Read El%20Ed%20Portfolio%2004-05.pdf text version

E L E M E N T A R Y

E D U C A T I O N

2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

Elementary Education

PORTFOLIO MATERIALS PACKET 2004-2005

Information and forms provided in this packet of information are available on: · the Department of Education's web site: http://www.elmhurst.edu/~edu · the ELEMENTARY EDUCATION BlackboardTM page, which allows guest access to all Elmhurst College students. http://bb.elmhurst.edu/.

Elementary Education candidates also are encouraged to join the Elementary Education Listserv to stay up-to-date on program policies and procedures. https://linux1.elmhurst.edu/mailman/listinfo/elmedu

E L E M E N T A R Y

E D U C A T I O N

2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

Department of Education Program Handbooks & Portfolios

Each teacher education program at ELMHURST COLLEGE has developed a program handbook and a program portfolio packet to outline the specific program requirements for earning a teaching certificate in the State of Illinois. Using these materials, the Department of Education faculty supports teacher candidates in monitoring their progress toward the appropriate department, program, and professional standards. This Elementary Education Portfolio Packet is purchased in EDU 110, Introduction to Education, to provide Elementary (K-8) teacher candidates with specific program objectives and an organizational template for beginning their Elementary Program Portfolio. The packet will be organized into a three-ring binder in EDU 110. The separate Elementary Education Handbook should be organized in a different three-ring binder. The Handbook is comprised of four different documents: (a) Elementary Education Program Advising Guide, (b) Department of Education Policies and Procedures, (c) Field Experience Guidelines, and (d) Elementary Education Student Teaching Policies and Procedures. The Handbook sections are available on-line and may be downloaded from the Department of Education Web Page or the Elementary Education BlackboardTM page listed on the front cover of this packet. The Handbook and Portfolio Packet are updated annually. As policies or procedures are revised they are available on-line. Questions about information in these materials should be addressed to an Elementary Education Program Director.

Definitions used throughout this Portfolio Packet:

Candidates refer to college students seeking certification in an education program at the College after admission to the Department of Education's Sequence. Clinical semester refers to the student teaching term. Cooperating teacher refers to the certified teacher supervising a student teacher during the clinical semester. Mentor refers to a certified teacher supervising a candidate in P-12 field experiences. Student teacher refers to the candidate who has been accepted into student teaching. Students refer to the children and young adolescents in K-8 field settings. © ELMHURST COLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 190 Prospect · Elmhurst, IL 60126­3296 Phone 630­617­3545 · Fax 630­617­3736

2

E L E M E N T A R Y

E D U C A T I O N

2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

Elementary Education Program Goals & Outcomes

The Department of Education Objectives, Elementary Program Objectives, State of Illinois Elementary Education Content Area Standards, Professional Teaching Standards, Language Arts, and Technology Standards for all teachers in addition to the INTASC Principles and NCATE/ACEI Standards for Elementary Teacher Candidates have been aligned within the Elementary Education curriculum at Elmhurst College. The outcomes of the Elementary Education Program, which integrate these standards, are documented in each candidate's program portfolio and evaluated by faculty at three portfolio checkpoints. This portfolio packet serves as a "starting" template and provides guidelines for creating an "Elementary Program Portfolio." A program portfolio is a systematic, yet individual, assessment tool for faculty to monitor and evaluate each candidate's growth and development from the first course in Education through the completion of student teaching. A portfolio also is an important self-evaluation tool and serves as a source of professional reflection. At three points, the faculty will formally review the portfolio in an individual interview with the candidate. These "portfolio checkpoints" serve as benchmarks to assess whether the candidate is ready to continue to the next stage of a teacher education program. As the teacher candidate develops so too will the portfolio change from a collection of materials that reflect foundational Program requirements to a professional portfolio that illustrates a candidate's full-range of professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

E L E M E N T A R Y

E D U C A T I O N

2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

ORGANIZING A PROGRAM PORTFOLIO

Initially, the Program portfolio should be organized around the MAJOR SECTIONS [underlined] with subsections ( bulleted) organized as indicated. Candidates should place the materials in this packet in a three-ring binder with the following as "tabbed" sections: PROFESSIONAL MATERIALS FIELD EXPERIENCES CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE · LITERACY · MATHEMATICS · SCIENCE · SOCIAL STUDIES · FINE ARTS · PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH · AREA OF CONCENTRATION HUMAN DEVELOPMENT · DEVELOPMENT & LEARNING · DIVERSITY INSTRUCTION · PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION · LEARNING ENVIRONMENT · INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY ASSESSMENT COMMUNICATION · LANGUAGE ARTS STANDARDS · TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS PROFESSIONALISM · COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS · REFLECTION & PROFESSIONAL GROWTH · PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT & LEADERSHIP ARTIFACT APPENDICES [A numbered or lettered section of tabs] Appendix A or 1: Standards Appendix B, C, etc. or 2, 3, etc.

Artifacts that represent multiple outcome areas should be placed appendices and referenced in a brief reflection within the outcome area. Artifacts that are placed in plastic sleeves should not have to be removed for review (i.e., only place a single-sided or two-sided single pages in plastic.)

