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A N N U A L

R E P O R T

Department of Chemical Engineering

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

CHAIRMAN'S SUMMARY FACULTY & RESEARCH

Faculty Research Interests Departmental Research Activities Current Research Projects & Grants 3 4 7 10 12 2

MISSION STATEMENT

1. To provide a high-quality education for undergraduate and graduate Chemical Engineering students through a comprehensive curriculum that emphasizes basic science, mathematics, engineering science, and engineering design. UH ChE faculty members are expected to maintain their reputations as superior teachers and to provide a stimulating educational environment.

Faculty News & Activities Institute for Improved Oil Recovery (IIOR)

DEPARTMENTAL FUNDING, SUPPORT, RANKINGS, & TRENDS

General Departmental Support & Graduate Fellowships Donor Organizations Outstanding Alumni Industrial Advisory Board Graduate Ranking--National Research Council 13 13 13 14 15 16 17 18 18

INTRODUCTION

This Annual Report describes the 2000­2001 activities and accomplishments of the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Houston. Information is provided regarding Departmental activities spanning education and research. 2. To engage in research programs that train graduate students, procure support for this research on a continuous basis, and contribute to the development of fundamental knowledge in the field of chemical engineering. Our Department's varied and aggressively pursued research ensures that our faculty

Graduate Ranking--The Gourman Report Undergraduate Ranking--The Gourman Report Enrollment Trends & Degrees Conferred Students Receiving Degrees

VISION STATEMENT

The Department will regain international prominence within five years, through leadership in three core research areas and our graduating students becoming leaders in the field. The Department will create the highest level of enthusiasm, collegiality, and citizenship among our faculty. The Department will lead in research and teaching.

members remain at the technological forefront of their respective areas of specialization.

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

19

3. To be of service to the community at large and, in particular, to the State of Texas, and to provide the local engineering community opportunities for advanced and continuing education.

ChE Undergraduate Admission Undergraduate Courses: Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Curriculum Undergraduate Degree Plan Undergraduate Scholarships Recipients

24 26 28 30 31 31 32

The University of Houston provides equal treatment and opportunity to all persons without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability, veteran status or sexual orientation except where such distinction is required by law. This statement reflects compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and all other federal and state regulations. A special thanks to Mr. Toban Dvoretzky for compilation of this Report, as he has done in stellar fashion on a regular basis since he conceived and produced the inaugural issue in 1992. Prepared by the University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering, Toban Dvoretzky Produced by the UH Cullen College of Engineering Office of Communications, Harriet Yim, Angie Shortt

Undergraduate AIChE Chapter The Tiller Scholarship Endowment Fund

THE GRADUATE PROGRAM

Introduction Full-time Graduate Programs in ChE Part-time Graduate Programs Graduate Courses Graduate Student Organization 33 35 37 39 41

SEMINARS & CONTINUING EDUCATION

Weekly Seminar Series Continuing Education 42 44

Department of Chemical Engineering

HOW TO CONTACT US

45

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

1

CHAIRMAN'S SUMMARY

F A C U LT Y & R E S E A R C H

The Department of Chemical Engineering comprises nine full professors, four associate professors, two professors emeriti, three affiliated faculty, two adjunct professors, three adjunct

Faculty Research Interests

This is the 2000­2001 Annual Report of the University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering. In it, we wish to introduce you to some of the facts and flavor surrounding our people and program. We hope that you will find this report both informative and illuminating. Professor. He is charged with reinvigorating our Undergraduate Practices Lab. Mickey brings with him many years of industrial research experience and an invaluable industrial perspective. This is of great benefit to the students. He will also participate in collaborative research in the area of catalytic reaction engineering. Prof. Peter G. Vekilov joins us for Fall 2001 from the faculty of the Michael Harold Dow Chair Professor & Department Chair The evolution of the Department of Chemical Engineering has been closely coupled with the emergence of Houston as a world center for the chemical and petrochemical industries. Our Department was founded in 1947 by three engineers who worked in process plants in the area. Growth since that time has been dramatic. Over the years, our program has produced a significant number of undergraduate and graduate students who have risen to positions of prominence in industry and academia. Employers speak very highly of our graduates. We are confident that our recently graduated students will continue to add to our reputation and recognition. Our Industrial Advisory Board first convened in April 1999, and semiannual meetings have occurred since. These valuable meetings generate much useful input from members of the group. We look forward to strengthening our interaction with the IAB members and the companies they represent. These relationships and the feedback are Thanks in large measure to our productive and distinguished faculty, our Department has developed special research strengths in a broad range of areas. Our research specialties encompass traditional chemical engineering science and the emerging areas of advanced materials and biochemical engineering. Our laboratory facilities, dedicated to specific and general uses, afford excellent support for fundamental and novel research. essential in helping us adjust our program to the ever-changing requirements of industry. The evolving needs in the chemical and oil industries affect all chemical engineers, and changes are required in the training of our graduates. While we must continue to provide our graduates a sound basis in the fundamentals of chemical engineering and a mastery of scientific tools, we need to prepare them to adjust to and succeed in a rapidly changing employment environment. We continue to The Department has embarked on an important period of growth, with several faculty to be hired over the next few years. This past year, two new faculty joined our Department: Dr. Charles W. "Mickey" Rooks, recently retired from Monsanto and Solutia, is our newest Adjunct We look forward to continued growth and mutually supportive interaction with you. We will appreciate any suggestions or comments that you have. welcome and solicit our IAB's suggestions about what the appropriate changes should be. Chemistry Department of the University of Alabama at Huntsville. Peter, a leading expert in protein crystallization and structure, has developed a vigorous research program at UAH. His addition strengthens the Department in the biochemical science and engineering area, certainly a growing one for the field of chemical engineering.

associate professors, and 21 lecturers:

PROFESSORS

AMUNDSON, NEAL R. (PhD Mathematics, Minnesota, 1945). Cullen Professor & Professor of Mathematics. Chemical reactions; transport; mathematical modeling. BALAKOTAIAH, VEMURI

(PhD ChE, Houston, 1982). Director of International Graduate Admissions. Chemical reaction engineering; environmental engineering; two-phase flow; dynamics of linear systems; applied mathematics.

engineering, catalyst preparation and characterization, catalyst design; solid-oxide fuel cells; solar energy, solar-receiver design, solar-related chemical processes; catalytic processes for the destruction of hazardous wastes; high-temperature superconductivity; processing of ceramic superconductors.

Purdue, 1990). Assistant Professor, Biochemical & Biophysical Sciences. Computational studies of protein structure and function; inhibitor design; investigations of possible inhibitor resistance pathways; development of methods for the above.

FOX, GEORGE E.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

KRISHNAMOORTI, RAMANAN (PhD ChE, Princeton, 1994). Structure/processing/ property relations for multiphase polymers; polymer crystallinity in bulk and thin films; thermodynamic interactions and viscoelasticity of polymer blends and copolymers; macro- and nanocomposite structure and viscoelasticity. Promotion effective Fall 2001. NIKOLAOU, MICHAEL (PhD ChE, UCLA, 1989). Director of Domestic Graduate Admissions. Process simulation; process control; computer-aided process engineering; process optimization.

(PhD Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1991). Protein crystallization; biochemical engineering; thermodynamics of protein solutions. Hire effective Fall 2001.

(PhD Chemistry, Syracuse, 1974). Professor, Biochemical & Biophysical Sciences. Structure, function, and evolution of RNA.

ECONOMIDES, MICHAEL J. (PhD Petr.

E., Stanford, 1984). University Professor. Petroleum-production engineering; directional and multilateral wells; reservoir stimulation (fracturing, acidizing), petroleum research/ research management; advanced reservoirexploitation strategies; well-completions.

LEE, T. RANDALL (PhD Chemistry, Harvard, 1991). Associate Professor of Chemistry. Design and synthesis of new types of polymeric materials, including polymeric drugs and drug-delivery systems.

ADJUNCT PROFESSORS

ECONOMIDES, CHRISTINE A. (PhD Petr. E., Stanford, 1979). Director, Petroleum Engineering Program. ROOKS, CHARLES W. "Mickey" (PhD ChE, Oklahoma, 1973). Director, Undergraduate Practices Laboratory.

ECONOMOU, DEMETRE J.

(PhD ChE, Illinois, 1986). John and Rebecca Moores Professor; Associate Department Chairman; Director of Undergraduate Admissions. Plasma-, ion-, and laser-assisted etching; deposition of electronic material; atomic-layer processing; composites and ceramics. (PhD of

VEKILOV, PETER G.

FLUMERFELT, RAYMOND W.

ChE, Northwestern, Engineering. 1965). Dean

ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

FLEISCHER, MICKY T.

Houston, 1978). (PhD ChE,

WILLSON, RICHARD C.

HAROLD, MICHAEL P.

(PhD ChE, Houston, 1985). Dow Chair Professor & Department Chairman. Chemical reaction systems; multifunctional chemical reactors; reaction-separation materials and devices; catalytic and biocatalytic materials.

(PhD ChE, MIT, 1988). Joint Associate Professor, Biochemical & Biophysical Sciences. Biochemical separations; molecular recognition.

MARPLE, STANLEY JR.

MIT, 1943).

(PhD ChE,

PROFESSORS EMERITI

HENLEY, ERNEST J.

(DSc ChE, Columbia, 1953).

OLIGNEY, RONALD E. (BSc PE summa cum laude, Alaska-Fairbanks, 1985). Director, Petroleum Institute.

LUSS, DAN (PhD ChE, Minnesota, 1966). Cullen Professor. Chemical reaction engineering; pattern-formation in chemically reacting systems; dynamics and stability of chemical reactors; kinetics of solid-solid reactions; SHS of complex oxides. MOHANTY, KISHORE K.

(PhD ChE, Minnesota, 1976). Director of MChE Program. Fluid flow; interfacial mechanics; porous-media transport; underground contaminants; oil recovery; fabrication of composite materials.

TILLER, FRANK M. (PhD ChE, Cincinnati,

1946). M.D. Anderson Professor; joint Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering. Fluid/ particle separation; ceramic processing; filtration, thickening, centrifugation; moisture transport in drying solids; CATscan analysis of solid/liquid systems; separation of biosolids from wastewater sludge; developing agricultural fibers as aids in solid/liquid separation and coalescence of oily waters.

LECTURERS

ChE.: Dr. Ye-Mon Chen, Dr. John J. Crump, Mark Dejmek, Fuad Khoury, Dr. Joseph M. Lee, Dr. Jagdish C. Maheshri, Dr. Jeffrey Smith, Dr. Raymond D. Steele, Albert Swarts Petr. E.: Jeffrey F. App, Dr. Jon Burger, Dr. Akhil DattaGupta, Dr. Amiel David, Dr. Birol Dindouk, Dr. J. Robert Gochnour, Robert O. Hubbell, Ross Kastor, John Martinez, David Murphy, Miles R. Palke, Dean C. Rietz, Dr. Grant E. Robertson

RICHARDSON, JAMES T. (PhD Physics/Chemistry, Rice, 1955). Heterogeneous catalysis and catalytic processes, reactor

2 University of Houston

AFFILIATED FACULTY

BRIGGS, JAMES M.

(PhD Chemistry,

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

3

Departmental Research Activities

Prof.

VEMURI BALAKOTAIAH'S

The research of Prof.

DEMETRE

Prof.

RAMANAN KRISHNAMOORTI

reverse-flow reactors; and the formation of electrical and magnetic fields during high-temperature solid reactions.

research involves the mathematical modeling and analysis of the interactions between the transport processes and reactions in various systems of engineering interest. The objective of the research is to elucidate the complex behavior of these nonlinear interactions and use this understanding to practical advantage. His group's current research projects include modeling and analysis of catalytic monoliths (for pollution-reduction in automobiles, oxidation of VOCs, power generation, and removal of NOx from exhaust gases); bifurcation analysis of chemical reactors and reacting flows (developing analytical and computational techniques for reacting flows in order to explore and classify the different types of behaviors in the parameter space); studies of wavy films in gas-liquid two-phase flows; and studies of these flows through packed beds under normal and microgravity conditions. The research performed by Prof. JIM

ECONOMOU involves: [a.] Plasma etching

and deposition: large-scale numerical simulations of plasma flow and chemistry in complex multidimensional geometries; fluid and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approaches; parallel computing; plasma diagnostics, involving laser-induced fluorescence, mass spectrometry, in situ real-time multichannel laser interferometry, and ion-energy and angular-distribution detectors. [b.] Plasma physics, including electron velocity distribution functions; plasma heating; and new plasma sources and chemistries for advanced integrated-circuit manufacturing. [c.] Chemical vapor deposition, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of thin films, and photo-assisted and plasma-assisted MOCVD. [d.] Atomiclayer processing, involving nanofabrication, and experimental realization of atomic-layer etching and molecular-dynamics simulation of the interaction of energetic beams with crystal surfaces. Prof. Economou also performs computational/ experimental studies of microwave-assisted chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) for the manufacture of composite materials.

has established a research program that aims to understand the structureprocessing-property relations in nanoand microstructured multiphase polymer materials. The foremost aspect of this program is the capability to synthesize well-defined and controlled polymers and inorganic materials. Combined with well-established measurement techniques to examine fundamental molecular and macroscopic properties, the final properties of multiphase polymer systems can be determined and characterized. Prof. Krishnamoorti investigates the effects of pressure on the phase behavior of polyolefin blends; phase transitions in block copolymers; and viscoelastic properties of polymer nanocomposites. All these areas have important industrial implications.

Prof.

KISHORE MOHANTY'S research

is conducted in the area of colloid and interfacial science, specifically transport in microstructured media; improved oil recovery; remediation of underground contaminants; and multiphase flow. The oil-recovery studies involve seismic studies, logs (how tools respond), analysis of core samples, geologic analysis of chips, fluid analysis, routine core analysis, thin sections, and mineralogy. Actual samples are studied for relative permeability and the potential for oil recovery. His group designs geological and simulation models to see how production can be optimized. Specific projects have included 3-D porous media reconstruction by simulated annealing method; NMR response; impact of

Prof.

RANDY LEE and his group focus

capillary and bond numbers on relative permeability; application of centrifuge techniques; studies of gas-condensate reservoirs during deep drilling; oil recovery via fracture reservoirs; nearmiscible gas injection; and surfactants and foams to make vesicles that are good drug-delivery vehicles.

on organic and materials research chemistry. The six general areas include selectively fluorinated organic thin films; complex organic interfaces with controlled local

BRIGGS focuses on computational

studies of protein structure and function, inhibitor design, investigations of possible inhibitor-resistance pathways, and development of methods for the above work. Targets for these studies include those important in the treatment of AIDS, cancer, tuberculosis, and other disease states.

The unifying theme behind the projects in the laboratory of Prof.

composition, structure, and function; biologically active interfaces; nanoparticle growth and manipulation; biopolymers and conducting polymers; and polymerization catalyst development. The common thread tying all of these research areas together is synthesis, whether organic, inorganic, organometallic, or solid-state, with the goal of preparing new materials for technological applications. Prof.

GEORGE FOX

MIKE NIKOLAOU focuses on

is seeking an understanding of the role of RNA in the early evolution of life. Bioinformatics studies are performed on ribosomal components in bacterial

computer-aided process engineering (design and operation) and the theory and application of process control in the chemical, oil and gas, food, and microelectronics industries. His research group screens candidate technologies, develops new approaches,

Prof.

MICHAEL ECONOMIDES'

genomes et al., and multiple bacterial species are monitored in spacecraft environments. Artificial RNAs are used as a possible monitoring system for genetically modified bacteria.

research focuses on various aspects of petroleum engineering. Current research projects include next-generation highintensity designs; complex well architecture in petroleum production; advanced petroleum-exploitation strategies; and near-well states of stress in elastic and plastic rocks.

The specific research by Prof.

DAN LUSS

and develops proofs of concepts or working prototypes. Recent topics of interest include model predictive control, nonlinear control, adaptive control, monitoring, development of new methods for the numerical solution of partial differential equations, and modeling of air pollution near roadways. Prof. Nikolaou's group has recently begun collaborating with other investigators in the areas of control of microelectronics processes, and acceleration of in situ bioremediation processes using process control.

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report 5

involves the dynamic features of chemically Prof.

MIKE HAROLD performs research

reacting systems, such as reverse-flow reactors, hot-spot formation in packed-bed reactors, and the dynamics of polyolefin polymerization via metallocene catalysts. Prof. Luss' group also studies the use of membrane reactors to produce synthesis gas; the destruction of nitrogen oxides in

in the areas of reactive separation devices and materials; multifunctional chemical reactor synthesis, analysis, and design; microfabricated chemical system devices and materials; selective-oxidation chemistry, kinetics, and reactors; and multiphase transport and reaction.

