: Jews of East and West Through the Middle Ages. (NW) (S) (E) (PM) Fall 2007 IntroductiontoJewishhistory,beginningwithfirstcenturiesoftheCommonEraandcontinuingto endof17thcentury.ExaminescentralthemesandpatternsinJewishhistory.Readingsconsistof narrativeaswellasdocumentaryhistorieswithdiscussionofdifferenttheoreticalapproachestothe writingofJewishhistory.Same as HST/JST 253. Hoffman, Staff 254. Jewish History II: Jews in the Modern World. (NW) (E) (S) Spring, 2008 IntroductiontoJewishlifeinthemodernerafromlate18thcenturyEmancipationandEnlightenmentthroughthepresent,tracingthetransformationsofJewishlife.Broadhistoricalsketchesare combinedwithclosereadingsofparticulartexts,movements,andthinkerstofleshoutthecontours anddynamicsoftheJewishexperienceintheModernworld.MajoreventsofJewishhistoryof20th century(theHolocaust,foundationoftheStateofIsrael,andmassmigrationofEuropeanJewsto theAmericas)areexaminedthroughsecondaryandprimarysources.Same as HST/JST 254. Hoffman 340. Jews in the Greco-Roman World. (H) Spring 2009 FocusesonJewsandJudaismduringperiodofprofoundchangesaftertheconquestofAlexanderthe GreatthatwerekeytodevelopmentofmodernJudaismandChristianity.SurveysvarietyofJewish writingfromtheperiod:historical;philosophical;apocalyptic;andexegetical.Thesetexts,including DeadSeascrolls,willbereadincombinationwithmodernscholarlyworkstreatingJewishlifeand historyoftheperiod. Same as JST 340. Cooper

CHRISTIANITY

265. The Protestant Reformation. (H) Fall 2009 Focusesonthehistoryandliteratureofthesixteenth-centuryProtestantReformationamongEurope's German-speakingpopulationsandonthetransferenceofthesetraditionstoGreatBritainandthe Americancolonies.Aimstoreadandunderstandprimarysourcesinthematrixofsocial,political, andreligioushistory.ExaminestheoriginsofAmericanevangelicalism. Cooper 384. Soul in Search of Selfhood: The Writings of St. Augustine. (H) Fall 2008 Intensivestudyofsomeofthemajorwritingsfocusingonhumanexistence,freewill,justice,the

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES

state,andthenatureofGod.Analyseshisintellectualandspiritualstruggles,hismatureconceptions oftheChristianreligion,andhisintegrationoftheculturalachievementsofMediterraneanantiquity intoChristianity.SeekstounderstandAugustine'sindividuallifeandthoughtwithinthematrixof hisowncultureandtimes. Cooper

ASIAN RELIGIONS

322. Buddhism in North America. (H) Spring 2008 FocusesonsomeofthedistinctiveformsthatBuddhismhastakeninNorthAmerica.Discussesa numberoftraditions,includingTheravada,Zen,andTibetanBuddhism,comparingtheirAmerican versionswiththoseinAsiaandaddressingthetransformationsofvariousBuddhisttraditionstoaccommodateAmericanlifestylesandviews.AlsoaddressesanumberofissuespertinenttoBuddhism inAmericaandtheWest,suchasBuddhistidentity,ethnicity,genderissues,authority,andsocial activism. McMahan 337. Hinduism. (H) (NW) Spring 2006 Astudyofthemajortexts,doctrines,andpracticesofHinduisminIndia,fromtheVedas,Upanishads, andBhagavadGitathroughdevotionalmovements,Tantra,andmodernfiguressuchasGandhi. McMahan 367. Religions of China and Japan. (H) (NW) Spring 2009 ThiscoursecoversthemajorreligioustraditionsofChinaandJapanandtheirexpressionsinphilosophy,ritual,art,andpopularpractice.InChina,wewillconcentrateonConfucianismandTaoism, aswellasBuddhisminitsChineseforms.WecontinuestudyingBuddhisminJapan,aswellasthe indigenousShintotradition. McMahan

ADvANCED SEmINARS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

420. Interpreting Religion. Spring 2008 WhatarethemajortheoriesintheWestaboutthenatureofreligion?Howdotheyhelporhinder usinourinterpretationofthedocumentsofspecificreligioustraditions?Wewillreadsomeofthe majortheoristsofreligionindepthandseehowtheyshedlightonreligioustextsandmovements. Lardas Modern 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbyReligiousStudiesstaff.Permissionofchairpersonanddepartmental faculty.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

HolyMenandHolyWomen:HagiographyandSainthoodinIslam. IntroductiontoBuddhism. IntroductiontoJudaism:ClassicalTexts. IslamintheModernWorld. Pain,Power,andImitation:MartyrdominEarlyChristianity.

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RUSSIAN

RUSSIAN

Professor Lina Bernstein, Chair Lina Bernstein Diane Z. Sand Professor of Russian Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Russian

TheRussianprogramisdesignedtoprovidestudentswithlinguisticandintellectualtools foradeepunderstandingofthecountry'sliterature,language,andculture.Itoffersminors inlanguageandliterature,inRussianstudies,andcoursesforliberalartseducation,thus servingstudentswithspecializationsinmanyacademicareas. MinorsarestronglyencouragedtospendasummerorasemesterinRussia.F&Mstudents haveparticipatedinprogramssponsoredbytheUniversityofArizona,MiddleburyCollege,andtheSchoolofRussianandAsianStudies,amongothers.Thedepartmentsupports summerstudyabroadwiththeRussellgrantanddepartmentalsummertravelgrants.See theInternationalandOff-CampusStudysectionofthecatalogforfurtherinformation. Thedepartmentofferstwominorprograms. A minor in Russian Language and Literatureconsistsofsixcourses:Russian101,102, 201,and202;andtwoothercourseschosenfromamongRussian214,216,301,and302. Interestedstudentsshouldcontactthechairoftheprogram. A minor in Russian Studies consistsofsixcourses:Russian102,201,214,216,and History225,226.Interestedstudentsshouldcontactthechairoftheprogram. A list of regularly offered courses follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

COURSES TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

214. The Russian Novel from Pushkin to Tolstoy. (H)Fall 2008 Studyoftheemergenceofanationalliterarytraditioninnineteenth-centuryRussiaasitwasfashioned bywritersandtheirreadingpublics.EmphasisontheRussianreactiontotraditionalWesternEuropean formsofnarrativeandthespecialstatusoftheRussianwriterasasocial"moralbarometer."Readings willincludeworksbyKaramzin,Pushkin,Lermontov,Gogol,Turgenev,Dostoevsky,andTolstoy. Allreadingswillbeintranslation,withspecialassignmentsforthoseabletoreadinRussian. Bernstein 216. Literature and Politics in Soviet Russia. (H) Spring 2009 Beginningwiththe1917revolution,Russiahasundergoneanalmostuninterruptedseriesofprofound andoftenviolentchanges:civilstrife,collectivization,purges,war,andinvasion.Wewillstudymodern Russianliteratureinthecontextofpolitical,cultural,intellectual,andaestheticupheaval.Special attentiontothedisruptionintheliteraryprocesswhenartisobligedtoservesocialandpoliticalends. Allreadingswillbeintranslation,withspecialassignmentsforthoseabletoreadinRussian. Bernstein

COURSES TAUGHT IN RUSSIAN

101. Introduction to Elementary Russian. Every Fall IntroductiontothecontemporaryRussianlanguage.ThecoursepresentsthefundamentalsofRussian

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grammarandsyntax.Emphasisonlisteningcomprehension,speaking,reading,writing,andcultural awareness.Threeeighty-minutemeetingsperweek,plusanadditionalconversationhourconducted byanativespeaker. Bernstein, Sand 102. Introduction to Elementary Russian. Every Spring ContinuationofRussian101.Threeeighty-minutemeetingsperweek,plusanadditionalconversation hourconductedbyanativespeaker.Prerequisite:Russian101orplacement. Bernstein/Sand 201. Intermediate Russian. (LS) Fall 2008 Vocabularybuilding,continueddevelopmentofspeakingandlisteningskills,andactivecommand ofRussiangrammar.Readingsfromauthenticfictionandpoetry.Shortcompositionassignments. Threeeighty-minutemeetingsperweek,plusanadditionalconversationhourconductedbyanative speaker.Prerequisite:Russian102orplacement. Bernstein/Sand 202. High Intermediate Russian. (H) Spring 2008 ContinuationofRussian201.IncreasedmasteryofRussiangrammaticalstructuresthroughreading anddiscussionofauthenticliteraryandculturaltexts.Continuedemphasisonspeaking,reading, andwritingRussian.Threeeighty-minutemeetingsperweek,plusanadditionalconversationhour conductedbyanativespeaker.Prerequisite:Russian201orplacement. Bernstein/Sand 301. Introduction to Literary Texts (19th Century). (H) Spring 2008 Reading,intheoriginalRussian,worksoffictionandpoetrybynineteenth-centuryauthorssuch asPushkin,Tolstoy,Gogol,Dostoevsky,TurgenevandChekhov.Frequentwritingandtranslation assignments.Prerequisite:Russian202orplacement. Staff 490. Independent Study.

TOPICS COURSE TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

Russia:TheTwentiethCenturyinPrintandFilm. IntroductiontoLiteraryTexts(20thCentury).

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

Professor James E. Strick, Chair Kirk Miller Roger D. K. Thomas D. Alfred Owens Glenn Ross (on leave Spring 2008) Michael S. Billig Anthony Chemero Robert Walter Andrea N. Lommen Keely Maxwell James E. Strick William Seeley Patricia Justice Levin Elizabeth Praton Richard Pepino B. F. Fackenthal Professor of Biology John Williamson Nevin Professor of Geosciences Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology Dr. Elijah E. Kresge Professor of Philosophy Professor of Anthropology Associate Professor of Psychology and of Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind Associate Professor of Geosciences Assistant Professor of Astronomy Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society and of Earth and Environment Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy Senior Adjunct Asst. Professor of American Studies/ Women and Gender Studies Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy Director, Public Policy Program

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SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

Thisinterdisciplinaryprogramdealswiththenatureofscienceandtechnology,thehistory andphilosophyofscience,andtheinteractionofscience,technology,andhumansociety. Theprogramisdesignedtomakeitpossibleforstudentstolinkrelatedworkinseveral disciplines,includingamethodologycourseinatleastoneofthosedisciplines.Theprogram hasitsowncoursesanditdrawsoncoursesgiveninseveraldepartments. Theprogramoffersthree distinct minors:HistoryandPhilosophyofScience,Scienceand Society,andMedicineinSociety(includingstudyofpublichealth).Eachminorisdesigned toenablestudentstoconceiveandpursueindividualizedprogramsofinterdisciplinarystudy inthesethreebroadareas,withinthefieldofScience,TechnologyandSociety. Eachminorwillconsistofsixcourses,including:acorecoursethatisintroductoryto theproposedminor;anappropriatemid-levelmethodologycourse;threeelectives;anda capstonecourseinvolvingsubstantialworkonanindividualproject,eitherasindependent studyorinanadvancedseminar.Eachstudent'sproposedminorprogrammustbeapproved bythechairpersonoftheSTSProgram,actinginconsultationwiththeSTSCommittee. Thefollowinglistsincludecoursesthatareappropriateforeachminor.Thesecourselists anddesignationsarenotexhaustive;othercoursesmaybeappropriate.Somecourseslisted haveprerequisites.Studentswhodonotplantotakethoseprerequisitesinfulfillmentof otherdegreerequirements,apartfromtheSTSprogram,mayhavetotakemorethansix coursestocompleteoneoftheSTSminors. History and Philosophy of Science. Core:NTW106;NTW115/FND136;NTW119; NTW122;PHI213;oranintroductorycourseinanyofthenaturalsciences.Methods: PHI337;HIS360;orasecondcourseinanaturalsciencesequence.Electives:STS311; STS312;STS384;STS385;STS386;STS387;STS/PSY489. Science and Society. Core:NTW108;NTW124;NTW134;NTW136;NTW141;STS 117;GOV215.Methods:ECO210;GOV250;SOC302;ANT/WGS355;ANT410. Electives:STS220;STS223;STS312;STS313. Medicine in Society.Core:NTW109;NTW124;NTW126;NTW138;BIO102;BIO 110.Methods:BIO210;PSY230;BIO305.Electives:STS223;ANT225;ANT/WGS 355;SOC330;STS311;HIS400;STS/PUB481. AmajorinScience,Technology,andSocietymaybearrangedthroughtheSpecialStudies Program.Studentsinterestedinthisprogramareurgedtodiscusstheirspecialinterests withthechairpersonofSTS. Theindicationastowhenacoursewillbeofferedisbasedonthebestprojectionpossible. Itmaybesubjecttochange. TobeconsideredforhonorsinSTS,graduatingseniors,inadditiontomeetingtheCollege's generalrequirementsforhonors,mustcompleteaseniorthesis(490). A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthehomedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

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115. Evolution: Patterns and Processes of Change in Nature. (NSP) Every Year Thegeneralconceptofevolutionarychange:spontaneousemergenceandhistoricaldevelopmentof complex,organizedsystemsinnature.Evolutionandthenatureoftime.Energyandtheemergenceof orderfromchaos.Comparativestudyofprocessesresponsiblefordirectionalchangeintheuniverse, thesolarsystem,theEarthanditscrust,theevolutionoflivingorganisms,andthedevelopmentof humancultures.Timescalesofchange.Same as GEO 115. Thomas 117. The Environment and Human Values. (S) Every Semester Studyofhistoricalandmodernattitudestowardnature;humanuseofnature'sresources;effectsof thegrowthofscienceandtechnologyonhumanusesofandattitudestowardtheenvironment;and theabilityofmodernhumanstosubstantiallyaltertheenvironment(e.g.,byalteringglobaltemperature).Keyconcepts:humanpopulationgrowth;thenotionof"limitstogrowth";andthedifficulty ofmanagingtheuseofcommonpoolresources. Same as ENV 117. Strick, Maxwell 172. The Great Watersheds. Spring 2008 Investigationoftwomajorwatersheds:theDelawareandtheChesapeake(includingtheSusquehanna andPotomac).Examinationoftheirhistories,science,origins,andsocioeconomics,includingnear andfara-fieldenvironmentalissues--whichareverydifferent,thelawsthatprotectthem,thepeople thatlivethere,thesciencethatisbeingdone(especiallyalongtheChesapeake,e.g.oysters),and politicsthatprovideverydifferentlevelsofenvironmentalsafeguardstoeachbodyofwater. Same as ENV 172. Pepino 216. Environmental Policy. (S) Every Fall Surveyshowfederal,state,andlocalregulationsseektoprotecthumanhealthandtheenvironment. Introducesframeworksformanagingwastesandprotectingairquality,waterquality,andhabitats. Reviews policy tools, including economic incentives, penalties, and legal obligations. Reviews policyevaluation,focusingonfederalstatutes,thelegislativeprocessthatcreatesthem,theroleof thejudiciary,andthesuccessofenvironmentallawinchangingpractices. Maxwell 223. Biomedical Ethics. (H) Every Year Ethicalissuesrelatedtodevelopmentsinbiologyandmedicine,includingpopulationcontrol,genetic engineering,andtheallocationofmedicalresources. Same as PHI 223. Seeley 234. Population. (S) Fall 2008 Introductiontopopulationstudiesfocusingonthedemographyofmodernsocieties.Topicsinclude causesandeffectsofrapidpopulationgrowth,changingmortalityandfertility,urbangrowth,age/sex composition,andspatialdistribution.Whilebasicdemographicanalysiswillbecovered,emphasis willbeonthesocioculturalcontextofpopulationprocesses.Prerequisites:ANT100orSOC100or ECO100orENV114orENV117,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ANT/ENV 234. Billig 275. Women's Healing Systems. (S) Fall 2007 Abroadrangeoftopicsexplored,includingwomenastraditionalfolkhealers,influenceofgender onhealthcareanddelivery,theWomen'sHealthInitiativeandthecontemporaryhealthcareenvironment.Drawingfromtheliteratureofthesocialsciences,history,folklore,anthropology,allied healthprofessionsandmedicine,thematerialsandmethodsofthecoursewillbeinterdisciplinary. Guestlecturersbylocalpractitionersinvarioushealthsystemsandfieldtripswillaugmentclass discussions.Same as WGS 275. P. Levin 311. History of Medicine. (S) Spring 2008 ThehistoryofmedicinewithparticularattentiontoAmericanmedicine.Therelationshipbetween medicineandsocietyisstudiedinitshistoricalcontext.Welookindetailatsometrendsinmodern medicineandthecurrentdebateovernationalhealthcarepolicyinlightofthehistoryofmedicine. Strick 312. Environmental History. (S) Spring 2009 Examinationofvariousapproachestoenvironmentalandecologicalhistory.Focusesonwaysinwhich thephysicalandbiologicalworldhaveaffectedhumanhistoryandonwaysinwhichhumansocial

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andpoliticalorganization,economicactivities,culturalvalues,andscientifictheorieshaveshaped ouralterationandconservationofnature.Selectedcasestudiesfromenvironmentalandecological history,withemphasisonthe17ththroughthe20thcenturies.Same as ENV 312. Strick 313. Nuclear Weapons, Power, and Waste Disposal. (S) Spring 2008 Developmentofnucleartechnology,beginningwiththeatomicbombeffortsofWWII.Thecourse dealsfirstwiththetechnologyitself,aswellaswiththewaysinwhichitwasembeddedinanddrove Americanandinternationalpolitics,includingthearmsraceandtheColdWar.Includespostwar developmentofciviliannuclearpowerreactors,creationoftheAtomicEnergyCommission,andthe nationaldebateovernuclearpowerandwastedisposalmethods.Same as ENV 313. Strick 337. Philosophy of Natural Science. (H) Every year Thegoals,methods,assumptions,andlimitationsofnaturalscience.Specialattentionwillbepaid tothephilosophyofpsychology,cognitivescience,andevolutionarybiology.Same as PHI/SPM 337. Chemero, Ross 373. Public Health Research: Pregnancy Outcomes in American Women. (S) Spring 2008 Thisinterdisciplinaryseminarwillexplorewomen'shealthandpregnancyoutcomethroughthelenses ofbothscienceandsocialanalysis.Inadditiontoreadinganddiscussiononinfluencesonpregnancy outcomes,studentswillexamineresultsofsurveysofAmishwomeninLancasterCounty,AfricanAmericanandHispanicwomeninLancasterCity,andwomenofchild-bearingageincentralPA. ThiscourseissupportedbyfundsfromthePADeptofHealth.(Anycoursethatincludesmethods ofdataanalysisorpermission.)Same as GOV/PUB/WGS 373. Miller 384. Changing Views of the Earth, 1650­1850. (S) Fall 2008 AVeryWreckofaWorld:speculativecosmologies,descriptivenaturalhistory,andtheoriginsof ascienceoftheEarth.TheageoftheEarthandour"PlaceinNature":afallfromgrace,limitless horizons,andtheVictoriancommitmenttoprogress.Nationalandsocialoriginsofthescienceand scientists.RelationofnewgeologicalconceptstotheIndustrialRevolutionandcontemporarycultural themes,includingtheirexpressioninthearts.Prerequisite:permissionofinstructor.Same as GEO 384. Thomas 385. The Darwinian Revolution. (S) Fall 2007 ThisseminarcoursedrawsonhistoricalandscientificworktoanalyzetherootsofDarwinianthinking ineconomics,socialpolicytowardthepoor,religiousthought,politics,andthesciencesinwhich Darwinwastrained.Inindividualresearchprojects,studentsassessthewaysinwhich"Darwinism" wasappliedforsocial,political,economicandtheologicalpurposes,aswellasscientificones.This courseprovidesthehistoricalbackgroundnecessaryforunderstandingDarwinianbiologyandthe present-dayCreation/evolutionconflict.Prerequisite:Permissionofinstructorrequiredforfirst-year studentstoenroll. Strick 386. Changing Concepts of the Universe. Spring 2008 Historicalexaminationofprimitiveandearlycosmologiestopresent-daytheoriesoftheorganization, extent,andnatureoftheuniverse.EarlyGreekastronomytopresent-day"bigbang"theory.Useof simpleastronomicalinstrumentstoreproduceobservationsofearlyastronomers.(Notalaboratory course.)Same as AST 386. Lommen 387. Archaeoastronomy. Spring 2009 Fundamentalastronomyofancientcultures;StonehengeandotherstoneringsinEnglandandEurope; circlesandtemplesintheAmericas,Asia,andAfrica;time-keepingandcalendars;predictionsof seasonsandeclipses.Methodsofanalysis;motionsofcelestialbodies;useofplanetarium,celestial globes,andgrids;surveyingofsites.(Notalaboratorycourse.)Same as AST 387. Praton 390. Topics in Science, Technology and Society. Studyofatopicortopicsintherelationshipbetweenscience,technology,andsociety.Topicsvary bysemesterandareofferedbythefacultyofseveralacademicdepartments.Maybetakenmorethan onceifthetopicchanges. ArecenttopichasbeenSocialHistoryofTuberculosis. Staff

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SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY­ SCIENTIFIC AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES OF mIND

489. History and Philosophy of Psychology. Every Fall ThehistoricaloriginsofcontemporarypsychologyinEuropeanphilosophy,physiology,andbiology, andsubsequentdevelopmentoftheschoolsofstructuralism,functionalism,Gestaltbehaviorism,and psychoanalysis.Emphasisonidentifyingthegoals,implicitassumptions,andpotentialcontributions ofscientificpsychology.Prerequisite:Seniorpsychologymajorstatusorpermissionofinstructor. Same as PSY/SPM 489. Owens, M. Anderson

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

GeopoliticsandHumanitarianEmergencies.(GeopoliticalCrises)

SCIENTIFIC AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES OF mIND

Professor Bennett W. Helm, Chair Michael J. Murray D. Alfred Owens Glenn Ross (on leave Spring 2008) Roger K. R. Thompson (on leave 2007­2008) Bennett W. Helm Anthony Chemero Jack F. Heller Stephan Käufer Michael L. Anderson Krista M. Casler Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities and Philosophy Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology Dr. Elijah E. Kresge Professor of Philosophy Dr. E. Paul and Francis H. Reiff Professor of Psychology Professor of Philosophy Associate Professor of Psychology and Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind Associate Professor of Psychology Associate Professor of Philosophy Assistant Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Psychology

ScientificandPhilosophicalStudiesofMind(SPM)seekstobridgethesciencesandthe humanitiesinthestudyofacommontopic:thenatureofmind.Inordertoprovideabreadth ofperspectiveaswellasdepthinanareaofspecialinterest,theSPMcurriculumdivides intotwoAreasofConcentration:CognitiveScienceandMoralPsychology. Cognitive science is concerned with how minds fit into the natural world. Nature is mechanistic;couldthemindbeamachine?Canotheranimals--orevencomputersor robots--think?Whatisthe(neural?)basisforconsciousness?Howdomindsandmental abilitiesdevelopaswemature? Moralpsychologyisconcernedwithwhatitisforanindividualtobeamoralagent--worthwhileandresponsibleinawaythatrocks,trees,andthe"lower"animalsappearnottobe. Canwesquareourmoralassessmentofpersonswithapsychologicalunderstandingofthe self?Whatdoesittakeforalifetobesignificantormeaningful? Successfullybridgingthesciencesandhumanitiessoastoanswerthesequestionsrequires thatstudentsgainabroadbackgroundinboththecontentandmethodologyofphilosophy andpsychology;thecoursesinthe"Core"ofthemajoraimtoprovidethisbackground.

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Theneededdepthisprovidedintheconcentrationsthemselves,inwhichmajorsfurther honetheirskillsofcriticalthinkingandphilosophicalanalysisinthecontextoftheinterpretation, assessment, and even construction of empirical research.The SPM major culminatesintheSeniorResearchSeminar,inwhichstudentsconductresearchonatopic thatcombinesbothphilosophicalandscientificapproachestothestudyofatopicoftheir choosing. Majors may also expand their senior theses with the goal of presenting the projectforDepartmentalHonors. A major in SPMconsistsof12courses.Ofthese,5coursesarerequiredasapartof thecommoncore,and6coursesmustbewithinaparticularareaofconcentration.(For details,seebelow.)Theremainingcoursecanbefromeitherconcentrationorfromthe followinglist:MSS103;MSS104;MSS105;MSS116;MSS118;MSS123;MSS127; MSS131;MSS137;MSS139;MSS142;NTW116;NTW121;NTW129orNTW133; PHI213;PSY489. StudentsintendingtomajorinSPMareencouragedtotakeoneormoreofthefollowing coursesintheirfirstyear:PSY100,PSY230,MSS104,oroneoftheotherFoundations curriculumcoursesfromtheabovelist.StudentswhodecidetoentertheSPMmajorafter reachingthe300-levelinpsychology,butwithouthavingtakenIntroductoryPsychology, shouldsubstituteanysecond300-levelpsychologycourseforPSY100.

CORE

Thefollowingcoursesarerequiredforthecore: PSY100:IntroductiontoPsychology PSY230:ExperimentalDesignandStatistics SPM250:PhilosophyofMind SPM337:PhilosophyofNaturalScience SPM499:SeniorResearchSeminar

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION

MajorsmayselecteithertheCognitiveScienceortheMoralPsychologyConcentration. Thesixcourseswithintheconcentrationmustbeevenlysplitbetweenthosedesignated assciencecoursesandthosedesignatedashumanitiescourses.Inaddition,atleastone courseinthesciencesaswellasatleastonecourseinthehumanitiesmustbeatthe300levelorhigher.Thefollowingtablesummarizeswhatcoursesfulfillwhatrequirements intheconcentrations.

Cognitive Science

Sciences: CPS210:IntermediateProgramming;BIO220:PrinciplesofPhysiology andDevelopment;SPM240:Neuroscience;BFB250:AnimalBehavior;SPM301: SensationandPerception;SPM302:Biopsychology;SPM303:EcologicalPsychology;SPM304:DevelopmentalPsychology;SPM305:CognitivePsychology;SPM 306:EvolutionofMindandIntelligence;SPM373:EmbodiedCognition;SPM375: CognitiveNeuroscience;SPM48x:CollaborativeResearch Humanities: LIN101:GeneralLinguistics;PHI244:SymbolicLogic;SPM255: MobileRobotics;PHI331:FreeWill;PHI335:Epistemology;PHI339:Philosophy of Language; PHI 342: Rational Choice; SPM 355: Possibility ofArtificial Intelligence

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SCIENTIFIC AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES OF mIND moral Psychology

Sciences: SOC220:SocialPsychology;SOC301:HistoryofSociology;SPM304: DevelopmentalPsychology;SPM307:PersonalityPsychology;SPM308:Psychopathology;SPM309:SocialPsychology;SOC320:Criminology;SOC380:Sociology ofLaw;SPM489:HistoryandPhilosophyofPsychology;SPM48x:Collaborative Research Humanities: PHI220:MoralTheory;GOV241:ClassicalPoliticalTheory;GOV 242:ModernPoliticalTheory;PHI319:20th-CenturyContinentalPhilosophy;SPM 331:FreeWill;SPM360:ConceptofaPerson;SPM361:MoralPsychology;SPM 365:FriendshipandCharacter;RST385:SoulinSearchofSelfhood MajorsinScientificandPhilosophicalStudiesofMindhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:AntiochCollegeProgram,BuddhistStudiesinJapan,Kyoto, Japan;ButlerUniversityProgram,UniversityofMelbourne,Melbourne,Australia;American UniversityinCairo,Cairo,Egypt;BostonUniversityProgram,Niamey,Niger. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement. Notethatcoursesbelowmarkedwithanasterisk(*)havepre-requisitesthatdonotcount towardtheSPMmajor.

I. CORE

250. Philosophy of Mind. (H) Every Spring Ageneralintroductiontothephilosophyofmind,addressingfourkeyphilosophicalissues:thenature ofpsychologicalexplanation;themind-bodyproblem;thepossibilityofartificialintelligence;and thenatureofpersons.Prerequisite:onecourseinphilosophyorpsychology.Same as PHI 250. Helm 337. Philosophy of Natural Science. (H) Every Year Thegoals,methods,assumptions,andlimitationsofnaturalscience.Specialattentionwillbepaidto thephilosophyofpsychology,cognitivescience,andevolutionarybiology.Same as PHI/STS 337. Chemero, Ross, Seeley 499. Senior Research Seminar. Every Fall Intensive research and writing on a topic of the student's choice. Permission of the instructor is required. Chemero Courses not cross-listed with SPM. See department listing for descriptions. Psychology100.IntroductoryPsychology.(N) Psychology230.ExperimentalDesignandStatistics.

II. AREAS OF CONCENTRATION A. Cognitive Science

1.Sciences

240. Neuroscience. (N) Every Spring Principlesofnervoussystemfunctionfromthemolecularthroughtheorgansystemlevelasillustrated

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bythevertebratesandinvertebrates.Approximatelyonehalfofthecoursewillcoverbasiccellular principlesofnervoussystemorganization,development,andphysiology.Theremaininglectureswill considertheroleoffunctionally-identifiedneuralnetworksinbehaviorcontrol.Prerequisite:BIO 220orBFB/PSY302.Same as BFB/BIO/PSY 240. Jinks 301. Sensation and Perception. Every Fall Reviewofphenomenaandresearchonsensoryprocessesandtheirroleinperception.Readingsand discussionwillexamineevidencefrombehavioral,psychophysical,andphysiologicalresearch,and considerimplicationsforexplanationsarisingfromthemechanistic,cognitive,computational,and naturalistictheoreticalperspectives.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230or BIO210.Same as BFB/PSY 301. Owens 302. Biopsychology. (N) Every Fall Behavioralandmentalprocessesasviewedfromabiologicalperspectivewithparticularemphasis upontheroleofneurochemicalandendocrinefactorsincentralnervoussystemfunction.Topics coveredwillincludereproductionandgender,chemicalsensesandingestion,emotion,learning, sleep,andpsychopathology.Aneuropharmacologicalapproachtothestudyofthenervoussystem willbeemphasized.Prerequisite:PSY100orBIO110orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230.Same as BFB/PSY 302. Heyser 304. Developmental Psychology. Every Fall Anexaminationoftherelativecontributionsofnatureandnurtureonchildren'sbehavioral,cognitive, and perceptual development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Topics include thedevelopmentoflanguage,concepts,intelligence,socialization,motorabilities,andemotional understanding,withdiscussioninformedbycurrentandclassicprimaryreading. Researchactivities andanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY 230orBIO210.Same as PSY 304. Casler 305. Cognitive Psychology. Every Fall Thiscourseprovidesanoverviewofhumancognitiveprocesses.Topicscoveredincludeknowledge acquisition,memory,conceptformation,textprocessing,thinking,problemsolving,anddecision making.Wewillcompareseveralapproachestothestudyofcognition,andwewillexamineand evaluatebothclassicandcontemporarytheoryandresearch.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210. Same as PSY 305. M. Anderson 306. Evolution of Mind and Intelligence. Spring 2009 Whatisintelligentbehavior,whatisitfor,andhowdiditevolve?Wewillattempttoanswerthese questionsandunderstandthenatureanddevelopmentofMindfromacomparativeperspective.We willdosobyinvestigatinglearning,perception,memory,thinking,andlanguageinanimalsandhumans.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisites:Oneof:PSY100, PSY301,PSY302,PSY303,PSY304,PSY305,BIO240,BIO250,orPHI338,orpermission. Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as BFB/PSY 306. R. Thompson 373. Embodied Cognition. Every Spring Inthiscoursewewillstudyintelligencebyfocusingonperceptionandactionintheenvironment. Tothisend,wewillfocusonecologicalpsychology,robotics,artificialneuralnetworks,andsimulatedevolution.Althoughstudentswillbeexpectedtobuildsimplerobotsandworkwithcomputer models,nobackgroundknowledgeofengineeringorcomputingwillbeassumed.(Knowledgeof programmingisnotrequired.)Prerequisite:PSY100.Same as PSY 373. Chemero 480. Collaborative Research in Comparative Cognition and Behavior. (N) Every Spring Comparativeperspectivesandapproachestothestudyofselectedtopicsdrawnfromcognitiveand developmental psychology, cognitive ethology, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience, cognitive science,andbehavioralprimatology.Researchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210,oneof PSY250,301,302,303,304,305,306;oroneofBIO250,330,379;oroneofBFB250,301,302, 306,330,379;orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as BFB/PSY 480. Blaser

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481. Collaborative Research in Developmental Psychology. (N) Every Spring Anoverviewofmethodsforconductingresearchwithchildren,withanemphasisonethicsofworkingwithchildparticipants.Currentempiricalandtheoreticalissuesindevelopmentalpsychologyare addressedthroughliteraturereviewandgroupresearchprojects.Topicsreflectingstudentinterests are considered. Laboratory research required. Prerequisites: PSY 230 or BIO 210; PSY 304, or permission. Same as PSY 481. Casler 483. Collaborative Research in Human Cognition. (N) Every Spring An in-depth consideration of selected empirical and theoretical issues in cognitive psychology. Emphasisisonrecentliteraturecoveringbasicresearchincognitivepsychology,cognitiveneuroscience,andcomputationalneurosciencemodeling,includingsuchtopicsasattentionandresource allocation,representation,conceptformation,memory,andtopicsreflectingresearchinterestsof participatingstudents.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY230orBIO210;PSY/SPM 305,orpermission.Same as PSY 483. M. Anderson 485. Collaborative Research in Human Perception and Action. (N) Every Fall Contemporaryresearchandtheoriesoftheinterrelationsofperceptualandmotorprocesses.Content willbedrawnfromtheliteraturesofexperimentalpsychology,neurophysiology,andhumanfactors. Animal models and computational algorithms will be considered when applicable, with primary emphasisonimplicationsforhumanperformance.Laboratoryresearchrequired.Prerequisites:PSY 230orBIO210;PSY301,orpermission.Same as PSY 485. Owens Courses not cross-listed with SPM. See department listing for descriptions. Biology220.PrinciplesofPhysiologyandDevelopment.*(N) ComputerScience210.IntermediateProgramming.* Psychology/BFB/Biology250.AnimalBehavior.(N) Psychology/BFB372.ConditioningandLearning. Psychology487.CollaborativeResearchinBiologicalPsychology.(N)

2.Humanities

255. Mobile Robotics. (H) Every Spring Canwebuildintelligentmachines?We'llattempttoanswerthisquestionbyexaminingboththe philosophicalandtheoreticalbackgroundofartificialintelligenceandresearchintomobilerobotics. Wewillalsobuildourownrobotssoastoprovidepracticalexperienceinformingouranswersto thisphilosophicalquestion.Same as PHI 255. Helm 331. Free Will. (H) Spring 2008, Spring 2010 Anexaminationofcontemporarytheoriesconcerningthenatureoffreechoice.Specialattentionis giventothenatureofmoralresponsibilityandtherelationshipbetweenfreechoiceanddeterminism. Prerequisites:PHI100orpermissionofinstructor.Same as PHI 331. Murray 355. Possibility of Artificial Intelligence. (H) Spring 2008 Acriticalanalysisoftheprogressandprospectsofattemptstobuildintelligentmachines.Prerequisites:PHI244andSPM/PHI250;orpermissionofinstructor. Same as PHI/PSY 355. Chemero Courses not cross-listed with SPM. See department listing for description. Linguistics101.GeneralLinguistics. Philosophy244.SymbolicLogic.(H) Philosophy335.Epistemology.(H)

B. moral Psychology

1.Sciences

304. Developmental Psychology. Every Fall Anexaminationoftherelativecontributionsofnatureandnurtureonchildren'sbehavioral,cognitive, and perceptual development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Topics include

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thedevelopmentoflanguage,concepts,intelligence,socialization,motorabilities,andemotional understanding,withdiscussioninformedbycurrentandclassicprimaryreading.Researchactivities andanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY 230orBIO210.Same as PSY 304. Casler 307. Personality Psychology. Every Spring Thiscourseprovidesanevaluativeandcomparativeoverviewofmajormodelsofpersonalityselected to illustrate psychodynamic, trait, cognitive, humanistic, physiological, and learning approaches. Thecoursewillemphasizethetestabilityofthemodelsandtheirconnectionwithcurrentresearch. Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite:PSY100orpermission. Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as PSY 307. Campbell 308. Psychopathology. Every Spring Thiscoursewillserveasanintroductiontodescriptiveandtheoreticalapproachestothestudyof psychopathology. In addition to the study of disease-related processes, special emphasis will be placedupondevelopinganunderstandingofthosebiological,psychological,andsocialconditions thatareessentialforhealthypsychosocialfunctioningacrossthelifespan.Prerequisite:PSY100or permission.Same as PSY 308. Penn 309. Social Psychology. Every Spring Thiscourseinvolvesthestudentinexplorationofsomeofthebasictopicsinexperimentalapproaches tosocialpsychology,suchascognitiveandmotivationalperspectivesonsocialphenomena,therole ofaffectandemotioninsocialaction,andcurrentusesoftheconceptofself.Issuesexploredinthis contextincludeself-affirmationprocesses,regulationofsocialaction,andtherelationshipbetween affect,cognition,andaction.Researchactivitiesandanalysesintegratedintocoursework.Prerequisite: PSY100orpermission.Corequisite:PSY230orBIO210.Same as PSY 309. Wilson 481. Collaborative Research in Developmental Psychology. (N) Every Spring Anoverviewofmethodsforconductingresearchwithchildren,withanemphasisonethicsofworkingwithchildparticipants.Currentempiricalandtheoreticalissuesindevelopmentalpsychologyare addressedthroughliteraturereviewandgroupresearchprojects.Topicsreflectingstudentinterests are considered. Laboratory research required. Prerequisites: PSY 230 or BIO 210; PSY 304, or permission.Same as PSY 481. Casler 489. History and Philosophy of Psychology. Every Fall ThehistoricaloriginsofcontemporarypsychologyinEuropeanphilosophy,physiology,andbiology, andsubsequentdevelopmentoftheschoolsofstructuralism,functionalism,Gestalt,behaviorism,and psychoanalysis.Emphasisonidentifyingthegoals,implicitassumptions,andpotentialcontributions ofscientificpsychology.Prerequisite:Seniorpsychologymajorstatusorpermissionofinstructor. Same as PSY/STS 489. M. Anderson, Owens Courses not cross-listed with SPM. See department listing for description. Psychology482.CollaborativeResearchinSocialPsychology.(N) Psychology484.CollaborativeResearchinPersonality.(N) Psychology488.CollaborativeResearchinPsychopathology.(N) Sociology220.SocialPsychology.* Sociology301.HistoryofSociology.* Sociology320.Criminology.* Sociology480.SociologyofLaw.*

2.Humanities

331. Free Will. (H) Spring 2008, Spring 2010 Anexaminationofcontemporarytheoriesconcerningthenatureoffreechoice.Specialattentionis giventothenatureofmoralresponsibilityandtherelationshipbetweenfreechoiceanddeterminism. Prerequisites:PHI100orpermission.Same as PHI 331. Murray

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360. Concept of a Person. (H) Fall 2007, Fall 2009 Acarefulexaminationofwhatitistobeaperson,asanautonomousmoralagentwhoselifecanbe meaningful,andofwhatdistinguishespersonsfromthe"lower"animals.Same as PHI 360. Helm 361. Moral Psychology. (H) Fall 2008 Moralpsychologyisthestudyofhumanmoralagency.Assuch,itisconstrainedby,andmustcohere with,thefactsabouthumanpsychology;butitsprimaryfocusisonhumangood,anevaluativenotion. Centralquestionsinclude:Whatarereasonsandwhatroledotheyplayinaction?Whatischaracter andhowisitrelatedtovirtue?Whatisfreewill,canwehaveit,andhowdowebestexplainweaknessofthewill?Same as PHI 361. Helm Courses not cross-listed with SPM. See department listing for description. Government241.ClassicalPoliticalTheory.(H) Government242.ModernPoliticalTheory.(H) Philosophy220.MoralTheory.(H) Philosophy319.20th-CenturyContinentalPhilosophy.(H) 385.SoulinSearchofSelfhood:TheWritingsofSt.Augustine.

III. SPECIAL TOPICS.

Seeprogramchairpersonforinformationonwhatmajorrequirementsparticularspecial topicsofferingssatisfy.

170­179, 270­279, 370­379, 470­479. Special Topics in SPM. 490. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheSPMstaff.Permissionofthechairpersonrequired.