4

E L E M E N T A R Y

E D U C A T I O N

2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

A MESSAGE TO PROSPECTIVE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION TEACHER CANDIDATES

"Teachers open the door, but you must enter by yourself." Chinese proverb

This materials packet contains standards-based guidelines, charts, and templates that outline the curriculum and portfolio assessment framework for the Elementary Education Program. All teacher candidates are reviewed at three formal checkpoints using their program portfolios as part of a Department-wide performance assessment. As you create your Elementary Education Program Portfolio, read each section carefully and plan for how you will demonstrate growth and development within each standard. Also read the guidelines and rationale for lesson planning in the "Planning for Instruction" section. Learn the procedures for documenting the three Language Arts Standards and eight Technology Standards in the "Communication" section. Remember that all forms are organizational templates. You may create similar forms or templates to personalize your portfolio and demonstrate your knowledge, technology skills, and creativity. Each candidate's portfolio should be unique and you may want to add sections that reflect your unique background and development as a teacher candidate. The College Library has a collection on developing professional portfolios in education. In addition some professors require and help you learn to use electronic portfolio software (e.g., PowerPoint) or packages (e.g., LiveText) as part of their courses. The Elementary Education Program does not have a specific requirement for the type of portfolio that candidates create. You may choose to organize a portfolio electronically or in a binder, or maintain both types. Either type may be used at a checkpoint as long as it contains all required documentation. You will begin to develop your portfolio in EDU 110, Introduction to Education. As you complete other course requirements and field experiences ("outcomes") you will provide evidence ("artifacts") in the appropriate sections of your portfolio, in separate artifact appendices, as attachments, or as links. Some outcomes will be recorded on specific forms (e.g., course learning outcome evaluations, mentor evaluations, field verification forms). Other outcomes will be course assignments with an evaluation rubric and a professor's verification signature. As you begin teaching, samples of K-8 students' work with their names masked to maintain confidentiality will be added as artifacts. Your professors will guide your selection of and reflection on these artifacts throughout your coursework. The Elmhurst College Education Faculty believes that induction into the teaching profession begins with the first Education course. Your portfolio should demonstrate your proficiency in all the standards as established by our Department of Education. These standards are set high because all children and adolescents deserve the most knowledgeable, caring, and committed teachers. The door is now open.

Debra K. Meyer, Ph.D.

Director of Elementary Education August 1, 2005

5

PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

Within the field of education there are multiple sets of professional standards. The Elementary Education Program curriculum is built around a set of 11 objectives that integrate the Department of Education's mission, philosophy, and objectives with the mission of Elmhurst College, national, and State standards. National standards include INTASC principles for new teachers, a set of guidelines used by teacher education programs nation-wide, and the NCATE/ACEI standards used by programs with national accreditation. The State of Illinois standards for teachers, which are explicitly a part of the Department's and Program's assessment systems, include the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards, Language Arts Standards, and Technology Standards for all teachers, as well as the Elementary Content Standards. All these standards overlap with each other and are supported by professional organizations within the separate content areas (e.g., International Reading Association, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, etc.). All professional standards share one common goal ­ to provide the best possible education for every student. This collective body of standards is the organizing framework for the curriculum objectives and assessment system used in the Elementary Education Program at Elmhurst College. The Elementary Program supports the mission of the Department of Education Department, which is dedicated "to the challenge of preparing teachers who are knowledgeable and caring creators and directors of learning experiences," and of the College: "The College seeks to support a diverse and caring community of scholars, teachers, students and staff who work together for the purpose of learning. The College dedicates itself to the development of humane values, the skills of critical and creative inquiry, the capacity and desire to serve others, commitment to meaningful work, understanding of global interdependence, and responsible citizenship. The College affirms the spiritual basis for living a meaningful and purposeful life." Study the standards on the next few pages carefully to understand their similarities as well as their differences. Reflect upon them as they are represented in each section of your portfolio and self-assess your life-long growth as a knowledgeable and caring teacher within and across these areas as you continue to grow from the synergy of a liberal arts and professional education. After you have become acquainted with the standards, locate them in Appendix A of your portfolio for future reference.

6

ELMHURST COLLEGE Department of Education Objectives

The primary purpose of the Department of Education is to prepare teachers who will: Demonstrate knowledge in the foundations of a liberal arts education and integrate that knowledge with specialty and professional knowledge to provide effective instruction. Demonstrate knowledge of the philosophical, historical, social, and psychological foundations of education. Apply professional knowledge, competencies, and skills in the actual classroom setting. Acquire and use new information through review and synthesis of current research, methodology, technology, materials, techniques, and strategies in order to develop and implement an integrative, holistic curriculum. Use a variety of methods, strategies, techniques, and technologies to assess students' needs and learning; individualizing instruction to plan for and prize the uniqueness of each student. Incorporate appropriate activities into the educational program, responding to societal issues that affect the lives of children and youth. Provide classroom environments and teaching methodologies that encourage creative, active, and joyful learning; affirm and support students in their learning efforts; and include all students in order to encourage them to become self-assured individuals, problem solvers, critical thinkers, independent decision makers, and lifelong learners. Empathize, communicate, and work with families of children and youth to provide academic and social environments for all students that are realistic, futuristic, and humanistic; that recognize and prize cultural and human diversity; and that are respectful of individual abilities, family structures, beliefs, and lifestyles. Use effective communication and interpersonal skills to cooperate with other agencies and groups; demonstrate an understanding of interagency processes; in order to provide an efficient, effective, and appropriate education for each student. Apply local, state, and federal guidelines and standards to programs in order to revise education programs in accordance with regulations, standards, and current research. Work effectively within the social context of the educational setting, collaborating with school administration, colleagues, support staff, families, and the school community. Become reflective, ethical practitioners who are able to use a variety of methods to evaluate instruction, curricula, and programs and make necessary revisions.