4

University of Houston

Current Research Projects & Grants

Awards granted to the Department of Chemical Engineering Prof. JIM

RICHARDSON conducts

interactions by low-concentration reagents lead to models for numerous protein-condensation diseases. [b.] Rational optimization of crystallization conditions of macromolecules-- whereas 95% of proteins studied by structural biologists yield crystals after robotized screening, and 60% yield crystals of sufficient quality, many of the important proteins are not in the 60%; insight into growth conditions and mechanisms may shorten the time of production of such diffraction-quality crystals. [c.] Formation and evolution of step patterns. During layer-growth of crystals, steps do not remain equidistant; quantitative data and numerical modeling will help design control strategies. [d.] Thermodynamics of protein solutions,

BALAKOTAIAH, VEMURI

$ 135,000.00 Robert A. Welch Foundation "Modeling & Analysis of Spatiotemporal Patterns in Catalytic Reactions & Reactors" (1999­2001) Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (ATP) "Novel Catalysts & Reactors for Air-Pollution Control" (2000­2001) NASA--Glenn Research Center "Studies on Wave Occlusion for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows in Pipes under Normal & Microgravity Conditions" (1999­2001) The Dow Chemical Company "Modeling of Catalytic Monoliths" (2000)

$

35,000.00

research in the areas of heterogeneous catalysis and catalytic processes; reactor engineering; catalyst preparation and characterization, and catalyst design. His interests also include solar energy, solar-receiver design, solar-related chemical processes, catalytic processes for the destruction of hazardous wastes, gas-to-liquid conversion processes, high-temperature superconductivity and processing of ceramic superconductors, solid oxide fuel cells, and ceramic membrane reactors. Prof. FRANK

Materials Research Science & Engineering Center "Neutral-Beam-Assisted Deposition of Oxides" (2000-2001) National Science Foundation "Support for Gaseous Electronics Conference GEC-2000" (2000­2001)

$

5,000.00

$ 110,000.00

$

44,000.00

HAROLD, MICHAEL

$ 60,000.00 ACS--Petroleum Research Fund "Shape-Selective Pneumatic Membrane Reactor for Enhanced Conversion & Yield in Equilibriumlimited Sequential-Parallel Reaction Systems" (2001­2004) BASF Corporation "Automated Reactor System for Undergraduate Practices Lab" (2001)

$

30,000.00

TILLER

performs theoretical

including DLVO and non-DLVO molecular interactions and their control, plus kinetics of the phase transitions and control of their rates.

$

32,000.00

and experimental research into many aspects of fluid/particle separation, including environmental and agricultural applications. Areas include thickening, filtration, centrifugation, CATscan analysis of solid/ liquid systems, sedimentation, flocculation, and interfacial phenomena. Additional focus includes separation of biosolids from wastewater sludge, processing of solids, stagewise drying, and new theories of supercompactibility. Prof. Tiller is also interested in developing agricultural fibers as aids in solid/liquid separation and coalescence of oily waters; ceramic processing; moisture transport in drying solids, and numerical/transient analysis of stagewise operations.

ECONOMIDES, MICHAEL J.

$ 324,831.98 Halliburton Energy Services "Development of a Novel Methodology for Stress & Stability-related Measurements in Boreholes" (1999­2001) * jointly with Profs. M. Nikolaou & P. Valkó (Texas A&M) Weatherford (Engineering Foundation) "Process Design for Complex Structures" (2000) $ 246,000.00

Molecular recognition and adsorption characterize Prof.

RICHARD

$ 60,000.00

KRISHNAMOORTI, RAMANAN

$ 354,195.00 National Science Foundation "Understanding the Role of Process Variables on Properties of Multiphase Polymeric Materials" (1998­2003) EXXON Chemical Company "Carbocationic Polymerization of Iso-olefin" (1998­2001) Welch Foundation "Tailoring Crystallinity in Thin Polymer Films" (2000­2003) DuPont Dow Elastomers "Phase Behavior in the Solution Process for the Production of EPDM" (1999­2001) NIST "Combinatorial Screening of Nanocomposites: Mechanical & Vapor-Barrier Properties" (2000­2001) American Chemical Society--PRF "Structure & Dynamics of Polymer-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites" (1997­2001)

WILLSON'S research. He specifically

investigates ion-exchange chromatography of proteins and nucleic acids; antibody affinity and selectivity; biophysical characterization of driving forces, equilibria, and kinetics of interactions involving biological macromolecules; directed mutagenesis of critical residues to test their contributions to association; environmental biotechnology; detection of mutagenic and DNA-damaging agents through luciferase-

ECONOMOU, DEMETRE J.

$ 557,207.00 National Science Foundation "Ion-Ion Plasmas: Fundamentals & Applications in Semiconductor Manufacturing" (1997­2001) National Science Foundation "Non-Local Electron Transport in Inductively Coupled Plasmas" (2000­2003) Sandia National Laboratories "Applications of Modular Plasma Reactor Simulator (MPRES)" (1996­2001) $ 135,000.00

Prof.

PETER VEKILOV'S

research

reporter systems; microbial degradation and modification of hydrocarbons, and isolation of enzymes responsible for these activities; DNA-probe monitoring of microbial populations in complex environments; combinatorial chemistry and catalysis; phage-surface display for improvement of affinity-separations ligands; enzyme engineering through phage display; and solid-phase combinatorial libraries.

$ 354,907.00

$

85,000.00

involves four primary areas: [a.] Control of the polymerization of sickle-cell hemoglobin, wherein ultrafast imagecapture, direct visualization of Hb polymers in vitro, monitoring of polymerization in cells, understanding of nucleation control via the dense liquid phase, and understanding and control of intermolecular

$ 349,774.00

$

33,950.00

$

20,000.00

continued

6

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

7

LUSS, DAN

$ 291,948.00 National Science Foundation "Electromagnetic Fields Produced by Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis (SHS)" (2001­2004) * jointly with Prof. A. Jacobson, UH MRSEC National Science Foundation "Temperature Patterns on Catalytic Pellets & Radial-Flow Reactor" (1999­2002) Robert A. Welch Foundation "Periodic & Chaotic Temperature-Patterns on Catalytic Surfaces" (1999­2001) U.S./Israel Binational Science Foundation "Control of Patterned States in Chemical Reactors" (1999­2001) * jointly with Prof. M. Sheintuch, The Technion, Israel Mobil Foundation, Inc. "Reaction Engineering Research" (1991­2000) Materials Research Science & Engineering Center "SHS & Membrane Reactors" (1999­2000) * jointly with Prof. J.T. Richardson Various Private-Profit Agencies "Research in Heterogeneous Catalysis--Chemical Reaction Engineering" (1991­2000) Materials Research Science & Engineering Center "Membrane Reactors for Synthesis-Gas Production" (2000­2001) * jointly with Prof. J.T. Richardson ACS--Petroleum Research Fund "Complex Dynamic Behavior of Countercurrent & Reverse-Flow Reactors" (2000­2002) U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation "Synthesis of Oxide & Composite Tubes in a Centrifuge" (2000­2001) Environmental Institute of Houston "Membrane Reactor for Synthesis-Gas Production" (2000­2001) U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation "Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of Oxide & Composite Tubes in a Centrifuge" (2000­2002)

MOHANTY, KISHORE K.

$ 637,010.00 U.S. Department of Energy "Fluid-Rock Characterization & Interactions in NMR Well-Logging" (1999­2002) * jointly with Prof. G. Hirasaki, Rice University U.S. Department of Energy "Impact of Capillary & Bond Numbers on Relative Permeability" (1999­2002) University of Tulsa "Exploitation & Optimization of Shallow-Shelf Carbonate-Reservoir Performance in Carney Field, Hunton Formation, Oklahoma" (2000­2005) Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (ATP) "Computation of Transport Properties from Petrographic Images" (2000­2001) Gulf Coast Hazardous-Substances Research Center "Biosurfactant Produced from Used Vegetable Oil for Removal of Metals from Wastewaters & Soils" (2000­2001) * with Prof. C. Vipulanandan, UH Civil Engineering Mobil Research and Development Corporation "Multiphase Flow in Mixed-Wet Porous Media" (1994­2000) Texas Hazardous-Waste Research Center "VOC Emission Control at Oil-Loading Terminals" (2000­2001) Mobil Oil Corporation "Non-Darcy Effects in Flow-Through Anisotropic Porous Media" (1996­2000) British Petroleum Exploration, Inc. "Reservoir Mechanisms & Scale-up" (1996­2000)

$ $

30,000.00 28,387.00

Frito-Lay, Inc. (unrestricted grant) (1999­2000) National Science Foundation "A Study on Plasma-Etching Yield Improvements through a Faculty-in-Industry Internship" (2001) Kellogg Brown & Root "Development of Performance-Monitoring Tools for Model Predictive Control" (2000­2002)

$

9,000.00

UH Institute for Space Systems Operation "Advanced Catalysts & Reactors for Mars-Exploration Sabaatier Processors" (2001)

$ $ 289,399.00 $ 471,983.00

21,000.00

WILLSON, RICHARD C.

$ 270,000.00 National Science Foundation "Competitive Ion-Exchange Adsorption of Proteins" (2001­2004) National Science Foundation "Acquisition of a Biosensor" (1997­2000) * jointly with Profs. S.H. Hardin, S.R. Blanke, A. Eskin National Space Biomedical Research Institute (2000­2003) * jointly with Prof. G.E. Fox Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (ATP) "Imaging Polarimeter for Rapid Screening of Chiral Libraries" (2000­2001) Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (ATP) "Imaging Polarimetry for High-Throughput Screening" (2000­2001) Robert A. Welch Foundation "Molecular Electrostatics of Protein Interactions" (1999­2002) * 15% effort Gulf Coast Hazardous-Substances Research Center "Enzymatic Detoxification of Cyanide Wastes" (2000­2003) * jointly with Prof. M. Benedik, UH Biochemistry Robert A. Welch Foundation "Physical Chemistry of Biomolecular Recognition" (1999­2001) Baylor College of Medicine "NASA National Space Biomedical Research Institute Micro-organisms in the Spacecraft Environment" (2000­2001) Gulf Coast Hazardous-Substances Research Center "Combinatorial Libraries of Heterogeneous Catalysts" (1999­2000) * jointly with Prof. J.T. Richardson Gulf Coast Hazardous-Substances Research Center "Improved Halogen Resistance of Catalytic Oxidation through Efficient Catalyst-Testing" (2000­2001) * jointly with Prof. J.T. Richardson

$ 135,000.00

$ 265,351.00

RICHARDSON, JAMES T.

$ 185,800.00 Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (ATP) "Improved Catalytic Membrane Reactors for SynthesisGas Generation" (2000­2001) Materials Research Science & Engineering Center "SHS & Membrane Reactors" (1999­2000) * jointly with Prof. D. Luss Various Private-Profit Agencies "Development of Heterogeneous Catalysis" (1991­2000) Sud-Chemie, Inc. "Screening of Carbon Formation on Steam-Reforming Catalysts" (2000­2001) Materials Research Science & Engineering Center "Membrane Reactors for Synthesis-Gas Production" (2000­2001) * jointly with Prof. D. Luss U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation "Efficient Continuous Technology for the Production of Soft Ferrite Materials" (2000­2001) * jointly with Prof. A.P. Bakhshievich, State Univ. of Armenia Gulf Coast Hazardous-Substances Research Center "Combinatorial Libraries of Heterogeneous Catalysts" (1999­2000) * jointly with Prof. R. Willson Gulf Coast Hazardous-Substances Research Center "Improved Halogen Resistance of Catalytic Oxidation through Efficient Catalyst-Testing" (2000­2001) * jointly with Prof. R. Willson UH Institute for Space Systems Operation "Improved Sabaatier Reactors for in situ Resource Utilization on Mars" (2000) U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation "Efficient Continuous Technology for the Production of Soft Ferrite Materials" (2000­2002)

$ 225,810.00

$ 135,000.00

$ 127,000.00

$ 150,000.00

$

80,000.00

$ 124,000.00

$

85,000.00

$

44,601.00

$

77,700.00

$

80,000.00

$ 123,465.00

$

40,000.00

$

75,437.00

$

73,900.00

$ 123,000.00

$

32,151.00

$

70,000.00

$

70,000.00

$ 111,000.00

$

25,000.00

$

57,000.00

$

90,199.50

$

60,000.00

$

20,000.00

$

55,000.00

$

61,745.00

$

47,000.00

NIKOLAOU, MICHAEL

$ $ 324,831.98 Halliburton Energy Services "Development of a Novel Methodology for Stress & Stability-related Measurements in Boreholes" (1999­2001) * jointly with Profs. M. Economides & P. Valkó (Texas A&M) $ 13,500.00 National Science Foundation "Design of Constrained Model Predictive Controllers with Enhanced Autonomy" (1998­2001) $ $ 55,000.00 Equilon Enterprises, L.L.C.--"Process Control" (unrestricted; renewable annually) 11,460.00 52,180.00 $ 55,000.00

$

10,750.00

$

9,400.00

$ 143,207.00

$

52,180.00

8

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

9

Faculty News & Activities

HAROLD TAKES CHAIRMANSHIP:

Effective 1 September 2000, Dr. Michael P. Harold accepted the position of Dow Chair Professor & Chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Houston. Prof. Harold was most recently Research Manager of Chemical Process Fundamentals with DuPont Central Research (Wilmington, DE). He previously held these other posts within DuPont: Global Technology Manager, Polymer & Fiber R&D (DuPont Dacron®); Research Supervisor, Dacron® Intermediates R&D; and Research R&D Associate, Reaction & Engineering (Central Research

C. ECONOMIDES HIRED:

Dr. Christine

VEKILOV HIRED:

Prof. Peter G. Vekilov

PROF. MICHAEL NIKOLAOU served as

a panelist in the session on Control Theory at the Chemical Process-Control Conference in January 2001. He presented five papers and invited seminars during 2000­2001. Prof. Nikolaou served as Director of Graduate Studies (concentrating on U.S. student recruitment) in the Department, and he is a member of the ABET Committee for the Cullen College of Engineering.

PROF. RAMANAN KRISHNAMOORTI

won the Cullen College of Engineering Junior Faculty Award in 2000, and, for exemplifying excellence in research in teaching in the area of polymeric materials, he followed this up by earning the prestigious University of Houston Award for Excellence in Research & Scholarship. He was joint editor of the ACS symposium series on Polymer Nanocomposites and of the MRS symposium series on Filled Polymers. He chaired sessions at technical meetings of the ACS, and

member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. He was awarded a Dr. Honoris Causa by the Petroleum & Gas University (Ploeisti, Romania) in 2001. He participated in at least 20 major conferences as a keynote speaker, session chairman, or panel member. During the year, he presented an estimated 12 papers in professional conferences, and he delivered approximately 50 seminars and talks in several countries and at various conferences. Prof. Economides is continuously involved in a number of public forums, including major newspapers. He appears regularly over the Dow Jones wire, Bloomberg News, and Energy News Live. He appeared on CNBC, Channel 13 (Houston), Channel 13 (Tokyo, Japan), Dutch national television, and ABC (Australia). He has been commissioned to write by El Paso edit Energy "Energy Corporation and

Ehlig-Economides joined the Department as Adjunct Professor in January 2000 to head the Petroleum Engineering program. Married to Prof. M. Economides, Dr. C. Economides is currently an International Account Manager and consultant for Schlumberger Global Sales Houston. Before that, she was the Manager for GeoQuest Reservoir Technologies, Latin America North. She was a member of a multidisciplinary task force for Anadrill Schlumberger, developing strategies for the design of re-entry and multilateral wells before becoming Technical & Marketing Manager for for Production Oilfield Enhancement Schlumberger

was hired as Associate Professor, effective Fall 2001. Prof. Vekilov was most recently on the faculty of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, where he developed an impressive research program in protein crystallization. His addition strengthens the Department's research in biochemical science and engineering. In 2000,

PROF. RICHARD WILLSON PROF. KISHORE MOHANTY

was promoted to Full Professor as of Fall 2000. He has served on the Editorial Board of the SPE Journal since 1999, and he is the volume coeditor of Current Opinion on Colloid & Interface Science (June 2001). He was a member of the Louisiana RCS Review panel. Prof. Mohanty chaired the 2000 Gordon Conference technical session on Flow through Permeable Media as well as the technical session on Transport and Reaction through Permeable Media at the AIChE Conference. Prof. Mohanty has been elected Vice-Chairman for 2000 and Chairman-elect for 2002 of the Gordon Research Conference on Flow through Permeable Media. He serves on UH's Radiation Safety Committee and the College of Engineering's Computer Policy Committee. Within the Department, he directs the Master of Chemical Engineering program and serves as Honors College Advisor.

was inducted as a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical & Biological Engineering. His PhD student Phillip Gibbs won the W.M. Peterson Award for best research-poster presentation from the ACS Division of Biochemical Technology at the 2000 ACS National Meeting. Prof. Willson serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Biochromatography, and, as a member of the CCR Vision 2020 Committee on Bioprocessing, he serves as co-editor for "New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a Sustainable 21st-Century Chemical Industry." He is a member of the NSF Environmental Biotechnology panel and the NASA Space Biotechnology panel. Prof. Willson served on the Programming Committee of the ACS Division of Biochemical Technology; as presider over the Biotechnology session of the Houston Society for Engineering in Medicine & Biology; as a session organizer at NASCRE-1 in January 2001; and on three Scientific Committees at other symposia. In 2000, he became President-elect of the International Society for Molecular Recognition. Prof. Willson filed two patent applications during 2000.

two each of the AIChE and MRS. He was Program Chair for the AIChE Division 1-A (Atlanta), and co-organizer of the ACS Special Symposium on Polymer Nanocomposites (San Francisco) and the MRS Symposium on Filled Polymers (Boston). Prof. Krishnamoorti delivered 13 papers and invited seminars during the year. He has also delivered a short course about polymers at the Fina Petrochemical Co. In 2001, he began a five-year term on the editorial board of the Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Edition. He also served as chair of the Department's Faculty Search committee during 2000.

