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Elementary Curriculum Units Project

Implementation Support Binder

Units for single and combined grade classes, Grades 1 - 8

The Elementary Curriculum Units Project

Phase II

Implementation Support Document for Elementary Teachers in Single and Combined-Grade Classes

Development team:

ECU Project

Writers

Andrea Bishop, Halton Catholic District School Board Diane Cooper, Niagara District School Board George Doros, Niagara Catholic District School Board Dan Koenig, Toronto Catholic District School Board Steve Soroko, Halton Catholic District School Board Curtis Tye, Niagara District School Board

Project Coordinator

Ann Perron, Institute for Catholic Education

Layout and Design

TEMPER Media

The following organizations have supported this project:

The Council of Ontario Directors of Education (CODE) The Institute for Catholic Education (ICE) Ministry of Education, Curriculum and Assessment Policy Branch

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE Introduction List of Units Directory Planning Elementary Curriculum Units Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting Planning for Students with Special Education Needs Health and Physical Education Language The Arts Suggestions for Using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner The Learning Continuum: Expectations for Health and Physical Education, Language, and The Arts, designed in fold-out pages

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ECU Project

2 8 13 41 44 55 68

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Introduction

Phase II of the Elementary Curriculum Units Project builds on the learning and successes from Phase I. Phase I produced sample curriculum units for teachers of single and combined grade classes, grades 1 to 8 in the areas of Mathematics, Science and Technology and Social Studies, History and Geography. The units and an Implementation Support document were released on a CD-ROM and in limited print copy in November 2001 to every district school board. The units are also available on the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner website: http://www.ocup.org and can be accessed through the Planner. The units are also available in PDF format. Phase II of the project followed a similar development process in the subject areas of Health and Physical Education, Language and the Arts. The Council of Ontario Directors of Education (CODE) and the Institute for Catholic Education (ICE) coordinated writing teams from public and Catholic school boards. The units were reviewed by a team of professional colleagues, including school librarians, teachers with ESL and Special Education qualifications, and teachers with assessment expertise. In addition, the Ontario Curriculum Centre (OCC) developed and managed a professional peer review process as well as the editing and publishing process. Catholic units had an additional theological review as part of the process. The curriculum units are considered to be resources written by teachers for teachers. The units were written using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner. Accessibility to the units in electronic format provides teachers with the opportunity to adapt the units to meet local needs (e.g., delivery in a combined and/or multi-grade class). The charts on the following pages list the units developed in Health and Physical Education, Language and the Arts in Phase II of the project.

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List of Units/Directory

Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II Single Grade Units

Grade 1

Health and Physical Education C My Personal Best P The Heart Helpers Language C Eye Spy P Write Where We Belong The Arts P Come Play with Us C Music Creations St. Clair CDSB York Region DSB St. Clair CDSB Renfrew County DSB Toronto DSB Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB

Grade 2

Health and Physical Education C My Body for Life P Stories Families Tell Language P Classroom Critters C Fairy Tale Friends and Foes The Arts P Art Affects Through Artefacts C Masks, Mosaics, and Masterpieces St. Clair CDSB York Region DSB Renfrew County DSB St. Clair CDSB Toronto DSB Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB

Grade 3

Health and Physical Education P Passport to Healthy Living C The Life of Pugz Language P A Day in the Life of a Pioneer Child C The Easter Story The Arts C Creating a County Fair P Land and Sea: Worlds of Difference Toronto DSB Halton CDSB

Renfrew County DSB Durham CDSB

Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB Toronto DSB

*C designates units written by teachers in Catholic DSBs. *P designates units written by teachers in public DSBs.

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List of Units/Directory

Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II Single Grade Units

Grade 4

Health and Physical Education P Knight School C Our Special Relationships Language C Classroom Capers: Creating a Magazine P The Knightly News The Arts P At the Watering Hole C Music in the Middle Ages

Peel DSB Toronto CDSB Durham CDSB Renfrew DSB Peel DSB Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB

Grade 5

Health and Physical Education C Growing and Changing P Kidlympics Language C Journeys C A Proposal to Lessen World Hunger P Life System Magazine The Arts C English Renaissance Fair P The Arts as Mood Makers Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB Peel DSB

Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB Renfrew County DSB

Ottawa-Carleton CDSB Peel DSB

Grade 6

Health and Physical Education C A Balanced Being P Let's Play Language C Newspapers in Language P What's Your Story? The Arts C Music Maestro! P The Arts in Motion Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB Peel DSB Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB Renfrew County DSB

Ottawa-Carleton CDSB Peel DSB

*C designates units written by teachers in Catholic DSBs. *P designates units written by teachers in public DSBs.

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List of Units/Directory

Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II Single Grade Units

Grade 7

Health and Physical Education C Body, Mind, & Spirit P Fit to Be a Star Language C Extra Extra...Read All About It P Magazine Mania The Arts C Our Creative Identities P Primal Rhythms and Echoes Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB Halton DSB

York CDSB Avon Maitland DSB

Ottawa-Carleton CDSB Upper Canada DSB

Grade 8

Health and Physical Education C Responsible Decisions P Walk the Walk Language P Poetry Power C Talk Shows The Arts P Art, Music, Dance/Drama C Building Character Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB Hastings & Prince Edward DSB Avon Maitland DSB York CDSB Upper Canada DSB Ottawa-Carleton CDSB

*C designates units written by teachers in Catholic DSBs. *P designates units written by teachers in public DSBs.

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List of Units/Directory

Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II Combined Grade Units

Grades 1 and 2

Health and Physical Education P Hop on the Health Wagon! C I am Special Language C Crazy about Creatures The Arts C Friendship P S.O.S - Searchers of Seasons Renfrew County DSB Halton CDSB St. Clair CDSB Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB York Region DSB

Grades 2 and 3

Health and Physical Education P The Safety Minute C Your Body is the Evidence Language C Fairy Tale Adventures The Arts C A Musical Patchwork P The Great Factory Debate Renfrew County DSB Halton CDSB Durham CDSB Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB York Region DSB

Grades 3 and 4

Health and Physical Education P Healthy Choices C The Changing You Language C Read All About It The Arts C Canada: Visual and Musical Journey P Not in My Backyard Renfrew County DSB Toronto CDSB

Durham CDSB Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington CDSB York Region DSB

*C designates units written by teachers in Catholic DSBs. *P designates units written by teachers in public DSBs.

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List of Units/Directory

Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II Combined Grade Units

Grades 4 and 5

Health and Physical Educaton C Energized for Life P Substance Use/Abuse The Arts P Healthy Living in Creative Ways C The Last Supper P Weathering the Storm Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB Renfrew County DSB Upper Canada DSB Ottawa-Carleton CDSB York Region DSB

Grades 5 and 6

Health and Physical Education P Healthy Eating C Totally Healthy Language C Dare You Delve into Fantasy The Arts C Cultural Connections P Stages on Stage: Drama for Healthy Living Renfrew County DSB Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB Ottawa-Carleton CDSB Upper Canada DSB

Grades 6 and 7

Health and Physical Education P Cleaner Air to Breathe! C Total Wellness Language C Writing for Radio The Arts C Creating an Impression P Who Will Buy? Music and Media Renfrew County DSB Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB York CDSB

Ottawa-Carleton CDSB Upper Canada DSB

*C designates units written by teachers in Catholic DSBs. *P designates units written by teachers in public DSBs.

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List of Units/Directory

Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II Combined Grade Units

Grades 7 and 8

Health and Physical Education P Healthy Living C Responsible Choices Language C TV Morning News The Arts C Bringing Art to Life P Surfing in the Elements Renfrew County DSB Nipissing-Parry Sound CDSB York CDSB

Ottawa-Carleton CDSB Upper Canada DSB

*C designates units written by teachers in Catholic DSBs. *P designates units written by teachers in public DSBs.

Planning Elementary Curriculum Units

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Planning Elementary Curriculum Units

"Design Down" Approach to Planning: Long-Range and Unit Planning

The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner supports a variety of ways to plan units, all of which reflect the following elements of the design process:

· Curriculum expectations · Assessment/evaluation · Teaching/learning strategies · Topic/theme/resources · Performance tasks and criteria

The Planner is intended as a tool to help teachers using a "design down" approach to planning units. In this approach it is important for the teacher to have a vision of the culminating task and how that task may present opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning. This document supports divisional planning, looking at connections among subject areas and planning for meaningful and relevant learning opportunities for students. Teachers find it helpful to examine the flow of curriculum expectations and to make connections between subject areas. When considering the number of potential expectations (e.g., in a combined grade unit), it is important to ensure that the unit encourages students to explore key questions, solve authentic problems, and apply new learning.

The Big Picture: A Local School Plan Based on Coordinated Long-Range Planning

One way to ensure student preparation for subsequent learning opportunities is to coordinate divisional planning meetings. An overall curriculum plan will lead to less repetition of content at the local level. At these meetings teachers may:

· use the Learning Continuum to identify expectations that flow from grade to

grade in one subject strand (e.g., Mathematics and Language as a starting point);

· identify and organize expectations to sequence knowledge, skills, and

application;

· identify expectations that imply an age-appropriate response and appear at every

level;

· identify the key concepts, big ideas, and enduring understandings for the area(s);

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Planning Elementary Curriculum Units

· build understanding about what concepts, skills, and knowledge should be acquired at various levels;

· work with colleagues in the division to establish priorities; · share information with other divisions to communicate a local school plan for

literacy and numeracy;

· share this plan with other schools; · share integrated planning approaches with school administration, parents,

and students, when appropriate (i.e., Social Studies and Arts units); and,

· create long-range program approaches based on the divisional work described

above. Research supports the notion that teachers build professional capacity and ownership when they routinely communicate with each other. Organized and focused divisional meetings allow the opportunity for teachers to express a professional response to local curriculum issues and action. Once a local school plan has been developed, teachers reflect upon the strengths, interests, and abilities of their students. The following list suggests ways in which schools can begin to develop the local school plan:

· Once the strand chosen from Mathematics and Language is established

through the process described above, share it with other school communities.

· Through school administration/board administration, select another strand

from Mathematics and Language to work on, based on the previous approach to planning.

· Review and adapt existing units available on the OCUP website:

http://www.ocup.org to suit local needs.

· Begin to identify gaps in resources and/or existing practice. · Determine knowledge/skill requirements related to literacy, numeracy, and

other subject areas.

· Identify units that maintain subject integrity. · Ensure that the tasks and activities planned will deepen the understanding of

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Planning Elementary Curriculum Units

concepts from subject areas such as Arts, Social Studies, Health and Physical Education.

Steps in Unit Planning

A divisional plan using the Learning Continuum will provide an overall framework for unit development.

· Define the purpose: What do you hope students will learn by the end of this

strand/theme/unit?

· Refer to the Learning Continuum appropriate to the subject(s) to select the

overall expectations addressed in the unit.

· Refer to the Learning Continuum appropriate to the subject(s) to select the

specific expectations addressed in the unit.

· Cluster the expectations using common words or concepts. Begin to identify

enduring understandings, concepts, skills, and/or connections that follow the learning path from Grades 1 to 8 and beyond (e.g., application of the elements of design, safety, et cetera).

· Consider the culminating task. Begin to map back from the culminating task

and sequence the subtasks.

· Consider the initial assessment that determines student readiness for the

unit. Teachers in Catholic elementary schools should refer to the Journey Activities and/or the list of Ontario Catholic Student Graduate Expectations to make meaningful connections to the overall/specific expectations and to the enduring understandings.

· Map the clustered expectations to the appropriate categories on the Achievement Chart(s).

· Determine meaningful connections to other subject areas/expectations. · Design the culminating activity and scoring rubric and/or checklist to

accompany the culminating task.

· Design down from the culminating activity into sequential subtasks. · Create varied teaching/learning strategies and experiences where students

are provided with multiple opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge/skills independently and cooperatively.

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Planning Elementary Curriculum Units

· Incorporate remediation, accommodations, and extensions as required. · Develop a range of assessment strategies (e.g., rubrics, checklists and tests)

that ensure that students are assessed in terms of grade-level expectations rather than by a generic evaluation of their progress.

· Gather, order, and prepare teaching/learning resources and materials for the

subtasks and culminating tasks.

Looking at the Students

It is important to consider the backgrounds, interests and abilities of students prior to planning a unit. It is a challenge to provide a range of options that allow students to select suitable ways to learn. Often a student will select an area of strength in order to demonstrate learning, but students should also be encouraged to select new areas that will challenge them. It is through these experiences that students learn about themselves and others. In writing original units or modifying sample units from the ECU project, teachers should consider students' prior knowledge and design an initial assessment to diagnose their readiness. Teachers often use the teaching/learning strategies they have used with comfort and success. However, many of our students may not demonstrate their strengths if only a select few modes of delivery are used. It is important to use a wide variety of teaching/learning strategies and assessment tools when looking at the evaluation of student learning. Our students are as diverse as the community we serve. It is important to recognize this diversity, and to reflect this in the teaching/learning and evaluation process. Assessment should reflect Wiggins' concern that "The classroom should be the safest place to make and recover from a mistake." A culture of "multiple opportunities to demonstrate learning" rather than a focus on a single assessment is a practice many teachers embrace.

(adapted from Assessment of Student Achievement in Catholic Schools, TCDSB, 2001)

Literacy Across the Curriculum

All subject areas involve some aspect of writing, reading and communicating. The strategies reflected in balanced literacy can be mirrored throughout all subject areas to reinforce concepts and attitudes and build students' self-confidence. A confident learner who has the skills to communicate effectively is better equipped for success in all other subject areas. Teaching/learning strategies to develop literacy in all subject areas include the following:

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Planning Elementary Curriculum Units

· reading aloud · shared reading · guided reading · independent reading · shared writing · interactive writing · independent writing · providing extensions to reading · chart and map making activities (Social Studies) · reading and writing music and plays, communicating through visual arts (The

Arts)

· notation and hypothesizing (The Arts) · problem solving and written explanation (Mathematics)

Integration - Maintaining Subject Integrity

Elementary teachers often teach most, if not all, subject areas described in the Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1 to 8. In order to manage multiple, diverse subject areas and expectations, teachers may cluster expectations effectively into meaningful and relevant learning opportunities. When integrating a unit of study, teachers need to ensure that activities drawn from other program areas relate appropriately to the subject being highlighted. In Visual Arts, for example, they can include not only subject-specific activities such as making/drawing/painting a picture but also activities such as constructing a mobile or a bridge. In this way, they expand the range of skills, approaches, and experiences for students while maintaining a Visual Arts focus.

Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

This section discusses considerations related to assessment, evaluation, and reporting for teachers of single or combined grades. It examines the teacher's role in the systematic collection, documentation, and reporting of assessment data concerning an individual student's achievement of grade expectations. The assessment methods, strategies, and recording devices presented are not intended to be an exhaustive list, but represent those most frequently cited for use in the Elementary Curriculum Units Project - Phase II. Assessment is gathering, recording, and analysing information about individual student achievement, group learning, and program effectiveness. Evaluation is judging the quality of student work on the basis of established criteria and assigning a value to represent that quality. (adapted from A Resource for Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting, 1999, Kawartha Pine Ridge DSB).

Reporting is sharing clear and accurate information about student achievement with the student, parents/guardians, and other educators. (adapted from The Implementation Support Binder, Phase 1, 2001). Teachers know that assessment, evaluation, and reporting are interrelated.

The Purposes of Assessment

The ultimate purpose of any or all assessment is improvement. For educators, the essential purposes of assessment are to document and improve student learning. Provincial and board assessments determine if curricular grade expectations have been achieved and give direction to the development of board and school action plans for program improvement. Classroom assessments influence instructional practices and programming needs. Through classroom assessments teachers decide: · whether curriculum expectations have been achieved; · how well students use knowledge and skills; · individual student's strengths and needs; · how to incorporate student feedback; · areas for program improvement; · effectiveness of teaching/learning strategies; and, · information to communicate to students and parents.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Planning Considerations

In order to ensure that assessments and evaluations lead to improved student learning and are valid and reliable, teachers must consider unique contextual elements and fundamental planning parameters.

The Context for Assessment

To be effective, assessment needs to be planned. When planning units of study for implementing the Ontario curriculum, teachers, in single or combined grades, consider many contextual elements including: · the unique strengths and needs of the students in the classroom; · the organization of the classroom and learning materials; · the management of time; · the use of the computer and other assistive devices; and, · the effective use of volunteers and other professional and paraprofessional staff.

Assessment Planning Parameters

When planning units of study for implementing the Ontario curriculum, teachers must use assessment, evaluation, and reporting methods and strategies that: · address both what students learn and how well they learn; · are based on the knowledge/skills categories on the Achievement Levels Charts; · are based on the level descriptors given on the Achievement Levels Chart in the curriculum policy document for each discipline; · are varied in nature, administrated over a period of time, and designed to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning; · are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students; · are fair to all students; · accommodate the needs of exceptional students, consistent with the strategies outlined in their Individual Education Plan;

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

· accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction;

Policies and Resources Used in Planning for Assessment

· ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement; · promote students' ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals; · include the use of samples of students' work that provide evidence of their achievement; and, · are communicated clearly to students at the beginning of the unit and at other appropriate points throughout the unit (from the Assessment Companion in the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner). Teachers use a number of policies and resources to plan for assessment including: · the expectations of the Ontario Curriculum policy documents; · curricular Achievement Levels Charts; · the Elementary Exemplars; · district school board documents and policies; and, · the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner. Expectations of the Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents The expectations of the Ontario Curriculum policy documents address the categories of knowledge and skills in the Achievement Charts. In order to connect each of the learning expectations to the appropriate knowledge or skill category, teachers often focus on the nature of the verbs. For example, expectations that begin with ask, compute, recognize, and write, may address the Knowledge/Understanding category. Expectations that begin with contrast, monitor or investigate, may address the Thinking/Inquiry category.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Achievement Levels Charts The overall framework of the Achievement Levels Chart includes the following four categories: 1 Knowledge/Understanding 2 Thinking/Inquiry/Critical Analysis 3 4 Communication Application/Performance/Creative Work

The Achievement Levels Chart found in each curriculum policy document is a framework for reporting student achievement over time. The names of the categories differ slightly from one discipline to another, reflecting differences in the nature of the disciplines.

The chart on the following page, developed by the Waterloo Catholic District School Board, illustrates that each subject has expectations related to Knowledge & Understanding, Thinking & Inquiry, Communication and Application & Making Connections.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1 - 8

Categories of Knowledge & Skills

Knowledge & Understanding Thinking & Inquiry Communication Application & Making Connections

Language

Organization of Ideas

Reasoning

Communication

Application of Language Conventions

French as a Second Language

Organization of Ideas

Comprehension

Communication

Application of Language Conventions

Mathematics

Understanding of Concepts

Problem Solving

Application of Mathematical Procedures

Science & Technology

Understanding of Basic Concepts

Inquiry & Design Skills

Communication of Required Knowledge

Relating of S&T to each other & the World Outside of School

Religion & Family Life

Knowledge & Understanding

Thinking & Inquiry

Communication

Application of Gospel Values

The Arts

Understanding of Concepts

Critical Analysis & Appreciation

Communication

Performance & Creative Work

Health & Physical Education

Understanding of Concepts

Active Participation

Communication of Required Knowledge

Movement Skills

Social Studies History & Geography

Understanding of Concepts

Inquiry & Research Skills & Map & Globe Skills

Communication of Required Knowledge

Application of Concepts & Skills

Each Ontario Curriculum subject discipline has expectations related to 4 categories of Knowledge and Skills. Although named differently in the policy documents, each subject has expectations related to Knowledge & Understanding, Thinking & Inquiry, Communication and Application & Making Connections.

Waterloo Catholic District School Board

Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations

Communication of required Knowledge related to Concepts, Procedures & Problem Solving

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Exemplars The exemplars are resource documents that were developed to: · show the characteristics of student work at each of the four levels of achievement; · promote greater consistency in the assessment of student work across the province; · provide an approach to improving student learning by demonstrating the use of clear criteria applied to student work in response to clearly defined assessment tasks; · show the connections between what students are expected to learn (the curriculum expectations) and how their work can be assessed using the levels of achievement described in the curriculum policy document for the subject. The samples in the exemplar documents represent examples of student achievement obtained using only one method of assessment - performance assessment. For the purposes of the exemplars project, a task-specific rubric was developed for each performance task, encompassing the four categories of knowledge and skills in relation to the Achievement Levels Chart in the curriculum policy document. Although teachers will also make use of a variety of other assessment strategies and tools in evaluating student achievement over a term or school year, exemplars can be used: · as a model to demonstrate assessment of student work in the four categories of achievement; · as a guide in developing clear descriptions of achievement for student work; and, · when data about patterns of student learning growth are desired.

(adapted from the Assessment Companion, Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, 2002).

School Board Documents and Policies Each school board in Ontario has developed action plans that address improvement initiatives in relation to provincial, board and school assessments. Many boards have developed policies and documents relating to assessment, evaluation, and reporting. Teachers need to consider these resources in their planning and implementing of classroom assessments. The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner The Assessment Companion of the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner is available at

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

www.ocup.org. Specific information on how to plan using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner is found in another section.

Planning Criteria for Assessment

Assessment must be planned at the beginning of unit development. Teachers need to give careful consideration to the types of assessment that will support the assessment purpose(s) and to the assessment strategies and recording devices they will use to determine students' acquisition of knowledge and skills throughout the unit and at the end of the unit. Teachers also make decisions about the frequency of assessment and the ways of collecting and recording student data. They use their professional judgement to determine the purpose of the assessment, and then select the appropriate assessment strategy for the learning expectations being assessed and the appropriate recording devices for scoring and recording data. The essential criteria in planning for assessment are: 1 know the purpose(s) of assessment; 2 consider the assessment context and the planning parameters; 3 engage in diagnostic assessment of the learners and the program; 4 select relevant curriculum grade expectations; 5 gather resources and design teaching/learning activities; 6 select assessment strategies and recording devices that align with selected knowledge and skill expectations; 7 determine assessment criteria for summative purposes; and, 8 analyze and record assessment data for reporting.

Types of Assessment and Evaluation

The three main types of assessment and evaluation are diagnostic, formative, and summative. Each type contributes to the improvement of student learning.

Diagnostic

Teachers usually collect data about students' prior knowledge and skill development before beginning a teaching/learning cycle in a unit of study. These initial

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

diagnostic assessments may be made using both formal and informal assessment strategies. Examples of an informal diagnostic strategy are a teacher's observational data of student performance during classroom instruction or insights gained from student feedback. Examples of formal diagnostic strategies are pre-tests or observational checklists. Preliminary data are very important in: · determining student needs; · determining needed remediation before beginning the unit of study; and · directing the planning of the unit of study. In the unit "TV Morning News," created for Grade 7/8 students by York Catholic District School Board, the Notes to Teacher clarify the use of the initial assessment in this subtask: "Initial assessment is about trying to determine what programming changes need to be made before students experience the activities of the unit. The information gained through initial assessment will not form part of the student's mark for the unit."

Formative

Formative assessment data are collected frequently throughout the teaching/ learning process to monitor student learning and help students acquire the knowledge and skills they will be required to demonstrate when they are evaluated. Through formative measures, teachers will know whether it is necessary to re-teach a topic or skill and/or redesign an activity, a lesson, an assessment strategy or a recording device. The Role of Student Feedback in Formative Assessment Formative assessment serves two important functions within a unit of study. It is a vehicle for individual student feedback and also a monitoring system for teachers to determine necessary program adjustments. Formative assessment should provide clear feedback to the student about the quality of the student's work. Where am I? What does my work look like now? Where do I need to go? Relative to the achievement criteria How do I get there? Suggestions for improvement

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Feedback to students gives them opportunities to self-assess and self-correct and engage in needed practice of a new learning or skill. Not all data recorded at this time is used when evaluating and reporting. Through formative assessments, teachers gain valuable insights as to how the students are responding to the instructional activities and make changes to the program accordingly. The information gathered about the effectiveness of the program will guide teachers in making appropriate adjustments. In the unit "Not in My Backyard," by York Region District School Board, the rubric for the culminating task is used as a formative assessment strategy and also for evaluation and reporting. The Assessment Map for each of the subtasks provides a graphic representation of the types of assessment used. As stated in the unit, "In order to assess (and evaluate) students fairly, a unit rubric functions as the window through which student achievement is to be viewed and tracked. Each subtask has its own assessment strategies and recording devices. It is important to distinguish between assessments that function in a diagnostic or formative role (feedback to improve learning), and assessment that is used as an evaluation of student achievement. This distinction is highlighted in each subtask and is illustrated on the black line master called Assessment Map." The Assessment Map is included on page 22.

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Not in My Backyard An integrated arts unit for combined grades 3 and 4 Unit Assessment Map

Prior Learning Required

Music elements of music form grade 2-3 beat, rhythm, dynamics, tempo Visual Art Drama facility with creation of 2-D awareness of role play images, cutting, pasting, (in and out of role) use of colour, basic elements of design Dance qualities of movement and levels

Science and Technology -awareness of the variety of earth environments and the plants and creatures within them, familiarity with the three environmental R's: reduce, reuse, recycle. -awareness of some community environmental issues from grade 2/3 air `water' soil topics.

diagnostic assessment

formative assessment

summative assessment

The Culture of a Habitat -ERP Project II

Creating the Illusion of Depth

Shoebox Habitat - ERP Project II

Dance Introduction to the Elements

Looking at Habitats in Art

Muscial Dependence

Responding to NIMBY'S Letter

Visualization: Making the Journey

Planning the Solution

Presenting the ERP Solution

Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Assessment

Welcome to ERP Projects

Movement Inspires

Subtasks

Unit Rubric

K/U

P/C

Analysis

Science

Science Rubric

Comm.

Unit Rubric

Reflection

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Summative

At the end of a unit, term or program, teachers collect data from the variety of recording devices used to measure the student's learning progress in relation to the achievement of curricular grade expectations. It is critical that students know from the outset the criteria upon which their work is to be judged and the purpose of each assessment recording device used throughout the unit of study. In combined grades, evaluation for each student is to be based on the expectations of the student's grade. For example, in "The Great Factory Debate" unit, written for students in Grades 2 and 3 by the York Region District School Board, students prepare an introduction to their presentations. Students in Grades 2 and 3 create and rehearse musical compositions combining sound patterns created in a previous task (2a20A) (3a16 A), while students in Grade 3 also create melodic contour "maps" that indicate the direction of pitches in familiar songs (3a12 A). Teachers provide students with many and varied opportunities to reinforce knowledge and skills through formative assessments before summative judgements are made. Summative recording devices establish the criteria upon which a teacher makes judgements regarding the quality of a student's work. As a result, summative data forms the basis of reporting to students, parents/guardians, and other educators. The Provincial Report Card requires that teachers communicate student learning in relation to achievement of the curriculum expectations and learning skills. Learning skills should be assessed separately from achievement, and therefore should not be included in the determination of a grade or percentage mark. The following diagram, adapted from the Avon Maitland District School Board, describes the reporting of learning skills and achievement for Grades 1 to 8.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Learning Skills and Achievement for Grades 1 to 8 For each student

How they learn?

What they learn?

Learning Skills

Curriculum Expectations

Elementary Learning Skills

Independent work Initiative Homework completion Use of information Cooperation with others Conflict resolution Class participation Problem solving Goal Setting to improve work

Knowledge/ Understanding

Inquiry/ Thinking

Communications

Making Connections/ Applications

Assessed as E - Excellent G - Good S - Satisfactory N - Needs Improvment

Use the Achievement Chart to see HOW WELL students compare to the Provincial Standard

The Provincial Report Card

Achievement of Expectations determines the percentage/letter grade Adapted from Avon Maitland DSB

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Assessment Methods

Assessment methods are the ways in which students demonstrate learning. Essentially, there are three methods of assessment: · Paper and Pencil Tests · Performance Tasks · Personal Communication Attention should be given to varying these three assessment methods throughout a unit of study. Understanding the strengths and uses of the three assessment methods enables teachers to plan and implement purposeful and meaningful assessment activities.

Paper and Pencil Tests

Paper and Pencil tests require students to select responses or provide short answers to a question or prompt. Examples of assessment strategies include fill-inthe-blank, true/false, and short-answer exercises. Strengths of Paper and Pencil Tests · allow assessment of students' understanding of concepts and basic knowledge · provide an efficient method of assessing students' level of understanding of knowledge, of some concepts and some skills

Performance Tasks

Performance tasks require students to create a product or perform in some way. In creating and completing a product or a performance, students integrate and demonstrate knowledge and skills from several areas. Performance tasks are usually hands on, often set in an authentic or simulated context and involve thinking skills and/or problem solving abilities. Because the tasks are complex, teachers can assess the product and/or the processes evidenced in performing the task. Some performance tasks require students to work in a group to complete some or all of the task. Examples of assessment strategies include classroom presentations, exhibitions/demonstrations, simulations or role plays. Classroom Presentation A presentation is a performance that requires students to verbalize their knowledge, select and present samples of finished work, and organize thoughts, in order to present a summary of learning about a topic. A presentation can provide students the opportunity to use concrete materials to express their ideas and talents.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

The criteria for the assessment of the presentation can be developed with the students as a group or with individual students. (adapted from the Assessment Companion,

Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, 2002.)

When could a classroom presentation be used? · when students have organized and summarized their learning · when students need an opportunity to demonstrate their unique talents · when students need to share summarized information with other students Exhibition/Demonstration An exhibition or demonstration is a performance in which a student is actively engaged in a task to show the ability to use knowledge and skills to complete a task (e.g., performing an experiment, demonstrating a skill learned in Physical Education, or playing a musical instrument). A list of performance attributes as well as the assessment criteria are determined and shared with the students prior to the demonstration. (adapted from the Assessment Companion, Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, 2002.) When could an exhibition/demonstration be used? · when students need an opportunity to show a sequence of skills or steps in a process · when students need an opportunity to demonstrate talents and abilities in a variety of ways · when the achievement standard can be shown to other students to assist their learning · when a visual or kinesthetic method for assessment is desired Simulation or Role Play A simulation is a performance assessment that copies a real-life situation or scenario but under controlled conditions. Students demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills in the performance task. When could a simulation be used? · when students need an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills in a correct sequence · when students need an opportunity to demonstrate learning or rehearse for

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

a real-life performance Strengths of Performance Tasks · allow evaluation of complex critical, creative, and inquiry skills · often allow teachers to evaluate process as well as product · allow assessment of all communication skills: oral, written and visual · preferred method of assessing authentic or simulated real-world performances

Personal Communication

Personal communication involves direct interaction between the teacher and the student. Clarification of questions and probing for additional information is immediate. In addition to communicating understandings of concepts, knowledge and skills, students can express feelings and attitudes. Examples of assessment strategies include interviews, conferences, oral questioning, response journals. Interview/Conference In an interview or conference, teachers begin with broad questions and gradually ask more specific and detailed questions. It is important to give the student ample time to respond to encourage him or her to provide a more considered and complex answer to the question. When could an interview/conference be used? · when students are asked to explain their thinking or approaches to solve a problem. In the unit "Art Affects through Artefacts" for Grade 2, written by teachers in the Toronto District School Board, suggested questions for a teacher/student conference include: 1. What techniques and tools did you find most useful? 2. Is there anything that you feel you still need to do? 3. Is there anything that has been a problem?

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Oral Questioning In this method, the teacher is gathering information about student learning. Questions reveal a student's understanding. Answers usually are a small sample of the student's achievement of the curriculum expectations. Questions that address higherorder thinking skills allow students to provide insights to their reasoning and understanding. When could oral questioning be used? ·when immediate feedback is desired about student learning and thinking ·when collecting information about a student's learning progress Response Journal A response journal is a vehicle for student communication with teachers, peers, and parents and includes both factual information and the student's personal reflections. It can include visual representations (e.g., artwork, sketches) and has the potential to be used in all subject areas. The response journal does not emphasize the formal aspects of writing style or correctness, but may still be challenging for students who experience difficulty with written language. It is important to note that the personal nature of a journal and the learner's desire for privacy should be respected. Strengths of Personal Communication Methods · allow evaluation of skills in verbal communication/expression of ideas and insights · allow evaluation of depth of understanding · provide opportunity for immediate feedback

Balancing Classroom Assessments

A balanced classroom assessment plan would include all three methods of assessment. It is important for students to have a variety of formats to demonstrate their knowledge and skill development. It is equally important for teachers to collect information on student learning using a range of assessment strategies.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Assessment Strategies

Paper and Pencil Selected response formats: true/false multiple choice matching fill in blanks Short answer tests/ quizzes Open Ended Testsallowing for knowledge to be applied to a new situation/ problem Responses could include visual organizers,graphs, sketches. Performance Task Classroom presentations Personal Communication Oral Questions/Tests

Exhibitions/Demonstrations Student/Teacher Interviews Simulations/Role Plays Scored Performances Investigations Culminating Tasks Product Creations: editorials, poems, essays, research projects, plays, debates, stories, videotapes, visuals (tables, graphs, art work) Conferences Response Journals Discussions

Assessment Recording Devices

Assessment recording devices are used to score a student's demonstrated learning. Teachers could use a variety of assessment recording devices including checklists, rubrics, rating scales, marking schemes, anecdotal records, and observation charts. Whenever an assessment recording device is used, students need to know the assessment criteria at the outset and have optimum opportunities to demonstrate their learning. Using the right assessment recording device depends on many factors that may include: · the curriculum expectations being assessed; · type of task students will complete;

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

· the category of achievement being assessed; · the learning skills being assessed; and, · whether its use is diagnostic, formative, or summative.