SOCIOLOGY

Professor Katherine E. McClelland, Chair Joel P. Eigen Carol J. Auster Howard L. Kaye Katherine E. McClelland Jerome I. Hodos Edward S. Gallagher Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology Professor of Sociology Professor of Sociology Associate Professor of Sociology Assistant Professor of Sociology Visiting Instructor of Sociology

Sociology is both a specialized academic discipline and an important part of a liberal education.Asasocialandculturalscience,sociologystudieshumaninteractionwithin andbetweengroups,theforcesofinterestandmeaningthathelptoshapeandreshapethat interaction,anditsconsequencesforthelivesofindividualsandsocialgroups.Asoneof theliberalarts,sociologyenrichesthestudyofhistory,philosophy,science,andthearts, andassistsstudentsinexaminingtheirpersonallives,professionalactivities,andpublic issuesinamorethoughtfulandcriticalway.Inbothcapacities,andasourgraduatesattest, thestudyofsociologycanbeexcellentpreparationforawiderangeofcareersincluding law,education,business,governmentservice,medicine,andsocialwork. A major in Sociologyconsistsofeightcoursestakenwithinthedepartment.Thesecourses mustincludeSOC100,301,302,anda400-levelseminarorIndependentStudy.Inaddition,majorsmusttakefourcoursesinrelatedsocialsciences,twoofwhichareinasingle

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department,withoneofthesebeingacoursethatmovesbeyondtheintroductorylevel. Related social sciences include the following: 1)All courses inAnthropology (ANT), Economics(ECO),Government(GOV),andHistory(HIS);2)Allcoursesinotherdepartmentscross-listedwithAnthropology,Economics,Government,andHistory;3)Courses inAfricanaStudies(AFS),AmericanStudies(AMS),JudaicStudies(JST),Womenand GenderStudies(WGS),andScience,Technology,andSociety(STS)thatarecross-listed withAnthropology,Economics,Government,orHistoryorthathaveasocialscience(S) designation;4)LIN120(Sociolinguistics);5)SelectedcoursesinBusiness,Organization, andSociety(BOS)andPsychology(PSY).Inaddition,studentsmajoringinSociology withasecondorjointmajoroutsidethesocialsciencesmaycounttheirCCSFoundations courseasarelatedsocialsciencecourse.StudentsshouldconsulttheiradviserinSociologywithquestionsabouttherelatedsocialsciencecourses. ForstudentscompletingaSociology/GovernmentdoublemajororaGovernmentmajor andaSociologyminor,GOV250maybesubstitutedforSOC302.Studentselectingthis optionareadvisedthattheotherrequirementsremainthesame:8coursesinSociology foraSociologymajor;and6coursesinSociologyforaSociologyminor. Sociology100isaprerequisitetoallothercoursesinthedepartment.Prerequisitesmay bewaivedonlybytheinstructor. ThewritingrequirementintheSociologymajorismetbycompletionofthenormalcourses requiredtocompletethemajor. AlthoughSOC210andSOC220arenotrequiredcourses,studentscontemplatingamajor inSociologyareencouragedtotakethesecoursesearlyinthemajorsequenceasthese subjectsareimportantforupper-levelcourses. A minor in Sociologyconsistsofatotalofsixcourses,includingSOC100,301,and302, andthreeothercoursesselectedinconsultationwiththestudent'sdepartmentaladviser. MajorsintheDepartmentofSociologyhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:ButlerUniversityPrograminBrisbane,Australia;SyracuseUniversityPrograminFlorence,Italy;ArcadiaUniversityProgramsinEdinburgh,ScotlandandLondon, England; Institute for the International Education of Students programs in Barcelona, SpainandBuenosAires,Argentina;andtheSchoolforInternationalTrainingprogramin JamaicaandBelize. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

100. Introductory Sociology. (S) Every Semester Introductiontothebasicconcepts,theories,andmethodsusedtostudyhumansocialinteractionand socialstructures.Readingsandtopicsvarysectiontosection,buttypicallyaddresssocialstratification(primarilybyrace,class,andgender)anditsimpactonindividualandsociallife,thesourcesof socialorderandsocialchange,devianceandsocialcontrol,andtheinterrelationsbetweenindividuals andsociety.Prerequisitetoallotherdepartmentalofferings. Staff 210. Class, Status, and Power. (S) Fall 2007 Acomparativesurveyoftheoriesandresearchoninequality.Geographicpatternsofinequalitywill bethemaintheme,inadditiontoracial,economicandpoliticalvarieties.Coversbothdeveloped

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SOCIOLOGY

anddevelopingcountries;pastcasestudieshaveincludedtheUS,Britain,SouthAfrica,andBrazil. Prerequisite:SOC100. Hodos 220. Social Psychology. (S) Spring 2008 Studyoftherelationshipbetweenselfandsociety,asseenthroughsociologicalsocialpsychology. Examinationofthegenesisofthesocialpsychologicalframeworkinbothpsychologyandsociology,andconsiderationofitsapplicationswithinsociologytoday.Emphasisonsymbolicinteraction andrelatedtheories.Topicsincludethestudyoflanguageandtalk;therelationshipsbetweenrole, identity,andself;sociologyofemotions;socialization;andtheroleofalloftheseinthecreation, maintenance,andchangeofsocialstructures.Prerequisite:SOC100. McClelland 301. History of Sociological Theory. (S) Every Fall An examination of the development of social thought from the Enlightenment to the early 20th century.Mainfocusonpastattemptstoexplainthenatureofcapitalismanditsattendanttransformationoffamily,work,andcommunity.Courseprobesthequestionofhowsharedidealsanddivisive interestsaffectboththeinternalcoherenceofhumansocietyandthestudyofhumansocietyaswell. Prerequisite:SOC100. Eigen, Kaye 302. Sociological Research Methods. (S) Every Fall Strategiesanddesignofsociologicalresearch,including:thedevelopmentofhypotheses;operationalizationofconcepts;ethics;anddatacollection,analysis,andpresentation.Specialattentiongiven tothemethodsofsurveyresearch,useofastatisticalpackage,andtabularanalysis.Prerequisite: SOC100. Auster, McClelland 310. Urban Sociology. (S) Spring 2008 A comprehensiveintroductiontothesociologicalstudyofcities. Topicsincludemigration,theories ofurbandevelopment,gentrification,poverty,urbanpolitics,suburbanizationandglobalization.CitiesdiscussedincludePhiladelphia,Bangkok,Barcelona,MexicoCity,Lagos,Cairo,Chicago,Los Angeles,Boston,andmore.Prerequisite:SOC100. Hodos 315. Sociology of Religion. (S) Fall 2007 ThesociologicalstudyofthecharacterandfunctionsofreligionprimarilyintheUnitedStates.Attentionwillbefocusedonthesocialroleofreligionandtheeffectofsocialconditionsonreligion. Topicswillincludethesocialconstructionofreligiousworldviewsandidentities,religiousritual andexperience,modernityandsecularization,religiousinstitutionsintheU.S.,andtherelationship betweenreligionandrace,gender,sexuality,politicsandviolence.Prerequisite:SOC100. Gallagher 320. Criminology. (S) Spring 2008 Surveystheoreticalandempiricaleffortstostudycrime,crimecausation,andpunishment.Special attentionpaidtothehistoricaloriginsanddevelopmentofnotionsofcriminalresponsibility,trial defenses,andthecourtroomdivisionoflabor.Sociological,psychological,andbiologicalexplanationsofcriminalbehaviorareexaminedalongwithresearchattemptstostudythedevelopmentof delinquentandcriminalcareers.Prerequisite:SOC100. Eigen 330. Sociology of Medicine. (S) Fall 2007 Anexaminationofthe socialandculturalfactorswhichinfluencetheoccurrence,distribution,and experience ofillness,theorganizationofmedicalcareinAmericansociety anditsrapidlyescalating costs,thetechnicalandethicalperformanceofphysicians,andtheethicaldilemmasassociatedwith modernmedicine.Prerequisite:SOC100. Kaye 340. Social Movements. (S) Fall 2007 Organizedactionbygroupsattemptingtochangethesocialandpoliticalsystemarerare,buttheir impacthasbeensignificant.Whenandwhydomovementsoccur?Whojoins,supports,remainsin, anddropsoutofmovements?Howaremovementsorganizedandhowaretheyrelatedtoboththe stateandmedia?Topicsincluderesourcemobilization,politicalprocesses,ideologiesandframing; statefacilitationandrepression;recruitment;andsocialmovementoutcomes.Movementsstudied

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SOCIOLOGY

include:NewLeft;civil,women's,andgayrights;whitesupremacist,labor,environmentalandmen's movements.Prerequisite:SOC100. Gallagher 350. Sociology of Gender. (S) Every Spring Anexaminationofthetransmissionofgenderexpectationsandtheirimpactonwomen'sandmen's educationalandemploymentpatterns,interpersonalrelationships,psychologicaltraits,familypatterns,andsexualbehavior.Considerationoftheroleofbiology,theintersectionofgenderwithother variablessuchassocialclass,andtheimpactofmicro-andmacro-scalechange.Prerequisite:SOC 100. Same as WGS 350. Auster 360. Race and Ethnic Relations. (S) Spring 2009 Studyofintergrouprelations,withanemphasisonprocessesofracial/ethnicstratification,assimilation,andculturalpluralism.FocusisonAmericansociety,pastandpresent.Topicsincludethe developmentandchangeofrace/ethnicidentities,intergroupattitudes,racialideologies,immigration, education,andtheintersectionofracewithsocialclassandgender.Prerequisite:SOC100.Same as AFS 360. McClelland 370­379, 470­479. Topics in Sociology. (S) Asingleproblemareaofmajorimportanceinsociology.Thecontentmaychangefromsemesterto semester.Maybetakenforcreditmorethanonce.Topicscoursesenvisionedfor2007­2008 will includetheSociologyofCulture. 384. Urban Education. (S) Spring 2008 Acommunity-basedlearningcourseanalyzingissuesfacing urbanschoolsfromasociologicalperspective,withparticularattentiontotheroleofrace,class,andgenderatboththemacroandmicro levels.Othertopicsincludeteachers,schoolsasorganizations,thesocialpsychologicalperspective onlearning,thepoliticsofcurriculaandinstruction,accountabilityandothercontemporaryreform movements.Studentsareexpectedtointegrateandapplytheirknowledgethroughworkinalocal school.Prerequisite:SOC100.Same as PUB 384. McClelland

SEmINARS

410. Globalization. (S) Spring 2008 Anin-depthinvestigationofeconomic,politicalandculturalaspectsofglobalization.Topicsinclude migration,economicinequality,transnationalsocialmovements,developmentandtrade,thefuture ofthenation-state,urbanization,andculture/media.Studentswillbeexpectedtowriteasubstantial researchpaper.Prerequisites:SOC100andSOC301,orpermissionofinstructor. Hodos 430. Sociology of Work Fall 2007 Workasanactivityandoccupationasasocially-definedrole.Topicsincludeoccupationalchoice andsocialization,workandfamily,workeralienation,deviantoccupationalbehavior,andmobility. Prerequisite:SOC100. Auster 480. The Sociology of Law. (S) Spring 2009 Examineshistoricalandcontemporaryschoolsofjurisprudence:thejudicialselectionofprecedents forlegaldecision-making.Particularattentionpaidtoconflictingclaimsregardingthepurposeand consequencesoflaw,competingschoolsoflegalinterpretationemergingfromthewritingsofMarx, Durkheim,andWeber,andcontemporarypoliticalandsocialdebatestouchingonlegalrights.Individualstudentpapersaredistributedtoseminarparticipantsforpresentationanddebate.Prerequisite: Sociology320orpermissionofinstructor. Eigen 490. Independent Study. (S) IndependentstudydirectedbytheSociologystaff.Permissionofchairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

SociologyofCulture.

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SPANISH

SPANISH

Professor Carmen C. Tisnado, Chair Carmen C. Tisnado Kimberly M. Armstrong (on leave Spring 2008) Beatriz Caamaño Alegre (on leave Fall 2007) Sofía Ruiz-Alfaro Veronika Ryjik (on leave Spring 2008) Neryamn R. Nieves Donna Chambers Carmen García-Armero Paul W. Seaver, Jr. Rita M. Gargotta Yolanda Gordillo Professor of Spanish Associate Professor of Spanish Assistant Professor of Spanish Assistant Professor of Spanish Assistant Professor of Spanish Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish Visiting Instructor of Spanish Visiting Instructor of Spanish Adjunct Assistant Professor of Spanish Adjunct Instructor of Spanish Spanish Teaching Assistant

A major in SpanishprovidesstudentsasolidfoundationinbothoralandwrittenSpanish atadvancedlevels.Further,ourcoursesofferstudentsthetheoreticalandcriticaltoolsto investigatedifferentculturaltraditionsfromLatinAmericaandSpain. AmajorinSpanishconsistsofninecoursesaboveSPA202.Therequiredcoursesare: SPA221,222,and261.Inaddition,eachstudentmusttakeone300­400-levelcoursein PeninsularLiteratureandone300­400-levelcourseinLatinAmericanLiterature.The remainingfourrequiredcoursesmaybeselectedamongtheofferingsintheSpanishupper-levelcourses.Atleastoneofthesecourseshastobeatthe400-level.Studentscan alsofulfillrequirementsduringtheirStudyAbroadsemester.TheDepartmentencourages majorstostudyonesemesteroroneyearinaSpanishspeakingcountry.Studentsshould havecompletedthethreerequiredcoursesbeforetheystudyabroad.Majorswhoplan graduateworkinSpanishareadvisedtoacquireatleastminimumcompetenceinanother foreignlanguage. AmajorinSpanishisdesignedtogivethestudentathoroughknowledgeofitsstructure, literature,andculture.Westrivetohelpstudentsachieveahighdegreeofproficiencyin thelanguagebydevelopingtheirabilitytocomprehend,readcritically,speak,andwrite inSpanishwhiledevelopinganappreciationofHispanicliteratureandcultures.Beginningwiththefirstcourse,classworkisconductedlargelyinthetargetlanguageandthe studentisencouragedtoalwaysuseSpanishbothinandoutsideoftheclassroomwhenever possible. MajorsintheDepartmentofSpanishhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsin recentyears:IESprogramsinSalamancaandMadrid(Spain),Santiago(Chile),LaPlata (Argentina); School for International training programs in Quito (Ecuador), Managua (Nicaragua),andGranada(Spain);SweetBriarCollegeprograminSeville(Spain);and SyracuseUniversityprograminMadrid. ThewritingrequirementintheSpanishmajorismetbycompletionofthenormalcourses requiredtocompletethemajor.Studentswhoneedhelptowritetheirliteraturepaperscan makeappointmentsattheSpanishWritingCenter.

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A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

101. Beginning Spanish I. Every Semester Forstudentswithnopreviousexperiencewiththelanguage.AcommunicativeapproachtoSpanish usingauthenticmaterialssuchasvideos.Studentswillbepresentedwithknowledgeaboutgrammar,pronunciation,culture,andcivilizationwithastrongemphasisondevelopingcommunicative skills. Chambers, García-Armero 102. Beginning Spanish II. AcontinuationofSPA101.Prerequisite:SPA101orequivalent. Every Semester Gargotta, Nieves

201. Intermediate Spanish I. (LS) Every Semester ReviewoftheSpanishlanguage.Emphasisonoralcommunication,reading,writing,andculture. Introductionofliteraryandculturaltexts.Prerequisite:SPA102orplacement. Armstrong, Chambers, Ryjik 202. Intermediate Spanish II. (H) AcontinuationofSPA202.Prerequisite:SPA201orplacement. Every Semester Armstrong

221. Grammar, Conversation, and Composition. (H) Every Semester Oralpracticedirectedtowardgreaterfluencyinthespokenlanguage.Discussionandreportsofcurrent materialsandliteraryselections.Emphasisisplacedonachievingfluencyinthespokenlanguage, withsecondaryemphasisonreadingandwriting.Prerequisite:SPA202orplacement. Armstrong 222. Advanced Conversation and Composition(H) Every Semester AcontinuationofSPA221.Practicedirectedtowardgreaterfluencyinthewrittenlanguage.Oral discussionandwrittenreportsoncurrentmaterialsandcontemporaryculturalandliterarytopics. Emphasisisplacedondevelopingstudents'abilitytoreadandwriteinSpanish,withasecondary emphasisonauralandoralskills.Prerequisite:SPA221orplacement. Ruiz-Alfaro 261. Introduction to Hispanic Literatures and Literary Analysis. (H) Every Semester First course dedicated to reading and interpreting literature. Introduction to the fundamentals of literatureandaestheticappreciationthroughcarefulreading,analysis,andclassdiscussionofSpanish-languagetextsfrombothsidesoftheAtlantic.Prerequisite:SPA222orpermission. Caamaño, Ryjik, Tisnado 291. Directed Reading. TutorialforstudentshavingcompletedSPA221.Studentswhohaveaspecialinterestmayarrange atutorialwithafacultymember.Enrollmentisconditionaloninstructor'spermission. 370­379, 470­479. Topics in Spanish Literature, Language, or Culture. Seminar for in-depth study of an author, theme, or period. Topic chosen to be announced each semester. 372. Spanish Prose 19th Century. Spring 2009 In this course students will read representative masterpieces of the costumbrista, psychological, realist,regionalist,andnaturalistschools,mainlythenovelandtheshortstory. Caamaño 376. Tales of a Continent. Contemporary Latin American Fiction and Film. Fall 2007 AnexplorationofLatinAmericanliteratureandfilmfromthesecondhalfofthetwentiethcentury tothepresentday.Focusontheliterary"Boom"andthe"NewLatinAmericanCinema"asartistic movementswhoseaestheticpractices,themes,andformshaveconstitutedadecisivedevelopmentin

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SPANISH­THEATER, DANCE AND FILm

modernLatinAmericanliteraryandfilmichistory.Prerequisites:SPA261orpermissionofinstructor. Ruiz-Alfaro 390. Independent Study. IndependentstudydirectedbytheSpanishstaff.Prerequisite:Permissionofdepartmentchairperson. 391. Directed Reading. TutorialforstudentshavingcompletedSPA261.Studentswhohaveaspecialinterestmayarrange atutorialwithafacultymember.Enrollmentisconditionaloninstructor'spermission. 401. Spanish Tutorial. (H) Extensivereadinginareasofspecialinterestandimportancetothestudent.Regularconferences withtutor;criticalpapers.Prerequisite:Permissionofdepartmentchairperson. 431. Theater of the Golden Age. Fall 2008 Themaingoalofthiscourseistoprovidestudentswithanunderstandingofthegreatimportance oftheaterin17th-centurySpain,asliterarytextandasperformance.TheworksofmajorSpanish playwrights,suchasLopedeVega,CalderóndelaBarca,andTirsodeMolina,willbestudiedfrom ahistorical,ideological,social,andliteraryperspective. Ryjik 474. Don Quijote. Fall 2007 Exploresthecomplexfictionalworldofoneoftheworld'smostinfluentialliteraryworks:Cervantes's Don Quijote.Focusingontheinterplayamongthismasterpiece,thesocio-historicalworldsofGolden AgeSpain,literarytraditions,andthequestionsofhumanexistence.Prerequisites:SPA261orpermissionofinstructor. Ryjik 476. Spanish Women Writers Fall 2008 Anintroductiontotheworksof20th-centurySpanishwomenwriters,focusingprimarilyonnovels andshortstories.Thestudentwillexplorethetransformationofthefemalesubjectontheseworks andhowthesocialandpoliticaleventsoftheperiodaffectedthelivesandliteraryproductionof womeninSpain.Prerequisites:SPA261orpermissionofinstructor. García-Armero 490. Senior Independent Study. AmajorresearchprojecttobecarriedoutunderthesupervisionofamemberoftheDepartment.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

TalesofaContinent. ContemporaryLatinAmericanFictionandFilm. ReflejosdeNarciso.

THEATER, DANCE AND FILm

Professor Lynn M. Brooks, Chair Lynn M. Brooks Carol Davis Dirk Eitzen Brian T. Silberman David Grotell Pamela Vail Gian Giacomo Colli Tracey Davis Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities and Dance Associate Professor of Theater Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies Associate Professor of Theater Visiting Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies Artist in Residence and Instructor of Dance Visiting Instructor of Theater Adjunct Instructor of Dance

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Elba Hevia y Vaca Roger Godin Matthew Mazuroski Robert Marenick Virginia West '78 John Whiting Adjunct Instructor of Dance Instructor of Film and Media Studies Performing Arts Coordinator; Adjunct Instructor of Theater Resident Technical Director Resident Costume Designer Resident Scenic and Lighting Designer

ThestudiesofferedbytheDepartmentofTheater,DanceandFilm(TDF)includedramaticliterature,history,andcriticism;design,acting,andplaywriting;danceperformance andstudies;andfilmandmediastudiesandproduction.Coursesindramaticliterature, theaterart,dance,andfilm/mediastudiesmeetdistributionrequirementseitherforArts orHumanities.

THEATER

ThestudyoftheateratFranklin&MarshallCollegeembracesallaspectsofdramaticartas partofaliberalartseducation.Interdisciplinarybynature,theaterstudiesallowallstudents todevelopaestheticresponsesandabilitiesinunderstandingandmakingdramaticworks ofart.Thecollectiveaestheticandintellectualactivitiesthatmakeuptheworkoftheater, includingreading,writing,discussing,creating,andperforming,helpstudentsdevelop skillsnecessaryforuseful,collaborative,andproductiveparticipationinsociety. ThetheaterprogramatF&Mintegratestheoryandpracticeasstudentsdevelophistorical knowledgeandcriticalthinkingskillsandcombinethemwithcurrentpracticesinperformance,playwriting,directing,design,andstudiesindrama. Introductorycourses,aswellasdepartmentalproductions,areopentoallcollegestudents, includingthosewithoutprevioustheaterexperience. Theatermajorstakeacoreofeightcoursesinthefollowingareas:acting,technicaltheater, textual,critical,theoretical,andhistoricalstudy,andtheatricalmedia.Majorsalsoselect aconcentrationeitherinperformance,design,film,ortheaterstudies,andgainpractical andcreativeexperienceworkingondepartmentalproductions. A major in theaterconsistsofaminimumof11creditsandthesuccessfulcompletion ofatleasttwocrewassignmentsarerequired.Thefollowingeightcoursesarerequired ofalltheatermajors: TDF105and106--WorldTheater1and2 TDF221--Stagecraft TDF286--BeginningActingWorkshop TDF311--SeminarinTheatricalMedia TDF385--PerformanceSeminar(twoat.5creditseach) TDF495--SeniorSeminar Oneelective(anyone-creditTDFcourse) Alsorequiredisaconcentration,consistingofthreecoursesinoneofthefollowingareas: TheaterStudies(173,211,250,251,340,383,485,or489) Performance(287,288,289,386,or388)

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Design(225,228,229) Film(165,andeither213,267,365,370,or373,andeither168,361,or362) Tobeconsideredforhonorsintheater,graduatingseniors,mustmeettheCollege'sgeneral requirementsforhonors,withaprojectapprovedbyatleasttwomembersoftheTheater faculty. Majorsintheaterhavestudiedabroadinthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears:British AmericanDramaAcademy,SarahLawrenceprogram;UniversityofLondon,RoyalHollowayCollege,London;SIT,Prague,CzechRepublic;IES,Milan,Italy,andLondon;The AmericanUniversity,Cairo,Egypt. A minor in Theater consistsofthesuccessfulcompletionofsixcourses(oneeachin theaterstudies,design,andperformance),311,twoelectives,andonecrewassignment.

DANCE

TheDanceMajorpreparesdancerstomove,create,analyze,writeabout,andevaluate danceasanexpressionoftheindividual,ofculture,andofhistory.Itfeaturesabalanced curriculumofperformance-basedandtheory-basedcourses,whileallcoursesaddressboth studioandanalyticalcomponentsoftopicscovered. A major in danceconsistsofelevencreditsasstipulated:eightdancecoursesdemonstrating abalancebetweenperformanceandtheorywork,fourfocusingonperformancecourses (techniqueandcomposition,listedunder"PerformanceFocus"below),andfouronhistory, theoryandanalysislistedunder"AnalyticalFocus"; TDF320(KinesiologyforDance)and 331(DanceHistory)mustbeamongtheAnalytical courses);theTDFcapstonecourse, TDF495(SeniorSeminar);anadditionaltwoTDFclassestobeselectedfromentry-level acting,design,theaterstudies,mediastudies,311(SeminarinTheatricalMedia),orother danceelectivesasapprovedbythedepartmentchairperson;andtwocrewassignments.At leastthreecoursesmustbetakenatorabovethe300-level.Studentsseekingadmissionto graduateschoolindanceshouldconsultwithfacultyadvisersaboutadditionalcoursesto furtherpreparethemforthatdirection. Studentsmaydevelopajointmajorindanceandanotherfieldinconsultationwiththehead oftheDanceProgram.Templatesforsuchamajorarecurrentlyavailablefordanceand biology,history,orpsychology.Thosestudentswishingtoproposeajointmajorbetween danceandfieldsotherthanthethreelistedshouldmeetwiththeheadsofthetheseprograms (danceandtheproposedfield)todetermineanappropriateprogramofstudy. A minor in DanceconsistsofsixcoursecreditsinDance:threefromthe"Performance Focus"courselist,andthreefromthe"AnalyticFocus"courselist,asapprovedbythe departmentchairperson.

FILm

Moviesinvolveeverymodeofexpression,frommovementtomusic,fromnarrativetonews. Nomediumisbettersuitedtothestudyofcommunicationandself-expression.Moviesare alsoafascinatingwindowintorecentandcontemporarycultures,revealingthingsabout themfromtheir"commonknowledge"totheirsecretdesires.Noformisbettersuitedto thestudyofsocieties'attitudes,beliefs,andvalues.TheFilmandMediaStudiesprogram openstheseavenuesofresearchtostudentsacrossthecurriculum.Theprogramoffersfilm

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history,criticism,andtheory,andvideoandwebsiteproduction.FilmandMediaStudies canbeaminor,partofaspecialmajor,oraconcentrationinatheatermajor. A minor in Film and Media Studiesconsistsofsixcourses,approvedbythedepartment chairperson.Thesesixcourseswillordinarilyincludeonetextualanalysiscourse,onefilm ortelevisionhistorycourse,onecourseinvideoproductionordramaticwriting,andone upper-leveltheorycourse. A list of regularly offered courses follows. Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

CORE COURSES

105. World Theater to 1700. (A) (NW) Every Fall Surveysdevelopmentsinliterature,historyandperformancetraditionsinbothEasternandWestern cultures.Recommendedfortheatercoursesatorabovethe300-level. Colli 106. World Theater, 1700­1945. (A) (NW) Every Spring Continuesstudyofliterature,history,andperformancetraditionstothepresent.Recommendedfor theatercoursesatorabovethe300-level. Silberman 221. Stagecraft. (A) Fall 2007 Studyoftheatricaltechnicalprocessesthroughlectures,demonstrations,andindividualhands-on traininginbasicsetconstruction,scenepainting,lighting,andrunning-crewpositions.Emphasis willbegiventothedutiesofthestagemanagerandtechnicaldirector. Marenick 286. Beginning Acting Workshop. (A) Every Semester Theoryandpracticeofactingfocusedonindividualandgroupcommunication.Workthroughvoice andmovementexercises,improvisation,textanalysis,scenestudy,andperformance. Colli, Davis 311. Seminar in Theatrical Media. (A) Spring 2008 Thiscourseexploresthehistorical,theoretical,andpracticaldifferencesandpointsofconvergence amonglivetheater,danceandfilm.Studentssharetheirexpertisewhilegainingpracticalexperience inanotherdiscipline.GuestsfromtheinterdisciplinaryTDFfacultyaugmenttheinstructor'sareaof expertisebyprovidingconsultationasneededandcritiquingstudentprojectsandpresentations. Grotell 385. Performance Seminar. (A) Every Semester Combinesperformanceworkintheaterwithresearchandanalysisrelevanttothegivenproduction, includingtheworkofactorsandtechnicians.(0.5creditpersemester;mayberepeatedforcredit). Prerequisite:permissionoftheinstructor. Colli, Davis, Mazuroski 495. Senior Seminar. (A) Every Spring Designedasaculminatinganalyticalandcreativeexperienceforseniormajors,thecoursewillexplore achallengingcriticaltopicasameanstowardintegratingeachstudent'sknowledgeandexperience ofthevarioustheatricaldisciplines. Staff

COURSES IN DESIGN

221. Stagecraft. (A) Seeunder"CoreCourses." Fall 2007

225. Costume Design. (A) Every Spring Theprocessofdesigningacostume,fromanalyzingthescriptthroughthefinishedproduct.Exam-

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inesthehistoryofWesterncostumeandotherdesigners'work.Projectswillallowstudentstoapply theory,technique,andresearchinachievingtheirowndesigns. West 228. Scene Design. (A) Every Fall Emphasizesthedesignprocessandthevisualidea,andanalyzesdesignsanddesigners.Students preparemodelsandrenderingsofassignedproductions.Same as ART 228. Whiting 229. Lighting Design. (A) Every Spring Explorestheoreticalfundamentalsoflightandvisualperception,andtheprocessoflightingdesign fromconceptthroughexecution. Whiting

COURSES IN ACTING AND DIRECTING

286. Beginning Acting Workshop. (A) Seeunder"CoreCourses." Every Semester

287. Intermediate Acting Workshop: Classical Theater. (A) Fall 2008 Theoryandpracticeofactingfocusedonskillsnecessarytounderstandandperformclassicalverse texts(GreekandShakespeare)aswellasphysicallybasedacting(commedia).Stagecombatand auditiontechniquewillalsobeintroduced.Prerequisite:TDF286. Davis 288. Intermediate Acting Workshop: Realistic Theater. (A) Fall 2007 TheoryandpracticeofStanislavskirealismasexploredthroughscriptanalysisandperformanceof selectedplays.Prerequisite:TDF286. Davis 289. Intermediate Acting Workshop: Presentational Acting. (A) Spring 2008 Theoryandpracticeofactingtechniquesneededtoperformnon-realisticscripts.Prerequisite:TDF 286. Colli 386. Directing Lab. (A) Fall 2008 Undertheguidanceoffaculty,studentsdirectplaysforpublicperformance.Areasofconcentration include: developing a production concept, dramaturgical research, visual composition, casting, rehearsalschedules,budgeting,etc.Prerequisite:TDF286andpermission. Davis

ELECTIvES

173. Black Playwrights. (H) Offered in 2007­2008 AnintroductiontoAfrican-AmericanplaywrightswithanemphasisonAugustWilson.Manythemes addressedincludinggender,race,spirituality,andhistory.Courseusesperformanceinadditionto literarymethodsofanalysis.Same as AMS/TDF/WGS 173. Kemp 211. Shakespeare. (A) Spring 2008 CenteringuponShakespeare'splays,thecourseemphasizestheirtheatricalanddramaticfeatures; explorestheiroriginalperformancecontexts;considerslaterproductions;anddrawsuponthegrowing archiveoffilmversions.Studentswillbothanalyzetextsandapproachperformancepossibilitiesas eitheractorsordesigners. Davis 250. 20th Century European Drama. (A) Spring 2008 BeginningwithIbsenandcontinuingtothepostmodernexperimentsofChurchillandMuller,this coursesurveysrepresentativeEuropeanplayswithinabroadhistorical,philosophical,andartistic context.Naturalism,realism,impressionism,expressionism,theTheatreofCruelty,andalienation, amongothers,areconsideredinconnectiontospecificplays. Staff 251. Modern American Drama. (A) Fall 2008 AliteraryandtheatricalexaminationofrepresentativeAmericandramafromtheRevolutiontothe present,emphasizingdevelopmentssince1920.ThefocusofthisstudyisonhowandwhyAmericans havebeendepictedonstageastheyhave,andthepowerfuleffectthisrangeofdepictionshashadon AmericanidentityandtheAmericanimagination.Same as AMS/ENG 251. Staff

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340. Comedy as Social Critique. (A) Fall 2007 Exploresvarietiesofcomicexperienceintheater,film,andTV,fromAristophanestoAyckbourn, bywayofkyogen,commedia,Congreve,andCosby;examinesthatexperienceasareflectionof itsculturalcontext;andappliesthetheoryofBergson,Freud,Meredith,Frye,andLangertoboth experienceandcontext. Silberman 383. Dramatic Writing. (A) Fall 2008 Thewritingofshortplaysunderclosesupervision.Permissionofinstructorrequired.Same as ENG 383. Silberman 485. Dramatic Theory and Criticism. (A) StudyofdramatictheoriesfromAristotletothecurrentperiod. Fall 2009 Staff

489. Shakespeare Seminar. (A) Spring 2008 AnintensivestudyofselectedShakespeareplays,withasurveyofthescholarlyandcriticalworks relatedtothem.Text,source,scholarship,criticism,andtheatricalhistoryare considered.Prerequisite: TDF211,orequivalent. Davis 490. Independent Study. (A) Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbytheTheater,DanceandFilmstaff.Permissionofchairperson.

COURSES IN DANCE: PERFORmANCE FOCUS

116. Beginning Modern Dance: Technique and Theory. (A) Every Fall Thepracticeofmoderndancetechnique,integratingmovementexperiencewithstudyofthephilosophiesandtheoriesthathaveshapedtheartanditspractice. Brooks 117. Beginning Ballet. (A) Spring 2009 Basictechniqueandtheoryofballetincludingtheanatomicallawsgoverningballetmovementand investigationofthestyleandaestheticofballettechnique. Brooks 200­201 and 300­301. Dance Production Ensemble I and II. (A) Every Semester CreditforworkundertakentowardperformanceinatleasttwoCollegeproductions.Studentsare castinchoreographiesbyaudition.Theystudytechniques,theory,andhistoryappropriatetomastery oftheworkinprogress.Class/rehearsalandperformanceparticipationaremandatory.ForTDF200 and300,studentsreceivenocredit,butafullcreditisawardedforthecompletionofTDF201and TDF301.Prerequisites:auditionandpermissionoftheinstructor. Brooks, Vail 218. Intermediate Modern Dance Technique and Performance. (A) Spring 2008 Acontinuationofmoderndancetechniquestudy,withfurtherdevelopmentofflexibility,strength, andefficiencyinmovement.Fundamentalsofdancecompositionarealsostudied.Waysthatdance cancommunicatemeaningareexploredthroughreading,writing,andmovement assignments.Prerequisite:TDF116orpermissionoftheinstructor. Vail 219 and 319. Flamenco Dance I and II. (A) Fall 2007 Technique,rhythms,andhistoryofFlamencodanceinastudioformat.TDF319hasaprerequisite ofTDF219orpermissionoftheinstructor. Hevia y Vaca 227. Intermediate Ballet. (A) Fall 2007 Continuedstudy ofballettechniqueandtheory.Classincludeskinesiologicalapplicationsaswellas historicalandcompositionalinvestigations.Thecourseemphasizesnotonlythepracticeofdancing butalsoofwriting,thinking,andspeakingcriticallyandclearlyaboutballet.Prerequisite:TDF117 orpermissionoftheinstructor. Vail 260. Compositional Improvisation. (A) Spring 2008 Thepracticeofimprovisationnotonlyasatoolforchoreography,butalsoasanartandperformance forminitself,offeringprofoundexperiencesanddiscoveries.Studentslearnhowtobefullypresent,

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bothinbodyandinmind,makingconsciouschoicesandcomposinginthemoment.Reading,writing, andmovementassignmentssupportin-classpractice. Vail 330. Choreography and the Creative Process. (A) Fall 2008 Investigationofchoreographicproblemsandcomplexquestionsofartistry,basedonreading,writing,discussion,feedback,movementexploration,andperformance.Questionsaskedinclude:What iscreativity?Howdowefosteritforourselves? Vail 490. Independent Study. (A) Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbytheTheater,DanceandFilmstaff.Permissionofchairperson. 495. Senior Seminar. (A) SeedescriptionunderTDFCoreCourses. Every Semester

COURSES IN DANCE: ANALYTICAL FOCUS

208. Dance and Community. (A) Fall 2009 Studyoftherelationshipbetweendanceandcommunityfromvariousperspectives.Readingsprovide abroadsurveyofcommunitydancemodelsfromaroundtheglobe;assuch,identifyingthevarying associationsbetweendanceandcommunitytakesonasociological/anthropologicalapproach.Integral arewritingassignmentsandinteractionsandexperienceswithourlocalcommunity. Vail 220. Introduction to Movement Analysis. (A) Fall 2008 Introduction to conceptsofmovementanalysis,includingtheoreticalandpracticalinvestigationsof effort,shape,space,andthebodyinmotion.Motif-writing,movementfundamentals,observational techniques,andhistoryofmovementanalysisareintroducedthrough lecture,discussion,andmovementexploration. Brooks 238. Dance on the American Musical Stage. (A) Fall 2009 Alecture-survey,supplementedbystudioexperiences,ofmusical stagedancinginAmericafrom thecolonialperiodtothepresent.Dancestylescoveredincludeacrobatic,ballet,ballroom,exotic, folk,jazz,modern,andtap.Same as AMS 238. Brooks 308. Writing Dance. (A) Fall 2007 Explorationof dancewritingthroughliterature(fictionandpoetry),librettiandscenarios,dance journalismincludingcriticism,anddanceandnotation.Inadditiontowritingaboutdance,students willrealize,throughmovement,theirowndancepoetryandscenarios.Prerequisite:TDF116or permissionofinstructor. Brooks 320. Kinesiology for Dance. (A) Spring 2009 Studyofthescienceofmovementasitrelatestodance,includingbasicanatomyandphysiology,the physicsinvolvedindancing,andthemind-bodyconnectionresponsibleforproducingandcontrolling movement.Lectures,discussions,andmovementlabsfocusonunderstandinghowthebodymoves andonincreasingmovementefficiencytoenhanceperformanceandpreventinjury. Staff 330. Creative Process. (A) Seetextabove,underPerformancecourses. Spring 2008 Vail

331. History of Western Theater Dance. (A) Spring 2008 Surveyof theforcesthathaveshapedandinfluencedstagedancinginmuchofWesternEuropeand theAmericasbeginningwiththerenaissance,andmovingthroughthebaroque,romantic,classical, modern, and contemporary periods. Class formats include lecture, discussions, and studio sessions. Brooks 380. Dance Notation and Repertory. (A) Fall 2009 Study of basic concepts and skills for reading and writing Labanotation, a system for recording movementinsymbolicform.Studioworkemphasizesrecreatingandperformingdancesfromwritten scores. Staff

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490. Independent Study. (A) Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbytheTheater,DanceandFilmstaff.Permissionofchairperson.