7

Department of Education Outcomes in Relationship to its Conceptual Framework

The Department of Education at Elmhurst College is dedicated to the challenge of preparing teachers who are knowledgeable and caring creators and directors of learning experiences. Learning Outcome: Elmhurst College teacher candidates are KNOWLEDGEABLE. Elmhurst College teacher candidates are: · Well-grounded in the liberal arts. (Department Objective #1) · Theoretically grounded in student-centered teaching and learning processes (that are constructivist, developmental, and transactional). (Department Objectives #4 & 5) · Competent in their content areas. (Department Objective #2 & 6) · Committed to life-long learning and professional development. (Department Objective #7 & 10) Learning Outcome: Elmhurst College teacher candidates are CARING. Elmhurst College teacher candidates believe in and practice: · The ethic of caring and advocacy for their students' learning and well-being. (Department Objective #6, 7, 9, & 11) · Self-reflection about their professional practice. (Department Objective #12) · Passionate dedication to teaching and learning. (Department Objectives #3, 8, & 12) · Being an active participant in a democracy. (Department Objectives #1, 7, & 8) Learning Outcome: Elmhurst College teacher candidates are CREATORS AND DIRECTORS OF LEARNING EXPERIENCES. Elmhurst College teacher candidates can: · Be creative in planning for instruction and using a variety of methods in their practice. (Department Objectives #3, 4, & 5) · Integrate technology in a manner that augments instruction for all learners. (Department Objectives #4 & 5) · Create and sustain educational environments that meet the diverse needs of students and families through culturally responsive and inclusive practices. (Department Objectives #6, 7, & 8) · Serve as collaborative problem solvers within the school community with colleagues, family members, students, and community members. (Department Objectives #6, 7, 8, & 11) · Model high professional awareness, ethics, and standards as educators within their areas of instruction. (Departmental Objectives #10, 11, & 12) · Help their students become participants in a democracy. (Department Objectives #7 & 8)

(Numbers in parentheses refer to the Departmental teacher preparation objectives ­ see previous page.)

8

Elementary Education Program Objectives

[Including alignment with national, state, and departmental standards and objectives.] Upon completion of Elmhurst College's Elementary Education Program, the candidate will: 1. Content Area Knowledge. [NCATE/ACEI Curriculum, 2a-2i] Demonstrate knowledge of the concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines by creating learning experiences that make their knowledge structures and ways of thinking meaningful for students. [aligned with INTASC Principle #1; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #1; Elementary Education Content Area Standards #1-7; and Department Objectives #1 & 2] 2. Planning & Instruction. [NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3a] 2. a. Create instructional plans that reflect current discipline knowledge and methods and are aligned with the learning goals of individual students and curriculum standards. 2. b. Apply and revise programs in accordance with regulations, standards, and current research. [aligned with INTASC Principle #7; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standards #4 & 6; Elementary Education Content Area Standards #10 & 12; and Department Objectives #3, 4, 5, & 10] 3. Assessment. [NCATE/ACEI Assessment, 4] Use multiple and appropriate formal and informal assessment strategies to measure and evaluate the continuous intellectual and social development of all learners and plan for future learning experiences. [aligned with INTASC Principle #8; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #8; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #14; and Department Objective #5] 4. Human Development. [NCATE/ACEI Development, Learning and Motivation, 1] Demonstrate an understanding of human development and learning by providing opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students. [aligned with INTASC Principle #2; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #2; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #8; and Department Objectives #2 & 5] 5. Learning Environment. [NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3c & 3d] 5. a. Demonstrate an understanding of human motivation by creating a learning environment that encourages social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. 5. b. Use a variety of instructional strategies for student development of critical thinking, problemsolving, and performance-based skills. [aligned with INTASC Principles #4 & 5; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #5; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #11; and Department Objective #7] 6. Diversity. [NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3b] Demonstrate an understanding of and valuing of how students differ in their learning approaches by creating learning opportunities adapted to the diverse needs of all students. [aligned with INTASC Principle #3; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #3; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #9; and Department Objectives #4, 5, & 8] 7. Professional, Family & Community Collaboration. [NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3e & Professionalism, 5c & d] Develop and maintain collaborative relationships with colleagues, families, and the community to support student learning and well-being. [aligned with INTASC Principle #10; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #9; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #15; and Department Objectives #8, 9, & 11]

9

8. Communication Skills. [NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3e] Use effective written, verbal, nonverbal, visual and electronic communication to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom and in professional development. [aligned with INTASC Principle #6; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #7; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #13; and Department Objectives #3 & 9] 9. Professional Knowledge & Ethics. [NCATE/ACEI Professionalism, 5d] 9. a. Demonstrate knowledge of the philosophical, historical, social, and psychological foundations of education, including the legal and moral dimensions of instructional decisions and practices. 9. b. Demonstrate standards of professional conduct and ethics through leadership and child advocacy to improve student learning and well-being. [aligned with State of Illinois Professional Standard #11; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #17; and Department Objectives #3 & 12] 10. Professional Development. [NCATE/ACEI Professionalism, 5a & 5b] 10. a. Continuously evaluate how choices and actions affect students, families, and other professionals in the learning community. 10. b. Continuously seek opportunities to grow professionally and study their own practice through synthesizing theory, research, and pedagogy. [aligned with INTASC Principle #9; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #10; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #16; and Department Objectives #10, 11, & 12] 11. Personal Development. [NCATE/ACEI Professionalism, 5b] Demonstrate caring guidance for the learning and development of all children through student-centered instruction and continuous self-reflection. [aligned with INTASC Principle #9; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #10; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #16; and Department Objective #12]