Anecdotal Record

The anecdotal record is a narrative of observations created by the teacher. It is most effective when teachers establish a systematic procedure to collect and record information about each student to inform instructional decisions or describe the student's progress towards achievement of the learning expectations. Teachers regularly collect information about a student's demonstration of knowledge and skills or about the student's learning skills. Teachers carefully analyse this information in order to make accurate judgements about student achievement and learning growth. (adapted from the Assessment Companion, Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, 2002.) When could an Anecdotal Record be used? · to provide an ongoing record of written observations of student progress · when information about student behaviour or non-verbal communication is desired · when data not provided through other assessment tools are desired · to indicate whether a student has effectively completed the series of steps of the performance task or demonstration

Checklist

The checklist is a written list of criteria used in assessing student performance through observation. It may also be used to assess student's written work or other productions, such as oral presentations, art and media works, and models. It lists specific concepts, skills, processes, and/or attitudes that are to be assessed. The checklist is diagnostic and reusable and helps the teacher to chart student progress. Using the same checklist more than once is an efficient way to obtain information about a student's improvement over time. (adapted from the Assessment Companion, Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, 2002.)

When could a checklist be used?

· when assessing student achievement of a sequence of activities · when checking for the presence of certain characteristics or activities in a

student's work

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

· in situations when students may review and evaluate their own work · in student-teacher conferences to record student progress.

In "Safety Minute," a unit created by teachers in the Renfrew District School Board, a teacher checklist is created for a safety poster or pamphlet. The questions are structured to be answered with a Yes/No response. Some of the questions include: 1. Did the student create a poster/pamphlet based on a safety issue studied in the class? 2. Did the student have a creative title for the poster? 3. Do all of the pictures make sense and go with the safety issue discussed?

Learning Log

The learning log is an ongoing record by the student of what he/she does while working on a particular task. It is useful for tracking student work on a project that stretches over several days or even weeks. For example, in the unit "Healthy Choices" for Grades 3 and 4, developed by teachers in the Renfrew DSB, students keep a learning log. Entries would respond to these statements: 1. I learned that heredity affects my body. Here are some examples: 2. Some things can be affected by diet and exercise. Here are some examples: When could a learning log be used?

· when information about a student's opinions, planning, and thinking is

sought Ideally, a teacher sets out the guidelines for the maintenance of the learning log and provides regular feedback to the students.

Rating Scale

The rating scale is based on a set of criteria that allows the teacher to judge performance, product, attitude, and/or behaviour along a continuum. It is used to judge the quality of a performance and can be analytic. Analytic rating scales describe a

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

product or performance in terms of multiple dimensions (e.g., in a writing task the dimensions or criteria that might be rated are organization, mechanics, and creativity). (adapted from the Assessment Companion, Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, 2002.) When could a rating scale be used?

· when helping students to see the important dimensions in their work · when student achievement can be described in varying degrees

In the unit, "Let's Play" developed by teachers in the Peel District School Board, an analytic rating scale (BLM 2.1) is included: Ratings are: Satisfactory; Good; Very Good; Excellent. Criteria are: · Information (name, date, time, place, description, theme) · Elements of Design (three main colours; effective use of space; one or two fonts) · Layout (graphics or decorations support theme; logically sequenced; effectively displayed) · Written Product (correct spelling and grammar)

Rubric A rubric is an assessment tool that clearly outlines a set of characteristics of student work to identify achievement in three or four categories of the achievement chart. Rubrics may be used for holistic and analytical scoring. In the Elementary Curriculum Units Project, rubrics, rather than assessments that require a single response answer, are often used in conjunction with performance tasks. Because of the developmental nature of rubrics, the teacher and the student can see the characteristics of the work at each level of achievement. Task-Specific Rubric A task-specific rubric identifies key criteria by which the student's work is to be assessed and it provides descriptions that indicate the degree to which the key criteria, in this particular task, have been met. A task specific rubric may be used as a diagnostic or formative tool or for summative evaluation. When could a task specific rubric be used?

· when descriptors of student work at each level are clearly defined · when scoring criteria are provided at the beginning of the unit

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

· when students are provided with regular feedback on their progress based

on the criteria of the rubric The following chart shows the difference between the achievement levels charts, and task-specific rubrics. Task-Specific Rubrics

Achievement Charts

·Descriptors refer to achievement

demonstrated over time

·Descriptors refer to specific task ·Used to assess one task

·Used for making summative

evaluations based on a body of evidence

Curriculum policy documents identify four levels of achievement. Achievement at level 3 is achievement at the provincial standard for the grade. Achievement at level 1 is achievement that demonstrates the required knowledge and skills in limited ways. The criteria for describing achievement at each of the four levels should be developed with the students. In combined grades, students in each grade will describe achievement and be assessed based on the expectations for the grade. Depending on the nature of the task, rubrics may be used in combination with other assessment tools and in such a case may have fewer than four categories of achievement. Providing students with samples of student work at the different levels of achievement and giving them opportunities to reflect and describe the criteria help students to identify the characteristics of work at each of the four levels and serve as a guide to their own performance. The rubric indicates what students have to do to reach or exceed the expected standard. The criteria should describe the attributes using clear language. The task-specific scoring rubrics should be introduced early and referred to often to assist students in progressing towards higher levels of achievement. The criteria should be decided before the task is begun and new criteria should not be introduced after students have started. As part of the ongoing development and refinement process of using rubrics for assessment, teachers review and revise the rubric after the assessment and incorporate any necessary changes. The following task-specific rubric is taken from the exemplar document for Science and Technology. In the task, the students were required to make a toy.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Expectations The codes for the expectations are from the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner. Students will: 1. describe the position and movement of objects, and demonstrate an understanding of how simple mechanisms enable an object to move (2s66); 2. design and make simple mechanisms, and investigate their characteristics (2s67); 3. recognize that different mechanisms and systems move in different ways, and that the different types of movement determine the design and the method of production of these mechanisms and systems (2s68); 4. ask questions about and identify needs or problems related to structures and mechanisms and explore possible answers and solutions (2s74); 5. plan investigations to answer some of these questions or solve some of these problems, and describe the steps involved (2s75); 6. communicate the procedures and results of investigations and explorations for specific purposes, using drawings, demonstrations, and oral and written descriptions (2s78).

(adapted from The Ontario Curriculum - Exemplars, Grades 1 and 2: Science and Technology.)

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Understanding of Basic Concepts The student: Expectations Level 1

1 -demonstrates limited understanding of how mechanisms enable movement and changes in direction

Level 2

-demonstrates some understanding of how mechanisms enable movement and changes in direction

Level 3

-demonstrates general understanding of how mechanisms enable movement and changes in direction

Level 4

-demonstrates thorough understanding of how mechanisms enable movement and changes in direction

Design Skills The student:

-identifying the problem/need -describes with limited clarity the challenge of designing and building a model of a toy incorporating simple machines -describes with some clarity the challenge of designing and building a model of a toy incorporating simple machines -lists some of the steps needed to execute the plan (clear observable criteria) (examples given) (positive wording) (more in "Notes to Teacher") -creates a partially labelled plan -clearly describes the challenge of designing and building a model of a toy incorporating simple machines -precisely describes the challenge of designing and building a model of a toy incorporating simple machines

· 4,5

-lists a few of the steps needed to execute the plan

-lists most of the steps -lists in a detailed needed to execute the manner all or almost all plan of the steps needed to execute the plan

-making the plan -creates a minimally labelled plan

-creates a fully labelled plan

-creates a detailed, fully labelled plan

·5

-executing and evaluating the plan -makes a few modifications to the plan as needed -makes some modifications to the plan as needed -makes appropriate modifications to the plan as needed, giving reasons for the modifications -creates a model that resembles the plan, including most recorded modifications -makes considerable improvements to the model -makes appropriate, detailed modifications to the plan as needed, giving reasons for the modifications

·2

-creates a model that resembles the plan to a limited extent -makes limited improvements to the model -creates a model that resembles the plan to some extent -makes some improvement to the model

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Please note: · Expectations reflect four categories of achievement from curriculum document. · Level 1 is still a ."pass" and uses positive statements to describe student work. · Level 4 is significantly above the provincial standard but still at grade level; no new criteria are introduced. Expectations Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4

Communication of Required Knowledge The student:

·6

-makes limited use of appropriate science and technology vocabulary to describe simple machines and their mechanisms -explains with limited clarity how the mechanism or simple machine is used to create movement, including changes in speed and direction -provides a simple explanation of how the toy could be used to improve fine-motor skills

-makes some use of appropriate science and technology vocabulary to describe simple machines and their mechanisms -explains with some clarity how the mechanism or simple machine is used to create movement, including changes in speed and direction -provides a somewhat clear explanation of how the toy could be used to improve fine-motor skills

-makes general use of appropriate science and technology vocabulary to describe simple machines and their mechanisms -explains clearly how the mechanism or simple machine is used to create movement, including changes in speed and direction -provides a clear explanation of how the toy could be used to improve fine-motor skills

-makes extensive use of appropriate science and technology vocabulary to describe simple machines and mechanisms - explains precisely how the mechanism or simple machine is used to create movement, including changes in speed and direction -provides a complex and detailed explanation of how the toy could be used to improve fine-motor skills

Relating of Science and Technology to Each Other and to the World Outside the School The student:

·3

-describes in limited detail similarities between the model and mechanisms and simple machines in real-life objects

-describes in some detail similarities between the model and mechanisms and simple machines in real-life objects

-describes in detail similarities between the model and mechanisms and simple machines in real-life objects

-describes in rich detail similarities between the model and mechanisms and simple machines in real-life objects

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Culminating Task-Specific Rubric A culminating task allows students to apply higher-level thinking skills and the concepts and skills gained through the unit of study. Not all tasks within a unit require a rubric. Sometimes other assessment recording devices are more appropriate. Before creating a task-specific assessment rubric, develop a rich culminating task based on the curriculum expectations. Rich tasks allow students to integrate knowledge and skills in a creative and real-world way. Students have the opportunity to think, plan and solve problems in an authentic manner. Students need related prior experience and knowledge in order to complete the task. Teachers need to use appropriate "scaffolding" to prepare students for the culminating task. Clearly differentiate between learning skills and achievement of expectations when planning and creating a rubric. In combined grades, assessment and evaluation must be discrete for each grade. A separate rubric for each grade must therefore be included, using the learning expectations from that grade. The planning process to develop a task-specific rubric for a culminating task in the elementary units is outlined on the following page in the diagram adapted from Halton District School Board.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Planning Process To Get To the Culminating Task Rubric

Curriculum Expectations List the learning expectations (related to the culminating task). Please Note: The curriculum learning expectations represent: ! what the student will be expected to know and be able to do ! what the teacher will be looking for during the student demonstration of learning Evidence of Student Learning Clarify the picture of the learning by drawing out what the learning looks like. Think of yourself as a detective of student learning. ! outline exactly what student learning is being addressed (i.e., learning expectations and knowledge skill categories.) describe what you will see the student doing and what you will hear the student saying be very specific and detailed about the evidence you will be looking for

!

!

Describe what the student should know and be able to do. What will you see and what will you hear? Answering Demonstrating Presenting Participating

Writing Demonstrating Presenting Participating

!

!

Achievement Knowledge/Skill Categories Connect each of the learning expectations to the appropriate knowledge/skill category (e.g. verb). Please Note: ! the learning expectations should be sorted and categorized into one (or more) of the four main areas ! the levels should be used to help the teacher determine how well the student knows or can do

!

Rubric for Culminating Task Assessment Tool(s) ! marking scheme ! checklist ! rating scale ! rubric

Assessment (Culminating) Task

!

Adapted from Halton District School Board

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

Demonstrating Step 1: Identify learning expectations (approximately four to six) from the categories of achievement in each curriculum document that are addressed in the performance task. When using the curriculum planner, mark the expectations as assessed, in order to put them in the rubric. Often the verbs used in the expectation suggest an appropriate category of achievement. When using the curriculum planner, put the code of the expectation in the appropriate category of the rubric. There will not be enough space to write the whole expectation. The complete expectation is listed above the rubric. Space is limited within the rubric template in the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner. Further explanations may need to be added in the Notes to the Teacher section. In an integrated unit, the learning expectations of each subject area must be identified clearly on the rubric. Step 2: Describe clearly the characteristics/descriptors that would illustrate a product at the provincial standard level of achievement (level 3). What does it look like, feel like, sound like? The number of descriptors may vary. Step 3: Next, describe clearly the characteristics/descriptors that would illustrate a product at levels 2, 1, and 4. Remember that level 1 is still a "pass". Words like "rarely" and "seldom" and "never", although they appear in the curriculum documents, refer to achievement "over time" and should not be used in a task- specific rubric. Level 4 is still at grade level, but the student work demonstrates a grasp of knowledge and skills specified for the grade that is significantly above the provincial standard. The criteria for level 4 remain the same as the other levels. No new criteria are introduced. Step 4: Review the rubric. Check to see that: · Expectations reflect the appropriate categories of achievement from the curriculum document. The following framework may be useful in developing task specific rubrics:

· Criteria describing the student work are clear, observable, measurable, and

are written from a positive viewpoint.

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Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting

· Level 1 is still a "pass", so statements reflect a positive tone. · In level 4, no new criteria are introduced. · Level 4 is still at grade level and achievement is significantly above the

provincial standard.

Planning for Students with Special Education Needs

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Planning for Students With Special Education Needs

This section discusses considerations related to planning for students with special needs. It examines the teacher's role in developing and recording necessary program accommodations, modifications, or alternative expectations. Terminology is clarified and examples are given to assist teachers in writing Individual Education Plans for students with special needs. All students receiving special education programs and services, including those identified as exceptional, should be given every opportunity to achieve the curriculum expectations set out in the Ontario provincial curriculum documents. To begin planning for students with special education needs, it is recommended that the classroom teacher make a list all of the subjects and/or skill areas, for which the student will receive instruction. Each subject and/or skill area should be sorted into the following organizing groups: Accommodated only refers to subjects from the Ontario curriculum that require accommodations only for the student to access the age appropriate grade expectations. Modified refers to subjects from the Ontario curriculum that require the development of modified expectations that differ from the regular grade expectations. The student may also require specific accommodations for these subjects. Alternative refers to programs that assist students to develop skills/knowledge and that require alternative expectations that are not included in the Ontario curriculum.

Accommodated

Accommodations refer to the teaching strategies, supports, and/or services that are required in order for the student to access the curriculum and demonstrate learning. Accommodations do not alter the provincial learning expectations for the grade and reflect what is different from what is provided for the other students in the class. Accommodations are recorded on the student's Individual Education Plan. Instructional accommodations refer to changes in teaching strategies that allow the student to access the curriculum. Environmental accommodations refer to changes that are required to the classroom and/or school environment. Assessment accommodations refers to changes that are required in order for the student to demonstrate learning. Accommodations that provide access to the curriculum and demonstration of learning, without altering the provincial learning expectations for the grade, should always be considered before the decision is made

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Planning for Students With Special Education Needs

to modify the curriculum expectations. If accommodations are in place but the provincial learning expectations for a subject are not appropriate for a minimally acceptable demonstration of learning for the student, the teacher will need to create modified expectations. Modified learning expectations refer to changes that are made to grade-level expectations for an Ontario curriculum subject. They may be drawn from a different grade level, above or below the student's current grade placement. They may also include significant changes (increases or decreases) to the number and/or complexity of the regular grade-level learning expectations. It is not unusual for students to require accommodations to demonstrate learning of modified expectations. Modified Modified learning expectations are recorded on the student's Individual Education Plan. They indicate, by reporting period, the knowledge and/or skills the student is expected to demonstrate and have assessed. Learning expectations are to be written in such a way that the student and parents are aware of the specific expectations that will be assessed for the next report card. They should represent specific knowledge and/or skills that the student can demonstrate independently, given the provision of appropriate assessment accommodations. Teachers should select an appropriate number of expectations that can reasonably be assessed in a reporting period. For Language and Mathematics, teachers frequently choose expectations from a different grade level. For example: A Grade 5 student's math expectations for a reporting period might be:

· Recall addition and subtraction facts to 18 (Grade 3 expectation) · Multiply whole numbers by 10, 100, and 1000 (Grade 4 expectation) · Read and write money amounts using two forms of notation (Grade 3 expectation) · Determine a line of symmetry of a 2D shape by using paper folding and reflections

(Grade 2 expectation) For Science & Technology, Social Studies, Health, and the Arts, teachers tend to change the number and/or complexity of the grade level expectations. For example: A Grade 5 student's Science & Technology expectations for the Human Organ Systems Unit might be:

· Describe the basic structure and function of the major organs in one of the organ

systems

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Planning for Students With Special Education Needs

· Create a visual chart and be able to name the food categories in Canada's Food

Guide

· Explain the importance of daily physical activity

These Grade 5 expectations reflect a reduction in number and complexity from the curriculum expectations. When determining a student's modified learning expectations, teachers are encouraged to select expectations that represent "essential" learning and/or will serve to prepare the student for learning subsequent expectations in the Ontario curriculum. It is also important to remember that the learning expectations reflect what learning will be demonstrated by the student and are a small subset of the academic instruction that will take place during the reporting period. Alternative A few students may require a program made up of alternative expectations for all or part of their program. Alternative expectations are related to skill development in areas not represented in Ontario curriculum policy documents. Examples of such areas include orientation and mobility training, personal care skills, speech and language instruction, and anger management. Alternative expectations should represent a specific program that has been designed for delivery to the student and will be assessed at the regular reporting period. Alternative expectations are recorded on the student's Individual Education Plan.

Health and Physical Education

44

Health and Physical Education

Introduction

Through the Health and Physical Education curriculum, students develop an understanding of the importance of physical fitness, health, and well-being. Students need to understand how their actions and decisions affect their health, fitness, and personal well-being and how to apply their learning to make positive, healthy decisions in all areas of life and personal development. The school environment can profoundly influence students' attitudes, preferences, and behaviours. A balanced Health and Physical Education program enables students to make a personal commitment to daily vigorous activity and positive health behaviours. Students also develop the basic movement skills that allow them to participate in physical activities throughout the rest of their lives. Through a balanced Health and Physical Education program that includes a broad selection of activities, students are given the opportunity to learn, practise, and perform to their full potential. It is important that the Health and Physical Education program motivates students to participate in physical activity. Students want to develop and demonstrate personal competence while also gaining social acceptance and support from their peers and significant adults. Another key motivator for students is that they derive fun from their participation. The enjoyment they experience through the Health and Physical Education program can maximize the positive and minimize the negative experiences related to physical activity.

Characteristics of an Effective Program

An effective health and physical education program is one that:

· evidences the three strands of the curriculum and their respective purposes.

Healthy Living Enables the learner to develop, maintain, and enjoy a healthy lifestyle within a healthy environment. Includes topics on healthy eating, growth and development, personal safety and injury prevention, substance use & abuse Provides the foundation for building the capacity to lead a healthy active life through a variety of lifetime physical activities Includes locomotion/travelling, manipulation, and stability Emphasizes the importance of physical activity and physical fitness Includes physical activity, physical fitness, living skills, and safety

Fundamental Movement Skills

Active Participation

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Health and Physical Education

· reflects the learning expectations of the three curricular strands. All lessons and

activities relate back to the expectations.

· makes students aware of the expectations and engages them in meaningful activities that reflect enduring understandings. Students should be able to state why they are engaged in any activity.

· challenges and engages students. It not only promotes participation in order to

demonstrate personal competence but also builds commitment to leading a healthy active life.

· limits the amount of time in which students are inactive. Students need to be

active during physical activity sessions. By using all of the facilities and resources available (gymnasiums, hallways, classrooms, community facilities, additional equipment), schools can increase the amount of participation and the corresponding benefits to students.

· demonstrates planning and organization in addressing the curricular expectations. Planning needs to be ongoing in order to determine that the skills are developmentally appropriate and suitable for the range of learners. The program should address the uniqueness of learners and allow for the fact that each student develops skills and understandings at different rates and through different methods of instruction.

· provides opportunities to participate in daily vigorous physical activity. The curriculum states: The daily vigorous activity will help the students understand, enjoy, and improve and/or maintain their physical health and well-being as well as display more positive attitudes towards themselves, improved interpersonal behaviour, and a willingness to meet and deal with the challenges of daily life.

(The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Health and Physical Education,p.5)

· highlights safety as an important part of all lessons and planning. Programs need

constant reviewing and updating to ensure that activities are safe and meet the curriculum expectations. There are a number of policy statements that should guide teachers as they plan their program in Health and Physical Education. A comprehensive approach to health and physical education emphasizes the shared responsibility of parents, peers, school, health-care systems, government, the media, and a variety of other institutions and agencies. A meaningful Health and Physical Education program also requires safe, health-promoting environments, support services from the community, and a school curriculum that makes health a priority in the school.

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Health and Physical Education

Planning an Effective Program

Teachers begin developing an effective program by asking basic questions related to curriculum planning. These questions include: What do we want students to know and be able to do? How will we know that students have learned the concepts and skills taught? How will students learn the concepts and skills? To begin to answer these basic planning questions, teachers must examine the curriculum expectations as outlined in the ministry documents. Through examining the overall and specific expectations for each grade level, teachers are able to identify enduring understandings for the students. When planning for a combinedgrade class it is important to use the Learning Continuum to identify the common expectations and enduring understandings for both grade levels. The answer to the question "What do we want the students to know and to be able to do?" is found within the curriculum expectations for each particular grade. In this first stage of planning, it is important to cluster similar expectations to determine the enduring understandings within the program. The next step in the planning process is to relate the clustered expectations to the Achievement Chart and plan relevant and authentic assessment tasks. The assessment tasks created will allow the students to demonstrate to the teacher that they have achieved the enduring understandings identified in the initial stage of planning. It is within the next phase of the planning process that the teacher must decide the appropriate way to organize a unit to ensure that students have opportunities to practice and demonstrate their achievement of the expectations. The teacher plans a variety of teaching/learning strategies appropriate for the unit being taught. The teacher must ensure that the concepts and skills taught are appropriate to students' ages and stages of development, and to their perceptions, prior knowledge, attitudes, learning styles, and exceptionalities. Because there is a strong emphasis on physical activity in the Health and Physical Education program, teachers need to use a variety of strategies to assess the ongoing development of participation and skills. Within the program-planning process, teachers must address how they are going to assess the individual student. Assessment is the process of gathering information about student performance from a variety of sources and providing students with feedback that leads to improvement. The assessment process also enables teachers to ensure that their planning is effective and provides information about where modifications to the teaching/learning strategies are needed.

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Health and Physical Education

Teachers must provide for diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments in their program planning. Diagnostic assessment allows teachers to determine students' prior knowledge or skill level before instruction. The information acquired through diagnostic assessments will provide teachers with information about approaches they need to include or change within their teaching/learning strategies. Diagnostic assessments should not be included as part of the final evaluation of student achievement. Once teachers have completed their diagnostic assessments and employed appropriate teaching/learning strategies, they must ensure that students have the opportunity to practise the skills being taught. Students' practice of skills and the feedback provided during this stage clarify what teacher and student need to do to enable the student to meet the curriculum expectations. These formative teacher, peer, and student self-assessments point to ways in which the student can improve and enrich his or her learning and also achieve the expectations. The last phase involved in program planning is evaluation and reporting. Evaluation involves making a judgement about overall student performance using established criteria for the purpose of assigning a value and communicating results. Summative assessments evaluate whether the student has demonstrated achievement of the curriculum expectations. Teachers are expected to use the Achievement Chart in assessing student achievement. It is important to note that the majority of expectations in the Health and Physical Education program fit into the Fundamental Movement Skills and Active Participation categories within the Achievement Chart. It is essential for teachers to link the expectations to the Achievement Chart during the initial phase of the planning process.

Long-Range Planning

Through long-range planning, teachers determine an effective way to address the overall and specific expectations listed in the Ontario Curriculum documents over the course of the entire school year. Long-range planning assists in the development of a balanced program incorporating a wide range of activities that will meet the needs of all students. It also provides a road map for teachers with a starting point and a finishing point. The specific directions that will be taken throughout the year are determined by the identified focus (enduring understandings) and the availability of facilities, resources, and equipment. A well-developed long-range plan allows the teacher to plan effectively throughout the year and enables him or her to communicate the focus and key components of the Health and Physical Education program to administrators, peers, parents, and students. Long-range planning must identify the enduring understandings by selecting the knowledge and skills that the students are required to demonstrate at the end of either a term or a school year. Once the enduring understandings are identified, the unit planning process begins. Long-range planning ensures that the units that are

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Health and Physical Education

planned provide students with a balanced program throughout each term and throughout the year. It is important to provide students with an opportunity to engage in a wide range of activities that will enable them to learn, practise, and demonstrate the identified knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis. Long-range planning enables both the teacher and the school to coordinate and provide a balance of activities during each term and throughout the school year. Within each term, long-range planning enables teachers to determine a balance between the units taught and the teaching strategies used. Teachers must ensure that overall and specific expectations are taught in each of the four Achievement Chart categories. Effective long-range planning enables teachers to use a balance of assessment and tracking devices to collect evidence of student learning in the four categories. The evidence that is collected over a term should reflect the curriculum expectations and enduring understandings set out at the beginning of the program as well as the Achievement Chart categories. Long-range planning is essential to ensure that there is sufficient recorded evidence of student learning at the end of a reporting period. Long-range planning is essential in Health and Physical Education to ensure the effective use of both school and community facilities. The gymnasium is only one area that can be used to implement the program. Effective long-range planning will enable a teacher or school to use not only school facilities but also facilities in the immediate and wider community to provide students with a variety of experiences to enable them to meet the expectations set out in the Health and Physical Education curriculum. Scheduling the use of the school facilities is also an essential component of the long-range planning process. Schools need to schedule the use of their gymnasium equitably and effectively to ensure the maximum benefit from facilities available at the school. Timetables should be designed to ensure that classes have a number of opportunities to use the gym each week. A process also needs to be in place to allow any unused gym time to be made available to other classes on a weekly or monthly basis. Schools may use other areas in the school besides the gymnasium to support daily physical activity by students. As the Health and Physical Education curriculum policy document states: This curriculum requires that students participate in vigorous physical activity for a sustained period of time each day (p. 5). The amount of time suggested varies from Grade 1 to Grade 8. The chart following outlines the amount of time suggested for each grade level.

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DIVISION

PRIMARY Grades 1 ­ 3 JUNIOR Grades 4 ­ 6

DAILY TIME EXPECTATION

·Students participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity for five to ten minutes.

·Students improve their fitness levels by participating in vigorous

physical activities for sustained periods of time (e.g., ten to fifteen minutes), including appropriate warm-up and cool-down procedures. ·Students improve or maintain their personal fitness levels by participating in vigorous fitness activities for sustained periods of time (e.g., a minimum of fifteen minutes) without undue fatigue.

INTERMEDIATE Grades 7 ­ 8

Long-range planning is needed to ensure that each of the three strands of Healthy Living, Active Participation, and Fundamental Movement Skills is addressed each term. Healthy Living is divided into four key areas: Healthy Eating, Growth and Development, Personal Safety and Injury Prevention, and Substance Use and Abuse. One approach to planning for the implementation of the Healthy Living strand is to teach one area per term for two terms and two areas in the third term. The other two strands of Health and Physical Education should be addressed in each of the terms. Ample opportunities exist to integrate expectations from Active Participation and Fundamental Movement Skills into many of the units. The same overall and specific expectations may be covered in each term. Long-range planning also assists in identifying any relevant cross-curricular connections with other subject areas. Health and Physical education has many natural links with other subject areas. Some of these links are found in the Drama and Dance strand of the Arts curriculum and in the Life Systems strand of the Science and Technology curriculum. Long-range planning assists in identifying these connections well in advance, ensuring that teachers have adequate time to develop the curricular connections among subject areas and plan how to collect adequate information and record student achievement in more than one area. The Learning Continuum for Health and Physical Education can facilitate effective long-range planning for combined-grade teachers. It can enable them to identify both the strong connections between grade levels and enduring understandings that provide a focus for the development of their program and the implementation of their plan.

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Unit Planning

Teachers begin the unit planning process with the overall and specific expectations, which outline what the students are to know and be able to demonstrate at the end of a unit. In unit planning, teachers decide their main focus by analysing the overall expectations and determining the enduring understandings that the students need to demonstrate within a particular unit. Once the main focus of the unit has been determined, teachers begin to cluster expectations that require students to demonstrate understandings related to the main focus. A culminating activity will be created that demonstrates these enduring understandings and also reflects the cluster of expectations that the teacher has selected to address the main focus of the unit. The cluster of expectations helps create the content that students are required to learn in order to complete the subtasks. The clustering of expectations also helps the teacher determine the essential questions that need to be asked in order for students to integrate the enduring understandings. The essential questions shape the content of the unit and allow the students to demonstrate an understanding of the selected expectations. The clustering of expectations into logical conceptual groupings also provides a framework for the individual subtasks. For combined grades, the clustering of expectations should reflect the differences in knowledge and skill between the different grades. For example, in the Grade 4 unit "Our Special Relationships" (Toronto CDSB), the writing team determined that the main focus or enduring understanding was directly related to the importance of developing healthy relationships. From this enduring understanding, the team was able to cluster expectations that related to the main focus of the unit. In the culminating activity, students were to portray a family historian who was asked to gather artifacts representing the importance of relationships within their lives. The artifacts needed to reflect specific criteria outlined in the culminating activity. The clustering of expectations along with the specific criteria helped the writers determine the subtasks and the learning that needed to be taught to prepare students to complete the culminating activity. The Learning Continuum for Health and Physical Education helps teachers of combined grades cluster expectations related to the focus of their units. The strands of Healthy Living, Fundamental Movement Skills, and Active Participation have substrands that are consistent from Grades 1 through 8. When teachers begin to plan units based on enduring understandings, they can cluster expectations and identify the common questions that pertain to a combined-grades class. During the clustering phase of unit planning, teachers consider how to assess and evaluate students. The cluster of expectations determines what part of the Achievement Chart will be used to assess and evaluate. The teacher also considers what it is that students will do within the unit, what the teacher needs to teach within the unit, what the students need to practise, what tools the teacher will use to assess and

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evaluate, and how often in the unit the teacher will assess students' achievement of the expectations. In the clustering of expectations, teachers in Catholic schools select the Catholic Graduate Expectations that fit well within the particular theme of the unit. If, in the planning process, the units for each grade can be related to similar topics, then both grades can be taught the same topics during the same class time. It is important during the planning process to identify the tasks appropriate for each grade and to determine the assessment and evaluation methods for the different grades. For combined grades, teachers need to analyse the curriculum so that they have a clear understanding of the enduring understandings that flow through the Health and Physical Education curriculum for Grades 1 to 8. The following chart lists enduring understandings related to three of the strands found in the curriculum:

Active Participation

Fundamental Movement Skills

Healthy Living

·participation in physical activities on a regular basis

·development and application of movement skills required to participate in physical activities

·understanding and

communication of health concepts

·understanding and

application of fitness knowledge

·application of principles of

movement while refining movement skills

·understanding and

application of living skills

·safe participation

The teacher in a combined-grades class can use these enduring understandings to begin to develop a thematic unit that focuses on one or more of the understandings. For example, a teacher of a combined Grades 4 and 5 may wish to construct a unit around the enduring understandings found in the Healthy Living strand of the program. The following chart shows that there are common themes that exist within this strand that would allow teachers to teach the same strand at the same time but modify the learning tasks and assessment measures according to the grade level:

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Grade 4 Healthy Living ­ Substance Use and Abuse ·identify the major harmful substances found in tobacco and explain the term "addiction" ·describe the short-term and long-term effects of first-hand and second-hand smoke, and identify the advantages of being smoke free ·identify the major harmful substances found in tobacco and explain the term "addiction" ·apply decision-making and assertiveness skills to make and maintain healthy choices related to tobacco use, and recognize factors that can influence decisions to smoke or to abstain from smoking ( e.g., the media, family members, friends, and laws) Grade 5 Healthy Living ­ Substance Use and Abuse

·describe the short-term and longterm effects of alcohol use and abuse

·apply decision-making skills to

make healthy choices about alcohol use, and recognize factors (e.g., the media, family members, friends, laws) that can influence the decision to drink alcohol

·demonstrate resistance techniques

(e.g., avoidance, walking away) and assertiveness skills (e.g., saying no) to deal with peer pressure in situations pertaining to substance use and abuse

Assessment

The primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. Communication about students' achievement should be continuous throughout the school year and should include a variety of reporting methods (report cards, conferences, portfolios, phone calls, informal reports). Teachers must use the descriptors in the four achievement levels (Understanding of Concepts, Movement Skills, Active Participation and Communication of Required Knowledge) as the basis for assessing student work. There should be a variety of assessment methods and techniques employed in order to determine what the students know and

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are able to do. Teachers are expected to identify the most consistent level of achievement and to comment on the strengths, weaknesses, and next steps for each student in their class. Since teachers are required to use the descriptors in the four achievement levels as the basis for assessing students' work, teachers need to determine how the verbs used in the expectations determine the category within the achievement chart. Teachers may wish to use the following chart to identify the verbs that could fit into a specific category in the achievement chart:

Understanding of Concepts

identify, recognize, label, examine, outline, distinguish, define, analyze, relate, determine

Movement Skills

dribble, throw, kick, send, pass, balance, perform, dismount, jump, balance, move, travel, bounce, demonstrate, combine, hit, stop, grip, hang, swing, use, stick-handle, shoot, intercept

Active Participation

use, employ, apply, display, work, follow, demonstrate, stay, assess, participate, implement, improve, maintain, adopt, provide, acquire, incorporate, transfer, monitor

Communication

explain, describe, communicate, discuss, present, suggest

This chart demonstrates that Health and Physical Education is a program in which students should be active and engaged in physical activity for a good percentage of the program. The Movement Skills and the Active Participation categories should reflect this notion. Teachers realize as they are analysing the curriculum expectations that some expectations will be assessed on a year-long basis, others in a variety of different activities, and finally, some in only a single activity. During the assessment phase, the teacher needs to decide what it is that should be assessed while always remembering the basic premise that teachers assess and evaluate to improve student learning. Early tries and diagnostic assessments should not be counted when identifying a students' overall achievement. The teacher will use some assessment strategies only for feedback in order to help the student improve. It is essential in physical activities that students have the opportunity to practise a skill before being formally assessed. Finally, what is evaluated should reflect the curriculum expectations

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and enduring understandings decided upon in the initial program planning. Bridges to Appendices Appendices A, B, C, D, E and F are examples of assessment strategies. Appendices G, H, I are examples of planners.