Development). He also served as Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware, and as Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at UMassAmherst. He earned his PhD in ChE at the University of Houston (1985, advisor Dan Luss) and his BS ChE at Penn State University (1980).

Services. She has specialized in well-testing and integrated reservoir characterization in previous Schlumberger positions. Before joining Schlumberger in 1983, she was the Petroleum Engineering Department Head at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. Her degrees include a B.A. in Math-Science from Rice University, an M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Kansas, and a PhD in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford University. She has served on numerous SPE publication committees (recent Executive Editor of SPEFE) and SPE program and forum committees, and she chaired the first SPE Committee on Cultural Diversity. She was the 1982 Alaska Petroleum Engineer of the Year and received an SPE Distinguished Faculty award that year. She won the 1995 SPE Formation Evaluation award, became an SPE Distinguished Member in 1996, and received the 1997 Lester C. Uren Award. As an SPE Distinguished Lecturer in 1997­1998, Dr. C. Economides visited more than 25 locations in 15 countries.

Integration," a major multidisciplinary book on the new energy spectrum.

ROOKS HIRED:

Dr. Charles W. "Mickey"

PROF.

VEMURI

BALAKOTAIAH

Rooks joined the Department as Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering, effective April 2001. Recently retired from Monsanto and Solutia after many years of significant industrial research experience, he is tasked with reinvigorating our Undergraduate Practices Lab. Dr. Rooks will also participate in collaborative research in the area of catalytic reaction engineering. Dr. Rooks received his BS in ChE from the University of Mississippi in 1969, and his MS and PhD in ChE from the University of Oklahoma in 1971 and 1973, respectively. He served as a consulting engineer (1972­1973), Senior Development Engineer with Monsanto Textiles Co. (1973­1974), Senior Research Engineer and then Senior Engineering Chemical Specialist with and

chaired the "Chemical Reactor Stability & Dynamics" session at the Los Angeles AIChE meeting (2000) and co-chaired the "Nonlinear Dynamics and Pattern Formation" session at the same meeting. He served on the review panel for Fluid Physics at the Glenn Research Center of NASA.

PROF. DEMETRE J. ECONOMOU,

Associate Chairman, has been reappointed John and Rebecca Moores Professor at the University of Houston. He serves on the international editorial board of Materials Science in Semiconductor Processing, and he was guest co-

PROF. NEAL R. AMUNDSON

member of the National Academy

is a of

PROF.

DAN

LUSS,

long-time

ChE

editor of the special issue of Thin Solid Films (374), published in 2000. He served on the NSF's CTS panel for selection of CAREER Awards. He chaired two Plasma Processing sessions at the Los Angeles AIChE meeting. Prof. Economou organized the entire 53rd Gaseous Electronics Conference, which was attended by approximately 300 registrants in Houston. He served in three officership roles for professional conferences, and he presented 11 papers at conferences and technical meetings during 2000, with four more definitely scheduled during 2001. He also lectured for the FE/EIT continuing-education course offered by UH Chemistry Review. In 2000 alone, Prof. Economou also served on six Departmental, three College, and two University committees.

Department Chairman who stepped back in as Interim Chairman from Fall 1999 through August 2000, serves as the editor of Reviews in Chemical Engineering and the Plenum Chemical Engineering book series. He is the president of the U.S. Board of Governors of the International Symposium on Chemical Reaction Engineering (ISCRE), and he organized a meeting of NASCRE in Houston in 2000. Prof. Luss participates on national review panels for the NSF and NIH. He serves on the Advisory Board for the Rutgers University ChE Department, and he was the Rutgers Collaboratus XI Lecturer in 2001. He delivered invited seminars in Germany, Israel, and

Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He was the first recipient of the Neal R. Amundson Prize, awarded at each ISCRE meeting to a recognized leader in the field of chemical reaction engineering. He also holds four honorary doctorates. The Chemical Engineering Building at the University of Minnesota is named in his honor.

PROF. FRANK M. TILLER bestowed the

2001 Frank Tiller Research Award upon Prof. Prof. Kishore Richard Hogg of Penn State University. This award is given annually by the American Filtration & Separation Society. Prof. Tiller is an honorary professor at five Latin American universities, and he holds two honorary doctorates. He continues his research in the Department.

MOHANTY PROMOTED:

Monsanto

Intermediates

K. Mohanty was promoted to Full Professor effective Fall 2000. Prof. Mohanty has developed a renowned program in interfacial mechanics and porous-media transport during his years at UH.

Monsanto Fiber Intermediates (1975­1997), and as Senior Engineering Specialist (Acrylonitrile R&D) with Solutia Inc. (1997­2001). He specializes in industrial catalyst development, technology, and economics. He has authored numerous proprietary Monsanto Corporation Final Technical Reports on fluid-bed coal gasification, toluene-based routes to styrene, acrylonitrile catalyst development, and wasteminimization in the acrylonitrile process. He holds four U.S. patents, with another application in process. 10 University of Houston

DEATH: DR. CHARLES W. ARNOLD,

on 13 October 2000. After many years of tireless service as director of the Department's Petroleum Engineering program, Dr. Arnold retired effective 31 December 1998. He will be fondly remembered by hundreds of students for the painstaking personal care with which he dealt with them, from their initial application to the Petroleum Engineering program through their graduation from it. Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report 11

KRISHNAMOORTI PROMOTED: Prof.

Ramanan Krishnamoorti was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure, effective Fall 2001. Prof. Krishnamoorti has continued to develop an impressive program in polymernanocomposite design and synthesis since his hire in August 1994. During 2000,

PROF.

JAMES

T.

The Netherlands during 2000. Prof. Luss serves on the membership committee of the National Academy of Engineering, and he is a member of the Board of the CRE Division of the AIChE. He continues to serve on several University, College, and Departmental committees.

RICHARDSON

became President-elect of

the University of Houston chapter of Sigma Xi. He delivered invited seminars during technical meetings, academic visits, and industrial visits during the year. Prof. Richardson holds seven U.S. patents.

PROF. ECONOMIDES was

In 2000,

MICHAEL

J.

inducted as a foreign

D E PA R T M E N TA L F U N D I N G , S U P P O R T, R A N K I N G S , & T R E N D S

Institute for Improved Oil Recovery (IIOR)

in the University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering Contact: Prof. Kishore K. Mohanty, Director University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering S 222 Engineering Bldg. 1, Houston, TX 77204-4004 713-743-4331 713-743-4323 fax Research areas include: · Advanced computing technology applied to reservoir engineering · Three-dimensional imaging of flow through porous media · Gas-flooding methods (CO2, hydrocarbon, N2) The mission of the Institute for Improved Oil Recovery (IIOR) is to improve recovery of crude oil and natural gas under present-day economics, apply improved oil-recovery technology to the in situ clean-up of hazardous wastes, and transfer technology to industry and national laboratories. The scope of the program encompasses R&D and field demonstration, testing, and evaluation. · Displacement mechanisms · Foams · Fractured reservoirs · Formation evaluation · Environmental engineering/containment technologies · Particle transport, surface chemistry, wettability. State and University Grants Private Grants Industrial Grants, Fellowships $ $ $ 342,519 272,460 226,775 State Budget for 2000­2001 Federal Research Grants $ 1,431,369 $ 544,659 The Institute for Improved Oil Recovery (IIOR) conducts its university research via a research consortium that is funded by major oil and gas producers, service companies, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the state of Texas. After research has been conducted through cooperative university and industrial projects, results are presented in conferences and workshops around the United States.

DEPARTMENTAL SUPPORT/ GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS

As of June 2001, the UH ChE research program comprised 53 full-time graduate students, four postdoctoral fellows, 31 Petroleum Engineering students, and 71 part-time Master of Chemical Engineering students (the industrially employed professionals who are attracted to our non-thesis terminal-degree option). The program is supported by the following sources:

DONOR ORGANIZATIONS

The Department of Chemical Engineering is most grateful for the support contributed by these industrial, educational, and nonprofit organizations:

American Institute of Chemical Engineers BASF Corporation BP/Amoco CAChE Corp. Chevron U.S.A. Inc. Council for Chemical Research The Dow Chemical Company Foundation The Dow Chemical Company E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company ExxonMobil Fluor Corp. Halliburton Foundation, Inc. Hoechst-Celanese Chemical Group The Lubrizol Foundation Marathon Oil Company

THE

SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPROVED OIL-RECOVERY TECHNOLOGY: The U.S. Department of

TOTAL

----------------$ 2,817,782

Energy and other entities have estimated that less than one-third of the original oil in place can be produced with existing technologies. Hence, recovery of the remaining two-thirds constitutes the target for development of improved technologies. Approximately 341 billion barrels of mobile and immobile oil will remain bypassed or trapped in known U.S. reservoirs at the conclusion of conventional production. Of this remaining oil, it is estimated that an additional 76 billion barrels are recoverable by currently identified technologies with the application of well-designed R&D and technology-transfer strategies. This would sustain current levels of U.S. production for several decades, which is necessary for an orderly transition to alternative transportation fuels. Improved technology allows producers to work more efficiently and to extract more oil than otherwise.

OUTSTANDING ALUMNI

These graduates of the UH Chemical Engineering program have received the UH Engineering Alumni Association's "Distinguished Alumnus" Award:

Pennzoil Products Company Rohm and Haas Company Shell Oil Company Foundation

Robert Baldwin The natural-gas supply from conventional resources is estimated to be approximately 800 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), of which 160 Tcf are proven reserves and 640 Tcf are inferred or undiscovered reserves. Half the conventional undiscovered gas is considered economical to produce, with improved recovery methods being necessary to convert this gas to reserves. The remaining 50% is also expected to require improved drilling, completion, and gathering technology. A reduction in imported oil could be one near-term payoff when new reserves are developed via improved exploration and extraction techniques. Fuel-switching in stationary markets could enable the replacement of two million barrels/day of oil (25% of imports) with 4 Tcf/year of gas. Technology can make a difference. William Brookshire Robert M. Zoch, Jr. J.C.M. "Jimmy" Lee Ravi Singhania

BS, 1949 BS, 1957 BS, 1968 PhD, 1970 PhD

Dr. Charles R. Cutler of Houston (PhD ChE) was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000. His election citation reads: "For invention, development, and commercial implementation of a new-generation digital process-control technology." Dr. Cutler serves on the Department's Industrial Advisory Board.

12

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

13

Graduate Ranking: National Research Council

Besides featuring the top-ranked doctoral program in the University of Houston, the Chemical Engineering Department ranked in the top 20 nationally out of 93 ChE doctoral programs rated by the National Research Council (1995):

INDUSTRIAL ADVISORY BOARD

The Chemical Engineering Department has an Industrial Advisory Board (IAB). The IAB provides the Chemical Engineering chairman and faculty an industrial perspective on important strategic and operational issues. With input and advice, the IAB addresses such salient topics as faculty hiring, student recruitment, curriculum content, and graduate research programs. The IAB members also provide a network through which fundraising efforts, student recruiting and internships, and engagement of alumni are enhanced.

Halliburton Energy Services (Duncan, OK) Dr. Ron Morgan, Technical Excellence Leader, Research 6 7 8 Dr. Charles Cutler, Industrial Consultant (Houston, TX) Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. (Houston, TX) Steve Hensler, Area Manager Aspen Technology, Inc. (Houston, TX) John Ayala, Senior Vice-President, Global Solutions Practice ATOFINA Petrochemicals, Inc. (Deer Park, TX) Dr. Michel Daumerie, Vice-President of Research & Technology BASF Corporation (Freeport, TX) Jim Saccomanno, Operations Director Bechtel Corp. (Houston, TX) Lance Murray, Principal VP, Manager of Refining Center of Excellence Celanese Ltd. (Pasadena, TX) Dieter Peters, Site Director Phillips 66 Co. (Sweeny, TX) Conoco Inc. (Houston, TX) Alok Jain, Manager, Project Engineering & Management, EPT Rohm and Haas Texas Incorporated (Deer Park, TX) The Dow Chemical Company (Freeport, TX) Tim May, Site Logistics Leader, Texas Operations Schlumberger--Oilfield Chemicals (Sugar Land, TX) DuPont Lycra (Wilmington, DE)

®

M.A. Ervin & Associates (Austin, TX) Dr. Mike Ervin, President Ethyl Corporation (Pasadena, TX) Kang Buoy, Plant Manager ExxonMobil Chemical (Baytown, TX) Joe Carey, Manager, Polypropylene Technology Fluor Corp. (Sugar Land, TX) Mike Piwetz, Vice-President, Process Engineering

RELATIVE RANKINGS FOR RESEARCH-DOCTORATE PROGRAMS

OVERALL RANKING

1 2 3 4 5

IN

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

NRC SCORE

4.86 4.73 4.63 4.62 4.42 4.41 4.35 4.34 4.14 4.08 3.97 3.87 3.86 3.82 3.75 3.67

INSTITUTION

University of Minnesota Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of California, Berkeley University of Wisconsin (Madison) University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) California Institute of Technology Stanford University University of Delaware Princeton University University of Texas at Austin University of Pennsylvania Carnegie Mellon University Cornell University University of California, Santa Barbara Northwestern University Purdue University

Members of the IAB are:

9 10

Kellogg Brown & Root (Houston, TX) Tim Challand, Vice-President, Global Engineering The Lubrizol Corporation (Deer Park, TX) Harold Smith, Technology Manager for the Texas Plants Marathon Ashland (Texas City, TX) Mike Armbrester, Division Manager OxyVinyls, L.P. (Deer Park, TX) Ken Carlson, Engineering Services Manager Pennzoil-Quaker State Co. (The Woodlands, TX) Dr. Ahmed Alim, Senior VP of Research & Development and Chief Technology Officer 11 12 13 14 15 16

17

18 19 20 T21 T21 23 24 25

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

University of Michigan City University of New York University of Washington University of Massachusetts at Amherst Rice University Pennsylvania State University University of Notre Dame North Carolina State University University of Colorado Lehigh University University of California, Davis State University of New York at Buffalo University of Virginia Georgia Institute of Technology

3.66

3.52 3.46 3.44 3.35 3.35 3.34 3.30 3.20 3.18 3.13 3.11 3.08 3.01 3.01

Rob Mitchell, Refining Process Engineering Manager

26 27 28 29 T30 T30

Bob Brinly, President & Plant Manager

Dr. Keith Dismuke, Department Head Shell Chemical Company (Houston, TX) Dr. Carlos Garcia, Technical Manager

Dr. Bill Hill, Global Technology Manager - Terathane®

Source: NRC report, "Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States: Continuity and Change" (1995). The NRC produces these reports once every 10 years.

14

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

15

Graduate Ranking: The Gourman Report

A Rating of Graduate & Professional Schools in American Universities (1995)

Undergraduate Ranking: The Gourman Report

A Rating of Undergraduate Programs in American Universities (1995)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING--THE TOP 30 U.S. PROGRAMS,

RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

IN

RANK ORDER:

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING--THE TOP 40 U.S. PROGRAMS,

RANK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

IN

RANK ORDER:

INSTITUTION

University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin, Madison California Institute of Technology University of California, Berkeley Stanford University University of Delaware Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Illinois (Champaign/Urbana) Princeton University

INSTITUTION

University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin (Madison) University of California, Berkeley California Institute of Technology Stanford University University of Delaware Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Illinois (Champaign/Urbana) Princeton University

SCORE

4.91 4.90 4.88 4.85 4.82 4.80 4.79 4.75 4.74

10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

Purdue University University of Notre Dame Northwestern University Cornell University University of Texas at Austin Stevens Institute of Technology University of Pennsylvania Carnegie Mellon University University of Michigan Rice University University of Washington University of Massachusetts, Amherst Iowa State University University of Florida University of Rochester State University of New York at Buffalo Pennsylvania State University Case Western Reserve University University of Colorado Washington University in St. Louis Lehigh University Texas A&M University City College of the City University of New York Ohio State University Georgia Institute of Technology North Carolina State University Yale University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University University of Tennessee, Knoxville

4.73

4.72 4.71 4.68 4.65 4.63 4.62 4.61 4.60 4.58 4.57 4.56 4.55 4.53 4.51 4.50 4.48 4.47 4.44 4.43 4.40 4.39 4.37 4.35 4.33 4.31 4.29 4.25 4.23 4.21 4.20

10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

Northwestern University University of Pennsylvania University of Texas at Austin Carnegie Mellon University Purdue University University of Michigan University of Washington Cornell University University of Notre Dame Rice University University of Massachusetts, Amherst Iowa State University University of Florida University of Rochester State University of New York at Buffalo University of Colorado Pennsylvania State University Washington University in St. Louis Case Western Reserve University Lehigh University

Source: The Gourman Report, A Rating of Graduate and Professional Schools (1995).