10

INTASC Principles

Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Principles Principle 1: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students. Principle 2: The teacher understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social and personal development. Principle 3: The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. Principle 4: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. Principle 5: The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. Principle 6: The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. Principle 7: The teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals. Principle 8: The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual and social development of the learner. Principle 9: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally. Principle 10: The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support the students' learning and well-being.

11

NCATE/ACEI Standards

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education/ Association for Childhood Education International

Development, Learning and Motivation 1. Development, Learning and Motivation--Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students' development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation. Curriculum 2a. Central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of content--Candidates know, understand, and use the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of content for students across the K-6 grades and can create meaningful learning experiences that develop students' competence in subject matter and skills for various developmental levels; 2b. English language arts--Candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas; 2c. Science--Candidates know, understand, and use fundamental concepts in the subject matter of science-- including physical, life, and earth and space sciences--as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal and social perspectives, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry processes scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific and technological literacy; 2d. Mathematics--Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define number systems and number sense, geometry, measurement, statistics and probability, and algebra in order to foster student understanding and use of patterns, quantities, and spatial relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data; 2e. Social studies--Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies--the integrated study of history, geography, the social sciences, and other related areas --to promote elementary students' abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world; 2f. The arts--Candidates know, understand, and use--as appropriate to their own understanding and skills--the content, functions, and achievements of dance, music, theater, and the several visual arts as primary media for communication, inquiry, and insight among elementary students; 2g. Health education--Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts in the subject matter of health education to create opportunities for student development and practice of skills that contribute to good health; 2h. Physical education--Candidates know, understand, and use--as appropriate to their own understanding and skills--human movement and physical activity as central elements to foster active, healthy life styles and enhanced quality of life for elementary students; 2i. Connections across the curriculum--Candidates know, understand, and use the connections among concepts, procedures, and applications from content areas to motivate elementary students, build understanding, and encourage the application of knowledge, skills, and ideas to real world issues. Instruction 3a. Integrating and applying knowledge for instruction--Candidates plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, subject matter, curricular goals, and community;

12

3b. Adaptation to diverse students--Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students; 3c. Development of critical thinking, problem solving, performance skills--Candidates understand and use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills; 3d. Active engagement in learning--Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior among students at the K-6 level to foster active engagement in learning, self motivation, and positive social interaction and to create supportive learning environments; 3e. Communication to foster collaboration--Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the elementary classroom Assessment 4. Assessment for instruction--Candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessment strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of each elementary student. Professionalism 5a. Practices and behaviors of developing career teachers--Candidates understand and apply practices and behaviors that are characteristic of developing career teachers; 5b. Reflection and evaluation--Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching and resources available for professional learning; they continually evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally; 5c. Collaboration with families--Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families to promote the academic, social and emotional growth of children; 5d. Collaboration with colleagues and the community--Candidates foster relationships with school colleagues and agencies in the larger community to support students' learning and wellbeing.

13

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards

Content Knowledge: The teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to all students. Human Development & Learning: The teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provide learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students. Diversity: The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. Planning for Instruction: The teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, the community, and curriculum goals. Learning Environment: The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. Instructional Delivery: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. Communication: The teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. Assessment: The teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students. Collaborative Relationships: The teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support student learning and well-being. Reflection and Professional Growth: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. Professional Conduct: The teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve student learning and well-being.

14

Illinois Core Language Arts Standards

STANDARD 1 All teachers must know a broad range of literacy techniques and strategies for every aspect of communication and must be able to develop each student's ability to read, write, speak and listen to his or her potential within the demands of the discipline. STANDARD 2 All teachers should model effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills during their direct and indirect instructional activities. The most important communicator in the classroom is the teacher, who should model English language arts skills. STANDARD 3 All teachers should give constructive instruction and feedback to students in both written and oral contexts while being aware of diverse learner needs. Teachers should effectively provide a variety of instructional strategies, constructive feedback, criticism, and improvement strategies.