Student Assessment ­ Movement Skill Checklist

Appendix A

Grade:_______________________ Skill:________________________________ What to Look For: Get-Ready Phase · · · Action Phase

Insert Picture Here

· Insert Picture Here · ·

Follow-Through Phase

· · ·

Insert Picture Here

Adapted from OPHEA Curriculum Support Binders K-10

Student Assessment ­ Movement Skill Checklist Grade:_______________________ Skill:

Get-Ready Phase · Insert Picture Here · · Action Phase · Insert Picture Here · Step forward with opposite leg of throwing arm and turn hips in the direction of the throw Shift weight from back to front leading with throwing shoulder Release ball as elbow straightens Reach behind (close to ear) with throwing arm, other arm out to side for balance

Appendix B

Throwing

What to Look For: Stand sideways to target with eyes on the target Hold ball with fingers Point non-throwing arm towards target

· · Follow-Through Phase · Insert Picture Here ·

Follow through pointing throwing hand towards the target Drop throwing arm down, towards opposite knee

Adapted from OPHEA Curriculum Support Binders K-10

Appendix C

Inside a Health and Physical Education Portfolio

Journal entries related to health topics

Audiotape (e.g., message describing the benefits of regular physical activity)

Conference summary with teacher

A self-created fitness assessment tool

!

" .

Parent/Guardian Responses

Self-assessment related to participation rubric, safety or social skills rubric

Focus: " Student thinking " Growth over time " Health and Physical Education connections " Student's view of himself or herself as a healthy active individual Commitment to daily activity and positive health behaviours, movement skills.

Skill movement photographs demonstrating the ready, action, and follow-through phases

Personal fitness goals

Group activity reflection (e.g., cooperative game)

Test or quizzes

Problem-solving model used for a health topic

Videotape of movement skill used for peer feedback

Appendix D

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION ­ PLANNING

ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORY Knowledge/ Understanding OVERALL LEARNING EXPECTATIONS SPECIFIC LEARNING EXPECTATIONS ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

ESSENTIAL LEARNING

CATHOLIC GRADUATE EXPECTATION

Thinking/Inquiry

FOR CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

Communication

Application

Appendix E

TEACHER REFLECTION

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Lesson: ___________________________

What were the strengths of my lesson/unit?

Date:______________________

_______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ What parts of my lesson/unit could I share with a colleague to assist in the planning and/or development of teaching/learning strategies for this grade level? What could I do to improve on my lesson/unit? _______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ What supports could I seek in order to improve my lesson/unit? _______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ What other resources could I use to support the planning or teaching of this lesson/unit? _______________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Further Comments or Suggestions:

_________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

Appendix F

COMBINED GRADE PLANNER GRADE: _____ Overall Expectation: GRADE: ______ Overall Expectation:

Specific Expectation:

Specific Expectation:

Activity/Resource

Assessment Strategies

Assessment Strategies

Health and Physical Education - Assessment Tracking Sheet Subject: _____________________________________________ Understanding Concepts DATE ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

Appendix G Term: ______

ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES Movement Skills Active Participation Communication of

Required Knowledge

Names

Letter Grade/% Mark

Letter Grade/% Mark

Letter Grade/% Mark

Letter Grade/% Mark

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT METHODS, STRATEGIES, AND TOOLS ALIGNED WITH THE ACHIEVEMENT-CHART CATEGORIES ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES Understanding of Concepts

· · ·

Appendix H

METHODS

PERFORMANCE PERSONAL COMMUNICATION · · · In class discussions Group work Student/teacher conferencing Explanation of skills Demonstration and critique of movement Use of video to identify skill Observation Discussion Student/teacher conferencing In-class questions PAPER AND PENCIL

ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

Presentations Leader - Fitness activities Projects Demonstration locomotion, manipulation, stability Game play Active participation - Fair Play, safety, living skills, decision making, problem solving, conflict resolution, goal setting Presentations ­ dance, fitness, games, etc. Cooperative groups Role play Cooperative group work Presentation · · · · · · · Quiz Test Worksheets Learning Log Quiz Worksheets Learning Log

Movement Skills

·

· · · · · ·

·

Active Participation

·

· ·

Learning Log Scenarios

· · · · ·

Communication of Required Knowledge

· · ·

Observation Teacher/student conferencing In-class discussion

ASSESSMENT TOOLS:

· · · · ·

Observation Checklists Rubrics Self evaluation Exemplar

· · · ·

Worksheets Personal fitnes plan · Open-ended questions · Learning Log Anecdotal comments Marking scheme Contract Peer evaluation

· ·

Adapted from Health and Physical Education, Discipline Specific Training, May/June 2000, Handout #7

Appendix I

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION LONG-RANGE PLANNING SHEET HEALTHY LIVING September FUNDAMENTAL MOVEMENT SKILLS ACTIVE PARTICIPATION

TERM 1 TERM 2 TERM 3

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May June

*List units and resources that will be covered in each of the months of the term under the specific strand.

Language

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LANGUAGE

The Purpose of Language Education

The purpose of language education is to develop literate learners. Literate learners reason, communicate, organize ideas, and apply language conventions confidently, accurately, and effectively. Literate learners have the skills to succeed in every subject area. The centrality of Language learning to success in school and life is affirmed in the following quotes: Language is central to students' intellectual, social, and emotional growth, and must be seen as a key element of the curriculum. Parents, students, and teachers need to understand that language is a crucial tool for learning in all areas. Whether they are studying literature or history, or learning science, students need fundamental language skills to understand information and express their ideas.

(The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Language, 1997,p. 5.)

In planning language programs, teachers should aim to help students acquire varied and correct language through instruction combined with interesting and purposeful activities in reading, writing, and the use of oral language. Because the various language functions are interdependent, teachers will plan activities that blend material from the different strands. Teachers will also emphasize the importance of language skills in the course of instruction in other subjects.

(The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Language,1997, p.6)

In today's world, academic success, secure employment and personal autonomy depend on reading and writing proficiency.

(American Federation of Teachers, Teaching Reading Is Rocket Science: What Expert Teachers of Reading Should Know and be Able to Do, Louisa C. Moats, 1999, p. 5 )

The following diagram overviews the attributes of literate learners and encompasses the essential Language learning skills that are taught and learned in an effective Language program.

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The Literate Learner, Grades 1-8

Reasoning The literate learner reasons with developing independence, consistency, and complexity of ideas. using the knowledge and experience to understand what he/she reads; retelling stories in sequence and identifying main ideas, characters, and story elements; identifying, analysing, and evaluating the main ideas in informational materials explaining how the details support the main ideas and synthesizing information; asking questions and listening to others to clarify ideas; explaining personal interpretations of texts; analysing and interpreting media works; writing and creating a variety of texts in a range of contexts for a variety of purposes; following a process for and developing the skills of inquiry and research.

Organization of Ideas The literate learner organizes information and ideas with developing independence, appropriateness, complexity, and logic, for a variety of purposes and contexts. organizing information and ideas for clarity; organizing information and ideas into paragraphs with main ideas and related details; organizing information and ideas creatively and logically in forms and structures appropriate to the purpose; using the knowledge of the organization and characteristics of different forms of texts and oral communications to improve his/her own reading, writing, and oral communications.

THE The LITERATE Literate LEARNER

Learner

Communication The literate learner communicates ideas and information with clarity and confidence for a variety of purposes and contexts: organizing information in a logical format;

Application of Language Conventions The literate learner applies the conventions of language and text with considerable accuracy, competence, and effectiveness: skimming, scanning, and using context cues to support his/her reading; using correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and usage in writing and in oral communication; applying a writing process; creating effective media works for different purposes; integrating technology into all aspects of the learning process; connecting with the world around him/her.

selecting the language and style best suited to

the purpose;

using various forms of communication,

including narratives, debates, poems, reports, and essays.

Adapted from Reaching Higher, A Resource package To Help Teachers Support Student Achievement In Literacy, Toronto, 2002 p. 6.

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Language

Characteristics of an Effective Language Program

An effective language program is one that is balanced. In a balanced language program, teachers:

· believe that literacy learning is fundamental to a child's success in school and

that every child can learn and progress;

· focus on the learning needs of students in the class; · address reading, writing, word study, and oral and visual communication every

day;

· use teaching/learning strategies that are supported by current and sound research;

· use a range of classroom teaching strategies that include the essential components of reading and writing to, with, and by students;

· use appropriate assessment tools to monitor changes in students' abilities in

relation to their achievement of the expectations, identify what students know and need to learn next, and guide and improve instruction and learning;

· organize students into flexible groupings according to individual needs and

rates of progress;

· provide assistance to students who are performing at level 1 or below on the

Achievement Chart for Language and have not been identified as requiring special education support;

· make a range of literacy resources available to students including a variety of

forms and levels of fiction and non-fiction, a wide variety of media works, and information-technology based resources;

· use audio, video, and information technologies to teach concepts and enhance

understanding; and,

· establish cooperative partnerships among all stakeholders: students, parents,

teachers, administrators, and the community.

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Language

Planning an Effective Language Program

All programming decisions are based on what students know and need to know next in the context of the overall process of building language knowledge and skills from grade to grade. An effective Language program incorporates the following five key areas:

· the curriculum expectations identified in the language strands by grade level; · the needs of the learner as determined by a cycle of on-going assessment; · a balanced literacy delivery model; · integration of language with other subject areas; and, · texts and instructional materials at appropriate levels of difficulty. The Curriculum Expectations

The Language curriculum policy document outlines the overall and specific expectations for each strand in each grade. Teachers can identify enduring understanding for students through a detailed examination of these expectations. When planning for a combined-grade class, teachers can use the Learning Continuum to identify the common expectations and enduring understandings for each grade. The language expectations in each strand are linked to the Achievement Chart. The Achievement Chart identifies the categories of knowledge and skills that are to be used to assess each student's achievement of the expectations in each grade and strand. Oral and Visual Communication It is important to emphasize the role of oral language in language development. During the elementary years, students spend 60 per cent of classroom time listening. This statistic jumps to 90 per cent in the secondary years. Emerging literacy research suggests that the four basic communication skills ­ listening, speaking, reading, and writing - develop simultaneously, and any change in one area influences changes in other areas. If students cannot clearly convey information orally, then they will likely not be able to express themselves clearly in written form. If students are not effective listeners, they will no doubt struggle with critical reading tasks. Weak speakers and listeners tend to become weak readers. Therefore, as a part of the broad foundation upon which literacy is built, oral language must exist as an integral part of the Language program.

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The Language curriculum strongly emphasizes the need for teachers to assist students in developing oral and visual communication skills. To promote success in this area, teachers should attempt to create a learning environment that fosters opportunities for students to: · interact; · express themselves confidently and fluently; and, · interpret media works and employ a variety of media to communicate ideas.

Oral Language Interrelationships

Self-Selected Reading & Teacher Read Aloud Focus: Reading Enjoyment Application of Skills

Supported Reading Focus: Comprehension Vocabulary Fluency Reading Strategies

ORAL LANGUAGE

Word Work Focus: Alphabetic Code Phonics Spelling Decoding Word Analysis Supported Writing Focus: Written Communication Use Form Process

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Language

Reading and Writing

The expectations for the strands of Reading and Writing weave with the expectations of Oral and Visual Communication. The components of effective Reading and Writing programs are well documented in The Ontario Curriculum. The following quotes speak to some of the essential program components: A well-balanced reading program will provide students with many opportunities to read for pleasure, for self-discovery, and for self-enrichment. Such reading activities are particularly important in the elementary grades, when attitudes to and habits of reading are first formed. (The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Language, 1997, p. 27.) Although writing is often used to clarify and express personal thoughts and feelings, it is used primarily to communicate with others.. .Students need ... to learn to select and organize their ideas, keeping in mind the purpose for which they are writing and the audience they are addressing.They also need to learn to use standard written forms and other conventions of language. (The Ontario Curriculum,

Grades 1-8: Language, 1997, p.11.)

Effective integration of all the Language strands requires an understanding of their reciprocal nature, of the literacy continuum, and of appropriate assessment strategies and recording devices. The Needs of the Learner Teachers must identify the strengths and needs of all learners. Learning style and language proficiencies are critical factors teachers must consider in their planning. Assessment is the key to identifying the needs of the learner. A student will be assessed on how well he or she reasons, communicates, organizes ideas, and applies language conventions. For each of these categories, there are four levels of achievement. These levels contain brief descriptions of degrees of achievement on which teachers will base their assessment of students' work.

(The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 : Language, 1997, p.8)

Teachers must plan for a cycle of on-going systematic assessment, using a variety of assessment measures, to gather information about student achievement of the expectations. A language assessment plan should be a component of a teacher's long-range plans and should include diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments that clearly link to program expectations. The plan should identify the appropriate assessment recording devices that will be used to assess what students know and need to know next. Analysis of assessment data is critical to identifying the needs of the learner, and should direct and support program planning for students.

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Diagnostic assessment provides initial data about what students know and need to know next and should not be included as part of the evaluation of student achievement of the expectations. Formative assessment provides ongoing feedback to the student during an instructional unit or a reporting period. Teacher, peer, and self-assessments provide direction to students about what they need to do to meet the expectations. Summative assessments evaluate the student's demonstration of achievement of the curriculum expectations at the end of a particular unit or reporting period. Teachers will use the criteria outlined in the Achievement Chart to make a judgement about the student's level of achievement based on his or her most recent performance, but within the context of his or her overall performance during the reporting period. Teachers may also find it helpful to consult the sample evaluations of student work in The Ontario Curriculum - Exemplars, Grades 1-8: Writing, 1999.

A Balanced Literacy Delivery Model

A balanced literacy model provides students with many opportunities to read and write for pleasure, self-discovery, and self-enrichment. Teachers should use modelled, shared, guided and independent strategies to address reading, writing, word study, and oral communication. Programming must be comprehensive, and must use current and well-researched instructional strategies and materials. To assist in this complex task, a structured but flexible framework is recommended - one that separates and clusters elements for instruction, and builds in opportunities for connection and integration. Four separate but interconnected areas of focus are suggested in the following table: Word Work: with a focus on using and understanding of the alphabetic code Supported/Guided Reading: with a focus on building comprehension Supported/ Guided Writing: with a focus on using and understanding written communication purpose & form, process, conventions Teacher Read Aloud/ Self-Selected Reading: with a focus on motivating students to read and providing opportunities for them to practise reading skills and comprehension strategies extension and application of literacy skills, variety of genres, choice

high frequency words, spelling/ phonics, word decoding/analysis

variety of genres, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension strategies

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Language

Integration of Language with Other Subject Areas

Integration can take many forms. Teachers can plan units that integrate strands within language or they can plan units that integrate language with other subjects. Subject specialist teachers can plan with classroom teachers to ensure that instructional strategies are used to promote literacy across the curriculum. All teachers are language teachers, since language is integral to all subjects. For example, the Grade 5 Language unit, "Life System Magazine" (Renfrew DSB) determined that the main focus was writing techniques as they applied to the Life Systems strand of the Ontario Curriculum Science and Technology policy document. The culminating activity has students producing a magazine using several different types of writing and displaying content from the Life Systems strand. The clustering of expectations allowed the writers to develop subtasks that addressed teaching/learning strategies, assessment strategies, and the needs of the learner in a meaningful way.

Texts and Instructional Materials at Appropriate Levels of Difficulty

The reading program should include a variety of materials, both fiction and nonfiction. Students should read texts of increasing complexity assigned by the teacher as well as materials chosen by themselves... In Grades 1-3, students should read: poetry (e.g., nursery rhymes, chants); folk tales; picture books, alphabet and counting books, pattern books, chapter books, stories such as adventure stories; humour; children's classics; and non-fiction (e.g., biography). In Grades 4-6, students should read: poetry (e.g., lyric, narrative); folk tales, fables, myths, legends; fantasy, adventure stories, mystery stories, science fiction; humour; children's classics; and non-fiction forms such as biography, textbooks and other information materials, and editorials. In Grades 7 and 8, students should read: poetry; myths and legends; narrative forms such as short stories and novels, including historical fiction; classics; nonfiction such as biography and autobiography, reports, short essays and articles, editorials, and advertising copy; plays; and scripts for television or radio.

(The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 : Language, 1997, p.28)

Teachers use available resources when planning the Language program. Texts and instructional materials of appropriate difficulty are necessary to meet the needs of students. However, teachers must prepare students for reading different types of text by introducing features of particular texts and by explicitly teaching the skills needed to work with different types of texts, such as:

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Language

· information texts, · graphic texts, · literary texts.

Introducing Readers to Text

The Reader Genre Layout

Print Features

Points to Consider When Introducting A Text

Language

Voice Main Idea

Vocabulary

Adapted from Reaching Higher: A Resource package To Help Teachers Support Student Achievement in Literacy, Toronto, 2002, p.4.

Teachers must also match students with appropriate instructional levels of texts. Text levels are determined by a variety of components, such as:

· · · ·

book and print features, content, theme and ideas, text structure, language and literacy elements.

Adapted from "Standards, Assessments, and Text Difficulty", Elfrida H. Hiebert, What Research Has To Say About Reading Instruction, 2002, Alan E. Farstrup and S. Jay Samuels, eds, p. 261 - 290.

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Long-Range Planning

Appropriate instructional practice requires planning by grade, division, and school, to ensure that the Language program is well balanced and comprehensive. Before beginning long-range planning, It is essential for teachers to read through the expectations for all the grades rather than just the grade they are teaching. The specific expectations for each grade should be seen in the context of the overall process of building language knowledge and skills from grade to grade.

(The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 : Language, 1997, p.7)

The Language Continuum and the Reaching Higher Continua are useful tools to help teachers of all divisions see the broader picture of literacy development. These continua can be used along with the Language document to ensure that expectations and enduring understandings are addressed at the Primary, Junior and Intermediate levels. See www.reaching-higher.org . In long-range planning, teachers should:

· emphasize the importance of partnership in the learning process among parents,

students, and teachers;

· provide for the learning needs of all students, including exceptional students; · provide instruction in language skills and conventions with opportunities for the

students to apply them across all areas of the curriculum;

· provide direct and explicit instruction and learning opportunities within authentic

language activities;

· include media literacy as a key component within the Oral and Visual Communication strand;

· provide for the direct teaching and assessment of group skills within the language curriculum;

· include tools and opportunities for students to reflect on and take ownership of

their own learning (i.e., metacognitive strategies); and,

· include a focus on employability skills needed for the workplace, especially in

Grades 7 and 8.

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Language

Unit Planning

The Language Learning Continuum presents the overall and specific expectations for Writing, Reading, and Oral and Visual Communication for grades 1-8, in an at-aglance format. Teachers can use the Learning Continuum to cluster expectations when planning for combined-grades classes, looking to address common skill and knowledge expectations. Teachers in Catholic schools will want to select the appropriate Catholic Graduate Expectations to support the particular focus of the unit. Once the main focus for a unit has been determined, the teacher will cluster expectations. For example, in the Grade 7 and 8 Language unit, "TV Morning News" (York CDSB), the main focus is oral and visual communication, but the unit offers crosscurricular assessment opportunities for reading, mathematics, and drama. Learning expectations are clustered sequentially to build on previous knowledge and skills. The clustering of expectations allowed writers to develop subtasks that addressed teaching/learning strategies, assessment strategies, and the needs of the learner. The subtasks prepare students to demonstrate their achievement of the expectations in a culminating activity. Similarly, the Grade 2 Language unit "Classroom Critters" focuses on the development of writing skills linked to the topic Growth and Changes in Animals in the Life Systems strand of the Science and Technology curriculum. Expectations from the Language and Science curricula are clustered to address a student investigation about animals. The culminating task has students writing a report using the information they have gathered and creating a visual presentation in the form of a diorama.

Instructional Strategies

Teachers are responsible for developing a range of instructional strategies based on sound learning theory. They need to address different student needs and bring enthusiasm and a variety of teaching approaches to the classroom.

(The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 : Language, 1997, p.4.)

In planning a balanced approach to the Language program teachers should consider a range of instructional strategies including:

·modeling, ·direct and systematic instruction, ·learning in a meaningful context, ·engaging, multi-level activities, ·discussions,

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· metacognition (thinking about thinking). Intervention Strategies

Many schools will require special programs and other forms of support for students at various stages of language learning. Teachers in all grades will need... to provide the appropriate combination of support and challenge for these students. (The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 : Language, 1997, p.7.) Students experiencing difficulty in language learning can be supported through intervention strategies that are integrated into regular classroom programming. Strategies can include small-group or individualized instruction or daily instruction on a short-term basis. Parental cooperation and involvement is an important component of any intervention program.

Approaches to Intervention

Prevention - to reduce the incidence of reading and writing difficulties.

· In preschool: reading aloud to children in an engaging manner from high-interest

texts

· In Kindergarten: enhancing children's experiences with print emphasizing meaning-making; monitoring phonological awareness and addressing it as needed in large and small-group sessions. Acceleration - to accelerate learning so that students are reading and writing at a level comparable to their peers.

· Classroom Corrective Reading: giving explicit instruction in the context of authentic reading and writing activities; tailoring instruction to student needs using appropriate materials and strategies; providing personalized and small-group instruction;

· Add-on Instruction: giving focused and personalized instruction outside the class

room on a one-to-one basis or in very small groups, using texts of appropriate difficulty, and providing many opportunities to read and write;

· Tutoring: Providing one-to-one tutoring; · Small Group Instruction: providing a targeted small group of students with explicit

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instruction in highly interactive sessions using texts of appropriate difficulty. Longer-Term Support - to maintain on-level literacy development over the long term.

(adapted from, Richard Allington, "Research on Reading / Learning Disability Interventions", in Allan E. Farstap and S. Jay Samuels, eds, What Research Has to Say About Reading Instruction, 2002)

Appendix A: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Writing Assessment Plan Achievement Chart WRITING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

Category:Reasoning ·Use writing for various purposes and in a range of contexts, including school work (e.g., to summarize information from materials they have read, and to Key Concepts: reflect on their thoughts, feelings, and imaginings) ·Uses and purposes of writing ·Produce media texts using writing and materials from other media (e.g., an advertisement for radio or television)

·Revision and editing ·Revise and edit their work, seeking feedback from

others and focusing on the content, organization, and appropriateness of vocabulary for audience Category: Communication ·Communicate ideas and information for a variety of purposes (e.g., to present and support a viewpoint) and to specific audiences (e.g., write a letter to a Key Concepts: newspaper stating and justifying their position on an issue in the news) ·Expression through writing

·Forms of

communication

·Produce pieces of writing using a variety of forms

(e.g. stories, poems, reports), narrative techniques (e.g., first-view-and-third-person points of view, dialogue), and materials from other media (e.g., illustrations)

Appendix A: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Writing Assessment Plan Achievement Chart WRITING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

Category: Organization Key Concept: ·Structure and sequence in writing Category: Application of Conventions Key Concepts: ·Conventions of language (grammar and punctuation)

·Organize information to convey a central idea, using

well-developed paragraphs that focus on a main idea and give some relevant supporting details

·Accurately use graphs and captions

·Use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar,

punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level

·Use noun-pronoun agreement correctly ·Use correct punctuation in final drafts ·Use quotation marks for passages of dialogue ·Use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for

this grade level

·Spelling and

vocabulary

·Use phonics, the meaning and function of words, and

some generalizations about spelling (e.g., many words for occupations end in er or or: teacher, author) to spell with accuracy

·Use the hyphen to divide words at the ends of lines

and to spell compound words (e.g., self-respect) and fractions (e.g., two-thirds)

Appendix A: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Writing Assessment Plan Achievement Chart WRITING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

·Spelling and

vocabulary

·Use a variety of resources to confirm spelling (e.g.,

dictionary, CD-ROM)

·Routinely introduce new words from their reading into

their writing

·Use levels of language appropriate to their purpose

(e.g., informal language to write a letter to a friend and formal language to invite a guest speaker to the school)

·Select and use words to create specific effects (e.g., to

create a mood)

·Sentence type and ·Use simple, compound and complex sentences

structure

·Use phrases appropriately to clarify meaning

(e.g., For someone of her age, she plays the piano very well)

·Proofreading

·Proofread and correct their final drafts, focusing on

grammar, punctuation, and spelling

Appendix B: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Reading Assessment Plan Achievement Chart READING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

Category: Reasoning Key Concepts: ·Uses and purposes of reading

·Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials (e.g., novels, short stories, biographies, editorials) for different purposes

·Reading strategies ·Read independently, selecting appropriate reading

strategies (e.g., adjust reading speed according to the purpose of reading or the difficulty of the piece, make inferences, record key points)

·Select appropriate reading strategies ·Ideas in and

elements of texts

·Describe a series of events in a written work

(e.g., in a novel or a history book), using evidence from the work

·Describe how various elements in a story function

(e.g., plot, characters, setting)

·Thoughts, feelings ·Make judgments and draw conclusions about the

and judgments

content in written materials, using evidence from the materials

·Begin to identify a writer's point of view

Appendix B: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Reading Assessment Plan Achievement Chart READING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

·Inquiry and

research

·Use research skills (e.g., formulate questions, locate

information, compare information from a variety of sources)

·Decide on a specific purpose for reading and select the

material that they need from a variety of appropriate sources Category: ·Explain their interpretation of a written work, supporting Communication it with evidence from the work and from their own Key Concepts: knowledge and experience ·Expression through reading

·Reading aloud

Category: Organization Key Concept: ·Structure, forms and characteristics of materials

·Read aloud, adjusting speed according to purpose and audience

·Identify various forms of writing and describe their

characteristics (e.g., science fiction, biography, mystery stories)

·Use their knowledge of the characteristics of different

forms of writing to help them select the appropriate materials for a specific purpose (e.g., short story, article in a reference book)

Appendix B: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Reading Assessment Plan Achievement Chart READING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

Category: Application of Conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation and style) Key Concepts: ·Conventions of language

·Use conventions of written materials to help them

understand and use the materials

·Use their knowledge of elements of grammar and oral

and written language structures to understand what they read

·Recognize patterns of word structure ( e.g., -ation in

nation, information) to determine pronunciation

·Vocabulary

development

·Understand the vocabulary and language structures

appropriate for this grade level

·Identify root words prefixes and suffixes, and use them

to determine the pronunciation and meaning of unfamiliar words and use them to determine the pronunciation and meaning of unfamiliar words

·Identify synonyms and antonyms · Use a dictionary and a thesaurus to expand their

vocabulary

·Use specialized terms in different subject areas as

appropriate

Appendix B: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Reading Assessment Plan Achievement Chart READING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

·Conventions of

text

·Locate and interpret information, using various conventions of formal texts ( e.g., index, maps, charts, lists, pictures, illustrative figures)

·Use punctuation to help them understand what they

read

Appendix C: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Oral & Visual Communication Plan Achievement Chart ORAL & VISUAL COMMUNICATION EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

Category:Reasoning Key Concepts: ·Uses and purposes of Oral & Visual communication

·Ask and answer questions on a variety of topics to

acquire and clarify information

·Description,

analysis & interpretation of media

·List and describe many of the ways in which the media

provide information (e.g., through news reports, the Internet, documentary films, CD-ROMS)

·Analyse media works ·Elements of Media ·Identify various types of media works and some of the

techniques used in them

·Identify the main characteristics of some familiar media

(e.g., television, film, magazines) Category: Communication Key Concepts: ·Expression through oral & visual communication

·Communication information, explain a variety of ideas

and procedures, and follow the teacher's instructions

·Express and respond to ideas and opinions concisely,

clearly and appropriately

·Demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying

Appendix C: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Oral & Visual Assessment Plan Achievement Chart READING EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

main points and staying on topic Category: Communication Key Concepts: ·Expression through oral & visual communication

·Use tone of voice, gestures, and other non-verbal

cues to help clarify meaning when describing events, telling stories, reading aloud, making presentations, stating opinions, etc.)

·Discuss with peers and the teacher strategies for

communicating effectively with others in a variety of situations

·Creating media

works

·Create a variety of media works ·Create a variety of media works (e.g., a simple multimedia presentation)

·Recognize that media works are composed of a series

off separate elements (e.g., shots in movies; sections of a newspaper)

·Group skills

·Contribute and work constructively in groups ·Speak clearly when making presentations ·Contribute ideas to help solve problems, and listen and

respond constructively to the ideas of others when working in a group

Appendix C: Sample Assessment Plans for Language

Grade 5-Oral & Visual Communication Plan Achievement Chart ORAL & VISUAL COMMUNICATION EXPECTATIONS Overall (italicized) and Specific expectations identified for the Writing Strand INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY How can I teach the expectaHow can I determine the strengths, needs and experi- tions to meet the strengths, needs and experiences of each ences of each student? student? ASSESSMENT MEASURE

Category: Organization Key Concept: ·Structure and Sequence in Speaking Category: Application of Conventions Key Concepts: ·Conventions of oral language

·Communicate a main idea about a topic and describe a

sequence of events

·Use the conventions (e.g., sentence structure) of oral

language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade level

·Use appropriate words and structures in discussions

or classroom presentations

·Use complex syntactical structures (e.g., principal and

subordinate clauses)

·Vocabulary in

speech

·Use vocabulary learned in other subject areas in a

variety of contexts

·Identify appropriate uses for slang and colloquial

language

The Arts

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The Arts

The Purpose of Arts Education

The purpose of arts education is to foster the development of the whole student, to stimulate students' personal growth and to encourage their interest in challenging and relevant issues. The arts provide young people with authentic learning experiences that engage their mind, body, and spirit in activities that promote self-knowledge, insight into human creativity, and the development of a personal voice and enhanced powers of self-expression. Arts education is fundamentally inviting and central to students' growth as learners and positive role models. The following quotes from the Arts curriculum reinforce the importance of Arts education: Teachers must keep in mind that the purpose of the arts curriculum is to give all students the opportunity to discover and develop their ability in different artistic forms and media and to learn to appreciate works of art. (The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8:

The Arts, p. 5).

Education in the arts is essential to students' intellectual, social, physical, and emotional growth. Through the study of music, visual arts, and drama and dance, students not only develop the ability to think creatively and critically, but also develop physical coordination and the ability to work both independently and with others. In addition, the creative and practical work encourages students to express themselves in both verbal and non-verbal ways, and can enable them to discover and develop abilities that can prove to be rich sources of pleasure later in life. (The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8:The Arts: p. 5.)

Study of the arts can broaden students' horizons in various ways. Through the study of the arts, students learn about artistic traditions of their own and other cultures. They develop the ability to communicate in various artistic media, and learn to understand that the arts have long served as important media for recording and communicating ideas and feelings. (The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: The Arts: p. 5).

The Goals of Arts Education

Goals provide the direction for developing a comprehensive program in the Arts in both single and combined grades in elementary schools. An Arts program needs to focus on the strands not only as distinct subject areas, but also as vehicles for integrated learning. The goals of Arts education are:

· to understand the basic concepts of each subject area within the Arts program; · to develop the skills, strategies, and habits of mind required to apply basic concepts in music, visual arts, and drama and dance; and,

· to relate arts skills and concepts to each other and to the world outside the class

room.

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The goals are equally important, can be achieved simultaneously in concrete and practical ways, and are intended to ensure that all students acquire the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need before entering secondary school (adapted from the Ontario Curriculum, Social Studies, History, and Geography, p. 54) .

The Importance of School and Community

When an effective Arts program is in place and working effectively, the whole school community becomes involved. The arts are a vehicle for displaying the learning that happens on a daily basis. By planning a comprehensive Arts program and giving priority to student achievement in the arts, schools can use the arts to motivate all the stakeholders to improve teaching and learning. Performance art communicates feelings of pride and shared achievement to the broader community. Connections to the community that expand students' horizons can be made through studio classes, visiting artists in the classroom, trips to theatres and galleries outside the immediate school area, and use of websites and multi-media resources. Arts education in schools is sustained and rejuvenated through pro-active involvement by community art groups. In districts with strong arts education, the community broadly defined as parents and families, artists, arts organizations, businesses and local civic and cultural leaders and institutions, actively support the arts in local schools.

Characteristics of an Effective Program

The following components contribute to effective Arts programs in schools:

· active parent and community involvement in school arts programs; · involvement of interdisciplinary teacher teams to develop arts; and, · program planning that fosters continuous, sequential learning in the arts.

Benefits of an Effective Arts Program

Arts education benefits students in many ways. An effective Arts program can:

· allow students to discover and explore their own interests and abilities

through investigation of each of the Arts disciplines (drama, dance, music and visual arts);

· help students develop a personal voice through integrative arts exposure and

exploration;

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· introduce students to fundamental principles in the arts through investigation of

humanitarian themes such as the importance of: cultural and racial tolerance, equity issues related to gender, the need to respect personal space and privacy, and the right to self-expression;

· help students meet learning expectations across the curriculum by providing experiences that support different learning styles and utilize a range of skills and abilities;

· provide opportunities for students to think creatively; · stimulate students to make connections that relate to other subject areas such as

history, science, and language;

· foster higher-order thinking skills in critical and constructive analysis, reflection,

and problem solving; and,

· require students to contribute to class activities in positive ways by developing

teamwork skills, verbal and non-verbal communication skills, emotional insight and empathy, imagination, decision making skills, and flexibility. Visualizing a Comprehensive Arts Experience for Students

Drama assists students in developing important problem solving and critical thinking skills.

Drama and Dance

Music

Music develops mathematical and logical abilities.

Visual Arts

Creating artwork develops spatial abilities.

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Research has shown that sustained involvement in particular art forms (e.g., music and drama) is highly correlated with success in mathematics and reading. Facility in artistic expression fosters higher-level thinking skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. For example: The arts are multi-modal, addressing and fostering multiple facets of intelligence.

· Drawing and sculpture develop spatial abilities. · Music develops mathematical and logical abilities. · Dance develops kinesthetic and physical abilities. · Drama develops interpersonal skills.