COURSES IN FILm AND mEDIA STUDIES

165. The Language of Cinema. (A) Every Fall Anintroductiontothewaymoviesareputtogether,tobasiccriticaltermsandconceptsusedinthe studyofmovies,videosandtelevision,andtothecomplexrolesthatcinemaandtelevisionplayin society--asart,business,entertainment,andmediumofinformationandideology. Eitzen 168. Stage to Screen. (A) Fall 2007 Thisseminarexplorestheprocessoftransformingplaysanddancesdesignedforlivestageperformance intomovies--aprocessnotunliketurningpoemsintopaintings,inasmuchasitinvolvesadifferent mediumandawholeotherlanguageofexpression.Thecourseincludesbothhands-onproduction experienceandstudiesintheoryandanalysis. Eitzen 213. Black American Film. (S) AnintroductiontofilmstudiesusingblackfilmasagenreofHollywoodandindependentfilm.CoverstheworkofOscarMichauxthroughthe"blaxploitation"filmsofthe1970sandbeyond.Explores filmsassocialcommentaryintheirparticularhistoricalcontexts.Particularattentionisgiventoscreen analysisofsegregation,sexuality,classdifferences,andmore.Same as AFS/AMS/WGS 213. Staff 245. The History of Photography: The First One Hundred Years. (A) Spring 2009 Anexaminationofthefirstonehundredyearsofthemediumfromitsinventiontothedocumentary photographyproducedundertheFarmSecurityAdministrationinthelate1930s.Emphasiswillbe placedontherelationshipofphotographytotheartsofpaintingandliterature,aswellasoncontextualizingphotographsasdocumentsofscientificinvestigation,ethnographicresearch,socialhistory, andpersonalexpression.(Prerequisite:Stronglyrecommendedthatstudentshavehadatleastoneart historycourse.)Same as ART 245. Kent 267. Film History. (A) Every Spring Anintroductiontodoinghistorywithmovies.Treatsmoviesfromthe1890stothe1960s.Providesan overviewoftheevolutionofpopularmoviesandofinfluentialartisticandrhetoricalcounter-currents, includingnationalfilmmovements,experimentalcinema,anddocumentary.Same as ART 267. Grotell 318. Media and Politics. (S) Fall 2007 Examinestheinterrelationshipbetweenthemassmedia(includingprint,broadcast,andnewmedia), publicopinion,andAmericanpolitics,givingparticularattentiontowaysinwhichthemediaand publicopinionbothhelpinfluenceandareinfluencedbythepoliticalprocess.(PreviouslyGOV214) (Prerequisite:GOV100.)Same as GOV 318. Medvic 362. Narrative Video Workshop. (A) Spring 2008 Anintensiveworkshopincinematicstorytelling.Studentseachdevelopashortscreenplayinfour weeks.Theclassisthendividedintoteamsofthreeorfour,eachofwhichproducesandpost-produces ashortmoviebasedononeofthesescreenplays.Thiscourserequiresanunusualamountofoutsideof-classwork.Priorexperienceintheater,creativewriting,orvideoproductionisrecommended. Studentsmaytakethiscoursetwice.Same as ART 362. Grotell 363. Film Theory Seminar. (A) Fall 2007 Advancedseminardevotedtoapplyingclassicalandcontemporaryfilmtheorytoparticularproblems andmovies.Topicvariesfromtermtoterm.Recenttopicsincludemelodrama,gender,andemotion; filmcomedy;filmmusic;andthenatureofnonfiction.Same as ART 363. Grotell 364. Community Media Lab. (A) Spring 2008 Anintensivevideoproductionworkshop,focusingondocumentaryasameansofcommunitybuilding

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andgrass-rootsactivism.Studentsworkinsmallgroupstoproduceshortdocumentaries,frequently withacommunitypartner.Thetopicorfocusofthecoursevariesfromtermtoterm.Studentsmay takethiscoursetwice.StudentsarestronglyencouragedtotakeTDF165beforethiscourse.Same as ART 364. Grotell 365. New American Wave: Films and Filmmakers 1968­1975. (A) Fall 2009 Examinationofsomeofthemostsignificantfilmsof thelate1960s,when theinfluenceoftheHollywoodstudioswaned,and agroupoftalentedfilmmakers,influencedbyliberatingmovementsin EuropeancinemaandthesocialandpoliticalupheavalinAmerica,emergedtocreatea"newAmerican cinema."Courseworkincludes closeanalysis,criticaltheory,andhistoricalresearch.Prerequisite: TDF165orTDF267orpermissionofinstructor.Same as AMS 365. Godin 370. Film Noir. (A) Spring 2008 Studyof post-WorldWarIIfilmsexploringadarkworldoflustandmurderinthenighttimestreets ofAmericancities.ThesefilmsstruckaparticularchordwithAmericanaudiencesofthe40sand 50s,butcoreelementsoffilmnoirhavepersistedinmoviestothepresent.Thiscourseexamines examplesoffilmnoir,usingcloseanalysis,criticaltheory,andhistoricalresearch.Prerequisite:TDF 165orTDF267orpermissionofinstructor. Godin 376. Hitchcock's Films. (A) Spring 2009 InvestigationoftheworkofAlfredHitchcock,arguablythemostfamousfilmdirectorinhistory.This courseinvolvesviewingasignificantnumberofHitchcock'sfilmsandreadingsintextualanalysis andfilmtheory. Godin 490. Independent Study. Every Semester IndependentstudydirectedbytheTheater,DanceandFilmstaff.Permissionofchairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008

SoloPerformance. HowtoReadaFilm. ScreenWriting. GenderBending:FilmandGenderIdentity.

WOmEN AND GENDER STUDIES

Professor Alice Drum, Chair James Taggart (on leave 2007­2008) Carol Auster Misty L. Bastian Lisa Gasbarrone Louise Stevenson Linda Aleci Dennis Deslippe Mary Ann Levine Judith Mueller Michael Penn Carla Willard (on leave 2007­2008) Cindy Yetter-Vassot Lewis Audenreid Professor of History and Archaeology Professor of Sociology Professor of Anthropology Professor of French Professor of History Associate Professor of Art History Associate Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Associate Professor of Anthropology Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of Psychology Associate Professor of American Studies Associate Professor of French

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Eiman Zein-Elabdin Genevieve Abravanel (on leave 2007­2008) M. Alison Kibler Richard Reitan Alice Drum Kabi Hartman Patricia Justice Levin Barbara John Associate Professor of Economics Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Assistant Professor of History Visiting Professor of English and Women and Gender Studies Visiting Assistant Professor of English Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies Adjunct Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies

Feministtheoryandpracticearetransformingtheworld.Thisprogramseekstounderstand theseongoingchangesthroughabroadinterdisciplinaryframework.Takentogether,the coursesintheWomenandGenderStudiesProgramofferagenderedperspectiveonthe diversityofhuman,andparticularlywomen's,experiencesinhistorical,global,andcrossculturalcontexts.Attentionispaidthroughouttotheinterconnectionsbetweengenderand othersocialinstitutions,suchasclass,ethnicity,nationality,race,andsexualorientation. AmajorinWomenandGenderStudiesmaybearrangedthroughtheSpecialStudiesProgramdescribedinthefrontofthiscatalogorasaJointMajor.Forajointmajor,seethe chairpersonofWomenandGenderStudiesforadviceindesigningaprogramofstudyand choosinganadviser.AminorinWomenandGenderStudiesconsistsofsixcourses,chosen inconsultationwiththechairperson:fourcoursesinWomenandGenderStudieschosen fromatleasttwodifferentdivisions(humanities,naturalsciences,andsocialsciences); WomenandGenderStudies210;andanadvancedseminaroranindependentstudy. JointmajorsandminorsintheWomenandGenderStudiesProgramhavestudiedabroad inthefollowingprogramsinrecentyears: AdvancedStudiesinEnglandPrograminBath, England;Arcadia University, University of London; Butler University Program at the UniversityofSydneyinSydney,Australia;IESinFreiburg,Germany;TrinityCollege, Dublin,Ireland. A list of regularly offered courses follows.Theindicationofwhenacoursewillbeoffered isbasedonthebestprojectionofthedepartmentandcanbesubjecttochange. Pleasenotethekeyforthefollowingabbreviations:(A)Arts;(H)Humanities;(S)Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP)NaturalScienceinPerspective;(NW)Non-WesternCulturesrequirement.

210. Gendered Perspectives. (S) Fall 2007, Spring 2008 Focusingonissuesrelatedtowomen'sexperiencesinthecontemporaryUnitedStatesandinother societiesaroundtheglobe,thisbroadcorecourseinwomen'sstudiesexploresbasicconcepts,methods ofinquiry,empiricalstudies,andsymbolicinterpretationsfromafeministperspective.WGS210is requiredfortheWGSminorandjointmajors.StudentswhoareconsideringaWGSminororjoint majorareurgedtotakeWGS210earlyintheircollegecareer. Kibler 213. Black American Film. (S) AnintroductiontofilmstudiesusingblackfilmasagenreofHollywoodandindependentfilm.CoverstheworkofOscarMichauxthroughthe"blaxploitation"filmsofthe1970sandbeyond.Explores filmsassocialcommentaryintheirparticularhistoricalcontexts.Particularattentionisgiventoscreen analysisofsegregation,sexuality,classdifferences,andmore.Same as AFS/AMS/TDF 213. Staff

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215. Women in Society. (S) Spring 2008 Howgenderrolesaffectwomen'sparticipationinpolitical,ritual,economic,andothersocialrelations.Thecoursematerialswillincludedetailedethnographicworkonspecificsocietiesandwill maintainatheoreticalperspectiveinformedbycontemporarygenderstudies.Prerequisite:ANT100. Same as ANT 215. Bastian 231. Women Writers I. (H) Spring 2008 AstudyoftheexperiencesofwomenaspresentedinselectedBritishandAmericanliteraturefromthe MiddleAgesthroughthe19thcentury,aspresentedfromavarietyofculturalperspectives.Wewill considervariousreadingsofthetexts,includingthosethatemphasizefeministtheoryandhistorical context.Amongothers,wewillbereadingJaneAusten,AphraBehn,AnneBradstreet,theBrontës, GeorgeEliot,andMaryWollstonecraft.Same as ENG 231 Hartman 233. Women Writers II. (H) Fall 2007 AstudyofthechangingworldofAmericanandBritishwomeninthe20thcenturyasportrayedby womenwriters.Thecriticalemphasiswillbeonfeministtheoryandthepolitical,social,andcultural backgroundofthetimes.Amongothers,wewillreadworksbyMargaretAtwood,ToniMorrison, SylviaPlath,AdrienneRich,AnneSexton,EdithWharton,andVirginiaWoolf.Same as ENG 233. Drum 244. Women in the Economy. (S) Fall 2007 Ananalysisoftheroleswomenandmenhavehistoricallyplayedandcontinuetoplayintheeconomy, bothwithinandoutsideofthelabormarket.Topicsincludethehistoricalconditionsunderwhich dominantgenderidealsemerged,thevalueofunpaidworkandnationalaccounting,occupational segregationandlabormarketdiscrimination.Economicandinterdisciplinaryapproachesareused. Prerequisite:ECO100and103,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ECO 244. Hewitson 250. Witchcraft and Sorcery in a Global Context. (S) Fall 2007 Considershowthecategories"witchcraft"and"sorcery"havebeenusedinanthropology,todescribe mysticalacts(particularlymysticalattacks)andasethnographicmetaphortodiscusspressuresof communallifeforindividuals.Coursecontentconsistsof,butnotlimitedto,witchcraftandsorcery asa"socialstraingauge,"witchcraftandsorceryasexpressionsofsymbolicpower,genderednature ofwitchcraftandsorcery,andwitchcraftandsorceryunderconditionsofwestern-stylemodernity. Prerequisite:ANT100orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as AFS/ANT/RST 250. Bastian 267. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (NW) (S) (Culture Area) Fall 2009 SocialandhistoricalpracticesofvariousAfricancultures,withaspecialemphasisonsub-Saharan groups.Topicsconsideredwillincludetheintersectionsbetweenpoliticaleconomy,performances, religion,art,andpopularmediaonthecontinent.Prerequisite:ANT100. Same as AFS/ANT 267. Bastian 282. Women, Culture, and Development. (NW) (S) Spring 2008 Roleofgenderindifferentculturesacrossnon-industrializedworldandimpactofeconomicdevelopmentonpositionofwomenandgenderrelationsinthesesocieties.Women'scontributiontoeconomic andsocialchangeandtheextenttowhichconventionalmethodsofanalysisindevelopmenteconomics canbeappliedtotheirsituations.Examinationofthedevelopmentofthe"ThirdWorldwoman"in thedevelopmentliterature.Prerequisite:ECO100and103,orpermissionoftheinstructor.Same as ECO 282. Zein-Elabdin 320. Women in American Society and Politics since 1890. (S) Spring 2008 AninterdisciplinarystudyofthevariouswayswomenhaveparticipatedinAmericansocietyand politics.Topicsincludethesuffragemovement,modernmodesofpoliticalparticipation,andthe NewDealandWorldWarII.Criticalanalysisofthemeaningoffeminismandspecialattentionto thepost­1945period. Same as AMS/HIS 320. Stevenson 350. Sociology of Gender. (S) Every Spring Anexaminationofthetransmissionofgenderexpectationsandtheirimpactonwomen'sandmen's

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WOmEN AND GENDER STUDIES

educationalandemploymentpatterns,interpersonalrelationships,psychologicaltraits,familypatterns,andsexualbehavior.Considerationoftheroleofbiology,theintersectionofgenderwithother variablessuchassocialclass,andtheimpactofmicro-andmacro-scalechange.(Prerequisite:SOC 100) Same as SOC 350. Auster 365. Queens and Goddesses. (S) Fall 2007 Asurveyof howarchaeologistsexaminegenderandinterprettherolesofwomeninancientsubsistenceeconomies,politics,andreligions.Toachievethisgoalwewilldiscusstherolesofwomen inegalitarianandstratifiedsocietiesandexploretheactionsandstatusofbothhigh-rankingand everydaywomenintheancientworld.Prerequisites:ANT100,ANT102,ANT200,orpermission oftheinstructor.Same as ANT 365. Levine 373. Public Health Research: Pregnancy Outcomes in American Women. (S) Spring 2008 Thisinterdisciplinaryseminarwillexplorewomen'shealthandpregnancyoutcomethroughthelenses ofbothscienceandsocialanalysis.Inadditiontoreadinganddiscussiononinfluencesonpregnancy outcomes,studentswillexamineresultsofsurveysofAmishwomeninLancasterCounty,AfricanAmericanandHispanicwomeninLancasterCity,andwomenofchild-bearingageincentralPA. ThiscourseissupportedbyfundsfromthePADeptofHealth.(Anycoursethatincludesmethods ofdataanalysisorpermission.)Same as GOV/PUB/STS 373. Miller 403. Selected Studies in Modern European History. (S) (E) Offered in 2007­2008 Readingsandresearchinselectedaspectsofthepolitical,social,andculturalhistoryofModern Europe.Recentseminarsinclude"GenderinModernEurope,""SocialDisciplineandSocialDeviance:TheConstructionofModernEuropeanSubjectivity,""TheFrenchRevolution,""ThePolitics ofMemory,""HumanRightsandCivilRights,"and"UrbanHistory."Someofthesecourseshave prerequisites(seerelevantdepartmentalofferings).Same as HIS 403. Schrader, Mitchell 431. Politics of Gender in Contemporary Art. (A) Spring 2009 Anadvancedseminarexaminingthechallengesposedbythemodernpoliticalmovementoffeminism totraditionalwaysofthinkingabout,lookingat,andmakingart.Emphasisisplacedonworkmade duringthelast3decadesofthetwentiethcentury.Questionsconsideredincludethefeministchallenge totheculturalstereotypeof"Artist";women'seffortstodefinea"female"aesthetic(or,istheresuch athing?);thefeministcritiqueofvisualrepresentation.Prerequisite:ART103orpermissionofthe instructor. Same as ART 431. Aleci 450. Selected Studies in East Asian History. (NW) (S) (WH) Fall 2007 Readingsandresearchinselectedtopicsofthesocial,political,andculturalhistoryofEastAsia. Recentseminarsinclude"WomenandGenderinChineseHistory,""MemoriesofEmpire."Same as HIS 450. Reitan

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2007­2008.

BlackPlaywrights. CourtshiptoHookup. War/GenderinModernEurope. FranklinCollegeandBeyond. Women'sHealingSystems. FreudandFeminism. AmericanMasculinities. WomenandPopularCulture. Ethics/Gender/Japan Hollywood! VirginiaWoolf. 490. Independent Study. Permissionofchairperson.

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Educational Support Services

AcAdEmic AdviSing

Franklin & Marshall College emphasizes an approach to advising that takes seriously the College's mission to foster in its students a love of learning, to educate them about the natural, social, and cultural worlds in which we live, and to encourage them to become citizens who contribute productively to their professions, communities, and world. Academic advisers guide students as they learn to make decisions about intellectual interests, course selection, a Major, and ultimately, the meaning of a liberal arts education. Faculty members from across the curriculum advise incoming students. Faculty in the academic departments advise their majors as well as offer advice to all students about pursuing graduate study in their disciplines. The College views academic advising as a natural extension of the faculty's teaching role, which is supplemented and supported by Dons and Prefects, who work within the College House System. Pre-healing arts and pre-law advising are also available.

AddiTiOnAL EdUcATiOnAL OPPORTUniTiES And RESOURcES

The College has found many ways to recognize, encourage, and reward special talents and to help students extend their academic interests into the realms of research, the arts, internships, educational travel, public service, and employment. Some of the most prominent opportunities are described below. In addition, the College offers an exceptionally large array of prizes, campus-wide or departmental awards, memberships in national honor societies, and other forms of recognition for outstanding achievement (see College Life Manual or www.fandm. edu/collegelife).

STUdEnT-FAcULTY cOLLABORATiOn

Hackman Scholars Program This ten-week summer research program, administered by the Office of the Provost and Dean of the Faculty, was established in 1984 by William M. and Lucille M. Hackman. It brings students and faculty together to work on challenging, high-level research projects. Ranging from astrophysics and chemistry to sociology and art, "Hackmans" receive a $3200 stipend to experience first-hand the excitement and challenge of collaborating with professors in advanced scholarly work. The program is open to all current Franklin & Marshall students. Participants must be nominated by the faculty members with whom they wish to work. Typically, about 60 students and 40 faculty members participate each summer. Applications should be made by faculty sponsors to the Committee on Grants.

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Leser and Nissley Student/Faculty Partnership The Leser and Nissley awards, established in 1993 by Walter and Martha Leser and J. Richard and Anna Ruth Nissley, support research conducted by students in true partnership with faculty members. Ten Leser awards (in the natural sciences) and ten Nissley awards of up to $1000 (in other disciplines) are given annually; both are administered by the Office of the Provost and Dean of the Faculty. Applications should be made to the Committee on Grants. Coutros Scholars The Coutros Fund for Interdisciplinary Studies, established in 2000 by Nicholas P. Coutros '79, supports student research that crosses and links disciplines. The Office of the Provost administers the Coutros Scholars Fund. Applications should be made to the Committee on Grants. Frederick G. Schappell Scholarships in Chemistry The Frederick G. Schappell Scholarships, established by the Frank Family Foundation in memory of Dr. Frederick G. Schappell '60, provide the opportunity for several senior chemistry majors to participate in a ten-week, full-time summer research experience with a faculty member in the Chemistry department, along with support to attend a national chemistry meeting to present the scholars' research results. Applications should be made to the chair of the Department of Chemistry. Preceptorships A number of upperclass students are invited by faculty to serve as student preceptors in First-Year Seminars and Foundations courses. More details about these opportunities may be obtained from the Office of the Provost. Production in the Arts Each year, there are numerous productions in venues such as the Green Room Theatre, Barshinger Center for Performing Arts, and the Roschel Performing Arts Center, sponsored by the Department of Theater, Dance, and Film, the Department of Music, and the Department of Art and Art History. Students, including non-majors in these areas, have the opportunity to perform or to become involved in working behind the scenes to help produce these performances and exhibits. Other Partnerships Many other academic-year and summer research positions are available through departmental and faculty grants.

ThE WARE inSTiTUTE FOR civic EngAgEmEnT

The Ware Institute for Civic Engagement focuses the College's work in the area of civic engagement. Through its several centers, the Ware Institute supports faculty and students as they both and act upon the connections between the liberal arts and the world of civic engagement. Center for Community-Based Learning The Center for Community-Based Learning provides administrative support for faculty teaching courses with a community-based learning component and serves as a resource for what is possible in this innovative area of pedagogy.

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Center for Volunteer Service This Center coordinates: · The Public Service Summer Internships program, which places about 20 students in full-time paid internships in Lancaster County, in such areas as human services, city and county government, law and justice, education, health care, economic development, and the arts. · The Spalding Leadership Program which offers students the opportunity to work with and shadow a local public leader. · The Mentorship Program, partnering with the Lancaster County Big Brothers/Big Sisters where students are paired with 6th-8th graders from a neighboring inner-city middle school. · Putting It Together (PIT) in the Community, a one-week pre-Orientation program that brings together incoming first-year students and upperclass mentors to explore public service opportunities in the Lancaster community. The Center for Institutional Engagement The Center for Institutional Engagement serves as the College's focal point for identifying and sustaining community partnerships. Important community partners include the School District of Lancaster, the Spanish American Civic Association, the Urban League of Lancaster County, Brightside Baptist Church, SouthEast Lancaster Health Services and Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lancaster.

cEnTER FOR LiBERAL ARTS And SOciETY (cLAS)

The Center for Liberal Arts and Society sponsors lectures, visiting scholars, programs, seminars, and symposia that explore the connections between our studies in the liberal arts and sciences and the complex contemporary questions we face as citizens in a democracy. CLAS designs and supports programs that enrich the curricula, foster interdisciplinary collaboration, and engage F&M faculty, students, and staff, as well as our fellow citizens in Lancaster, in ongoing discussions about pressing public issues. CLAS hosts both the Seachrist and Bonchek Insitutes. The Bonchek Institute for Reason and Science in a Liberal Democracy seeks to foster rational thought, critical thinking, and an appreciation for the scientific method, as well as their application to ethical, social, economic and political questions. The Institute supports student and faculty research, and sponsors public programs and lectures. The Seachrist Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies was established to develop programs that explore the power of entrepreneurship to foster positive change. Its emphasis is on public and social entrepreneurship and the use of entrepreneurial approaches to meet pressing civic and social needs.

ThE FLOYd inSTiTUTE FOR PUBLic POLicY

The Center for Opinion Research and the Center for Politics and Public Affairs of the Floyd Institute are also considered part of the Ware Institute for Civic Engagement. The Center for Opinion Research seeks to provide empirically sound research

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solutions and opportunities for academic and public policy researchers and the local community. It conducts the Franklin & Marshall Keystone Poll, the oldest Pennsylvania statewide poll exclusively directed and produced in the state. It also aims to produce and disseminate information that supports learning by students, researchers, and the general public. The Center for Politics and Public Affairs fosters the study of politics and public policy. It seeks to stimulate discourse on political and policy issues. Its activities include fellowships and internships, public policy and political research, publishing research on policy and political topics, and overseeing the Keystone Poll. The Floyd Institute also houses the local Economy Center which provides learning opportunities for students interested in studying local economies and serves the research needs of the Lancaster community.

ThE WRiTing cEnTER

The Writing Center provides assistance for students working on college writing assignments through one-on-one tutorials and, at the request of faculty, in-class writing workshops. The Center's trained staff of student writing assistants, mostly juniors and seniors, represents a wide range of majors and career interests. Students should prepare for a conference by bringing all available materials: the assignment, any data being used, a rough plan or formal outline, a few sketched-out paragraphs, or a complete paper. Writing assistants will not edit a paper, but they can help writers recognize errors and make the necessary changes.

cOOPERATivE PROgRAmS OF STUdY

TEAching

Franklin & Marshall College offers students the opportunity to secure the Pennsylvania Instructional I Teacher Certification in areas of secondary education through a cooperative program with Millersville University. Students may be certified in Citizenship (Social Studies), English, French, Spanish, German, Chemistry, Biology, Earth Science, Physics, and Mathematics. Upon successful completion of the degree requirements and the certification program, the Pennsylvania Instructional I Teacher Certification is issued, granting permission to teach in public schools in Pennsylvania. Franklin & Marshall faculty and professional staff support students who seek to apply their liberal arts education to the field of teaching and recognize that there are limitless possibilities and numerous ways to enter teaching careers. Examples include the Bank Street College Program (The Urban Semester), private school teaching, internships (e.g., New Caanan Country School), and Bill Cosby's scholarship for a Franklin & Marshall student to attend Teacher's College of Columbia University. Four years at Franklin & Marshall College does not always allow a student to complete both the Franklin & Marshall degree and full certification through Millersville University. Students are encouraged, however, to complete the Franklin & Marshall degree and a portion of certification and then fulfill certification requirements through postbaccalaureate work in education.

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EnginEERing

Franklin & Marshall students may participate in a cooperative engineering program with Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, Pennsylvania State University College of Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or Washington University in St. Louis. In this 3/2 (or 4/2) program, the student takes three (or four) years of prescribed undergraduate work at Franklin & Marshall, and then, upon successful completion of this work and receipt of the appropriate recommendation, transfers to one of the participating engineering schools. There, the student studies engineering for two additional years. Upon successful completion of five (or six) years of study, the student receives two degrees: a Bachelor of Arts from Franklin & Marshall, and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from the other institution. The student can sometimes complete a Master's degree in one additional year. In addition to the conventional fields of engineering, other areas of study include: bio-medical engineering, environmental engineering, computer and systems engineering, engineering and policy, and materials science and engineering. Interested students should consult Dr. Ken Krebs, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy.

EnviROnmEnTAL SciEncE, mAnAgEmEnT, And POLicY

The College offers a cooperative program with Duke University in the areas of environmental science, management, and policy. The student earns the bachelor's and master's degrees in five years, spending three years at Franklin & Marshall and two years in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke. The A.B. degree is awarded by Franklin & Marshall upon successful completion of one year of study at Duke, provided that 32 credits are earned. Duke awards the professional degree of Master of Forestry (M.F.) or Master of Environmental Management (M.E.M.) to qualified candidates at the end of the second year. The student must complete a total of 60 units at Duke. The M.F. degree is in Forest Resource Management. Eight options are available for the M.E.M. degree: Coastal Environmental Management; Conservation Science and Policy; Ecosystem Science and Management; Energy and the Environment; Environmental Health and Security; Global Environmental Change; Environmental Economics and Policy; or Water and Air Resources. Concurrent degrees may be earned alongside the M.F. or M.E.M. in Business (M.B.A.), Law (J.D.), Public Policy (M.P.P.), or Teaching (M.A.T.) through formal agreements between the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and other professional schools at Duke. Alternatively, some students prefer to complete the requirements for the bachelor's degree at Franklin & Marshall before entering Duke. The requirements for these 4-2 students are essentially the same as those for students entering Duke after the junior year. Interested students should consult the coordinator, Dr. Timothy Sipe, Associate Professor of Biology, early in their careers at Franklin & Marshall, about appropriate course scheduling, so that the necessary prerequisites for admission to Duke can be completed. Additional information about the Duke program is available at: http://www. nicholas.duke.edu

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Academic Policies and Procedures

AcAdEmic hOnESTY

Fundamental to the principle of independent learning is the requirement of honesty and integrity in performance of academic assignments, both in the classroom and outside. Accordingly, Franklin & Marshall College holds its students to the highest standards of intellectual integrity. Students who violate the responsibility of their educational freedom should understand the following: A. A student charged with giving or receiving uncondoned assistance in an examination or other academic work will be brought before the Committee on Student Conduct or will be subject to administrative action. B. Plagiarism is considered to be a violation of the Student Code. Penalties for plagiarism generally include a failing grade for the course and often suspension from the College for a period of one academic semester. It is mandatory that students adhere to the rules for acknowledging outside sources. The College relies upon a variety of means to uphold the principles of academic integrity, including the use of services to evaluate papers for plagiarism. The Writing Center has available for a nominal price Using Outside Sources, a useful guide to paraphrasing and quoting without plagiarizing. For more detailed information on documentation, students may consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers and the University of Chicago's Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations by Kate Turabian. C. No student may infringe upon the rights of others to have fair and equal access to library resources. Failure to sign out library materials appropriately is considered academic dishonesty and may result in the suspension of library privilege or other appropriate penalties. Failure to return promptly materials that have been recalled also constitutes an infringement upon the rights of others to fair and equal access to library resources. Offenders may be brought before the Committee on Student Conduct or may be subject to administrative action. D. Academic honesty, integrity, and ethics do not hinge upon, nor are they influenced by, technological change; plagiarism or other forms of cheating are just as wrong whether accomplished by pen, typewriter, computer, video or audio recording, telecommunications, or any other means. Similarly, interfering with student and faculty access to educational materials is wrong, whether the material is a computer disk or a library book. E. A student who suspects another student of committing an act of academic dishonesty should consult with either the instructor for the course or the Dean of the College. F. Faculty who suspect a student of academic dishonesty or receive a report of possible academic dishonesty from a student should contact the Dean of the College.

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FAcULTY STATEmEnT On PLAgiARiSm And OThER FORmS OF AcAdEmic diShOnESTY

(Adopted by the Faculty, November, 1980.) Plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty (e.g., cheating on examinations or the unauthorized duplicate submission of papers or other work) strike at the very heart of the academic enterprise. They constitute instances of bad faith that are inappropriate to the College community. The College should make every effort to set papers and examinations that do not encourage academic dishonesty and make every effort to educate students about the nature of academic dishonesty, about why it is contrary to the spirit of learning and teaching, and about the consequences for those who engage in it. If an instructor believes that a student has plagiarized material and can locate the source, then the instructor will normally bring the evidence promptly to the attention of the Dean of the College or designee. If the Dean of the College agrees with the instructor that the student may have plagiarized, then the Dean of the College or designee may send the case to the Committee on Student Conduct for prompt hearing. Alternatively, with the agreement of the faculty member, the student may accept a penalty imposed by the Dean of the College or designee. If the Committee on Student Conduct finds a student guilty of plagiarism, the student will normally suffer suspension for an appropriate period. Furthermore, the instructor should award the student a failing mark for the course in which the plagiarism occurred. In the case of a student who has chosen the Pass/No Pass option, the Dean of the College will tell the Registrar to rescind the option. It is a matter of discretion of the Committee on Student Conduct whether or not to make the exact reason for the suspension a permanent part of the student's transcript. If an instructor believes that the student has misrepresented his or her work, but the instructor cannot locate a source, the instructor will normally consult with the department chair or the Dean of the College. If the chair or Dean agrees that there are sufficient reasons to believe a student may have misrepresented his or her work, the faculty members involved should try to determine whether or not misrepresentation has occurred. One means would be to ask the student to explain the paper. A student's inability to understand the work he or she submitted will normally result in a significantly lowered grade for the course. Moreover, the chair should inform the Dean of the College when the instructor concludes that a misrepresentation has occurred. Again, in cases of Pass/No Pass options, the Dean of the College will tell the Registrar to rescind the option. Allegations concerning other forms of academic dishonesty, such as cheating on an examination or unauthorized duplicate submission of papers or other work, will be subject to review in a manner similar to that described above. The penalties for such acts of academic dishonesty, which violate the spirit and purpose of an academic community, will be similar to those for plagiarism.

ThE USE OF cOPYRighTEd mATERiALS

The College obeys, and expects its students to obey, Federal copyright laws. These laws generally prohibit the copying without permission of a copyrighted work. That work may be literary, musical, or dramatic; a picture, a sound or video recording, or a computer program or material; or any other original expression fixed in some

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tangible form. For guidelines governing copyrighted materials, consult the College's Copyright Handbook (compiled summer 2000). Further questions may be addressed to the appropriate College offices, particularly the Library and Academic Technology Services.

PATEnT POLicY OF FRAnKLin & mARShALL cOLLEgE

The objective of the College patent policy is to facilitate the invention, transfer, and application of new technology that promises to be of benefit to the general public and, at the same time, to protect the interests of the inventor and the College. It applies to all employees and students of Franklin & Marshall College. A copy of this policy may be obtained by contacting the Office of the Provost or by viewing it at www.fandm.edu/provost.xml.

diSRUPTiOnS OF ThE AcAdEmic PROcESS

All students should be familiar with this policy statement on campus disruptions, adopted by the Faculty in May, 1969: 1. Franklin & Marshall College is fully committed to the principle that freedom of thought and expression must be assured for all members of the College community, including the freedom to express or demonstrate disagreement and dissent by reasonable and peaceful means. 2. This freedom is a sine qua non of a college. The commitment is hereby reaffirmed. 3. The spirit of this commitment is clear and it should, by common consent, be held inviolate. 4. But the determination of what is orderly and peaceful cannot be left only to those engaged in that action. The College retains the responsibility to state and enforce those determinations. 5. The process of free exploration, examination, and evaluation of ideas can survive only in an atmosphere in which every member of the College is guaranteed the right to think, talk, and move about freely. When any members of the College, unwittingly or by design, deprive others of these rights, the institution and its academic endeavors are placed in grave jeopardy. 6. Those who deny this freedom to others shall be subject to sanctions by the College and may, after due process, be considered unwelcome as members of the community. 7. The academic process cannot be conducted in an atmosphere tainted by disruption or by the threat of intimidation, coercion, or duress. 8. While the maintenance of the integrity of the academic process is an obligation of all members of the College, there is a clear responsibility imposed upon the faculty to safeguard that integrity and to certify standards of performance of all engaged in the academic life of the College. 9. The College's determinations on such matters are reached through reasoned thought and rational discourse. The College will not condone or tolerate un185

reasoned or injudicious violations of the spirit of the College or disruptions of the orderly academic process. 10. The College cannot recognize as valid conclusions reached under the imposition or threat of intimidation. 11. It is asserted, therefore, that activities which disrupt the normal academic processes of the College are not only inappropriate but intolerable. Individuals who initiate or engage in such activity shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary procedures or sanctions by the College. Such action shall, of course, provide for appropriate access to fair hearing and due process.

ThE cOURSE cREdiT SYSTEm

Franklin & Marshall College uses a course credit system. Thirty-two (32) course credits are required for graduation. A typical course is assigned one (1) course credit (equivalent to 4 semester hours), though some courses may be assigned more or less than one course credit. Departments may offer half (0.5) credit courses and double (2.0) credit courses. The smallest unit of credit offered at Franklin and Marshall is one-half (0.50).

gRAdUATiOn REqUiREmEnTS

APPLicATiOn FOR dEgREE

Every junior must complete an Application for Degree form in the Registrar's Office one calendar year prior to the student's intended date of graduation.

BAchELOR OF ARTS

To be eligible for the Bachelor of Arts degree, a student must satisfy these requirements: 1. Earn 32 course credits (at least 21 of them with standard grades) a. within a time period of (1) twelve (12) semesters of enrollment and (2) eight (8) calendar years from initial matriculation, b. with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00, and c. with standard grades in all General Education, Distribution, Writing, Language Studies, Non-Western Cultures, major or minor courses, or any other course used to satisfy a specific requirement; 2. Meet all General Education requirements by: a. completing the Foundations requirement during the first two years of study: (1) for students matriculating in the fall of 2006 or beyond, the requirement is to pass two Foundations (FND) courses; (2) for students matriculating prior to the fall of 2006, and no earlier than the fall of 1998, the requirement is to pass one course in each of the

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3. 4.

5. 6.

Foundations categories of Community, Culture, and Society (CCS), Mind, Self, and Spirit (MSS), and The Natural World (NTW). b. completing the Distribution requirement by: (1) passing at least one course in the humanities, the arts, and the social sciences; (2) satisfying the natural sciences distribution requirement; a) for students matriculating in the fall of 2006 or later, this requirement is satisfied by passing two natural science with lab courses or by passing one natural science with lab course and an additional course carrying the Natural Science in Perspective (NSP) designation; b) for students matriculating prior to the fall of 2006 but no earlier than the fall of 1998, this requirement is satisfied by passing one natural science with lab course. (3) satisfying the Language Studies requirement; a) for students matriculating in the Fall 2007 semester or beyond, the requirement is to complete the third course in a foreign language sequence or to demonstrate equivalent proficiency through testing. This requirement is waived for international students from non-English speaking countries. See page 4 for further details, b) for students matriculating prior to the Fall 2007 semester, a two-course requirement was in place (see page 4 for further details). (4) satisfying the Non-Western Cultures requirement by passing a course which has been designated as "NW," or through an experience which has been approved by the College as a suitable alternative, and c. completing the First-Year Writing requirement by either: (1) passing ENG 105, (2) passing a first-year seminar, (3) passing an introductory course which has been designated writing intensive (W), or (4) earning a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition exam; Pass an approved major field of study, with a minimum of a 2.00 grade point average in those courses considered by the major department to fulfill the major requirements; Students matriculating in the Fall 1998 through Spring 2005 will complete an Exploration of at least three course credits approved by the major adviser; there is no Exploration requirement for students matriculating in the Fall of 2005 and beyond; Earn at least sixteen (16) course credits on the Franklin & Marshall campus; and Enroll in at least three course credits during each of the last two semesters (usually the seventh and eighth semesters) in which the student completes degree requirements, with the final semester being in residence at Franklin & Marshall College. Permission to complete degree requirements elsewhere must be secured from the Committee on Academic Status. · Petitions for exceptions to either of these rules on educational grounds must be made to the Committee on Academic Status. · Students who have attended Franklin & Marshall College for eight full187

time semesters and who expect to complete the graduation requirements elsewhere may petition the Committee on Academic Status to do so. For special graduation requirements for transfer students, see "Transfer Credit Prior to Matriculation" page 212­213.

dEgREE AUdiTS

A degree audit is a computerized review of each student's course transcript matched against the College's requirements for a degree. Students may review their degree audits through myDiplomat and become informed about their progress toward the degree at any given time. Faculty advisers also have access to the degree audits of their student advisees. While the electronic degree audit is usually accurate, at times the complicated nature of a major or other requirement may lead to inaccuracies. Students are responsible for reporting audit discrepancies to the Registrar. In addition, a discrepancy in the degree audit does not change the actual requirements for graduation; in particular, unfulfilled requirements are not waived because of degree audit discrepancies. The responsibility for understanding and meeting degree requirements rests entirely with the student.

gRAdUATiOn RATE

Franklin & Marshall College, in compliance with the 1990 Federal Student Right-toKnow and Campus Security Act, publishes the percentage of students who enter the College as new first-year students in the fall and then graduate in six years or less. The six-year graduation rate for the classes who entered as first-year students in the Fall of 1997 through 2000 was 82%.

cOLLEgE gRAdUATiOn hOnORS

College honors are awarded to graduating students on the basis of their final cumulative grade point average according to the following standards: Summa Cum Laude 3.90 -- 4.00 Magna Cum Laude 3.70 -- 3.89 Cum Laude 3.50 -- 3.69

gRAnTing OF hOnORS

Departmental or program honors are awarded to students who successfully meet the following requirements: 1. Complete an approved outstanding Independent Study project, which entails extensive independent research or creative effort and which culminates in a thesis, a work of art, a recital, or some other performance. 2. Submit the Independent Study project to a specially constituted review board and successfully defend the project in an oral examination of the project and of related work. 3. Complete a significant body of course work of high caliber in the department or program or in related departments or programs. The rule of thumb for a "significant body of course work" in the field or

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related fields is a minimum of four courses, in addition to the Independent Study project. If departments or programs wish to impose stricter guidelines or to waive this minimum, they should submit requests to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty, who may consult the Educational Policy Committee for advice in particular cases. Departments may determine whether a "significant body of course work" is worthy of honors in either of two ways: first, they may determine a minimum grade point average for work in the department beneath which students may not be granted honors; or second, they may meet subsequently to the student's oral defense and vote to determine whether the "significant body of course work" is worthy of honors. Students usually will, but need not, major or minor in a particular department or program in order to receive honors in it, provided that they: meet the above requirements, are recommended by the review board to the department or program for honors on the basis of the quality of the project and its defense; and receive the recommendation of the department or program that the supporting course work in the field is of sufficiently high caliber to support the recommendation for honors. The "significant body of course work" of students with a Joint major will be evaluated by the home department of the adviser of the Independent Study. For students with Special Studies majors, this evaluation will be conducted by the student's primary department (typically the one in which five courses or more are taken). The following guidelines are to be observed in Independent Study projects considered for departmental or program honors: 1. As early as possible, the project adviser, in consultation with the advisee and department or program chairperson, should constitute a review board of at least three but no more than five persons, one of whom might well be from another department, program, or institution. Copies of the completed thesis or project should be sent to all members of the review board before the oral examination. 2. The adviser should establish procedures for the oral defense with the examiners, specifying, for example, whether the student will make a brief opening statement, how much time will be allotted to each examiner and in what manner, etc. The adviser is responsible for briefing the student on these procedures well in advance of the defense. 3. The defense should last at least one, but no more than two hours. Artistic performances will, of course, vary in length. The defense should be open to any interested observers, with the knowledge of the student, and its time and location should be published in advance of the meeting. 4. To allow the student and examiners maximum freedom, the adviser should not enter into the defense unless specifically asked to do so, and should not feel obligated to be present for all the deliberations of the review board. 5. After the oral examination, the review board members alone should, after discussion, vote, by secret ballot, on the thesis and its defense. They are asked to determine whether the thesis and its defense warrant a recommendation of "Honors" or "No Honors," as one part of the department's or program's evaluation of candidates for honors. The chairperson of the review board should notify the department or program chairperson in writing of the board's recommendation. 6. The recommendation to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty for departmental or program honors will consist of:

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a. The written recommendation to the department or program chairperson by the chairperson of the review board concerning "Honors" or "No Honors" on the basis of the project and its defense, and; b. The evaluation by the department or program chairperson concerning the caliber of a significant body of course work in the field. Both recommendations must be made at the "Honors" level for students to receive departmental or program honors. 7. The project adviser alone is responsible for assigning the final grade for the Independent Study project and for reporting that grade to the Registrar.

inTERdiSciPLinARY hOnORS

A student who earns "Honors" on an interdisciplinary project may be granted "Interdisciplinary Honors" if each department meets separately and each grants "Honors" based on a significant body of work in its own discrete department. In that instance, the transcript will read "Interdisciplinary Honors: Dept 1/ Dept 2."