39 40

Source: The Gourman Report, A Rating of Undergraduate Programs (1995).

16

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

17

F A C U LT Y P U B L I C AT I O N S

Following are authored works accepted for or pending publication since January 2000. Reprints may be requested from the professors through the Departmental mailing address, by phone, or by e-mail (q.v. Section 9.0).

Enrollment Trends & Degrees Conferred

Enrollment figures are as of the start of the Fall semesters in the years indicated. Degree figures are totals of those conferred at the ends of the Spring semesters in the years indicated.

BALAKOTAIAH, VEMURI UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT & DEGREES CONFERRED:

YEAR:

Fall Enrollment: BS Degrees:

STUDENTS RECEIVING DEGREES:

* NOTE: Some students have filed Privacy

1993

545 36

1994

480 38

1995

445 46

1996

460 43

1997

383 40

1998

373 36

1999

317 40

2000

295 29

Requests and are thus not listed here.

Gupta, N., V. Balakotaiah and D.H. West, "Bifurcation Analysis of a Two-Dimensional Monolith Reactor Model," Chem. Eng. Sci. 56, 1435 (2001). Dao, E.K. and V. Balakotaiah, "Experimental Study of Wave Occlusion on Falling Films in a Vertical Pipe," AIChE J. 46, 1300 (2000). Balakotaiah, V. and N. Gupta, "Controlling Regimes for Surface Reactions in Catalyst Pores," Chem. Eng. Sci. 55, 3505 (2000). Balakotaiah, V., N. Gupta and D.H. West, "A Simplified Model for Analyzing Catalytic Reactions in Short Monoliths," Chem. Eng. Sci. 55, 5367 (2000). Dommeti, S.M.S. and V. Balakotaiah, "On the Limits of Validity of Effective Dispersion Models for Bulk Reactions," Chem. Eng. Sci. 55, 6169 (2000). Nguyen, L.T. and V. Balakotaiah, "Modeling and Experimental Studies of Wave Evolution on Free-Falling Viscous Films," Phys. Fluids 12, 2236 (2000).

Lee, K.W. and J.M. Briggs, "Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) Study of Epothilones as Tubulin Inhibitors: Pharmacophore Search using 3D QSAR Methods," J. Computer-Aided Mol. Design (in press, 2001). Liu, N., H. Samartzidou, K.W. Lee, J.M. Briggs and A.H. Delcour, "Effects of Pore Mutations and Permeant Ion Concentration on the Spontaneous Gating Activity of OmpC Porin," Protein Eng. 13, 491 (2000). Lins, R.D., T.P. Straatsma and J.M. Briggs, "Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrase Active Site upon Metal Binding," Biopolymers 53, 308 (2000). Soares, T., J.M. Briggs, D. Goodsell and A. Olson, "Ionization State and Molecular Docking Studies for the Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor: The Role of Lysine 32 in the Catalytic Mechanism," J. Molec. Recog. 13, 146 (2000). Carlson, H.A., K.M. Masukawa, K. Rubens, F.D. Bushman, W.L. Jorgensen, R.D. Lins, J.M. Briggs and J.A. McCammon, "Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase," J. Med. Chem. 43, 2100 (2000). Lins, R.D., A. Adesokan, T.A. Soares and J.M. Briggs, "Investigations on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Integrase/DNA Binding Interactions via Molecular Dynamics and Electrostatics Calculations," Pharm. Therap. 85, 123 (2000).

Ehlig-Economides, C.A. and J. Spivey, "Intuition and Well-Test Interpretation," Hart's E&P (October 2000). Ehlig-Economides, C.A. and M.J. Economides, "Single-Well Reservoir Management--The Ultimate Multibranch Well Challenge," SPE 59447 (April 2000). Ehlig-Economides, C.A., B.G. Fernandez and C.A. Gongora, "Global Experiences and Practice for Cold Production of Moderate and Heavy Oil," SPE 58773 (February 2000). Ehlig-Economides, C.A., M. Taha, H.D. Marin, E. Novoa and O. Sanchez, "Drilling and Completion Strategies in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs," SPE 59057 (February 2000).

2000­2001 BS ChE Graduates with Honors and/or Membership in the Honors College

Folabi A. Ayoola (cum laude) Marc N. Charendoff (magna cum laude) Jacob A. Collins (cum laude)

GRADUATE ENROLLMENT & DEGREES CONFERRED:

YEAR:

Fall Enrollment MS Degrees: MS Degrees in ChemE: MS Degrees PetroleumE: PhD Degrees: MChE Degrees:

1993

129 8 ~ ~ 10 5

1994

107 ~ 11 10 17 5

1995

135 ~ 7 13 10 13

1996

113 ~ 12 16 16 6

1997

98 ~ 9 7 7 6

1998

95 ~ 16 8 12 7

1999

103 ~ 14 6 7 6

2000

94 ~ 9 7 6 8

Randall L. Collum, Jr. (summa cum laude) Monica M. Losey (magna cum laude) Cynthia Mata (magna cum laude) Nile A. Mead (magna cum laude) Brian E. Moore (cum laude) Michael J. Moreno (cum laude) Olayemi O. Ogidan (magna cum laude) Arti A. Patel (magna cum laude)

ECONOMIDES, MICHAEL J.

Economides, M.J., R.E. Oligney and A.S. Demarchos, "Natural Gas: The Revolution is Coming," JPT, p. 102 ff. (May 2001). Economides, M.J. and A. Ghalambor, "Equivalency of International Petroleum Engineering Programs," JPT, p. 64 ff. (January 2001).

2000­2001 RECIPIENTS, PHD

IN

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Recipents (since Fall 2000): Master of Chemical Engineering

Nilva P. Barrios Mark E. Hubert Nancy J. Ma Dustin D. Olson Amish B. Patel Jorgé J. Delgado-Acevedo Johnny L. Gipson Philip J. Houm

Sandra M. Dommeti, Numerical Computation and Bifurcation Analysis of Reacting Flow Systems (V. Balakotaiah, advisor) S. Alper Eker, Control of Nonlinear Processes Operating at Various Steady States: Analysis and Synthesis of Linear and Adaptive Model-based Control Approaches (M. Nikolaou, advisor)

BOOKS:

Balakotaiah, V. and H.-C. Chang, Applied Nonlinear Methods for Engineers, Cambridge Univ. Press (publication anticipated in 2001). Balakotaiah, V., Design, Analysis and Simulation of Chemical Reactors (publication anticipated in 2001).

NONREFEREED PUBLICATIONS:

Sumrow, M.H. and M.J. Economides, "Pushing the Boundaries of Coiled Tubing Applications," SPE 68480 (2001). Economides, M.J. and R.E. Oligney, "Energy Mix of New Economy Dominated by Natural Gas," The Amer. O&G Reporter, p. 35 ff. (December 2000). Ehlig-Economides, C.A. and M.J. Economides, "Accelerating Oil Recovery with ?-Mode Production Strategy," World Oil, p. 53 ff. (November 2000). Wang, X., S. Indriati, P.P. Valkó and M.J. Economides, "Production Impairment and Purpose-Built Design of Hydraulic Fractures in Gas-Condensate Reservoirs," SPE 64749 (2000). Saputelli, L., B. Cherian, K. Grigoriadis, M. Nikolaou, C. Oudinot, G. Reddy, M.J. Economides and C. Ehlig-Economides,

M.S. in Chemical Engineering

Hani A. Gadalla, Two-dimensional Heat-Transfer Properties of Ceramic Foams in the Presence of Chemical Reactions (J.T. Richardson, advisor) Nikunj Gupta, Modeling and Bifurcation Analysis of Catalytic Reactions in Monoliths (V. Balakotaiah, advisor) Leonidas Kappos, Miscible and Immiscible Displacements in Porous Media (K. Mohanty, advisor) Bryan C. Basden Bilu V. Cherian Raphael J. Guerithault Shirley Indriati David L. Jewell Bruno LeCerf Cedric Oudinot Ankur Rastogi Hrushikesh K. Shah

ECONOMIDES, CHRISTINE A.

NONREFEREED PUBLICATIONS:

Saputelli, L., B. Cherian, K. Grigoriadis, M. Nikolaou, C. Oudinot, G. Reddy, M.J. Economides and C. Ehlig-Economides, "Integration of Computer-Aided High-Intensity Design with Reservoir Exploitation of Remote and Offshore Locations," SPE 64621 (2000); SPE J. (accepted for publication, 2001). Ehlig-Economides, C.A. and M.J. Economides, "Accelerating Oil Recovery with ?-Mode Production Strategy," World Oil, p. 53 ff. (November 2000).

M.S. in Petroleum Engineering

James T. Ritchie, Ceramic-Membrane Reactor for Synthesis Gas Production (D. Luss & J.T. Richardson, advisors) Olufisoye Delano Ayed I. Husain Dana J. Jalal Willem F. Maas Edmund O. Morris Michael H. Sumrow Evan K. Swingholm

BOOK CHAPTER:

Balakotaiah, V. and J. Khinast, "Numerical Bifurcation Techniques for Chemical Reactor Problems," IMA Vol. Math & Its Appl. 119, 1 (2000).

PhD in Biomedical Engineering

Phillip R. Gibbs, Studies in Biocatalysis (R. Willson, advisor)

BRIGGS, JAMES M.

Cui, M., J. Shen, J.M. Briggs, X. Luo, X. Tan, H. Jiang, K. Chen and J. Li, "Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Interaction Between Scorpion Toxin Lq2 and Potassium Ion Channel," Biophys. J. (in press, 2001).

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Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

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"Integration of Computer-Aided High-Intensity Design with Reservoir Exploitation of Remote and Offshore Locations," SPE 64621 (2000); SPE J. (accepted for publication, 2001). Sankaran, S., M. Nikolaou and M.J. Economides, "Fracture Geometry and Vertical Migration in Multilayered Formations from Inclined Wells," SPE 63177 (2000). Economides, M.J., R.E. Oligney and A.S. Demarchos, "Natural Gas: The Revolution is Coming," SPE 62884 (2000). Ehlig-Economides, C.A. and M.J. Economides, "Single-Well Reservoir Management--The Ultimate Multibranch Well Challenge," SPE 59447 (April 2000). Barwani, M., A. Marhubi, R.E. Oligney and M.J. Economides, "The Role of the Local PetroleumServices Company in Asset Management," SPE 59445 (2000). Ghalambor, A. and M.J. Economides, "Formation Damage Abatement: A QuarterCentury Perspective," SPE 58744 (2000). Nikolaevskiy, V.N. and M.J. Economides, "The Near-Well State of Stress and Induced Rock Damage," SPE 58716 (2000).

Ramamurthi, B.N. and D.J. Economou, "TwoDimensional Simulation of Pulsed-Power Electronegative Plasmas," J. de Physique (accepted for publication, 2001). Kim, C.-K. and D.J. Economou, "Energy and Angular Distributions of Ions Extracted from a Large Hole in Contact with a High-Density Plasma," Proc. Symp. "Fundls. of Gas-Phase and Surface Chemistry of Vapor Deposition II," The Electrochemical Society (Washington, DC) (accepted for publication, 2001). Kim, C.-K. and D.J. Economou, "Plasma Molding over Surface Topography: Energy and Angular Distributions of Ions Extracted out of Large Holes," J. Appl. Phys. (accepted for publication, 2001). Panda, S., D.J. Economou and L. Chen, "Anisotropic Etching of Polymer Thin Films by High Energy (100s of eV) Oxygen-Atom Neutral Beams," J. Vac. Sci. Technol. (accepted for publication, 2001). Kanakasabapathy, S.K., L.J. Overzet, V. Midha and D.J. Economou, "Alternating Fluxes of Positive and Negative Ions from an Ion-Ion Plasma," Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 173 (2001). Economou, D.J., "Modeling and Simulation of Plasma-Etching Reactors for Microelectronics," Thin Solid Films 365, 348 (2000). Feldsien, J., D. Kim and D.J. Economou, "SiO2 Etching in Inductively Coupled Plasmas: Surface Chemistry and Two-Dimensional Simulations," Thin Solid Films 374, 311 (2000). Midha, V. and D.J. Economou, "Spatiotemporal Evolution of a Pulsed Chlorine Discharge," Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 9, 256 (2000). Panda, S., D.J. Economou and M. Meyyappan, "Effect of Metastable Oxygen Molecules in High-Density Power-Modulated Oxygen Discharges," J. Appl. Phys. 87, 8323 (2000). Kaganovich, I., B. Ramamurthi and D.J. Economou, "Self-Trapping of Negative Ions due to Electron Detachment in the Afterglow of Electronegative Gas Plasmas," Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 2844 (2000).

Kaganovich, I., D.J. Economou, B. Ramamurthi and V. Midha, "Negative Ion-Density Fronts during Ignition and Extinction of Plasmas in Electronegative Gases," Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1918 (2000).

Krishnamoorti, R. and E.P. Giannelis, "StrainHardening in Model Polymer Brushes," Langmuir 17, 1448 (2001). Yurekli, K., R. Krishnamoorti, M.-F. Tse, K.O. McElrath, A.H. Tsou and H.-C. Wang, "Structure and Dynamics of Carbon-Black-Filled Elastomers," J. Polym. Sci. Part B: Polym. Phys. 39, 256 (2001). Manias, E., H. Chen, R. Krishnamoorti, J. Genzer, E.J. Kramer and E.P. Giannelis, "Intercalation Kinetics of Long Polymers in 2nm Confinements," Macromolecules 33, 7955 (2000). Krishnamoorti, R., M.A. Modi, M.F. Tse and H.C. Wang, "Pathway and Kinetics of Cylinder-toSphere Order-Order Transition in Block Copolymers," Macromolecules 33, 3810 (2000). Krishnamoorti, R., A.S. Silva, M.A. Modi and B. Hammouda, "Small-Angle Neutron-Scattering Study of a Cylinder-to-Sphere Order-Order Transition in Block Copolymers," Macromolecules 33, 3803 (2000). Ren, J., A.S. Silva and R. Krishnamoorti, "Linear Viscoelasticity of Disordered PolystyrenePoly-isoprene Block Copolymer Bases LayeredSilicate Nanocomposites," Macromolecules 33, 3739 (2000). Tse, M.-F., H.-C. Wang, T.D. Shaffer, K.O. McElrath, M.A. Modi and R. Krishnamoorti, "Physical Properties of Isobutylene-based Block Copolymers," Polym. Engng. & Sci. 40, 2182 (2000).

composites," in "Polymer Nanocomposites" (T.J. Pinnavaia and G. Beall, eds.), J. Wiley & Sons, New York (2000).

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS:

Ivkov, R., P. Papanek, P.M. Gehring and R. Krishnamoorti, ACS PMSE Preprints 82, 210 (2000). Krishnamoorti, R. and A.S. Silva, ACS PMSE Preprints 82, 218 (2000). Ren, J. and R. Krishnamoorti, ACS PMSE Preprints 82, 264 (2000).

Perry, S.S., S. Lee, T.R. Lee, M. Graupe, A. Puck, R. Colorado Jr. and I. Wenzl, "Molecular-Level Interpretations of Frictional Force Data Collected with Atomic-Force Microscopy: Chain-Length Effects in Self-Assembled Organic Monolayers," Polym. Prepr. (ACS, Div. Polym. Chem.) 41, 1456 (2000). Shon, Y.-S. and T.R. Lee, "Desorption and Exchange of Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) on Gold Generated from Chelating Alkanedithiols," J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8192 (2000). Shon, Y.-S. and T.R. Lee, "A Steady-State Kinetic Model Can Be Used to Describe the Growth of Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) on Gold," J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8182 (2000). Fukushima, H., S. Seki, T. Nishikawa, H. Takiguchi, K. Tamada, K. Abe, R. Colorado Jr., M. Graupe, O.E. Shmakova and T.R. Lee, "Microstructure, Wettability, and Thermal Stability of Semifluorinated Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) on Gold," J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 7417 (2000). Shon, Y.-S., S. Lee, R. Colorado Jr., S.S. Perry and T.R. Lee, "Spiroalkanedithiol-Based SAMs Reveal Unique Insight into the Wettabilities and Frictional Properties of Organic Thin Films," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 7556 (2000). Shon, Y.-S., S. Lee, S.S. Perry and T.R. Lee, "The Adsorption of Unsymmetrical Spiroalkanedithiols onto Gold Affords Multicomponent Interfaces that are Homogeneously Mixed at the Molecular Level," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 1278 (2000). Genzer, J., E. Sivaniah, E.J. Kramer, J. Wang, M. Xiang, K. Char, C.K. Ober, R.A. Bubeck, D.A. Fischer, M. Graupe, R. Colorado Jr., O.E. Shmakova and T.R. Lee, "Molecular Orientation of Single and Two-Armed Monodendron Semifluorinated Chains on `Soft' and `Hard' Surfaces Studied using NEXAFS," Macromolecules 33, 6068 (2000).

HAROLD, MICHAEL P.

Hsing, I.-M., R. Srinivasan, M.P. Harold, K.F. Jensen and M.A. Schmidt, "Simulations of Micromachined Chemical Reactors for Heterogeneous Partial Oxidation Reactions," Chem. Eng. Sci. 55, 3 (2000). Harold, M.P. and B. Ogunnaike, "Process Engineering in the Evolving Chemical Industry," AIChE J. 46, 2123 (2000).