Program Delivery: Subject-specific or Integrated

In each of the Arts strands, specific skills and concepts are important to overall understanding and application in that area. At times it is necessary to present these concepts and skills in the context of a single strand without reference to other strands or subject areas. However, the arts also make a vital contribution to student success in other subject areas. An integrated Arts program can dramatically improve overall student achievement and motivation in all areas of the curriculum. Not only does it allow teachers to bring greater enthusiasm and passion to their subject matter, but learning opportunities in the Arts commonly challenge students to apply problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Arts education, therefore, is not just about the arts as "pure" art forms: Arts education in our elementary schools ...is not just learning to appreciate the arts or mastering a basic skill, but the releasing of the creative artist in every student. ( W. Pitman, Learning the Arts: In an Age of Uncertainty,

1998, p. 51).

Planning an Effective Arts Program

In planning an Arts program, teachers need to be conscious of the powerful nature of artistic and personal exploration. A balanced, student-centred, and meaningful program provides students with a variety of opportunities to acquire knowledge and skills in each of the Arts strands. An Arts program needs to address a subjectspecific as well as an integrated approach to student experience and enjoyment in the arts. The following flow chart provides a basic template from which to organize globally when planning.

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Curriculum Expectations Knowledge Subject-Specific Continuum Skills

Balanced Program Long-Range Planning Unit Planning

Demonstrated Student Achievement Formative Assessment Summative Evaluation Use of a Wide Range of Strategies

Curriculum Expectations

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: The Arts, contains two main elements: expectations and achievement levels. The program in all grades is designed to develop a range of skills in practical and creative activity in the various arts, as well as an appreciation of works of art. The expectations identified for each grade describe the knowledge and skills that students are expected to develop and to demonstrate in their class work, on tests, and in various other activities through which their achievement is assessed. Teachers use their professional judgement in deciding which instructional methods will best foster the learning described in the expectations. The achievement levels for the arts focus on four categories of knowledge and skills: understanding of concepts, critical analysis and appreciation, performance

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and creative work, and communication. When teachers use the achievement levels in reporting to parents and speaking with students, they can discuss what is required of students to achieve the expectations set for their grade. (The Ontario

Curriculum, Grades 1-8, The Arts, p. 4)

Long-Range Planning

Long range plans can:

· be used to sequence and coordinate activities in all subject areas over the course

of the year;

· provide an outline or road map of topics to be covered, strands to be addressed,

and expectations to be achieved;

· be used to determine the time when units will be delivered. The timing of experiences can make a substantial difference to a student's learning;

· be used to develop a continuum of activities rather than an isolated series of

events; and,

· achieve a balance among the four Arts disciplines (music, visual arts, drama, and

dance) during the course of the year. Varied approaches might include a weekly focus on each of the Arts areas, a quarterly focus, or an innovative integrated plan linked to other subjects. (See Appendix A for a sample template.)

Integrating the Arts

Virtually all subject areas regularly incorporate arts activities to enhance learning. In such cases, it is important that both arts expectations and expectations in other subject areas are addressed. When integrating the Arts, teachers need to plan for the systematic introduction of activities from the arts. They may do this by focusing on familiar arts-based ideas and activities to enhance learning across the curriculum. Art related activities could include:

· designing and drawing covers for reports, and posters for school events; · singing songs about issues, topics, and groups studied; · dramatizing significant events such as a scientific break through, or an important

sports event, or topics linked to relationship or health issues such as peer pressure, bullying, and substance abuse;

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· opportunities for artist residencies, student exhibitions, and student performances

for community audiences;

· utilization of teachers' strengths and interests in the arts; and, · generating an interpretive dance piece that illustrates the story of a family depicted in a history lesson, or that shows how a conflict can be solved in a noncombative non-confrontational way.

Planning for Combined-Grade Classes

Planning curricula for students in a combined-grade classroom requires professional skills. The chart "Combined-Class Planning for Spring Performance Art Event" (See Appendix E) shows one way in which teachers may approach the planning of an arts unit for a single or combined-grade classroom. The focus of the chart is an in-school arts showcase to take place in December, prior to the school break. Each Arts strand is represented, the relevant ministry expectations are outlined, and activities are identified that would provide varied opportunities for formative and summative assessment and evaluation.

Unit Planning

In unit planning, teachers begin the planning process by identifying the overall and specific expectations the unit will address. These outline what students are to know and be able to demonstrate by the end of the unit. Teachers then define the main focus of the unit by analysing the expectations to determine the unit's key, big ideas/ enduring understandings. Further steps in unit planning include:

· clustering expectations and identifying possibilities for integration with other subject areas (e.g., Can the unit theme be expanded into activities in other subject areas?) ;

· selecting activities that are engaging, challenging, and offer a component of risk

taking and problem solving;

· selecting activities that are appropriate to the grade and to students' varied learning styles and skill levels;

· determining what types of accommodation need to be made to the physical space

of the classroom for the unit to be carried out;

· determining what types of assessment strategies and recording devices will be

used as evidence of learning;

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· determining how much time students will need to understand concepts fully and

develop the required skills; and,

· determining if there are appropriate and sufficient resources and materials available to carry out the unit. (See Appendix B 1,2,3 and 4 for sample unit plans.)

Planning a Unit for a Combined-Grade Class

Approaches for teaching combined grades in the Arts are similar to those for other subjects. These may include:

· identifying common themes shared by both grade levels. Examine links to other

subject disciplines if using integration. (e.g., using "the seasons" as a common theme allow integration with social studies and science);

· examining the continuum of overall and specific expectations from the lower

grade to the higher grade to determine common content that can be taught to both grades at the same time (e.g., Visual Arts Grade 5: colour-identify three pairs of complementary colours; Grade 6: colour- identify colour relationships using a basic colour wheel);

· identifying different levels of complexity within the common theme for each grade;

and,

· scheduling a combination of distinct and collaborative activities in grade group

ings with the aim of producing a common end result. For example in Drama, the Grade 1 group could present a tableau based on a current event while the Grade 2 develops character roles based on the same topic. When the groups come together they use their different approaches to present on the same theme. The following chart shows possible thematic extensions of two Arts units developed using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner for combined grades. Grades 5/6 Title Stages on Stage: Drama for Healthy Living Not in My Backyard Arts Strands Drama and Dance All strands Related Subject / Theme Health / Bullying and relationships with peers Science and Technology / Natural environments and habitats

3/4

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The Arts

Planning an Integrated Unit

In an Arts education integrated curriculum, different strands in the Arts and/or other subjects are brought together into a larger unit. This type of curriculum may be created through thematic teaching or the use of small units of study that relate different subject areas to each other. An Arts integrated curriculum is as academically rigorous as a general curriculum. In planning units of study, teachers can combine clusters of expectations from one or more strands or subject areas, based on aspects that the two areas have in common. For example, there are observable similarities between concepts that are central to visual art and music. Visual Art Elements: shape, colour, form, space, texture, size Principles: positive/negative, repetition, variety, contrast Music Elements: rhythm, pitch, sound quality (timbre), dynamics Principles: repetition, contrast, pattern Similar concepts may also link the study of dance and drama. Dance Elements: body, space, time, energy, relationship Principles: pattern, repetition, contrast, narrative Drama Elements: character, focus, setting, plot, tension Principles: repetition, contrast, narrative In the initial stages of integrated curriculum design, teachers should start with units that integrate no more than two or three subject areas. Trying to stretch units to cover too much of the curriculum or too many subjects at one time may produce weak units. Teaching and assessment strategies for an integrated unit should give equal emphasis to each of the subject areas.

Summary: Planning an Integrated Unit · Start small. · Review the expectations for each subject area to find common elements

themes, ideas, or concepts.

· Plan, reflect, and adjust the unit. · Create a workable time schedule for the unit. · Make time to review the unit to discuss strengths, weaknesses, and lessons

learned, and adjust accordingly.

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An Integrated Approach: Social Studies and The Arts

Arts Ministry Expectations Activities Social Studies Ministry Expectations

VISUAL ARTS Critical Thinking Compare works from various periods and cultures, and describe how the artists have used the elements and principles of design (e.g., compare headdresses and masks by traditional artists and others). Creative Work Produce 2 and 3 dimensional works of art. DRAMA/ DANCE Creative Work Explain the function of masks, and use masks in their drama and dance presentations. Storytelling Interpret and communicate legends and stories to be used with mask dramatizations. Mask Making Research the various uses of masks. Create a 3 dimensional mask based on a myth and/or character.

SOCIAL STUDIES Understanding Concepts Describe the relationship between people and their environment (e.g. with respect to food, shelter and traditional practices). Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills Use appropriate vocabulary (e.g., social, political, economic, explorers, contributions) to describe their inquiries and observations. Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills Locate relevant information about the relationship between the environment and lifestyles, using primary sources (e.g., interviews, field trips) and secondary sources (e.g., maps, illustrations, print materials, videos, CDROMs). Applying Concepts and Skills Identify the contributions of people to the political and social life of Canada (e.g., in music, art, politics, literature, science) and/ or the world.

MUSIC Creative Work Create musical compositions that show appropriate use of various elements of music and perform them. Traditional music making Create musical sounds using created instruments and traditional percussion instruments that complement sounds in the performance of the mask drama.

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Assessment in the Arts

In the Arts, particularly in the areas of performance or production, a wide variety of solutions, answers, or interpretations may be acceptable or "right." Because Arts subjects may be less oriented towards objective facts and definitive answers than other disciplines, accurate assessment of student achievement presents some challenges for teachers. Broad criteria to guide assessment are provided in the Achievement Chart for the Arts, which describes degrees of student achievement in four areas: Knowledge/Understanding, Communication, Analysis, and Creative Production. Sub-criteria related to these areas can be developed based on questions such as the following:

· Is the student willing to search out and explore new ideas? · Does the student investigate various solutions to problems? · Does the student use terminology/vocabulary appropriate to the subject area? · Has the student developed an increased level of skill? · Is the student able to relate Arts learning to other subject areas?

In applying these criteria, teachers should examine a wide variety of student activities, products, and processes to ensure that students have sufficient opportunities to demonstrate learning in the different categories.

Activities, Processes, and Products: The Portfolio

A portfolio is a purposeful collection of information about a student's work that provides a record of the students efforts, progress, and achievement in one or more areas over a period of time. Formats for Arts portfolios can be paper, video or audio tapes, or computer disks, depending on the nature of the art genre, the amount of technical support available, and the type of storage in the classroom. Portfolios typically contain a student's choice of his/her best pieces, as well as a self-evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the pieces. Portfolios may also contain one or more works-in-progress. Portfolios often include many other types of information, such as:

· observational/anecdotal records; · checklists; · various types of journals and learning logs;

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The Arts

· reading logs; · essays and reports; · samples of poetry and creative writing; and, · audio or visual tapes.

Portfolios provide a record of the activities undertaken over time in the development of a product. They show where a child has been and what he/she has accomplished during the assessment period. Portfolios are a valuable assessment tool because, as representations of classroom based performance, they can be fully integrated into the curriculum. They supplement rather than take time away from instruction. Samples of student's work collected over time can provide a more meaningful measure of student performance than a single report-card grade. Individual portfolios will be used in conjunction with report cards to communicate student achievement to parents to demonstrate achievement in the different categories.

Assessment Strategies

In addition to examining varied types of student work, teachers should use a variety of assessment instruments to accommodate the different ways in which students demonstrate learning. Assessment strategies can include:

· quizzes and questionnaires; · teacher/student goal-setting conferences; · student self-evaluation; and, · rubrics cooperatively developed by teacher and students.

(See Appendices C1, C2, C3, and C4 for assessment samples.)

Formative Assessment and Summative Evaluation

Formative assessment provides ongoing feedback to the student during an instructional unit or reporting period. Its primary purpose is to keep the teacher informed about the student's day-to-day progress in order to adjust strategies and improve student learning. Summative assessment evaluates the student's performance at the end of a reporting period, but should take into account the student's overall performance during the reporting period. When preparing to assess and evaluate students in the Arts, teachers should consider using a "design down" model to plan for assessment and evaluation.

80

The Arts

(See Appendix D for an overview of assessment and evaluation design.) This model illustrates a global approach to evaluating student work in the arts, based on evidence that assessment of a single activity in isolation gives an unreliable picture of student achievement. Rather, assessment should be continuous throughout the year, allowing teachers to assess students' learning skills, and providing a body of data to support an informed judgement about the level of each student's overall achievement.

Classroom Management in the Arts

The focus on creativity and personal exploration that is central to the Arts curriculum makes it important to give students a positive learning environment that encourages them to try new things, take risks, and cooperate with others.Teachers should use a variety of classroom management strategies to provide such a supportive environment. Classroom management in the arts classroom or arts studio requires the efficient management not only of a variety of materials, processes, seating and storage, but sometimes of valuable equipment. The following suggestions may assist teachers in making an effective management plan for an Arts program.

Advanced Planning

Prepare ahead for arts activities by:

· making sure classroom materials and handouts are ready before the start of

class;

· dividing the class into small groups or teams of students (e.g., cooperative teams:

role-based groups such as actors, production, stage crew, painters);

· teaching students correct techniques for performing simple tasks required by an

activity (e.g., how to clean a paintbrush or stack paper materials).

Management · Remove obstacles and rearrange furniture and equipment to avoid any congestion.

· Develop a room plan that includes storage areas, work areas, centres, and activity areas.

81

The Arts

Safety · Stress safety awareness related to the proper handling of materials, respect for

others space, and furniture restrictions.

Flexibility · In the Arts program, students need an atmosphere that encourages them to explore and create. A flexible approach to lesson delivery will encourage students to participate constructively and respond imaginatively to the learning opportuni ties provided.

Discipline and Behaviour

Ask students to assist you in creating rules for classroom conduct. Keep the rules simple and direct. Create realistic and appropriate consequences for not following the rules.

Appendix A

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UNIT PLANNING SHEET

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Appendix B2

START

Determine the specific purpose for the unit and select a cluster of expectations. Decide on a starting point, and then plan a sequence of learning experiences. Assess results.

UNIT PLANNING

EXPECTATIONS

1 2 3 5 4 6

* Review Catholic Graduate Expectations to provide a context for the learning experiences (Catholic Schools only)

7

Visual Arts Planning

Appendix B3

I

·

KNOWLEDGE OF ELEMENTS

ELEMENTS FOR ORGANIZING-DESIGNING-COMPOSING COLOUR TEXTURE SPACE LINE VALUE LIGHT SHAPE (FORM, MASS) PRINCIPLES FOR ORGANIZING-DESIGNING-COMPOSING UNITY-COHESIVENESS-BALANCE-HARMONY-REPETITION EMPHASIS-DOMINANCE-AREA OF FOCUS-CENTRE OF INTEREST-TENSION REPETITION-RHYTHM-PATTERN VARIETY-CONTRAST-DECORATION

· · · · ·

WHAT

II CRITICAL THINKING

TOPICS AND THEMES · · · · PERCEPTUAL AWARENESS PERSONAL AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION AWARENESS OF MEDIA APPRECIATION

WHY

III

· · · · · · · ·

CREATIVE WORK

VISUAL ART FORM DRAWING PAINTING SCULPTURING PRINTMAKING CRAFTS AND ASSEMBLAGE SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES USE OF MATERIALS

HOW

Appendix B4

TEACHER REFLECTION ­ THE ARTS

Reflections on my lessons/units in:

Music ____________________________ Visual Arts ________________________ Drama/Dance ______________________

What was successful in my classroom?

(space, pace, organization, student response, unit planning)

_____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ What would I like to see changed in the execution and/or assessment of the lessons?

(resources accessed, grade applicability, flow of lesson, rubric relevance)

_____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ What changes are needed to ensure a more accurate assessment?

(revamping lesson focus, changing amount of material, direction of assessment)

_____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ What other ideas do I want to employ in future long-range and unit planning?_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Next steps: curriculum connections and technological links _________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

Notes: ______________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

Appendix C 1

SEQUENCE PLAN

EXPECTATIONS ACTIVITY MEDIA TECHNIQUES DESIGN ELEMENTS

NEW VOCABULARY

TOPIC

AWARENESS (HISTORY, AESTHETICS)

1

2

3

4

Student Evaluation: Note:

Appendix C2 EVALUATION TRACKING SHEET

SUBJECT_____________________________________ STUDENT NAME_______________________________ GRADE_______________

COMMUNICATION UNDERSTANDING

DATE

UNIT

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION

MOST CONSISTENT LEVEL OF ACHIEVEMENT

OVERALL ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL:______________% MARK__________________

PERFORMANCE

CRITICAL ANALYSIS

LEVEL

Appendix C3

Checklist for Stomp Composition

Check to see which of these elements are, or are not, included in your composition.

YES Does each bar have the equivalent of 4 beats? Is there repetition involved in the rhythm? Is there layering involved in the piece? Are dynamics employed successfully in the piece? Is the score set up in the proper format? Are there movements and visual elements employed in the final performance? Is proper performance etiquette adhered to? (deportment) Has each player memorized his or her part?

NO

Stomp ­ Video Assignment

Name: ______________________________________

1. Describe your favourite "scene":

2. How were the different "instruments" played to create different tones, and dynamics?

3. How were "patterns" used to create "songs"?

4. How were dynamics used to "shape" the music?

5. Discuss the role of choreography in the production.

Appendix C4

Folk Song Assignment Checklist

Name:______________________________

Use this checklist to see if you've covered all the bases in preparing your presentation and written assignment. Check off whether you've clearly and completely presented all the information, or not. If you have not addressed a concept clearly and completely, you have more work to do!

Concept

origins of the song method of communication of song (has it changed? evolved?) notation of the song (is it written down anywhere?) meaning of the song importance of the song significance and function of the song in a historical and cultural context musical elements of the song form harmony timbre texture rhythm dynamics artistic choices you made song performance improvisation (any?) classification/song type ensemble or solo is it a good example of a folk song from that country? voice quality instrumentation do the instrumental parts support the music? How? similarities and differences to other songs studied in class

Yes

No

To fully understand these concepts, you should consider expanding on the areas that you have not checked off "Yes."

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Appendix E

Combined Class Planning for Spring Performance Art Event

Clustering expectations to allow for practical implementation and theoretical design.

Drama/Dance

Knowledge of Elements

Creative Work

· speak in role as characters in a story, assuming the attitude and gestures of the people they are playing (e.g., as a courtier, bow to the king and use appropriate language when speaking to him); · use language and non-verbal means of communication effectively for a variety of purposes both in and out of role (e.g., explain why a character in a story or drama should not leave home);

Critical Thinking

· compare, while working with others, some possible solutions to problems identified through drama and dance (e.g., finding the way home when lost in the forest); · identify specific aspects (e.g., movements, words) of their work and that of others that were effective (e.g., the scary way the dancer stopped and turned).

Grade 2 Expectations

· identify and use some key elements of drama and dance in exploring source materials (e.g., move at different speeds and different levels to music or to the words of a poem); · describe their own and others' work, using drama and dance vocabulary (e.g., identify the tableau as a way of crystallizing a moment of importance in a story);

· recognize and demonstrate movement sequences used by · interpret songs, music, poetry, or specific characters or found in images, using elements of their natural surroundings (e.g., movement (e.g., rhythm, space). the sequence of movements of a knight donning armour; the sequence of movements of a butterfly emerging from a cocoon);

Related / Suggested Activities

·Performance art and presentation ·Vocal work and enunciation ·Memorization techniques

Knowledge of Elements

· describe their own and others' work in drama and dance, using appropriate vocabulary (e.g., character, suspense, rhythm);

·Body movement and choreography ·Cooperative group work

Creative Work

· create works of drama and dance, using appropriate elements (e.g., rhythm, form); · · communicate, through movement, their thoughts and feelings about topics studied in other subject areas (e.g., create a movement sequence to express their fear of an environmental event such as a storm);

Critical Thinking

· identify effective uses of drama and dance elements in perform ances (e.g., form, space, pattern, energy) and compare their own responses with those of their peers; · solve artistic problems in drama and dance in cooperative work groups (e.g., discuss the effect of combining different voices in choral reading; discuss the effects of using one dancer or several to convey a message);

Grade 3 Expectations

· demonstrate the ability to concentrate while in role in drama and dance (e.g., during an improvisation; while performing a dance); · recognize and choose appropriate elements of movement for dramatizing their responses to different stimuli or ideas (e.g., real-life situations, the scientific concept of magnetic force); · identify technological means of creating different effects (e.g., the use of recorded music or lighting to heighten suspense); · distinguish between a variety of dance forms, using specific criteria (e.g., steps, music, costumes).

Appendix E

Combined Class Planning for Spring Performance Art Event

Music

Knowledge of Elements

· identify rhythmic patterns (e.g., clap the pattern of syllables in nursery rhymes); · distinguish between beat and rhythm in a variety of pieces of music; · reproduce specific pitches in calland-response activities (e.g., singing games);

Creative Work

· create simple patterned movement to familiar music, using their knowledge of beat and rhythm; · using simple, familiar songs in tune in unison;

Critical Thinking

· recognize that mood can be created through music (e.g., in a work such as Carnival of the Animals by Saint-Saëns); · recognize and explain the effects of different musical choices (e.g., slow music that is loud can be dramatic or ceremonial whereas slow music that is soft can suggest thoughtfulness).

· Vocal / choral work · Instrumentation and performace in music making

· Sound effescts and "formal" music · Use of technology and electronic music

Knowledge of Elements

· identify the beat, rhythm, melodic contour (or shape), dynamics, and tempo in familiar pieces of music;

Creative Work

· create melodic contour "maps" that indicate the direction of pitches (higher, lower) in familiar songs (e.g., "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star"); · indicate, with appropriate arm movements, the dynamics heard in familiar music (e.g., big movements for loud passages, small movements for soft); · using expressively, showing awareness that changes in volume or speed can help to convey the meaning of the text;

Critical Thinking

· identify the feelings that are evoked by a particular piece of music (e.g.,s by Sergei Prokofiev); · identify and explain the effects of different musical choices (e.g., the effects of choosing specific instruments).

Appendix E

Visual Arts

Knowledge of Elements

· identify the characteristics of symmetrical shapes and forms (e.g., show that all sides of square objects are the same in length); · describe different ways in which a variety of art materials, tools, and techniques can be used (e.g., construction paper can be fringed with scissors, used as a background for paintings, cut into shapes to make pictures), and demonstrate understanding of their safe and proper use.

Creative Work

· identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own and others' art work, and explain their choice (e.g., "I did a good job of cutting out the circles. Next time I will choose a background colour that makes the circles stand out more").

Critical Thinking

· describe the relationship between an art work and their own experiences (e.g., explain how the images used by an artist to represent winter are similar to or different from images that they would use to depict their own experiences of winter).

·Set design and construction ·Painting techniques and perspective art

·Program design ·Advertising posters

Knowledge of Elements

· recognize and name the warm (red, orange, yellow) and cool (purple, green, blue) colours, and describe their emotional impact (e.g., a warm colour scheme may make people feel warmer); · use art tools, materials, and techniques correctly to create different effects (e.g., paint with a sponge to create an open, airy feeling in a work; apply paint thickly with a brush to suggest heaviness).

Creative Work

· solve artistic problems in their art works, using at least three of the elements of design specified for this grade (e.g., describe why they placed objects in the foreground, middle ground, or background); · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own and others' art work (e.g., the need to have better control in using paints).

Critical Thinking

· explain how the artist has used the elements of design to communicate feelings and convey ideas (e.g., show that the artist has placed certain objects in the foreground of a picture to convey the idea that they are important);

Suggestions for Using the

Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

Suggestions for Using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner is an innovative CD-ROM that helps teachers to implement the Ontario curriculum by: · giving them access to a compendium of resources, including all curriculum expectations from Kindergarten to Grade 12, assessment policy, and best practices; and · enabling teachers at all levels of experience to design, share, adapt, and manage excellent plans, units, and course profiles for classroom use. Since the same application is available to all teachers in publicly-funded Ontario schools, the Planner, together with its website at www.ocup.org, supports interaction among teachers in a consistent way throughout the province.

The Elementary Curriculum Units Project Phase II

To help elementary teachers in single and combined-grade classes to use the Planner effectively to design and adapt units of instruction, the following section provides five selected documents: Making the Most of the Planner's Authoring Environments Guide for Designing a Unit in the Outliner Environment Guide for Designing a Unit in the Lite Environment Guide for Designing a Unit in the Open Environment Help and Training for the Planner 2 6 12 25 39

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Making the Most of the Planner's Authoring Environments

Teachers asked for different ways to design a unit that would meet their immediate and long-term planning needs. Some felt that time is the key concern. Some focussed on the on-screen format. Others wanted the complete range of options for individual and team planning. For ease and flexibility, the Planner provides three templates or "environments." Use the following information to select the environment that best suits your task. Then follow the Guide to Designing a Unit for the environment chosen.

Outliner L i te Open

The Outliner Environment provides a concise, two-page framework, in an 8½ x 11 landscape layout. In this environment, you move between the two pages using the tabs at the top. Add data with the "+" symbol and fill in the text fields. The Lite Environment provides a focused WYSIWYG ­ what you see is what you get ­ framework, in an 8½ x 11 portrait layout. Move among the pages using the tabs on the right. Add data with the "+" symbol and fill in the text fields. The Open Environment provides a spacious framework and maximum design options. Move through the environment using the sectional tabs at the top and the sub-sectional buttons on the left. Add data with the "+" symbol and fill in the text fields.

Each environment offers you options as outlined in the chart below:

Options

Subtasks Expectations Per Subtask Teaching/Learning Strategies Groupings Assessment Strategies Recording Devices Number of Resources Length of Unit

Outliner

5 6 3 3 3 3 15 per unit 2 pages in total

Lite

unlimited 8 3 3 3 3 17 per subtask ~10 pages + 2 pages per subtask

Open

unlimited unlimited 5 5 5 5 unlimited expands to fit contents

Remember: you can "convert" an Outliner unit to a Lite or an Open unit, or a Lite unit to an Open unit. Text automatically goes from your original environment into the appropriate field of the new environment so you don't have to start from scratch.

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The Outliner Environment

You can make the most of the Outliner Environment by using it to: Start small! Organize current lessons Save time right away Create a snapshot Find and click Copy previous work Create and list resources Use a daybook approach Record ideas concisely in a framework that gets you started or becomes a placeholder for future work. Gather and group your lessons and activities into subtasks and units by grade, subject, and course. Design a unit quickly from a library of expectations, teaching/ learning and assessment strategies, and sample units. Get instant help along the way. Make a visual record of your unit and its subtasks for class reference. Share your outline with colleagues and parents. Identify expectations by subject or keyword. Click to add ideas from a databank of strategies and resources. Copy text (e.g., from previous files) into any text field or the Scrapbook (click the pencil symbol on the top menu). Pointform notes work best in this environment. Create handouts for a unit or subtask. Make a short bibliography of resources using handy, consistent templates. Record the length of time for each subtask to fit a timetabled slot (e.g., the length of a class period in a five-period week cycle). For additional clarity, you could name each subtask Day 1: (+Name of Task), Day 2: (+Name of Task), etc. The Planner automatically saves your unit in the Planner Library ("My Work"). Export it to your desktop and copy it to a transportable format (e.g., floppy disk). Print, preview, and publish a draft or finished unit in an attractive, economical two-page format. Convert your Outliner-based unit upwards to the more complex Lite and Open environments for further development.

Save electronically Print, preview, and publish Convert

The Outliner Environment is not suitable for · including unlimited subtasks, expectations, strategies, or resources; · writing detailed descriptions in the brief text fields available; · using advanced Planner features (e.g., re-ordering subtasks, noting Considerations).

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The Lite Environment

You can make the most of the Lite Environment by using it to: Build up! Develop unit plans Save time presently Create a summary Find, click, and describe Extend previous work Create and sort resources Manage each unit's components Save and send Enlarge ideas in a "what you see is what you get" template. Use a variety of Planner design features to plan units (e.g., beginning with expectations; cycling through different fields). Design a unit using twelve convenient buttons at the right of every page that lead directly to planning elements (e.g., expectations and strategies). Check your work along the way. Make a detailed summary of your unit and its subtasks. Share any or part of the details with colleagues and parents. Identify expectations by subject or keyword. Add and summarize teaching/ learning and assessment strategies and key ideas from the Planner's Teaching Companions. Rearrange subtasks or copy them from another unit. Use the prompt text in each field to challenge and extend your ideas. Short sentences work best in this environment. Create handouts for a unit or subtask. Make a medium-sized bibliography of resources using handy, consistent templates. Store each unit (e.g., electronically or in a binder) for convenient access. Get access to the individual sections of the unit (e.g., unit expectations, subtasks, resources). The Planner automatically saves your unit in the Planner Library ("My Work"). Export it to your desktop and send it to a colleague in a zipped format (e.g., email attachment). Print, preview, and publish a draft or finished unit in an attractive format of 10+ pages (two pages per subtask). Convert your Lite-based unit upwards to the more complex Open environment for further development.

Print, preview, and publish Convert

The Lite Environment is not suitable for · including unlimited expectations, strategies, or resources; · writing lengthy descriptions that exceed the size of visible fields; · creating either a quick outline or a comprehensive unit.

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The Open Environment

You can make the most of the Open Environment by using it to: Think big! Extend unit plans Save time eventually Develop ideas fully in a template that makes the most of all elements of the planning process. Develop your unit comprehensively by describing a full range of strategies. Explore sample Open units on CD or the Planner web site to get new ideas. Design a unit using clear tabs and buttons that lead directly to a comprehensive set of planning elements. Get help when you chose. Complete fields in the order that best suits your task. Make a detailed plan of your unit and its subtasks that is ready to share, in whole or in part, with colleagues and parents. Identify expectations by subject or keyword and describe teaching/learning and assessment strategies in greater detail. Add key ideas from the Planner's Teaching Companions and elaborate on cross-curricular planning considerations. Create a full electronic library of your best work. In this environment, text boxes expand to fit your contents. Create and attach handouts for any activity. Make an unlimited bibliography of resources using handy templates. Coordinate units for a whole term or year using the Planner's Program/Profile environment. The Planner automatically saves your unit in the Planner Library ("My Work"). Send the unit to colleagues in a zipped format and collaborate online to develop its components. Print, preview, and publish a draft or finished unit in an attractive format that accommodates the length of your work. Use this environment to adapt Ministry-sponsored Open units.

Create a full picture Find, click, describe, and elaborate. Expand previous work Create/organize resources Manage all units Save and collaborate Print, preview, and publish Adapt

The Open Environment is not suitable for · creating a quick outline · minimizing training required to use the Queen's Printer for Ontario, 2002 Planner effectively. The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner ©

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Guide for Designing a Unit in the Outliner Environment

The Outliner Environment provides a concise, twopage framework, in an 8½ x 11 landscape layout. Move between the two pages using the tabs at the top. Add data with the "+" symbol and fill in the text fields.

Outliner

You can use this guide to design units in the Outliner Environment and assess their effectiveness. The guide reflects the following elements of the design process: · · · · · curriculum expectations, assessment/evaluation, teaching/learning strategies, topic/theme/resources performance tasks and criteria. Topic/ Theme/ Resources Performance Tasks and Criteria

Curriculum Expectations

Assessment Evaluation

The guide proceeds step-by-step using the navigation buttons or tabs from the Curriculum Unit Planner`s Outliner Environment. Under each button or tab you will find:

· ·

Teaching/ Learning Strategies

a sentence summarizing the intended action; instructions (prompt text) to complete the step;

Overall criteria to consider in writing an effective unit are included at end of this guide. You can choose to follow the steps in sequence or use a different order to match your design process. Consult the separate guide for each environment when converting a unit from one environment to another.

The developers of this guide would like to thank the Ontario Curriculum Centre for their valuable assistance with this document.

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Unit Info

Unit Info

Identify your unit. Enter a brief title and subtitle. Click the grade box to select your grade(s). Choose whether or not to see the prompt text in fields as you write. Click the "+" symbol to select a logo from a digital source (e.g., a photograph, symbol, or drawing). Indicate the grade(s), the board type, the panel, and whether or not the unit is integrated. The information regarding the title, subtitle, and grade(s) will appear on the first page of your finished unit.

Unit Prefs

Identify your unit preferences. Choose the way of recording the subtask length (in minutes or hours) and the unit length (from your calculation ­ the sum of subtask times ­ or from your estimate). Select the unit status (locked or unlocked) for purposes of editing and sharing.

Author Info

Identify the author(s) of the unit. Edit the information provided when you registered yourself as an author. For example, there may be several people working on this specific unit that you wish to add as names. The edited information regarding school, telephone number, and e-mail address will appear on the first page of your finished unit. Your name(s), and the name(s) of the original author(s) of a copied unit, will appear on the first page.

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TAB 1: Page 1

Unit Summary

Provide a brief overview of the entire unit. Summarize (in two or three sentences) the contents and focus of the unit, describing key ideas, issues, or questions addressed by the unit as a whole. This summary becomes the unit's description in Planner libraries and indexes .

Assessment

Summarize the assessment strategies for this unit. Describe (in two or three sentences) how students will demonstrate their learning. Consider which learning expectations are checked as being assessed and which assessment strategies are added (click G/TL/A/RD) in each subtask.

Subtasks

Identify the subtasks for the unit. Subtasks are those activities by which students learn and practise new skills and knowledge that they will later apply in the culminating task. The Planner presets the first subtask as an initial assessment and the last subtask as a summative assessment. For each subtask (Subtasks 1 to 3 on Page 1; Subtasks 4 and 5 on Page 2), enter a brief title and the time it will take to complete (minutes or hours as set in Unit Preferences). Select and cluster the learning expectations to be addressed in each subtask. Click the "+" symbol at the top right corner of each column to view expectations from curriculum documents. Use Find (magnifying glass) to search for related expectations. Select and cluster the learning expectations into logical conceptual groupings that will form the basis of each subtask. Click the "+" symbol to the right of an expectation to add it to the unit.