WiThhOLding And REvOcATiOn OF dEgREES

1. A student who is subject to a pending disciplinary case is not eligible to receive a degree or participate in graduation until that case is resolved. 2. The College reserves the right to withhold a degree and/or graduation participation if warranted by circumstances, such as the discovery of serious violation of the College's policy on Academic Honesty. 3. The College also reserves the right to revoke an already granted degree if circumstances such as the above warrant. 4. An eligible student with any unpaid College bills may participate in the graduation ceremony but will not receive a diploma. The College reserves the right not to release official transcripts until all bills are paid.

cOmmEncEmEnT

Degrees are conferred once each year at the annual Commencement exercises following the Spring semester. Students who complete all requirements for the degree in Summer or Fall will receive their diplomas and will be listed in the Commencement program the following Spring. Candidates for a degree are not required to attend these ceremonies. Those who elect not to attend should notify the Registrar and indicate their preferred mailing address in writing to the Registrar in order to receive their diploma. Seniors who are close to completion of graduation requirements by the end of the Spring semester may apply in the Registrar's Office to participate in Commencement exercises without receiving a diploma if they: 1. Have a 2.00 or higher major grade point average, a 2.00 or higher cumulative grade point average, and the approval of their major department; 2. Are in overall good standing at the College (this includes disciplinary matters); 3. Are able to complete all graduation requirements by satisfactorily completing not more than two (2) additional course credits; 4. Submit a workable plan to complete all graduation requirements as soon

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as possible and no later than the August 31 following Commencement. In extraordinary circumstances, students may request an exception. If such a request is approved, students will not be permitted to participate in extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate sports, subsequent to the Commencement in which they participate; 5. Students will not be permitted to participate in extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate sports, subsequent to the Commencement in they participate. This policy is administered by the Senior Associate Registrar. Exceptions to these requirements are rarely made. If a student feels that an extraordinary situation is present, he or she may present the case, in a written petition, to the Registrar for special permission to participate. Denial by the Registrar may be appealed to the Committee on Academic Status; no further appeals are possible. Qualified students may participate fully as seniors in all Commencement exercises. Their names will be listed in the Commencement program with a notation "degree requirements to be completed." These students will receive their diplomas in the spring following completion of all requirements but will not be listed in that year's Commencement program. For alumni purposes, such students will be considered members of the class of their choice. Additional information may be obtained from the Registrar's Office.

hOnORS LiST And dEAn'S LiST

A student whose grade point average for the preceding semester is 3.70 or better is placed on the Honors List. A student who attains an average of 3.25 or better is placed on the Dean's List. In both cases, to be eligible the student must have satisfactorily completed three course credits in courses for which the standard grading option was utilized. (In addition, there may be no grade below "C-," where "NP" grades are considered to be below "C-.")

hOnORS SOciETiES And SimiLAR REcOgniTiOn

Alpha Epsilon Delta--pre-medical Alpha Kappa Delta--sociology Black Pyramid--senior honorary society Mu Upsilon Sigma--instrumental music Omicron Delta Epsilon--economics Phi Alpha Theta--history Phi Beta Kappa--scholarship Pi Delta Phi--French Pi Gamma Mu--social science Pi Mu Epsilon--mathematics Pi Sigma Alpha--political science Psi Chi--psychology Sigma Delta Pi--Spanish Sigma Pi Sigma--physics Skull and Crown--sophomore honorary society

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Phi Beta Kappa recognizes superior intellectual achievement in the pursuit of liberal education. Founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary, Phi Beta Kappa is the premiere academic undergraduate honorary society. The Theta Chapter of Pennsylvania was established at Franklin & Marshall College in 1908. Each year, resident members of the Chapter meet to review students' credentials and elect new members, predominantly seniors, plus a few highly exceptional juniors. The Society seeks students with outstanding records and good character who have developed the qualities of mind that are the aim of a liberal, humane education and approach their studies with intellectual curiosity in pursuit of a comprehensive understanding of the natural and social worlds. Evaluation of candidates is based on various indicators of the intellectual spirit, including but not limited to high grades, the opinions of professors and professional staff familiar with candidates' achievements, participation in upper-level classes, independent research, competency in areas such as quantitative analytical skills and foreign languages, and sparing use of the Withdrawal and Pass/No Pass options. Dana Scholars The Dana Scholars program, made possible by the Charles A. Dana Foundation, recognizes about 70 continuing students of high academic achievement, outstanding character, and leadership potential. Dana Scholars are nominated by the faculty and honored at an annual dinner.

AcAdEmic STAndARdS

Students who are making satisfactory progress toward the degree are allowed to continue their studies at Franklin & Marshall College. Satisfactory progress toward the degree is defined as meeting the following minimum class standing and academic performance standards: A. ACADEMIC PROGRESS. Students are normally expected to complete four course credits each semester and to complete course work required for the Bachelor of Arts degree within eight semesters. A review is made at the end of each regular semester to determine the class standing of every student. For enrollment in the sophomore class, a student must have earned seven course credits; in the junior class, 15 course credits; in the senior class, 23 course credits; and for graduation, 32 course credits. While unusual circumstances may prevent some students from proceeding on this schedule, the College is unwilling to extend the time indefinitely. Therefore, sophomore status must be attained in a maximum of three semesters; junior status in a maximum of six semesters; senior status in a maximum of nine semesters; and graduation within a maximum of 12 semesters. All requirements for graduation must be completed within a maximum of eight calendar years from initial matriculation. Students who fail to meet the minimum requirements of academic progress will be placed on academic suspension for a period of one semester. Students with unusual circumstances that prevent them from meeting these requirements may petition the Committee on Academic Status for an extension. All students, during their first two years at Franklin & Marshall College, must complete their required Foundation courses. (The specific requirement to which a student is subject depends on his/her date of matriculation.) Students who do not complete

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this requirement will be issued a progress warning. Students who receive this warning must complete their Foundations requirement by the end of the subsequent semester, or they will be placed on academic suspension for a period of one semester. End of semester grade reports are no longer routinely mailed to students; grades may be viewed when they are submitted within myDiplomat. Students desiring a semester grade report may request one in writing from the Office of the Registrar. B. ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE. Students must achieve the following minimum cumulative grade point averages as a function of the number of course credits earned: Course Credits Earned Minimum CGPA 0 to 4 1.50 more than 4 to 8 1.60 more than 8 to 12 1.70 more than 12 to 16 1.80 more than 16 to 20 1.90 more than 20 2.00 Students who do not achieve a semester grade point average of at least 2.00 will be placed on "semester advisory" status. Students who do not achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 will be placed on "cumulative advisory" status. Students who do not achieve either a semester or cumulative grade point average of 2.00 will be placed on "semester and cumulative advisory" status. Students on "advisory" status will be informed of this in writing, and a Student Academic Affairs dean will meet with these students to discuss academic concerns. Students should consider these meetings to be mandatory. Students will be placed on Academic Suspension if: They fail to meet the minimum cumulative grade point average for the appropriate credits earned (unless in the just completed semester they earned a semester grade point average of 2.40 or higher for at least three course credits); They fail to meet the minimum requirements for class standing or completing the Foundations requirements; OR They fail all courses attempted in any one regular semester. Students in their first semester at Franklin & Marshall College will generally not be suspended if they pass at least one course. Suspended students may submit an appeal for a rescission of the suspension to the Committee on Academic Status. First suspensions are for a period of one academic semester, and they include the summer period between the end of the semester at which they receive the suspension and their eligible date of return. Students receiving a suspension at the end of a Fall semester are eligible to resume their studies at the beginning of the next Fall semester. Students receiving a suspension at the end of a Spring semester are eligible to resume their studies at the beginning of the next Spring semester. This period of suspension allows students time to reflect upon the sources of their academic difficulties and return to the College better prepared to meet the academic expectations of the faculty. Students placed on suspension should choose carefully the activities they pursue during the period of suspension because they will be expected

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to explain and justify those choices as part of the procedure for returning from a suspension. Although students may enroll in courses at another institution during the period of suspension, they may not earn credit toward graduation requirements at Franklin & Marshall College during this period. Return to the College after a first suspension is highly likely but not automatic. Subsequent suspensions are for a period of two academic semesters, and include summer period(s) from the beginning of the suspension to the eligible date of return. Subsequent suspensions place in doubt a student's willingness and ability to meet the academic standards of the College. This longer period of time should be used to examine seriously whether the student should continue at the College. Although students may enroll in courses at another institution during the period of suspension, they may not earn credit toward graduation requirements at Franklin & Marshall College during this period. Students who wish to return from an academic suspension must write a letter to the Committee on Academic Status requesting permission to return. Prior to submission of this letter, students are expected to consult with the Dean of the College or a designated dean from Student Academic Affairs.

cOURSE REgiSTRATiOn And cREdiT

cLASS SchEdULing

The "Master Schedule of Classes" is published prior to registration each semester. No classes are scheduled at 8 a.m. on Tuesday (reserved for multiple-section common examinations). Conferences or other engagements involving students should not be scheduled for this hour. In order to permit student participation in extracurricular activities, attendance at regularly scheduled classes or labs is not usually required after 4:20 p.m., except for regularly scheduled evening classes. Some courses involve field trips, lectures, or other activities scheduled outside of regular class hours. These experiences are listed in a course syllabus whenever reasonably possible. If a schedule conflict occurs for a student, s/he should contact the instructor and attempt to resolve the matter as soon as possible, and certainly substantially in advance of the event.

REgiSTRATiOn PROcEdURE

Class scheduling is done through the Registrar's Office, which maintains all official academic records, sends out transcripts, supervises course registration and changes, and tracks students' progress in meeting degree requirements. Students submit course requests approved by their academic advisers in the Fall or Spring semester for the following semester's classes. The class schedules of first-year students are prepared during the summer preceding entrance into the College. Subject to the payment of the appropriate fees, students may register for courses listed in the "Master Schedule of Classes" issued by the Registrar prior to each registration period. Exceptions to this are: 1. Students may not register for courses with listed prerequisites which they have not completed without permission of the instructor of the course or the

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chairperson of the department in which the course is offered. The student is responsible for satisfying prerequisites for a course. Credit for a course may be denied or later withdrawn if a student enrolls without the necessary prerequisites or prior approval of the instructor or department chairperson. 2. In certain courses, specified in the "Master Schedule of Classes," permission of the instructor is required prior to registration. Permission of the instructor may be withheld if a student has not completed the necessary prerequisites for a course or has not done sufficient supplementary reading and work to prepare the student to profit from the course. 3. Registration in all courses is subject to availability of spaces in classes, and it is the student's responsibility to insure that he or she is properly registered in all courses. Departments and instructors may, with the approval of the Provost and Dean of the Faculty, establish enrollment limits in courses. Enrollment may not exceed 50 in a course without permission of the Provost and Dean of the Faculty.

FULL-TimE STATUS

A student must be enrolled for at least three course credits a semester to be regarded as a full-time student. The normal student workload is four course credits each semester.

PART-TimE STATUS

Part-time status is defined as registration for fewer than three course credits. This option is not available during each of the last two regular semesters in which students are completing degree requirements. A student may neither initially enroll for fewer than three course credits nor drop to fewer than three course credits during the semester without the approval of the Committee on Academic Status. Part-time status may have some effect on the student's participation in College activities (e.g., intercollegiate athletics, College governance, etc.). Also, the part-time student may not be eligible for any form of institutional financial aid.

Adding cOURSES

After pre-registration has been completed, a student may enter an open course by submitting a Schedule Change Form to the Registrar. Entering a course later than the second meeting of the class requires the approval of the course instructor. The deadline to add a course is the same as the "withdraw-without-record" deadline, typically 13 calendar days after the start of the semester. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that he or she is properly registered in the courses being pursued.

cOURSE cREdiT OvERLOAdS

Course credit overloads are subject to the following rules: 1. A course load of four-and-one-half course credits (4.5) is not considered an overload.

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2. A student may not take five course credits during his or her first semester of enrollment at Franklin & Marshall College. 3. After the first semester, students who in the previous semester were enrolled as full-time students and earned a semester grade point average of 2.50 or higher automatically qualify to enroll for five course credits. 4. Students who do not automatically qualify must petition the Committee on Academic Status for permission to enroll for five course credits. 5. Students may not enroll for more than five course credits without the approval of the Committee on Academic Status. 6. Students may register for the fifth course credit beginning the day before the first day of classes. 7. A .5-credit course that meets only for half the semester (with a frequency for that half semester equal to that for a full-credit course) shall be considered to contribute a credit load of .5 for the entire semester. A student not automatically eligible for a course credit overload may petition the Committee on Academic Status for permission for such an overload.

WiThdRAWing FROm cOURSES WiThOUT REcORd

A student may withdraw from a course or courses during the "withdraw-without-record" period (typically 13 calendar days after the start of the semester), and no notation of the withdrawal will be made on the student's academic record. A Schedule Change Form must be submitted to the Registrar's Office.

WiThdRAWing FROm cOURSES WiTh REcORd

Withdrawals with record may occur after the "withdraw-without-record" period and before the withdrawal deadline (typically 10­14 calendar days before the last day of regularly scheduled classes). Withdrawals with record are subject to the following rules: l. Any student in his or her first semester at the College may withdraw with record from one course provided that full-time status is preserved; a "W" will appear on the student's academic record. 2. After the first semester at Franklin & Marshall College, a student may withdraw with record from two additional courses. This rule means that a student may withdraw from one of four courses in two different semesters or from two of five or more courses in one semester. In each case, the student must submit a completed Course Withdrawal Form to the Registrar's Office and a "W" will appear on the student's academic record. 3. Any student who does not follow the required procedures for withdrawing from a course will receive a grade of "F." See the 2007­2008 academic calendar for official withdrawal deadline dates.

WiThdRAWing FROm cOURSES And PART-TimE STATUS

When withdrawing from a course (or courses) will result in a student being enrolled in fewer than three course credits, the student's status changes from full-time to parttime.

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1. A student wishing to drop courses and assume part-time status must petition the Committee on Academic Status. Students should not assume that the Committee's approval is automatic. 2. Dropping to part-time status is an unusual step, and Committee approval depends upon the existence of extenuating circumstances such as health problems or unusual personal difficulties. 3. The deadline for submitting a petition for part-time status is the last day of classes in that semester.

PASS/nO PASS OPTiOn

The College encourages students to broaden their educational experience by taking some of their electives in areas that are of interest to them, regardless of the level at which they might perform. To this end, the College allows students the option of taking some electives on a Pass/No Pass basis. The purpose of this option is not to lighten course loads or to increase students' grade point averages. The following rules apply: 1. A student may elect to take up to eight course credits on a Pass/No Pass basis. 2. The Pass/No Pass option is not available during a student's first semester at Franklin & Marshall College. 3. If a student is enrolled in fewer than five course credits, only one course credit may be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis (including courses with required Pass/No Pass registration). 4. If a student enrolls for five course credits, two course credits may be taken on a Pass/No Pass basis. 5. The Pass/No Pass option may not be used when completing a course that satisfies any of the curriculum requirements. 6. The Pass/No Pass option may not be used when completing a course that satisfies any requirements for a major, minor, or special studies area of concentration (including specified related courses). 7. The Pass/No Pass option must be elected not later than 28 calendar days after the opening of a semester. Election of the option requires the submission of a form to the Registrar's Office with the signature of the adviser. The adviser should not be asked to sign the form if the adviser is also the instructor in the course. In this case, the student should obtain the signature of the department chair or the Dean of the College. The signature of the instructor in the course is intentionally not required, and the instructor should not be consulted in this process. The instructor should not know who is registered on a Pass/No Pass basis until after final grades are submitted. 8. A grade of "C-" (as of Fall 2005) or better earns a "P" grade. 9. Courses taken Pass/No Pass that receive a grade of "P" earn credit toward graduation, but they are not included in the calculation of grade point averages. 10. One summer session course credit may be taken each five-week term on a Pass/No Pass basis. This option applies only to courses taken at Franklin & Marshall College or a Central Pennsylvania Consortium school. 11. The election of a Pass/No Pass option is final. To change a grading option

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after the deadline, a student must petition the Committee on Academic Status. The Committee rarely grants these petitions unless there were truly extenuating circumstances why the regular deadline was not met.

REPEAT OF A cOURSE

College policy permits a student to repeat a Franklin & Marshall course for a grade only if the previous grade was "D+," "D," "D-," "F," or "NP." The following rules apply to repeating a course: 1. When a course is repeated, it counts only once for credit toward the degree. 2. When a course is repeated, only the most recent grade is included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average and the average in the major or minor. Both grades, however, appear on the permanent record, with the original grade annotated "No credit--course repeated." 3. Repeated courses must be taken for a regular grade unless the first grade was an "NP. " When the original grade was an "NP," a student may elect either the Pass/No Pass or regular grading options. 4. No course may be taken more than twice without the approval of the Committee on Academic Status. 5. No course that is a prerequisite to another course may be repeated if the higher level course has been passed successfully ("P" or "D-" or higher). 6. No course may be repeated by taking a proficiency exam. 7. A student may not use the repeat option more than three times. 8. An allowable repeat of a course must be taken at the same institution where the course was originally taken. In particular, courses originally taken at Franklin & Marshall with a grade of "D+," "D," "D-," "F," or "NP" may only be repeated at Franklin & Marshall. Students may petition the Committee on Academic Status for exceptions to this policy. 9. As clarification, if a course for which the original grade was "D-" or higher is repeated, and if a withdrawal ("W") occurs in the repeat, then the original grade and credit are retained. If, however, the course is failed when repeated, the original credit is lost. If a course for which the original grade was "F" is repeated, and if a withdrawal ("W") occurs in the repeat, then the original grade remains for grade point average calculations. 10. Election of the repeat option requires the submission of a form to the Office of the Registrar. 11. It is the student's responsibility to verify that repeated courses are properly noted on the transcript.

AUdiTing cOURSES

There is no official auditing of courses at Franklin & Marshall College. Any fulltime student may, with the prior permission of the instructor, attend a course for which the student is not registered. There is no record of this shown on the student's transcript.

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ATTEndAncE AT cLASS

At the opening meeting of each course, instructors state their policy on class attendance. Subject to the discretion of individual instructors, students are expected to attend all scheduled meetings, lectures, discussions, and laboratory periods that make up the course. Students who violate instructors' rules of attendance may receive a grade of "F." In addition, when the rules of attendance are clearly communicated in the course syllabus or in a similarly explicit manner, a student who violates the attendance policy may be dismissed from the course upon the joint agreement of the instructor and the Dean of the College. Students who are dismissed from a course for excessive absences may be reinstated only by the joint consent of the instructor and the Dean of the College. Students who believe that they are obliged to miss class for health or counseling reasons should see those offices in advance, unless emergency conditions prevent, to discuss a possible excuse; students with other reasons that they believe are valid for missing class should contact the Dean of the College, also in advance unless emergency conditions prevent. The academic calendar of the College is, by policy, a secular one. A student who has a schedule conflict due to a religious obligation should discuss the situation with his or her professors prior to the date of the conflict; any accommodation would be at the discretion of the faculty member. The administrative academic calendar can be found on the College server and on the College's online calendar. Holy days are listed on the College's web site.

PETiTiOnS FOR ExcEPTiOnS TO AcAdEmic POLiciES

Students may petition the Committee on Academic Status for exceptions to academic policies of the College. Petitions are received by the Committee on Academic Status through Student Academic Affairs/Office of College House Administration. Petition forms may be found in the Office of College House Administration and on the Registrar's Office web site.

mAjORS And minORS

mAjORS

The regulations for admission to, and the maintenance of, an academic major at Franklin & Marshall College are as follows: 1. A student must submit to the Registrar a major declaration form, approved by the chairperson of the department in which the student chooses to major, preferably by the end of the second semester of the sophomore year. 2. A department may refuse a student admission to regular major status or dismiss a student from regular major status only in the following circumstances: a. If, after the end of the sophomore year, the student has not taken courses in the department, or has failed to attain a grade point average of at least 2.00 in those courses within the major.

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b. If the student has failed to meet other clearly defined academic criteria, approved by the Educational Policy Committee, for admission to or continuance in the major in the department. c. A maximum of seventy-five (75) students from any class may declare a major in Business, Organizations, and Society. 3. Departments will establish a "provisional major" category to which students are assigned when their circumstances fit the situations outlined in Item 2. The department chairperson notifies the Registrar when a student is made a "provisional" major or is granted regular major status. If a student fails to satisfy departmental criteria for major status after one semester as a "provisional" major, the student may be dropped as a major by departmental action. 4. A student is permitted to continue in College for one semester without a major after having been dismissed from a major. 5. Appeals from students concerning their major status may be made to the Committee on Academic Status.

SPEciAL STUdiES mAjOR PROgRAm

The rules governing the Special Studies major program include the following: 1. A student must prepare a proposal that includes a succinct but accurate title for the major, a brief description, and a list of courses, including course numbers and names and grades in any courses already taken. The proposal must also include a rationale for proposing a Special Studies major instead of a double or Joint major or a major/minor combination. 2. Courses must include at least five courses from one department, five divided among two other departments, and a one-semester course, SPC 490. Courses may include additional research (490) courses, Directed Readings, and preapproved courses taken at other institutions, including study abroad courses. The total number of courses may not exceed 16. 3. The proposal must also include the signatures of a primary adviser, a secondary adviser, and the official academic adviser to Special Studies majors. The primary adviser is usually a member of the department in which five or more courses are taken. 4. When the proposed major intersects with programs such as Africana Studies, International Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Science, Technology, and Society, or Women and Gender Studies, the major should be designed in consultation with that program and approved by the program chairperson. 5. A student must submit a copy of the approved proposal and a course projection sheet to the Registrar's Office. 6. Students in the Special Studies program can, if they have an outstanding academic record, pursue Academic Honors by writing a formal thesis and submitting to an oral examination by a Committee of at least three voting faculty members. Such students are subject to the rules governing departmental or program honors. 7. A student who has declared a Special Studies major may not apply more than three courses from that major toward a second major or minor. Interested students should consult Dr. Ira Feit, Department of Biology, who is the official academic adviser to Special Studies majors.

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jOinT mAjOR

A Joint major is a group of courses from two departments/programs and requires the approval of both departments/programs and the Associate Dean of the Faculty. Each of the component majors must be represented by eight course credits. The following rules govern Joint majors: 1. A Joint major must be approved by both programs or departments and by the Associate Dean of the Faculty. 2. Students must submit a projection form to the Registrar's Office from each department or program. 3. Students who have declared a Joint major may not apply more than three courses from that major toward a second major or minor. 4. At least one of the departments/programs combined in the Joint major must offer its own major.

OPTiOnAL minOR

The regulations for admission to an academic minor at Franklin & Marshall College are: 1. Students may elect to pursue a minor in any department or program offering an approved minor program. 2. Approved minor programs consist of six course credits (or approved substitutions) arranged by a department or program to constitute an integrated, cumulative academic experience. 3. Minors should be declared before the beginning of the senior year. 4. All courses in the minor must be taken for standard grades, and the student must pass all six course credits with at least a 2.00 grade point average overall. 5. At least four of the minor courses must be taken at Franklin & Marshall College. 6. A student may officially declare only one minor. 7. To declare a minor, a student consults with the designated department or program chairperson and submits a minor declaration form to the Registrar's Office. 8. A student who has declared a Special Studies major may not apply more than three courses from that major toward a minor. 9. A student who has declared a Joint major may not apply more than three courses from that major toward a minor.

gUidELinES FOR inTERnATiOnAL And OFF-cAmPUS STUdY

Students wishing to explore off-campus study options are encouraged to meet with the Office of International Programs staff as early as possible. While most students participate in off-campus study for a semester or two during their junior year, there are some opportunities for participation earlier or in the fall of the senior year. Rules governing off-campus study programs: 1. Programs have a range of different application deadlines. The optimal time

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2.

3.

4. 5.

6. 7.

to start the more formal process of choosing a program and applying is about a year in advance of the study-away semester. However, in some cases, it is feasible to begin this process as late as the middle of the semester prior to the study-away semester. A student must be approved as an off-campus study student before applying to a particular program. A student must meet the following criteria as determined by the Office of International Programs: a. cumulative grade point average of 2.5, or continued improvement of academic performance that demonstrates the academic maturity necessary to participate in the proposed off-campus study program; b. academic and social maturity necessary to engage in an off-campus study program; c. evidence that the proposed off-campus study program is a part of the student's Franklin & Marshall undergraduate program in one or more of the following ways: · as part of a broader investigation of a culture (regional, national, ethnic) different from the student's own; · as a language immersion opportunity; · as a chance to enhance the student's major, minor, or liberal arts experience (e.g. field studies, internships, service-learning opportunities); d. discussion of the student's particular program choice with the student's faculty adviser; and Franklin & Marshall College has established a list of pre-approved off-campus study programs which students are strongly encouraged to use. These programs have been evaluated for academic and administrative integrity and have proven to be complementary to the Franklin & Marshall curriculum. Requests for approval of a program not on the pre-approved list should be addressed to the Associate Dean for International Programs. Students who participate in off-campus study work with the appropriate departmental chairpersons, the Associate Dean for International Programs, and the Registrar to assure proper transfer of credit. Students who participate in off-campus study are billed by Franklin & Marshall College for the College's tuition fee; Franklin & Marshall College then pays the study abroad program's tuition fee. Billing for room and board fees and other miscellaneous items varies depending upon the program in which a student enrolls. In most cases, these fees are paid by the student directly to the program. Students receive a credit on the College tuition bill for an airfare allowance that is intended to cover all or most of the cost of air transportation. Please contact the Office of International Programs for information about exceptions (e.g. Franklin & Marshall Student Exchange Programs, Grant-inAid and Tuition Exchange Benefits). Financial aid is available to those students who are eligible for aid at the College. Aid includes federal and state loan money and Franklin & Marshall merit scholarships, loans, and need-based grants. International students attending Franklin & Marshall College are eligible to participate in off-campus-study programs. They may use only one semester of financial aid from the College toward the cost of approved off-campus study.

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ExPLORATiOnS

The Explorations requirement applies only to students who matriculated Fall 1998 through Spring 2005. For details, see the Registrar's Office web site: http://www. fandm.edu/registrar.xml

AddiTiOnAL SPEciAL EdUcATiOnAL OPPORTUniTiES

Students at Franklin & Marshall College may earn academic credit by completing a number of additional special educational opportunities including Tutorials, Directed Readings, Independent Studies, and Internships-for-Credit. The smallest unit of credit offered at Franklin & Marshall is one-half (0.50).

TUTORiALS

A Tutorial is a regular course (either one that is a permanent part of the curriculum or one taught as a "topics" course) taught on an individual basis. A student may register for a Tutorial with the consent of the instructor and the approval of the department chair. The student should complete an "Application for Tutorial" form available in the Registrar's Office.

diREcTEd REAdingS

A Directed Reading is an investigation through readings of a topic chosen by a student with the agreement of the instructor. Assignments normally include multiple short papers as opposed to a thesis. A student may register for a Directed Reading with the consent of the instructor and the approval of the department chairperson. The student should complete an "Application for Directed Reading" form available in the Registrar's Office.

indEPEndEnT STUdiES

An Independent Study consists of an extensive research project completed under the supervision of a faculty member. The following rules govern Independent Studies: 1. An Independent Study must be approved by a faculty adviser and the department chairperson. 2. An Independent Study must culminate in a thesis or performance. 3. The student and the adviser for the Independent Study should agree in advance whether the project will extend over one or two semesters, for one-half, one or two course credits. 4. The deadline to register for an Independent Study is the end of the first two weeks of the semester in which the Independent Study is undertaken. 5. To register for an Independent Study, a student completes the "Application for Independent Study" form and returns it to the Registrar's Office.

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6. If an Independent Study is to be considered for Departmental Honors, the additional guidelines described in the section on Departmental Honors should also be observed. The regulations governing grading options for an Independent Study are as follows: 1. If the student elects the standard letter grade option, the student registers under normal procedures and presents the required Independent Study application with the department or program chairperson's approval. It should be noted that this is the only one of the grading options that is automatic. Each of the others requires additional input to the Registrar from the student, the department chairperson, or both. 2. The student may elect the Pass/No Pass option in the first semester of a twosemester Independent Study. In this case, the student completes the Independent Study application and a Pass/No Pass form, including the signature of the chairperson, and files it with the Registrar before the add deadline. This procedure differs from the normal Pass/No Pass regulations in that the instructor (i.e., the Independent Study adviser) knows about the use of the option and reports the grade directly as Pass or No Pass. 3. In some cases the department requires the Pass/No Pass option in the first semester of a two-semester Independent Study. In this instance, the chairperson notifies the Registrar in writing prior to the add deadline. This note must include the name of each student involved. The chairperson should also indicate this requirement on the approval form given to the student when the student requests permission for Independent Study. 4. If the student elects the "no grade/double grade" option, then no grade and no course credit are awarded at the end of the first semester and two grades and two course credits are awarded at the end of the second semester. The use of this option must be approved by the chairperson of the department or program. This option must be indicated on the Independent Study application and cannot be selected after the two-week deadline. In other words, this option is viable only for an Independent Study originally designed to cover two semesters and for which it is not realistic to assign a grade halfway through the Independent Study. 5. For Independent Studies under the "no grade/double grade" option, the deadline to withdraw without record is the "withdraw-without-record" deadline for regular courses during the first semester. A withdrawal beyond that date, but during the first semester, will result in a "W" (withdrawal with record) on the student's transcript for only the first semester. Withdrawal (after the "withdraw-without-record" deadline) during the second semester will result in a "W" on the student's transcript for both semesters.

inTERnShiPS-FOR-cREdiT

Students may earn academic credit by completing an approved Internship-for-Credit with appropriate off-campus organizations. Internships-for-Credit broaden an educational experience by linking the theoretical and conceptual frameworks provided by the many academic disciplines offered at the College with the practical application of this knowledge.

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Each Internship-for-Credit has two main components. The first involves on-site duties and responsibilities--the structured practical experience. The second component entails an Educational Plan which is developed in conjunction with the faculty sponsor. The Educational Plan includes a bibliography of related readings, a schedule of agreedupon consultations between the student and faculty sponsor, and a description of the proposed project, paper, or performance that the student will complete for the faculty sponsor. This project, paper, or performance will serve as the most important element of the grade received for the Internship. The faculty member will receive a brief appraisal of the student's performance from the on-site supervisor. The following regulations govern Internships-for-Credit: 1. Students must have sophomore, junior, or senior status in order to register for an Internship-for-Credit. 2. Only students with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher are eligible to register for an Internship-for-Credit. It is the student's responsibility to verify this eligibility prior to proposing an Internship-for-Credit experience. 3. Internships-for-Credit may occur during the academic year or during the summer. Summer Internships are approved only if they allow for regular consultation with a Franklin & Marshall faculty sponsor. Consultation may take place by e-mail or telephone where necessary. 4. A student may receive one-half, one, or two course credits for an Internshipfor-Credit, depending on the time commitment per week or the length of the project. Two-course-credit Internships occur over two consecutive semesters or an entire summer and an adjoining semester (the summer counts as one semester). A one-course-credit Internship must involve a minimum of 96 hours for the semester. Almost all summer Internships-for-Credit are half-time or full-time over 10­12 weeks. 5. Internships-for-Credit may extend over two semesters. 6. Only two course credits from Internships may count toward the completion of graduation requirements. 7. A student may receive credit for Internships that are embedded in off-campus study programs that have already been approved by the College, such as study abroad programs or the Washington Semester program. 8. Once the student has completed the Internship-for-Credit, the faculty sponsor may receive a brief statement of appraisal of the student's performance from the on-site Internship supervisor. However, the most important element in determining the grade will be those items specified on the Educational Plan for an Internship-for-Credit. The regulations governing grading options for an Internship-for-Credit are as follows: 1. All Internships-for-Credit are graded on a Pass/No Pass basis and, therefore, credit earned for passing an Internship will not count toward a student's major or minor. 2. Students who enroll for a two-semester Internship may not elect the "no grade/double grade" option. The following regulations govern registration for an Internship-for-Credit: 1. The Office of Career Services administers the Internship-for-Credit program. All of the appropriate application materials, along with detailed student guide205

lines for participation, may be obtained at Career Advisement Services. 2. Internships may be taken for credit only if a faculty member has agreed to act as an adviser for the Internship experience. Before speaking with the faculty member, a student should have received an offer for an Internship position from a field supervisor at an approved site. This stipulation means that a student chooses a position at a site that is part of a list of permanently approved sites, or gains approval of the site from the Internship administrator at Career Services. 3. The department chairperson of the faculty sponsor's department must approve the Application for Internship Study and the Educational Plan for an Internship-for-Credit. 4. The student must submit an Application for Internship Study and an Educational Plan for an Internship-for-Credit to the Registrar's Office. 5. Students undertaking an Internship-for-Credit over the summer are required to register and pay the appropriate tuition charge as published each spring.

ExchAngE OPPORTUniTiES

The following policies govern course registration in the exchange programs at Millersville University, the Lancaster Theological Seminary, and the Central Pennsylvania Consortium colleges of Gettysburg College and Dickinson College: 1. Only courses which are not available at Franklin & Marshall College may be taken at another institution for credit. 2. A student may register for one course per semester at Millersville University or the Lancaster Theological Seminary. A student may spend a semester or a year in residence at Gettysburg College or Dickinson College, in addition to the option of taking one course per semester while in residence at Franklin & Marshall. (Students participating in the secondary education program at Millersville University may take more than one course to meet the program requirements. See "Careers and Programs of Study-Teaching" for more information.) 3. Permission forms must be obtained from the Registrar and the course must be included on the student's Franklin & Marshall schedule. 4. This free exchange provision pertains only to regular semesters (Fall and Spring) and is open only to full-time, matriculated (degree candidate) students. 5. Under the exchange procedure, three-credit-hour offerings are awarded a full course credit at Franklin & Marshall College. This provision applies to all courses at the exchange institutions, including those (e.g. summer courses) not covered by the exchange agreement. 6. Such courses are noted on the student's academic record with the assigned grades indicated and included in the student's grade point average calculations. Exchange courses may be taken Pass/No Pass if appropriate. This provision applies to all courses at the exchange institutions, including those (e.g. summer courses) not covered by the exchange agreement. 7. Enrollment in exchange programs may delay graduation clearance for second-semester seniors. Franklin & Marshall credit is given only upon receipt of an official transcript sent directly from the exchange institution to the Franklin & Marshall Registrar's Office.

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8. If a course is repeated after having received an original grade of "D+," "D," "D-," "F," or "NP," the repeat must take place at the same institution at which the course was originally taken. In particular, courses originally taken at Franklin & Marshall that are eligible to be repeated may not be repeated at an exchange institution.

EvALUATiOn And gRAdES

It is College policy that members of the faculty judge the academic quality of students' work and assign a grade as a measure of their evaluation. This responsibility may not be delegated.

RETURn OF STUdEnT WORK

All work submitted by students for evaluation in a course must be returned to them as expeditiously as possible, usually within two weeks of submission. With the exception of term papers, work submitted prior to the final week of classes should normally be returned no later than the final class period.

PRivAcY POLicY

It is the policy of Franklin & Marshall College to ensure that student grades are a private matter between student and faculty member, to be shared only with authorized officials of the College, unless the student signs a statement giving permission for his or her grades to be released to a third party. This policy entails the following: 1. All graded student assignments must be returned individually to students in such a way as to protect the confidentiality of the grade and the privacy of the student. 2. In many cases, it is helpful for students to know the distribution of grades for each assignment. In cases where the instructor believes this to be appropriate to the goals and methods of a particular course, he or she should regularly inform students of the class-wide grade distribution on graded assignments. 3. Student grades may never be posted but must be communicated to students individually, in private.

gRAdES

The letter grading system uses 12 passing grades ("A" through "D-," and "P") and two failing grades ("F" and "NP"). Their numerical values, used to calculate a student's grade point average, are as follows: A -- 4.00 C -- 2.00 A- -- 3.70 C-- 1.70 B+ -- 3.30 D+ -- 1.30 B -- 3.00 D -- 1.00 B-- 2.70 D-- 0.70 C+ -- 2.30 F -- 0.00

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"P" (Pass) and "NP" (No Pass) grades are not used in calculating a student's quality point average. The following definitions offer verbal descriptions of the value of grades: A, A- = EXCELLENT. Work of consistently high standard, showing distinction. B+, B, B- = GOOD. Work showing superiority in such qualities as organization, accuracy, originality, understanding, and insight. C+, C, C- = SATISFACTORY. Work which fulfills essential requirements in quality and quantity and meets the acceptable standard for graduation from Franklin & Marshall College. D+, D, D- = PASSING. Work which falls below the acceptable grade point average standard for graduation, yet is deserving of credit in the course. F, NP = FAILING. Work undeserving of credit in the course. An "NP" grade does not affect a student's grade point average. I = INCOMPLETE: see the following section. NC = NO CREDIT (for activities offered on a non-credit basis). NG = NO GRADE. A temporary mark indicating the final grade has not yet been submitted. Class lists for courses carry no distinction between students taking a course on a Pass/No Pass basis and students taking a course on a letter-graded basis. Faculty members report letter grades for all students, including those taking the course on a Pass/No Pass basis. Grades of "A" to "C-" are converted by the Registrar to "P." Grades of "D+" through "F" are converted to "NP." Any questions concerning the Pass/No Pass option should be directed to the Registrar's Office.

incOmPLETE gRAdE

A temporary grade of Incomplete ("I") is given, only with the prior approval of a Student Academic Affairs dean, when a student is not able to complete the required work in a course within the normal time period. Incompletes are authorized only when there are extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control. An Incomplete is never justified when the student simply has neglected to complete course work on time. There may be courses whose content or format make grades of Incomplete inappropriate. Moreover, if a student has been absent from a number of classes or has a substantial number of assignments outstanding, an Incomplete grade may not be appropriate. A student who wishes to appeal the denial of an Incomplete grade may make a written appeal to the Dean of the College, who will make a decision after consultation, as appropriate, with the instructor, the student, and the Student Academic Affairs dean. Any incomplete grade not approved by a Student Academic Affairs dean will be returned by the Registrar to the instructor. Incomplete grades are to be replaced by permanent grades no later than thirty days after the end of the final examination period in any semester. This deadline is subject to appeal to the Dean of the College. After the deadline for replacing such grades, the Incomplete will be changed to an "F" or "NP." It is the responsibility of the instructor to inform the Registrar what the permanent grade should be even if the student has not completed the work and the grade should become an "F" or "NP."

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gRAdE REPORTS

Grades are reported to students through myDiplomat, an online Franklin & Marshall information system that is (through authorized password access) available through an internet connection. End-of-semester grade reports are no longer automatically mailed to students. Students may, however, request the receipt of a printed end-of-semester grade report by notifying the Registrar's Office in writing. Students who wish to have their grades mailed to an address other than their home address should report this fact to the Registrar's Office before the end of the final examination period. In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, Franklin & Marshall College does not automatically send grades to parents. Students may authorize the regular release of grades to their parents by signing a formal release form available in the Registrar's Office. Grade reports may be withheld from the student if the student has an outstanding balance with the College.

RAnK in cLASS

All full-time students are ranked by cumulative grade point average at the end of each semester according to their anticipated graduation year as determined by the Registrar's Office. When students graduate, they are ranked with all other students who were awarded degrees at the same time. Rank in class is printed on students' official transcripts only after they have graduated but may be viewed on a student's degree audit accessible through myDiplomat.

TRAnScRiPTS

Official transcripts are released by the Registrar's Office to designated parties upon written authority of the student involved. Students enrolled on campus must make these requests in person at the Registrar's Office. Transcripts are generally mailed within three working days of the receipt of the request. Students requiring same day service may be charged a fee. Official transcripts released directly to the student will be marked as such. There is no fee for this service if fewer than ten transcripts per academic year are requested. This service may be denied if the student or former student has an outstanding balance with the College or if there is a pending disciplinary matter. A student who is enrolled or on leave and not denied access to an official transcript may see his or her unofficial transcript through myDiplomat.

chAngES in A REcORdEd gRAdE

After a student's course grade is officially recorded, a change may be made only with the approval of the Committee on Academic Status through a petition letter from the faculty member stating good and sufficient reason for the change. Grade changes may not be requested on the basis of student work submitted after the official grading deadline. A significant part of the Committee on Academic Status' rationale is that a change in a student's grade should be made only after grades for all students enrolled in that course have been reviewed, and the instructor is reasonably sure that no other student

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is affected unjustly by not having had an equivalent review of his or her reported grade. The petition submitted by an instructor should include both an explanation of the reasons why the change is required and a description of how discrimination against other students has been prevented. A form is available in the Registrar's Office. The Committee on Academic Status also authorizes changes in grades following conviction for academic dishonesty. These changes are also initiated by a petition from the instructor in the course.