NONREFEREED PUBLICATIONS:

Ren, J. and R. Krishnamoorti, "Structure and Rheology of Intercalated PolystyrenePolyisoprene Layered-Silicate Nanocomposites," Polym. Mater. Sci. Eng. 82, 264 (2000). Krishnamoorti, R. and A.S. Silva, "Phase Transitions in Layered-Silicate Nanocomposites," Polym. Mater. Sci. Eng. 82, 218 (2000).

INVITED REVIEW:

Mills, P., J. Nicole and M.P. Harold, "New Methodologies and Reactor Types for Catalytic Process Development," Stud. Surf. Sci. & Catal. (accepted for publication, 2001).

KRISHNAMOORTI, RAMANAN

Krishnamoorti, R., W.W. Graessley, A. Zirkel, D. Richter, L.J. Fetters and D.J. Lohse, "Melt-State Polymer-Chain Dimensions as a Function of Temperature," J. Phys.: Conden. Mat. (accepted for publication, 2001). Lincoln, D.M., R.A. Vaia, Z.G. Wang, B.S. Hsaio and R. Krishnamoorti, "Temperature Dependence of Polymer Crystalline Morphology in Nylon 6/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites," Polymer (accepted for publication, 2001). Krishnamoorti, R., C.A. Mitchell and A.S. Silva, "Effect of Silicate-Layer Anisotropy on Cylindrical and Spherical Microdomain Ordering in Block Copolymer Nanocomposites," J. Chem. Phys. (accepted for publication, 2001). Silva, A.S., C.A. Mitchell, M.-F. Tse, H.-C. Wang and R. Krishnamoorti, "Templating of Cylindrical and Spherical Block Copolymer Microdomains by Layered Silicates," J. Chem. Phys. (accepted for publication, 2001). Krishnamoorti, R., J. Ren and A.S. Silva, "Shear Response of Layered Silicate Nanocomposites," J. Chem. Phys. 114, 4968 (2001).

LEE, T. RANDALL

Garg, N., J.M. Friedman and T.R. Lee, "Adsorption Profiles of Chelating Aromatic Dithiols and Disulfides: Comparison to Those of Normal Alkanethiols and Disulfides," Langmuir 16, 4266 (2000). Lee, S., Y.-S. Shon, R. Colorado Jr., R.L. Guenard, T.R. Lee and S.S. Perry, "The Influence of Packing Densities and Surface Order on the Frictional Properties of Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) on Gold: A Comparison of SAMs Derived from Normal and Spiroalkanedithiols," Langmuir 16, 2220 (2000). Shon, Y.-S., R. Colorado Jr., C.T. Williams, C.D. Bain and T.R. Lee, "Low-Density Self-Assembled Monolayers on Gold Derived from Chelating 2-Monoalkylpropane-1,3-dithiols," Langmuir 16, 541 (2000). Colorado Jr., R. and T.R. Lee, "Physical Organic Probes of Interfacial Wettability Reveal the Importance of Surface Dipole Effects," J. Phys. Org. Chem. 13, 796 (2000).

BOOKS:

Economides, M.J. and R.E. Oligney, The Color of Oil, 200 pp., Round Oak Publishing (Houston), February 2000. Economides, M.J. and K.G. Nolte, Reservoir Stimulation, 3rd ed. (to be published, 2001).

BOOK CHAPTERS:

Mitchell, C.A. and R. Krishnamoorti, "Influence of Layered Silicates on the Rheological Properties of Diblock Copolymer Nanocomposites," in "Polymer Nanocomposites" (R. Krishnamoorti and R.A. Vaia, eds.), ACS, Washington (in press, 2001). Vaia, R.A. and R. Krishnamoorti, "Introduction," in "Polymer Nanocomposites" (R. Krishnamoorti and R.A. Vaia, eds.), ACS, Washington (in press, 2001). Krishnamoorti, R. and A.S. Silva, "Rheological Properties of Polymer Layered-Silicate Nano-

ECONOMOU, DEMETRE J.

Kaganovich, I., B.N. Ramamurthi and D.J. Economou, "Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Charged Species in the Afterglow of Plasmas Containing Negative Ions," Phys. Rev. E (accepted for publication, 2001). Midha, V. and D.J. Economou, "Dynamics of Ion-Ion Plasmas under Radio-Frequency Bias," J. Appl. Phys. (accepted for publication, 2001).

LUSS, DAN

Marwaha, B., J. Annamalai and D. Luss, "HotZone Formation during Carbon Monoxide

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University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

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Oxidation in a Radial-Flow Reactor," Chem. Eng. Sci. 56, 89 (2001). Ming, Q., M.D. Nersesyan, S.-C. Lin, J.T. Richardson, D. Luss and A.A. Shiryaev, "A New Route to Synthesize La1-xSrxMnO3," J. Mater. Sci. 35, 3599 (2000). Garg, R., D. Luss and J.G. Khinast, "Dynamic and Steady-State Features of a Cooled Countercurrent-Flow Reactor," AIChE J. 46, 2029 (2000). Khinast, J.G. and D. Luss, "Efficient Bifurcation Analysis of Periodically-Forced DistributedParameter Systems," Computers & Chem. Eng. 24, 139 (2000).

Media from Thin-Sections," SPE 69623; SPE J. (accepted for publication, 2001). Rodriguez-Guadarrama, L.A., S.K. Talsania, K.K. Mohanty and R. Rajagopalan, "Mixing Properties of Two-Dimensional Lattice Solutions of Amphiphiles," J. Coll. & Interf. Sci. 224, 188 (2000). Singh, M. and K.K. Mohanty, "Permeability of Spatially Correlated Porous Media," Chem. Eng. Sci. 55, 5393 (2000). Wang, X. and K.K. Mohanty, "Multiphase Non-Darcy Flow in Gas-Condensate Reservoir," SPE J. 5, 426 (2000).

"Integration of Computer-Aided High-Intensity Design with Reservoir Exploitation of Remote and Offshore Locations," SPE 64621 (2000); SPE J. (accepted for publication, 2001). Sankaran, S., M. Nikolaou and M.J. Economides, "Fracture Geometry and Vertical Migration in Multilayered Formations from Inclined Wells," SPE 63177 (2000).

BOOK:

Economides, M.J. and R.E. Oligney, The Color of Oil, 200 pp., Round Oak Publishing (Houston), February 2000.

TILLER, FRANK M.

Tiller, F.M. and W.P. Li, "Dangers of Lab-Plant Scale-up for Solid/Liquid Separation Systems," Chem. Eng. Comm. (in press, 2001). Tiller, F.M. and W.P. Li, "Modified Capillary Suction Theory with Effects of Sedimentation for Rectangular Cells," J. Chinese Inst. Of Chem. Engng. (in press, 2001). Tiller, F.M. and W.P. Li, "Optimizing Candle Filters for Super-Compactible Cakes," Adv. In Filtration & Separation Technol. 15 (2001). Tiller, F.M. and W.P. Li, "CATscan Analysis of Batch Sedimentation of Kaolin Clay," Water Research (accepted for publication, 2001). Lee, D.J., J.-H. Kwon and F.M. Tiller, "Behavior of Highly Compactible Filter Cake: Variable Internal Flow Rate," AIChE J. 46, 110 (2000). Tiller, F.M. and W.P. Li, "Strange Behavior of Supercompactible Filter Cakes," Chem. Proc. (Sept. 2000).

Apoferritin Molecules in Solution: Effects of Added Electrolyte," Biophys. J. 78, 2060 (2000). Thomas, B.R., A.A. Chernov, P.G. Vekilov and D.C. Carter, "Distribution Coefficients on Protein Impurities in Ferritin and Lysozyme Crystals. Self-Purification in Microgravity," J. Crystal Growth 211, 149 (2000). Galkin, O. and P.G. Vekilov, "Control of Protein Crystal Nucleation around the Metastable Liquid-Liquid Phase Boundary," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 6277 (2000). Yau, S.-T., B.R. Thomas and P.G. Vekilov, "Molecular Mechanisms of Crystallization and Defect Formation," Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 353 (2000). Yau, S.-T. and P.G. Vekilov, "Quasi-Planar Nucleus Structure in Apoferritin Crystallization," Nature 406, 494 (2000). Hirsch, R.E., R.E. Samuel, N.A. Fataliev, M.J. Pollack, O. Galkin, P.G. Vekilov and R.L. Nagel, "Differential Pathways in Oxy and Deoxy HbC Aggregation/Crystallization," Proteins 42, 99 (2000). Yau, S.-T., D.N. Petsev, B.R. Thomas and P.G. Vekilov, "Molecular-level Thermodynamic and Kinetic Parameters for the Self-Assembly of Apoferritin Molecules into Crystals," J. Molec. Biol. 303, 667 (2000). Vekilov, P.G. and J.I.D. Alexander, "Dynamics of Layer Growth in Protein Crystallization," Chem. Rev. 100, 2061 (2000).

RICHARDSON, JAMES T.

McMinn, T.E., F.C. Moates and J.T. Richardson, "Catalytic Steam-Reforming of Chlorocarbons: Catalyst Deactivation," Appl. Catal. B (accepted for publication, 2001). Ming, Q., M.D. Nersesyan, S.-C. Lin, J.T. Richardson, D. Luss and A.A. Shiryaev, "A New Route to Synthesize La1-xSrxMnO3," J. Mater. Sci. 35, 3599 (2000). Twigg, M.V. and J.T. Richardson, "Effects of Alumina Incorporation in Coprecipitated NiOAl2O3 Catalysts," Appl. Catal. A 190, 61 (2000). Couté, N. and J.T. Richardson, "SteamReforming of Chlorocarbons: Chlorinated Aromatics," Appl. Catal. B 26, 217 (2000). Couté, N. and J.T. Richardson, "Catalytic SteamReforming of Chlorocarbons: Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)," Appl. Catal. B 26, 265 (2000). Richardson, J.T., Y. Peng and D. Remue, "Properties of Ceramic Foam Catalyst Supports: Pressure Drop," Appl. Catal. A 204, 19 (2000).

BOOK CHAPTER:

Nikolaou, M., "Model Predictive Controllers: A Critical Synthesis of Theory and Industrial Needs," Adv. in ChE Series, Academic Press (2001).

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS:

Zhang, H. and M. Nikolaou, "Control of Spatial Uniformity in Microelectronics Manufacturing: An Integrated Approach," APC/AEC XII Sematech Workshop, Lake Tahoe (2000). Saputelli, L., B. Cherian, K. Grigoriadis, M. Nikolaou, C. Oudinot, G. Reddy and M.J. Economides, "Integration of Computer-Aided High-Intensity Design with Reservoir Exploitation of Remote and Offshore Locations," SPE Int'l. Oil & Gas Conference & Exhibition in China, Beijing (2000). Sankaran, S., M. Nikolaou and M.J. Economides, "Fracture Geometry and Vertical Migration in Multilayered Formations from Inclined Wells," SPE Annual Meeting, Dallas (2000).

SHORT COURSE:

Co-director and lecturer, Applications of Heterogeneous Catalysis, University of Houston, with J.T. Richardson et al., semiannually in 2000 and 2001.

NIKOLAOU, MICHAEL

Haarsma, G.J. and M. Nikolaou, "Multivariate Controller Performance-Monitoring: Lessons from an Application to a Snack-Food Process," J. Proc. Control (accepted for publication, 2001). Nikolaou, M. and M. Cherukuri, "The Equivalence between Model Predictive Control and Anti-Windup Control Schemes," Automatica (accepted for publication, 2001). Zhang, H., Y. Peng and M. Nikolaou, "Development of a Data-Driven Dynamic Model for a Plasma-Etching Reactor," J. Vac. Sci. Tech. (accepted for publication, 2001). Eker, S.A. and M. Nikolaou, "Simultaneous Model Predictive Control and Identification: Closed-Loop Properties," Automatica (accepted for publication, 2001). Eker, S.A. and M. Nikolaou, "Ensuring Coprimeness in Least-Squares Identification of ARX Models: The SICLS Algorithm," Automatica (accepted for publication, 2001). Eker, S.A. and M. Nikolaou, "Linear Control of Nonlinear Systems--The Interplay between Nonlinearity and Feedback," AIChE J. (accepted for publication, 2001).

MOHANTY, KISHORE K.

Singh, M., M. Honarpour and K.K. Mohanty, "Comparison of Viscous and Gravity-Dominated Gas/Oil Relative Permeabilities," J. Petrol. Sci. & Engng. (accepted for publication, 2001). Rodriguez-Guadarrama, L.A., S. Ramanathan, K.K. Mohanty and R. Rajagopalan, "Modeling of Mixed Amphiphiles in a Lattice Solution," J. Coll. & Interf. Sci. (accepted for publication, 2001). Hidajat, I., M. Singh and K.K. Mohanty, "Transport Properties of Microporous Media from Simulated NMR Response," Transport in Porous Media (accepted for publication, 2001). Gupta, D. and K.K. Mohanty, "Visualization of DNAPL Remediation using Surfactant," ES&T (accepted for publication, 2001). App, J.F. and K.K. Mohanty, "The Benefit of Local Saturation Measurements in Relative Permeability Estimation from Centrifuge Experiments," SPE 69682; SPE J. (accepted for publication, 2001). Hidajat, I., A. Rastogi, M. Singh and K.K. Mohanty, "Transport Properties of Porous

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS:

Tiller, F.M. and W.P. Li, "Determination of the Critical Pressure-Drop for Filtration of Supercompactible Cakes," Sludge Management Entering 3rd Millennium, IWA Conf. Proceedings, Taipei (2001).

OLIGNEY, RONALD E.

Economides, M.J., R.E. Oligney and A.S. Demarchos, "Natural Gas: The Revolution is Coming," JPT, p. 102 ff. (May 2001).

BOOK:

Richardson, J.T., M. Spencer and M.V. Twigg, The Catalyst Manual, Plenum Press (in preparation, 2001).

VEKILOV, PETER G.

Lin, H., D.N. Petsev, S.-T. Yau, B.R. Thomas and P.G. Vekilov, "Lower Incorporation of Impurities in Ferritin Crystals by Suppression of Convection: Modeling Results," Crystal Growth & Design 1, 73 (2001). Galkin, O. and P.G. Vekilov, "Are Nucleation Kinetics of Protein Crystals Similar to Those of Liquid Droplets?" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 156 (2000). Petsev, D.N. and P.G. Vekilov, "Evidence for Non-DLVO Hydration Interactions in Solutions of the Protein Apoferritin," Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1339 (2000). Petsev, D.N., B.R. Thomas, S.-T. Yau and P.G. Vekilov, "Interactions and Aggregation of

SHORT COURSE:

Co-director and lecturer, Applications of Heterogeneous Catalysis, University of Houston, with D. Luss et al., semiannually in 2000 and 2001.

WILLSON, RICHARD C.

D'Souza, L.M., R.C. Willson and G.E. Fox, "Expression of Marker RNAs in Pseudomonas Putida," Current Microbiol. 40, 91 (2000). Murphy, J.C., G.E. Fox and R.C. Willson, "Structured RNA Isolation and Fractionation with Compaction Agents," Analytical Biochem. (in press, 2001).

NONREFEREED PUBLICATIONS:

Economides, M.J. and R.E. Oligney, "Energy Mix of New Economy Dominated by Natural Gas," The Amer. O&G Reporter, p. 35 ff. (December 2000). Economides, M.J., R.E. Oligney and A.S. Demarchos, "Natural Gas: The Revolution is Coming," SPE 62884 (2000). Barwani, M., A. Marhubi, R.E. Oligney and M.J. Economides, "The Role of the Local PetroleumServices Company in Asset Management," SPE 59445 (2000).

ROOKS, CHARLES W.

PATENT:

"Method of Rapidly Converting an Acrylonitrile Reactor to Methanol Feed and Back to Polylene Feed," patent application (in process, 2001).

NONREFEREED PUBLICATIONS:

Saputelli, L., B. Cherian, K. Grigoriadis, M. Nikolaou, C. Oudinot, G. Reddy, M.J. Economides and C. Ehlig-Economides,

PATENT:

U.S. Patent 6,063,633

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University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

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T H E U N D E R G R A D U AT E P R O G R A M

ChE UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION

Students seeking admission as freshmen to the Cullen College of Engineering should refer to www.uh.edu/enroll/admis/ freshman_req.html for the current and complete requirements. 4. A GPA of 2.25 or higher for all college-level English courses attempted; international students must have a TOEFL score of 550. 5. A GPA of 2.25 or higher for all college-level engineering Students aspiring toward undergraduate Chemical Engineering study at the University of Houston may request applications from: Undergraduate Admissions Office 122 E. Cullen Bldg. Houston, TX 77204-2023, U.S.A. courses attempted. 6. Must have attempted at least one college-level mathematics course and at least one college-level physics or chemistry course.