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Click the Trash Can icon to remove it. If an expectation is to be assessed, click on the box beside "Assess." When a unit is completed (locked), all expectations attached to subtasks are listed as in the Expectation Summary. Select the most appropriate teaching/learning G / TL / A / RD strategies and groupings for each subtask. For teaching/learning strategies, click the "+" symbol, use the drop-down menu of categories to view the strategies, and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. For student groupings, click the "+" symbol to view the strategies and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. Select the most appropriate assessment G / TL / A / RD strategies and recording devices for each subtask. For assessment strategies, click the "+" symbol, use the menu to view the strategies, and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. For recording devices, click the "+" symbol to view the devices and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. Briefly describe each subtask. Teaching/Learning In the text box, describe, in two or three sentences, how the activities/learning experiences are constructed to focus on specific knowledge and skills acquisition or refinement (i.e., the clustered expectations). Summarize (e.g., in point form) how teaching/learning strategies and groupings, and assessment strategies and devices, are applied practically, step-by-step in this subtask. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark teaching/learning and assessment strategies. For Subtask 1, briefly describe the Initial assessment. Describe the activity you will use as an initial assessment of student readiness. Identify the key knowledge and skills that students should have to begin the work of this unit (e.g., check the expectations of previous grades or courses). Identify how to facilitate meeting the needs of all learners.

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TAB 2: Page 2

Subtasks

Complete information for Subtasks 4 and 5 Follow instructions and considerations for Subtasks 2 or 3 on Tab 1. For Subtask 5: Culminating Task, briefly describe the summative assessment. Create the summative assessment as an authentic task by which students can demonstrate the achievement of the skills and knowledge (related to the expectations) that they have practised and learned throughout the work of this unit.

Resources

Identify those resources used throughout the entire unit or in a specific subtask. Click the "+" symbol and determine whether the resource should be attached to the whole unit or to a specific subtask. View the menu of types of resources, click a type, and complete the details in bibliographic form. Click "Done" or "Add Another" (for the same type of resource) and click "Back". For blackline masters, click "Attach File" and browse to the file you wish to attach. Click and open the file. To select an existing resource, click the "+" symbol at the bottom of the menu of resource types, click either "View Library" or "View Mine" at the bottom, click resource type icon at the top, and click the "+" symbol to attach to the unit. A complete list of all resources is provided when you preview or print the unit's resources.

Adaptations

Identify adjustments that can be made to activities and assessment to address individual and unique learning needs or special circumstances. Adaptations include adjustments for exceptional pupils, students with special education needs, and/or ESL/ELD students.

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Teachers should consult individual student IEPs for specific directions on required accommodations and/or modifications. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark Special Education and ESL/ELD strategies.

Notes to Teacher

Prepare for the teaching of the unit. Briefly describe specific ideas for planning and implementing the unit. This might include background information for teachers and description of classroom organization. Include statements regarding cautions and sensitivities, as appropriate (e.g., suggestions about possible problems encountered with unit's focus or activities).

Analysis

Preview

Print

Use the Preview or Print buttons to access the list of all of the subtasks' expectations ­ selected and assessed. This includes the number of times each has been selected (green), assessed (red) or both selected and assessed (black) in the unit. The analysis includes a summary of the number of subtasks, expectations, resources, strategies and groupings, and expectations that are unique to a specific subject or course. . Revisions to this list must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level. Use the Preview or Print buttons to access the list of all of the unit's resources. This includes all resources organized by type and alphabetically by subtask. Revisions to these lists must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level. Use the Preview or Print buttons to access an analysis of the unit. The analysis includes a summary and running total of o subtasks, expectations, resources, strategies and groupings, and expectations that are unique to a specific subject or course; o teaching/learning and assessment strategies, student groupings, and recording devices. Revisions to this list must be made at the subtask level.

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The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

Guide for Designing a Unit in the Lite Environment L i te

The Lite Environment provides a focused WYSIWYG ­ what you see is what you get ­ framework, in an 8½ x 11 portrait layout. Move among the pages using the tabs on the right. Add data with the "+" symbol and fill in the text fields. You can use this guide to design units in the Lite Environment and assess their effectiveness. The guide reflects the following elements of the design process: · · · · · curriculum expectations, assessment/evaluation, teaching/learning strategies, topic/theme/resources performance tasks and criteria. Topic/ Theme/ Resources Performance Tasks and Criteria

Curriculum Expectations

Assessment Evaluation

The guide proceeds step-by-step using the navigation tabs from the Planner's Lite Environment. Under each tab you will find:

· · ·

Teaching/ Learning Strategies

a sentence summarizing the intended action; instructions (prompt text) to complete the step; questions to consider in writing an exemplary unit.

Overall criteria are also included at end of this guide. You can choose to follow the steps in sequence or use a different order to match your design process. Consult the separate guide for each environment when converting a unit from one environment to another.

The developers of this guide would like to thank the Ontario Curriculum Centre for their valuable assistance with this document.

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TAB 1: Unit Info Cover

Identify your unit. Enter (revise) a brief title and enter a subtitle.

UNIT INFO Cover

Click the "+" symbol to select a logo from a digital source (e.g., a photograph, symbol, or drawing). They will appear on the cover of your finished unit, together with the name(s) provided when you registered yourself as an author and the Subtask List created in the Unit Overview. Consider: · Does the title indicate what the unit is about? · Does the subtitle identify the discipline or focus of the unit? · Does the logo reflect the unit's content, and is it appropriate for an educational setting?

TAB 2: Unit Info Cover

Identify your unit preferences Indicate the grade(s), the board type, the panel, and whether or not the unit is integrated. This information will appear on the inside cover of your finished unit. Choose the way of recording the subtask length (in minutes or hours) and the unit length (from your calculation ­ the sum of subtask times ­ or from your estimate). Select the unit status (locked or unlocked) for purposes of editing and sharing. Choose whether or not to see the prompt text in fields as you write. Consider: · For combined-grade units, are both grade boxes selected? · For integrated units, is the integrated button selected? · When exporting units, is the unit locked upon completion to give recipients copy privileges only?

UNIT INFO Inside

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Identify the author(s) of the unit. Edit the information provided when you registered yourself as an author. For example, there may be several people working on this specific unit that you wish to add as names. The edited information regarding school, telephone number, school board, and e-mail address will appear on the inside cover of your finished unit. Your name(s), and the name(s) of the original author(s) of a copied unit, will appear on the cover. Consider: · Is the Author Information accurate? · Does the Author Information acknowledge all writers?

TAB 3: Overview Expectations

Select the learning expectations to be clustered and addressed in the unit. Click the "+" symbol on this page to view expectations from curriculum documents. Use Find (magnifying glass) to search for related expectations. Click the "+" symbol to the right of an expectation to add it to the Holding Tank for use while writing the unit. Click the Trash Can icon to remove it. When a unit is completed (locked), all expectations attached to subtasks are listed as in the Expectation Summary. While a unit is in progress, you can print the Holding Tank to reflect on the expectations that have been selected. Consider: · Do the unit expectations support the unit's rationale? · Can the unit expectations be clustered into groupings around which effective subtasks can be developed?

OVERVIEW Expectns.

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TAB 4: Overview Page 1

In Unit Context, briefly describe the rationale for doing the unit. Consider the clustered expectations. In the first paragraph describe how the unit will develop skills and knowledge that are important to students, essential to the subject, or necessary for further study. In the second paragraph, describe the real-life or simulated situation within which the work of the unit occurs that will encourage students to explore key questions, solve authentic problems, and apply new learning. For a Catholic unit, provide a statement of rationale and click the "+" symbol on this page to select appropriate Catholic Graduate Expectations (CGEs). Consider: · Is the unit aligned with the Ontario curriculum? · Is the rationale for the unit clear and well conceived? · Does the unit encourage students to explore key questions, solve authentic problems, and apply new learning? · For a Catholic unit, does the Unit Context provide a statement of rationale, followed by the selection of appropriate CGEs for the teaching/learning of the unit? In Unit Summary, provide a brief overview of the entire unit. First summarize the contents and focus of the unit, describing key ideas, issues, or questions addressed by the unit as a whole. Then describe the sequence of individual and group activities and the intended connections to other units in the course. The Unit Summary becomes the unit's description in Planner libraries and indexes. Consider: · Are the content and focus of the unit clearly summarized? · Do the unit's activities offer opportunities for appropriate treatment of the subject/topic under study? · Do the unit's activities offer opportunities to work independently and collaboratively? In Culminating Task, briefly describe the summative assessment. Create the summative assessment as an authentic task by which students can demonstrate the achievement of the skills and knowledge related to the

OVERVIEW Page 1

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expectations that they have practised and learned throughout the work of this unit. This description will automatically appear as the Culminating Subtask description in the Subtask section. Consider: · Does the culminating task offer students authentic opportunities to demonstrate the achievement of the expectations by the end of the unit? · Does the culminating task describe the enduring understandings that students will have? · For combined grades, does the culminating task provide for student demonstration of each grade's expectations?

TAB 5: Overview Page 2

In Links to Prior Knowledge, identify the key knowledge and skills that students should have to begin the work of this unit. Provide relevant details. Consider expectations from previous grades or courses (e.g., secondary school course prerequisites). To add expectations from previous grades or courses, click the Expectations "+" symbol at Overview Expectations, click the expectation code at the left, copy the expectation, and paste it into the Prior Knowledge field. Based on these details, develop the first subtask of the unit as an initial assessment of student readiness. Consider: · Does the unit clearly identify the prior knowledge and skills required to begin the work of this unit? · Does the unit include an initial subtask to offer students opportunities to demonstrate their previous learning? · For combined grades, are the differences in skills and knowledge accounted for? In Considerations, identify program-planning considerations relevant to the unit. Click the box next to an area (e.g., Technology, Career Education, ESL)

OVERVIEW Page 2

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Consider: · Does the unit contribute significantly to the inclusion of considerations for planning an entire year's work (e.g., as part of an elementary program or a secondary course)? In Notes to Teacher, prepare for the teaching of the unit. Briefly describe specific ideas for planning and implementing the unit (e.g., background information for teachers and description of classroom organization). Include statements regarding cautions and sensitivities, as appropriate (e.g., suggestions about possible problems encountered with unit's focus or activities). Consider: · Are the Notes to Teacher appropriate to the unit's purpose and activities? · Do the Notes to Teacher provide useful information for teachers using or adapting the unit?

Tab 6: Subtask List

List the unit's individual subtasks/activities. Subtasks are those activities by which students learn and practise new skills and knowledge that they will later apply in the culminating task. The Planner presets the first subtask as an initial assessment (see Prior Knowledge description) and the last subtask as a summative assessment (see Culminating Task description). For each subtask, enter a brief title and the time it will take to complete (minutes or hours as set in Unit Preferences). Click "View" to complete the information about each subtask. Click the "+" symbol to add subtasks to the three preset subtasks. Click the "++" symbol to copy an existing subtask from another unit. To reorder subtasks, change the numbers in the first column and click the Subtask List button at the right.

SUBTASK List

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Consider: · Are subtasks organized in a logical sequence that builds on previous skills and knowledge, offers opportunities for practice and growth, and leads to the culminating task? · Do the subtask titles indicate what the subtask is about? · Are appropriate time allocations identified for the subtasks?

TAB 7: Subtask Page 1

In Description, briefly describe each subtask. For each Subtask, describe, in two or three sentences, how the activities/learning experiences are constructed to focus on specific knowledge and skills acquisition or refinement (i.e., the clustered expectations). For the Initial Assessment Subtask, describe the activity you will use to assess the achievement of the key knowledge and skills identified as Prior Knowledge. Identify how to facilitate meeting the needs of all learners. The description of the Culminating Task from the Overview Page 1 has automatically been copied into the Culminating Subtask description. You can navigate from one subtask to another by clicking the directional arrows under the Subtask Page 1 button at the right, Consider · Do subtasks provide opportunities to learn and practise the knowledge and skills required for the unit and its culminating task? · Do the subtasks show evidence of effective design (e.g., backward mapping from culminating task; structuring tasks to address clustered expectations and the focus of the unit)? · Are subtasks described clearly and accurately? · Are subtasks appropriate to the grade level of the students? · Does the initial assessment subtask, if present, identify and assess prior knowledge and skills required for the work of the unit? Select and cluster the learning expectations. Select and cluster the learning expectations into logical conceptual groupings that will form the basis of each subtask. Click the "+" symbol on this page to view expectations from curriculum documents. Use Find (magnifying glass) to search for related expectations. Click the "+" symbol to the right of an expectation to attach it to the subtask.

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SUBTASK Page 1

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Click the Trash Can icon to remove it. If an expectation is to be assessed, click on the box beside "Assess." Consider: · Are the key learnings introduced and assessed in an appropriate sequence across the subtasks? · Are the clustered expectations addressed in the planned subtasks? · For combined grades, does the clustering reflect differences in knowledge and skills? Select the most appropriate teaching/learning strategies for this subtask. For teaching/learning strategies, click the "+" symbol, use the drop-down menu of categories to view the strategies, and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. For student groupings, click the "+" symbol to view the strategies and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. In the text box, briefly summarize how the strategies and groupings are applied practically, step-by-step in this subtask. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark teaching/learning strategies. Consider: · Are the teaching/learning strategies described and explained clearly (e.g., do they present the roles of the teacher and students; do they use the present tense)? · Do the teaching/learning strategies support the intended learning (e.g., do they link the expectations and assessment; do they provide ongoing opportunities for practice, remediation, and consolidation; are they the most appropriate to the discipline and/or course type; do they address problem-solving and life skills)? · Are the teaching/learning strategies varied and balanced in type and purpose (e.g., direct instruction, inquiry and research models, integration of technological applications)? · Do the student groupings facilitate the instruction/learning? · For combined grades, do the teaching/learning strategies support the learning as identified through grade level expectations?

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TAB 8: Subtask Page 2

Select the most appropriate assessment strategies for this subtask. Recall which learning expectations are checked as being assessed, check the verbs used in the expectations, and focus on the categories of knowledge and skills from relevant Achievement Charts. For assessment strategies, click the "+" symbol, use the menu to view the strategies, and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. For recording devices, click the "+" symbol to view the devices and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. In the text box, briefly describe how students will demonstrate their learning and how the strategies and devices will be applied practically, step-by-step. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark assessment strategies. Consider: · Are the assessment strategies described and explained clearly? · Are the recording devices appropriate for tracking the achievement of the expectations? · Are assessment strategies and recording devices varied and balanced in type and purpose (e.g., exemplars and rubrics; diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment)? · Do the assessment strategies give students the opportunity to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations (e.g., across all four categories of knowledge and skills)? · Do the assessment strategies provide opportunities for ongoing improvement? · For combined grades, is the assessment reflective of the learning as identified through grade level expectations? In Adaptations, identify adjustments that can be made to activities and assessment to address individual and unique learning needs or special circumstances. Adaptations include adjustments for exceptional pupils, students with special education needs, and/or ESL/ELD students.

SUBTASK Page 2

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Teachers should consult individual student IEPs for specific directions on required accommodations and/or modifications. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark Special Education and ESL/ELD strategies. Consider: · Do subtasks include relevant and feasible adjustments that address individual and unique learning needs or special circumstances? · Are the adaptation strategies described and explained clearly? Identify those resources used throughout the entire unit. (Subtask-specific resources should be attached at the subtask level.) Click the "+" symbol to view the menu of types of resources, click a type, and complete the details in bibliographic form. Click "Done" or "Add Another" (for the same type of resource) and click "Back". For blackline masters, click "Attach File" and browse to the file you wish to attach. Click and open the file. To select an existing resource, click the "+" symbol at the bottom of the menu of resource types, click either "View Library" or "View Mine" at the bottom, click resource type icon at the top, and click the "+" symbol to attach to the unit. A complete list of all resources is provided in the Resource Summary. Consider: · Are unit-wide resources identified and described clearly and accurately (e.g., bibliographic form, titles, names, ISBN numbers, active web sites)? · Are unit-wide resources of recognizable quality (e.g., authoritative, current, and reflecting Canadian context, where possible) · Do unit-wide resources support teaching and learning (e.g., will they interest students, develop themes, foster new learning)? · Do unit-wide resources accommodate different learning styles and needs? · Are copyright and license restrictions that are applicable to specific resources noted (e.g., copyrighted materials have been listed but not copied; registered names have not been used)? In Notes to Teacher, prepare for the teaching of the subtask. Briefly describe specific ideas for planning and implementing the subtask's activities/learning experiences (e.g., background information for teachers; description of classroom organization). Note cautions and sensitivities, as appropriate (e.g., suggestions about possible problems encountered with unit's focus or activities).

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Consult the Teacher Companion for considerations in using teaching and assessment strategies. Consider: · Are the Notes to Teacher appropriate to the subtask's purpose and activities? · Do the Notes to Teacher provide useful information and reflection for teachers using or adapting the subtask? Identify resources recommended for the specific subtask. Click the "+" symbol to view the menu of types of resources, click a type, and complete the details in bibliographic form. Click "Done or "Add Another" (of the same type or resource) and click "Back". For blackline masters, click "Attach File" and browse to the file you wish to attach. To select an existing resource, click the "+" symbol at the bottom of the menu of resource types, click either "View Library" or "View Mine" at the bottom, click resource type icon at the top, and click the "+" symbol to attach to the subtask. Consider: · Are subtask resources identified and described clearly and accurately (e.g., bibliographic form, titles, names, ISBN numbers, active web sites)? · Are subtask resources of recognizable quality (e.g., authoritative, current, and reflecting Canadian context, where possible) · Do resources support teaching and learning in each subtask (e.g., varied and balanced in type and purpose; available in classroom and school/public libraries)? · Do subtask resources accommodate different learning styles and needs? · Are copyright and license restrictions that are applicable to specific resources noted (e.g., copyrighted materials have been listed but not copied; registered names have not been used)? · Is AppleWorks used as the integrated application for the creation of blackline masters (e.g., handouts) to support province-wide sharing of units?

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TAB 9: Analysis of Expectations

ANALYSIS Expectns.

Access the list of all of the subtasks' expectations­ selected and assessed. This includes the number of times each has been selected (green), assessed (red) or both selected and assessed (black) in the unit. The printed/previewed analysis includes a summary of expectations that are unique to a specific subject or course. Analysis of a secondary unit's expectations also includes a summary by strand. Revisions to this list must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level. Consider: · Do the number of expectations and subtasks appropriately reflect the intended learning of the unit (e.g., is the unit overbuilt; are expectations identified that are not addressed adequately within the subtasks)? · Does the unit reflect a variety and balance of expectations? · For combined grades, are the same considerations followed for each grade?

TAB 10: Analysis of Resources by Type

ANALYSIS Res (Type)

Access the list of all of the unit's resources by type (1). This includes all resources organized alphabetically by type. The analysis keeps a running total of the number of times each type has been used in the unit. Click each resource title for further information or to launch file. Revisions to these lists must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level.

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TAB 11: Analysis of Resources by Subtask

ANALYSIS Res (STs)

Access the list of all of the unit's resources by subtask (2). This includes all resources organized alphabetically by subtask. Click each resource title for further information or to launch file. Revisions to these lists must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level. Consider: · Does the unit contain an appropriate number of resources for the intended learning of the unit? · Does the unit reflect a variety and balance of types of resources? · Are all blackline masters included and attached to the unit (e.g., questionnaires, rubrics, worksheets)? · For combined grades, are the same considerations followed for each grade?

TAB 11: Analysis of Strategies

ANALYSIS Strategies

Access a list of all of the unit's strategies. The analysis includes a summary and running total of o subtasks, expectations, resources, strategies and groupings, and expectations that are unique to a specific subject or course; o teaching/learning and assessment strategies, student groupings, and recording devices. Revisions to this list must be made at the subtask level. Consider: · Does the unit contain an appropriate number of teaching/learning and assessment strategies for the intended learning of the unit? · Does the unit reflect a variety and balance of types of strategies? · For combined grades, are the same considerations followed for each grade?

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The Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner

Guide for Designing a Unit in the Open Environment Open

The Open Environment provides a spacious framework and maximum design options. Move through the environment using the sectional tabs at the top and the sub-sectional buttons on the left. Add data with the "+" symbol and fill in the text fields. You can use this guide to design units in the Open Environment and assess their effectiveness. The guide reflects the following elements of the design process: · · · · · curriculum expectations, assessment/evaluation, teaching/learning strategies, topic/theme/resources performance tasks and criteria. Topic/ Theme/ Resources Performance Tasks and Criteria

Curriculum Expectations

Assessment Evaluation

The guide proceeds step-by-step using the navigation tabs and buttons from the Planner's Open Environment. Under each button you will find: · · · a sentence summarizing the intended action;

Teaching/ Learning Strategies

instructions (prompt text) to complete the step; questions to consider in writing an effective unit.

Overall criteria are also included at end of this guide. You can choose to follow the steps in sequence or use a different order to match your design process. Consult the separate guide for each environment when converting a unit from one environment to another.

The developers of this guide would like to thank the Ontario Curriculum Centre for their valuable assistance with this document.

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TAB 1: Unit Info

Unit Information

Identify your unit. Enter a brief title and subtitle. Click the grade box to select your grade(s). Click the "+" symbol to select a logo from a digital source (e.g., a photograph, symbol, or drawing). They will appear on the cover of your finished unit, together with the name(s) provided when you registered yourself as an author and the Subtask List created in the Unit Overview. Consider: · Does the title indicate what the unit is about? · Does the subtitle identify the discipline or focus of the unit? · Does the logo reflect the unit's content, and is it appropriate for an educational setting?

Unit Preferences

Identify your unit preferences. Indicate the grade(s), the board type, the panel, and whether or not the unit is integrated. This information will appear on the inside cover of your finished unit. Choose the way of recording the subtask length (in minutes or hours) and the unit length (from your calculation ­ the sum of subtask times ­ or from your estimate). Select the unit status (locked or unlocked) for purposes of editing and sharing. Choose whether or not to see the prompt text in fields as you write. Consider: · For combined-grade units, are both grade boxes selected? · For integrated units, is the integrated button selected? · When exporting units, is the unit locked upon completion to give recipients copy privileges only?

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Author Information

Identify the author(s) of the unit. Edit the information provided when you registered yourself as an author. For example, there may be several people working on this specific unit that you wish to add as names. The edited information regarding school, telephone number, school board, and e-mail address will appear on the inside cover of your finished unit. Your name(s), and the name(s) of the original author(s) of a copied unit, will appear on the cover. Consider: · Is the Author Information accurate? · Does the Author Information acknowledge all writers?

TAB 2: Unit Overview

Unit Expectations

Select the learning expectations to be clustered and addressed in the unit. Click the "+" symbol on this page to view expectations from curriculum documents. Use Find (magnifying glass) to search for related expectations. Click the "+" symbol to the right of an expectation to add it to the Holding Tank for use while writing the unit. Click the Trash Can icon to remove it. When a unit is completed (locked), all expectations attached to subtasks are listed as in the Expectation Summary. While a unit is in progress, you can print the Holding Tank to reflect on the expectations that have been selected. Consider: · Do the unit expectations support the unit's rationale? · Can the unit expectations be clustered into groupings around which effective subtasks can be developed?

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Unit Context

Briefly describe the rationale for doing the unit. Consider the clustered expectations. In the first paragraph, describe how the unit will develop skills and knowledge that are important to students, essential to the subject, or necessary for further study. In the second paragraph, describe the real-life or simulated situation within which the work of the unit occurs that will encourage students to explore key questions, solve authentic problems, and apply new learning. For a Catholic unit, provide a statement of rationale and click the "+" symbol on this page to select appropriate Catholic Graduate Expectations (CGEs). Consider: · Is the unit aligned with the Ontario curriculum? · Is the rationale for the unit clear and well conceived? · Does the unit encourage students to explore key questions, solve authentic problems, and apply new learning? · For a Catholic unit, does the Unit Context provide a statement of rationale, followed by the selection of appropriate CGEs for the teaching/learning of the unit?

Unit Summary

Provide a brief overview of the entire unit. First summarize the contents and focus of the unit, describing key ideas, issues, or questions addressed by the unit as a whole. Then describe the sequence of individual and group activities and the intended connections to other units in the course. The Unit Summary becomes the unit's description in Planner libraries and indexes. Consider: · Are the content and focus of the unit clearly summarized? · Do the unit's activities offer opportunities for appropriate treatment of the subject/topic under study? · Do the unit's activities offer opportunities to work independently and collaboratively?

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Culminating Task

Briefly describe the summative assessment. Create the summative assessment as an authentic task by which students can demonstrate the achievement of the skills and knowledge related to the expectations that they have practised and learned throughout the work of this unit. This description will automatically appear as the Culminating Subtask description in the Subtask section. Consider: · Does the culminating task offer students authentic opportunities to demonstrate the achievement of the expectations by the end of the unit? · Does the culminating task describe the enduring understandings that students will have? · For combined grades, does the culminating task provide for student demonstration of each grade's expectations?

Prior Knowledge

Identify the key knowledge and skills that students should have to begin the work of this unit. Provide relevant details. Consider expectations from previous grades or courses (e.g., secondary school course prerequisites). To add the text of these expectations, click the Expectations "+" symbol for a subtask, click the expectation code at the left, copy the expectation, and paste it into the Prior Knowledge field. Based on this information, develop the first subtask of the unit as an initial assessment of student readiness. Consider: · Does the unit clearly identify the prior knowledge and skills required to begin the work of this unit? · Does the unit include an initial subtask to offer students opportunities to demonstrate their previous learning? · For combined grades, are the differences in skills and knowledge accounted for?

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Unit-Wide Resources

Identify those resources used throughout the entire unit. (Subtask-specific resources should be attached at the subtask level.) Click the "+" symbol to view the menu of types of resources, click a type, and complete the details in bibliographic form. Click "Done" or "Add Another" (for the same type of resource) and click "Back". For blackline masters, click "Attach File" and browse to the file you wish to attach. Click and open the file. To select an existing resource, click the "+" symbol at the bottom of the menu of resource types, click either "View Library" or "View Mine" at the bottom, click resource type icon at the top, and click the "+" symbol to attach to the unit. A complete list of all resources is provided in the Resource Summary. Consider: · Are unit-wide resources identified and described clearly and accurately (e.g., bibliographic form, titles, names, ISBN numbers, active web sites)? · Are unit-wide resources of recognizable quality (e.g., authoritative, current, and reflecting Canadian context, where possible) · Do unit-wide resources support teaching and learning (e.g., will they interest students, develop themes, foster new learning)? · Do unit-wide resources accommodate different learning styles and needs? · Are copyright and license restrictions that are applicable to specific resources noted (e.g., copyrighted materials have been listed but not copied; registered names have not been used)?

Considerations

Identify program-planning considerations relevant to the unit. Click the box next to an area (e.g., Technology, ESL) and enter a brief description, if necessary, below the heading that appears in the field. Click the Choices into Action button, check the grade range in the top righthand corner and click the ADD button to paste relevant competencies into the Considerations field. Provide any additional details. Consider: · Does the unit clearly identify relevant considerations for program planning? · Does the unit contribute significantly to the inclusion of considerations for planning an entire year's work (e.g., as part of an elementary program or a secondary course)?

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Unit Notes

Prepare for the teaching of the unit. Briefly describe specific ideas for planning and implementing the unit (e.g., background information for teachers; description of classroom organization). Include statements regarding cautions and sensitivities, as appropriate (e.g., suggestions about possible problems encountered with unit's focus or activities). Consider: · Are the Unit Notes appropriate to the unit's purpose and activities? · Do the Unit Notes provide useful information for teachers using or adapting the unit?

Subtask List

List the unit's individual subtasks/activities. Subtasks are those activities by which students learn and practise new skills and knowledge that they will later apply in the culminating task. The Planner presets the first subtask as an initial assessment (see Prior Knowledge description) and the last subtask as a summative assessment (see Culminating Task description). For each subtask, enter a brief title and the time it will take to complete (minutes or hours as set in Unit Preferences). Click "View" to complete the information about each subtask. Click the "+" symbol to add subtasks to the three preset subtasks. Click the "++" symbol to copy an existing subtask from another unit. To reorder subtasks, change the numbers in the first column and click the Reorder button. Consider: · Are subtasks organized in a logical sequence that builds on previous skills and knowledge, offers opportunities for practice and growth, and leads to the culminating task? · Do the subtask titles indicate what the subtask is about? · Are appropriate time allocations identified for the subtasks?

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TAB 3: Subtasks

Subtask Description

Briefly describe each subtask. For each Subtask, describe, in two or three sentences, how the activities/learning experiences are constructed to focus on specific knowledge and skills acquisition or refinement (i.e., the clustered expectations). For the Initial Assessment Subtask, briefly describe the activity you will use to assess the achievement of the key knowledge and skills identified as Prior Knowledge. Identify how to facilitate meeting the needs of all learners. The description of the Culminating Task from the Unit Overview has automatically been copied into the Culminating Subtask description. Consider · Do subtasks provide opportunities to learn and practise the knowledge and skills required for the unit and its culminating task? · Do the subtasks show evidence of effective design (e.g., backward mapping from culminating task; structuring tasks to address clustered expectations and the focus of the unit)? · Are subtasks described clearly and accurately? · Are subtasks appropriate to the grade level of the students? · Does the initial assessment subtask, if present, identify and assess prior knowledge and skills required for the work of the unit?

Expectations

Select and cluster the learning expectations. Select and cluster the learning expectations into logical conceptual groupings that will form the basis of each subtask. Click the "+" symbol on this page to view expectations from curriculum documents. Use Find (magnifying glass) to search for related expectations. Click the "+" symbol to the right of an expectation to attach it to the subtask. Click the Trash Can icon to remove it.

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If an expectation is to be assessed, click on the box beside "Assess." Consider: · Are the key learnings introduced and assessed in an appropriate sequence across the subtasks? · Are the clustered expectations addressed in the planned subtasks? · For combined grades, does the clustering reflect differences in knowledge and skills?

Teaching/Learning

Select the most appropriate teaching/learning strategies for this subtask. For teaching/learning strategies, click the "+" symbol, use the drop-down menu of categories to view the strategies, and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. For student groupings, click the "+" symbol to view the strategies and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. In the text box, briefly summarize how the strategies and groupings are applied practically, step-by-step in this subtask. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark teaching/learning strategies. Consider: · Are the teaching/learning strategies described and explained clearly (e.g., do they present the roles of the teacher and students; do they use the present tense)? · Do the teaching/learning strategies support the intended learning (e.g., do they link the expectations and assessment; do they provide ongoing opportunities for practice, remediation, and consolidation; are they the most appropriate to the discipline and/or course type; do they address problem-solving and life skills)? · Are the teaching/learning strategies varied and balanced in type and purpose (e.g., direct instruction, inquiry and research models, integration of technological applications)? · Do the student groupings facilitate the instruction/learning? · For combined grades, do the teaching/learning strategies support the learning as identified through grade level expectations?

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Assessment

Select the most appropriate assessment strategies for this subtask. Recall which learning expectations are checked as being assessed, check the verbs used in the expectations, and focus on the categories of knowledge and skills from relevant Achievement Charts. For assessment strategies, click the "+" symbol, use the menu to view the strategies, and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. For recording devices, click the "+" symbol to view the devices and click the "+" symbol to the right to select. In the text box, briefly describe how students will demonstrate their learning and how assessment strategies and devices will be applied practically, step-by-step. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark assessment strategies. Consider: · Are the assessment strategies described and explained clearly? · Are the recording devices appropriate for tracking the achievement of the expectations? · Are assessment strategies and recording devices varied and balanced in type and purpose (e.g., exemplars and rubrics; diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment)? · Do the assessment strategies give students the opportunity to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations (e.g., across all four categories of knowledge and skills)? · Do the assessment strategies provide opportunities for ongoing improvement? · For combined grades, is the assessment reflective of the learning as identified through grade level expectations?

Adaptations

Identify adjustments that can be made to activities and assessment to address individual and unique learning needs or special circumstances. Adaptations include adjustments for exceptional pupils, students with special education needs, and/or ESL/ELD students. Teachers should consult individual student IEPs for specific directions on required accommodations and/or modifications. Use the Teacher Companion to browse, copy, or bookmark Special Education and ESL/ELD strategies.

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Consider: · Do subtasks include relevant and feasible adjustments that address individual and unique learning needs or special circumstances? · Are the adaptation strategies described and explained clearly?

Resources

Identify resources recommended for the specific subtask. Click the "+" symbol to view the menu of types of resources, click a type, and complete the details in bibliographic form. Click "Done or "Add Another" (of the same type or resource) and click "Back". For blackline masters, click "Attach File" and browse to the file you wish to attach. Click and open the file. To select an existing resource, click the "+" symbol at the bottom of the menu of resource types, click either "View Library" or "View Mine" at the bottom, click resource type icon at the top, and click the "+" symbol to attach to the subtask. Consider: · Are subtask resources identified and described clearly and accurately (e.g., bibliographic form, titles, names, ISBN numbers, active web sites)? · Are subtask resources of recognizable quality (e.g., authoritative, current, and reflecting Canadian context, where possible) · Do resources support teaching and learning in each subtask (e.g., varied and balanced in type and purpose; available in classroom and school/public libraries)? · Do subtask resources accommodate different learning styles and needs? · Are copyright and license restrictions that are applicable to specific resources noted (e.g., copyrighted materials have been listed but not copied; registered names have not been used)? · Is AppleWorks used as the integrated application for the creation of blackline masters (e.g., handouts) to support province-wide sharing of units?

Subtask Notes

Prepare for the teaching of the subtask. Briefly describe specific ideas for planning and implementing the subtask's activities/learning experiences (e.g., background information for teachers; description of classroom organization). Note cautions and sensitivities, as appropriate (e.g., suggestions about possible problems encountered with unit's focus or activities). 35

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Consult the Teacher Companion for considerations in using teaching and assessment strategies. Consider: · Are the Subtask Notes appropriate to the subtask's purpose and activities? · Do the Subtask Notes provide useful information and reflection for teachers using or adapting the subtask?