APPEAL OF A gRAdE BY STUdEnTS

Students are entitled to objective, professional evaluation of their academic work and to fair, equitable treatment in the course of their academic relationships with members of the faculty. These criteria are observed by members of the Franklin & Marshall faculty as a part of their professional responsibilities. Misunderstandings have traditionally been resolved, informally, in discussion between students and professors, and this manner of resolving problems is judged to be appropriate in this academic community. Should students believe they have a legitimate grievance which has not been reconciled by such private conversation, they may pursue the matter by consultation with the Dean of the College, who will consult with the department chairperson. After having exhausted these means to resolve the matter informally and having found the grievance still unreconciled and still believing the grievance to be legitimate, the student may inform the Dean of the College in writing, setting forth a full, fair account of the incident or circumstances giving rise to the grievance. If, after review of the statement and conversation with the student, the Dean of the College finds that the matter is not referenced in established College regulations or for other reason merits further consideration, the Dean of the College will, with the professor's department chairperson, make inquiry of the professor. The Dean of the College may then, with the student, professor, and the department chairperson, informally resolve the situation, taking such action as the Dean of the College may deem appropriate. If these informal methods fail to resolve the grievance, the Dean of the College may form an ad hoc committee of three department chairpersons from the division of the department in which the grievance arose. This committee shall hear the complaint and response and investigate the matter fully, and shall make a recommendation to the Dean of the College for appropriate action. Alternatively, if, in the judgment of the Dean of the College, the grievance is of such gravity or its resolution would have such impact on the welfare of students generally or on the conduct of professional responsibilities in the College as to require even more formal safeguards for the aggrieved student and professor involved, the Provost, in consultation with the Professional Standards Committee and Solicitor of the College, shall prescribe an appropriate procedure consonant with the College's Statement on Academic Freedom.

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ExAminATiOn PROcEdURES

FinAL ExAminATiOnS

Schedules of final examinations are prepared by the Registrar and published several weeks before the examination period begins. All final examinations are offered during examination periods which are up to three hours in duration. Final examinations are scheduled during three periods each day as follows: 9 a.m. to 12 noon; 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Athletic competitions, including those for both intercollegiate and club teams, are not to be scheduled during the final exam period or the preceding "reading days." The exception to this policy is postseason competition associated with Franklin & Marshall's membership in the Centennial Conference. Examinations that cover a substantial portion of the semester's work and that count a significant percentage of the semester grade may not be given at a time other than the designated final examination period. A student scheduled for three examination periods in a row (whether over one or two calendar days) may request a make-up time for the examination scheduled for the 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. time period. Such requests require a two-week advance approval by the Registrar's Office, which verifies the situation and notifies the professor involved. Faculty scheduled for final examinations in the evening period must honor approved requests. Unless students are scheduled for three consecutive examinations, they are expected to take all finals as scheduled. Instructors are not permitted to make individual arrangements or exceptions. When individual students are faced with extenuating circumstances beyond their control, a final examination may be rescheduled with the approval of the Registrar. This examination must be taken no later than two days before the official date for end-of-semester grades. Instructors may not reschedule a final for an entire class without prior approval of the Registrar. If a student has a final rescheduled against his or her will, this fact should be reported to the Registrar. No re-examinations are permitted for the purpose of raising a grade.

PROFiciEncY ExAminATiOnS

Proficiency examinations are available only to full-time students and may not be taken for any course in which the student registered during the previous calendar year or which he or she has completed with a grade (including "F" or "NP") at any time. A proficiency examination may not be taken for any course that is a prerequisite for a course in which the student has ever been enrolled. Students who are approved to take proficiency examinations should not expect the faculty to provide any special tutoring. Proficiency examinations are not intended to be taken so as to receive credit for work substantially undertaken at Franklin & Marshall College but for which credit has not been received. Students interested in receiving credit through a proficiency examination must adhere to the following procedures: a. The student must secure permission from the department chairperson to take the examination; the chairperson has the right to deny such requests. If the

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b. c.

d. e. f.

chairperson grants the request, he or she completes an Application (available in the Registrar's Office) indicating the agreed-upon date of the examination. The student takes the Application to the Business Office, pays a non-refundable proficiency examination fee of $100, and receives a receipt. The Application and receipt are returned to the chairperson. The chairperson sends the Application and receipt, with his or her signature certifying approval, to the Registrar and indicates the date the Registrar can expect the department's decision as to credit awarded. The chairperson also consults with the instructor of the course to determine the best time and place for the examination and notifies the Registrar of that decision. The student takes the examination on the assigned date. The student may expect the results of the examination shortly after the deadline established by the chairperson for the results to be submitted to the Registrar. The chairperson notifies the Registrar's Office of both positive and negative results of all proficiency examinations. The Registrar's Office informs the student and his or her academic adviser of the results. Only results awarded course credit are recorded on the student's permanent record. No grade is assigned; the course does not count as either Pass/No Pass or a regularly graded course.

Each credit earned through a proficiency examination reduces the student's 32-course-credit graduation requirement by an equivalent amount of course credit. Such course credits cannot count toward the 16 course credits that must be earned at Franklin & Marshall College nor toward the 21 course credits that must be earned with standard grades. Students may not earn credit for courses in basic language in modern languages (normally the first four courses in the sequence) by proficiency examination. For any approved proficiency examination in a course not in the Franklin & Marshall curriculum, the student is responsible for any fees of outside examiners, in addition to the regular Franklin & Marshall proficiency examination fee of $100 per course.

TRAnSFER OF cREdiT POLiciES

All transfer students will be expected to adhere to all graduation requirements listed in this Catalog unless noted otherwise below. Transfer credit is only considered for courses that are completed at institutions which are accredited by one of the regional accrediting commissions and documented on an official transcript sent directly to the Registrar's Office from the original institution. Transfer of credit to Franklin & Marshall College is generally governed by the following regulations:

TRAnSFER cREdiT PRiOR TO mATRicULATiOn (TRAnSFER STUdEnT)

Credit earned prior to matriculation at Franklin & Marshall College is transferred on the basis of courses in which the student has earned grades of "C-" or better. The

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amount of credit transferred is determined by dividing the total number of semester hours of credit earned by four (the number of credit hours per course at Franklin & Marshall College). This gives the number of course credits which may be granted at Franklin & Marshall College. (Transfers from a quarter-hour system divide total quarter hours by six.) A student must complete a minimum of 16 course credits at Franklin & Marshall College regardless of the amount of credit transferred and even if all other degree requirements can be met with fewer than 16 course credits. Transfer students may satisfy the general competency requirement of the College's Writing Requirement by transfer of credit for an approved course in English composition. (Courses in English literature do not typically satisfy this requirement.) Those who do not have transfer credit for such a course will be required to take and pass English 105 or another course designated in the Master Schedule as fulfilling the writing requirement (a "Writing Intensive" course). Grades in transferred courses are not included in the Franklin & Marshall grade point average. Thus, they are not taken into account in the determination of College honors. Grades in transferred courses are not posted on a student's Franklin & Marshall transcript. Graded courses for which credit is transferred from other institutions will count toward the requirement that a student must pass 21 regularly graded courses to graduate from the College. The specific courses which are transferred are determined on the basis of the following considerations: a. Existence of comparable courses in the Franklin & Marshall curriculum; b. Intended field of concentration (including related courses); c. Distribution requirements; and d. Grades earned ("C-" or better is required; courses taken on a Pass/No Pass basis are generally not eligible for transfer credit). No transfer credit is granted for technical courses, physical education courses, secretarial courses, engineering courses, drafting courses, courses in military science, real estate courses, or any courses from non-accredited schools or institutes. Additionally, criminal justice courses, communications courses (including oral communications), vocal or instrumental music lesson credits, and most education courses, are not awarded Franklin & Marshall credit. Franklin & Marshall College grants credit for some nontraditional course work, such as the following: a. Armed Services Language Institutes (transcripts evaluated with approval of appropriate language department chairperson) b. Nursing degree (up to eight course credits) c. Advanced Placement Examinations (see pages 215­216) d. International Baccalaureate Diploma (see page 217) e. CLEP Subject Tests (see page 217) f. Proficiency examinations (see pages 211­212, under Examination Procedures). Foreign student credentials are evaluated on a case-by-case basis and may require the services of a course credit evaluation agency at the student's expense. Courses in question are referred to the department chairperson, whose decision is the final authority. When the department chairperson is uncertain, the student may be offered the opportunity to take a proficiency examination (without charge). Incoming transfer students are granted Franklin & Marshall credit upon receipt

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of their final official transcript from their previous institution. This transcript must be mailed directly from the previous institution to the Franklin & Marshall Registrar's Office.

TRAnSFER OF cREdiT AFTER mATRicULATiOn

No credit may be transferred for courses taken during a Fall or Spring semester in which the student is enrolled at Franklin & Marshall. Transfer of credit is considered only for courses that are completed at institutions which are accredited by one of the regional accrediting commissions or by a recognized accrediting agency for that discipline. Transfer of credit requires approval of the appropriate department chairperson at Franklin & Marshall College before the course is taken. The College grants transfer credit for work successfully completed elsewhere only on the basis of the following equation: Franklin & Marshall course credits = number of semester hours divided by four, OR number of quarter hours divided by six (to the nearest .25, minimum: .25) By this formula, the following Franklin & Marshall course equivalencies can be made: 1 semester hour = .25 F&M course credit 2 semester hours = .50 F&M course credit 3 semester hours = .75 F&M course credit 4 semester hours = 1.00 F&M course credit 1 quarter hour = no F&M credit 2 quarter hours = .25 F&M course credit 3 quarter hours = .50 F&M course credit 4 quarter hours = .75 F&M course credit 5 quarter hours = .75 F&M course credit 6 quarter hours = 1.00 F&M course credit It is important to note that while the department chairperson determines what course a student can take to transfer credit, and what specific course requirement at Franklin & Marshall College will be met through taking the course (major, minor or elective), the chairperson cannot authorize a student to transfer credit according to any formula other than that explained above. No transfer credit is granted for technical courses, physical education courses, secretarial courses, engineering courses, drafting courses, courses in military science, real estate courses, or any courses from non-accredited schools or institutes. Additionally, criminal justice courses, communications courses (including oral communications), vocal or instrumental music lesson credits, and most education courses, are not awarded Franklin & Marshall credit. If Franklin & Marshall credit is received for a specific course that was taken elsewhere, then the student may not retake the course at Franklin & Marshall.

gRAdES FOR APPROvEd TRAnSFER And STUdY ABROAd cREdiT AFTER mATRicULATiOn

1. In order to receive transfer credit, a passing grade must be earned ("D-" or above) and must be reflected on an official transcript sent directly to the Reg214

istrar's Office from the host institution. 2. All courses must be taken for a regular grade (not Pass/No Pass). 3. All transferred grades, including failing grades, will be entered onto the Franklin & Marshall transcript but will not be calculated into the Franklin & Marshall cumulative grade point average. One set of exceptions regards work completed at a Central Pennsylvania Consortium institution, the Lancaster Theological Seminary, or through the Millersville Exchange program. An additional exception regards courses taken in the fall, spring, or summer sessions of Advanced Studies in England. All courses taken by Franklin & Marshall students at ASE will be treated the same as courses taken at Franklin & Marshall; the grades for ASE courses will be counted in the Franklin & Marshall cumulative GPA with four semester-hour courses receiving one Franklin & Marshall credit. 4. Transfer credit may not be received for a course already taken at Franklin & Marshall College. 5. Courses taken at Franklin & Marshall for which a grade of "D+," "D," "D-," "F," or "NP" was received may not be repeated at another institution. Students may petition the Committee on Academic Status for exceptions to this policy. Special policies and procedures apply for courses taken as part of a semester (or year-long) study abroad program or a domestic off-campus affiliated program. Interested students should consult the Office of International Programs for policies and procedures in this area.

AdvAncEd PLAcEmEnT

Franklin & Marshall College participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. A student who takes an Advanced Placement examination is given college credit if the subject matter of the Advanced Placement course and examination is comparable to that covered in an elementary course taught by a Franklin & Marshall department. The following Franklin & Marshall course credits are currently awarded if a student achieves a test score of 4 or better on the Advanced Placement subjects listed: AP Subject Franklin & Marshall Course Studio Art: General ART Elective Studio Art: Drawing ART 114 History of Art ART Elective Biology General Elective (or BIO 110, as determined by department) Chemistry CHM 111 and 112 Computer Science CPS 150 Economics (Macro) General Elective Economics (Micro) General Elective (if credit is awarded for both Macro and Micro Economics, one credit is General Elective and one credit is ECO 100) English Literature/Comp. General Elective English Language/Comp. ENG 105 Environmental Science ENV Elective*

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French Human Geography German American Government Comparative Government American History European History World History Italian Lang/Culture Latin Math Calculus Math Statistics Music Listening/Literature Music Theory Physics B Physics C: E&M Physics C: Mech. Psychology Spanish Language Spanish Literature

FRN 203 ENV Elective GER 202 GOV 100 GOV 222 HIS 238 HIS 222 HIS Elective ITA 210 LAT 201 MAT 109 MAT 116 MUS 101 MUS 222 PHY 101 PHY 112 PHY 111 PSY Elective* SPA 221 SPA Elective

* May not be used toward the Natural Science distribution requirement (Natural Science with lab or Natural Sciences in Perspective). When a student is awarded credit and advanced placement, the fact, but no grade, is entered on the student's permanent record, and the number of courses required for graduation is reduced by the number of courses for which credit is given. Such credit will satisfy a major or minor requirement if the course is listed in the Catalog as satisfying that requirement. Whether a student is awarded credit for more than one semester's work in a single subject is determined by the department concerned. These procedures do not permit the granting of two college credits for the same work (e.g., introductory calculus taken in high school and repeated at Franklin & Marshall College). If a student is officially enrolled at the end of the second week of classes for a course at Franklin & Marshall College for which Advanced Placement credit has been awarded, the student forfeits the awarding of this credit. There is no limit on the number of Advanced Placement course credits a student may receive, but these credits cannot count toward the 16 course credits that must be earned at Franklin & Marshall College nor toward the 21 course credits that must be earned with standard grades.

cOLLEgE cREdiTS TAKEn in high SchOOL

Franklin & Marshall College will only accept, in transfer, college credits taken while the student attended high school that are earned under the following conditions: 1. The course was taught on the campus of a college accredited by one of the regional accrediting associations; 2. The course was taught by a regular member of the college faculty; 3. The student was enrolled in a course with degree candidates of that college; and

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4. The course was a regular part of the curriculum of the college. All other policies listed under "Transfer Credit Prior to Matriculation" apply.

cREdiT BASEd On FOREign And inTERnATiOnAL AcAdEmic cREdEnTiALS

International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma recipients with a total score of 30 or more are awarded eight course credits (one full year) toward the Franklin & Marshall degree. IB Certificate recipients receive one or two course credits (depending on discipline) for each higher level examination passed with a score of 5 or higher. IB credits may be counted toward major or minor requirements or electives contingent upon departmental approval. French Baccalauréat and German Abitur recipients may be granted credit for up to one full year (eight course credits) toward a degree at Franklin & Marshall College. The College generally awards credit to students who have passed British "A" Level examinations with a grade of "C" or higher. See the Registrar for details. Other course credits from foreign countries are evaluated on an individual basis. If an accurate evaluation of foreign credentials is not possible, the student may be asked to secure, at his/her expense, a professional evaluation from an appropriate agency.

cOLLEgE LEvEL ExAminATiOn PROgRAm (cLEP)

Franklin & Marshall College participates in the CLEP program of The College Board, accepting scores of 50 or higher in subject area tests as entrance credits. Matriculated students must receive the prior approval of the appropriate department chairperson.

WiThdRAWAL FROm ThE cOLLEgE

Students who withdraw voluntarily from the College (including those who transfer to another institution) must notify the Associate Dean for Student Academic Affairs in writing. Students who withdraw from the College are expected to complete an Exit Survey. Students must complete the Exit Survey before the College will refund $500 of the matriculation deposit minus any sums owed. The deadline for withdrawal from the College to exclude grades for the current semester is the last day of classes. All other withdrawals become effective with the beginning of the next semester.

REFUnd POLicY

The Higher Education Amendments of 1992 require that each institution participating in a Title IV program have a fair and equitable refund policy in effect. When a student withdraws, changes from full-time to part-time status, or takes a leave of absence, and officially notifies the Associate Dean for Student Academic Affairs, then the College refunds tuition, room, and board charges previously paid by

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the student, less administrative costs, based on the following schedule: During First Week ........................................... 87.5% During Second Week ..................................... 75.0% During Third Week ........................................ 62.5% During Fourth Week ....................................... 50.0% During Fifth Week .......................................... 37.5% During Sixth Week ......................................... 25.0% During Seventh & Eighth Weeks ...................... 2.5% For those students who are receiving institutional financial aid, institutional grants will be reduced according to the above schedule. Federal funds will be returned as prescribed by the Department of Education using Return to Title IV regulations.

LEAvE POLicY

There are three types of Leaves of Absence subject to the various conditions described in the following sections. See also International and Off-Campus Study.

LEAvES OF ABSEncE

The following conditions apply to all Leaves of Absence: 1. The College retains the Matriculation Deposit and the Advance Registration Deposit. 2. A student who has purchased a computer from the College continues payment during the leave. 3. A student on Leave of Absence must meet the normal deadlines for applying for aid in order to be considered for funding for the semester in which he or she plans to return. 4. Commencing with the last day of enrollment before the leave takes effect, a student who has taken out an educational loan has a six-month grace period before repayment of the loan must begin. A. Leave of Absence for Health Reasons 1. Recommendations for a Leave of Absence for Health Reasons take the form of a written statement from Health Services or Counseling Services (or both) to the Dean of the College. Under certain circumstances, upon the recommendation of the Director of Health Services and/or the Director of Counseling Services, a student may be placed on required Leave of Absence for Health Reasons. A detailed copy of this policy is available from the Dean of the College. 2. A request for a Leave of Absence for Health Reasons may be made at any time. 3. A Leave of Absence for Health Reasons is granted either for a specified length of time (usually one or two semesters) or for an unspecified length of time, depending upon the nature of the reason for the leave. 4. When a student is granted a Leave of Absence for Health Reasons during the course of a semester, the grade of "W" will normally be recorded for

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courses in which the student is enrolled that semester. If appropriate and if the instructor is agreeable, a "W" may be replaced by a regular grade upon completion of work. A student who is interested in pursuing this option must contact the Dean of the College. 5. Students who are on a Leave of Absence for Health Reasons may not be on campus without the permission of the Dean of the College. 6. A student who is ready to return to Franklin & Marshall College must notify the Dean of the College in writing. Such notification must be accompanied by a written statement from Health Services or Counseling Services (or both). Notification is normally required no later than July 1 for the Fall semester or December 1 for the Spring semester. B. Leave of Absence for Personal Reasons 1. A request for a Leave of Absence for Personal Reasons must be made to the Dean of the College. A leave is normally granted only if the request is made no later than August 1 for the Fall semester or January 1 for the Spring semester, and only if a student is in good academic standing for his or her most recently completed semester. 2. A request may be made for a variety of reasons; for example, a student may wish to work or travel for a time, or may need some time away from the College to consider future academic plans and goals. This leave is granted for a specified period of time. 3. A student who is ready to return to Franklin & Marshall College must notify the Dean of the College in writing. Notification is normally required no later than July 1 for the Fall semester or December 1 for the Spring semester. C. Leave of Absence for Academic or Disciplinary Reasons 1. A student may be placed on a Leave of Absence for Academic Reasons. 2. Students may be suspended for one or two semesters because of administrative or Committee on Student Conduct disciplinary action. 3. Students who are on a Leave of Absence for Academic or Disciplinary Reasons may not be on campus without the permission of the Dean of the College.

REAdmiSSiOn TO ThE cOLLEgE

Any person who has attended Franklin & Marshall College in the past and wishes to be readmitted should contact the Dean of the College. The Committee on Academic Status reviews all applications for readmission. Return from a Leave of Absence or Approved Off-Campus Study is not considered readmission.

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ASSESSmEnT OF inSTRUcTiOn BY STUdEnTS

At the end of each semester, students have the opportunity to provide the College with their assessments of the effectiveness of teaching in courses they have taken. These assessments of courses and instructors are submitted anonymously on a questionnaire, which includes some standard questions and some specific to the course; students are required to provide written comments on each course. The questionnaires are completed in class every semester in courses taught by untenured faculty members and in alternate calendar years in the courses taught by those with tenure. The responses to these questionnaires are tabulated and the results are distributed only to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty, the Professional Standards Committee, the chairperson of each faculty member's department, and the faculty members themselves. This information is used, together with other evidence bearing on the quality of a faculty member's teaching, in making decisions on rehiring, promotion, and tenure. Students are expected to take the responsibility of providing this information seriously by completing the questionnaires as thoughtfully and objectively as possible, and by following closely the details of the process by which they are administered.

cOmPUTing AT FRAnKLin & mARShALL

Franklin & Marshall is committed to the integration of computing into the life of the College. We believe that the computer has become an indispensable tool for scholarship, and we want our students to become adept in its use. The campus is well equipped with computing power; all faculty members and nearly all of the students have personal access to a computer. All computers on campus are directly connected to the campus network and a wireless network extends across the campus. Both libraries have public access computing facilities that include printing for a small fee per page, and many of the academic departments have special-purpose computing labs. In this computing-intensive environment, computers are employed in coursework, in the classroom, in the laboratory, and for students' independent work. About 80% of current students have followed the College's recommendation to have personal access to an Apple Macintosh computer. In addition to providing access to a standard suite of application software (word processing, spreadsheet, graphing, presentation, virus protection) the College also maintains site licenses for statistical, mathematical, and analytical applications. Through a customized web site, FummerFirst.fandm.edu, first year students can easily install all of the programs necessary to utilize the campus information infrastructure and to be productive in the classroom or laboratory. Utilizing digital video and electronic documentation, we have included information on the Library Catalog, the campus network, electronic mail, the World Wide Web, and more. Franklin & Marshall has adopted Blackboard, a course/instructional management system. Blackboard is a web-based solution for online delivery of course-based instructional materials offering an easy-to-use interface and instructional management tools that require no HTML authoring skills. The College created and maintains a web-based campus-wide information portal called myDiplomat. Through myDiplomat, students can register for classes,

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examine progress toward their degree, and check their grades and other personal information. Faculty can manage their class rosters, guide advisees, and submit grades. Future additions to the College information environment will be accessible through myDiplomat. eDisk is personal space for electronic document storage and information exchange that is available from any internet-connected computer. eDisk supports both file and web sharing and provides private and public access. Franklin & Marshall students can use eDisk to store assignments, to move files from computer to computer at school and at home, to publish digital portfolios, or to create personalized web sites. Providing general assistance in the use of all computing resources is the responsibility of Information Technology Services (ITS), located in the Martin Library of the Sciences and Stager Hall. ITS has particular responsibility for the College's network infrastructure, administrative information systems, and the support of standard applications and utilities. ITS also maintains a user helpdesk, public computing facilities, a computer repair establishment, and a hands-on computing classroom, as well as color printing, scanning, and multimedia workstations. Media Services and Emerging Technologies, divisions of ITS located in Stager Hall, promote and support the integration of media and computing technologies into the College curriculum. These groups provide support for the College's non-print media collection; instructional digital materials design, production, and delivery; Blackboard, the College's learning management system; and numerous technology enhanced classrooms and learning spaces. ITS staff collaborates with faculty and students in the evaluation, creation, and delivery of "technology-based" instructional materials that support the educational mission of the College.

ThE USE OF cOmPUTERS

The College uses computers and the electronic networks that link them in an ethical and legal way and expects its students to do the same. Unauthorized inspection, obstruction, and interference with the work of others are serious academic and ethical offenses. Students should respect the privacy and integrity of others' work: examining other people's work without permission and tampering with or destroying the work of others are unacceptable courses of conduct. Introducing computer viruses and other forms of damaging and destructive software into computers or networks and sending harassing or nuisance messages over networks constitute serious interference with the work of others. Pennsylvania law, in fact, prohibits the intentional and unauthorized access, alteration, damage, or destruction of "any computer, computer system, computer network, computer software, computer program or data base, or any part thereof" (18 Pa. C.S.A. 53933). The security of the College's computer systems and the work of everyone who uses them depend in large measure on a system of user identification codes and secret passwords. Students should keep their computer passwords secret by memorizing them rather than writing them down, using passwords not obviously associated with themselves, and changing passwords frequently. The use of a computer account is limited to its owner. The sharing of passwords is forbidden. Students should also respect the limitations that are placed on their use of some College computing facilities. Public facilities are available and easily accessible; faculty and administrative systems, files, and equipment are off-limits to students unless express permission is given to use them. This includes computers and printers

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in faculty, academic, and administrative departments and offices. The unauthorized copying of computer materials is almost always wrong. If the material is protected by copyright, it may violate Federal copyright laws, as stated above. If the material is sold commercially, it may violate Federal and state laws prohibiting the theft of trade secrets, or the seller's registration or licensing agreements. Even if the material is not copyrighted or sold commercially, as in the case of another student's work, unauthorized copying almost certainly violates reasonable standards of ethical conduct and academic honesty. The above is intended only as a brief summary of the College's policies regarding student use of computers and computer networks and should not be regarded as comprehensive. More detailed information is available on request from Information Technology Services.

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Admission to the college

Franklin & Marshall welcomes applications from capable students who demonstrate a serious interest in higher education. Students most competitive for admission are those who, in the judgment of the Admission Committee, will most benefit from and contribute to both the academic and extra-curricular programs of the College.

SELEcTiOn

Selection is based upon several criteria, with the quality of the student's secondary school record as the most important. The best preparation for study at Franklin & Marshall is a rigorous academic program that provides fundamental training in the arts, English language, foreign language, history, literature, mathematics, and science. It is highly recommended that a student have some combination of four years of strong English language courses and literature courses, three to four years of a modern or classical foreign language, four years of mathematics resulting in a readiness for beginning college calculus, at least two years of historical study, and three years of study in the natural sciences. The College also recommends that students take at least five academic courses during their senior year. Other factors considered in a student's evaluation are a demonstrated interest in the College, participation in extra-curricular activities, standardized test scores, recommendations, and information concerning the student's personality and character. Domestic students may elect to take advantage of our Standardized Test Option. Applicants choosing this option are required to submit two recently graded writing samples from their junior or senior year in place of their standardized tests. The writing samples may be creative or analytical essays written for English, humanities, or social science courses.

cAmPUS viSiT And inTERviEW

A campus visit and on-campus interview is an important part of the admission process and is strongly recommended. Interviews are available by appointment Monday through Friday from 9:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Tours of campus depart Monday through Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. For those who are unable to visit the campus on a weekday, group seminars are conducted on selected Saturdays during the academic year. Interested parties are advised to schedule appointments for interviews and seminars at least two weeks in advance by contacting the Office of Admission at (717) 291-3951 or (877) 678-9111.

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TYPES OF APPLicATiOn

REgULAR AdmiSSiOn

The deadline for submitting applications and all required credentials is February 1. An admission application must be accompanied by a $50 non-refundable application fee. Applicants for freshman status are notified of the Committee's decisions by April 1.

EARLY dEciSiOn

Candidates who select Franklin & Marshall as their first choice college and desire early notification are invited to participate in the Early Decision Program. Candidates who submit a completed application and the Early Decision Supplement by November 15 for Early Decision Round I will receive notification by December 15; those who apply by January 15 for Early Decision Round II will be notified by February 15. Early Decision applicants who live within a half day's drive of the College are required to have an on-campus interview before a decision will be made. An Early Decision candidate may initiate applications to other institutions. If offered admission to Franklin & Marshall, however, the candidate is obligated to withdraw the other applications and enroll at Franklin & Marshall. Admitted students must enroll within one month of their acceptance. Those candidates who are deferred will be considered later as Regular Decision candidates.

AccELERATEd AdmiSSiOn

Candidates for either Early Admission or accelerated entrance to college are those outstanding secondary school students who are: 1) qualified to enter college after having completed three years of secondary school and who will receive their high school diploma after having satisfactorily completed their first year of college; or 2) those students who will graduate from secondary school in less than four years, having successfully completed all academic units required for a diploma. The College welcomes applications from such students who are socially mature and academically prepared for a college experience. An on-campus interview is a requirement for all Accelerated Admission candidates. These students must identify themselves as such when making an appointment. These candidates also need to include a personal statement articulating the reason for beginning college early. A letter of recommendation from the high school administration and a statement of permission from parents/guardians must be part of the submitted credentials. To apply, students should follow the normal application procedure, using February 1 as the deadline for application.

hOmE SchOOLEd OR nOn-TRAdiTiOnALLY EdUcATEd STUdEnTS

Students who have been home schooled or educated in a non-traditional setting are welcome to apply to Franklin & Marshall College. Candidates for admission who have been educated in the home must interview with an Admission Officer and include

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with their application both the accrediting and evaluative documentation mandated by their home state. Additionally, these candidates for admission are required to submit standardized tests (SAT or ACT) and are encouraged to take SAT II subject tests.

TRAnSFER STUdEnTS

Transfer applicants are welcome for either the Fall or Spring semesters. Transfer applicants are expected to be in good academic and social standing at their present college or university. A transfer application form must be accompanied by a $50 non-refundable application fee and should be submitted by May 15 for the fall semester and by December 1 for the spring semester. Decisions are made as soon as all required credentials are complete. Admission is selective and contingent upon available space. Transfer students are eligible for financial assistance if funds are available. Financial aid applications must be submitted in full by May 15. The transfer candidate interested in Summer School study should communicate directly with the Registrar's Office. Questions regarding the transfer process should be directed to the Office of Admission by calling (717) 291-3951 or (877) 678-9111.

high SchOOL STUdEnT PROgRAm

Franklin & Marshall College offers selected local area high school seniors the opportunity to enroll, free of charge, in up to two courses at F&M. This program is designed to offer enrichment opportunities and intellectual challenge to local pre-college students as a service to the community. These high school seniors are screened and selected by their respective high schools. Students admitted by the College into the program are limited to one course per semester on a space-available basis. High school seniors should contact the Office of the Registrar at (717) 291-4168 for more information.

FinAnciAL Aid

No student should fail to apply for admission to the College because of financial considerations. Two-thirds of the students at Franklin & Marshall receive some form of financial aid from a variety of public and private sources. The College's financial aid policy reflects a desire to attract and retain a diverse student body of the highest possible promise. For those students to whom aid is offered, the College attempts to meet the majority of demonstrated need with grant funding. In most cases, the College awards several forms of financial aid, usually combining a grant with a job or a loan. Franklin & Marshall is a member of the College Board and the College Scholarship Service (CSS) and subscribes to that organization's principles of financial aid. Need-based grants are awarded to students who have demonstrated financial need as determined from information provided in the PROFILE form and the Free Application for Federal Student Assistance (FAFSA). As the student is the primary beneficiary of the education, Franklin & Marshall assumes that each family will first make a reasonable sacrifice in financing its son's or daughter's education before applying to the College for assistance. Students receiving financial aid from the College are expected to work during the summer to earn funds

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for their education. In addition, all applicants must apply for any state, federal, or other awards for which they may be eligible. Expected federal and state grants usually replace institutional grants. Failure to complete all applications for federal and state grants could result in the loss of institutional funding. In addition to need-based financial aid, a number of merit-based awards are available to first-time applicants. All awards except the Gray Scholarship are renewable tuition scholarships, subject to completing a specified number of graded courses each semester and maintaining GPAs as specified for each award. Approximately 25% of Franklin & Marshall students are recognized with one or more of the following awards in a competitive process during the application review. For the purposes of awarding federal, state, and institutional financial aid at Franklin & Marshall College, the Academic Year is defined by the Academic Calendar and comprised of two 15-week semesters. In addition to standard term awarding, students may receive federal or state aid for the summer terms, provided they enroll in at least two courses at Franklin & Marshall College. They may also receive federal or state aid when attending other colleges in the summer, provided they enroll in the equivalent of six semester hours and complete a Consortium Agreement provided by the Office of Financial Aid.

The Andrew M. Rouse Scholarship, endowed by and named in honor of Andrew M. Rouse '49, former Trustee of the College, seeks to recognize two outstanding first-year students who have demonstrated high academic achievement, strong character, and significant leadership skills, whether through their communities, schools, or religious organizations. Rouse Scholars should have the potential to make a positive and significant impact on the student body, and to contribute to the legacy of the College. The scholarship covers all academic costs, including full tuition, books, and laboratory fees and is renewable for three years (subject to demonstrating academic eligibility and showing leadership at the College). Rouse Scholars also receive a Franklin & Marshall Computer Store credit to purchase the faculty recommended Apple Macintosh system. Each scholar is eligible to apply for a $3,000 research/travel grant that will enable the student to develop further his or her leadership skills.

AndREW m. ROUSE SchOLARS

The John Marshall Scholar Program supports students who, during their high school years, have demonstrated unusual motivation, spirit of achievement, and independence of thought. The program was created on the premise that bright, curious minds flourish best when challenged in an environment that gives highest priority to individual interests and abilities. The Marshall Scholar award consists of three components: (1) a $12,500 renewable merit-based scholarship, (2) eligibility to apply for a $3,000 research/travel grant, and (3) a Franklin & Marshall Computer Store credit to purchase the faculty recommended Apple Macintosh system. Each of the above enhances a student's ability to engage in unique and personal academic pursuits. Scholars also receive special opportunities for excursions and on-campus activities. Questions regarding the program may be directed to the Office of Admission at (717) 291-3951 or (877) 678-9111.

jOhn mARShALL SchOLARS

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John Marshall Scholars who are designated National Merit Finalists and notify the National Merit Scholarship Corporation that Franklin & Marshall College is their first choice institution will be named National Merit Marshall Scholars and will receive a merit-based scholarship of $18,000 from the College and a $750-$2000 Franklin & Marshall Merit Scholarship from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, sponsored by Franklin & Marshall College. The William H. Gray, Jr., Scholarship, established by his son William H. Gray III, provides financial aid to outstanding students from backgrounds that are traditionally underrepresented in higher education. Gray Scholars are chosen on the basis of potential for achievement as demonstrated by academic strength, leadership ability, and commitment to service. The financial aid package for Gray Scholars is designed to reduce loan and job expectations over the course of four years. Gray Scholars receive student and alumni mentors and can apply for special internships, on and off campus. Questions may be directed to the Office of Admission at (717) 291-3951 or (877) 678-9111. The Presidential Scholarship is a merit-based award offered to students in Franklin & Marshall's applicant pool who have demonstrated excellent academic achievement in a challenging high school course load. Presidential Scholars receive a $7,500 renewable tuition scholarship, renewable for each of three subsequent years at Franklin & Marshall (subject to making regular progress toward graduation and maintaining a specified GPA). Presidential Scholars are invited to special events on campus. Questions may be directed to the Office of Admission at (717) 291-3951 or (877) 678-9111. Buchanan Scholars are chosen from the applicant pool each year and are recognized for extraordinary public service. Buchanan Scholars receive a $5,000 renewable tuition scholarship and are invited to apply for a special public service workshop called "Putting It Together in the Community" (PIT). This program for incoming first-year students introduces them to service opportunities in the Lancaster community. Musically active students in the applicant pool are invited to audition for Music Scholarships at Franklin & Marshall. Renewable scholarships of $2,500, $3,500, and $5,000 are awarded to students on the basis of musicianship, dedication, and the potential for making positive contributions to the Music program at Franklin & Marshall. Students who are named Joseph P. and Marianne S. Nolt Music Scholars are also eligible to apply for a grant up to $2,000 to support musically enriching projects. The Klein Scholarship is a merit-based award offered to selected students in the applicant pool who have demonstrated excellence in a challenging high school curriculum and have contributed to their school and community in significant and positive ways. Klein Scholarships are $5,000, renewable annually. Further details on each of the scholarships, including renewal criteria, is available at http://www.fandm.edu/departments/admission/apply/scholarships/. Further details

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nATiOnAL mERiT SchOLARS

WiLLiAm h. gRAY, jR. SchOLARS

PRESidEnTiAL SchOLARS

BUchAnAn SchOLARS

mUSic SchOLARS And nOLT mUSic SchOLARS

h. m. j. KLEin SchOLARS

regarding financial aid can be found at http://www.fandm.edu/departments/financialaid/ and in the College Life Manual.

TUiTiOn And FEES

Each student is charged, on a semester by semester basis, fees that cover tuition, room, board, and most College charges for activities, laboratories, treatment at the Infirmary, and special events such as lectures and theater productions. The cost to the College of educating the student, of course, is well in excess of these fees. The balance is provided principally by gifts from alumni and friends and by income from endowments. The schedule of expenses shown below indicates actual charges for 2007­2008 and is subject to change. Tuition, Services and Activities Fee .......................... Standard Room Fee*.................................................. Special Room Fee* .................................................... 225 Block Meal Plan/$120 Flex Dollars.................... 180 Block Meal Plan/$145 Flex Dollars.................... 125 Block Meal Plan/$220 Flex Dollars.................... 70 Block Meal Plan/$195 Flex Dollars**.................. 50 Block Meal Plan/$245 Flex Dollars**.................. Application Fee .......................................................... General Matriculation Deposit .................................. (first-time students) New Student Orientation Fee ..................................... (first-time students) Proficiency Examination Fee ..................................... Chemistry Breakage Deposit ..................................... Biology Breakage Deposit ......................................... Late Payment Fee....................................................... Health Services Fee ................................................... $36,430 per year $5,880 per year $6,380 per year $3,294 per year $3,184 per year $2,941 per year $2,056 per year $1,758 per year $50 $500 $200 $100 per course $25 per course $10 per course $500 per semester $25 per semester

* New laundry program included. This program allows the campus student unlimited use of new energy efficient washers and dryers. Freshman residential students are required to be on the 225 Block Meal Plan. Sophomore students must be on either the 225 Block Meal Plan or the 180 Block Meal Plan. Junior and Senior students are not required to be on a meal plan. ** Available to juniors and seniors. Part-time students (those taking fewer than three courses) are charged $4,554 per course. A non-refundable processing fee of $50 must accompany each application for admission to the College. The General Matriculation Deposit of $500 is required of each incoming freshman, transfer student or re-admitted student, to reserve and maintain the student's position in the College. The deposit remains with the College during the student's entire academic career, and is refundable, less charges incurred or bills unpaid, when the student graduates or withdraws. The deposit is forfeited if the student, after accepting admission to the College, decides not to enroll. The $500 matriculation deposit will

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be refunded to students who withdraw from the College only if they complete the exit questionnaire. The $200 new student orientation fee is not refundable. A $100 fee, payable in advance, is assessed for each proficiency examination taken by a student to earn credit for a course. A late payment fee of $500 is assessed for all accounts unpaid as of 10 days prior to the first day of classes. A breakage deposit of $25 is required for each laboratory course taken in chemistry, and a $10 deposit is required for each course in biology. The unused portions of breakage cards should be returned to the Business Office at the end of the semester for a refund. Any student whose College bills are unpaid is not eligible to receive a diploma. The College reserves the right to refuse to release official transcripts of a student's records if bills are unpaid. All fees are subject to change without notice.

PAYmEnT

All charges and fees for each semester are billed in advance and must be paid in full approximately two weeks prior to the first day of classes. The College does not extend credit. It does recognize that payment in full at the beginning of each semester may present a problem. The College's Business Office can suggest a reputable commercial plan for deferred payment. Failure to adhere to a deferred payment plan will cause a late fee of $500 to be assessed. Student accounts that remain unsettled at the end of a semester will be reviewed by the Committee on Student Financial Status. In the event that an account remains unpaid, the student may be placed on a Leave of Absence for Financial Reasons. If this occurs, payment in full is expected to be made in order for the student to enroll for the following semester.

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Facilities

(See Campus Map on page 280)

ThE Ann And RichARd BARShingER LiFE SciEncES And PhiLOSOPhY BUiLding

This new 104,000 square foot three-story building houses the departments of Biology, Psychology, and Philosophy, as well as the interdisciplinary programs in the Biological Foundations of Behavior and Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind. The building contains 11 teaching labs, 22 research labs, 14 student research areas, 12 discussion areas, a 3-story atrium, a 120-seat lecture hall, a humanities common room, a greenhouse, a vivarium, an outdoor garden, seminar rooms, and classrooms. It is a physical embodiment of the innovative multidisciplinary work in these areas that has occurred for many years.

cOLLEgE ROW RESidEnTiAL/ RETAiL cOmPLEx

The result of a partnership between Franklin & Marshall College and Campus Apartments of Philadelphia, this three-building, 200,000 square foot residential/retail complex stretches over a five-acre plot adjacent to the College's Alumni Sports and Fitness Center. It features about 50,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor, with residential space for approximately 400 Franklin & Marshall juniors and seniors on the upper floors. The project is being managed by Campus Apartments of Philadelphia.