Applicants with special questions about the undergraduate Transfer applicants who have earned fewer than 15 semester hours of college credit must meet the engineering requirements for high-school graduates. Applicants who have earned between 15 and 29 semester hours of college credit must meet all of these requirements: 1. A grade-point average (GPA) of 2.50 or higher for all college-level work attempted. 2. A GPA of 2.50 or higher for all college-level mathematics courses attempted. 3. A GPA of 2.50 or higher for all college-level chemistry and physics courses attempted. 4. A GPA of 2.50 or higher for all college-level English courses attempted; international students must have a TOEFL score of 550. 5. A GPA of 2.50 or higher for all college-level engineering courses attempted. 6. Must have attempted at least one college-level mathematics course and at least one college-level physics or chemistry course. Phone: 713-743-4325 E-mail: [email protected] Chemical Engineering program may contact: Mrs. Sharon Gates, Undergraduate-Admissions Analyst University of Houston, Chemical Engineering S 222 Engineering Bldg. 1 Houston, TX 77204-4004, U.S.A.

ENROLLMENT TRENDS:

YEAR*

1975 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

ENROLLMENT

237 356 423 470 596 322 229 167 205 200 260 313 385 479 545 480 445 460 383 373 317 295 The success of our program is due to the soundness of our undergraduate curriculum, the commitment of our faculty (all of whom teach undergraduate courses), and the support of local petroleum and petrochemical industries. We look forward to continued growth in the future and to the changes in chemical engineering education demanded by the 21st century. Figures since 1991 include students registering as Postbaccalaureates. Enrollment figures have followed national trends. * at the beginning of the academic period.

Transfer applicants who have earned 30 or more semester hours

The undergraduate Chemical Engineering program of the University of Houston is consistently rated among the top programs in the country (10th in the recent Gourman Report).

of college credit must meet all of these requirements: 1. A GPA of 2.25 or higher for all college-level work attempted. 2. A GPA of 2.25 or higher for all college-level mathematics courses attempted. 3. A GPA of 2.25 or higher for all college-level chemistry and physics courses attempted.

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University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

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Undergraduate Courses: Chemical Engineering (CHEE)

1131: Challenge of Chemical Engineering

Cr. 1 (1-0). Prerequisites: Science or Engineering major. The Chemical Engineering professions. Strongholds and frontiers of Chemical Engineering. Career opportunities for chemical engineers. Communication skills; engineering ethics.

1331: Computing for Engineers (also CIVE 1331, INDE 1331) Cr. 3 (2-2). Prerequisite: MATH 1431. Credit cannot be received for more than one of CHEE 1331, CIVE 1331, or INDE 1331. Introduction to the computing environment, matrix arithmetic, programming essentials, spreadsheets, symbolic algebra tools, solution of typical engineering problems using computer tools. 2331: Chemical Processes Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisites: CHEE or CIVE 1331, MATH 1432, PHYS 1321, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2433 and CHEM 1332. Introduction to chemical engineering, calculations, unit equations, process stoichiometry, material and energy balances, states of matter, case studies.

3363: Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers (formerly ENGI 3363) Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE 2332, MATH 3321 or equivalent, MECE 3400, PHYS 1321, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 3334. Foundations of fluid mechanics, fluid statics, kinematics, laminar and turbulent flow; macroscopic balances; dimensional analysis and flow correlations. 3366: Topics in Physical Chemistry Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 3333. Introduction to various physical-chemical topics; electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, colloid and particle science, macromolecules.

4361: Chemical Engineering Practices Cr. 3

(1 1/2-5). Prerequisites: CHEE 3462, 3467, 3369, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. Design and execution of experiments, with emphasis on heat and mass transport, unit operations, process control, and reactors. Written reports.

chemical reactors. Determination of thermochemical and kinetic constants from statistical mechanics and transition-state theory. Applications from vapor-phase processes to catalysis.

4367: Chemical Reaction Engineering Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE 3366, 3369, and 3462. Chemical-reaction kinetics, mechanisms, and reactor design in static and flow systems; introduction to heterogeneous catalytic reactions in flow systems.

5375: Chemical Processing in Microelectronics Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 4367 or consent of instructor. Chemical engineering principles applied to microelectronicdevice fabrication and processing. 5376: Solid/Liquid Separation-- Environmental Processes Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE or ENGI 3363. introduction to solid/fluid separation and processing. Particle characteristics, porous media; interfacial phenomena; flow through compactible and granular beds; sedimentation, clarification, filtration, centrifugation, expression, washing. 5377: Introduction to Polymer Science

Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Introduction to the synthesis, characterization, physical properties, and processing of polymeric materials. The course thematically revolves around methods to measure, characterize, and tailor structure, processing, and property correlations for polymeric materials.

5387: Plasma Processing: Principles & Applications Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: senior standing in Engineering or Natural Sciences, or consent of instructor. Principles of low-pressure glow-discharge plasmas; plasma generation and maintenance, plasma chemistry, plasma diagnostics. Applications with emphasis on semiconductor manufacturing. 5388: Catalytic Processes Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisites: credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4321 and 4367. Process-oriented survey of catalytic technology; catalyst selection and design; catalytic processes, engineering and economics in the petroleum, chemical, and pollution-control industries.

3367: Process-Modeling & Control Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE 3334, CHEE or ENGI 3363, MATH 3321, and PHYS 1322. Modeling techniques of chemical engineering problems, with emphasis on process control.

5360: Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. Analysis and design fundamentals for biochemical process, reactor design, transport phenomena; applications of enzymes and microbial populations. 5367: Advanced Process Control Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 3367 or consent of instructor. Application of the use of high-speed computers in the control of chemical processes, reactors, and units.

5397: Safety & Reliability Cr. 3 (3.0).

Prerequisites: CHEE 3363, 3369, 3367. An overview of risk, safeguards, and hazards associated with chemical process engineering. Layers of protection, hazard identification, source-term models, toxic release and dispersion models, fires and explosions, probabilistic analysis, fault-tree analysis, designs to prevent accidents, safety-instrumented systems, and safety-related standards and regulations.

3369: Chemical Engineering Transport

Processes Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE or ENGI 3363. Mass transfer in single- and multiphase systems and combined heat- and mass-transfer. Selected topics in heat and mass transfer, and in heat and momentum transfer.

2332: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: CHEM 1332, MATH 2433, PHYS 1321, CHEE 2331. Fundamental concepts of thermodynamic systems, heat and work, properties of pure substances, first and second laws. 3333: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 2332. Multicomponent systems, phase equilibria, and prediction of thermodynamic properties. 3334: Statistical & Numerical Techniques

for Chemical Engineers Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE or CIVE 1331, CHEE 2332, MATH 3321 or equivalent, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in ENGI or CHEE 3363. Statistics for chemical engineers, curve-fitting, numerical methods in linear algebra, nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary and partial differential equations, optimization. Special emphasis on problems appearing in chemical engineering applications.

3399-4399: Senior Honors Thesis Cr. 3 per semester. Prerequisites: senior standing; 3.00 cumulative grade-point average in chemical engineering and overall. 3462: Unit Operations Cr. 4 (3-1 [1-2]).

Prerequisites: CHEE 3333, CHEE or ENGI 3363, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 3369. Unit operations, with emphasis on distillation, absorption, extraction, and fluid-solid systems.

5371: Pollution-Control Engineering Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4321 and CHEE 4367. Pollution problems and remedies with the Earth as an environmentally closed system. Limitations of absorption and self-cleaning for terrasphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere, and their interrelationship. 5373: Environmental Remediation Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 3363, CHEE 3462, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. In situ and ex situ methods of remediation or restoration of contaminated environmental sites. Emphasis is on hydrocarbon contaminants in soil, surface water, and groundwater.

5380: Biochemical Separations Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: senior standing in Chemical Engineering, or consent of instructor. Producing cloned proteins in useful amounts; use of recombinant DNA methodologies to produce proteins; characterization methods.

4198:4298:4398:4498: Special Problems Cr. 1-4 per semester, or more by concurrent enrollment. Prerequisite: approval of the Chairman. 4321:4322: Chemical Engineering Design

Cr. 3 per semester (3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE 3333, 3462, 3369, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. Computer-aided design of chemical processes, with emphasis on process economics, profitability analysis, and optimal operating conditions.

5383: Advanced Unit Operations Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: senior standing in Chemical Engineering, or consent of instructor. Property prediction of multicomponent fluids. Advanced principles of heat-exchanger design, multicomponent fractionation, absorption, stripping, and extraction. 5386: Air-Pollution Problems & Control

Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Air-pollutant identification and control technology; estimation of pollutant transport, dispersion, and conversion; computer application for design of control units.

5374: Reaction Kinetics for Industrial

Processes Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. Methods for predicting product distribution in practical

26

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

27

Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Curriculum

University Core Curriculum

Chemistry

Engineering

Math

Physics

Sem. Hours

First

year

HIST 1376 or 1377

POLS 1336

ENGL 1303

CHEM 1111

CHEM 1331

MATH 1431

17

ENGL 1304

CHEM 1112

CHEM 1332

CHEE 1131 Chem Eng Chal

MATH 1432

PHYS 1321

15

Second

year

POLS 1337

CHEM 3331

CHEE 2331 Chem Proc

CHEE 1331 Comp for Engrs

MATH 2433

16

CHEM 3221

CHEM 3332

CHEE 2332 Thermo I

MATH 3321

MECE 3400

15

Third

year

Humanities

Chemistry elective

*

CHEE 3333 Thermo II

CHEE 3334 Anal/Num Tech

CHEE 3363 Fluid Mec

PHYS 1322

18

Social or Behav Science

CHEE 3366 Phys Chem

CHEE 3462 Unit Ops

CHEE 3369 Transport

CHEE 3367 Proc Cont

16

Fourth

year

HIST 1378 or 1379

Vis Perform Arts

CHEE 4367 Reac Eng

CHEE 4361 Practices

CHEE 4321 Design

Technical elective

*

18

Social or Behav Science WI

Science elective

*

Technical elective

*

CHEE 4322 Design

Technical elective

*

15

Total 130

C A B 1. Arrow to top of box (C is prerequisite for B) 2. Arrow to side of box (credit or registration in A at the same time as B) * From Approved Courses

28

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

29

Undergraduate Degree Plan

Effective Fall 1999.

Scholarships

THIRD YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

Hrs. 1 3 3 3 4 3 ---17 Course # CHEE 3333 CHEE 3334 CHEE 3363 PHYS 1322 Course ChE Thermo. II Anal./Numer. Techn. Fluid Mech. for ChE Engng. Physics II Humanities Core Adv. Chem. elective Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 3 ---18

FIRST YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

Course # CHEM 1111 CHEM 1331 ENGL 1303 HIST 1376/7 MATH 1431 POLS 1336 Course Fund. of Chemistry Lab Fundam. of Chemistry English Composition I U.S. History to 1877 Calculus I U.S. & Texas Politics

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Our undergraduate program enjoys a robust level of support from industrial and organizational donors. Following are the 2000­2001 recipients of these undergraduate scholarships:

UNDERGRADUATE AICHE CHAPTER

The Department has an active undergraduate chapter of the South Texas Section of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). The chapter is advised by Prof. Richard Willson.

BP/AMOCO FOUNDATION

Shane Mansur Joel Roberts Dany Tran

SPRING SEMESTER

Course # CHEE 1131 CHEM 1112 CHEM 1332 ENGL 1304 MATH 1432 PHYS 1321 Course Chem. Engng. Challenges Fund. of Chemistry Lab Fundam. of Chemistry English Composition II Calculus II Engineering Physics I Hrs. 1 1 3 3 4 3 ---15

SPRING SEMESTER

Course # CHEE 3366 CHEE 3367 CHEE 3369 CHEE 3462 Course Topics, Phys. Chem. Proc. Mod./Control ChE Transport Proc. Unit Operations Social or Behavioral Science core 3 ---16 Hrs. 3 3 3 4

Pamela Williams

DOW OUTSTANDING JUNIOR

May Shek

HALLIBURTON FOUNDATION, INC.

Matthew Peel Cong Trinh

SECOND YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

Course # CHEE 1331 CHEE 2331 CHEM 3331 MATH 2433 POLS 1337 Course Computing for Engineers Chemical Processes Fund. of Organic Chem. I Calculus III U.S. Government Hrs. 3 3 3 4 3 ---16

FOURTH YEAR

FALL SEMESTER

Course # CHEE 4321 CHEE 4361 CHEE 4367 HIST 1378/9 Course ChE Design I ChE Practices Chem. Reaction Eng. US Hist. since 1877 Technical elective Vis./Perf. Arts core Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 3 ---18

LUBRIZOL FOUNDATION

Randall Collum, Jr. Mei Yee Khoo Olayemi O. Ogidan Joey Stowers

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

Jacob A. Collins Jason P. Manthey

SPRING SEMESTER

Course # CHEE 2332 CHEM 3221 CHEM 3332 MATH 3321 MECE 3400 Course Chem. Eng. Thermo. I Fund. of Org. Chem. Lab Fund. of Organic Chem. II Engineering Mathematics Intro to Mechanics Hrs. 3 2 3 3 4 ---15

SPRING SEMESTER

Course # CHEE 4322 Course ChE Design II Technical elective Technical elective Adv. Sci. elective Soc./Beh. Sci. core Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 ----15

May Shek, junior ChE student, was awarded a Tau Beta Pi Scholar Award. Only 16 are given nationwide to Engineering students, and only four to Chemical Engineering students.

TOTAL UNDERGRADUATE HOURS: 130

30 University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report 31

T H E G R A D U AT E P R O G R A M

The Tiller Scholarship Endowment Fund

THE FRANK M. AND MARTHA R. TILLER SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

On November 15, 1998, the University of Houston established the Frank M. and Martha R. Tiller Scholarship Endowment Fund.

This endowment account was established with a gift from Prof. and Mrs. Tiller. The Cullen College of Engineering is the beneficiary of the remainderment of a gift annuity established by the Tillers.

The annual distributed income from this endowment provides scholarship funding for undergraduate students in the Chemical Engineering Department of the Cullen College of Engineering. The recipient(s) of the scholarship are determined by the Dean of Engineering and a selection committee. Recipients are designated as "Tiller Chemical Engineering Scholars."

The scholarship monies are distributed in accordance with these criteria: 1. Scholarship recipients must be undergraduate students currently enrolled in the Department of Chemical Engineering of the Cullen College of Engineering. 2. Scholarship recipients must exhibit academic excellence and leadership qualities as determined by the Selection Committee. 3. Recipients must be full-time, degree-seeking students at the University of Houston. 4. Recipients must enroll for a minimum of 12 credit hours during each semester of award. 5. Recipients must maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better.

The Dean of Engineering has administrative control over the annual distributed income from this endowment.

The Chemical Engineering graduate program at the University of Houston is among the top 20 in the nation (17th in the 1995 National Research Council ratings). Our doctoral program is among the highest-rated doctoral programs in the entire University. This is due to the excellence of our faculty in research, the international reputation of our professors, and the success of our graduates. On the average, our faculty members receive $1 million of support each year, and the Department generally has total overall annual expenditures of approximately $3.5 million for graduate research activities.

32 University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report 33

Full-Time Graduate Programs in ChE

The Department offers four graduate programs:

FULL-TIME PROGRAMS

OF

STUDY (REQUIRING

A THESIS)

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of

1. FULL-TIME MS/PHD: This program supports the research

activity of the faculty and is designed for full-time graduate students receiving financial support. Most students pursue the PhD degree, which may be completed (without an intermediate MS) in four years of study.

Philosophy (PhD) degree programs, both of which focus on advanced engineering fundamentals and research.

Recipients of the MS degree are qualified for employment in industry or for continued studies toward the PhD degree. Coursework for the MS degree includes four specific classes (Engineering Mathematics, Reaction Engineering, Transport Processes, and

2. PART-TIME MS (NON-THESIS OPTION): Intended

for part-time students from local industry who have a BS ChE degree, this program requires 30 semester hours of coursework, including the same core required for full-time MS students.

Classical & Statistical Thermodynamics) and two electives of the student's choice. The student also completes a research project and writes a Master's thesis describing the work. Candidates entering the program with a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering can complete all requirements in 12 to 18 months.

Candidates for the PhD degree enjoy intensive exposure to a specific field of

3. PART-TIME MChE: This is a separate Master's program

that emphasizes advanced engineering and business management. Admission and graduation requirements are the same as for the MS degree, but mastery of advanced engineering is the main goal. Approximately 25 students enroll annually. The MChE degree may be completed in four semesters (two years).

engineering research in addition to continued study of engineering fundamentals. Individual research is the major focal point for these students, who will learn, absorb, and otherwise experience the general philosophy, methods, and concepts of research and scholarly inquiry. After graduation, UH ChE PhD recipients will be qualified to contribute to the solution of significant problems related or unrelated to their doctoral research. For students considering an academic career, instructorships are available. Coursework for the PhD degree includes six specific courses (Engineering Mathematics II, Transport Processes II, and the four courses listed in the preceding paragraph) and six elective courses, which allow for specialization in the student's

4. MASTERS OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERING: Similar

to the MChE degree, this program offers advanced thesis or non-thesis studies to full- or part-time students in petroleum engineering. Annual enrollments range from 40 to 80 students, with an additional number of postbaccalaureate students involved in the coursework.

research area. In addition, all students undertake a doctoral research project and dissertation to expand the frontiers of knowledge in their research areas. Acceptance into this full-time program is generally accompanied by Departmental financial support. Candidates with a BS in Chemical Engineering can complete all requirements in about four years.