Reflections

Make notes after you have used the subtask. Outline potential changes and improvements you would make to the subtask, or raise questions or concerns for future thought. Record any decisions you wish to pass on to others in the Subtask Notes, because the contents of this field are not passed along in the published unit.

TAB 4: Analysis

Expectation Summary

Access the list of all of the subtasks' expectations ­ selected and assessed. This includes the number of times each has been selected (green), assessed (red) or both selected and assessed (black) in the unit. The printed/previewed analysis includes a summary of the number of subtasks, expectations, resources, strategies and groupings, and expectations that are unique to a specific subject or course. Analysis of a secondary unit's expectations also includes a summary by strand. Revisions to this list must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level. Consider: · Do the number of expectations and subtasks appropriately reflect the intended learning of the unit (e.g., is the unit overbuilt; are expectations identified that are not addressed adequately within the subtasks)? · Does the unit reflect a variety and balance of expectations? · For combined grades, are the same considerations followed for each grade?

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Resource Summary

Access the list of all of the unit's resources. This includes all resources organized alphabetically by type. The analysis keeps a running total of the number of times each type has been used in the unit. Click each resource title for further information or to launch file. Revisions to this list must be made at the unit-wide or subtask level. Consider: · Does the unit contain an appropriate number of resources for the intended learning of the unit? · Does the unit reflect a variety and balance of types of resources? · Are all blackline masters included and attached to the unit (e.g., questionnaires, rubrics, worksheets)? · For combined grades, are the same considerations followed for each grade?

Strategies Summary

Access a list of all of the unit's strategies. This includes all teaching/learning and assessment strategies, student groupings, and recording devices. The analysis keeps a running total of the number of times each type has been used in the unit. Revisions to this list must be made at the subtask level. Consider: · Does the unit contain an appropriate number of teaching/learning and assessment strategies for the intended learning of the unit? · Does the unit reflect a variety and balance of types of strategies? · For combined grades, are the same considerations followed for each grade?

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Overall Criteria

Throughout your work in using the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner, the following overall criteria may be useful to consider: alignment appropriateness authenticity authority balance clarity creativity depth feasibility growth inclusiveness integration organization relevance variety with Ontario curriculum policy; of tasks, activities, strategies, and resources for grade and discipline; of tasks and activities for real-life applications; of content, including accuracy, comprehensiveness, and currency; of tasks, activities, strategies, and resources to support learning and assessment; of language and ideas; of design to engage learning; of understanding fostered by the learning tasks and activities; of successful completion of unit tasks and activities; opportunities for students to extend learning; of activities and assessment to accommodate all students; of expectations (from subject strands, across other subjects, from Catholic Graduate Expectations); of elements to sequence knowledge, skills, and application; of strategies and resources to tasks and activities; of tasks, activities, strategies, and resources to support learning and assessment.

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Help and Training for the Planner

A. THE PLANNER CD

The Planner CD provides help at every step of the planning process including: · a HELP MENU with a reference handout, an electronic tutorial, printable blank templates, sample units with instructional prompts, a glossary, and connection to web-based contact and support. the question mark at the top for step-by-step assistance.

·

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B. THE PLANNER WEB SITE

The Planner web site at www.ocup.org provides a variety of materials to help you develop facility with the Ontario Curriculum Unit Planner. 1. Under UNITS you will find: · · Tips for Downloading a Unit (in Acrobat .pdf format); support documents (.pdf) and PowerPoint slideshows for the Elementary Unit Project

2. Under PROFILES you will find: · Tips for Downloading and Extracting a Profile.

3. Under SUPPORT you will find: · · · · access to training resources (see "Training Resources" below); links to support software; a way to register as a Planner user for email updates; a FAQ section to submit a question or view answers to others' questions.

4. Under RESOURCES you will find useful documents, including three guides for designing a unit in each of the Outliner, Lite, and Open environments. Each guide proceeds step-by-step with instructions and ideas to consider in creating an effective unit. Overall criteria are also included at end of each guide.

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C. TRAINING RESOURCES

The website provides a comprehensive series of PowerPoint presentations to help you train yourself at your desktop or lead group demonstrations. Presentations are divided into smaller sections to accommodate short, sequential learning opportunities. Each presentation comes with relevant .pdf documents. The website also provides a link to the site for downloading a program (for Mac or Windows) to view the presentations if you don't have the PowerPoint application.

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The Learning Continuum

Learning Continuum

Health & Physical Education: Healthy Living

Overall Expectations

Learning Continuum

Grade 2

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·identify healthy eating habits; ·identify the stages in development of humans (e.g., comparing physical changes from birth to childhood) and of other living things; ·recognize safety risks and safe practices; ·recognize commonly used medicines and household products.

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·identify healthy eating practices and use a decision-making model to make healthy food choices; ·describe parts of the human body, the functions of these parts, and behaviours that contribute to good health; ·outline safety rules and safe practices; ·describe the effects on the body of appropriate and inappropriate uses of medicines.

Specific Expectations:

Healthy Eating

·identify the food groups and give examples of foods in each group; ·suggest occasions (e.g., a bake sale, a class party) when they can choose healthy food snacks, and describe the factors affecting their choices (e.g., choices made because of allergies or culture); ·describe ways to care for their teeth. ·identify a balanced diet and apply decision-making skills to create menus for healthy meals; ·describe the importance of food to the body (e.g., for energy and growth); ·explain the negative effects of poor nutrition on healthy teeth and the importance of regular brushing and visits to the dentist.

Growth & Development

Personal Safety and Injury Prevention

·outline the potential safety risks in the home, school, and community (e.g., from fire or toys); ·describe exploitative behaviours (e.g., abusive behaviours, bullying, inappropriate touching) and the feelings associated with them; ·identify people who can provide personal safety assistance (e.g., block parents) and explain how to access them (e.g., by phoning 9-1-1).

·identify safety rules to be followed in the home, school, and community (e.g., electrical safety, schoolyard rules, bus safety); ·describe types of verbal and physical violence (e.g., name calling, kicking, hitting); ·explain the importance of being able to say no to exploitative behaviours (e.g., improper touching), and describe how to seek help.

Substance Use & Abuse

·recognize that there are some medicines (e.g., cough syrup, nose drops) and other substances (e.g., vitamins) that help the body when used properly (safely); ·identify (e.g., from their symbols and labels) medicines and household products that are harmful to the body; ·employ decision-making skills to identify when and how medicines should be used (e.g., seeking out adult assistance).

·describe the difference between prescription and non-prescription medicines; ·outline the safe use of medicines (e.g., the need for an adult to supervise the administration of medicines, taking proper dosages); ·use decision-making skills to identify healthy alternatives to drug use (e.g., fresh air and exercise can help relieve headaches).

...........FOLD & PASTE HERE..........

·describe simple life cycles of plants and animals, including humans; ·recognize that rest, food, and exercise affect growth; ·identify the major parts of the body by their proper names.

·distinguish the similarities and differences between themselves and others (e.g., in terms of body size or gender); ·describe how germs are transmitted and how this relates to personal hygiene (e.g., using tissues, washing hands before eating); ·identify the five senses and describe how each functions.

Health & Physical Education: Healthy Living

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will: ·describe the relationship among healthy eating practices, healthy active living, and healthy bodies; ·outline characteristics in the development and growth of humans from birth to childhood; ·list safety procedures and practices in the home, school, and community; ·describe what a drug is, list several examples (e.g., nicotine, caffeine, alcohol), and describe the effects of these substances on the body.

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will: ·explain the role of healthy eating practices, physical activity, and heredity as they relate to body shape and size; ·identify the physical, interpersonal, and emotional aspects of healthy human beings; ·use living skills to address personal safety and injury prevention; ·identify the influences (e.g., the media, peers, family members) af fecting the use of tobacco, as well as the effects and legalities of, and healthy alternatives to, tobacco use.

Specific Expectations:

·identify foods from different cultures and classify them by food groups; ·describe the benefits of healthy food choices, physical activity, and healthy bodies; ·describe a variety of ways to prevent tooth decay (e.g., brushing, making appropriate food choices, rinsing the mouth). ·outline the factors that influence body shape and size (e.g., heredity, diet, exercise); ·analyse, over a period of time, their own food selections, including food purchases (e.g., "everyday food" versus "sometimes food") and determine whether or not they are healthy choices.

·identify ·identify

·explain relevant safety procedures (e.g., fire drills, railway-crossing and crosswalk procedures); ·use a problem-solving process to identify ways of obtaining support for personal safety in the home, school, and community; ·identify examples of real and fictional violence (e.g., schoolyard fights, cartoons, movies).

the characteristics of healthy relationships (e.g., showing consideration of others' feelings by avoiding negative communica tion); the challenges (e.g., conflicting opinions) and responsibilities in their relationships with family and friends.

·apply decision-making and problem-solving skills in addressing threats to personal safety (e.g., from abuse or physical fighting) and injury prevention (e.g., bicycle safety, road safety); ·identify people (e.g., parents, guardians, neighbours, teachers) and community agencies (e.g., Kids' Help Phone) that can assist with injury prevention, emergency situations, and violence prevention.

·define the term drug and identify a variety of legal and illegal drugs; ·identify nicotine (in cigarettes), caffeine (in coffee and colas), and alcohol as drugs; ·use decision-making skills to make healthy choices about drug use, and recognize the effects of various substances (e.g., nicotine, caffeine, alcohol) on the body.

·identify the major harmful substances found in tobacco and explain the term addiction; ·describe the short- and long-term effects of first- and second-hand smoke, and identify the advantages of being smoke-free; ·apply decision-making and assertiveness skills to make and maintain healthy choices related to tobacco use, and recognize factors that can influence decisions to smoke or to abstain from smoking (e.g., the media, family members, friends, laws).

...........PUNCH HOLES & INSERT INTO BINDER......

·outline the basic human and animal reproductive processes (e.g., the union of egg and sperm); ·describe basic changes in growth and development from birth to childhood (e.g., changes to teeth, hair, feet, and height).

·describe

the four stages of human development (infancy, child hood, adolescence, and adulthood) and identify the physical, interpersonal, and emotional changes appropriate to their current stage;

...........FOLD & PASTE HERE..........

Health & Physical Education: Healthy Living

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·analyse information that has an impact on healthy eating practices (e.g., food labels, food guides, care-of-teeth brochures); ·describe physical, emotional, and interpersonal changes associated with puberty; ·apply strategies to deal with threats to personal safety (e.g., in response to harassment) and to prevent injury (e.g., from physical assault); ·identify the influences (e.g., the media, peers, family) affecting alcohol use, as well as the effects and legalities of, and healthy alternatives to, alcohol use.

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will: ·explain how body image and self-esteem influence eating practices; ·identify the major parts of the reproductive system and their functions and relate them to puberty; ·use basic prevention and treatment skills (e.g., basic first aid) to help themselves and others; ·identify the influences (e.g., the media, peers, family) affecting the use of cannabis and other drugs, as well as the effects and legalities of, as well as healthy alternatives to, cannabis and other drugs.

Specific Expectations:

·explain the purpose and function of calories and the major food nutrients; ·identify critical content information on food labels (e.g., ingredients, calories, additives, fat content); ·describe the influence of the media on body image (e.g., shape and size); ·explain how changes in our bodies sometimes affect our eating habits (e.g., increased appetite during growth spurts).

...........PUNCH HOLES & INSERT IN BINDER........

·determine the influence of various factors (e.g., the media, family traditions, allergies) on personal food choices, body image, and selfesteem; ·analyse personal eating habits in a variety of situations (e.g., at home, in school, in restaurants); ·describe the benefits of healthy eating for active living.

·apply

·explain how people's actions (e.g., bullying, excluding others) can affect the feelings and reactions of others; strategies (e.g., anger management, assertiveness, conflict resolution) to deal with personal-safety and injury-prevention situations (e.g., swarming, threatening, harassment).

·identify and describe appropriate methods for preventing and treating ailments (e.g., sunburn, minor cuts); ·identify the responsibilities associated with caring for themselves and others (e.g., while babysitting); ·describe and respond appropriately to potentially violent situations relevant to themselves (e.g., threats, harassment, violence in the media).

·describe the short- and long-term effects of alcohol use and abuse; ·apply decision-making skills to make healthy choices about alcohol use, and recognize factors (e.g., the media, family members, friends, laws) that can influence the decision to drink alcohol; ·demonstrate resistance techniques (e.g., avoidance, walking away) and assertiveness skills (e.g., saying no) to deal with peer pressure in situations pertaining to substance use and abuse.

·describe the short- and long-term effects of cannabis and other illicit drugs; ·determine influences (e.g., interpersonal, personal, legal, economic) on the use and abuse of tobacco and other drugs (e.g., alcohol, cannabis, LSD) and consider them as part of a decision-making process to make healthy choices; ·identify people and community agencies that support making healthy choices regarding substance use and abuse.

...........FOLD & PASTE HERE..........

·identify strategies to deal positively with stress and pressures that result from relationships with family and friends; ·identify factors (e.g., trust, honesty, caring) that enhance healthy relationships with friends, family, and peers; ·describe the secondary physical changes at puberty (e.g., growth of body hair, changes in body shape); ·describe the processes of menstruation and spermatogenesis; ·describe the increasing importance of personal hygiene following puberty.

·relate the changes at puberty to the reproductive organs and their functions; ·apply a problem-solving/decision-making process to address issues related to friends, peers, and family relationships.

Health & Physical Education: Healthy Living

Grade 7

By the end of Grade 7, students will: ·relate healthy eating practices and active living to body image and self-esteem; ·describe age-appropriate matters related to sexuality (e.g., the need to develop good interpersonal skills, such as the ability to communicate effectively with the opposite sex); ·explain how harassment relates to personal safety; ·apply living skills to deal with peer pressure related to substance use and abuse.

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will: ·adopt personal goals that reflect healthy eating practices; ·identify the physical, emotional, interpersonal, and spiritual aspects of healthy sexuality (e.g., respect for life, ethical questions in relationships, contraception); ·identify local support groups and community organizations (e.g., public health offices) that provide information or services related to health and well-being; ·analyse situations that are potentially dangerous to personal safety (e.g., gang violence) and determine how to seek assistance; ·apply living skills (e.g., decision-making, problem-solving, and refusal skills) to respond to matters related to sexuality, drug use, and healthy eating habits.

Specific Expectations:

·examine the effects of healthy eating and regular physical activity on body size and shape, and on self-esteem; ·describe how our body image influences our food choices; ·identify factors affecting healthy body weight (e.g., food intake, growth spurts, physical activity/inactivity). ·analyse the effects of undereating (e.g., as a result of bulimia or sports dieting) and overeating (e.g., obesity) on health and well-being; ·identify ways to maintain a healthy body weight (e.g., physical activity); ·adopt personal food plans, based on nutritional needs and personal goals, to improve or maintain their eating practices.

·explain the male and female reproductive systems as they relate to fertilization; ·distinguish between the facts and myths associated with menstruation, spermatogenesis, and fertilization; ·identify the methods of transmission and the symptoms of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and ways to prevent them; ·use effective communication skills (e.g., refusal skills, active listening) to deal with various relationships and situations; ·explain the term abstinence as it applies to healthy sexuality; ·identify sources of support with regard to issues related to healthy sexuality (e.g., parents/guardians, doctors); ·describe harassment and identify ways of dealing with it; ·identify people and resources that can support someone experiencing harassment.

·explain the importance of abstinence as a positive choice for adolescents; ·identify symptoms, methods of transmission, prevention, and highrisk behaviours related to common STDs, HIV, and AIDS; ·identify methods used to prevent pregnancy; ·apply living skills (e.g., decision-making, assertiveness, and refusal skills) in making informed decisions, and analyse the consequences of engaging in sexual activities and using drugs; ·identify sources of support (e.g., parents/ guardians, doctors) related to healthy sexuality issues. ·analyse situations (e.g., hitchhiking, gang violence, violence in relationships) that are potentially dangerous to personal safety; ·identify support services (e.g., the school guidance department, shelters, Kids' Help Phone) that assist victims of violence, and explain how to access them.

...........FOLD & PASTE HERE..........

·outline a variety of issues related to substance use and abuse (e.g., the effects of second-hand smoke; the impact of laws governing drug use, including the use of tobacco and alcohol); ·identify and categorize drugs as stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens; ·apply a decision-making process to make informed choices regarding drug use; ·demonstrate strategies (e.g., saying no, walking away) that can be used to counter pressures to smoke, drink, and take drugs, and identify healthy alternatives to drug use.

·outline the possible negative consequences of substance use and abuse (e.g., fetal alcohol syndrome, effects of steroid use, accidents when drinking and driving); ·identify those school and community resources that are involved in education about substance use and abuse, and those involved in preventing and treating substance abuse; ·describe causes and symptoms of stress and positive ways (as opposed to substance use) to relieve stress; ·apply the steps of a decision-making process to address age-specific situations related to personal health and well-being in which substance use or abuse is one of the factors.

Health & Physical Education: Fundamental Movement Skills

Overall Expectations

Learning Continuum

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·perform the basic movement skills required to participate in physical activities: locomotion/travelling (e.g., galloping, running), manipulation (e.g., throwing, catching), and stability (e.g., jumping, landing); ·demonstrate the principles of movement (e.g., in various directions, alone, with others, at various speeds) using locomotion/travelling, manipulation, and stability skills.

Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·perform the basic movement skills required to participate in physical activities: locomotion/travelling (e.g., skipping, hopping ), manipulation (e.g., throwing, bouncing), and stability (e.g., balancing, twisting); ·demonstrate the principles of movement (e.g., at various levels, in relationship to equipment, using different body parts) using locomotion/travelling, manipulation, and stability skills.

Specific Expectations:

Locomotion/ Travelling Skills

·travel in a variety of ways (e.g., leap, gallop) in different directions in response to signals (e.g., stop or go signals); ·travel in a variety of ways using different pathways (e.g., straight, curved, or zigzag pathways in creative dance). ·travel and change from one kind of locomotion/travelling movement to another (e.g., hopping to skipping); ·travel in a variety of ways, changing pathways and directions (e.g., in creative dance, dances from other countries).

Manipulation Skills

·jump forward with control, using a variety of take-offs and landings; ·demonstrate basic static balances (e.g., stork balance) without equipment; ·transfer their weight from one body part to another.

Stability Skills

·jump and land safely, using take-off combinations of one or two feet; ·balance on a variety of body parts, on and off equipment, while stationary and moving (e.g., balancing on a bench without moving, walking forward on a bench); ·transfer their body weight over low equipment in a variety of ways (e.g., from feet to hands to feet).

...........FOLD & PASTE HERE..........

·throw objects of various sizes and shapes underhand, using one or two hands and large targets (e.g., toss a bean bag through a hoop); ·catch objects of various sizes, shapes, and textures below the waist and using two hands (e.g., catch a utility or beach ball); ·bounce, while stationary, a ball with one hand.

·kick a stationary ball, using either foot, to a partner or to a large target; ·dribble a ball over a short distance, using their feet. ·bounce a ball while moving, using either hand;

Health & Physical Education: Fundamental Movement Skills

Grade 3

·perform

By the end of Grade 3, students will: the basic movement skills required to participate in physical activities: locomotion/travelling (e.g., dodging, chasing), manipulation (e.g., striking, hitting), and stability (e.g., balancing on equipment, performing rolls);

the principles of movement (e.g., in various body shapes; using sudden, sustained, fast, or slow movements) using locomotion/travelling, manipulation, and stability skills.

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will:

·perform the movement skills required to participate in lead-up games, gymnastics, dance, and outdoor pursuits: locomotion/ travelling (e.g., sliding, gliding), manipulation (e.g., kicking, trap ping), and stability (e.g., putting their weight on different body parts). ·demonstrate the principles of movement in acquiring and then beginning to refine movement skills (e.g., combining directions and levels in sequence).

·demonstrate

Specific Expectations:

·combine various locomotion/travelling movements with changes in direction and level, both with and without equipment (e.g., selecting two ways to travel on a bench while performing a change in direction and level); ·travel in various ways, and dodge stationary objects or opponents. ·combine locomotion/travelling skills in repeatable sequences, incorporating a variety of speeds and levels (e.g., in novelty dances, co-operative games).

·jump for distance or height over low objects;

·balance

in different positions, using different body parts and levels (e.g., on and off gymnastics equipment, responding to stimuli in creative dance); ·move their bodies in various ways (e.g., over, under, through, and around equipment).

·balance safely in a variety of static positions; ·grip, hang, and swing from equipment; ·jump from a low height, using a variety of turns, shapes, and directions.

...........PUNCH HOLES & INSERT INTO BINDER......

·throw a ball overhead using two hands, while stationary, to a large target or a stationary partner; ·catch, while stationary, objects of various sizes and shapes using two hands both above and below the waist (e.g., catch a nerf ball); ·hit a slowly moving object (e.g., a ball or a balloon) using various parts of the body, directing it to a partner or a large target.

·throw, both while stationary and while moving, a ball using a onehand overhand motion to a partner or large stationary target, or pass (hand off) and receive an object (e.g., relaying a baton); ·stop an object with the lower part of the body or with a piece of equipment (e.g., trapping a ball or disc with the foot or a piece of equipment).

...........FOLD & PASTE HERE..........

Health & Physical Education: Fundamental Movement Skills

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·perform the movement skills required to participate in games, gymnastics, dance, and outdoor pursuits alone and with others: locomotion/travelling (e.g., running in patterns in game activities), manipulation (e.g., catching, throwing), and stability (e.g., transferring their weight); ·demonstrate the principles of movement while refining their movement skills (e.g., matching the movements of a partner in a sequence).

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will: ·perform movement skills in the kind of combinations that are required in a variety of modified games, gymnastics, dance, and outdoor pursuits: locomotion/travelling (e.g., running, jumping, and hopping in combination, as performed in basketball or in a triple jump), manipulation (e.g., stepping sideways to get in position to bump or volley a ball, as performed in volleyball), and stability (e.g., running and jumping and landing, as in long jump); ·demonstrate the principles of movement while refining movement skills (e.g., combining body shapes and movements with changes in direction as in a dance or gymnastics routine).

Specific Expectations:

·perform a combination of locomotion/ travelling movements, incorporating a variety of speeds, in relationship to objects or others (e.g., square dancing, dodging or faking to escape or deceive an opponent). ·perform a combination of locomotion/ travelling skills using equipment (e.g., navigating through obstacle courses, skiing, skating); ·demonstrate a variety of running techniques (e.g., sprints, crosscountry runs).

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·catch, while moving, objects of various sizes and shapes (e.g., balls, Frisbees) using one or two hands; ·use a piece of equipment to send and receive an object to a partner or a target (e.g., propel a ball with a scoop, hit a badminton bird with a racquet, pass a ball using a floor-hockey stick); ·stick-handle an object (e.g., a ball, a disc) while moving in different directions and at different speeds, alone or with a partner; ·hit a ball with various parts of the body (e.g., heading a soccer ball).

·kick balls of various sizes and shapes for distance and accuracy (e.g., punt a football, kick a soccer ball); ·throw an object overhand or side arm, using the dominant hand, to a target or a partner for distance and accuracy; ·demonstrate goal-tending skills (e.g., blocking, trapping, catching, clearing) with or without a piece of equipment.

·perform a sequence of movements (e.g., rolling, balancing, jumping, ·jump for height (e.g., vertical wall jump); ·perform locomotion/travelling and stability skills in combination landing); ·perform rotations, both single rolls and rolls in sequence, in a variety (e.g., use a sprint approach and jump for distance, as in long jump); ·perform a variety of springing actions (e.g., spring into vertical roof directions on mats; tations such as quarter-turns on the floor or springs to mounts on ·transfer body weight in a variety of ways, using changes in direction equipment). and speed; ·dismount safely from equipment (e.g., from a bench or box-horse).

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Health & Physical Education: Fundamental Movement Skills

Grade 7

·combine ·apply

By the end of Grade 7, students will; a variety of movement skills (locomotion/travelling, manipu lation, and stability) in games, gymnastics, dance, and outdoor pursuits (e.g., basketball, flag football, gymnastics floor routines, novelty dances like the Alley Cat, orienteering);

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will; ·apply a variety of movement skills in combination and in sequence (locomotion/ travelling, manipulation, and stability) in physical activities (e.g., dance) and formal games (e.g., badminton, soccer); ·apply the principles of movement while refining movement skills (e.g., dribbling a ball quickly and slowly in basketball).

the principles of movement while refining movement skills (e.g., running into an open space to elude an opponent in soccer).

Specific Expectations:

·perform locomotion/travelling, manipulation, and stability skills in combination (e.g., in high jump: approaching the bar, taking off, and landing); ·move to external stimuli, using a variety of steps, sequences, directions, and hand actions (e.g., square dancing, doing fitness routines). ·apply locomotion/travelling, manipulation, and stability skills in combination and in sequence in specific physical activities (e.g., in volleyball: moving into a ready position to contact the ball).

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·send an object to a partner, to a target, or over a net, using a serve, an underhand throw or pass, or an overhand throw or pass (e.g., a volleyball underhand serve, underhand bump pass, or overhand volley pass); ·perform a variety of throws, passes, and shots after a faking motion; ·intercept objects (e.g., balls, Frisbees) while moving in various directions and at different speeds; ·pass an object to a moving partner (e.g., using a chest pass, bounce pass, two-hand overhead pass, one-hand overhead pass) for distance and accuracy;

·throw, pass, or shoot an object (e.g., a ball) to a partner or a target while being defended; ·shoot an object at a target (e.g., a basket or a goal) for distance and accuracy; ·hit an object (e.g., a ball or badminton bird) using the hand or a piece of equipment, using backhand and forehand motions; ·dribble a ball, using the dominant hand or foot, in different directions and at different speeds, while being defended; ·perform movement skills in sequence (e.g., shoot or pass a ball from a dribble).

·balance while moving from one static position to another on the floor and on equipment (gymnastics, dance); ·dismount from equipment and land safely and in control; ·transfer their body weight to get over pieces of apparatus (e.g., vaulting).

·balance in control while moving on and off equipment (e.g., step aerobics); ·perform rolls and balances in sequence (e.g., consecutive straddle rolls to a front support balance); ·perform rotations on equipment (e.g., front roll on a bench).

Health & Physical Education:

Overall Expectations

Active Participation

Learning Continuum

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, fitness activities, outdoor pursuits); ·recognize the importance of being physically active; ·acquire living skills (e.g., basic problem-solving, decisionmaking, goal-setting, and interpersonal skills) through physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits); ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities.

Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance); ·recognize the personal benefits of being physically active; ·acquire living skills (e.g., basic problem-solving, decisionmaking, goal-setting, and interpersonal skills) through physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits); ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities.

Specific Expectations:

·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., physical activity centres, dancing to music, tag games); ·display readiness to participate in the instructional program (e.g., joining in readily, wearing appropriate clothing, removing jewellery); ·follow instructions, pay attention, and attempt new activities. ·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., individual and group activities, dancing to music, co-operative games); ·identify the reasons for participating in regular physical activity; ·display readiness to participate in the instructional program (e.g., taking out and putting away equipment, joining in readily, wearing appropriate clothing, and applying sun protection when necessary); ·stay on task, follow instructions, pay attention, and see tasks through to completion.

Physical Activity

Physical Fitness

Living Skills

·participate in class or small-group discussion activities related to physical activity (e.g., goal setting through a theme-related activity such as a walk-run to the Olympics); ·work co-operatively with others (e.g., sharing equipment, helping others); ·demonstrate respect for others in group situations (e.g., being courteous, speaking kindly).

·participate in personal or group goal setting related to physical activity (e.g., to bring proper clothing for gymnastics, to bench step for two minutes); ·demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills and respectful behaviour (e.g., displaying etiquette, playing fairly, co-operating) in physical activities; ·provide help to and ask for help from group members.

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·participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity (e.g., animal-walk fitness circuit) for five to ten minutes; ·recognize that the heart is always beating and pumping blood to the muscles and the rest of the body, and that increased activity increases both the work of the heart and the speed of breathing.

·participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity (e.g., an aerobics routine) for five to ten minutes; ·explain the importance of stretching the large muscle groups through warm-ups before physical activity; ·recognize that the body needs activity for sustained amounts of time to improve the strength of the heart and lungs; ·assess their degree of exertion in physical activities (e.g., by calculating their heart beat or breathing rate).

Health & Physical Education:

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., skipping to music); ·recognize the personal benefits of being physically active; ·acquire living skills (e.g., basic problem-solving, decision-making, goal-setting, and interpersonal skills) through physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits); ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities.

Active Participation

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., tag games); ·identify the benefits of physical fitness; ·apply living skills-such as goal setting, conflict-resolution techniques, and interpersonal skills (e.g., playing fairly, co-operating, behaving respectfully) - to physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits); ·demonstrate a variety of interpersonal skills (e.g., playing fairly, cooperating, behaving respectfully); ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities.

Specific Expectations:

·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., tag games, outdoor pursuits); ·demonstrate an awareness of the importance of being physically active in their leisure time; ·describe the health benefits of participating in regular physical activity (e.g., developing a strong heart and lungs). ·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., lead-up games, creative dance); ·identify the factors that motivate participation in daily physical activity (e.g., fun, improved health, increased energy level).

·adopt an action plan based on an individual or group goal related to physical activity (e.g., power walking for one kilometre three times a week); ·demonstrate respect for the abilities and feelings of others (e.g., accepting everyone into the group); ·follow the rules of fair play in games and activities (e.g., giving everyone a chance to play); ·communicate positively to help and encourage others.

·use a goal-setting process (e.g., set a realistic goal, identify and address barriers, prepare an action plan, decide who can help, and identify how to know when the goal has been reached) related to physical activity; ·follow the rules of fair play in games and activities (e.g., displaying good sports etiquette by maintaining self-control whether winning or losing); ·demonstrate respectful behaviour towards others in the group (e.g., speaking kindly, refraining from hurtful comments, acknowledging others' ideas and opinions).

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·participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity (e.g., power walking) for eight to ten minutes; ·identify the new capabilities (skills) that result from improved physical fitness (e.g., being able to run farther, requiring shorter rest periods); ·assess their degree of exertion in physical activities (e.g., by taking a "talk test").

·improve their fitness levels by participating in vigorous physical activities (e.g., line dancing) for sustained periods of time (e.g., ten to fifteen minutes), including appropriate warm-up and cool-down procedures; ·recognize that the health of the heart and lungs is improved by physical activity (e.g., aerobics activities to music); ·recognize that muscle strength and endurance increase with exercise and physical activity; ·monitor their pulse rates before and after physical activity (e.g., locate and compare their pulses before and after taking part in physical activity, and explain the reasons for differences in pulse rates).

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Health & Physical Education:

Grade 5

Active Participation Learning Continuum Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will; ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., rope skipping to music); ·apply living skills, including interpersonal skills, in physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits) and describe the benefits of using these skills in a variety of physical activities; ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities, and begin to take responsibility for their own safety.

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., one-on-one or two-on-two soccer-type games); ·identify the components of physical fitness and describe physical activities that improve these components; ·apply living skills (e.g., goal setting, conflict-resolution techniques, and interpersonal skills that contribute to positive group interaction) to physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits); ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities.

Specific Expectations:

·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., gymnastic stations, fitness circuit); ·describe the factors that motivate participation in daily physical activity (e.g., seeing an activity on TV, idolizing a sports hero, doing an activity with your family) and connect them to various activities. ·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., crosscountry running, co-operative games); ·describe the factors that motivate participation in daily physical activity (e.g., the influence of friends, enthusiasm for the outdoors) and begin to consider them when making their own choices of physical activities.

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·improve their fitness levels by participating in vigorous physical activities (e.g., rope skipping to music) for sustained periods of time (e.g., ten to fifteen minutes), including appropriate warm-up and cooldown procedures; ·describe the components of physical fitness and relate each component to an appropriate physical activity (e.g., cardiorespiratory skipping; muscle endurance - abdominal crunches; muscle strength push-ups; flexibility - sit and reach); ·assess their progress in fitness-enhancing activities at regular intervals (e.g., weekly monitoring of their pulses before and after running or completing exercise circuits).

·improve their personal fitness levels by participating in vigorous physical activities (e.g., Ultimate Frisbee) for sustained periods of time (e.g., ten to fifteen minutes), including appropriate warm-up and cool-down procedures; ·assess their progress in fitness-enhancing activities at regular intervals (e.g., daily, weekly, or monthly monitoring of their pulses before and after active games, stretching, or push-ups).

·incorporate time-management and organizational skills in the goalsetting process (e.g., set a realistic goal, identify and address barriers, prepare an action plan, decide who can help, and identify how to know when the goal has been reached) related to physical activity or personal fitness; ·follow the rules of fair play in games and activities (e.g., by displaying sports etiquette, by encouraging others with positive comments).

·implement and revise as required plans of action to achieve personal fitness goals; ·follow the rules of fair play in games and activities, and support the efforts of peers to improve their skills.

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Health & Physical Education: Active Partcipation

Grade 7

By the end of Grade 7, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., power walking, hiking); ·identify the benefits of each component of physical fitness (e.g., cardiorespiratory fitness - healthy heart and lungs); ·apply living skills (e.g., basic problem-solving, decision-making, goal-setting, and conflict-resolution techniques) in physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, music, outdoor pursuits); ·transfer appropriate interpersonal skills (e.g., exhibiting etiquette, fair play, co-operation, and respectful behaviour) to new physical activities; ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities, and continue to take responsibility for their own safety.

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will: ·participate on a regular basis in physical activities that maintain or improve physical fitness (e.g., aerobics to music); ·apply living skills (e.g., basic problem-solving, decision-making, goal-setting, and conflict-resolution techniques) in physical activities (e.g., games, gymnastics, dance, outdoor pursuits); ·transfer appropriate interpersonal skills (e.g., exhibiting etiquette, fair play, co-operation, and respectful behaviour) to new physical activities; ·follow safety procedures related to physical activity, equipment, and facilities, and continue to take responsibility for personal safety.