WARE cOLLEgE hOUSE

The intent of the College House System is to blend the academic and social lives of students and encourage extended scholarly discussions with faculty outside of the classroom. The master plan for the College House System proposes to create first-rate common spaces in the residence halls that include seminar rooms, multi-purpose great rooms, living rooms, service kitchens, and offices for faculty Dons, staff Prefects, and student House leaders. The first of these new spaces, completed in 2007, is a 4,000 square foot expansion of the North Ben Franklin Residence Hall for the Ware College House.

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BOnchEK cOLLEgE hOUSE

Schedule to be available for the start of the 2008-2009 academic year, an addition to the South Ben Franklin Residence Hall to complete the facilities of the Bonchek College House is the next step of facilities expansion to accommodate properly the mission of the College House System.

diSTLER BOOKSTORE And cAFÉ

Distler House, the original gymnasium for the College, was renovated in 2004 to bring the campus bookstore back to the heart of the campus. The new bookstore, operated by Barnes and Noble, now occupies the main floor and most of the lower level of Distler. The remaining portion of the lower level is a "Jazzman's Café" operated by Sodexho Dining Services. A two-story "glass lantern" atrium off the north side of the building has been added to accommodate seating areas for the café and the bookstore, with a spiral stair connecting the two levels. An outdoor terrace with seating completes this new gathering space for the Franklin & Marshall community.

ThE jOSEPh inTERnATiOnAL cEnTER

Opened in 2006, this 3,500 square foot two-story house, located at 701 College Avenue, supports interaction between international students and students pursuing study abroad options by bringing together the Office of International Programs and the International Studies program. The Center will also facilitate more generally the integration of "things international" into campus life as a whole.

PhiLAdELPhiA ALUmni WRiTERS hOUSE

The Philadelphia Alumni Writers House was constructed next to the Wohlsen Admission House along College Avenue at the eastern edge of the arts quadrangle in 2004. The 3,600 square foot two-story house contains a main reading room/performance space, two-story house contains a main reading room/performance space, two seminar rooms, a kitchen and dining room, staff offices, and spaces for student writing clubs, the Philadelphia Alumni Writers House serves as the hub for creative writing on campus, as well as provides an excellent intellectual gathering space for the campus. A series of lectures and readings will be held at the House throughout 2007­2008.

FAcKEnThAL LABORATORiES REnOvATiOn

Designed by architect Charles Klauder, this magnificent building has been the home to the Department of Biology in recent years. With the move of Biology to the Barshinger Life Sciences and Philosophy building, Franklin & Marshall plans a major renovation

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to convert Fackenthal into a center of activity for business, government, and public policy, as well as an innovative information technology area including a technology "sandbox" to facilitate high level work by students and faculty. The new facility will house the Departments of Business, Organizations and Society (BOS) and Government, the Floyd Institute for Public Policy, and the College's administrative department of Information Technology. Renovation work will begin in the Fall of 2007 with opening scheduled for the Fall of 2009.

ThE PhiLLiPS mUSEUm OF ART

The Phillips Museum of Franklin & Marshall College, located in the Steinman College Center, reflects the College's commitment to the liberal arts. The Museum presents both traveling exhibitions and rotating exhibits from the College's extensive permanent collection (e.g., 19th- and 20th-century paintings; 20th-century photographs; sculpture; Pennsylvania folk art; African art; ancient Roman coins). The Museum provides opportunities for research and study, as well as less formal learning experiences, for students, faculty, and the Lancaster community. It houses three distinct yet interconnected exhibition spaces--the Dana, Rothman, and Curriculum Galleries. Located on the street level, the Dana Gallery features solo and group exhibitions of contemporary artists as well as traveling exhibits. The focus is on presentation of fine arts, whether two-dimensional, three-dimensional, installation, or digital. The Rothman Gallery, on the level below, features textiles, fraktur, ceramics, metals, and glass from the College's outstanding collection of Pennsylvania folk art. The objects are not only fine examples of the work of early artisans; they also reiterate the bond between Lancaster County and the College. On the lowest level, the Curriculum Gallery provides both students and faculty a flexible space to examine and study art, as well as to display their own work. The exhibition schedule includes contemporary, historical, and multicultural materials that offer members of various academic disciplines an opportunity to display and analyze objects of material culture.

ThE LiBRARY

The Library supports the mission of the College by providing scholarly resources and participating in the process of students acquiring the research skills necessary for them to become independent and productive leaders and learners in a changing world. The librarians work with the faculty and students to assist them in discovering and interpreting information in a dynamic environment. The Library's collections and services are available in two locations on campus. Shadek-Fackenthal Library, built in 1938 and expanded in 1983, houses materials in the humanities and social sciences. The first floor features the Reference and Circulation Desks, the Periodicals and Reference Rooms, microforms, and computers. Government documents, bound periodicals, and Special Collections are on the ground floor. The second floor has a computer classroom and a traditional reading room. General study areas are located throughout the building. The Library also maintains a small collection of general and leisure reading material in the Browsing Collection.

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The Martin Library of the Sciences, opened in August 1990, contains the book collections for the natural and physical sciences, science reference materials, scientific periodicals, and appropriate government publications. The Science Library also contains an extensive collection of geologic maps and other special scientific materials. Most non-print media are housed in Academic Technology Services and in the Visual Resources collection. The combined libraries contain more than 500,000 volumes, 410,000 government documents, and a sizeable microforms collection including the Evans Collection of Early American Imprints. The Library has been a depository of U.S. Government Documents since 1895. As a result, the College has one of the most extensive collections of government documents of any college its size. The Library's overall growth averages about 11,000 volumes a year through purchase, gift, and exchange. Periodical and other serial subscriptions number more than 2,800. Reference and research assistance is available in person at the service desks in both libraries, and online via email and instant messaging. Reference librarians provide expert assistance with student and faculty research, and are also available for more in-depth research appointments. An excellent collection of paper and online reference materials and databases support these efforts. The entire College community has online access to the Library's catalog, plus over 175 scholarly resources, databases and full-text journal and newspaper collections, via the Library's web site, http://library.fandm.edu. A computer connected to the campus network (either on campus or remotely) is required to access subscriptionbased resources, such as Lexis-Nexis, JStor, ARTstor, Project Muse, Business Source Premier and Web of Science. The Library holds memberships in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), a global network of libraries, the Associated College Libraries of Central Pennsylvania (ACLCP), Access PA, and the Pennsylvania Consortium of Academic Libraries, Inc. (PALCI). Membership in these consortia grants Franklin & Marshall community members off-site borrowing privileges to tens of millions of titles. The College ID Card gains on-site access to all ACLCP libraries, which includes Millersville University and Dickinson, Elizabethtown, and Gettysburg Colleges. Students may also use EZBorrow or Interlibrary Loan to obtain needed books or Interlibrary Loan to obtain copies of articles from libraries here and abroad. The Archives and Special Collections Department preserves and makes available the College's rare book, manuscript, digital, and archival collections. Some of the subjects for which these collections provide primary and secondary source materials are: 18th- and 19th-century German-American imprints (monographs, almanacs, pamphlets, broadsides, fraktur); Lincolniana; Franklin J. Schaffner '42 (film director); Reynolds Family (Wilkes Expedition, U.S. Civil War); and Franklin & Marshall College history.

FRAnKLiniAnA

Frankliniana is a virtual database of objects owned or associated with Benjamin Franklin. Created as part of the tercentennial celebration of Franklin's birth in 1706, it has been given to Franklin & Marshall College by the Benjamin Franklin Tercentenary. It brings to Franklin & Marshall great potential for student-faculty collaborative research projects as well as opportunities for learning curatorial work for our students.

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PERFORmAncE ARTS

ThE Ann And RichARd BARShingER cEnTER FOR mUSicAL ARTS in hEnSEL hALL

The Ann and Richard Barshinger Center for Musical Arts in Hensel Hall, dedicated in March 2000, offers a premier, 500-seat concert and performance venue for members of the College and surrounding community. The concert hall which adds to the beauty and artistic quality of the campus, features an expanded stage accommodating up to 135 performers, an impressive acoustic environment, a three-level lobby, secondfloor balcony, rehearsal rooms, and a soundproof classroom backstage. Each year the College offers a series of concerts and other cultural events by internationally-known performers and lecturers.

ThE ROSchEL PERFORming ARTS cEnTER

The Roschel Performing Arts Center, dedicated in October 2003, is the new performance home for the Department of Theater, Dance, and Film. The Center, with its expanded stage and orchestra pit, has created an inspired and inspiring environment for students and faculty to practice their craft, as well as allow members of the College and surrounding communities to enjoy performances that still have an intimate feel. In addition to the 305-seat main stage theater, the Roschel Center also includes two new dance studios, an interactive media lab, drama rehearsal space, a costume shop, an expanded scene shop, and multiple dressing rooms. In addition to a full schedule of student and TDF performances, each year a number of outside performances are held in the venue.

SPEciAL inTEREST hOUSing

Franklin and Marshall College offers a variety of special interest housing options for upperclassmen in addition to our traditional residence halls. The majority of housing options exist in residential houses but also include apartments on West James Street and traditional dormitory-style housing in Dietz Hall. Dietz Hall provides Healthy Living housing and a community for students interested in wellness-based living. Residents and their guests agree to keep the living units free at all times of cigarettes and other tobacco products, alcohol, and illicit drugs. The Murray Arts House, located at 560 West James Street, provides living arrangements for 24 members of the College community who wish to reside in a space that encourages students to express themselves through their art or art appreciation. The House fosters individuality as it pertains to all creative expression. Residents hold regular house meetings, encourage activities in support of house members with relation to the arts, and take trips in order to provide opportunities to attend art events in area cities. The Community Outreach House, located at 550­52 West James Street, provides a community for students interested in strengthening ties between Franklin & Marshall College and the Lancaster community at large through programs that encourage students to be active members of the Lancaster community. All members of the Community

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Outreach House are expected to complete a minimum of 10 hours of community service per month. The French House at 548 West James Street is a small house where students gather to speak French and to enjoy French culture and cuisine. The six residents often serve as hosts for many of the events held in the house. Residents participate in regular pause cafés, dinners, films, faculty socials, and trips. The International House, located at 611 College Avenue, offers approximately 11 students interested in cultural diversity a place to live and participate in varied multicultural events throughout the academic year. The West James Street Apartments form a living community where upperclass students live independently and gain skills in community development with their neighbors. Students make many independent living decisions and are responsible for creating and maintaining appropriate living standards.

dEPARTmEnT OF AThLETicS And REcREATiOn

miSSiOn STATEmEnT

The athletic program at Franklin & Marshall promotes liberal learning in the fullest sense by complementing the academic mission of the College. This objective is accomplished through a variety of programs: intercollegiate, intramural and club sport competition as well as recreation and wellness activities. Through our participation in athletics, we grow in respect for others as we develop responsibility, integrity, perseverance, industry and the ideals of sportsmanship. These activities inspire participants to reach for standards of excellence and to develop character through both individual and collaborative action. At the same time, responsibility to the community and the academic program requires that all participants adhere to the highest standards of personal and civic behavior.

inTERcOLLEgiATE AThLETicS

As a NCAA Division III institution, the College places the highest priority on the overall quality of the educational experience and on the successful completion of all students' academic programs. We seek to establish and maintain an environment in which a student-athlete's activities are conducted as an integral part of the studentathlete's educational experience. We also seek to establish and maintain an environment that values cultural diversity and gender equity among their student-athletes and athletics staff. The College sponsors twenty-seven intercollegiate athletic programs. Twentythree of the programs compete primarily in the Centennial Conference with Bryn Mawr College, Dickinson College, Franklin & Marshall College, Gettysburg College, Haverford College, Johns Hopkins University, McDaniel College, Muhlenberg College, Swarthmore College, Ursinus College and Washington College. Wrestling competes at the Division I level while Men's and Women's Squash are non-divisional sports.

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Men's: Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Football, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Squash, Swimming, Tennis, Track and Field (Indoor and Outdoor), Wrestling Women's: Basketball, Crew, Cross Country, Field Hockey, Golf, Lacrosse, Soccer, Softball, Squash, Swimming, Tennis, Track and Field (Indoor and Outdoor), Volleyball

cLUB SPORTS

Club sports are comprised of students who have a common interest in a specific sport. They compete with other regional clubs and/or provide skill instruction. Participation requires strong personal commitment--the membership has responsibility for club leadership, decision-making and fundraising. The Athletic and Recreation Department staff provides professional guidance, assistance with facility scheduling and an administrative framework--which may include limited funding. Participation creates strong sense camaraderie and clubs always welcome new members of all skill levels. Where permissible, club membership is open to all members of the Franklin & Marshall community. Offerings: Cheerleading, Men's Crew, Cricket, Equestrian, Ice Hockey, Men's Rugby, Women's Rugby, Men's Volleyball, Ultimate Frisbee.

inTRAmURAL SPORTS

Intramural Sports are structured leagues, tournaments and one day special events offering men and women from campus friendly competition in a variety of activities for beginning to skilled players. Leagues are organized for minimal time commitment and are played with a spirit of sportsmanship, teamwork, cooperation, and personal responsibility. Participation is intended to be a fun way to promote a healthy lifestyle, relieve stress, and encourage positive social interaction. Offerings: Basketball, Bowling, Flag Football, Soccer, Softball

REcREATiOnAL cLASSES

Recreational Classes are offered to improve individual health and fitness, promote wellness, and teach positive lifetime activity skills in a supportive group environment.

inFORmAL REcREATiOn

Informal Recreation describes all the self-initiated activities for personal fitness and exercise. Opportunities for "drop-in" use of the facilities and equipment are available during the facilities open hours. Informal Recreation allows individuals to participate as their schedule permits.

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FAciLiTiES

Mayser Center facilities, including a gymnasium and squash courts, are available for student, faculty, and professional staff use whenever intramural, intercollegiate, or other College activities are not scheduled. Outdoor recreation areas include an all-weather, 400-meter, eight-lane track and practice areas for lacrosse and football on the main campus. West of the main campus is 54-acre Baker Field, used for recreation, intramurals, club sports, and varsity soccer, field hockey, lacrosse, baseball, and softball. In 2006, the Brooks Tennis Center opened on the north side of Harrisburg Ave. and is home to eight lighted courts. The Alumni Sports and Fitness Center, opened in the fall of 1995, is an all-campus recreational facility. It includes a field house (170' x 300') featuring five full-sized courts convertible for basketball, volleyball, tennis, and badminton, an elevated walking/jogging track, and a six-lane, 200-meter running track. The area is also used for indoor varsity practice of the baseball, softball, lacrosse, soccer, field hockey, tennis, and football teams. Sports equipment can be checked out with a Franklin & Marshall ID card. The ASFC is open 122 hours per week to serve the recreational needs of the College community. The 4,000 square foot Poorbaugh Aerobic Fitness Center, located in the Alumni Sports and Fitness Center, features the latest in aerobic and strength training machinery, including treadmills, steppers, exercycles, rowing machines, Nordic tracks, recumbent bicycles, cross-trainers, a 21-station selectorized conditioning circuit, and a variety of conditioning hand weights. The final Alumni Sports and Fitness Center building component, a 25-yard by 50meter swimming pool, allows expanded aquatic programming, especially recreational and lap swimming. It is open for recreational use 56 hours per week.

inSTiTUTiOnAL PROcEdURES RELATing TO ThE FAmiLY EdUcATiOn RighTS And PRivAcY AcT OF 1974 (FERPA)

The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, commonly referred to as the Buckley Amendment, is supportive of previously adopted policy of Franklin & Marshall College concerning the rights of students to the confidentiality of their educational records and to the rights of students to have access to such records. However, the Act makes certain rights and procedures explicit and requires that the College establish certain procedures to ensure that the purpose of the Act is achieved. A copy of the Act and the regulations issued thereunder are available at the reserve desk of the library. The major features of the Act are the identification of "educational records" of students, the right of student access to such records, the opportunity of students to correct or amend these records when warranted, and the privacy of the records. The following paragraphs establish the procedures used at Franklin & Marshall College for the implementation of the Act.

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A. Definition of Educational Records 1. Educational Records. Educational Records are defined by the Act as those records, files, documents, and other materials which contain information directly related to a student and which are maintained by the College or an agent of the College. Students will be notified of their FERPA rights annually by publication in the Catalog. These records are: a. Admission folders and materials held in the Office of Admission until transferred to the Registrar's Office. b. Academic records, grade reports, transcripts of grades, major slips, and such other information as may appear on the College transcript held in the Registrar's Office. c. Records and documents related to the decisions of the Committee on Academic Status and the Committee on Student Conduct, and general information regarding the student's curricular and extracurricular performance and activities, held in the office of the Dean of the College. d. Records held by the student's academic adviser. e. Records and documents held in the Office of Financial Aid. f. Records and documents relating to the decisions of the Committee on the Pre-Healing Arts. g. Records and documents relating to the decisions of the Pre-Law Committee. h. Records of the office of Career Advisement Services. Further information about files, their location, and their custodian is in the Office of the Provost and Dean of the Faculty. B. Privacy of Student Educational Records 1. Release of Student Educational Records. No educational record shall be released by the College or its agents, nor shall access be granted thereto without the consent of the student except as hereinafter provided in Paragraph 2. Student requests for the release of information may be made by filing the forms provided for the purpose with the officer of the College holding such educational record(s). 2. Exceptions to Release Only at Student Request. The Act provides for exceptions to the necessity of the College obtaining a student's consent before releasing or permitting access to that student's records. The following persons and organizations may have such access, subject to the limits stated in each case: a. School officials who have a legitimate interest in the records. School officials include l) any persons employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position, 2) a person elected to the Board of Trustees, or 3) a person employed or under contract to the College to perform a special task. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official is l) performing a task that is specified in his or her job description or by a contract agreement, 2) performing a task related to a student's education, 3) performing a task related to the discipline of a student, or 4) providing a service or benefit relating to the student or student's family, such as health care, counseling, job placement, or financial aid.

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b. Authorized representatives of government who need the information to audit, oversee, or administer the Act, federally supported education programs, or financial obligations of the College or the student. c. Organizations conducting studies concerning the validity of predictive tests, administering student aid programs, or improving instruction, if such studies are conducted in such a manner that specific students cannot be identified in the publication of the results, and provided such information will be destroyed when it is no longer needed for the purpose for which the study was made. d. Accrediting organizations for the performance of their accrediting function. e. Parents of a student who have established with the office of the Dean of the College or the Registrar (depending on the record sought) that student's status as dependent according to Internal Revenue Code of 1954, Section 152. f. Such information as may be required by judicial order, or any lawfully issued subpoena, will be released on condition that the student is notified prior to release of the information and on condition that the College will not suffer legal liability. g. In the event of a health or safety emergency, information may be released to appropriate persons without the consent of the student if such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or of other persons. h. To officials of another school, upon request, in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. i. In connection with a student's request for, or receipt of, financial aid, as necessary to determine the eligibility, amount or conditions of the financial aid, or to enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. j. If required by a state law requiring disclosure that was adopted before Nov. 19, 1974. Complaints regarding alleged failures by Franklin & Marshall College to comply with the requirements of FERPA should be forwarded to: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 3. Directory Information. Neither the Act nor these regulations preclude the publication by the College of directory information providing the student has not withdrawn consent to the publication of or electronic access to such information. This directory information includes and is limited to the following: a. Name, home address, home phone number, local address, local phone number, e-mail address, photograph, and names and addresses of parents; b. Name and address of secondary school attended, periods of enrollment and degrees awarded, field of concentration, date of graduation, confirmation of signature, and membership in College organizations; c. Such information as is normally included on rosters and programs prepared for athletic contests.

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d. Announcement of the granting of honors, awards, and other accomplishments. Students may withhold directory information in any or all of the above categories by indicating their wishes on the appropriate screen on myDiplomat or by contacting the Registrar's Office. Students are responsible for any impact that such an action may have and should carefully consider the consequences. Questions should be directed to the Registrar's Office. 4. Implementation by Instructors. It is the policy of Franklin & Marshall College to ensure that student grades are a private matter between student and faculty member, to be shared only with authorized officials of the College unless the student signs a statement giving permission for his or her grades to be released to a third party. This policy entails the following: a. All graded student assignments must be returned individually to students in such a way as to protect the confidentiality of the grade and the privacy of the student; b. In many cases, it is helpful for students to know the distribution of grades for each assignment. In cases where the instructor believes this to be appropriate to the goals and methods of a particular course, he or she should regularly inform students of the class-wide distribution on graded assignments; c. Student grades may never be posted but must be communicated to students individually and in private. C. Access to Educational Records Subject to the procedures and the exceptions contained below, students have a right of access to the records described in Section A, above, and a right to challenge the accuracy of these records and to have explanations or comments on these records placed in their file. They also have a right to have copies of their records with a payment of fifteen cents per page to cover the costs of duplication. 1. The Act contains exceptions to the general right of students to access to files and documents. These exceptions are: a. Confidential statements and letters placed in the files prior to January 1, 1975, and confined in their use to the purposes for which they were intended; b. Confidential letters and statements as to which students have waived a right of access; c. Notes, statements, records, documents or other papers which are kept in the sole possession of the maker thereof and are not accessible to others (such as private notes made by professors, academic advisers, or administrators that are purely personal reminders of an event or fact that they may or may not use in a subsequent decision such as determining a grade in a course, advising as to courses, etc.); d. Records and documents of the office of Public Safety; e. Records created and maintained by Health Services, Counseling Services, and Career Advisement Services which are used in connection with the treatment of the student; f. Confidential financial records of students' parents; 2. Waiver of Access. A student may waive a right of access to confidential state240

ments and letters submitted as part of his or her admissions dossier, but this waiver does not apply if the letters or statements are used for purposes other than to make a judgment about the admission of the student to Franklin & Marshall College. Students may also waive a right of access to confidential recommendations respecting admission to another college or university, a graduate school or a professional school. Authors of such letters will give the student an opportunity to waive a right of access to such letters of recommendation as they may write. Students may also waive a right of access to confidential recommendations concerning application for employment or receipt of an honor or honorary recognition. 3. Access Procedure. Students who wish to review their records may do so by submitting an application to the pertinent officer of the College on a form provided for the purpose which shall identify what part of the educational records the student wishes to review. Within 45 days of the submission of the application, the College officer responsible for maintaining those records will meet with the student and present to the student the records and documents to which the student is entitled and will provide such explanations or comments as the student may require for clarification. Should the student challenge any part of the folder, file, document, or record, the Provost and Dean of the Faculty (or designee) shall try to resolve the matter by such informal means as discussion and/or deletion of erroneous material, addition to the record of an explanatory statement, or such other remedy as is deemed appropriate in the judgment of the Provost and Dean of the Faculty (or designee) and the student. If the challenge to the content of the record cannot be resolved by such informal means, a hearing shall be held within a reasonable time to resolve the matter and the decision of the hearing panel will be final. The hearing panel (all three members of which are to be drawn from the College community) will be made up of a member chosen by the student, a member chosen by the Provost and Dean of the Faculty, and a member chosen by the Provost and Dean of the Faculty's representative and the student's representative. The decision of the hearing panel will be rendered within ten days of the hearing, will be in writing, and will be delivered to the student and the Provost and Dean of the Faculty. 4. Record of Access. Those officers under whose care the records are kept shall keep a log of the names (and dates) of those who have requested or have had access to the student's record, and the legitimate interest that each person has in obtaining this information. 5. Limited Scope and Purpose of Student Review of Records. It is not the intention of the Act or these procedures to provide a forum for challenging course grades, the decisions of the Committee on Academic Status, the Committee on Student Conduct, or any other committee or officer of the College assigned the responsibility to make judgments. Rather, it is the intention of the Act and these procedures to make known to students the informational base upon which decisions included in the educational records are made and to allow corrections of that information or inclusion of explanatory statements.

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D. Administration of Policy and Procedures The Provost and Dean of the Faculty shall have general oversight of the administration of the Act and the above regulations. Questions concerning the matters covered by these regulations and the Act should be directed to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty in such form as may be required. Recommendations for changes and amendments to these regulations will be welcomed by the Provost and Dean of the Faculty, and such changes as experience demonstrates should be made will be made in a manner and at such times as conform to Franklin & Marshall procedures.

AccOmmOdATiOn FOR diSABiLiTiES: REhABiLiTATiOn AcT OF 1973 SEcTiOn 504

The College has designated the Director of Counseling Services as the coordinator of services and accommodations to meet the needs of students whose participation in the programs and activities of the College is limited by a disability. Every student at the College has the opportunity to complete a Request for Special Academic Services or Notifications of Special or Limiting Health Conditions form, mailed to all new students and available throughout the year at the office of Counseling Services. The College considers information provided on this form as confidential and uses it to provide appropriate accommodations for qualifying students. Students who wish to appeal an accommodation or file a complaint arising under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and/or the Americans with Disabilities Act should use the following procedures:

APPEAL OF AccOmmOdATiOnS UndER ThE REhABiLiTATiOn AcT OR AmERicAnS WiTh diSABiLiTiES AcT

1. A student who wishes to appeal an accommodation because the accommodation is felt to be inadequate or inappropriate should contact the Director of Counseling Services within 90 days of receiving the accommodation to discuss his or her concerns. 2. If a satisfactory resolution cannot be obtained in discussion with the Director of Counseling Services then an appeal should be made, in writing, to the Dean of the College within 15 days of failing to achieve a resolution through the Director of Counseling Services. 3. The Dean of the College will review all pertinent information and make a final determination of a reasonable accommodation for the student within 30 working days. 4. The appeal of an accommodation that involves the waiver of an academic requirement must be presented to the Committee on Academic Status in consultation with the Director of Counseling Services.

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cOmPLAinTS UndER ThE REhABiLiTATiOn AcT OR AmERicAnS WiTh diSABiLiTiES AcT

1. A student should file a written complaint with the Dean of the College within 90 days of the alleged violation. 2. The Dean of the College may conduct an investigation, as is appropriate, to resolve the alleged violation.

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The College Directory

BoarD of TrusTees

offICers

Chair DALE F. FREY '54 Retired Chairman and CEO General Electric Asset Management Weston, Conn. Vice Chair DANIEL B. BURTON Managing Director RBC Dain Rauscher Lancaster, Pa. Vice Chair DONALD R. ZIEGLER, C.P.A. '54, P'78 Retired Vice Chairman Price Waterhouse Dewey Beach, Del. Treasurer THOMAS J. KINGSTON, JR. (Term Ends 12/31/07) HELEN Y. BOWMAN (Term Begins 1/1/08) Assistant Treasurer PAUL E. METZGER Secretary J. SAMUEL HOUSER, PH.D. `89 Assistant Secretary DEBORAH M. MARTIN '72 Solicitor JOHN O. SHIRK, ESQ. Barley Snyder LLC Lancaster, Pa. THOMAS E. BEEMAN President and Chief Executive Officer Lancaster General Deputy Chief of Staff Navy Medicine East United States Naval Reserve Lancaster, Pa. LAWRENCE I. BONCHEK, M.D., P'91 Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Lancaster General Hospital Lancaster, Pa. STANLEY M. BRAND, ESQ. '70 Principal Brand Law Group Washington, D.C. ROBERT J. BROOKS, SR. '66, P'98 Retired Executive Vice President of Strategic Development Westinghouse Air Brake Technologies Corporation (Wabtec) Murrysville, Pa. JOHN F. BURNESS '67 Senior Vice President for Public Affairs and Government Relations Duke University Durham, N.C. DANIEL B. BURTON Managing Director RBC Dain Rauscher Lancaster, Pa. ROBERT D. CARL, III '75 Chairman, President and CEO CSCM, Inc. Atlanta, Ga. STANLEY V. CHESLOCK, JR. '67, P'03, P'04 Principal Cheslock Bakker & Associates Stamford, Conn. RONALD M. DRUKER '66, P'90 President The Druker Company, Ltd. Boston, Mass.

TrusTees

R. REEVE ASKEW, D.C. '66, P'96 Chiropractor Easton, Md. PAMELA G. BAILEY President and CEO Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association Washington, D.C.

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KENNETH M. DUBERSTEIN '65, P'09 Chairman and CEO The Duberstein Group, Inc. Washington, D.C. STANLEY J. DUDRICK, M.D. '57, P'88 Professor of Surgery Yale University School of Medicine Chairman Department of Surgery Director Program in Surgery St. Mary's Hospital Waterbury, Conn. DAVID L. ELGART '75 Math Chair Elementary and Middle School The Buckley School New York, N.Y. DOUGLAS H. EVANS, ESQ. '72 Special Counsel Sullivan & Cromwell New York, N.Y. NANCY FLOYD '76 Managing Director Nth Power, LLC San Francisco, Calif. DALE F. FREY '54 Retired Chairman and CEO General Electric Asset Management Weston, Conn. JOHN A. FRY President Franklin & Marshall College Lancaster, Pa. JOHN H. GLICK, M.D. President and Director Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute Vice President and Associate Dean for Resource Development University of Pennsylvania Health System and School of Medicine Philadelphia, Pa. WILLIAM H. GRAY, III '63 Chairman The Amani Group, LLC Miami Beach, Fla. ELLEN A. GROFF Lancaster, Pa.

BRIAN HARD, P'01, P'03 President Penske Truck Leasing Reading, Pa. PATRICIA E. HARRIS '77 First Deputy Mayor City of New York New York, N.Y. SUSAN KLINE KLEHR '73 Interior Designer Philadelphia, Pa. ANTHONY I. KREISEL '66 Retired Chief Investment Officer Large Cap Value Putnam Investments, Inc. Sudbury, Mass. BARRY S. LAFER, ESQ. '69 President Lafer Management Corp. New York, N.Y. LES J. LIEBERMAN '78 Executive Managing Director Sterling Partners, LLC New York, N.Y. PATRICIA A. McCONNELL, C.P.A. '71 Retired Senior Managing Director Bear Stearns & Company Naples, Fla. DOUGLAS J. McCORMACK, ESQ. '85 Senior International Tax Counsel Bristol-Myers Squibb Company New York, N.Y. KENNETH B. MEHLMAN '88 Partner Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Washington, D.C. MARY L. SCHAPIRO '77 Chairman & CEO NASD Washington, D.C. LAURENCE A. SHADEK '72, P'05, P'06 Executive Vice President/Director H. G. Wellington & Company, Inc. New York, N.Y. HENRY B. duP. SMITH '84 Vice President, Chief Investment Officer and Director The Haverford Trust Company Radnor, Pa.

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ROBERT H. SMITH '60, P'89 Retired President Time-Life Education, Inc. Alexandria, Va. WILEY W. SOUBA, M.D., Sc.D., M.B.A. P'08 Dean OSU College of Medicine Columbus, Oh. ANDREW P. STEFFAN, P'93 Retired Managing Director Citigroup, Inc. New York, N.Y. ARTHUR S. TAYLOR '83 President Benefit Allocation Systems, Inc. King of Prussia, Pa. H. ART TAYLOR, ESQ., C.P.A. '80 President and CEO BBB Wise Giving Alliance Arlington, Va. MICHAEL R. WALKER '70 Partner Key Real Estate, LLC Kennett Square, Pa. PAUL W. WARE '72, P'99 Retired Chairman Penn Fuel Gas, Inc. Lancaster, Pa. SUSAN L. WASHBURN '73 Principal Washburn & McGoldrick, Inc. Latham, N.Y. COLLEEN ROSS WEIS '85 20th Century Decorative Arts Adviser New York, N.Y. BENJAMIN J. WINTER '67 Principal The Winter Organization New York, N.Y. FRANCES DONNELLY WOLF '96 Artist Mt. Wolf, Pa. W. KIRK WYCOFF '79, P'09 CEO Continental Bank Plymouth Meeting, Pa.

LINDA YARDEN, ESQ. '81 Vice President Goldman, Sachs & Co. New York, N.Y. ROBERT ZEMSKY, PH.D. Chair and Professor The Learning Alliance for Higher Education University of Pennsylvania West Chester, Pa. DONALD R. ZIEGLER, C.P.A. '54, P'78 Retired Vice Chairman Price Waterhouse Dewey Beach, Del.

eMerITI TrusTees

DOREEN E. BOYCE, PH.D. Retired President Buhl Foundation Pittsburgh, Pa. SIDNEY DICKSTEIN, ESQ. '47 Senior Counsel Dickstein Shapiro Washington, D.C. ROBERT I. FLEDER '43, P'69, P'76 Retired President Fleder Mfg. Co. Inc. Sarasota, Fla. EUGENE H. GARDNER Investment Manager Gardner Russo & Gardner Lancaster, Pa. DONALD K. HESS '52 Retired Vice President, Administrative Affairs University of Rochester Williamsburg, Va. DAVID H. HOPTON '54 Private Investor Irvington, Va. L. JAMES HUEGEL '38, P'76 Retired Executive Vice President Consolidation Coal Company, Inc. Pittsburgh, Pa. DAVID H. KLINGES '50, P'82, P'85 Retired President, Marine Construction Bethlehem Steel Corporation Bethlehem, Pa.

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AARON J. MARTIN, Ph.D. '50 Private Investment Manager Kennett Square, Pa. WILSON D. McELHINNY Ketchum, Idaho HAROLD T. MILLER '46 Retired President and CEO Houghton Mifflin Publishing Company Lincoln, Mass. STEPHEN D. MOSES '55 Stephen Moses Interests Los Angeles, Calif. MARGARET S. MOSS, P'74, P'79 Willow Street, Pa. PAUL A. MUELLER, JR., ESQ. Retired Judge Court of Common Pleas of Lancaster County Willow Street, Pa. JOHN L. NEIGH, M.D. '55, P'92 Retired Chairman Department of Anesthesiology Physician Adviser CRM Department, Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia Drexel Hill, Pa. JOSEPH P. NOLT '59 Chairman Murray Risk Management and Insurance Lancaster, Pa. CAROLINE S. NUNAN President James Hale Steinman Foundation Director Lancaster Newspapers Lancaster, Pa. THOMAS G. PHILLIPS, III '54 Chief Executive Officer Phillips Office Products Middletown, Pa. KARL W. POORBAUGH '51, P'84 President Poorbaugh Timberlands Somerset, Pa. ANDREW M. ROUSE '49 Philadelphia, Pa.

WILLIS W. SHENK Retired Chairman Steinman Enterprises Lancaster, Pa. WILLIAM G. SIMERAL, PH.D. '48 Retired Executive Vice President E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. Wilmington, Del. KENNETH F. SMITH '55, P'78, GP'10 Retired Ford Motor Company Bloomfield Hills, Mich. J. W. STUTZMAN, M.D. '37 Retired President Riker Laboratories, Inc. Naples, Fla. ROBERT G. TANCREDI, M.D. '58 Boca Raton, Fla. PATRICIA ROSS WEIS, P'85 Sunbury, Pa. HENRY W. WIGGINS, JR., M.D. '55, P'91 St. Bernard Hospital Chicago, Ill.

seNIor sTaff of THe CoLLeGe

JOHN A. FRY (2002) President B.A., Lafayette College; M.B.A., New York University Stern School of Business HELEN BOWMAN (2006) Vice President for Finance [effective January 2008] B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh ALAN S. CANIGLIA (1982) Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Vice Provost for Planning and Institutional Research A.B., Bucknell University; Ph.D., University of Virginia NANCY E. COLLINS (2007) Vice President for College Communications A.B., Bowdoin College

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JONATHAN C. ENOS (1982) Associate Provost and Chief Information Officer B.A., Connecticut College; M.S., West Chester University; Ed.D., Temple University NANCY ESHLEMAN (1999) Director, Human Resources B.A., Alfred University; M.I.L.R., Cornell University J. SAMUEL HOUSER '89 (1996) Secretary of the College and Executive Assistant to the President B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; Ph.D., Brown University THOMAS J. KINGSTON, JR. (1995) Vice President for Finance and Administration B.S., LeMoyne College; M.Ed., University of Delaware DEBORAH M. MARTIN '72 (1989) Director of Special Events Assistant Secretary to the Board of Trustees A.A., Centenary College for Women; B.A., Franklin & Marshall College

KEITH A. ORRIS '81 (2002) Vice President for Administrative Services and External Affairs B.A., Franklin & Marshall College ANN R. STEINER (1981) Provost and Dean of the Faculty A.B., Bryn Mawr College; M.A., Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College LEWIS E. THAYNE (2005) Vice President for College Advancement A.B., Rutgers University; M.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University KENT C. TRACHTE (1988) Dean of the College B.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., State University of New York, Binghamton DENNIS TROTTER (2003) Vice President for Enrollment Management and Dean of Admission B.A., Whitworth College; M.B.A., University of Iowa1

THe faCuLTY

BRIAN A'HEARN (1999) Associate Professor of Economics Economics Department Chair B.A., The American University; Ph.D., The University of California, Berkeley JAMES G. ABERT (2006) Visiting Scholar in the Local Economy Center B.S., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Duke University GENEVIEVE ABRAVANEL (2004) Assistant Professor of English B.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., Duke University (on leave 2007­2008) BRIAN ADAMS (2000) Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.E.M., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of Delaware GREGORY S. ADKINS (1983) William G. and Elizabeth R. Simeral Professor of Physics B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles M. JILL AHLBERG YOHE (2007) Visiting Instructor of Anthropology B.A., University of Maryland; M.A. University of New Mexico DOUGLAS L. ALBERT (1998) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Trumpet B.S. Mus. Ed., Millersville University; M.M., Duquesne University LINDA S. ALECI (1986) Associate Professor of Art History B.A., Occidental College; M.F.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University

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JAY M. ANDERSON (1988) Richard S. and Ann B. Barshinger Professor of Computer Science B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., Harvard University MICHAEL L. ANDERSON (2006) Assistant Professor of Psychology B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Yale University DOUGLAS A. ANTHONY (1996) Associate Professor of History B.G.S., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Northwestern University DANIEL R. ARDIA (2006) Assistant Professor of Biology B. S., Tufts University; M.S., S.U.N.Y.; Ph.D., Cornell University KIMBERLY M. ARMSTRONG (1989) Associate Professor of Spanish Language Studies Council Chair B.A., Skidmore College; M.A., Georgetown University; Ph.D., Georgetown University (on leave Spring 2008) ANNETTE ARONOWICZ (1985) The Robert F. and Patricia G. Ross Weis Professor of Judaic Studies Professor of Religious Studies Judaic Studies Program Chair B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles CAROL J. AUSTER (1981) Professor of Sociology A.B., Colgate University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University LOUISE K. BARNETT (2000) Research Associate in American Studies B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr MEREDITH J. BASHAW (2005) Assistant Professor of Psychology B.S., Duke University; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology

MISTY L. BASTIAN (1995) Professor of Anthropology Africana Studies Program Chair B.A., University of Chicago; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago ROBERT BATTISTINI (2001) Assistant Professor of English B.S., Indiana University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Columbia University CURTIS C. BENTZEL (1986) Associate Professor of German B.A., George Washington University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University PATRICK S. BERNARD (2001) Associate Professor of English B.A., University of Sierra Leone; M.A., University of Northern Iowa; Ph.D., Purdue University (on leave 2007­2008) LINA BERNSTEIN (1991) Professor of Russian Russian Studies Program Director German and Russian Studies Department Chair Comparative Literary Studies Program Chair Diploma in Foreign Pedagogy, Moscow Institute of Foreign Languages; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts ANNA MARIA BERTINI-JONES (2005) Visiting Instructor of Italian B.A., Universita La Sapienza; M.A., Universita La Sapienza, Terza Universita di Roma ZACHARY P. BILES (2005) Assistant Professor of Classics B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder MICHAEL S. BILLIG (1986) Professor of Anthropology B.A., Columbia University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Harvard University RACHEL E. BLASER (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A., Reed College; M.A., University of Hawaii, Manoa; Ph.D., University of Hawaii, Manoa

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EUGENE N. BORZA (1999) Research Associate of Classics B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago DAVID R. BOWNE (2005) Research Associate Professor of Biology B.S., Rutgers University; M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Virginia DAVID M. BRENNAN (1998) Associate Professor of Economics B.B.A., University of Miami; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame (on leave 2007­2008) ROBERT BRESLER (1999) Adjunct Professor of Government A.B., Earlham College; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University SCOTT H. BREWER (2007) Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University LYNN M. BROOKS (1984) Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities Dance Director of the Program in Dance Theater, Dance, and Film Department Chair B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.Ed., Temple University; Ed.D., Temple University; C.M.A., Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies KATHLEEN M. BROWN (1998) Research Associate in History B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin MATTHEW W. BUTTERFIELD (2003) Assistant Professor of Music B.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (on leave Spring 2008) BEATRIZ CAAMAÑO ALEGRE (2004) Assistant Professor of Spanish B.A., Universidad de Santiago de Compostela; M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Rutgers University (on leave Fall 2007) MONICA CABLE (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology B.A., Middlebury College; M.A. Tulane University; Ph.D., Tulane University