A student must pass the PhD Qualifying Exam to be formally accepted as a doctoral candidate. To be eligible to take this examination, a student must have completed the six specifically required PhD courses with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0/4.0. There is no foreign-language requirement. Highly qualified students

Details of these programs, and descriptions of the coursework offered, appear on the pages following.

may bypass the MS degree and pursue the doctorate directly.

The ratio of graduate students to faculty is low, typically four to six students per research advisor. After new students have spent their first semester in the Department, the ChE faculty make presentations of their research programs and interests to better enable the students to submit their requests for choice of research advisor. Every reasonable effort is made to accommodate students' first choice of advisor.

34

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

35

Master of Chemical Engineering (MChE) Degree (part-time)

Current areas: Reaction engineering Catalytic engineering Electronic materials Polymer science and engineering Biochemical engineering Colloids & supramolecular fluids Advanced inorganic materials Solid/liquid separations Petroleum engineering Multiphase flow Computer-aided process engineering

RESEARCH AREAS & EQUIPMENT

The department's research programs are broad and innovative, encompassing traditional and emerging chemical engineering disciplines. Departmental research equipment includes an X-ray diffractometer with a hot stage, a pulsed excimer-pumped dye laser, a quasielastic laser-light-scattering spectroscopy unit, a computerized axial tomographic scanner (CATscan) system, rheometers, a fluorescence-polarization stopped-flow kinetics apparatus, and a titration microcalorimeter. Additionally, the Department houses numerous workstations and personal computers for graduate research. Access to a university VAX network and Hitachi AS/9000N mainframe is also available. For large computations, many faculty have reserved time on various national supercomputers.

requirement is waived for applicants from primarily Englishspeaking countries and for applicants who have earned a lesser ChE degree from a U.S. institution. The University of Houston requires a fee of $75 (in U.S. funds) to process graduate applications from non-U.S. citizens.

MASTER

OF

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (MCHE) DEGREE

The MChE degree is a non-thesis program for the working professional. This program has been designed for those persons who plan careers in plant operations, design, and management. It is intended to be competitive neither with the Master of Science degree (which is specifically research-oriented) nor with an MBA degree. Rather, the goal of this program is to permit earlier productive use of young engineers' technical skills and to

All applicants (U.S. and international) must also submit a completed University of Houston application form and a Chemical Engineering Department application form. Transcripts and all other documents should be mailed directly to one of the two addresses below, as application requests or components addressed to the UH Office of Admissions frequently fail to reach the Chemical Engineering Department in timely fashion. Note: Incoming UH ChE graduate students are admitted for Fall semesters only. Fall-semester applications that are received

impart broad concepts of systems analysis, advanced process economics, and technical management. The program is aimed at improving opportunities for chemical engineers in chemical-process and related industries.

The program comprises a core of six required courses, plus four elective courses selected to meet the student's interests in the areas of process control, management and business economics, biochemical and environmental engineering, and petroleum engineering. The courses are available in the late afternoon and evenings, and the degree program can be completed in two to three years of part-time study.

For complete information, prospective students should contact the MChE Program Director: Prof. Kishore K. Mohanty University of Houston, Chemical Engineering

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS (U.S.

STUDENTS)

by the preceding February 1 are most favorably considered, although later applications may also be considered.

Entrance requirements include a Bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering, industrial employment, and approvals of the MChE Program Director, the Chairman of the Chemical Engineering Department, and the Dean of Engineering. Unconditional admission may be granted for a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0

S 222 Engineering Bldg. 1 Houston, TX 77204-4004

Admission to the Department's graduate programs is competitive, based on GPAs from undergraduate and graduate studies, GRE scores, and letters of recommendation. The U.S. applicant must generally have achieved a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0/4.0 and a minimum GRE score (Verbal + Quantitative) of 1100. Students with undergraduate degrees in fields other than Chemical Engineering may apply, but these students may need to take preparatory courses prior to or concurrently with ChE graduate study.

Qualified U.S. and international students may request a complete application package for the full-time, thesis-option MS or PhD programs from the appropriate agent below:

(4.0 scale) and a minimum GRE score (verbal + quantitative) of 1100. Conditional admission may be granted for a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.6/4.0 and a minimum GRE of 1000, with special permission of the Program Director and the Dean of Engineering. Achievement of a grade of "B" or better in the first 12 hours of coursework removes the conditional status.

U.S. CITIZENS/PERMANENT RESIDENTS:

Graduate Studies Coordinator University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering S-222 Engineering Bldg 1, Houston, TX 77204-4004

Required courses are: CHEE 6350, 6368, 6369, 6383, 6367 (for descriptions, see p. 39, Chemical Engineering course listings); and INDE 6372 (Operations Research & Analysis of Systems). Elective courses include: CHEE 6330, 6331, 6332, 6333, 6334, 6335, 6336, 6337, 6360, 6365, 6370, 6371, 6375, 6386, 6388 (q.v.); INDE

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS (INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS)

The international students offered admission over recent years have ranked in the top 10% of their class, and they have scored over 1200 on the GRE (Verbal + Quantitative) and over 550 on the TOEFL.

INTERNATIONAL CITIZENS:

International Graduate Coordinator University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering S-222 Engineering Bldg 1, Houston, TX 77204-4004, U.S.A.

6332 (Engineering Project Management), 6334 (Statistical Decision Analysis & Design), 6335 (Engineering Administration), 6350 (Design of Artificial-Intelligence Systems), 6364 (Advanced Engineering Statistics), 6370 (Operations Research, Digital Simulation), and 6371 (Operations Research, Optimization Methods); and ENGI 6302, 6304, 6308, 6312, 6320, 6322, 6324, 6326 (for descriptions, see Petroleum Engineering course listings).

FINANCIAL AID

Fellowships that typically consist of a stipend, tuition and fees are available for qualified PhD and full-time MS candidates. These fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis. Applicants may apply for financial assistance when requesting admission to the graduate program.

International applicants thus qualified should be prepared to submit unofficial copies of GRE scores, TOEFL scores, and transcripts well in advance of the Department's request for official documents. Official GRE and TOEFL scores should then be sent, using ETS Institutional Code 6870. The TOEFL

36 University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

37

Master of Science in Petroleum Engineering (MSPE)

MASTER

OF

Graduate Courses

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (CHEE)

Analysis and design fundamentals for biochemical processes: introductory biochemistry, microbiology, biological kinetics, reactor design, transport phenomena; applications of enzymes and single mixed microbial populations.

SCIENCE

IN

PETROLEUM ENGINEERING

6111: Graduate Seminar Cr. 1 (1-0). May be

repeated for credit.

The MSPE degree is ideal for any engineering graduate who desires to begin working or to improve his position in the upstream petroleum industry. This program offers courses held 5:30­8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, enabling attendance after business hours for full-time professionals.

6197:6297:6397: Selected Topics Cr. 1-3

per semester (1-0; 2-0; 3-0). May be repeated for credit.

6365: Fundamentals of Catalysis Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: CHEE 4367 or equivalent. Theories and experimental procedures in modern heterogeneous catalysis, catalyst preparation and properties, absorption, surface mechanisms, catalyst design, and catalytic processes.

6374: Reaction Kinetics for Industrial Processes Cr. 3 (3.0). Prerequisite: credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. Fundamental methods for predicting product distributions in practical chemical reactors. Determination of thermochemical and kinetic constants from statistical mechanics and transition-state theory. Applications from vapor-phase processes to catalysis. 6375: Chemical Processing for Microelectronics Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE 4367 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Chemical Engineering principles applied to microelectronic-device fabrication and processing. 6376: Solid/Liquid Separation-- Environmental Processes Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: ENGI 3363. Introduction to solid/fluid separation and processing. Particulate characteristics, porous media, interfacial phenomena, flow through compactible and granular beds; sedimentation, clarification, filtration, centrifugation, expression, washing. 6377: Introduction to Polymer Science

Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Introduction to the synthesis, characterization, physical properties, and processing of polymeric materials. Methods to measure, characterize, and tailor structure-processing-property correlations for polymeric materials.

6198:6298:6398:6498:6598: Research

Cr. 1-5 per semester, or more by concurrent enrollment. Prerequisite: approval of Chairman.

Students may elect whether to complete the Nonthesis Option, which requires 30 credit hours of approved courses beyond the introductory level in Petroleum Engineering, or the Thesis Option, which requires 18 credit hours of approved courses beyond the introductory level in Petroleum Engineering plus 12 credit hours dedicated to the Master's thesis. Petroleum Engineering courses can also be taken for Continuing Education credit, and they can be applied as Professional Development Hours for maintaining professional competency for the Professional Engineer (PE) certification.

6289:6389: Chemical Engineering Project

Cr. 2 or 3 per semester (2-0; 3-0). Prerequisite: approval of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Industrial-scale chemical engineering economics and/or engineering project.

6367: Advanced Process Control Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: CHEE 3367 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Application of high-speed computers in the control of chemical processes, reactors, and units.

For application forms, contact the Program Director. All correspondence and supporting documents (official transcripts and test scores) should also be mailed to this address: Dr. Christine A. Economides University of Houston Chemical Engineering S 222 Engineering Bldg 1 Houston, TX 77204-4004

A Bachelor's degree in Engineering from an accredited institution is normally required for admission to the MSPE program. Undergraduate degrees in Petroleum, Chemical, or Mechanical Engineering provide all or most of the prerequisite courses for this program. Holders of other scientific degrees, as well as some Engineering graduates, must complete prerequisite requirements. All candidates should have credit for courses equivalent to the University of Houston's prerequisites for this degree.

6330: Computational Methods for Chemical Engineers Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced computational and numerical methods for the solution of chemical engineering problems. Solution of linear and nonlinear equations. Conjugategradient-like methods. Newton and quasiNewton techniques. Solutions of elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations using finite-difference and finite-element techniques. Applications to chemical engineering problems. 6331:6332: Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering Cr. 3 per semester (3-0). Prerequisite: approval of Department. Linear methods applied to chemical engineering, matrices, transforms, series, complex variable methods, boundary-layer problems. 6333:6334: Transport Processes Cr. 3 per semester (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 3369. Advanced principles of fluid mechanics and heat/mass transfer, with application to problems in research and design. Emphasis on unified point of view to transport processes in laminarand turbulent-flow situations. 6335:6336: Classical & Statistical

Thermodynamics Cr. 3 per semester (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 3460. Advanced methods.

6368: Chemical Process Economics I Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemical engineering and CHEE 6350. Managerial economics of chemical processes and products; development of decision-making methods using examples from the chemical industry.

6369: Chemical Process Economics II Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisites: CHEE 6350, 6368. Study of profitability, process-comparison, and risk analysis from an advanced viewpoint, followed by extensive case-history studies of managerial economics in process industries.

For unconditional admission to the program, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (4.0 scale) and an acceptable GRE score (verbal + quantitative) are required. For conditional admission, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.6, an acceptable GRE score, and special consent of the Program Director and the Dean of Engineering are required. International applicants must qualify for unconditional admission and satisfy the University of Houston's requirement of a minimum TOEFL score of 550.

6370: Advanced Topics in Biochemical Engineering Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 6360, or consent of instructor. Mathematical modeling and optimization of separation-unit operations in biochemical engineering, including chromatography, flocculation, centrifugation, and filtration. Engineering analysis and design of mammalian-cell bioreactors. 6371: Pollution-Control Engineering Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4321 and 4367 or equivalent. General survey of problems and remedies with the Earth as an environmentally closed system. Limitations of absorption and self-cleansing of the terrasphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere, and their interaction and interrelationship. 6372: Fluid/Particle Separation Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: ENGI 3363 or equivalent. Introduction to heterogeneous, fluid/particle, multiphase systems. Development of fundamental principles of flow through compactible beds. Application to solid/liquid separation. Brief study of aerosols, coalescence, and flotation.

6379: Safety & Reliability Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisites: CHEE 3363, 3367, 3369. Overview of risks, safeguards, and hazards associated with chemical process engineering. Layers of protection, hazard identification, source-term models, toxic release and dispersion models, fires and explosions, probabilistic analysis, fault-tree analysis, designs to prevent accidents, safety-instrumented systems, and safety-related standards and regulations.

6380:

Once accepted into the graduate program, part-time students will be advised how to schedule courses sufficient for the MSPE degree program. (Part-time students commonly take one or two courses per semester.) Full-time students will be advised how to complete the required courses within a period of 1.5 years.

6337: Advanced Reactor Engineering Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisite: undergraduate kinetics or reactor-design course. Introduction to modern concepts and techniques of chemical-reactor analysis and design.

Biochemical Separations Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering, or consent of instructor. Producing a cloned protein in useful amounts; use of recombinant DNA methodologies to produce proteins; characterization methods.

6383: Advanced Unit Operations Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: CHEE 3462. Property-prediction of multicomponent fluids. Advanced principles of heat-exchanger design, multicomponent fractionation, absorption, stripping, and extraction from a unified point of view.

6350: Finance & Accounting for Industrial & Chemical Processes Cr. 3 (3.0). Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemical engineering, or permission from the director of the MChE program. Finance and accounting procedures for nonfinancial managers, with emphasis on cost, working capital, budgeting, cost of capital, long-term financing, and financial assets for chemical engineers. 6360: Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: graduate standing, or senior with consent of instructor.

38 University of Houston

6386: Air-Pollution Problems & Control

Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Air-pollutant identification and control technology; estimation of pollutant transport, dispersion, and conversion; computer application for design of control units.

6373: Environmental Remediation Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 3363, CHEE 3462, and credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4367. In situ and ex situ methods of remediation or restoration of contaminated environmental sites. Emphasis is on hydrocarbon contaminants in soil, surface water, and groundwater.

6388: Catalytic Processes Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEE 4321 and 4367. Process-oriented survey Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report 39

Graduate Student Organization

of catalytic technology; catalyst selection and design; catalytic processes, engineering, and economics in the petroleum, chemical, and pollution-control industries.

6399-7399: Master's Thesis Cr. 3 per

semester.

7350: Applied Nonlinear Methods for

Engineers Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: CHEE 6331, 6332, or consent of instructor. Recent nonlinear methods, with emphasis on Engineering applications. Nonlinear functional analysis, steady-state bifurcation theory, dynamical systems, nonlinear partial differential equations, nonlinear waves, computation methods in bifurcation theory.

5370: Petroleum-Production Operations Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: senior, postbaccalaureate, or graduate standing in Engineering or Science. Subsurface and surface facilities for producing oil and gas; gas-oil and water-oil separation and measuring systems; gathering systems; gas-processing facilities; injection systems for gas or water. 5397: Selected Topics Cr. 3 (3-0). May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 6298:6398:6498:6598: Research Cr.

2­5 per semester, or more by concurrent enrollment. Prerequisite: approval of Chairman.

discounting and cash-flow calculations, effects of taxation, and external financing.

ORGANIZATION OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENTS (OChEGS) is an educational and social student

group that supplements formal departmental activities and functions. As part of the Department's weekly seminar program (q.v.), OChEGS annually organizes and conducts an all-day symposium, featuring keynote speakers specially recruited from industry, academia, or government. At the symposium, several students give oral presentations of their research while others display posters. The organization holds social events (picnics, get-togethers for sports, et al.), and elects officers annually.

6312: Evaluation of Petroleum-Bearing

Formations II Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5362, and 6304, or consent of instructor. Advanced well-log interpretation and loggingtool theory. A continuation of ENGI 6304 (Evaluation of Petroleum-Bearing Formations I).

6314: Pressure-Transient Testing Cr. 3 (30). Prerequisites: ENGI 5362 and 6302. Theory and application of pressure-transient testing of oil and gas wells for determination of reservoir properties and near-well damage or stimulation.

Corporate sponsors of the 2000 OChEGS Symposium, to whom the Department and OChEGS are most grateful, were Chevron Research & Technology Company; ExxonMobil Chemical; BP; and several UH alumni.

6302: Reservoir Engineering II Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisites: ENGI 5361 and 5362, or consent of instructor. Capillary pressures and vertical distribution of gas, oil, and water saturations, relative permeability and fractional flow relationships, Buckley-Leverett equation and linear-displacement efficiency of gas and water drives; effect of well patterns, mobility ratio, and reservoir heterogeneity on areal and vertical-sweep-efficiency performance of black-oil reservoirs.

6316: Well Drilling & Completion II Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5368 and graduate standing in petroleum engineering. Principles and procedures for cost-effective casing design; materials, design, and procedures for cementing; optimization of bits, weight, and R.P.M. for minimum cost for drilling; directional drilling.

7387: Plasma Processing: Principles &

Applications Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: graduate standing in Engineering or Natural Sciences, or consent of instructor. Principles of low-pressure glow-discharge plasma; plasma generation and maintenance; plasma chemistry; plasma diagnostics. Applications with emphasis on semiconductor manufacturing.

Here is the agenda of the 15th-annual Chemical Engineering Graduate Students' Symposium (Fall 2000). Jeremy Strauch presided as OChEGS President, and Stefanie Brown served as MC:

6318: Oilfield Facilities Design &

Operation II Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5370, and 6306. Design theory and practice for facilities for unusual situations as may be required of practicing engineers; adaptations for offshore and other hostile environments.