Specific Expectations:

·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., three-onthree basketball, aerobics); ·apply the factors that motivate their daily activities (e.g., competing, attaining improved fitness levels) to their personal action plans. ·participate vigorously in all aspects of the program (e.g., indoor soccer, cricket); ·apply the factors that motivate their daily activities (e.g., health benefits, interpersonal interaction) to positively influence others (e.g., family, friends, members of the community) to become physically active.

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·improve

or maintain their personal fitness levels by participating in vigorous fitness activities for sustained periods of time (e.g., a minimum of fifteen minutes) without undue fatigue; ·identify the training principles that affect their fitness levels (e.g., frequency, intensity, time, and type - F.I.T.T.); ·assess their own levels of physical fitness on an ongoing basis, comparing with past performances, and apply the information to their personal goals.

·improve or maintain their fitness levels by participating in vigorous fitness activities for sustained periods of time (e.g., a minimum of fifteen minutes) without undue fatigue; ·assess their personal levels of physical fitness on an ongoing basis comparing to past performances, and apply the information to their short- and long-term goals.

·apply a goal-setting process (e.g., set a realistic goal, identify and ·apply a goal-setting process (e.g., set a realistic goal, identify and address barriers, prepare an action plan, determine and access address barriers, prepare an action plan, determine and access sources of support, and identify how to know when the goal has sources of support, and identify how to know when the goal has been reached) to short- and long-term goals related to physical been reached) to short-term goals related to physical activity or peractivity or fitness; sonal fitness; ·participate fairly in games or activities (e.g., accepting and respect- ·demonstrate respectful behaviour towards the feelings and ideas of ing decisions made by officials, whether they are students, teachers, others; ·follow the rules of fair play and sports etiquette in games and or coaches). activities (e.g., maintaining self-control whether winning or losing).

Learning Continuum

Language: Writing

Grade 1

Overall Expectations

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·communicate ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes; ·organize information so that the writing conveys a clear message; ·write simple sentences using proper punctuation; ·produce short pieces of writing using simple forms; ·use some materials from other media to enhance their writing; ·begin to revise written work, with the assistance of the teacher; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·communicate ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes; ·organize ideas in a logical sequence; ·begin to write more elaborate sentences by using adjectives and adverbs; ·produce short pieces of writing using simple forms; ·use some materials from other media to enhance their writing; ·revise and edit written work, focusing on specific features, with assistance from the teacher; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

Specific Expectations:

Grammar

·write simple but complete sentences; ·correctly form the plural of single-syllable words. ·identify nouns as words that name people, places, and things; ·use connecting words to link simple sentences; ·use a variety of sentence types; ·use adjectives appropriately for description; ·use the negative correctly. ·use ·use ·use and question marks appropriately; capital letters for proper nouns; a comma correctly to separate items in a list, in dates, in addresses.

Punctuation

Spelling

·correctly spell words identified by the teacher (on charts/ lists posted in the room and on individual word lists); ·use phonics to spell unfamiliar words; ·use capitals to begin sentences and to differentiate certain words (the pronoun I, names, days of the week, and months).

·correctly spell words identified by the teacher; ·use phonics to spell more difficult words; ·use es to form the plural of certain words; ·begin to use resources to confirm spelling.

Visual Presentation

Word Use & Vocabulary Building

·use words from their oral vocabulary as well as less familiar words from class-displayed word lists.

·use words from their oral vocabulary, personal word lists, and class lists compiled through brainstorming.

·print legibly (capitals and small letters); ·leave spaces between words.

·use titles to summarize content; ·use words and pictures to create a message; ·use underlining, colour, size of print for emphasis; ·print legibly; ·use margins and spacing appropriately.

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·use a period at the end of a statement; ·use a comma after a salutation in a letter or note.

Language: Writing

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will: ·communicate ideas and information for specific purposes and to specific audiences; ·write materials that show a growing ability to express their points of view and to reflect on their own experiences; ·organize information into short paragraphs that contain a main idea and related details; ·begin to use compound sentences and use sentences of varying length; ·produce pieces of writing using a variety of forms; ·use materials from other media to enhance their writing; ·revise and edit their work, using feedback from the teacher and their peers; ·proofread and correct their final drafts; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will: ·communicate ideas and information for a variety of purposes and to specific audiences; ·begin to write for more complex purposes; ·organize and develop ideas using paragraphs; ·use simple and compound sentences and vary their sentence structure; ·produce pieces of writing using a variety of specific forms and materials from other media to enhance their writing; ·produce media texts using writing and materials from other media; ·revise and edit their work, using feedback from the teacher and their peers; ·proofread and correct their final drafts, focusing on grammar, punctuation, and spelling; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

Specific Expectations:

·use correct subject-verb agreement; ·correctly use nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs; ·use irregular plurals correctly. ·use verb tenses correctly and appropriately; ·identify various parts of speech; ·write simple and compound sentences; ·use a variety of sentence types correctly and appropriately; ·use connecting words correctly to link ideas in a paragraph.

·use the apostrophe in common contractions; ·use exclamation marks appropriately.

·use the apostrophe to indicate possession; ·use quotation marks for direct speech.

·use phonics and memorized spelling rules to increase accuracy in spelling; ·use a variety of sources to check the spelling of unfamiliar words; ·use abbreviations to spell frequently used words; ·divide words into syllables.

·use phonics and knowledge of word structure and meaning to spell words correctly; ·use a dictionary and thesaurus to confirm spelling.

·use common prefixes and suffixes; ·use compound words; ·introduce new words from their reading into their writing; ·choose words that are most appropriate for their purpose; ·use a dictionary to expand vocabulary.

·introduce vocabulary from other subject areas into their writing; ·use synonyms and antonyms; ·choose words that are most effective for their purpose; ·use a dictionary and thesaurus to expand vocabulary.

·accurately use titles and subheadings as organizers; ·use visual material to reinforce a message; ·select and correctly use the format suited to their purpose for writing; ·print legibly and begin to use cursive writing.

·use proper form for paragraphs; ·label and use pictures and diagrams appropriately; ·print legibly and use cursive writing.

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Language: Writing

Grade 5

·communicate ideas and information for a variety of purposes and to specific audiences; ·use writing for various purposes and in a range of contexts, including school work; ·organize information to convey a central idea, using well-developed paragraphs that focus on a main idea and give some relevant supporting details; ·use simple, compound, and complex sentences; ·produce pieces of writing using a variety of forms, narrative techniques, and materials from other media; ·produce media texts using writing and materials from other media; ·revise and edit their work, seeking feedback from others and focusing on content, organization, and appropriateness of vocabulary for audience; ·proofread and correct their final drafts, focusing on grammar, punctuation, and spelling; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

·communicate ideas and information for a variety of purposes (to inform, to persuade, to explain) and to specific audiences; ·use writing for various purposes and in a range of contexts, including school work; ·organize information to convey a central idea, using well-linked paragraphs; ·use a variety of sentence types and sentence structures appropriate for their purposes; ·produce pieces of writing using a variety of forms, techniques and resources appropriate to the form and purpose, and materials from other media; ·produce media texts using writing and materials from other media; ·revise and edit their work in collaboration with others, seeking and evaluating feedback, and focusing on content, organization, and appropriateness of vocabulary for audience. ·proofread and correct their final drafts, focusing on grammar, punctuation, spelling, and conventions of style; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

By the end of Grade 5, students will:

By the end of Grade 6, students will:

Specific Expectations:

·use phrases appropriately to clarify meaning; ·use noun-pronoun agreement correctly. ·use subordinate clauses correctly; ·use adjective and adverb phrases correctly and effectively; ·use the positive, comparative, and superlative forms of adjectives correctly; ·use verb tenses consistently throughout a piece of writing.

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·use quotation marks for passages of dialogue; ·use correct punctuation in final drafts.

·use a colon before a list, between numbers in time, and after a greeting.

·use phonics, the meaning and function of words, and some generalizations about spelling to spell with accuracy; ·use the hyphen to divide words at the ends of lines and to spell compound words and fractions; ·use a variety of resources to confirm spelling.

·apply generalizations about spelling to identify exceptions to spelling patterns; ·use a variety of resources to confirm spelling of common exceptions to spelling patterns.

·routinely introduce new words from their reading into their writing; ·use levels of language appropriate to their purpose; ·select and use words to create specific effects.

·select words and expressions to create specific effects; ·frequently introduce vocabulary from other subject areas into their writing; ·use homonyms correctly.

·accurately use graphs and captions.

·accurately use appropriate organizers; ·integrate media materials into their writing to enhance their message.

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Language: Writing

Grade 7

·communicate ideas and information for a variety of purposes (to outline an argument, to report on observations) and to specific audiences, using forms appropriate for their purpose and topic; ·use writing for various purposes and in a range of contexts, including school work; ·organize information to develop a central idea, using well-linked and welldeveloped paragraphs; ·use a variety of sentence types and sentence structures, and sentences of varying length; ·produce pieces of writing using a variety of forms, techniques and resources appropriate to the form and purpose, and materials from other media; ·produce media texts using writing and materials from other media; ·revise and edit their work, focusing on content and elements of style independently and in collaboration with others; ·proofread and correct their final drafts, focusing on grammar, punctuation, spelling, and conventions of style; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

·communicate ideas and information for a variety of purposes (to evaluate information, to compare points of view) and to specific audiences, using forms appropriate for their purpose and features appropriate to the form; ·use writing for various purposes and in a range of contexts, including school work; ·organize information and ideas creatively as well as logically, using paragraph structures appropriate for their purpose; ·use a wide variety of sentence types and sentence structures, with conscious attention to style; ·produce pieces of writing using a variety of specific forms, techniques and resources appropriate to the form and purpose, and materials from other media; ·produce media texts using writing and materials from other media; ·revise and edit their work, focusing on content and on more complex elements of style, independently or using feedback from others; ·proofread and correct their final drafts, focusing on grammar, spelling, punctuation, and conventions of style; ·use and spell correctly the vocabulary appropriate for this grade level; ·use correctly the conventions (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.) specified for this grade level (see below).

By the end of Grade 7, students will:

By the end of Grade 8, students will:

Specific Expectations:

·identify and name major parts of the sentence; ·use a variety of subordinate clauses correctly and appropriately for their purpose; ·use modifiers, including prepositional phrases, correctly and with increasing effectiveness; ·use a variety of sentence types (statements, exclamations, questions, commands) appropriately and effectively;

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·use case for pronouns correctly; ·use more complex sentence structures correctly.

·use periods consistently after initials, after abbreviations containing lower-case letters, and in decimal numbers; ·use parentheses appropriately.

·use a period and commas accurately with quotation marks; ·use the comma to separate an introductory phrase or clause from the main part of the sentence, and to separate phrases and clauses in a series; ·use quotation marks to distinguish words being discussed and to indicate titles of songs, poems, essays, and articles; ·use the ellipsis (three periods) to show that words have been omitted from a quotation or that a sentence is unfinished; ·use a dash to show a sentence break or interrupted speech.

·spell a wide range of commonly used words correctly; ·identify some generalizations about spelling and use them to spell difficult unfamiliar words; ·use a variety of resources to spell difficult unfamiliar words.

·use

generalizations about spelling and their knowledge of how words are formed to spell technical terms and unfamiliar words.

·give evidence of an expanding vocabulary in their writing; ·show a growing awareness of the expressiveness of words in their word choice.

·use the vocabulary expected for this grade level accurately and imaginatively in their writing; ·select and use their words with increasing sophistication and effectiveness.

·use printing and cursive writing with increasing speed and control; ·use printing and cursive writing appropriately for the purpose; ·use spreadsheets appropriately to convey specific types of information.

·use italics or underlining for titles of books, movies, plays, and magazines; ·use different styles of type appropriately for specific purposes; ·use spreadsheets, computer-generated charts, and graphs for specific purposes and in appropriate contexts.

Language: Reading

Overall Expectations

Learning Continuum

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·read a variety of simple written materials for different purposes; ·read aloud in a way that communicates the meaning; ·read independently, using reading strategies appropriate for this grade level; ·express clear responses to written materials, relating the ideas in them (thoughts, feelings, experiences) to their own knowledge and experience; ·independently select stories and other reading materials by a variety of authors; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use some conventions of written materials to help them understand what they read.

Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·read a variety of simple written materials for different purposes; ·read aloud in a way that communicates the meaning; ·read independently, using reading strategies appropriate for this grade level; ·express clear responses to written materials, relating the ideas in them (thoughts, feelings, experiences) to their own knowledge and experience; ·independently select stories and other reading materials by a variety of authors; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use some conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Specific Expectations:

Reasoning & Critical Thinking

·use their knowledge and experience to understand what they read; ·retell a simple story in proper sequence and recall information in it accurately; ·follow written directions; ·reread all or parts of a written piece to clarify their understanding of its meaning; ·predict what may happen next in a story, and revise or confirm predictions; ·express their thoughts and feelings about a story. ·restate information in a short non-fiction text in their own words; ·retell a story in proper sequence, identify the main idea and the characters, and discuss some aspects of the story; ·use a variety of reading strategies to understand a piece of writing; ·express their thoughts and feelings about ideas in a piece of writing.

Understanding of Form & Style

·identify ways in which different kinds of written materials are organized.

·identify characteristics of different forms of written materials.

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Knowledge of Language Structures

·use their knowledge of sentence structure in speech to understand written sentences; ·use predictable word patterns to determine the meaning of sentences.

·use their knowledge of sentence structure in oral and written language to determine the meaning of a sentence; ·use their knowledge of word endings to recognize the same word in different forms; ·understand that the same sounds may be represented by different spellings.

Vocabulary Building

·use pictures and illustrations to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words; ·use simple sound patterns to learn new words; ·use phonics as an aid in learning new words.

·substitute one word for another in a meaningful way; ·separate words into parts and use patterns of word structure to determine the meaning of new words; ·use phonics as an aid in learning new words.

Use of Conventions

·use punctuation to help them understand what they read; ·understand the use of some conventions of spelling; ·use some basic conventions of formal texts to locate information.

·use punctuation to help them understand what they read; ·use and interpret some conventions of formal texts.

Language: Reading

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will: ·read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials for different purposes; ·read aloud, speaking clearly and with expression; ·read independently, using a variety of reading strategies; ·express clear responses to written materials, relating the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience and to ideas in other materials that they have read; ·select material that they need from a variety of sources; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will: ·read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials for different purposes; ·read aloud, speaking clearly and with expression; ·read independently, using a variety of reading strategies; ·state their own interpretation of a written work, using evidence from the work and from their own knowledge and experience; ·decide on a specific purpose for reading, and select the material that they need from a variety of appropriate sources; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Specific Expectations:

·identify and restate the main idea in a piece of writing, and cite supporting details; ·identify and describe some elements of stories; ·distinguish between fact and fiction; ·begin to make inferences while reading; ·use familiar vocabulary and the context to determine the meaning of a passage containing unfamiliar words; ·begin to develop their own opinions by considering some ideas from various written materials. ·identify the main idea in a piece of writing, and provide supporting details; ·identify and describe elements of stories; ·make inferences while reading; ·make judgements about what they read on the basis of evidence; ·make predictions while reading a narrative piece on the basis of evidence; ·retell a story by adapting it for presentation in another way; ·develop their opinions by reading a variety of materials; ·begin to develop research skills.

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·identify and describe different forms of writing; ·use their knowledge of the organization and characteristics of different forms of writing as a guide before and during reading.

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·identify various forms of writing and describe their main characteristics; ·use their knowledge of the organization and characteristics of different forms of writing to understand and use content.

·use their knowledge of word order in oral and written language to determine the meaning of sentences; ·use basic grammatical relationships to help them understand what they read.

·use their knowledge of oral and written language structures and of elements of grammar to understand the meaning of sentences; ·use patterns of word structure to determine pronunciation.

·use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words; ·understand frequently used specialized terms in different subject areas.

·identify root words and use them to determine the pronunciation and meaning of unfamiliar words; ·identify synonyms and antonyms for familiar words; ·use a dictionary to expand their vocabulary; ·understand specialized terms in different subject areas.

·use punctuation to help them understand what they read; ·identify various conventions of formal texts and use them to find information.

·use punctuation to help them understand what they read; ·use various conventions of formal texts to reinforce understanding of ideas.

Language: Reading

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials for different purposes; ·read aloud, adjusting speed according to purpose and audience; ·read independently, selecting appropriate reading strategies; ·explain their interpretation of a written work, supporting it with evidence from the work and from their own knowledge and experience; ·decide on a specific purpose for reading, and select the material that they need from a variety of appropriate sources; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will: ·read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials for different purposes; ·read aloud, showing understanding of the material and awareness of the audience; ·read independently, selecting appropriate reading strategies; ·explain their interpretation of a written work, supporting it with evidence from the work and from their own knowledge and experience; ·decide on a specific purpose for reading, and select the material that they need from a variety of appropriate sources; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Specific Expectations:

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·describe a series of events in a written work, using evidence from the work; ·describe how various elements in a story function; ·make judgements and draw conclusions about the content in written materials, using evidence from the materials; ·begin to identify a writer's or character's point of view; ·select appropriate reading strategies; ·use research skills.

·identify the elements of a story and explain how they relate to each other; ·make predictions while reading a story or novel, using various clues; ·summarize and explain the main ideas in information materials, and cite details that support the main ideas; ·make judgements and draw conclusions about ideas in written materials on the basis of evidence; ·identify a writer's perspective or character's motivation; ·select appropriate reading strategies; ·plan a research project and carry out the research.

·identify various forms of writing and describe their characteristics; ·use their knowledge of the characteristics of different forms of writing to help them select the appropriate materials for a specific purpose.

·identify different forms of writing and describe their characteristics; ·use their knowledge of the characteristics of different forms of writing to select the appropriate materials for a specific purpose.

·use their knowledge of elements of grammar and oral and written language structures to understand what they read; ·recognize patterns of word structure, and use them to determine pronunciation.

·use their knowledge of the elements of grammar and the structure of words and sentences to understand what they read; ·use generalizations about spelling to help them pronounce words.

·identify root words, prefixes, and suffixes, and use them to determine the pronunciation and meaning of unfamiliar words; ·identify synonyms and antonyms; ·use a dictionary and a thesaurus to expand their vocabulary; ·use specialized terms in different subject areas, as appropriate.

·use their knowledge of word origins and derivations to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words; ·consult a dictionary to confirm pronunciation and/or find the meaning of unfamiliar words; ·use a thesaurus to expand their vocabulary; ·understand specialized words or terms, as necessary.

·use punctuation to help them understand what they read; ·locate and interpret information, using various conventions of formal texts.

·use punctuation to help them understand what they read; ·use a variety of conventions of formal texts to find and verify information.

Language: Reading

Grade 7

By the end of Grade 7, students will: ·read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials for different purposes; ·read aloud, showing understanding of the material and awareness of the audience; ·read independently, selecting appropriate reading strategies; ·explain their interpretation of a written work, supporting it with evidence from the work and from their own knowledge and experience; ·decide on a specific purpose for reading, and select the material that they need from a variety of appropriate sources; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will: ·read a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials for different purposes; ·read aloud, showing understanding of the material and awareness of the audience; ·read independently, selecting appropriate reading strategies; ·explain their interpretation of a written work, supporting it with evidence from the work and from their own knowledge and experience; ·decide on a specific purpose for reading, and select the material that they need from a variety of appropriate sources; ·understand the vocabulary and language structures appropriate for this grade level; ·use conventions of written materials to help them understand and use the materials.

Specific Expectations:

·explain how various elements in a story function in relation to each other; ·identify the main ideas in information materials, and explain how the details support the main ideas; ·make judgements and draw conclusions about ideas in written materials on the basis of evidence; ·clarify and develop their own points of view by examining the ideas of others; ·select appropriate reading strategies; ·plan a research project and carry out the research. ·explain how various elements in a story function in relation to each other; ·identify the main ideas in information materials, and explain how the details support the main ideas and question and evaluate the ideas in the material; ·make judgements and draw conclusions about ideas in written materials on the basis of evidence; ·clarify and broaden their own points of view by examining the ideas of others; ·select appropriate reading strategies; ·plan a research project and carry out the research. ·identify various forms of writing and describe their key features; ·use their knowledge of the characteristics of different forms of writing to help them select the appropriate materials for a specific purpose; ·identify some stylistic devices in literary works and explain their us.

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·identify various forms of writing and describe their key features; ·use their knowledge of the characteristics of different forms of writing to help them select the appropriate materials for a specific purpose; ·identify some stylistic devices in literary works and explain their use.

·use their knowledge of the elements of grammar and the structure of words and sentences to understand what they read.

·use their knowledge of the elements of grammar and the structure of words and sentences to understand what they read.

·use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words; ·use a thesaurus to expand their vocabulary; ·use the special terminology in a particular area of study, as necessary.

·use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words; ·use a thesaurus to expand their vocabulary; ·use the special terminology in a particular area of study, as necessary.

·use punctuation to help them understand written material; ·use a variety of conventions of formal texts to locate information they need.

·use punctuation to help them understand written material; ·use a variety of conventions of formal texts to locate information they need.

Language: Oral and Visual Communication

Overall Expectations

Learning Continuum

Grade 2

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·communicate messages, and follow basic instructions and directions; ·ask questions about their immediate environment and offer personal opinions; ·listen and react to stories and recount personal experiences; ·respond to familiar or predictable language patterns by joining in or using choral response; ·apply some of the basic rules of participating in a conversation and working with others; ·view, read, and listen to media works with simple messages or factual information and describe what they have learned; ·create some simple media works; ·use the convention of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·communicate messages, and follow instructions and directions; ·listen to discussions on familiar topics and ask relevant questions; ·retell stories and recount personal experiences, presenting events in a coherent sequence; ·talk about characters and situations in stories, and information in non-fiction materials, and relate them to personal experience; ·apply the rules of participating in a conversation and working with others; ·view, read, and listen to media works with simple messages or factual information and describe what they have learned; ·create simple media works; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Non-verbal Communication Use of Words & Oral Language Skills

Specific Expectations:

·use familiar classroom vocabulary and oral language structures in conversations with their teacher and peers; ·use linking words such as and, then, and but to connect ideas in speech; ·present ideas in speech in a coherent sequence; ·notice and respond to unusual features of language. ·use appropriate vocabulary and oral language structures to express emotions in a variety of situations; ·use linking words such as because, if, and after to organize ideas in speech; ·recognize the beginning and end of a spoken text, and present their own remarks in a coherent order; ·experiment with rhyme, rhythm, and word play to create humorous effects. ·use appropriate gestures and tone of voice, as well as natural speech rhythms, when speaking.

Group Skills

·allow others to speak, and wait their turn in conversations or class discussions; ·listen to and comment positively on the contributions of others in group and class discussions.

·participate in group discussions, demonstrating a sense of when to speak, when to listen, and how much to say; ·use speech appropriately for various purposes.

Media Communication Skills

·view, read, and listen to media works to obtain information and to complete assigned tasks; ·arrange still pictures and/or photographs in a sequence to create their own stories; ·distinguish between real life and life depicted in animated works; ·create some simple media works.

·view, read, and listen to media works to obtain information and to complete assigned tasks; ·distinguish between a commercial and a program and between an advertisement and an article; ·identify different technologies and understand that they serve different functions; ·create some simple media works.

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·use simple gestures, volume, and tone of voice to communicate their wishes and needs; ·interpret and respond appropriately to non-verbal cues.

Language: Oral and Visual Communication

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will; ·communicate messages, and follow and give directions for a variety of activities and events; ·listen to discussions and ask questions to clarify meaning; ·retell stories, demonstrating an understanding of basic story structure and including information about characters, action, and story ending; ·talk about characters and situations in stories, and information and ideas in non-fiction materials; ·apply the rules for working with others; ·view, read, and listen to media works that convey messages or information and talk about what they have learned; ·create a variety of simple media works; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will; ·communicate various types of messages, explain some ideas and procedures, and follow the teacher's instructions; ·ask questions on a variety of topics and respond appropriately to the questions of others; ·communicate a main idea about a topic and describe a short sequence of events; ·express and respond to ideas and opinions concisely and clearly; ·contribute and work constructively in groups; ·demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic; ·identify several types of media works and some techniques used in them; ·analyse media works; ·create media works; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Specific Expectations:

·use linking words such as although, instead of, and so that to organize and clarify ideas in speech; ·rephrase to clarify their ideas; ·speak on a variety of topics in classroom discussions using some specialized language, and select words carefully to convey their intended meaning. ·use some vocabulary learned in other subject areas in simple contexts; ·use effective openings and closings in oral presentations.

·use appropriate volume, tone of voice, gestures, and stance when speaking, making a presentation, or reading aloud; ·use pauses and repetition effectively for emphasis in speech.

·use appropriate tone of voice and gestures in social and classroom activities.

·contribute ideas appropriate to the topic in group discussion and listen to the ideas of others.

·present information to their peers in a focused and organized form on a topic of mutual interest; ·listen to others and stay on topic in group discussion; ·use appropriate strategies to organize and carry out group projects.

·identify basic elements of text and basic techniques that help convey the message in print and media materials; ·use basic terminology to discuss visual images in print and electronic media; ·create simple media works.

·identify ·identify ·create

camera angles and distance from the subject in photographs and describe their effects on the viewer's perceptions;

and describe the different types of advertising that they encounter in their surroundings; a variety of media works.

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Language: Oral and Visual Communication

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·communicate information, explain a variety of ideas and procedures, and follow the teacher's instructions; ·ask and answer questions on a variety of topics to acquire and clarify information; ·communicate a main idea about a topic and describe a sequence of events; ·express and respond to ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately; ·contribute and work constructively in groups; ·demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic; ·identify various types of media works and some of the techniques used in them; ·analyse media works; ·create a variety of media works; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will: ·make reports, describe and explain a course of action, and follow detailed instructions; ·ask and answer questions to obtain and clarify information; ·communicate a main idea about a topic and describe a sequence of events; ·express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately; ·contribute and work constructively in groups; ·demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic; ·identify the main types of media works and the most characteristic techniques used in them; ·analyse media works; ·create a variety of media works; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Specific Expectations:

·use vocabulary learned in other subject areas in a variety of contexts; ·use appropriate words and structures in discussions or classroom presentations; ·identify appropriate uses for slang and colloquial language; ·use complex syntactical structures. ·use a varied vocabulary and a range of sentence structures to add interest to their remarks; ·speak correctly, observing common grammatical rules such as subject-verb agreement, noun-pronoun agreement, and consistency of verb tense; ·recognize and interpret figurative language in the speech of others and use it to add interest to their own remarks.

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·speak clearly when making presentations; ·contribute ideas to help solve problems, and listen and respond constructively to the ideas of others when working in a group; ·discuss with peers and the teacher strategies for communicating effectively with others in a variety of situations.

·use constructive strategies in small-group discussions; ·follow up on others' ideas, and recognize the validity of different points of view in group discussions or problem-solving activities.

·identify the main characteristics of some familiar media; ·recognize that media works are composed of a series of separate elements; ·list and describe many of the ways in which the media provide information; ·create a variety of media works.

·identify questionable strategies presenters use to influence an audience; ·identify the various types of professionals involved in producing a media work and describe the jobs they do; ·analyse and assess a media work and express a considered viewpoint about it; ·create a variety of media works.

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·use tone of voice, gestures, and other non-verbal cues to help clarify meaning when describing events, telling stories, reading aloud, making presentations, stating opinions, etc.

·use tone of voice and gestures to enhance the message and help convince or persuade listeners in conversations, discussions, or presentations.

Language: Oral and Visual Communication

Grade 7

By the end of Grade 7, students will: ·use instructions and explanations to plan and organize work; ·ask questions and discuss different aspects of ideas in order to clarify their thinking; ·listen to and communicate related ideas, and narrate real and fictional events in a sequence; ·express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately; ·contribute and work constructively in groups; ·demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic; ·identify various types of media works and a variety of the techniques used in them; ·analyse and interpret media works; ·create a variety of media works; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will: ·provide clear answers to questions and well-constructed explanations or instructions in classroom work; ·listen attentively to organize and classify information and to clarify thinking; ·listen to and communicate connected ideas and relate carefullyconstructed narratives about real and fictional events; ·express and respond to a range of ideas and opinions concisely, clearly, and appropriately; ·contribute and work constructively in groups; ·demonstrate the ability to concentrate by identifying main points and staying on topic; ·identify a wide range of media works and describe the techniques used in them; ·analyse and interpret media works; ·create media works of some technical complexity; ·use the conventions of oral language, and of the various media, that are appropriate to the grade (see below).

Specific Expectations:

·regularly incorporate new vocabulary into discussions and presentations; ·use words and phrases to signal that a new or important point is about to be made; ·use analogies and comparisons to develop and clarify ideas; ·use repetition for emphasis; ·rehearse and revise their material before making a presentation. ·use the specialized vocabulary appropriate to the topic in oral presentations; ·identify subtle effects in the dialogue in films or dramas; ·identify the characteristics of different types of speech and use them appropriately.

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·identify some of the ways in which non-verbal communication techniques can affect audiences, and use these techniques in their own speech to arouse and maintain interest, and convince and persuade their listeners; ·use eye contact, variations in pace, appropriate gestures, and such devices as the "pause for effect" in presentations.

·use tone of voice and body language to clarify meaning during conversations and presentations; ·adjust their delivery to suit the size of different groups; ·use resource materials to illustrate ideas in presentations.

·listen and respond constructively to alternative ideas or viewpoints; ·express ideas and opinions confidently but without trying to dominate discussion; ·analyse factors that contribute to the success, or lack of success, of a discussion.

·contribute collaboratively in group situations by asking questions and building on the ideas of others; ·work with members of their group to establish clear purposes and procedures for solving problems and completing projects.

·identify and describe categories of works typical of a particular medium; ·describe the function of different elements in magazines and newspapers; ·describe and explain how sound and image work together to create an effect; ·create a variety of media works.

·identify and analyse the formulas used in different categories of media works; ·describe a media work, outlining its different parts and the steps and choices involved in planning and producing it; ·evaluate the effectiveness of various informational media works; ·create media works of some technical complexity.

Learning Continuum

THE Arts: Music

Overall Expectations

Learning Continuum

Grade 1 Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will:

·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·recognize a variety of sound sources and use some in performing and creating music; ·use correctly the vocabulary and musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·identify and perform music from various cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their response to music in ways appropriate for this grade.

By the end of Grade 1, students will:

·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·use correctly the vocabulary and musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·listen to and identify music from different cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their response to music in ways appropriate for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

·identify correctly specific sounds heard in their classroom environment; ·identify examples of beat in daily life and in music; ·identify rhythms in language; ·distinguish between beat and rhythm in a simple song; ·identify higher- and lower-pitched sounds in their environment and in music; ·identify examples of dynamics (the varying degree of volume of sound) in their environment and in music; ·identify different tempi (faster and slower speeds) in their environment and in music; ·reproduce specific pitches in group call-and-response activities. ·identify examples of beat in their environment and in music; ·identify rhythmic patterns; ·distinguish between beat and rhythm in a variety of pieces of music; ·identify higher- and lower-pitched sounds in a familiar melody; ·reproduce specific pitches in call-and-response activities; ·identify examples of dynamics in pieces of music and describe how the loudness and softness are achieved; ·identify the tempo of various pieces of music; ·identify the four families of orchestral instruments (strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion).

Knowledge of Elements

·express their responses to various kinds of music by means of appropriate movements; ·sing music from a variety of cultures and historical periods; ·create rhythmic patterns, using a variety of sounds; ·produce a specific effect, using various sound sources; ·sing expressively, showing awareness of the meaning of the text; ·create simple accompaniments and sound effects to songs, poems, and chants, using the voice, instruments, or "found" materials; ·accompany songs, using appropriate rhythm instruments, body percussion, or "found" instruments; ·create and perform musical compositions, applying their knowledge of the elements of music and patterns of sound; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·identify ways in which music is a part of their daily life; ·describe their responses to music that they sing and hear, using appropriate vocabulary or musical terminology; ·recognize that mood can be created through music.

·sing music from a variety of cultures and historical periods; ·create rhythmic and melodic patterns, using a variety of sounds; ·create simple patterned movement to familiar music, using their knowledge of beat and rhythm; ·sing simple, familiar songs in tune in unison; ·sing expressively, showing an understanding of the text; ·accompany songs in an expressive way, using appropriate rhythm instruments, body percussion, or "found" instruments; ·create and perform musical compositions, applying their knowledge of the elements of music and patterns of sound; ·create short songs and instrumental pieces, using a variety of sound sources; ·produce a specific effect, using various sound sources. ·express their response to music from a variety of cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·recognize that mood can be created through music; ·explain, using basic musical terminology, their preference for specific songs or pieces of music; ·recognize and explain the effects of different musical choices.

Critical Thinking

Creative Work

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THE ARTS: Music

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will:

·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·create and perform music, using a variety of sound sources; ·use correctly the vocabulary and musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·identify and perform music from various cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their response to music in ways appropriate for this grade.

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will:

·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·create and perform music, using a variety of sound sources; ·use correctly the musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·begin to read standard musical notation; ·identify and perform music from various cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their response to music in ways appropriate for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

·demonstrate understanding of the difference between the terms beat and rhythm; ·identify the beat, rhythm, melodic contour (or shape), dynamics, and tempo in familiar pieces of music; ·recognize that sounds and silences of different durations may be represented by symbols; ments. ·recognize that the treble clef defines the names of the lines (e, g, b, d, f) and spaces (f, a, c, e) on the staff; ·recognize that specific pitches may be represented by notes placed on a staff; ·recognize that a unison consists of two notes on the same line or in the same space that are to be sung or played simultaneously; ·distinguish between movement by a step (i.e., the interval between a note on a line and a note on the adjacent space, or vice versa) and movement by a skip; ·identify whole notes, half-notes, quarter-notes, and eighth-notes, and their corresponding rests in 4/4 time; ·identify the form verse­chorus in familiar songs; ·identify the individual instruments of the woodwind, brass, string, and percussion families; ·identify tone colours (the specific sounds of individual instruments or voices) in familiar music; ·demonstrate an understanding of correct breathing technique and posture when playing and/or singing; ·demonstrate knowledge of techniques to produce a clear and open head tone while singing; ·demonstrate their understanding of beat through conducting a piece in 4/4 time, using the standard conducting pattern.