ANTONINO G. CALLARI (1979) The Sigmund M. and Mary B. Hyman Professor of Economics B.A., City College of New York; M.A., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts JOHN B. CAMPBELL (1984) Professor of Psychology Psychology Department Chair B.A., College of Wooster; Ph.D., University of Michigan (on leave Fall 2007) KAREN J. CAMPBELL (1990) Associate Professor of German B.A., Lawrence University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University ALAN S. CANIGLIA (1982) Professor of Economics Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Vice Provost for Planning and Institutional Research Interim Italian Department Chair A.B., Bucknell University; Ph.D., University of Virginia JOHN CARBON (1984) Professor of Music Music Department Chair (Fall 2007) B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.M., Rice University; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara JOHN F. CARTER (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A., Regents College; M.S., Western Washington University; Ph.D., University of Oregon KRISTA CASLER (2005) Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A., Eastern Nazarene College; M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., Boston University ALEXIS Q. CASTOR (2000) Assistant Professor of Classics B.A., George Mason University; M.A., Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College (on leave 2007­2008) DONNA M. CHAMBERS (2006) Visiting Instructor of Spanish B.A. Gettysburg College; M.A., West Chester University

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ANTHONY P. CHEMERO (1999) Associate Professor of Psychology and Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind B.A., Tufts University; Ph.D., Indiana University MICHAEL R. CLAPPER (2005) Associate Professor of Art History B.A., Swarthmore College; M.F.A., Washington University; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Northwestern University MICHAEL CLARK (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics B.A., Brown University; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., Oxford University JANE M. LITWAK CLIPMAN (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology B.A., Lehigh University; M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota ADIEL COCA (2007) Visiting Instructor of Chemistry B.S., Iona College; Ph.D., Penn State University GIAN GIACOMO COLLI (2006) Visiting Instructor of Theater B.A./M.A., Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia, University of Rome; M.F.A., University of Hawaii STEPHEN A. COOPER (1993) Associate Professor of Religious Studies B.A., Hampshire College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Columbia University (on leave 2007­2008) ANNALISA CRANNELL (1992) Professor of Mathematics B.A., Bryn Mawr College; M.A., Brown University; Ph.D., Brown University FRONEFIELD CRAWFORD III (2006) Assistant Professor of Astronomy B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology THOMAS DANIELS (2004) Research Associate of American Studies B.A., Harvard University; M.S., University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England; Ph.D., Oregon State University

UTTEEYO DASGUPTA (2006) Assistant Professor of Economics B. A., University of Delhi; M.A., Jawaharlal Nehru University; M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D., University of Arizona CAROL C. DAVIS (2004) Associate Professor of Theater B.A., University of California, San Diego; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley TRACEY M. DAVIS (2007) Adjunct Instructor of Dance A.B., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University GEOFFREY A. DEEMER (2006) Adjunct Instructor of Music, Oboe B.Mus., The Curtis Institute of Music JAMES A. DELLE (1998) Research Associate in Anthropology B.A., Holy Cross College; M.A., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst JOHN DELLICARPINI (2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of English B.A., Saint Charles Borromeo College; M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., Temple University DENNIS A. DESLIPPE (2006) Associate Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies B.A., Wayne State University; M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Iowa GUILLAUME de SYON (1998) Research Associate of History B.A., Tufts University; M.A., George Washington University; Ph.D., Boston University ANDREW P. de WET (1990) Associate Professor of Geosciences B.Sc., University of Natal; Ph.D., University of Cambridge CAROL B. de WET (1990) Professor of Geosciences B.A., Smith College; M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., University of Cambridge (on leave 2007­2008)

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BOUBAKARY DIAKITÉ (2007) Assistant Professor of Francophone Studies and French B.A., National University of Abidjan; Ph.D., Louisiana State University SUSAN DICKLITCH (1997) Associate Professor of Government B.A., McMaster University; M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., University of Toronto NED S. DIXON (1984) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics B.A., St. Olaf College; M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D., Stanford University ALICE DRUM (1985) Visiting Professor of English and Women and Gender Studies Women and Gender Studies Program Chair B.A., Wilson College; Ph.D., The American University TABATHA A. EASLEY (2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Flute B.Mus., University of Alaska; M. Mus., California State University; Ph.D., Eastman School of Music JOEL P. EIGEN (1976) Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology B.A., Ohio University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania DIRK EITZEN (1993) Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies B.A., Goshen College; M.F.A., Temple University; Ph.D., University of Iowa JONATHAN C. ENOS (1982) Lecturer of Film and Media Studies Associate Provost and Chief Information Officer B.A., Connecticut College; M.S., West Chester University; Ed.D., Temple University IRA N. FEIT (1964) Professor of Biology B.S., Brooklyn College; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University

ARNOLD D. FELDMAN (1979) Carmie L. and Beatrice J. Creitz Professor of Mathematics B.A., Harvard University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Michigan EDWARD E. FENLON (2003) Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.S., St. Lawrence University; Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign PETER A. FIELDS (2001) Associate Professor of Biology B.A.S., Stanford University; M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego (on leave 2007­2008) JANET M. FISCHER (2000) Associate Professor of Biology B.A., Wellesley College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin (on leave 2007­2008) SEAN FLAHERTY '73 (1980) Professor of Economics A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley RICHARD A. FLUCK (1974) Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biology Associate Dean of the Faculty B.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley LINDA C. FORBES (2002) Assistant Professor of Organization Studies B.S., Rollins College; M.A., University of South Florida; Ph.D., University of South Florida KATIE FORD (2007) Assistant Professor of English B.A., Whitman College; M.Div., Harvard University; M.F.A., University of Iowa G. ALFRED FORSYTH (2005) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Business, Organizations, and Society B.A., Dickinson College; M.S., North Carolina State University; Ph.D., Purdue University FEDERICA FRANCESCONI (2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of History and Judaic Studies B.A., University of Bologna; M.A., University of Bologna; Ph.D., Haifa University

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LEE A. FRANKLIN (2006) Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University DANIEL E. FRICK (1990­1991, 1992­ 1994, 1995­1996, 2000) Director of the Writing Center Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of English B.A., Elmhurst College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Indiana University DAVID M. FREIDENREICH (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Columbia University, M.Phil., Columbia University; M.A., Jewish Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia University ROBERT J. FRIEDRICH (1976) Associate Professor of Government B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Michigan DEBRA W. FRIELLE (2003) Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh LINDA S. FRITZ (1984) Professor of Physics Physics and Astronomy Department Chair B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Stanford University EDITH L. GALLAGHER (2001) Research Associate of Biology B.S., Florida Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Scripps Institution of Oceanography EDWARD S. GALLAGHER (2006) Visiting Instructor of Sociology B.A., Fordham College; Ph.D., Fordham University CARMEN GARCÍA ARMERO (2007) Visiting Instructor of Spanish B.A., Valencia University; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Virginia RITA M. GARGOTTA (2002, 2006) Adjunct Instructor of Spanish B.S., West Chester University; M.A., West Chester University

LISA GASBARRONE (1986) Professor of French French Department Chair B.A., Bowdoin College; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton JAMES H. GEER (2006) Visiting Scholar of Psychology B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh IRWIN F. GELLMAN (2005) Visiting Scholar of History B.A., University of Maryland, College Park; M.A., University of Maryland, College Park; Ph.D., Indiana University ROBERT GETHNER (1987) Professor of Mathematics B.S., University of Michigan; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin GWYNNE GEYER (2002) Artist in Residence of Music, Voice B.M., Indiana University; M.M., Indiana University ALAN S. GLAZER '69 (1975) Henry P. and Mary B. Stager Professor of Business A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (on leave Spring 2008) TAMARA A. GOEGLEIN (1989) Associate Professor of English Associate Dean of the Faculty B.A., Earlham College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Indiana University KATHERINE A. GORDY (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of Government B.A., State University of New York, Albany; Ph.D., Cornell University VAN E. GOSSE (2001) Assistant Professor of History A.B., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rutgers University ROBERT C. GRAY (1972) The Hon. and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government B.A., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

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JOHN GROSH (2005) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S., Geneva College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley DAVID GROTELL (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies B.A., Wesleyan University; M.F.A., Columbia University BRUCE GUSTAFSON (1981) Charles A. Dana Professor of Music Music Department Chair (Spring 2008) B.A., Kalamazoo College; M.Mus., University of Oklahoma; A.M.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Michigan (on leave Fall 2007) DORIS J. HALL-GULATI (1990) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Clarinet B.Mus., Johns Hopkins University; M.Mus., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor DEAN C. HAMMER (1994) John W. Wetzel Professor of Classics Professor of Government Government Department Chair B.A., Augustana College; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley CURTIS R. HARE (2002) Visiting Associate Professor and Research Associate of Chemistry B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University KATHERINE HARTMAN (2001) Visiting Assistant Professor of English B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Temple University SIMON HAWKINS (2004) Assistant Professor of Anthropology B.A., Swarthmore College; M.Ed., George Washington University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago (on leave Fall 2007) JACK F. HELLER (1972) Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa

NICOLE E. HELLER (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Stanford University BENNETT W. HELM (1995) Professor of Philosophy Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind Program Chair A.B., Carleton College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh KENNETH R. HESS (1987) Professor of Chemistry Health Professions Adviser B.A., Gettysburg College; Ph.D., University of Virginia ELBA HEVIA Y VACA (2003) Adjunct Instructor of Dance B.A., George Washington University GILLIAN HEWITSON (2002) Assistant Professor of Economics B.Ec. Flinders University; M.Ec., Monash University; Ph.D., La Trobe University CHARLES J. HEYSER (1998) Associate Professor of Psychology B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., State University of New York, Binghamton; Ph.D., State University of New York, Binghamton CAROL L. HICKEY (1981) Senior Adjunct Instructor of Art B.A., Catholic University of America (Spring 2008 only) LAWRENCE F. HINNENKAMP '79 (1992­1997, 1999) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Business, Organizations, and Society B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.B.A., Vanderbilt University; J.D., Vanderbilt University (Spring 2008 only) JEROME HODOS (2003) Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., Harvard University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania MATTHEW HOFFMAN (2004) Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and History B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.A., Graduate Theological Union; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley/Graduate Theological Union (on leave Fall 2007)

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JORG HOMBERGER (1992­1993; 1995) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of English B.A., Albright College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania DEVIN HOWELL (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Double Bass B.Mus., New England Conservatory of Music; M.Mus., Carnegie Mellon University SUSAN HURLEY-GLOWA (2001) Assistant Professor of Music B.M., Potsdam College; Advanced Performance Diploma, State Conservatory of Music, Freiburg Im Breisgau (Germany); M.M., University of Louisville; M.A., Brown University; Ph.D., Brown University WILLIAM HUTSON (1989­1996; 1999) Jennie Brown Cook and Betsy Hess Cook Distinguished Artist-in-Residence of Art University of New Mexico; San Francisco Academy of Art ZESHAN ISMAT (2002) Assistant Professor of Geosciences B.S., University of Rochester; M.S., University of Rochester; Ph.D., University of Rochester MICHAEL JAMANIS (1993) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Violin B.Mus., Juilliard School of Music; M.Mus, Yale University; D.M.A. Rutgers University PABLO D. JENIK (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., University of Buenos Aires; M.S., University of Buenos Aires; Ph.D., Yale University JUSTIN JENNINGS (2005) Research Associate of Anthropology B.A., Tufts University; M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara ROBERT N. JINKS (1997) Associate Professor of Biology Biological Foundations of Behavior Program Chair B.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Syracuse University

BARBARA JOHN (2004, 2005, 2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of American and Women and Gender Studies B.A., The Pennsylvania State University; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University JOSEPH J. KARLESKY (1970) The Hon. and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government A.B., LaSalle College; Ph.D., Columbia University CONRAD J. KASPERSON (1976) Professor of Management A.B., Pacific Lutheran University; M.B.A., Pacific Lutheran University; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute STEPHAN A. KÄUFER (1999) Associate Professor of Philosophy Philosophy Department Chair B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Stanford University HOWARD L. KAYE (1982) Professor of Sociology B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., University of Chicago; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania JULIE E. KEENAN (2003, 2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of English B.Ed., University of Southampton, United Kingdom, M.A., University of Maryland, College Park; Ph.D., University Maryland, College Park ELIZABETH KELLER (1990) Senior Adjunct Instructor of Music, Piano B.Mus., Curtis Institute KIMBERLY D. B. KELLEY (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Bassoon B.M., The Harid Conservatory School of Music; M.M., University of Rochester; D.M.A., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign RICHARD K. KENT (1991) Associate Professor of Art History B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University

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NANCY KHALEK (2007) Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Research Associate of History B.A., Princeton University; M.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University JENNIFER D. KIBBE (2004) Assistant Professor of Government B.A., Drake University; M.S., Georgetown University; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles (on leave Fall 2007) M. ALISON KIBLER (2002) Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women and Gender Studies B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa JOHN KENNETH KREBS (2002) Assistant Professor of Physics B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.Ed., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Georgia JERRY LABORANTI JR. (2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Jazz, Saxophone B.A., The University of the Arts; M.Mus., The University of the Arts SCOTT LACEY (2003) Assistant Professor of Physics A.B., Colgate University; Ph.D., University of Oregon, Eugene JOHN LARDAS MODERN (2006) Assistant Professor of Religious Studies B.A., Princeton University; M.A., Miami University, Ohio; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara. CHRISTIE L. LAROCHELLE (2002) Assistant Professor of Physics B.S., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., University of Maine PHYLLIS A. LEBER (1982) Dr. E. Paul and Francis H. Reiff Professor of Chemistry Chemistry Department Chair B.S., Albright College; Ph.D., University of New Mexico GIOVANNA F. LERNER (2004) Assistant Professor of Italian Laurea, Catholic University of Milan; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

L. SCOTT LERNER (1995) Associate Professor of French and Italian B.A., Yale University; A.M. Harvard University; Ph.D., Harvard University (on leave 2007­2008) ALAN LEVINE (1983) Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.A., Hofstra University; M.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook; Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook MARY ANN LEVINE (1998) Associate Professor of Anthropology Anthropology Department Chair B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.A., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst PATRICIA JUSTICE LEVIN (2000) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of American Studies and Women's and Gender Studies B.S., University of Illinois; B.A., Millersville University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania DEBORAH LINDER (2005) Adjunct Instructor and Research Associate of English B.A., Macalester College; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University JUN-CHENG LIU (1997) Associate Professor of Art Art and Art History Department Chair B.F.A., Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts, P.R. China; M.F.A., Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts, P.R. China; M.F.A., East Texas State University ANDREA N. LOMMEN (2003) Assistant Professor of Astronomy and Director of Grundy Observatory B.A., Carleton College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley MARY MacAUSLAND (2007) Visiting Instructor of Business B.A., Temple University; M.A., Saint Joseph's University

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GERALD P. MADDEN (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Business, Organizations and Society B.S., St. Joseph's University; M.B.A., Temple University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University G. TERRY MADONNA (2004) Professor of Public Policy B.S., Millersville University; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D. University of Delaware VIRGINIA A. MAKSYMOWICZ (1991­1994; 1995­1996; 1999) Associate Professor of Art B.A., Brooklyn College; M.F.A., The University of California, San Diego YUKIE MAMMOTO (2007) Adjunct Instructor and Japanese Language Fellow B.A., Elizabeth University; M.A., Columbia University SYEDA SHARMIN MASWOOD (2003) Research Associate of Psychology Ph.D, Texas Woman's University KEELY B. MAXWELL (2005) Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies B.A., Williams College; M.F.S.,Yale University; M.S.& M.Phil., Yale University; Ph.D., Yale University. MATTHEW MAZUROSKI (2005) Performing Arts Coordinator/ Adjunct Instructor of Theater B.A., Emporia State University; M.F.A., Northwestern University KATHERINE E. McCLELLAND (1984) Associate Professor of Sociology Sociology Department Chair B.A., Brown University; M.A., Brown University; Ph.D., Harvard University MICHAEL P. McCOOEY (2002) Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Indiana University DAVID L. McMAHAN (1999) Associate Professor of Religious Studies Religious Studies Department Chair B.A., Kent State University; M.A., Florida State University; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara

BENJAMIN R. McREE (1987) Associate Professor of History B.A., Pomona College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Indiana University STEPHEN K. MEDVIC (2002) Associate Professor of Government B.A., Texas A&M University; M.A., Purdue University; Ph.D., Purdue University (on leave Spring 2008) RYAN A. MEHL (2002) Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.S., Moravian College; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., Cornell University DAVID MERLI (2003) Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A., State University of New York, Geneseo; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ohio State DOROTHY J. MERRITTS (1987) Professor of Geosciences B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of Arizona STANLEY A. MERTZMAN (1972) Earl D. Stage and Mary E. Stage Professor of Geosciences B.S., University of Dayton; M.S., Case Western Reserve University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University GRETCHEN E. MEYERS (2007) Assistant Professor of Classics B.A., Duke University; M.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Texas STANLEY J. MICHALAK, JR. (1966, 2006) Senior Adjunct Emeritus Professor of Government A.B., Albright College; Ph.D., Princeton University KIRK MILLER (1978) B.F. Fackenthal, Jr. Professor of Biology B.A., Antioch College; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma MARIA D. MITCHELL (1994) Associate Professor of History History Department Chair B.A., The Johns Hopkins University; M.A. Boston University; Ph.D., Boston University

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KEN-ICHI MIURA (2006) Director of the Japanese Language Program B.A., Nanzan University; M.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison PADMINI MONGIA (1989) Professor of English B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., University of Delhi; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University NICHOLAS MONTEMARANO (2002) Assistant Professor of English B.A., Fairfield University; M.A., Binghamton University; M.F.A., University of Massachusetts RICHARD S. MOOG (1986) Professor of Chemistry B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Stanford University CLARA S. MOORE (2002) Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Loyola College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University AMY R. MORENO (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of English B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of Delaware JENNIFER L. MORFORD (2002) Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.S., Boston College; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., University of Washington DAVID HOLMES MORTON (2006) Adjunct Research Professor of Biology B.S., Trinity College; M.D., Harvard Medical School NING MU (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Viola B.M., Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing, China; M.M., Rutgers University JUDITH MUELLER (1993) Associate Professor of English English Department Chair B.A., Ithaca College; M.A.,State University of New York, Binghamton; Ph.D., State University of New York, Binghamton

MICHAEL J. MURRAY '85 (1990) Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities and Philosophy B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame RONALD L. MUSSELMAN (1985) Professor of Chemistry B.S., California State University, Fresno; M.S., University of California, Davis; Ph.D., New Mexico State University (on leave Fall 2007) MARIKO NAKADE-MARCEAU (1996) Visiting Scholar of the Japanese Language Program B.S., Sugino Women's College; M.A., University of Delaware MARTHA K. NELSON (1990) Associate Professor of Business B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh JEFFREY NESTERUK (1993) Professor of Legal Studies Business, Organizations and Society Department Chair B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Pennsylvania State University; J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School (on leave Spring 2008) NERYAMN R. NIEVES (2001­2003; 2004) Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish B.A., Messiah College; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., Temple University BARBARA E. NIMERSHIEM (1992) Associate Professor of Mathematics Mathematics Department Chair B.A., New College; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Michigan EMILY NOËL (2007) Artist Teacher of Music, Voice B. Mus., University of Maryland; M.Mus., Peabody Conservatory of Music, Johns Hopkins University BRIAN H. NORCROSS (1986) Instrumental Conductor B.Mus.Ed., University of Massachusetts; M.Mus.Ed., New England Conservatory of Music; D.M.A., Catholic University of America

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SHAWN O'BRYHIM (2004) Associate Professor of Classics Classics Department Chair B.A., Ball State University; M.A., Ball State University; M.A., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin STEVEN P. O'DAY (1996) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Business, Organizations, and Society, Associate Dean of the College and Head Women's Soccer Coach B.A., Millersville University; J.D., Temple University PATRICIA A. O'HARA (1989) Professor of English B.A., University of Vermont; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., Rutgers University (on leave 2007­2008) MARK H. OLSON (2000) Associate Professor of Biology B.S., University of Alberta, Edmonton; Ph.D., Michigan State University (on leave 2007­2008) D. ALFRED OWENS '72 (1978) Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University EDWARD PEARSON (1992) Associate Professor of History B.A., University of Birmingham (England); M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison MICHAEL L. PENN (1991) Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Temple University; Ph.D., Temple University RICHARD V. PEPINO (2004) Director of the Public Policy Program B.A., LaSalle University; M.S., Villanova University JAMES C. PETERSON (1970) Associate Professor of Art B.F.A., Cooper Union; M.F.A., Pennsylvania State University ELIZABETH L. PFAFFLE (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Horn B.Mus., The Ohio State University; M.Mus., University of Akron; Ph.D., Indiana University

CARL S. PIKE (1971) Harry W. and Mary B. Huffnagle Professor of Biology and Biology Department Chair B.S., Yale University; M. Phil., Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard University JO ANN L. PIOTROWSKI (2007) Visiting Instructor of French B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.A., Millersville University JEFFREY S. PODOSHEN (2005) Assistant Professor of Marketing B.S.B.A., University of Delaware; M.B.A., Temple University; Ph.D., Temple University ELIZABETH PRATON (1997) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Astronomy B.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst IWAN PRATON (1997) Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology JULIA BETH PROFFITT (2005) Research Associate of Business, Organizations, and Society B.A., Yale University; M.S., Northwestern University W. TREXLER PROFFITT, JR. (2005) Assistant Professor of Organization Studies B.A., Yale University; M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Northwestern University ERIK G. PUFFENBERGER (2006) Adjunct Research Associate Professor of Biology B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University AMELIA RAUSER (2003) Associate Professor of Art History B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Northwestern University ELIZA J. REILLY (2003) Director of Center for Liberal Arts and Society (CLAS) Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies B.A., Regents College; M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Rutgers University

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RICHARD REITAN (2006) Assistant Professor of History B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., University of Chicago CHRISTINA REITZ (2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music B.Mus., Youngstown State University; M.Mus., University of Florida (Fall only) WENDELL E. RESSLER (1994) Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A., Eastern Mennonite College; M.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., Temple University (on leave 2007­2008) ELIZABETH RICE (2007) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology B.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., Cornell University GLENN ROSS (1980) Dr. Elijah E. Kresge Professor of Philosophy B.A., Westmont College; M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D., University of Arizona (on leave Spring 2008) SOFÍA RUIZ-ALFARO (2007) Assistant Professor of Spanish B.A., Saint Louis University; M.A., Saint Louis University; M.A. University of Southern California; Ph.D., University of Southern California THOMAS R. RYAN (2000, 2004) Research Associate of American Studies B.A., College of the Holy Cross; M.Ed, Boston College; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of Delaware VERONIKA RYJIK (2004) Assistant Professor of Spanish B.A., McGill University, Ph.D., Brown University (on leave Spring 2008) JUN SAITO (2007) Assistant Professor of Government B.A., Sophia University; M.A., Sophia University; Ph.D., Yale University DIANE Z. SAND (1981) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Russian A.B., Bryn Mawr College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

FRITZ SCHROEDER, JR. (2006) Community Partner Volunteer in the Local Economy Center B.A., The College of Wooster MATTHEW M. SCHOUSEN (1993) Professor of Government B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Duquesne University; Ph.D., Duke University ABBY M. SCHRADER (1996) Associate Professor of History A.B., Columbia College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania DAVID SCHUYLER (1979) Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities and American Studies American Studies Department Chair B.A., The American University; M.A., Winterthur Program, University of Delaware; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., Columbia University PAUL W. SEAVER, JR. (2005) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Spanish B.S., Kent State University; M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Maryland WILLIAM P. SEELEY (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A., Columbia University; M.F.A., Columbia University; M.A., City University of New York; Ph.D., City University of New York NESSIA SHAFRANSKY (1995) Visiting Scholar of Judaic Studies B.A., Tel Aviv University JAMES G. SHULTZ '68 (1984) Senior Adjunct Instructor of Government B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.P.A., Kent State University ROSEMARY SIEGRIST (2005) Artist Teacher of Music, Piano B.A., Eastern Mennonite University BRIAN T. SILBERMAN (2007) Associate Professor of Theater B.A., Middlebury College; M.A., University of Arizona; M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; Ph.D., New York University TIMOTHY W. SIPE (1997) Associate Professor of Biology B.A., Wabash College; M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Harvard University

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CONRAD L. STANITSKI (2005) Visiting Professor of Chemistry B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., University of Northern Iowa; Ph.D., University of Connecticut BRIAN D. STEFFY (1988) Associate Professor of Organization Studies B.A., State University of New York, Utica; M.S., State University of New York., Binghamton; Ph.D., University of Georgia JEFFREY C. STEINBRINK (1975) Alumni Professor of English Literature and Belles Lettres B.A., Allegheny College; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of North Carolina ANN STEINER (1981) Shirley Watkins Steinman Professor of Classics Provost and Dean of the Faculty A.B., Bryn Mawr College; M.A., Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College LAWRENCE F. STENGEL (1997) Senior Adjunct Assistant Professor of Government B.A., St. Joseph University; J.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Law (Spring 2008 only) D. GRIER STEPHENSON, JR. (1970) Charles A. Dana Professor of Government A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University ROBERT S. STERNBERG (1983) Professor of Geosciences B.S., Cornell University; M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D., University of Arizona LOUISE L. STEVENSON (1982) Professor of History B.A., Barnard College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Boston University KEVIN A. STRAUSS (2006) Adjunct Research Associate Professor of Biology B.A., Colgate University; M.D., Harvard Medical School

JAMES E. STRICK (2002) Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society Science, Technology, and Society Program Chair B.S., State University of NewYork, Cortland; M.S., State University of New York; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University CALVIN STUBBINS (1989) Professor of Physics B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Stanford University JAMES M. TAGGART (1971) Lewis Audenreid Professor of History and Archaeology B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., University of Southern California; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh (on leave 2007­2008) STEVEN J. TEDFORD (2002) Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A., Marist College; M.A., Binghamton University; Ph.D., Binghamton University DOROTHY THAYNE (2006) Visiting Scholar of Art and Art History B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Rutgers University ROGER D. K. THOMAS (1975) John W. Nevin Memorial Professor of Geosciences Earth and Environment Department Chair B.Sc., Imperial College, University of London; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., Harvard University JOSEPH T. THOMPSON (2006) Assistant Professor of Biology A.B., Bowdoin College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. ROGER K. R. THOMPSON (1976) Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biological Sciences B.A., University of Auckland; M.A., University of Auckland; Ph.D., University of Hawaii (on leave 2007­2008) MARCUS W. THOMSEN (1983) Professor of Chemistry B.A., Luther College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

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CARMEN C. TISNADO (1996) Professor of Spanish Spanish Department Chair B.A., Universidad Católica del Perú; M.A., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D., The Catholic University of America DANIELA TOMER (2006) Adjunct Instructor of Hebrew B.A., College of Art Education, Tel Aviv, Israel KATHLEEN L. TRIMAN (1990) Professor of Biology B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Oregon ANTHONY J. UGOLNIK (1975) Dr. Elijah E. Kresge Professor of English B.A., Wayne State University; M.A., Brown University; Ph.D., Brown University YURIKO UJIKE (2006) Drill Instructor of Japanese B.A., The University of North Carolina; M.B.A., Georgia Southern University PAMELA S. VAIL (2002) Artist in Residence and Instructor in Dance B.A., Middlebury College; M.F.A., Smith College SCOTT A. VAN ARMAN (1992) Associate Professor of Chemistry B.S., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University (on leave 2007­2008) ATHANASSIOS VERGADOS (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics B.A., National and Capodistrian University; M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Virginia PAVITHRA VIVEKANAND (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Madras University; M.S., Madras University; Ph.D., Weslyan University FLORENCEMAE WALDRON (2004, 2007 Research Associate of History B.A., Williams College; M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., University of Minnesota ANDREW S. WALLS (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Low Brass B.S., Duquesne University; M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music

ROBERT WALTER '75 (2001) Associate Professor of Geosciences B.S., Franklin & Marshall College; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University DANIEL A.WASHBURN (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies B.A., University of Puget Sound; Ph.D., Stanford University VIRGINIA WEST '78 (1984) Resident Costume Designer A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; M.F.A., University of Hawaii ROGER WHITE (2005) Assistant Professor of Economics B.A., San Francisco State University; M.A., San Francisco State University; M.A., University of California, Santa Cruz; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz KERRY H. WHITESIDE (1983) Clair R. McCollough Professor of Government A.B., Stanford University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University JOHN WHITING (1985) Resident Scenic and Lighting Designer B.A., Michigan State University; M.F.A., Wayne State University CARLA WILLARD (1995) Associate Professor of American Studies B.A., University of Stockholm; M.A., Uppsala University; M.A., Temple University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania CHRISTOPHER J. WILLIAMS (2005) Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania CAROL L. WILSON (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology B.S., Virginia Tech; M.S., Texas A&M; Ph.D., Texas A&M KERRY SHERIN WRIGHT (2003) Director of the Writers House and Adjunct Assistant Professor of English B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Hollins College; M.A., Temple University; Ph.D., Temple University

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SCOTT WRIGHT (2003) Visiting Assistant Professor and Artist in Residence of Art B.F.A., State University of New York, Purchase; M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania WILLIAM B. WRIGHT (2001) Choral Conductor B.A., Amherst College; M.Mus., The New England Conservatory; PhD., University of North Carolina at Greensboro CINDY YETTER-VASSOT (1989) Associate Professor of French B.S., West Chester University; M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University of Virginia MARK YINGLING (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music, Percussion B.M., Johns Hopkins University; M.M., The Pennsylvania State University CLAUDE H. YODER '62 (1966) Charles A. Dana Professor of Chemistry A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; Ph.D., Cornell University BERWOOD YOST (2004) Adjunct Instructor of Government and Director, Floyd Institute's Center for Opinion Research B.S. Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Temple University

EIMAN ZEIN-ELABDIN (1995) Associate Professor of Economics B.A., University of Khartoum; M.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Tennessee PHILIP D. ZIMMERMAN (1998) Research Associate of History B.A., Yale University; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., Boston University J. JEFFREY ZINK (2007) Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics B.A., St. Olaf College; Ph.D., University of Utah ERIC S. ZOLOV (1998) Associate Professor of History B.A., Colby College; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Chicago CECILE C. ZORACH (1984) Professor of German and Director of the International Studies Program B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Princeton University

eMerITI faCuLTY

RICHARD KNEEDLER '65 (1968­2002) President Emeritus B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; L.L.D., Tohoku Gakuin University, 1993; L.H.D., Franklin & Marshall College, 2002 KEITH SPALDING (1963­1983) President Emeritus A.B., University of Kansas, 1942; LL.D., Albright College, 1963; LL.D., Temple University, 1964; L.H.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1968; L.H.D., Waynesburg College, 1971; LL.D., Dickinson School of Law, 1973; L.H.D., Washington College, 1975; LL.D.; Elizabethtown College, 1982 L. RICARDO ALONSO (1975­1997) Charles A. Dana Professor of Spanish, Emeritus Doctor en Derecho, University of Havana, 1952; Doctor en Ciencias Sociales, University of Havana, 1960; M.A., Boston College, 1969; Ph.D., Boston College, 1975 LOUIS L. ATHEY (1963­1991) Charles A. Dana Professor of History, Emeritus B.A., Trenton State College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1965 ROBERT J. BARNETT, JR. (1963­2004) Emeritus Professor of Classics A. B., Roanoke College, 1958; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1964

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PHILLIP E. BEDIENT (1959­1987) Emeritus Professor of Mathematics A.B., Park College, 1943; M.A., University of Michigan, 1947; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1959 EDWARD C. BEUTNER (1970­2003) Emeritus Professor of Geosciences B.S., Oregon State University, 1963; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1968 LUTHER J. BINKLEY '45 (1949­1991) Emeritus Professor of Philosophy A.B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1945; B.D., Lancaster Theological Seminary, 1947; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1950 JEAN BLEVINS (1965­1993) Emerita Instructor in Public Address B.S., University of Kansas, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1952 EDWARD S. BRUBAKER '49 (1952­1988) Alumni Professor of English Literature and Belles Lettres, Emeritus A.B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1949; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1950 C. ALAN BRUNS (1964­1994) Emeritus Professor of Physics B.S., Tufts University, 1952; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 1961 LESLIE J. BURLINGAME (1976­2002) Emerita Associate Professor of Science, Technology, and Society A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1964; M.A., Cornell University, 1968; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1973 LEONARD V. CHERRY (1961­1989) Emeritus Professor of Physics B.S., City College of New York, 1947; Ph.D., Duke University, 1953 LINDA L. CUNNINGHAM(1975­2002) Arthur and Katherine Shadek Humanities Professor of Art, Emerita B.F.A., Ohio Wesleyan, 1961; M.F.A. Syracuse University, 1962 ROBERT F. ESHLEMAN (1955­1984) Emeritus Professor of Sociology B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1939; M.A., University of Illinois, 1944; B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1945; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1948

J. JOEL FARBER (1963­1995) Shirley Watkins Steinman Professor of Classics, Emeritus A.B., University of Chicago, 1952; M.A., University of Chicago, 1954; Ph.D., Yale University, 1959 JOHN J. FARRELL (1965­2000) Emeritus Professor of Chemistry B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 LEON GALIS (1965­1999) Emeritus Professor of Philosophy A.B., University of Georgia,1961; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1966 IRA GRUSHOW (1962­1998) Alumni Professor of English Literature and Belles Lettres, Emeritus A.B., City College of New York, 1954; M.A., Yale University, 1957; Ph.D., Yale University, 1963 RICHARD HOFFMAN (1968­2002) Emeritus Professor of Physics B.S., Lehigh University, 1962; M.S., Lehigh University, 1963; Ph.D., Lehigh University, 1967 CHARLES H. HOLZINGER(1949­1986) Emeritus Professor of Anthropology M.A., University of Chicago, 1949 THOMAS J. HOPKINS (1961­1996) Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1953; B.S., College of William and Mary, 1953; M.A., Yale University, 1959; Ph.D., Yale University, 1962 WILLIAM HUTSON (1989­1996; 1999­2006) Cook Distinguished Artist-in-Residence, Emeritus University of New Mexico, 1957; San Francisco Academy of Art, 1961 WILLIAM J. IANNICELLI '48 (1949­1989) Emeritus Associate Professor of Physical Education B.S., Franklin & Marshall College, 1948 BERNARD JACOBSON (1956­1994) Emeritus Professor of Mathematics B.S., Western Reserve University, 1951; M.A., Michigan State University, 1952; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1956

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ANGELA M. JEANNET (1963­1996) Charles A. Dana Professor of Romance Languages, Emerita Maturita Classica, Liceo Classico "Dante Alighieri," Florence, Italy, 1948; Diplome de langue et littérature Francaises, University of Lille, France, 1953; Ph.D., Universita degli Studi, Florence, Italy, 1954 JOHN JOSEPH '50 (1961­1988) Lewis Audenreid Professor of History and Archaeology, Emeritus A.B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1950; M.A., Princeton University, 1953; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1957 MARVIN E. KAUFFMAN '55 (1959­1993) Emeritus Professor of Geology B. S., Franklin & Marshall College, 1955; M. S., Northwestern University, 1957; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1960 FOLKE TYKO KIHLSTEDT (1974­2005) Emeritus Professor of Art and Art History B.A., Dartmouth College, 1962; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1967; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1973 DAVID B. KING (1965­1996) Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biology, Emeritus B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1959; M.A., University of Massachusetts, 1961; Ph.D., Indiana University, 1965 W. FRED KINSEY III (1963­1990) Emeritus Professor of Anthropology Emeritus Director of the North Museum A.B., Columbia College, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1953; Ph.D., Catholic University of America, 1973 DOROTHY LOUISE (1988 ­ 2007) Emeritus Professor of Theater B.A., Rosary College, 1962; M.A., Stanford University, 1966; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1969 WILL LYONS (1960­1982) Emeritus Professor of Economics B.S., Bucknell University, 1939; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1963

RAFAEL V. MARTINEZ (1966­1980) Emeritus Professor of Spanish B.S. & L., Havana Provincial Institute, 1944; M.A., University of Chicago, 1955; Th.M., Iliff School of Theology, 1961; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1964 JOHN J. McDERMOTT (1958­1996) B. F. Fackenthal Professor of Biology, Emeritus B.S., Seton Hall University, 1949; M.S., Rutgers University, 1951; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1954 LAURIS A. MCKEE (1985­1995) Emerita Associate Professor and Senior Research Associate in Anthropology B.A., George Washington University, 1972; M.A., Cornell University, 1975; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1980 STANLEY J. MICHALAK, JR. (1966­2004) Honorable John C. and Mrs. Kunkel Professor of Government, Emeritus A.B., Albright College, 1960; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1967 ROBERT C. MICKEY (1950­1985) Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies A.B., University of Denver, 1939; B.D., Pacific School of Religion, 1942 SANFORD S. PINSKER (1967­2004) Arthur and Katherine Shadek Professor of Humanities, Emeritus B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1963; M.A., University of Washington, 1965; Ph.D., University of Washington, 1967 P. BRUCE PIPES (1996-2006) Provost Emeritus B.A. Rice University, 1963; M.S. Stanford University, 1964; Ph.D. Stanford University, 1970 AUSTIN J. RICH (1957­1994) Emeritus Professor of Chemistry B.S. Bates College, 1952; M.S. Purdue University, 1955; Ph.D. Purdue University, 1960 JONATHAN L. RICHARDSON (1966­ 1999) Dr. E. Paul and Frances H. Reiff Professor of Biology, Emeritus B.A., Williams College, 1957; M.A., University of New Zealand, 1960; Ph.D., Duke University, 1965

265

GEORGE M. ROSENSTEIN, JR. (1967­2002) Emeritus Professor of Mathematics B.A., Oberlin College, 1959; M.A., Duke University, 1962; Ph.D., Duke University, 1963 ROBERT W. RUSSELL (1955­1990) Charles A. Dana Professor of English, Emeritus B.A., Yale University, 1945; M.A., Yale University, 1946; B.Litt., Oxford University, 1951; Honorary D.Litt., Hamilton College, 1963 PETER S. SEADLE (1953­1984) Emeritus Professor of German A.B., Wayne University, 1947; M.A., Wayne University, 1949; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1964 MICHAEL A. SEEDS (1970­2003) John W. Wetzel Professor of Astronomy, Emeritus B.S., University of Illinois, 1965; M.A., Indiana University, 1970; Ph.D., Indiana University, 1970 JAMES N. SPENCER (1980­2007) William G. and Elizabeth R. Simeral Emeritus Professor of Chemistry B.S., Marshall University; Ph.D., Iowa State University GLENN L. STEVENS (1995­2007) Emeritus Associate Professor of Finance B.A., Lycoming College, 1968; M.B.A., Loyola College, 1977; M.Fin., Loyola College, 1979; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1995 CHARLES N. STEWART (1962­1999) Charles A. Dana Professor of Psychology, Emeritus A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1953; M.S., University of Oregon, 1956; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1962 PHILLIP H. SUTTER (1964­1997) Emeritus Professor of Physics B.S., Yale University, 1952; M.S., Yale University, 1954; Ph.D., Yale University, 1959 FREDERICK H. SUYDAM '46 (1946­1947, 1952­1986) Charles A. Dana Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus B.S., Franklin & Marshall College, 1946; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1950

CHARLES W. TAYLOR (1955­1991) Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Trainer, Emeritus B.S., Iowa State College, 1950; M.A.S., University of Maryland, 1962 NORMAN W. TAYLOR (1962­1988) Charles A. Dana Professor of Economics, Emeritus B.Sc., London University, 1950; M.A., Yale University, 1954; Ph.D., Yale University, 1958; LL.D., Tohoku Gakuin University, 1988 DONALD J. TYRRELL (1967­1996) Emeritus Professor of Psychology B.A., University of Connecticut, 1960; M.A., University of Connecticut, 1962; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1966 JOHN H. VANDERZELL (1952­1989) Emeritus Professor of Government A.B., Miami University, Ohio, 1949; Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1954 RUTH W. VAN HORN (1949­1954; 1956­1982) Emerita Professor of Chemistry B.A., University of California at Los Angeles, 1939; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles, 1940; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1944 SAMUEL WAGNER (1982­2003) Dr. Clair R. McCollough Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus B.A., Trinity College, 1961; M.A., Temple University, 1964; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1971 SOLOMON WANK (1961­1991) Lewis Audenreid Professor of History, Emeritus B.A., New York University, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1952; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1961 SARAH M. WHITE (1976­1999) Emerita Professor of French and Italian B.A., Radcliffe College, 1958; M.A., University of Michigan, 1968; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1973 WILLIAM E. WHITESELL (1965­2003) Henry P. and Mary B. Stager Professor of Economics, Emeritus B.A., Davidson College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1963