15

Illinois Elementary Education Content Standards

STANDARD 1 ­ Curriculum The competent elementary teacher understands and demonstrates the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of content and creates meaningful integrated learning experiences that develop all students' competence in subject matter and skills for various developmental levels. STANDARD 2 ­ Curriculum: English Language Arts The competent elementary teacher demonstrates proficiency in the use of oral and written English; understands and communicates ideas, information, and perspectives in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; and promotes all students' ability to apply language and thinking skills to many different genres, concepts, and situations. STANDARD 3 ­ Curriculum: Mathematics The competent elementary teacher demonstrates proficiency in the use of mathematics; understands, communicates, and connects the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define number systems and number sense, geometry, measurement, statistics, probability and algebra; and promotes all students' ability to apply, interpret, and construct mathematical thinking skills in a variety of situations. STANDARD 4 ­ Curriculum: Science The competent elementary teacher understands the interrelationships among science, technology, and society; understands the fundamental concepts of life, physical, environmental, earth and space sciences; and uses strategies to engage all students in discovering new knowledge through the use of scientific thinking and reasoning. STANDARD 5 ­ Curriculum: Social Science The competent elementary teacher understands the interrelationships among the social sciences; uses history, geography, economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and archaeology concepts and modes of inquiry; and promotes all students' ability to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world. STANDARD 6 ­ Curriculum: Physical Development and Health The competent elementary teacher understands the comprehensive nature of students' physical, emotional, and social well-being; understands the role of human movement and physical activity as elements central to active healthy lifestyles; and promotes all students' ability to develop and practice skills that contribute to good health and enhanced quality of life. STANDARD 7 ­ Curriculum: Fine Arts The competent elementary teacher understands the educational, communicative, and aesthetic value of dance, drama, music, and visual art and the role fine arts plays in reflecting history and culture and promotes all students' ability to express themselves creatively. STANDARD 8 ­ Human Development and Learning The competent elementary teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support all students' cognitive, social, emotional, moral/ethical, and physical development.

16

STANDARD 9 ­ Diversity The competent elementary teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. STANDARD 10 ­ Planning for Instruction The competent elementary teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, community, and curriculum goals. STANDARD 11 ­ Learning Environment The competent elementary teacher understands individual/group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and selfmotivation. STANDARD 12 ­ Instructional Delivery The competent elementary teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage all students' development of critical-thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills. STANDARD 13 ­ Communication The competent elementary teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction. STANDARD 14 ­ Assessment The competent elementary teacher understands and uses various formal and informal assessment strategies to support the learning of all students. STANDARD 15 ­ Collaborative Relationships The competent elementary teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/family, and the community to promote the cognitive, social, emotional, moral/ethical, and physical growth of all learners. STANDARD 16 ­ Reflection and Professional Growth The competent elementary teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. STANDARD 17 ­ Professional Conduct and Leadership The competent elementary teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, serves as a positive role model, and provides leadership to improve student learning and well-being.

17

General Guidelines for Creating a Program Portfolio

Update your program portfolio continuously by adding artifacts that represent your development of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions as an Elementary Education teacher candidate. All artifacts should be verified with a college professor's signature and dated as portfolio quality (i.e., representing "A" or "B" quality). Many artifacts from your Education courses and field experiences will represent multiple standards simultaneously (represented by the various sections of this portfolio). "Outcome Summary Sheets" have been created for each standard to help you monitor your progress within each area. Careful organization and record keeping will make your portfolio checkpoint interviews a professional growth and "hassle-free" experience. A sample summary sheet for General Curriculum knowledge and skills is provided on the next page. In addition, sections of your portfolio should be created for maintaining important documentation that will be needed at the portfolio checkpoint interviews and for applications to program and student teaching, for example: The Professional Materials section for organizing resumes, transcripts, grade reports, certification test results, copies of your letters of admission to sequence, program, and student teaching, etc. The Field Experience section for maintaining all copies of field-related logs, evaluations, and documentation. The Program Outcomes section for retaining copies of your course evaluations (CLOEs) and portfolio checkpoint materials.

18

SAMPLE

General Content Knowledge & Curriculum Outcome Summary Sheet The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to all students

State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #1 1A. understands major concepts, assumptions, debates, principles, and theories that are central to the discipline(s) in which certification is sought. 1B. understands the processes of inquiry central to the discipline. 1C. understands how students' conceptual frameworks and their misconceptions for an area of knowledge can influence their learning. 1D. understands the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas and to life and career applications. 1E. understands how a student's disability affects processes of inquiry and influences patterns of learning. 1F. evaluates teaching resources and curriculum materials for their comprehensiveness, accuracy, and usefulness for representing particular ideas and concepts. 1G. uses differing viewpoints, theories, "ways of knowing" and methods of inquiry in teaching subject matter concepts. 1H. engages students in generating and testing knowledge according to the process of inquiry and standards of evidence of the discipline. 1I. designs learning experiences to promote student skills in the use of technologies appropriate to the discipline. 1J. anticipates and adjusts for common misunderstandings of the discipline(s) that impede learning. 1K. uses a variety of explanations and multiple representations of concepts that capture key ideas to help students develop conceptual understanding. 1L. facilitates learning experiences that make connections to other content areas and to life and career experiences. 1M. designs learning experiences and utilizes adaptive devices/technology to provide access to general curricular content to individuals with disabilities. Artifact

Research Paper on the effects of inclusion on students with and without disabilities. Microteaching Project Hands-on science lessons Collaborative Interdisciplinary Thematic Unit Differentiation of Instruction Project Basal group activity for early literacy Math tutoring sessions and whole class lessons Web Quest Rubric for 4-8 Literacy Virtual field trips and web quests in Integrative Unit Literacy Tutoring Sessions in grades 4-8 Small-group Mathematics Tutoring Sessions Language Experience Lesson and Read Aloud Interdisciplinary Thematic Social Studies Unit Multiple Intelligences/Problem-based Learning Science Unit Participation in field experiences involving students with disabilities

19

PROFESSIONAL MATERIALS

Professional materials are the documents that record and illustrate your professional accomplishments as an educator. The following list of materials is typical of a collection of professional artifacts. Each artifact should be related to your professional goal of becoming an elementary teacher and be a current reflection of your knowledge, skills, or dispositions as an educator of K-8 students. · Resume · Philosophy of Teaching

See also Professional Growth & Reflection ­ it is recommended that you keep the previous versions of your philosophy or teaching statements here for review.