Friday, November 3, 2000 8:00 ­ 8:35 a.m. 8:35 ­ 8:55 a.m. 8:55 ­ 9:15 a.m. 9:15 ­ 9:35 a.m. 9:35 ­ 9:55 a.m. Breakfast & Welcoming Address Keynote Address by Prof. Michael P. Harold, Chairman of UH ChemE

Koray Yurekli, "Structure & Dynamics of Carbon-Black-Filled Elastomers" Nikunj Gupta, "Modeling & Bifurcation Analysis of Catalytic Reactions in Monoliths" Doosik Kim, "Energy & Angular Distribution of Ions Effusing from a Hole in Contact with

7397: Selected Topics Cr. 3 per semester

(3-0). May be repeated for credit.

6304: Evaluation of Petroleum-Bearing

Formations I Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361 & 5362, or consent of instructor. Characterization of formations by geologic and petrographic examination, by analysis of fluid contents of cores, and by a suite of well-logging tests and their combined interpretation.

PETROLEUM ENGINEERING (ENGI) 5361: Introduction to Petroleum

Engineering Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: senior, postbaccalaureate, or graduate standing in Engineering or Geology. Petroleum origin and migration, major oil and gas fields, drilling and production methods, petroleum composition and phase behavior, reservoir-engineering methods of oil-resource estimation and optimization.

6320: Enhanced Oil-Recovery Processes

Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5362, and 6302, or consent of instructor. Review of waterflood-calculation methods, extension to polymer flooding, caustic flooding, and carbonated-water flooding. Hydrocarbonmiscible flooding and CO flooding; estimation of recovery.

a High-Density Plasma" 9:55 ­ 10:10 a.m. 10:10 ­ 10:30 a.m. 10:30 ­ 10:50 a.m. 10:50 ­ 11:10 a.m. 11:10 ­ 11:30 a.m. Coffee Break

Ying Peng, "Characterization of Washcoated Ceramic Foam as Catalyst Support" Mohit Singh, "Dynamic Modeling of Two-Phase Flow through Porous Media" Jingxiang Ren, "Shear Response of Layered Silicate Nanocomposites" Shirley Indriati, "Production Impairment & Purpose-Built Design of Hydraulic Fractures in

5362: Reservoir Engineering I Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: senior, postbaccalaureate, or graduate standing in Engineering or Geology. Rock and fluid properties and interactions, P-V-T behavior of crude oil and natural gas, fundamentals of fluid flow through subsurface porous media, reservoir-energy mechanisms in recovery, material balance, and reserves estimation.

6306: Oilfield Facilities Design & Operation I Cr. 3 (3-4). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5368, and 5370, or consent of instructor. Design and operating principles of gas and water-surface separation and ratio-testing equipment, water-supply and water-disposal systems, gas-dehydration and -purification systems, gas compression, corrosion control, and clathrate prevention. 6308: Advanced Petroleum-Production Operations Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5368, and 5370, or consent of instructor. Inflow performance relationships for oil, twophase, and natural-gas wells; near-well zone and damage; vertical-lift performance; welldelivery. Forecast of well performance; methods of diagnosis of well performance. Well-testing and production-logging; well stimulation by acid treatments and hydraulic fracturing. Artificial lift (gas- and pump-assisted). Systems analysis. 6310: Petroleum-Production Economics I

Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5362, and 6302, or consent of instructor. Estimation of initial reservoir contents and forecasts of production vs. time of crude oil and natural gas by primary, secondary, and tertiary recovery methods, evaluation of costs and risks vs. expected rewards by alternative recovery methods, measures of profitability by

6324: Reservoir Simulation I Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5362, and 6302, or consent of instructor. Survey of reservoirsimulation methods, stream-tube simulator, finite-difference, finite-element, and collocation methods. Theory of finite-difference simulators; formulation of equations and resulting matrices, alternative solution methods.

Gas-Condensate Reservoirs" 11:30 ­ 1:00 p.m. 1:00 ­ 1:20 p.m. 1:20 ­ 1:40 p.m. 1:40 ­ 2:00 p.m. 2:00 ­ 2:15 p.m. 2:15 ­ 2:35 p.m. 2:35 ­ 2:55 p.m. 2:55 ­ 3:15 p.m. 3:15 ­ 5:00 p.m. Lunch & Poster Session

Katerina Kourentzi, "Rapid Detection & Monitoring of Microorganisms using Hybridization Assays" Pratik Misra, "Input Design for Model-Order Determination in Subspace Identification" Eric K. Dao, "Modeling & Experimental Studies of Wave Occlusion on Falling Films in a Vertical Pipe"

6326: Reservoir Simulation II Cr. 3 (3-0).

Prerequisite: ENGI 6324, or consent of instructor. Application of reservoir simulators to demonstrate effects of reservoir characteristics on oil recovery by a variety of processes. Simplified representation of complex reservoir structures by use of cross-sections and areal models with pseudo-functions.

5364: Origin & Development of Oil & Gas

Reservoirs Cr. 3 (3-0). Prerequisite: senior, postbaccalaureate, or graduate standing in Engineering. Major oil provinces of the world reviewed from the standpoints of geologic and depositional environment, and of diagenetic changes affecting petroleum entrapment.

Coffee Break

Rohit Garg, "Dynamic & Steady-State Features of a Cooled Countercurrent-Flow Reactor" Jason Murphy, "Nucleic-Acid Purification with Compaction Agents & Immobilized Metal Affinity" Stefanie Brown, "The Sabaatier Reaction on Ceramic Foams"

6388: Petroleum Engineering Project Cr. 3

per semester (3-0). Prerequisites: ENGI 5361, 5362, 5368, and 5370, or consent of the project advisor. May be repeated once for credit.

5368: Well-Drilling & Completion Cr. 3

(3-0). Prerequisite: senior, postbaccalaureate, or graduate standing in Engineering or Science. Drilling-rig design and operation; drilling programs; drill string and bit designs; drillingmud composition, properties, and functions; casing design and cementing; methods of well-completion. 40 University of Houston

Reception

6397: Selected Topics in Petroleum Engineering Cr. 3 (3-0). May be repeated for credit. 7397: Selected Topics Cr. 3 (3-0). May be repeated for credit.

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report 41

S E M I N A R S & C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N

Weekly Seminar Series

The Department attracts renowned speakers to address our graduate students on virtually a weekly basis. These speakers provide lecture abstracts that are distributed not just intradepartmentally, but to key industrial and academic figures statewide who may wish to attend. Unless exceptional circumstances apply, all ChE seminars are held on Fridays at 10:30 a.m. in room W122 of Bldg. D3, Cullen College of Engineering. These seminars were presented in 2000­2001:

SPRING SEMESTER 2000

JANUARY 21: Prof. Michael Tsapatsis, Chemical Engineering

Department, University of Massachusetts (Amherst, MA): "I. Molecular-Sieve Nanoparticles, Wires & Films; & II. Spontaneous Pattern-Formation in Materials"

FALL SEMESTER 2000

AUGUST 25: Prof. Akhil Datta-Gupta, Petroleum

Engineering Department, Texas A&M University (College Station, TX): "Streamline Simulation: Yesterday, Today, & Tomorrow"

NOVEMBER 3: 15th-Annual OChEGS Symposium (q.v.) NOVEMBER 9­10: UH ChE Industrial Advisory Board Meeting DECEMBER 1: Prof. David T. Allen, Chemical Engineering

Department, University of Texas (Austin): "The Texas Air-Quality Study: State of the Science of Air Quality in Texas & Implications for Air-Quality Policy"

FEBRUARY 23: Dr. Alan W. Mahoney, School of

Chemical Engineering, Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN): "Inverse-Problem Modeling of Particulate Dynamics"

JANUARY 27: Prof. Andreas Acrivos, Chemical Engineering

Department, The City College of the City University of New York (New York, NY): Inaugural Neal R. Amundson Lecture-- "Particle Migration & Segregation in Suspension Flows undergoing Shear"

SEPTEMBER 1: Dr. Herbert McKee, Industrial Consultant (Houston, TX): "Houston Air Quality: Current Status & Future Programs" SEPTEMBER 8: Dr. Grigorios Kolios, Chemical Engineering

Department, University of Houston: "Multifunctional Autothermal Reactors: Review & New Applications"

SPRING SEMESTER 2001

JANUARY 9: Dr. James Wei, Dean of Engineering & Applied Sciences, Princeton University (Princeton, NJ): Second Annual Neal R. Amundson Lecture--"The Third Paradigm of Chemical Engineering: Molecular-Product Engineering" JANUARY 19: Prof. H.H. Rotermund, Department of

Physical Chemistry, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-PlanckGesellschaft (Berlin, Germany): "Shedding Light on Surface Reactions: Imaging Pattern Formations from Ultra-High Vacuum up to High Pressure"

MARCH 2: Dr. Victor M. Ugaz, Chemical Engineering Department, University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI): "Investigation of the Interplay between Structure & Rheology in Model Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Polymers using in situ X-ray Scattering Techniques" MARCH 9: Emmanouhl S. Tzanakakis, Chemical Engineering & Materials Science Department, University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN): "Tissue Engineering through Hepatocyte Spheroid Self-Assembly" MARCH 23: Dr. Michael R. King, Chemical Engineering

Department, University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA): "The Dynamics of Leukocyte Adhesion in a Multicellular Environment"

FEBRUARY 11: Dr. Ahmed Alim, Vice-President of Research

& Development, Pennzoil-Quaker State Co. (The Woodlands, TX): "Industrial Career... Go for It!"

SEPTEMBER 15: Prof. John A. Pojman, Department of

Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Southern Mississippi (Hattiesburg, MS): "Frontal Polymerization: From Microgravity to New Materials"

FEBRUARY 18: Dr. Ching-Hwa Kiang, Department of

Chemistry/Biochemistry, University of California (Los Angeles, CA): "Molecular Nanotechnology"

SEPTEMBER 22: Prof. Fernando Muzzio, Chemical

Engineering Department, Rutgers University (Piscataway, NJ): "Powder Mixing & Segregation: From Pharmacy to Physics... and Back to Pharmacy"

JANUARY 26: Prof. Jennifer L. West, Chemical Engineering

& Bioengineering Department, Rice University (Houston, TX): "Synthetic ECM Analogs: New Biomaterials for Use in Tissue Engineering"

MARCH 30: Prof. Gilbert F. Froment, Chemical Engineering

Department, Texas A&M University (College Station, TX): "Synthesis-Gas Production by Steam/CO2 Reforming & Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Natural Gas"

FEBRUARY 25: Prof. Daniel J. Lacks, Chemical Engineering

Department, Tulane University (New Orleans, LA): "Disappearing Minima of Energy Landscapes"

OCTOBER 6: Prof. Matteo Pasquali, Chemical Engineering MARCH 3: Mattheos Koffas, Chemical Engineering

Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA): "Metabolic Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for Amino-Acid-Production Improvement" Department, Rice University (Houston, TX): "Coating Rheology: Modeling & Detection of the Microstructure of Flowing Polymer Solutions"

FEBRUARY 2: Prof. Michael V. Pishko, Chemical Engineering

Department, Texas A&M University (College Station, TX): "Microscale & Nanoscale Hydrogels for Chemical Sensing"

APRIL 6: Maria I. Klapa, Chemical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA): "High-Resolution Flux Determination using Stable Isotopes & Mass Spectrometry" APRIL 27: Aaron J. Golumbfskie, Chemical Engineering Department, University of California (Berkeley, CA): "Simulation of Biomimetic Recognition between Polymers & Surfaces" JUNE 11: Prof. J.B. Joshi, Department of Chemical

Technology, University of Mumbai (Matunga, Mumbai, India): "Computational Flow Modeling & Design" (cancelled due to the local flooding from Tropical Storm Allison).

OCTOBER 13: Prof. Larry W. Lake, Department of Petroleum MARCH 10: Dr. Efrosini Kokkoli, Materials Research

Laboratory, University of California (Santa Barbara, CA): "Nanoscale Interactions: Implications in Biomimetics & Materials" & Geosystems Engineering, University of Texas (Austin, TX): "Estimating True Dispersivity"

FEBRUARY 9: Prof. Donald Dabdub, Mechanical &

Aerospace Engineering Department, University of California (Irvine, CA): "Mathematical Modeling of Size- & Chemically Resolved Urban Atmospheric Aerosols"

OCTOBER 20: Prof. Eric J. Beckman, Chemical Engineering MARCH 24: Prof. Michael W. Deem, Chemical Engineering

Department, University of California (Los Angeles, CA): "Statistical Mechanics in Biomedical Engineering & Biotechnology" Department, University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA): "Chemical Processing using CO2"

FEBRUARY 16: Prof. Peter G. Vekilov, Chemistry

Department, University of Alabama (Huntsville, AL): "Phase Transitions in Protein Solutions: Structures, Dynamics, & Control Strategies"

MARCH 31: Dr. John A. Morgan, Chemical Engineering

Department, University of California (Berkeley, CA): "Metabolic Engineering of Cantharus roseus Cultures for the Production of Indole Alkaloids"

42 University of Houston

OCTOBER 27: Prof. Toshiaki Makabe, Department of Electronics & Electrical Engineering, Keio University (Yokohama, Japan): "Vertically Integrated CAD for Microelectronic-Device Fabrication"

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

43

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N

Continuing Education

The following fee-basis Continuing Education course is presented semiannually (generally in May and December) by a team of UH ChE professors and outside experts:

FACULTY

Amundson, Neal R. 713-743-3492 Balakotaiah, Vemuri [email protected] 713-743-4318 Economides, Christine A. [email protected] 713-743-4328 or 713-743-4300 Economides, Michael J. [email protected] 713-743-4330 Economou, Demetre J. [email protected] 713-743-4320 Flumerfelt, Raymond W. Dean [email protected] 713-743-4200 [office] Harold, Michael P. Chairman [email protected] 713-743-4307 Henley, Ernest J. [email protected] 713-743-4326 Krishnamoorti, Ramanan [email protected] 713-743-4312 Luss, Dan [email protected] 713-743-4305 Mohanty, Kishore K. [email protected] 713-743-4331 Nikolaou, Michael [email protected] 713-743-4309

Richardson, James T. [email protected] 713-743-4324 Rooks, Charles W. [email protected] 713-743-4316 Tiller, Frank M. [email protected] 713-743-4322 Vekilov, Peter G. [email protected] 713-743-4315 Willson, Richard C. [email protected] 713-743-4308

Doucet, Kendra Financial Assistant [email protected] 713-743-4300 Thomas, Yolanda Office Assistant I [email protected] 713-743-4302 Maté, Robert Supervisor, Machine Shop [email protected] 713-743-4354 Dawlearn, David Lab Machinist [email protected] 713-743-4354

"APPLICATIONS OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS"

INSTRUCTORS:

Prof. Dan Luss (University of Houston) Prof. James T. Richardson (University of Houston) Prof. Joe W. Hightower (Rice University) Dr. Vern W. Weekman, Jr. (Retired Director, Central Research, Mobil R&D Corporation)

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Successful applications of the principles of catalysis to process design require a combination of physics, chemistry and engineering, together with state-of-the-art "know-how." Contemporary catalysis has made significant progress in recent years toward the scientific design of optimal catalyst systems for specific process requirements. The purpose of this course is to cover current knowledge for both the researcher in catalysis and the engineer interested in process applications. It will serve as a review for those knowledgeable in the subject and as an introduction to newcomers to the field.

STAFF

Cooks, Patricia A. Department Business Manager [email protected] 713-743-4321 Dvoretzky, Toban Assistant to the Chairman, et al. [email protected] 713-743-4304 Moses, Pamela J. Accounting Specialist [email protected] uh.edu 713-743-4303 Gates, Sharon M. Undergraduate Coordinator [email protected] 713-743-4325 Walker, Rosalind Graduate Coordinator [email protected] 713-743-4311

MAILING ADDRESS

Department of Chemical Engineering University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering S222 Engineering Bldg 1 Houston, TX 77204-4004, USA

The course considers how to select, prepare, characterize, test, and use a catalyst. Both laboratory and commercial methods of catalyst preparation are reviewed, with emphasis on practical applications. Modern instrumental methods for the characterization of catalysts' physical and chemical properties are also included. Techniques for the measurement of surface areas, pore properties, diffusivities, crystallite sizes, acidities, etc. are discussed. All aspects of catalytic kinetics, both chemical and diffusional, are considered with reference to specific problems. Common mechanisms and their relationship to catalyst properties are outlined fully.

WEB ADDRESSES

Chemical Engineering www.che.uh.edu Cullen College of Engineering www.egr.uh.edu

To inquire about course dates, registration, and fees, contact: Patricia A. Cooks University of Houston, Department of Chemical Engineering S 222 Engineering Bldg 1 Houston, TX 77204-4004, U.S.A. Phone: 713-743-4321 Fax: 713-743-4323 E-mail: [email protected]

INFORMATION

Phone: 713-743-4300 Fax: 713-743-4323

44

University of Houston

Department of Chemical Engineering 2000 Annual Report

45

Department of Chemical Engineering S222 Engineering Bldg 1 Houston, TX 77204-4004 713-743-4300 | www.che.uh.edu

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