·identify the instruments within the percussion family of orchestral instru-

·sing music from a variety of cultures and historical periods; ·substitute different words in familiar songs or create new verses, using their ·create melodic contour "maps" that indicate the direction of pitches (higher, ·indicate, with appropriate arm movements, the dynamics heard in familiar mu·sing expressively, showing awareness that changes in volume or speed can ·create or arrange music to accompany a reading or dramatization, using ap·create and perform musical compositions in which they apply their knowledge

of the elements of music and patterns of sounds, and use the voice, instruments, or "found" materials. propriate rhythm instruments, body percussion, or "found" instruments; help to convey the meaning of the text; sic; lower) in familiar songs; knowledge of rhythm to ensure that the new text fits with the melody;

·write new words to familiar melodies, using their knowledge of rhythm to ensure that the new text fits with the melody; ·create an accompaniment for a story, poem, or drama presentation, using their knowledge of beat, rhythm, and tone colour; ·read music, using their knowledge of contour mapping and notation; ·read and perform simple rhythmic patterns in 4/4 time; ·sing or play expressively, giving particular attention to using suitable dynamics and tempi; ·create musical compositions that show appropriate use of some of the elements of music, and perform them; ·create an accompaniment for a song, using a melodic ostinato (short melodic pattern repeated throughout the song); ·sing and/or play in tune songs from a variety of times and places. ·express their response to music from a variety of cultures and historical period;

·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·explain, using appropriate musical terminology, their preference for specific songs or pieces of music; ·describe how a composer can manipulate the elements of music to create a specific mood; ·explain the effects of different musical choices.

·express their response to music from a variety of cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·identify the feelings that are evoked by a particular piece of music; ·explain, using appropriate musical terminology, their preference for specific songs or pieces of music; ·identify and explain the effects of different musical choices.

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THE ARTS: Music

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·create and perform music, using a variety of sound sources; ·use correctly the musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·read simple musical notation; ·identify and perform music from various cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their response to music in ways appropriate for this grade.

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will: ·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·sing and play instruments with expression and proper technique; ·use correctly the musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·read and perform from musical notation; ·identify and perform music from various cultures and historical periods; ·communicate their response to music in ways appropriate for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

·interpret correctly whole notes, half-notes, quarter-notes, and eighthnotes, and the corresponding rests in 4/4 time; ·conduct in 4/4 and 2/4 time, using standard conducting patterns; ·recognize the major scale through listening and in notation; ·demonstrate understanding of the meaning of the sharp, flat, and natural symbols; ·explain the use of key signatures and identify the key of music they sing or play; ·begin to sing or play the major scale in keys that occur in the music they sing or play; ·identify the form of introduction, verse, and chorus in music that they sing, play, or hear; ·recognize different kinds of tone colour in pieces of music; ·recognize and classify various instruments; ·sing or play in tune; ·demonstrate an understanding of correct breathing technique and posture when playing and/or singing. ·read correctly familiar and unfamiliar music that contains whole notes, half-notes, quarter-notes, and eighth-notes, and their corresponding rests in 4/4 time; ·read correctly familiar and unfamiliar songs, using their knowledge of sharps, flats, naturals, and key signatures; ·sing and play the major scale in keys that they encounter in the music they perform; ·identify simple structural patterns in music that they sing, play, or hear; ·identify music that consists of a single line as monophonic; ·identify the type of texture in music from a variety of cultures and historical periods (homophonic, polyphonic); ·identify different kinds of tone colour in various performing ensembles; ·sing and play in tune.

·create an accompaniment for a story, poem, or drama presentation, using their knowledge of beat, rhythm, tone colour, and melody; ·sing or play expressively, showing awareness of different tone colours; ·create musical compositions that show appropriate use of various elements of music, and perform them; ·create and perform a song based on a scene from a story or poem; ·sing familiar songs and manipulate a musical element to change the overall effect.

·sing or play expressively, giving particular attention to using suitable dynamics, tempi, and phrasing; ·sing familiar songs and manipulate a musical element to change the overall effect; ·create musical compositions that show appropriate use of various elements of music, and perform them; ·create an accompaniment for a story, poem, or drama presentation; ·create and perform a song based on a scene from a story, poem, or play; ·conduct pieces in 4/4, 2/4, and 3/4 time, using standard conducting patterns. ·describe how the various elements of music are used to create mood in two pieces of music in different styles; ·describe, through listening, the main characteristics of pieces of music from the Baroque and Classical periods; ·describe briefly the construction and use of an instrument; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media.

·describe how various elements of music are combined to create different moods; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·listen to music from the Renaissance period and identify its main characteristics.

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THE ARTS: Music

Grade 7

·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·sing and play instruments with expression and proper technique; ·use correctly the musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·read, write, and perform from musical notation accurately and with some fluency; ·communicate their understanding and knowledge of music in appropriate ways; ·identify and perform music of a variety of cultures and historical periods.

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

·demonstrate an understanding of the basic elements of music specified for this grade (see below) through listening to, performing, and creating music; ·sing and play instruments with expression and proper technique; ·use correctly the musical terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade; ·read, write, and perform from musical notation accurately and fluently; ·communicate their understanding and knowledge of music in appropriate ways; ·identify and perform music of a variety of cultures and historical periods.

By the end of Grade 7, students will:

By the end of Grade 8, students will:

Specific Expectations:

·identify the names of the notes of the clef appropriate to their vocal range and/or instrument; ·recognize unisons, seconds, and thirds aurally and in written form; ·read music accurately from the staff, using their knowledge of notation (including sharps, flats, naturals, and key signatures) and intervals; ·sing and play the major scale in keys that they encounter in the music they perform; ·demonstrate the ability to produce the same pitch as others, vocally or instrumentally; ·identify the dotted half-note, the dotted quarter-note, and the corresponding rests in pieces studied, and explain the function of the dot; ·identify the dotted quarter-note and eighth-note combination and the eighth-quarter-eighth combination in pieces studied, and recognize the latter as a form of syncopation; ·demonstrate an understanding of appropriate articulation in singing or playing music; ·identify simple duple and triple metres and the corresponding time signatures (2/4 and 3/4) in music they sing or play; ·identify note and rest values in 4/4, 3/4, and 2/4 time in pieces studied; ·identify the upbeat and downbeat, as well as conducting patterns for 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 metres, in pieces studied; ·identify pick-up notes, first and second endings, and D.C. al fine in pieces studied; ·demonstrate understanding of the markings and Italian terms for dynamics, tempo, articulation, and phrasing in the music they sing and play; ·identify the type of texture in music appropriate for the grade (homophonic, polyphonic); ·recognize binary form (AB) and ternary form (ABA) in music they perform and hear; ·identify tone colours in various performing ensembles; ·demonstrate understanding of correct breathing technique and posture when playing and/or singing. ·sing or play a variety of pieces expressively; ·sing familiar songs and manipulate a musical element to change the overall effect; ·create and perform musical compositions that make use of elements of music studied in pieces learned in this grade; ·create accompaniments for songs, using appropriate sounds and structures; ·create and perform two contrasting songs based on a scene from a story, poem, or play, and connect them with dialogue. ·read music appropriate for this grade, showing their understanding of the necessary aspects of notation; ·identify and perform the major scale in keys that they encounter in the music they sing or play; ·demonstrate the ability to produce the same pitch as others, vocally or instrumentally; ·identify metres and the corresponding time signatures in the pieces they play or sing; ·play or sing music with appropriate articulation and phrasing; ·conduct 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 time, or a metre in a piece appropriate for their grade, correctly using standard conducting patterns; ·demonstrate understanding of the markings and Italian terms for dynamics, tempo, articulation, and phrasing in the music they play or sing; ·explain the meaning of D.C. al coda, d.s. al fine, and d.s. al coda; ·identify the type of texture in music appropriate for the grade; ·recognize rondo form (ABACA) and theme-and-variations form (A, A1, A2, etc.) in music they perform and hear.

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·sing or play expressively pieces in various styles; ·create musical compositions that make use of elements of music studied in this grade, write them in standard notation, and perform them; ·create and perform a short musical that consists of contrasting songs, dialogue, and drama; ·improvise a solo melodic line (accompanied or unaccompanied).

·describe how changes in texture alter the mood in a piece of music; ·describe, through listening, some characteristics of music of the Romantic period; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·describe their response to a musical performance in their community; ·describe the history, construction, and use of an instrument; ·identify ways in which the music industry affects various aspects of society and the economy.

·recognize and describe the difference between program music and absolute music; ·describe some aspects of the historical context of music that they sing, play, or listen to; ·communicate their thoughts and feelings about the music they hear, using language and a variety of art forms and media; ·describe their response to a musical performance in their community.

The Arts: Visual Arts

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes; · use the elements of design (colour, line, shape, form, space, texture), in ways appropriate for this grade, when producing and responding to works of art; · describe how the ideas in a variety of art works relate to their own knowledge and experience; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Learning Continuum

Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to familiar audiences; · use the elements of design (colour, line, shape, form, space, texture), in ways appropriate for this grade, when producing and responding to works of art; · describe how the ideas in a variety of art works relate to their own knowledge and experience and to other works they have studied; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

· recognize and name the primary colours of pigment (red, blue, yellow); · identify the value of a colour (i.e., distinguish between lighter and darker tones of a colour); · describe different kinds of lines; · identify the horizon line; · distinguish between geometric and organic shapes and forms; · describe the texture of various familiar objects, using vocabulary and terminology appropriate for this grade; · identify the elements of design in familiar environments; · identify a variety of art tools, materials, and techniques, and demonstrate understanding of their proper and safe use. · recognize and name the secondary colours of pigment (purple, orange, green); · describe how the secondary colours can be created by mixing the primary colours; · identify types of lines in art works and in the environment; · identify the characteristics of symmetrical shapes and forms; · identify and describe a variety of textures; · identify the elements of design in a variety of familiar objects and in works of art; · describe different ways in which a variety of art materials, tools, and techniques can be used, and demonstrate understanding of their safe and proper use.

· make artistic choices in their work, using at least one of the elements of design specified for this grade; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate thoughts and feelings; · identify, in a plan, the subject matter and the tools and materials they will use to produce an art work; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own and others' art work.

· make artistic choices in their work, using at least two of the elements of design specified for this grade for a specific purpose; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate their thoughts and feelings on familiar topics; · identify, in a plan, their specific choices of subject matter and tools, materials, and techniques; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own and others' art work, and explain their choice.

· describe the subject matter in both their own and others' art work; · describe, using appropriate vocabulary , how artists use the elements of design to communicate information and create a particular mood; · express a response to an art work that clearly communicates how the ideas, information, and feelings relate to their own experiences.

· describe the subject matter of a variety of art works from various cultures and periods and in various styles; · describe, using appropriate vocabulary, how artists use the elements of design to create a specific effect; · describe the relationship between an art work and their own experiences.

The Arts: Visual Arts

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to familiar audiences; · identify the elements of design (colour, line, shape, form, space, texture), and use them in ways appropriate for this grade when producing and responding to works of art; · describe how the ideas in a variety of art works relate to their own knowledge and experience and to other works they have studied, and how the artists have used at least one of the elements of design; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · identify the elements of design (colour, line, shape, form, space, texture), and use them in ways appropriate for this grade when producing and responding to works of art; · describe their interpretation of a variety of art works, basing their interpretation on evidence from the works (i.e., on ways in which an artist has used the elements of design for expressive purposes) and on their own knowledge and experience; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

· recognize and name the warm (red, orange, yellow) and cool (purple, green, blue) colours, and describe their emotional impact; · identify characteristics of a variety of lines; · label the foreground, middle ground, and background, and identify objects in each of these areas of a work; · identify symmetrical and asymmetrical shapes in both the human-made environment and the natural world; · describe textures that are real in art works and illusory; · identify elements of design in a variety of natural and human-made objects; · use art tools, materials, and techniques correctly to create different effects. · identify monochromatic colour schemes (i.e., tints and shades of one colour); · identify the emotional quality of lines; · demonstrate awareness that the overlapping of shapes is one way of creating the illusion of depth; · distinguish between relief and free-standing sculpture; · describe ways in which artists use a variety of tools, materials, and techniques to create texture; · describe their knowledge of the strengths and limitations of a variety of familiar art tools, materials, and techniques, which they gained through experiences in drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking; · demonstrate understanding of the proper and controlled use of art tools, materials, and techniques singly and in combination.

· solve artistic problems in their art works, using at least three of the elements of design specified for this grade; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate their thoughts and feelings about specific topics or themes; · identify and explain the specific choices they made in planning, producing, and displaying their own art work; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own and others' art work.

· solve artistic problems in their art work, using the elements of design specified for this grade; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate thoughts, feelings, and ideas for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · plan a work of art, identifying the artistic problem and a proposed solution; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own work and that of others.

· identify the similarities and differences in content between two or more works on a related theme; · explain how the artist has used the elements of design to communicate feelings and convey ideas; · state their preference for a specific work and defend their choice with reference to both their own interests and experience and to the artist's use of one or more of the elements of design.

· describe how a variety of artists working in different styles and media and in different historical periods have used the elements of design and/or tools, materials, and techniques of their art; · explain how the elements of design are organized in a work of art to communicate feelings and convey ideas; · state their preference for a specific work chosen from among several on a similar theme, and defend their choice, with reference to their own interests and experience and to the artist's use of the various elements of design.

The Arts: Visual Arts

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate a range of ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · define the elements of design (colour, line, shape, form, space, texture), and use them in ways appropriate for this grade when producing and responding to works of art; · describe their interpretation of a variety of art works, basing their interpretation on evidence from the works (especially on ways in which an artist has used the elements of design to clarify meaning) and on their own knowledge and experience; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate a range of ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to specific audiences, using a variety of familiar art tools, materials, and techniques; · identify the elements of design (colour, line, shape, form, space, texture) and the principles of design (emphasis, balance, rhythm, unity, variety, proportion), and use them in ways appropriate for this grade when producing and responding to works of art; · explain their interpretation of a variety of art works, supporting it with examples of how the elements and some of the principles of design are used in the work; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

· identify the three pairs of complementary colours (red and green, purple and yellow, blue and orange); · describe how line may be used to define shapes and forms and to create movement and depth; · identify how the shading of shapes can be used to create the illusion of depth; · identify negative and positive shapes in works of art and the environment; · recognize and describe the relationship between a work of art and its surroundings; · identify tools and techniques used by artists to create the illusion of texture; · describe the strengths and limitations of various art tools, materials, and techniques; · select the most appropriate tools, materials, and techniques for a particular purpose, and use them correctly. · identify colour relationships, using a basic colour wheel that they have made; · describe how line can be used to direct the viewer's attention; · describe how one-point perspective can be used to create the illusion of depth; · demonstrate understanding that shadows and shading create the illusion of a third dimension; · identify things to be considered when placing a sculpture in a specific location; · describe how artists may use texture to represent or to evoke an emotional response; · describe how the strengths and limitations of both traditional and contemporary art tools, materials, and techniques affect artistic choices; · identify the most appropriate tools, materials, and techniques for the size and scope of the work and use them correctly.

· organize their art works to create a specific effect, using the elements of design; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate a range of thoughts, feelings, and ideas for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · identify, in their plan for a work of art, the artistic problem and a number of possible solutions; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own work and that of others.

· solve artistic problems in their work, using the elements of design and at least one of the principles of design specified for this grade; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate a range of thoughts, feelings, and ideas for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · describe, in their plan for a work of art, how they will research their subject matter, select their media, and use the elements and principles of design in solving the artistic problems in the work; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own work and that of others.

· compare works on a similar theme from various periods and cultures, and describe the impact of time and location on style; · describe the connection between an element of design and a specific artistic purpose, using appropriate vocabulary; · defend their preference for specific art works with reference to at least three elements of design.

· compare works from various periods and cultures, and describe how the artists have used the elements and principles of design; · demonstrate awareness that an artist intentionally uses some of the elements and principles of design to convey meaning, and explain how the artist accomplishes his or her intentions; · explain their preference for specific art works, with reference to the artist's intentional use of the elements and principles of design to communicate an idea or feeling; · identify the function of visual arts in their community and the contribution that the visual arts make to the economy.

The Arts: Visual Arts

Grade 7

By the end of Grade 7, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate a variety of ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to specific audiences, using appropriate art forms; · identify the principles of design (emphasis, rhythm, balance, unity, variety, proportion), and use them in ways appropriate for this grade when producing and responding to works of art; · explain how artistic choices affect the viewer. and support their conclusions with evidence from the work; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will:

· produce two- and three-dimensional works of art that communicate a variety of ideas (thoughts, feelings, experiences) for specific purposes and to specific audiences, using a variety of art forms; · define the principles of design (emphasis, balance, rhythm, unity, variety, proportion), and use them in ways appropriate for this grade when producing and responding to works of art; · explain how an artist has used the expressive qualities of the elements and principles of design to affect the viewer, and support their analyses with evidence from the work; · use correctly vocabulary and art terminology associated with the specific expectations for this grade.

Specific Expectations:

· describe how the repetition of elements is used to create rhythm; · identify the area of emphasis (or focal point) in a work of art; · describe how two-point perspective is used to create the illusion of depth; · distinguish between formal (symmetrical) and informal (asymmetrical) balance in compositions; · explain how the intent, character, and size of a work determine which tools, materials,and techniques the artist will use; · use the appropriate tools, materials, and techniques correctly, selecting those that will create the desired effect. · describe how the repetition of elements of design creates rhythm, which unifies the composition; · describe how the elements of design are used to create the area of emphasis (focal point) in a work of art; · describe how the elements of design are used to create formal (symmetrical) and informal (asymmetrical) balance in compositions; · explain how the size, scope, and intent of a work determine which tools, materials, and techniques the artist will use; · use tools, materials, and techniques correctly, selecting those that are appropriate for the size, scope, and intent of the work.

· organize their art works to communicate ideas, using at least one of the principles of design specified for this grade; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate a range of thoughts, feelings, and experiences for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · describe, in their plan for a work of art, how they will research their subject matter, select the appropriate form and media, and use the elements and principles of design to solve the artistic problems in the work; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own work and that of others.

· organize their art works to create a specific effect, using at least two of the principles of design specified for this grade; · produce two- and three-dimensional works of art (i.e., works involving media and techniques used in drawing, painting, sculpting, printmaking) that communicate a range of thoughts, feelings, and experiences for specific purposes and to specific audiences; · describe, in their plan for a work of art, the main idea they wish to communicate and the artistic decisions they have made to support that message; · identify strengths and areas for improvement in their own work and that of others, and describe possible strategies for improving their work.

· describe how artists representing a variety of historical periods, styles, and cultures have used the elements and principles of design to create a specific effect; · explain how the principles of design are used to organize a work, communicate feelings, and convey ideas, using appropriate vocabulary and terminology; · explain their preference for specific art works, with reference to the artist's intentional use of the elements and principles of design; · identify ways in which the visual arts affect various aspects of society and the economy.

· describe how artists representing various periods, styles, and cultures have used similar materials, tools, and the principles of design for a variety of purposes, and recognize that many modern artists and designers are influenced by designs from other periods and cultures; · explain how the effective use of the elements and principles of design contributes to an art work's ability to communicate feelings, convey ideas, and enrich people's lives; · explain their preference for specific art works, with reference to the artist's use of the principles of design and their understanding of the ideas and feelings expressed in the work.

The Arts: Drama and Dance

Overall Expectations

Learning Continuum

Grade 2

By the end of Grade 2, students will: ·describe some of the basic elements of drama and dance; ·interpret the meaning of stories, poems, and other material drawn from a variety of sources and cultures, using several basic drama and dance techniques; ·create short dance pieces, using techniques learned in this grade; ·communicate understanding of works in drama and dance through discussion, writing, movement, and visual art work; ·solve problems in various situations through role playing and movement in drama and dance.

Grade 1

By the end of Grade 1, students will: ·demonstrate an understanding of some basic elements of drama and dance; ·interpret the meaning of stories, poems, and other material drawn from a variety of sources and cultures, using some basic drama and dance techniques; ·create short dance pieces, using techniques learned in this grade; ·communicate understanding of works in drama and dance through discussion, movement, and visual art work; ·solve problems in everyday situations through role playing and movement in drama and dance.

Knowledge of Elements

Specific Expectations:

·identify ways in which the voice and body can be used to convey thoughts and feelings when role playing; ·identify and correctly use drama and dance vocabulary; ·identify the meaning of symbols used in their dramatic exploration of stories and poems; ·describe some basic ways in which the body can be used in space and time; ·demonstrate their knowledge of the movements of natural objects and materials, using their voice and/or body. ·identify and use some key elements of drama and dance in exploring source materials; ·use the vocabulary, tone of voice, and body movements appropriate for a specific character when role playing; ·write in role as characters in a story, using the vocabulary and portraying the attitudes of the characters; ·describe their own and others' work, using drama and dance vocabulary; ·identify and describe symbols that are relevant to the meaning of stories and poems; ·distinguish between real and imaginary situations in drama and dance; ·recognize and demonstrate movement sequences used by specific characters or found in their natural surroundings; ·identify parts of the body and describe the variety of movements that can be done by each of them. ·speak in role as characters in a story, assuming the attitude and gestures of the people they are playing; ·demonstrate the ability to move and control their bodies in space and time; ·use language and non-verbal means of communication effectively for a variety of purposes both in and out of role; ·perform a "soundscape" or sound collage based on a theme or topic studied in another area of the curriculum; ·interpret songs, music, poetry, or images, using elements of movement.

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Creative Work

·communicate their responses to a variety of stimuli by using elements of drama and dance; ·use the vocabulary and body movements of a particular character when role playing; ·demonstrate control of their bodies when moving like different objects and animals; ·create dance phrases, showing the beginning and the end of their work in appropriate ways.

Critical Thinking

·describe ways in which the experiences of characters in simple performances relate to their own experiences; ·identify themes and subjects used in works of drama and dance; ·demonstrate an understanding of different points of view; ·identify ways in which role playing and movement are part of their daily experience.

·compare what they experience through drama and dance presentations with their experience of daily life; ·ask and respond appropriately to relevant questions, in and out of role, about characters and dramatic situations being explored; ·compare, while working with others, some possible solu tions to problems identified through drama and dance; ·identify specific aspects of their work and that of others that were effective.

The Arts: Drama and Dance

Grade 3

By the end of Grade 3, students will: ·describe basic elements of drama and dance; ·interpret and communicate the meaning of stories, poems, plays, and other material drawn from a range of sources and cultures, using basic drama and dance techniques; ·create short dance pieces, using techniques learned in this grade;

Learning Continuum

Grade 4

By the end of Grade 4, students will: ·demonstrate understanding of some of the principles involved in the structure of works in drama and dance; ·interpret and communicate the meaning of stories, poems, plays, and other material drawn from a variety of sources and cultures, using a variety of drama and dance techniques; ·communicate, orally and in writing, their response to their own and others' work in drama and dance; ·identify and apply solutions to problems presented through drama and dance, and make appropriate decisions in large and small groups; ·explain their use of available technology to enhance their work in drama and dance.

·compare ·solve

their own work with the work of others in drama and dance through discussion, writing, movement, and visual art work;

problems presented in different kinds of dramatic situations through role playing and movement; ·use available technology appropriately to enhance their work in drama and dance.

Specific Expectations:

·demonstrate an understanding of a character's point of view through writing and speaking in role, and through using body movement in role; ·describe their own and others' work in drama and dance, using appropriate vocabulary; ·explain the importance of symbols used in specific stories, poems, and dances; ·demonstrate the ability to concentrate while in role in drama and dance; ·recognize and choose appropriate elements of movement for dramatizing their responses to different stimuli or ideas; ·identify technological means of creating different effects; ·describe the kinds of energy involved in a sequence of movements; ·distinguish between a variety of dance forms, using specific criteria. ·demonstrate an understanding of voice and audience by speaking and writing in role as characters in a story; ·describe and interpret their own and others' work, using appropriate drama and dance vocabulary; ·identify and explain the use and significance of symbols or objects in drama and dance; ·identify and describe how the principles of variety and unity are used in drama and dance productions; ·identify and describe examples of movement found in their environment, and explain their use in creative movement; ·describe aspects of dances from a variety of cultures; ·demonstrate awareness of the need to do warm-up exercises before engaging in activities in dance.

·defend a point of view through speaking and writing in role; ·create works of drama and dance, using appropriate elements; ·communicate, through movement, their thoughts and feelings about topics studied in other subject areas; ·write and perform chants.

·enact or create, rehearse, and present drama and dance works based on novels, stories, poems, and plays; ·represent and interpret main characters by speaking, moving, and writing in role; ·demonstrate control of voice and movement by using appropriate techniques; ·demonstrate the ability to maintain concentration while in role; ·create and present a short choreography individually or in a group; ·demonstrate an understanding of the use of production technology to create different effects.

·identify effective uses of drama and dance elements in performances and compare their own responses with those of their peers; ·identify the themes and subjects found in drama and dance works, and make links between these and their own experiences; ·clarify the meaning of complex or ambiguous dramatic situations; ·solve artistic problems in drama and dance in cooperative work groups; ·explain how their understanding of work in dance and drama has been increased through research.

·explain how elements of drama and dance work together to create an intended effect on the audience; ·identify their own feelings and reactions in various situations, and compare them with those of a character they have portrayed; ·solve problems in drama and dance, individually and in groups, by analysing the problems; ·explain the importance of research in producing effective dramatizations.

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The Arts: Drama and Dance

Grade 5

By the end of Grade 5, students will: ·demonstrate understanding of some of the principles involved in the structuring of works in drama and dance; ·interpret and communicate the meaning of stories, films, plays, songs, and other material drawn from different sources and cultures, using a range of drama and dance techniques; ·create dance pieces, using a variety of techniques; ·describe, orally and in writing, their response to their own and others' work in drama and dance, gather others' responses, and compare the responses; ·solve problems presented through drama and dance, working in large and small groups and using various strategies; ·use different forms of available technology to enhance their work in drama and dance.

Learning Continuum

Grade 6

By the end of Grade 6, students will: ·demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved in the structuring of works in drama and dance; ·interpret and communicate the meaning of novels, scripts, legends, fables, and other material drawn from a range of sources and cultures, using a variety of drama and dance techniques, and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques; ·evaluate, orally and in writing, their own and others' work in drama and dance; ·create dance pieces, using a variety of techniques; ·solve problems presented through drama and dance in different ways, and evaluate the effectiveness of each solution; ·create different interpretations of their work in drama and dance, using available technology.

Specific Expectations:

·demonstrate awareness of audience when writing in role, and use the appropriate language, tone of voice, gestures, and body movements when speaking as a character in a drama; ·use drama and dance vocabulary in describing and interpreting their own and others' work; ·explain drama and dance techniques and use them to convey information and feelings; ·identify the significance of symbols or objects in drama and dance, and use props appropriately; ·demonstrate the ability to sustain concentration in drama and dance; ·describe the use of sequential patterns in both drama and dance; ·demonstrate understanding of the use of technology in creating contrasting effects; ·describe various dance forms. ·demonstrate understanding of ways of sustaining the appropriate voice or character when speaking or writing in role for different purposes; ·describe the meaning and evaluate the effect of the work of others, using drama and dance vocabulary correctly; ·identify and describe examples of balance, harmony, and contrast in drama and dance productions; ·identify the significance of symbols in dramatic explorations, and use various props appropriately; ·recognize when it is necessary to sustain concentration in drama and dance; ·explain and demonstrate the use of different patterns in creating effects in drama and dance; ·recognize and name characteristics of drama and dance perform ances that incorporate technology, visual art, music, and popular media to create artistic effects; ·describe the skills needed to perform in public; ·distinguish between different dance forms and different theatrical genres. ·interpret and perform some types of dances and forms of drama; ·create dances, using steps and positions borrowed from a variety of dance forms; ·explain the function of masks, and use masks in their drama and dance presentations; ·create, rehearse, and present drama and dance works to communicate the meaning of poems, stories, paintings, myths, and other source material drawn from a wide range of cultures; ·create drama and dance productions in which they make effective use of the principles of harmony, balance, and contrast; ·produce a short script that makes use of a variety of technologies to create different effects for different audiences.

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·create characters and portray their motives and decisions through speech; ·rehearse and perform small-group drama and dance presentations drawn from novels, poems, stories, plays, and other source materials; ·select words, visual images, and sounds from other subjects in the curriculum for interpretation and dramatization; ·identify the elements of drama and dance that are best suited for conveying a specific subject or theme in drama and dance.

·explain how elements of drama and of dance work together to create different effects on the audience; ·describe some drama and dance performances, and compare events in them with their own experiences; ·describe, orally and in writing, the differences between their own responses to a situation and the responses of a character they have portrayed; ·evaluate drama and dance presentations done in class; ·solve problems in drama and dance individually and in groups, and evaluate the solutions; ·provide support for their interpretations of personal experiences and aspects of history, which they have presented through drama and dance, using various research resources to gather information; ·explain the use of rhythm and movement in their dance pieces.

·present and defend their analysis of a performance, focusing on assessment of the ways in which various elements of drama and dance are used together; ·evaluate drama and dance performances, with reference to their own experiences in daily life; ·solve artistic problems in drama and dance, individually and in groups, and evaluate the solutions; ·explain their preferences for specific drama and dance works; ·provide evidence for their interpretations of personal experiences and events of social significance, which they present through drama and dance, using a variety of research sources; ·identify the function of dance and drama in their community and the contribution that dance and drama make to the economy.

The Arts: Drama and Dance

Grade 7

By the end of Grade 7, students will: ·describe the overall effects of various aspects of drama and dance (i.e., elements, principles, techniques); ·interpret and communicate the meaning of novels, scripts, historical fiction, and other material drawn from a wide variety of sources and cultures, using a variety of drama and dance techniques; ·create dance pieces, using a variety of techniques; ·evaluate, orally and in writing, their own and others' work in drama and dance, using criteria developed by the class; ·solve, in various ways, a problem that is presented through drama and dance, and explain ways in which each solution is effective; ·create different interpretations of a single drama or dance work, using available technology for performance.

Learning Continuum

Grade 8

By the end of Grade 8, students will: ·evaluate the overall effect of various aspects of drama and dance (i.e., elements, principles, techniques, style); ·interpret and communicate ideas and feelings drawn from fictional accounts, documentaries, and other material from a wide variety of sources and cultures, selecting and combining complex drama and dance techniques; ·create drama pieces, selecting and using a variety of techniques; ·critique, orally and in writing, their own and others' work in drama and dance, using criteria developed independently and in a group; ·critique solutions to problems presented in drama and dance, make decisions in large and small groups, and defend their artistic choices; ·create different multimedia interpretations of a single work, using available technology to enhance their work in drama and dance performances.

Specific Expectations:

·demonstrate understanding of the motives of the characters they interpret through drama and dance; ·write in role in various forms, showing their understanding of the complexity of a dramatic situation, and using appropriate vocabulary, tone, and voice for the character portrayed; ·use drama and dance vocabulary correctly in analysing the meaning and effect of their own and others' work; ·explain the significance of the materials, props, costumes, and symbols used in drama and dance; ·identify ways of sustaining concentration in drama and dance; ·recognize and use criteria for evaluating the quality of drama and dance performances; ·choose specific kinds of technology to enhance their drama and dance work, and explain their choices; ·identify different theatrical venues and their effect on modes of presentation. ·interpret and present scripts, paying attention to the subtext, characters, and setting; ·create and present drama anthologies, independently and in a group, manipulating various techniques of drama and dance and incorporating multimedia technology; ·develop a routine of warm-up exercises and use it regularly before engaging in dance activities; ·assemble, rehearse, and perform a collection of drama and dance works based on themes and issues drawn from a variety of sources from diverse cultures; ·communicate abstract ideas through drama and dance. ·demonstrate understanding of the appropriate use of the voice, gestures, and the level of language in different dramatic situations; ·describe theatrical dance performances, and distinguish between the types or styles used; ·write in role in various forms, showing understanding of the complexity of a dramatic situation and using appropriate vocabulary, tone, and voice for the character portrayed; ·use the vocabulary of drama and dance correctly in analysing, explaining, and critiquing the meaning and effect of their own and others' work; ·identify ways of sustaining concentration in drama and dance; ·identify and evaluate the variety of choices made in drama and dance that influence groups to make different interpretations or representations of the same materials; ·choose technology for enhancing their drama and dance work, and evaluate the effectiveness of their choice. ·write in role, analysing the subtext of a script and the attitudes and points of view of the characters portrayed; ·write, memorize, and present, through drama and dance, short documentary scenes based on their improvisational work and on source material drawn from diverse cultures; ·create dance compositions based on material explored in drama; ·create a dance warm-up program, alone or with another student; ·select appropriate themes that deal with specific situations and that are aimed at a specific audience; ·organize and carry out a group improvisation; ·produce pieces that deal appropriately with youth problems; ·produce work as a member of an ensemble.

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·evaluate the quality of a drama and a dance performance by writing a review that refers to what was seen, heard, and experienced; ·identify performance techniques that have an effect on the audience's emotions and senses, and evaluate their use in a performance; ·describe the significance of drama and dance in their lives; ·describe the economic and social impact of drama and dance in our society; ·research and dramatize material from various sources; ·describe how different cultures use drama and dance; ·describe attitudes and skills needed to organize and perform a group theatrical work.

·review drama and dance performances, orally or in writing, critiquing the use of elements and techniques in the particular genre of the piece; ·evaluate the overall effect of a performance in drama and dance, analysing the key elements; ·identify and discuss the qualities and skills needed to create and perform productions in drama and dance; ·produce pieces of writing in which they reflect on their experiences in drama and dance, and in which they show their ability to analyse and find solutions to problems in real life; ·dramatize material that they have researched from primary sources, and use it effectively in presenting documentary scenes.

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