· Transcripts and grade reports · Awards and honors · Letters of appreciation and recommendation · Certificates of professional development activities

See also Professional Growth & Reflection

· Documentation of special areas of certification

See also Content Knowledge ­ Area of Concentration

· Documentation of unique skills as they relate to teaching · Experiences working with children or youth · Community service or service learning

See also Community Collaboration

20

FIELD EXPERIENCES

In this section of the portfolio all field experiences should be documented, including the following: · An updated field experience spreadsheet · A copy of your Field Experience Plan · Copies of all Field Experience Logs with teacher signatures. · Copies of all Field Evaluation and Verification Forms, with teacher evaluation and signature. · Copies of all mentor teacher evaluations. · Copies of school report cards for schools in which field participation occurred. These may be obtained at the school or via the Illinois State Board of Education web site. · Copies of all formal field placements (e.g., Satellite placement letters, student teaching placement communications, etc.) Samples of each of these forms will be discussed in EDU 110, Introduction to Education. These artifacts should be organized within this subsection chronologically.

21

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE

LITERACY MATHEMATICS SCIENCE SOCIAL STUDIES FINE ARTS PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH AREA OF CONCENTRATION

This section of the portfolio should be divided into the seven content areas that comprise an elementary educator's subject matter knowledge base. Content knowledge and skills are acquired through study in educational "methods" courses as well as through the distributed liberal arts requirements of the Department of Education, which parallel the College's general education curriculum. These courses are listed within each subarea to articulate this integration. The Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and Illinois Elementary Education Content Standards overlap on all 11 categories. However, the Elementary Education Content Standards are more in-depth in the seven content areas ­ language arts, mathematics, social science, science, physical education and health, and fine arts ­ because those are the subject areas that comprise the elementary curriculum as reflected in the State Learning Goals. Elementary Education Program's Objective #1: Content Knowledge.

Demonstrate knowledge of the concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines by creating learning experiences that make their knowledge structures and ways of thinking meaningful for students. [aligned with INTASC Principle #1; NCATE/ACEI Curriculum, 2a-2I; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #1; Elementary Education Content Area Standards #1-7; and Department Objectives #1 & 2]

22

CURRICULUM

EDU 210 --Introductory Methods in Elementary / Middle School Organization & Instruction EDU 314 -- Literacy I-Learning Language: Emergent/Early Literacy EDU 315 -- Literacy II-Using Language to Learn EDU 325 -- Social Studies in the Elementary and Middle Schools EDU 326 -- Science in the Elementary and Middle Schools EDU 330 -- Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools

General Content Knowledge & Curriculum Outcome Summary Sheet

The competent teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to all students

State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #1 1A. understands major concepts, assumptions, debates, principles, and theories that are central to the discipline(s) in which certification is sought. 1B. understands the processes of inquiry central to the discipline. 1C. understands how students' conceptual frameworks and their misconceptions for an area of knowledge can influence their learning. 1D. understands the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas and to life and career applications. 1E. understands how a student's disability affects processes of inquiry and influences patterns of learning. 1F. evaluates teaching resources and curriculum materials for their comprehensiveness, accuracy, and usefulness for representing particular ideas and concepts. 1G. uses differing viewpoints, theories, "ways of knowing" and methods of inquiry in teaching subject matter concepts. 1H. engages students in generating and testing knowledge according to the process of inquiry and standards of evidence of the discipline. 1I. designs learning experiences to promote student skills in the use of technologies appropriate to the discipline. 1J. anticipates and adjusts for common misunderstandings of the discipline(s) that impede learning. 1K. uses a variety of explanations and multiple representations of concepts that capture key ideas to help students develop conceptual understanding. 1L. facilitates learning experiences that make connections to other content areas and to life and career experiences. 1M. designs learning experiences and utilizes adaptive devices/technology to provide access to general curricular content to individuals with disabilities. Artifact

23

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE LITERACY

Courses: Six semester hours of Composition Three semester hours of Literature Three semester hours of Public Speaking or Drama/Acting EDU 314 -- Literacy I-Learning Language: Emergent/Early Literacy EDU 315 -- Literacy II-Using Language to Learn

Language Arts Content Outcome Summary Sheet

The competent elementary teacher demonstrates proficiency in the use of oral and written English; understands and communicates ideas, information, and perspectives in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; and promotes all students' ability to apply language and thinking skills to many different genres, concepts, and situations. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #2 2A. understands phonological, word analysis, and vocabulary strategies. 2B. understands skills and strategies involved in reading for various purposes: factual information, personal response, literary appreciation, critical analysis, and social interaction. 2C. understands a diverse body of works, authors and movements in U.S. and world literature, literature for children and young adults, and characteristic features of various literary genres. 2D. understands skills and strategies involved in writing for various purposes and audiences, incorporating knowledge of English grammar and mechanics, and the critical analysis of written work in terms of organization, clarity, and style. 2E. understands skills and strategies involved in listening for various purposes: factual information, personal response, literary appreciation, critical analysis, and social interaction. 2F. understands skills and strategies involved in speaking to audiences for various purposes: information, persuasion, and entertainment. 2G. understands the research process and study skills. 2H. demonstrates proficiency in the use of oral and written English. 2I. teaches the reading, writing, speaking, and listening processes. Artifact

Language Arts Standard #2

2J. teaches using a diverse body of works, authors, and movements in U.S. and world literature, literature for children and young adults, and characteristic features of various literary genres. 2K. selects and uses a wide range of instructional resources and technologies to support reading, writing, and research.