266

GORDON M. WICKSTROM (1961­1991) Alumni Professor of English Literature and Belles Lettres, Emeritus B.A., University of Colorado, 1950; M.A., University of Colorado, 1954; Ph.D., Stanford University 1968

ROBERT A. WIEBE ( 1966­2007) Emeritus Professor of Geosciences B.S., Stanford University; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University

aDMINIsTraTIVe offICes

aDMINIsTraTIVe serVICes

KEITH ORRIS '81 (2002) Vice President for Administrative Services and External Affairs B.A., Franklin & Marshall College BARRY L BOSLEY (2003) Associate Vice President for Administration B.A., Salisbury State University; M.S., Hood College MARK MACHAN (2002) Senior Assistant Dean of Admission B.A., Union College; M.A., Boston College ERIC D. MAGUIRE (2000) Senior Associate Dean of Admission and Director of Admission Operations B.A., Muhlenberg College; M.S., Indiana University TERRY J. PIERCE (2000) Admission Office Manager ELIZABETH M. RANDOLPH'06 (2006) Regional Dean B.A., Franklin & Marshall College DANIEL E. TAGLIOLI (2005) Director of Enrollment Information Systems B.A., Franklin & Marshall College REBECCA A.K. TRAJTENBERG (2006) Assistant Dean of Admission B.A., Muhlenberg College MICHELLE WOLTKAMP '05 (2005) Regional Dean B.A., Franklin & Marshall College

aDMIssIoN

DENNIS TROTTER (2003) Vice President for Enrollment Management/Marketing and Dean of Admission B.A., Whitworth College; M.B.A., University of Iowa AARON BASKO (2001) Senior Associate Dean of Admission and Director of Admission Services B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.A., University of Illinois LAUREN COBB '03 (2005) Regional Dean B.A., Franklin & Marshall College JODY HARNISH (2005) Assistant to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Dean of Admission PENNY G. JOHNSTON (1983) Associate Dean of Admission & Director of International Admissions B.A., Beaver College MICHELLE S. LUI '04 (2005) Regional Dean B.A., Franklin & Marshall College

aDVaNCeMeNT serVICes

BECKY WILE (2004) Director of Advancement Services B.S., Penn State University KATHARINE HOCKNEY (1983) Associate Director for Records Management MALIK PERKINS '01 (2001) Associate Director B.A., Franklin & Marshall College LIN WEIDMAN (2000) Associate Director for Gift Accounting

267

DANIEL ZENZEL (2005) Director of Advancement Information Systems

arT & arT HIsTorY

RUSSELL O'CONNELL (1988) Sculpture and Print Shop Supervisor/ Exhibition Coordinator B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania

aLuMNI ProGraMs

CATHERINE ROMAN '77 (2001) Director B.A., Franklin & Marshall College AIMEE VICTORIA ACHORN (2006) Assistant Director B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., Bryn Mawr College RAINE C. RALSTON '07 (2007) Alumni Fellow B.A., Franklin & Marshall College STACY L. THORNWALL-ROGERS (2004) Assistant Director B.A., Gettysburg College

arT CoLLeCTIoNs

ELIZA J. REILLY (2003) Director of the Center for Liberal Arts and Society Acting Director of the Phillips Museum B.A., New York University Stern School of Business; M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Rutgers University CLAIRE GIBLIN (2007) Acting Curator of the Phillips Museum of Art

aTHLeTICs aND reCreaTIoN

PATRICIA S. W. EPPS (1978) Director B.A., Cornell University SHAWN CARTY (2003) Associate Director B.A., Kenyon College; M.ED, Temple University HILARY JORDAN CORNELIUS (2006) Coordinator of Recreation & Facilities B.A., Millersville University ASHLEE C. COURTER (2006) Head Women's Basketball Coach B.A., Marymount University; M.S., McDaniel College CARRIE E.A. DITZLER (2005) Assistant Certified Athletic Trainer B.A., Shippensburg University; M.A., Washington College MATTHEW S. EASTERDAY (2006) Assistant Swimming Coach and Assistant Aquatics Director B.A., McDaniel College MATTHEW S. KELLER (2003) Associate Certified Athletic Trainer B.S., Lock Haven University; M.S., Shippensburg University

aPPeL HeaLTH serVICes

MARIANNE L. KELLY M.D. (1988) Director of Student Health Services B.A., Temple University; M.D., Temple University Medical School; Reside; S.P., University of Rochester; Board Certified Internal Medicine CINDEE L. ABACHNOU M.S.N., C.R.N.P. (2004). Nurse Practitioner SALLY L. BALMAN R.N.C. (1996) Registered Nurse R.N., Presbyterian University of Pennsylvania JANET S. MASLAND C.R. N.P. (1991) Nurse Practitioner, Coordinator of Health and Wellness Education/Sexual Assault Victim's Advocate B.S.N., Boston University; C.R.N.P., University of Maryland ELEANOR J. PEIFER R.N.C. (1988) Registered Nurse B.S., Millersville University; R.N., Lancaster General Hospital School of Nursing FRANCINE STEFANY (2003) Medical Office Manager

268

RANDY MARKS (2006) Assistant Men's Lacrosse Coach B.S., West Chester University; M.Ed., West Chester University STEVE E. PEED (2006) Interim Sports Information Director B.A., McDaniel College ANN L. PHELAN (1994) Assistant to the Director ANNE PHILLIPS '80 (2002) Head Women's Lacrosse Coach B.A., Franklin & Marshall College GLENN R. ROBINSON (1968) Head Men's Basketball and Golf Coach B.S., West Chester University CHRIS ROGERS (2004) Assistant Men's Basketball Coach B.S., Penn State University; M.S., West Chester University ROBERT RUEPPEL (2001) Head Swimming Coach and Aquatics Director B.B.A., Saint Bonaventure University R. J. RYAN (2007) Assistant Football Coach B.A., Lehigh University CARL SCHNABEL (2003) Head Coach of Men's and Women's Track and Field B.A., University of Delaware; M.A., Calvary Baptist Seminary PETER B. SCHUYLER (1998) Head Wrestling Coach B.S., Lehigh University; M.A., University of Maryland JEFFREY M. STOUDT A.T.C. (1995) Coordinator of Sports Medicine B.S., West Chester University CRAIG A. SUTYAK (2006) Assistant Football Coach B.A., Dickinson College; M.Ed., Edinboro University JOHN D. TROXELL (2006) Head Football Coach B.A., Lafayette College; M.A., Columbia University

DAN WAGNER (2002) Head Men's Soccer Coach/Coordinator of Athletic Development B.A., Messiah College BETH WALKENBACH (2006) Head Field Hockey Coach B.A., Cornell University WILLIAM J. WALKENBACH (2005) Head Baseball Coach B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Georgia State University ROBIN WERT (1998) Coordinator of Athletic Equipment Operations B.S., Millersville University; M.Ed., Millersville University GAY WILLIAMS (1999) Office Manager CLAUS F. WOLTER (2007) Head Crew Coach B.S., McMaster University TYLER B. YOUNG (2003) Assistant Certified Athletic Trainer B.S., West Chester University

BusINess offICe

PAUL E. METZGER (1996) Controller and Associate Treasurer B.S., Penn State University; C.P.A., State of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., Temple KATHRYN J. ELLIEHAUSENSLOBOZIEN (1991) Assistant Controller B.S., Penn State University; M.B.A., Saint Joseph's University ELEANOR M. LEWIS (1999) Financial Accountant B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; C.P.A., State of Pennsylvania BABS A. SMITH (1987) Director, Student Accounts A.A., Clarion State College DIANNA L. ZIMMERMAN (1997) Office Manager

269

Career serVICes

FRANK J. TORTORELLO (2005) Executive Director B.A., Georgetown University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania MELISSA A. FITZGERALD (2007) Assistant Director, Special Events B.S., Ball State University; M.S., Western Illinois University TAMMY J. HALSTEAD (2006) Director of Career Development B.A., Holy Family College; M.A., Millersville University KATE C. HUNTER (2007) Assistant Director, Employer Outreach and Life After College Program B.A., Moravian College; M.Ed., Kutztown University KIRSTEN E. KIRBY (2006) Assistant Director of Career Services for Programming and Resources B.A., Smith College; M.S.ED, University of Pennsylvania

CoLLeGe aDVaNCeMeNT

LEWIS E. THAYNE (2005) Vice President for College Advancement M.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Princeton University CAROLE D'ETTORRE (1989) Assistant to the Vice President, College Advancement A.S., Cazenovia College

CoLLeGe House DoNs

ANNALISA CRANNELL (1992) Professor of Mathematics B.A., Bryn Mawr College; M.A., Brown University; Ph.D., Brown University JOEL P. EIGEN (1976) Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology B.A., Ohio University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania JACK F. HELLER (1972) Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa KATHLEEN L. TRIMAN (1990) Professor of Biology B.A. University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. University of Oregon

CeNTeNNIaL CoNfereNCe

STEVEN F. ULRICH '82 (1993) Executive Director B.A., Franklin & Marshall College KIMBERLY A. WENGER (2002) Assistant Director B.A., Lock Haven University; M.S., Kutztown University

CoMPuTING serVICes

JONATHAN C. ENOS (1982) Associate Provost and Chief Information Officer B.A., Connecticut College; Ed.D., Temple University; M.S., West Chester University OSCAR J. RETTERER (1992) Director of Academic Technology Services B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., University of Toledo WENDY BAKER DAVIS (1993) Coordinator of Classroom Technology, Academic Technology Services B.S., Penn State University JOSHUA D. BARON (2006) Server Systems Administrator

CeNTer for LIBeraL arTs aND soCIeTY

ELIZA J. REILLY (2003) Director of the Center for Liberal Arts and Society B.A., New York University Stern School of Business; M.A., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Rutgers University MARCY DUBROFF (1993) Associate Director B.S., Cornell University

270

JEFFREY C. BRETHAUER (1980) Application Software Specialist M.A., Ohio State University; B.A., University of Rhode Island PAUL L. CLARK (1977) Director of Application Services A.A.S., State University of New York; B.S., Lancaster Bible College JOHN A. COCCIA (1991) Director of Media Services B.S., Kutztown University; M.S., West Chester University BRIAN A. GALL (2007) Instructional Technologist/Designer in Academic Technology Services B.S.Ed., Shippensburg University; M.Ed., Penn State University RONALD S. GREMBOWIEC (1992) Computer Store Manager A.S.E.E.T, De Vry Institute of Technology HARRY H. HADDON (1987) Coordinator of Applications Development and Evaluation, Academic Technology Services B.S., Lafayette College TERESA HAGAN (1991) Assistant Director of Web Services B.S., Millersville University ANTHONY OCHS (2001) Application Support Specialist A.S.B., Pace Institute LARRY A. OWENS (1995) Systems Manager, Networking and Systems MATT RICHARD (1999) Access and Security Coordinator JACQUELINE L. RIEKER (1985) Application Software Specialist B.S., Lebanon Valley College GREG A. SCHUMAN (1999) Network Analyst A.S., Delaware County Community College; B.S., West Chester University; M.B.A., Lebanon Valley College AMANDA JEAN SOLLENBERGER (2006) Coordinator of Audio Visual Resources B.A., Millersville University; M.F.A., American University

ALAN H. SUTTER '87 (1981) Director of Networking and Systems B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.B.A., Lebanon Valley College CHRISTOPHER C. SWISHER (1995) Director of User Services B.A., West Chester University; M.S., Drexel University OMAR TIRADO '04 (1997) Assistant Director of User Services B.A., Franklin & Marshall College CHARLES T. WACHIRA (2007) Instructional Technologist/Designer in Academic Technology Services B.S., Bloomsburg University; M.S., Bloomsburg University

CouNseLING serVICes

CHRISTINE G. CONWAY (1996) Clinical Director of Counseling Services B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame MICHAEL F. MAYERS (2005) Clinical Psychologist A.A.S., Montgomery County Community College; B.A., Temple University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut

DeVeLoPMeNT

DONALD R. COONEY (2006) Associate Vice President of Development B.A., Gettysburg College MARY T. BAUER (2001) Associate Director of Annual Giving and Director of Reunion Giving B.S., Bloomsburg University ANTHONY J. DEMARCO '84 (2007) Major Gifts Officer B.A., Franklin & Marshall College CATHERINE FERRY (1978) Major Gifts Officer B.S., University of Connecticut; M.S., University of Pennsylvania BARBARA E. GALLEN (2007) Major Gifts Officer B.S., Gwynedd Mercy College

271

MATTIA S. GUINIVAN (2004) Associate Director of Development Information B.A., Millersville University D.J. KORNS '69 (2000) Annual Giving Officer B.A., Franklin & Marshall College JANE A. PRICE '85 (1988) Director of Development Information B.A., Franklin & Marshall College KELLY J. SAYLOR (2007) Donor Relations Manager B.A., Susquehanna University DAVE SOWERS (2006) Director of Major Gifts B.A., Gettysburg College; M.S., McDaniel College MAURA CONDON UMBLE '83 (1988) Director of Parent Programs B.A., Franklin & Marshall College STEFANIE B. VALAR (1995) Director of Planned Giving B.A., Dartmouth College MATTHEW D. WEAVER '03 (2003) Director, Annual Giving B.A., Franklin & Marshall College

PERRY L. SCHEID (2007) Assistant Director for Mechanical Trades THEODORE W. SCHMID (1983) Grounds/SWAT Manager B.A., East Stroudsburg University BARBARA WILSON (1989) College Property Manager

faCILITIes PLaNNING aND CaPITaL ProJeCTs

LARRY WILLIAM HARDER (2006) Associate Vice President for Facilities Planning and Capital Projects B.A., University of British Columbia; B.E.S., University of Manitoba

fINaNCe aND aDMINIsTraTIoN

THOMAS J. KINGSTON (1995) Vice President for Finance and Administration B.S., Lemoyne College; M.Ed., University of Delaware EILEEN AUSTIN (1996) Assistant to the Vice President for Finance and Administration HELEN Y. BOWMAN (2006) Associate Vice President for Finance Vice President for Finance [effective January 2008] B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.B.A., Katz Graduate School of Business ELIZABETH M. DUNLAP (1998) Investment Officer B.S., California Polytechnic State University; M.B.A., California State University KATHLEEN M. FISH (1993) Endowment and Insurance Administrator A.A., Bucks County Community College; B.S., Millersville University DENISE RAE FREEMAN (2004) Director of Environmental Health and Safety A.S., Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology

faCILITIes aND oPeraTIoNs

MARIA T. CIMILLUCA (2007) Director, Facilities & Operations A.A.S., Suny College Technical; B.L.A., Suny E.S.F. / Syracuse University; M.S., East Tennessee State University RONALD L. KENNARD (1987) Director of Construction Services Diploma, De Vry Technical Institute DAN T. LEWIS (1984) Manager, Building Trades ANNE E. MANNING '97 (2006) Service Response Manager B.A., Franklin & Marshall College MARTY McGRATH (1983) Assistant Director for Conferences & Events B.S., Queens University; CERT.Ed, Saint Joseph College of Education

272

GREGORY L. FULMER '95 (2007) Associate Vice President for Finance B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; C.P.A., State of Pennsylvania WENDY J. GENTILE (1990) Executive Assistant to the Vice President for Finance and Administration A.S., Lebanon Valley College

SANDRA L. ATKINS (1992) Assistant Director B.S., Millersville University ERIKA N. SHEHATA (1999) Research Associate B.S., University of Pittsburgh MELISSA THORPE (2001) Research Associate B.A., Lebanon Valley College

fLoYD INsTITuTe

G. TERRY MADONNA (2000) Director, Floyd Institute's Center for Politics and Public Affairs B.S., Millersville University; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of Delaware BERWOOD A. YOST (2003) Director, Floyd Institute's Center for Opinion Research B.S., Penn State University; M.A., Temple University KELLY L. FREY (2003) School District of Lancaster Project Manager B.A., Millersville University; M.S., Millersville University BONNIE M. GOBLE (2006) Office Manager JENNIFER HARDING (2003) Project Manager B.A., Millersville University ANGELA N. KNITTLE '04 (2004) Project Manager B.A., Franklin & Marshall College RICHARD L. SENFT (2006) Database Developer B.A., University of Delaware; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Colorado State University

HuMaN resourCes

NANCY A. ESHLEMAN (1999) Director, Human Resources B.A., Alfred University; M.I.L.R., Cornell University LAURA M. FIORE (2007) Assistant Director B.S., University of Scranton

INsTITuTIoNaL researCH

ALAN S. CANIGLIA (1982) Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Vice Provost for Planning and Institutional Research A.B., Bucknell University; Ph.D., University of Virginia CHRISTINE A. YERKES (1995) College Registrar and Associate Director of Institutional Research B.A., Lebanon Valley College; M.A., Millersville University

INTerNaTIoNaL sTuDIes

KEN-ICHI MIURA (2006) Director of the Japanese Language Program M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison

HIGHer eDuCaTIoN DaTa sHarING CoNsorTIuM

JASON P. CASEY (2000) Director B.F.A., Memphis State University; M.S., University of Memphis; Ph.D., University of Memphis

JaMes sTreeT IMProVeMeNT DIsTrICT

LISA RIGGS (2003) Executive Director B.A., Johns Hopkins University DAVID T. AICHELE (2006) Operations Manager

273

SHELBY NAUMAN (2004) Project Manager B.A., West Chester University MARSHALL W. SNIVELY (2007) Deputy Director B.A., University of Maryland

LISA M. STILLWELL (1999) Information Literacy Librarian, Associate Librarian B.A., Oberlin College; M.L.S., University of Michigan SCOTT VINE (2003) Reference Services Librarian, Senior Assistant Librarian B.A., Hiram College; M.A., University of Memphis; M.L.S., Kent State University

LIBrarY serVICes

PAMELA SNELSON (1998) College Librarian B.A., Drew University; M.A., Drew University; Ph.D., Rutgers University MARTIN GORDON (1974) Acquisitions Librarian, Associate Librarian B.A., Syracuse University; M.L.S., University of Rhode Island ANDREW K. GULATI (1991) Systems Librarian, Senior Assistant Librarian B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.S., Drexel University THOMAS A. KAREL (1984) Collection Development Librarian, Senior Assistant Librarian B.A., Moravian College; M.A., Temple University; M.L.S., Drexel University LOUISE A. KULP (1994) Visual Resources Librarian, Assistant Librarian B.F.A., University of the Arts; M.A., University of the Arts; M.L.I.S., University of Pittsburgh CHRISTOPHER M. RAAB (2002) Archivist and Special Collections Librarian, Associate Librarian B.A., Carnegie Mellon University; C.A.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh DALE B. RIORDAN (1999) Science Librarian, Associate Librarian B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.L.S., Kent State University RENATE B. SACHSE (1975) Catalog and Circulation Librarian, Senior Assistant Librarian B.A., Clarion State College; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh

MusIC

MARK MISKINIS (2000) Performance Manager for the Barshinger Center for Musical Arts B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania BRIAN H. NORCROSS (1986) Instrumental Conductor B.Mus.Ed., University of Massachusetts; D.M.A., Catholic University of America; M.Mus.Ed., New England Conservatory of Music WILLIAM WRIGHT (2001) Choral Director B.A., Amherst College; D.M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Music, New England Conservatory of Music

offICe of CoLLeGe CoMMuNICaTIoNs

NANCY E. COLLINS (2007) Vice President for College Communications A.B., Bowdoin College ANITA L. FOCHT (1982) Assistant Publications Director JOHN T. SVATEK (1997) Publications Director B.A., University of Chicago CHRISTOPHER J. WEAVER'90 (1996) College Web Manager B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., Millersville University

274

offICe of CoLLeGe House aDMINIsTraTIoN aND sTuDeNT aCaDeMIC affaIrs

STEVEN P. O'DAY (1996) Associate Dean of the College B.S., Millersville University; J.D., Temple University TODD DEKAY (1997) Associate Dean and House Prefect B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., University of Michigan ROGER A. GODIN (1986) Associate Dean and House Prefect B.A., College of the Holy Cross; Ed.D., University of Delaware; M.Ed., Rhode Island College KATHARINE J. SNIDER '99 (2005) Associate Dean and House Prefect B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., University of Delaware DAVID M. STAMESHKIN (1978) Associate Dean and House Prefect A.B., University of Chicago; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Ph.D., University of Michigan

KARYN D. CONVEY (2006) Assistant Dean for International Programs B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Long Island University; M.Ed., Boston College NICOLE M. ZEIMIS (2006) International Programs Adviser B.A., Luther College; M.A., University of Minnesota

offICe of THe DeaN of THe CoLLeGe

KENT C. TRACHTE (1988) Dean of the College B.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., State University of New York MARY KATE BOLAND '01 (2003) Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life B.A., Franklin & Marshall College XAY M. CHONGTUA (2005) Assistant Director for Multicultural Affairs B.S., Penn State University MARION A. COLEMAN (1989) Associate Dean of Students B.A., Hampton University; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh TERRI COOKE (2001) Assistant Dean of Students B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.A., Geneva College CHRISTIANE FISHER (1990) Assistant to the Dean of the College RALPH TABER (1986) Senior Associate Dean of the College and Dean of Students B.A., Trenton State College; M.Ed., Trenton State College; Ph.D., University of Connecticut

offICe of fINaNCIaL aID

CHRISTOPHER K. HANLON (1998) Director, Financial Aid B.A., Winthrop University; M.A., Hollins College VARO L. DUFFINS (1996) Assistant Director of Financial Aid and Associate Dean of Admission B.A., University of Delaware JANE ANN WEIDMAN (1987) Coordinator of Financial Aid & Campusbased Aid Programs

offICe of INTerNaTIoNaL ProGraMs

PATTI L. BROWN (2003) Associate Dean for International Programs B.A., Hope College

offICe of THe PresIDeNT

JOHN A. FRY (2002) President B.A., Lafayette College; M.B.A., New York University Stern School of Business DEBRA J. BROOKS (2004) Assistant to the President

275

J. SAMUEL HOUSER '89 (1996) Secretary of the College and Executive Assistant to the President B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; Ph.D., Brown University KATHY JOHNSON (1977) Secretary to the President DEBORAH MURRAY MARTIN '72 (1989) Director of Special Events/Assistant Secretary to the Board of Trustees A.A., Centenary College for Women; A.B., Franklin & Marshall College

offICe of PuBLIC safeTY

MAUREEN P. KELLY (2003) Director B.A., Temple University; M.S., Saint Joseph's University EDWARD P. CARROLL (2004) Sergeant LISA ANN DARLINGTON (2005) Sergeant BRET ALLEN MITCHELL (2006) Fire Safety/Events Manager, Administrative Supervisor PAUL P. MORIN (2004) Captain B.S., Concordia College and University DENNIS H. WALTERS (2004) Lieutenant, Operations and Training B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.L.S., Antioch University

offICe of THe ProVosT

ANN R. STEINER (1981) Provost and Dean of the Faculty A.B., Bryn Mawr College; M.A., Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College ALAN S. CANIGLIA (1982) Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Vice Provost for Planning and Institutional Research A.B., Bucknell University; Ph.D., University of Virginia RICHARD A. FLUCK (1974) Associate Dean of the Faculty B.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley TAMARA A. GOEGLEIN (1989) Associate Dean of the Faculty B.A., Earlham College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Indiana University KATHRYN M. HERTZLER (1992) Administrative Assistant for Budgets and Information Technology Planning B.S., Eastern Mennonite College JOAN LEFEVER (1988) Assistant to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty ROBERT M. MARENICK (2007) Theater Technical Director B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.F.A., Ohio University KATHRYN L. MISSILDINE (1999) Executive Assistant to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., Trinity College

PHILaDeLPHIa aLuMNI WrITers House

KERRY SHERIN WRIGHT (2003) Director B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Hollins College; Ph.D., Temple University

reGIsTrar's offICe

CHRISTINE A. YERKES (1995) College Registrar and Associate Director of Institutional Research B.A., Lebanon Valley College; M.A., Millersville University GWEN L. BLEACHER (1988) Senior Associate Registrar

sCIeNTIfIC researCH suPPorT

MICHAEL A. RAHNIS '92 (2006) GIS Research Specialist B.A., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., The University of Texas at Austin STEVEN W. SPADAFORE (1986) Electronics Engineer B.S., Ohio Institute of Technology

276

STEVEN SYLVESTER '71 (1971) Research Specialist B.S., University of Dayton; M.S., Franklin & Marshall College

Ware INsTITuTe for CIVIC eNGaGeMeNT

BARBARA H. VERRIER (1991) Director, the Ware Institute for Civic Engagement B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; M.Ed., University of Vermont GEOFF S. WHITCOMB (2006) Assistant Director B.A., Kutztown University; M.A., Asbury Theological Seminary; M.S., Mankato State University LISA C. WOLFE (2003) Associate Director, the Ware Institute for Civic Engagement B.S., Millersville University

sTuDeNT aCTIVITIes

KATHY B. HAM (1998) Assistant Director, Office of Student Activities & Steinman College Center

THeaTer, DaNCe, aND fILM

MATTHEW MAZUROSKI (2005) Performing Arts Coordinator B.A., Emporia State University PAMELA S. VAIL (2002) Artist in Residence and Instructor in Dance B.A., Middlebury College; M.F.A., Smith College VIRGINIA M. WEST '78 (1984) Costume Designer A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; M.F.A., University of Hawaii JOHN F. WHITING (1985) Scenic and Lighting Designer B.A., Michigan State University; M.F.A., Wayne State University

WoMeN's CeNTer

JUDY PEHRSON (2004) Director B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., University of Michigan

WrITING CeNTer

DANIEL E. FRICK (2000) Director B.A., Elmhurst College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Indiana University

277

2008 summer session I

(5 weeks, May 28­June 26, 2008) Registration Deadline: Tuesday, May 27, 2008: Wednesday, May 28, 2008: Thursday, May 29, 2008: Thursday, June 5, 2008: Tuesday, June 24, 2008: Thursday, June 26, 2008: Friday, June 27, 2008: Monday, May 12, 2008 Theme Houses open for Session I, Noon Session I classes begin; last day for First Session housing refunds (Business Office) Session I deadline for course changes, or withdrawing without record by 4:30 p.m. Session I grading option (P/NP) deadline Session I deadline to withdraw with record Session I classes end Students in residence must vacate their rooms by Noon

278

2008 summer session II

(5 weeks, July 1­31, 2008) Registration Deadline: Monday, June 30, 2008: Tuesday, July 1, 2008: Wednesday, July 2, 2008: Friday, July 4, 2008 Wednesday, July 9, 2008: Tuesday, July 29, 2008: Thursday, July 31, 2008: Friday, August 1, 2008: Monday, June 16, 2008 Residence Halls open for Session II, Noon Session II classes begin; last day for Second Session housing refunds (Business Office) Session II deadline for course changes, or withdrawing without record by 4:30 p.m. Holiday--No Classes Session II grading option (P/NP) deadline Session II deadline to withdraw with record Session II classes end Students in residence must vacate their rooms by Noon

279

Ross Street To Baker Campus, Grundy Observatory, and Athletic Fields To Brooks Tennis Center Student Parking

Clay Street

James Street Business Office 644­646 Race Ave. Chi Phi Race Avenue Parking Parking Benjamin Franklin Residences Catering Suite

Frederick Street

Buchanan Park (not part of F&M) Kaufman Lecture Hartman Hall Green Fackenthal Laboratories Martin Library of the Sciences Main Parking Area Hackman Physical Sciences Labs Ann & Richard Barshinger Life Sciences & Philosophy Building

Central Services: Strength Training Center

To Park

CAMPUS MAP

Buchanan Hall Schnader Hall Thomas Hall

City, US

Parking

Public Safety

Ware College House

Weis Hall

30, I-28

Marshall Hall Athletic Practice Field

3

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Parking

North Museum & Planetarium Gerhart House College Avenue

Fre

ShadekFackenthal Library

Sponaugle-Williamson Field Admission Parking

Steinman College Roschel Center Performing Arts Mayser Center Physical Education Stager Meyran Hall Hensel Center Hall Keiper Hall Spalding Hall Plaza Barshinger Stahr Auditorium Center Green Room Theatre Dietz Hall International House Phi Kappa Tau Financial Aid

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Guest House

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Black Career Cultural Services Center Greek Life, Asian Cultural Center, Off-Campus Housing & Multicultural Affairs

College House Admin. & Student Academic Affairs

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Parking

PhilaArt Office for Faculty, Emeriti Faculty delphia Studio & Foreign Language Tutors Alumni Writers House To Other Room Theatre

Stre et

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PUBLIC SAFETY (M A RS H A L L /B U C HA N A N HA L L -- OP E N 2 4 HOURS DAIL Y

tre es S

Delta Sigma Phi

Lancaster Theological Seminary (not affiliated with F&M)

Local Economy Center

New

La

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Marshall Gate

Wohlsen House, Hillel Joseph International Center Admission

b u rg P ik e

280

OVERPASS College Square Alumni Sports & Fitness Center Phillips Museum of Art North Campus College Row Residential/ Retail Complex Liberty Street Retail Space Proposed Grocery Store Warehouse 415 Harrisburg Avenue Capital Program Management Building & Grounds Facilities & Operations Service Response Center

Main Entrance to Administrative Offices

To Nevonia, the President's House

Buchanan House

Old Main: Nevin Chapel & Miller Recital Hall

Distler Appel House: Bookstore Infirmary & Jazzman's Café

Buchanan Avenue

Herman Fine Arts Center

Huegel Alumni House

Diagnothian Hall

Goethean Hall

et

Index

Abbreviations .................................................... 27 Academic Advising (see Advising) .................178 Academic Calendar ...................................... viii­x Academic Grades appeal of grade ..........................................210 class status (full-time/part-time) ...............195 grade change .............................................209 grading system .......................................... 207 incomplete grade .......................................208 pass/no pass option ................................... 197 privacy of .................................................. 207 rank in class...............................................209 reports of ...................................................209 return of..................................................... 207 Academic Honesty ..........................................183 Academic Performance ...................................193 Academic Policies, petitions for exceptions to .........................183 Academic Process, disruptions of ...................185 Academic Progress ..........................................192 Academic Standards ........................................192 Academic Technology Services (see Computing in the Curriculum) ..........220 Accelerated Applicants....................................224 Accommodation for Disabilities .....................242 Acting, courses in (see Theater, Dance, and Film) ...........................................167, 170 Adding Courses ...............................................195 Additional Educational Opportunities and Resources ..................................................203 Administrative Offices, list of ......................... 267 Admission to the College ................................223 Advanced Placement credit, transfer of ..........215 Advising academic ...................................................178 career, pre-professional ............................. 181 Bachelor of Arts Degree .................................186 Barshinger Center for Musical Arts ................234 international study................................. 7, 201 off-campus study ................................... 7, 201 pre-healing arts..........................................178 Writing Center .......................................... 181 Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity ........iii Africana Studies ................................................ 27 American Studies .............................................. 31 Ancient History (see Classics) ..........................66 Animal Behavior (see Biological Foundations of Behavior)............................48 Anthropology ....................................................36 Appeal of a Grade by Students (see Academic Grades) .............................210 Appeals Process for exceptions to academic policies ..........199 for change of grade ...................................209 Application for Admission ..............................224 Application for Degree ....................................186 Arabic Language (see International Studies).........................113 Archaeology (Anthropological) .......................36 Archaeology (Classical) ....................................66 Architecture Studies, programs in (see Art and Art History) ............................. 41 Art and Art History............................................ 41 Art Studio (see Art and Art History) ................. 41 Asian Studies (see International Studies) ........ 111 Assessment of Instruction by Students ...........220 Astronomy .......................................................134 Astrophysics ....................................................134 Athletics & Recreation ....................................235 Auditing Courses .............................................198

281

Barshinger Life Sciences and Philosophy ......230 Biological Foundations of Behavior .................48 Biology .............................................................54 Bonchek College House ................................. 231 Bonchek Institute ..............................................80 Bookstore ........................................................ 231 Business, Organizations, and Society ...............59 Calendar (see Academic Calendar) ............. viii­x Campus Map ...................................................280 Campus Visit and Interview ............................224 Careers and Programs of Study ...................... 181 Center for Community-Based Learning and Service ................................179 Center for Liberal Arts and Society (CLAS).........................................180 Center for Opinion Research ..........................180 Center for Politics and Public Affairs ............. 181 Central Pennsylvania Consortium ....................12 Changes in a Recorded Grade (see Academic Grades) .............................209 Chemistry..........................................................63 Class Attendance .............................................199 Class Scheduling.............................................194 Classics (incl. Classical Archaeology, Ancient History, Greek, and Latin) .............66 Collaborations ..................................................... 7 Collaborative Opportunities ............................178 College Directory............................................244 College Graduation Honors ............................180 College House System ....................................... vi College Level Examination Program (CLEP) ...................................................... 217 College Row Residential/Retail Complex ......230 Commencement ..............................................190 Community and Public Service Opportunities (seeWare Institute for Civic Engagement) ..............................179 Comparative Literary Studies ...........................70

Computer Science ............................................. 71 Computer, security policy ............................... 221 Computing at Franklin & Marshall.................220 Copyrighted Materials, use of.........................184 Course Credit Overloads.................................195 Course Credit System .....................................186 Course Load (see Full-Time/ Part-Time Status) ......................................195 Course Offerings ...............................................14 Course Registration and Credit .......................194 Course Repeat Policy ......................................198 Creative Writing................................................89 Credit by Examination .................................... 217 Credit, transfer of ............................................212 Curriculum .......................................................... 1 Dana Scholars .................................................192 Dance Program ....................................... 168, 171 Dean's List (see also Honors List) .................. 191 Degree application for ...........................................186 requirements for ........................................186 Degree Audits .................................................188 Departmental or Program Honors...................188 Directed Readings (see also Departmental and program listings) ................................203 Disabilities, appeals for ..................................242 accommodations for ..................................242 Disclaimer Statement ..........................................ii Distribution Requirement ...................................3 Drama and Dramatic Literature (see Theater, Dance, and Film)......................... 167 Early Decision ................................................224 Earth and Environment .....................................73 Economics ........................................................ 81 Education, preparation for careers in .............. 181 Educational Records (see Family Education Rights & Privacy Act) .............. 237

282

Educational Support Services .........................178 Electives .............................................................. 7 Engineering, preparation for careers in ..........182 English ..............................................................85 Environmental Science .....................................78 Environmental Studies ......................................78 Environmental Studies and Forestry, preparation for careers in ..........................182 Evaluation and Grades .................................... 207 Examinations final ........................................................... 211 proficiency................................................. 211 Exchange Programs ....................................9, 206 Explorations ....................................................203 Facilities..........................................................230 Fackenthal Laboratories.................................. 231 Faculty of the College, list of..........................248 Faculty Emeriti, list of ....................................263 Faculty Statement on Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty ................184 Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA) .................................................... 237 Fees (see Tuition and Fees).............................228 Film and Media Studies ..........................168, 173 Final Examinations ......................................... 211 Financial Aid ..................................................225 First-Year Seminars ...................................... 2, 21 Floyd Institute for Public Policy .....................180 Forestry and Environmental Studies, preparation for careers in ..........................182 Foundations: courses ....................................2, 14 Frankliniana ....................................................233 French ...............................................................92 Full-time Status (see also Academic Grades) .....................................195 Galleries (see Phillips Museum of Art) ..........232 General Education Requirements .......................2

Geosciences .....................................................76 German .............................................................95 Government ......................................................99 Grades (see Academic Grades) ....................... 207 Grade Reports (see also Academic Grades)....209 Graduate School, preparation for ....................178 Graduation Rate ..............................................188 Graduation Requirements ...............................186 Gray Scholars.................................................. 227 Greek (see Classics) ..........................................68 Guidelines for International and Off-Campus Study.............................. 201 Hackman Scholars Program ...........................178 Hebrew (see Judaic Studies) ........................... 117 High School Student Program ................216, 225 History ............................................................104 History of the College ......................................... v Home Schooled Students ................................224 Honor Societies...............................................192 Honors college graduation .....................................188 departmental or program ...........................188 interdisciplinary ........................................190 Honors List (see also Dean's List) .................. 191 Incomplete Grades (see Academic Grades) ......................................................208 Independent Study (see also Departmental and program listings) ................................203 Integration of Academic and Residential Learning .................................... vi Intercollegiate Athletics ..................................235 International and Off-Campus Study .................. 7 guidelines .................................................. 201 programs abroad............................................ 7 Off-Campus Study programs within the U.S. ........................................ 11 statement of philosophy ................................ 7

283

International Baccalaureate ............................ 217 International Center ........................................ 231 International Relations, courses in (see Government) ...............................................99 International Studies ....................................... 111 Internships for academic credit ............................115, 204 community and public service ..................180 Interviews for Admission ................................223 Italian ..............................................................115 Japanese (see International Studies) ...............113 Joint Major ...................................................... 201 Judaic Studies ................................................. 117

Music .............................................................. 124 history of ...................................................126 performance of ..........................................128 theory of ....................................................126 National Merit Scholars .................................. 227 Natural Sciences Requirement............................3 Neuroscience (see Biological Foundations of Behavior) ................................................49 Nondiscrimination, statement of policy on .........ii Non-Traditional Educated Students ................224 Non-Western Cultures (Distribution Requirement).................................................4 Part-time Status (see Academic Grades).........195

Language Studies (Distribution Requirement).................................................4 Latin (see Classics) ...........................................69 Law School, preparation for ...........................178 Leave Policy ...................................................218 Leaves of Absence ..........................................218 Leser and Nissley Student/Faculty Partnership ................................................179 Liberal Arts (Distribution Requirement) ............3 Library ............................................................232 Linguistics ......................................................119 Major, the ....................................................6, 199 Management, courses in (see Business Organizations, and Society) ........................59 Marshall Scholars ...........................................226 Mathematics....................................................120 Medical School, preparation for .....................178 Mentorship Program .......................................180 Millersville University ............................181, 206 Minor, the (see also Departmental and program listings) ....................................... 201 Mission of the College ........................................ v

Pass/No Pass Option (see Academic Grades) ...................................................... 197 Patent Policy ...................................................185 Payment ..........................................................229 Performance Arts ............................................234 Petitions and appeals.......................................199 Phi Beta Kappa ...............................................192 Phillips Museum of Art...................................232 Philosophy ......................................................130 Physical Education (see Athletics and Recreation) .........................................235 Physics ............................................................134 Plagiarism, faculty statement on .....................184 Policies, exception to ......................................199 Preceptorships .................................................179 Presidential Scholars....................................... 227 Privacy of academic grades (see Academic grades) ................................................... 207 of educational records ............................... 237 Proficiency Examinations ............................... 211 Psychology......................................................138 Public Policy ...................................................143 Public Service Internships ..............................180

284

Rank in Class (see Academic Grades) ............209 Readmission Policy ........................................219 Refund Policy ................................................. 217 Registration Procedure....................................194 Rehabilitation Act of 1973 ..............................242 Religious Studies ............................................144 Repeat of a Course ..........................................198 Reports, grade .................................................209 Roschel Performing Arts Center ....................234 Rouse Scholars................................................226 Russian............................................................149 Scholarships ....................................................226 Science, Technology, and Society...................150 Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind......................................................154 Seachrist Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies .......................180 Seminary, preparation for ...............................206 Senior Staff of the College..............................248 Sociology ........................................................160 Spalding Leadership Program.........................180 Spanish............................................................164 Special Educational Opportunities .................203 Special Interest Housing .................................234 Special Studies ................................................200 Study Abroad (see International and Off-Campus Study) ....................................... 7 Summer/Study Travel Awards ..........................12 Summer Sessions 2007 ...................................278 Teaching, preparation for ................................ 181 Theater, Dance, and Film ................................166 Traditional Areas of the Liberal Arts (Distribution Requirement) ...........................3 Transcripts, academic .....................................209 Transfer of Credit Policies ..............................212 Transfer Students, admission of ......................225 Trustees of the College, list of ........................244

Tuition and Fees ..............................................228 Tutorials (see also Departmental and program listings) .......................................203 Ware College House........................................230 Ware Institute for Civic Engagement ..............179 Withdrawal, Leave, and Readmission Policies ..............................2179 Withdrawal from a course (with or without credit) ......196 from the College........................................ 217 Withholding and Revocation of Degree ..........190 Women and Gender Studies ............................174 Writers House ................................................. 231 Writing Center ................................................ 181 Writing Requirement (see also Departmental listings)..........................................................5

285

Notes

286

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