24

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE MATHEMATICS

Courses: 6 semester hours of Mathematics EDU 330 -- Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools

Mathematics Content Outcome Summary Sheet

The competent elementary teacher demonstrates proficiency in the use of mathematics; understands, communicates, and connects the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics, including number systems and number sense, geometry, measurement, statistics, probability, and algebra; and promotes all students' ability to apply, interpret, and construct mathematical thinking skills in a variety of situations. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #3 3A. understands various approaches used (estimation, mental mathematics, manipulative modeling, numerical/geometric/algebraic pattern recognition, and technology) to analyze mathematical ideas, solve problems, and investigate real-world situations. 3B. understands approaches used (estimation, mental mathematics, manipulative modeling, numerical/geometric/algebraic pattern recognition, and technology) to interpret and communicate mathematical information, reasoning, concepts, applications, and procedures. 3C. understands concepts, skills, and procedures related to number (e.g., integers and natural, rational, and real numbers), number sense, and numeration and their use in real-world situations. 3D. understands concepts, skills, and procedures related to synthetic/analytical geometry and spatial relationships and their use in real-world situations. 3E. understands concepts, skills, and procedures related to algebraic relations/functions and their use in real-world situations. 3F. understands concepts, skills, and procedures related to measurement and their use in real-world situations. 3G. understands concepts, skills, and procedures related to statistics/data analysis and their use in real-world situations. 3H. understands concepts, skills, and procedures related to probability/expectations and their use in real-world situations. 3I. demonstrates proficiency in the use of mathematics. 3J. teaches major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes related to number systems and number sense, geometry, measurement, statistics, probability, and algebra. 3K. selects and uses a wide range of manipulatives, instructional resources, and technologies to support the learning of mathematics. Artifacts

25

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE SCIENCE

Courses: One Biology course with a lab One Physical Science course with a lab EDU 326 -- Science in the Elementary and Middle Schools

Science Content Outcome Summary Sheet

The competent elementary teacher understands the interrelationships among science, technology, and society; understands the fundamental concepts of life, physical, environmental, earth, and space sciences; and uses strategies to engage all students in acquiring new knowledge through the use of scientific thinking and reasoning. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #4 4A. understands the interrelationships among science, technology, and society in historical and contemporary contexts. 4B. understands the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of life, physical, environmental, earth, and space sciences and their use to interpret, analyze, and explain phenomena. 4C. understands principles and procedures, including safety practices, related to the design and implementation of scientific investigations and the application of inquiry skills and processes to develop explanations of natural phenomena. 4D. understands the use of scientific investigation and inquiry skills across the sciences to conduct experiments and solve problems. 4E. demonstrates and communicates the concepts, theories, and practices of science. Artifacts

4F. demonstrates and uses strategies to engage students in acquiring new knowledge through the use of scientific thinking and reasoning. 4G. selects and uses a wide range of instructional resources and technologies to support scientific learning.

26

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE SOCIAL STUDIES

Courses: Three semester hours of General Psychology Three semester hours of Non-western Culture may be in social science Three semester hours of American Government Three semester hours of American History EDU 325 -- Social Studies in the Elementary and Middle Schools

Social Science Content Outcome Summary Sheet

The competent elementary teacher understands the interrelationships among the social sciences; uses concepts and modes of inquiry appropriate to history, geography, economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and archaeology; and promotes all students' ability to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society and interdependent world. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #5 5A. understands the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States and the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary for successful participation in civic life. 5B. understands the interrelationships of economic and political principles, concepts, and systems and their relationship to historical and contemporary developments in Illinois, the United States and the world. 5C. understands from multiple perspectives the significant eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of Illinois, the United States, and the world. 5D. understands the interrelationships between people and their environment. 5E. understands geographic concepts and phenomena and their impact on Illinois, the United States, and the world. 5F. understands concepts related to the structure and organization of human societies and processes of socialization and social interaction. 5G. understands the implications of cultural heritage and diversity, as well as cohesion, within and across groups. 5H. demonstrates proficiency in the principles of social science. 5I. uses history and modes of inquiry to make informed decisions. 5J. uses literature for children and young adults to support learning in the social sciences. 5K. uses social science processes, skills, and concepts (e.g., gathering, organizing, mapping, interpreting, and analyzing information). 5L. models and teaches the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a democratic society. 5M. selects and uses a wide range of instructional resources and technologies to support learning in the social sciences. Artifacts

27

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE FINE ARTS

Three semester hours of Fine Arts Three semester hours of Non-western Culture may be a fine arts course Three semester hours of Public Speaking may be a Drama/Acting course Recommended elective: ART 361 ­ Art Methods [offered fall terms] The integration of fine arts is a component of the following courses: EDU 210 Introductory Methods in Elementary and Middle School Organization & Instruction EDU 314 -- Literacy I-Learning Language: Emergent/Early Literacy EDU 315 -- Literacy II-Using Language to Learn EDU 325 -- Social Studies in the Elementary and Middle Schools EDU 326 -- Science in the Elementary and Middle Schools EDU 330 -- Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools Courses:

Fine Arts Content Outcome Summary Sheet

The competent elementary teacher understands the educational, communicative, and aesthetic value of dance, drama, music, and visual art and the role fine arts plays in reflecting history and culture and promotes all students' ability to express themselves creatively. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #7 7A. understands concepts, techniques, and materials of the visual arts; cultural dimensions of the visual arts; and interrelationships among the visual arts and the other art forms. 7B. understands concepts, techniques, and materials for producing, listening to, and responding to music; cultural dimensions of music; and interrelationships among music and the other art forms. 7C. understands concepts, techniques, and materials related to drama; cultural dimensions of drama; and interrelationships among drama and the other art forms. 7D. understands concepts, techniques, and materials related to dance; cultural dimensions of dance; and interrelationships among dance and the other art forms. 7E. promotes artistic development, appreciation, and performance. Artifacts

7F. teaches the use of various tools, including technology, for creating, analyzing and performing works of art.

28

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH

Courses: Two semester hours of Lifestyles for Health [KIN 200] EDU 326 -- Science in the Elementary and Middle Schools

Physical Education & Health Content Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent elementary teacher understands the comprehensive nature of students' physical, emotional, and social well-being; understands the role of human movement and physical activity as elements central to active healthy lifestyles; and promotes all students' ability to develop and practice skills that contribute to good health and enhanced quality of life. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #1 and Elementary Content Standard #6 6A. understands concepts related to movement, sports, and team-building skills. 6B. understands the systems of the human body, physical fitness concepts and practices, and interrelationships between fitness and body systems. 6C. understands basic principles and practices of personal, interpersonal, and community health and safety. 6D. understands conflict resolution and its relationship to health and well-being. 6E. uses communication and decision-making skills to promote personal, interpersonal, and community health and well-being. 6F. promotes and adapts skills that contribute to health and safety. 6G. provides opportunities for individual and team physical activities. 6H. models, teaches, and promotes conflict resolution and its relationship to health and well-being. 6I. selects and uses a wide range of instructional resources and technologies to support physical development and health. Artifacts

29

CURRICULUM & CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AREA OF CONCENTRATION

Area of Concentration:

Area of Concentration Artifact List

Course number and description Artifacts

30

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT & LEARNING

Elementary Education Program Objective #4: Human Development. Demonstrate an understanding of human development and learning by providing opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students. [aligned with INTASC Principle #2; NCATE/ACEI Development, Learning and Motivation, 1; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #2; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #8; and Department Objectives #2 & 5]

DIVERSITY

Elementary Education Program Objective #6. Diversity. Demonstrate an understanding of and valuing of how students differ in their learning approaches by creating learning opportunities adapted to the diverse needs of all students. [aligned with INTASC Principle #3; NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3b; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #3; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #9; and Department Objectives #4, 5, & 8]

31

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT & LEARNING

Human Development & Learning Artifact Summary Sheet

The candidate demonstrates an understanding of human development and learning by providing opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #2 and Elementary Content Standard #8 2A. understands how students construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop habits of mind. Artifacts

2B. understands that students' physical, social, emotional, ethical, and cognitive development influences learning. 2C. understands human development, learning theory, neural science, and the ranges of individual variation within each domain. 2D. understands that differences in approaches to learning and performance interact with development.

2E. understands how to include student development factors when making instructional decisions.

2F. knows the impact of cognitive, emotional, physical, and sensory disabilities on learning and communication processes. 2G. analyzes individual and group performance in order to design instruction that meets learners' current needs in the cognitive, social, emotional, ethical, and physical domains at the appropriate level of development. 2H. stimulates student reflection on prior knowledge and links new ideas to already familiar ideas and experiences. 2I. introduces concepts and principles at different levels of complexity so that they are meaningful to students at varying levels of development and to students with diverse learning needs.

32

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DIVERSITY

Diversity Artifact Summary Sheet

The candidate demonstrates an understanding of and valuing of how students differ in their learning approaches by creating learning opportunities adapted to the diverse needs of all students. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #3 and Elementary Content Standard #9 3A. understands the areas of exceptionality in learning as defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and the State Board's rules for Special Education (23 Ill. Adm. Code 226). 3B. understands the process of second language acquisition and strategies to support the learning of students whose first language is not English. 3C. understands how students' learning is influenced by individual experiences, talents, and prior learning, as well as language, culture, family, and community values. 3D. understands and identifies differences in approaches to learning and performance, including different learning styles, multiple intelligences, and performance modes. 3E. understands cultural and community diversity through a wellgrounded framework and understands how to learn about and incorporate students' experiences, cultures, and community resources into instruction. 3F. understands personal cultural perspectives and biases and their effects on one's teaching. 3G. facilitates a learning community in which individual differences are respected. 3H. Makes appropriate provisions (in terms of time and circumstances for

work, tasks assigned, communication, and response modes) for individual students who have particular learning differences or needs.

Artifacts

3I. uses information about students' families, cultures, and communities as a basis for connecting instruction to students' experiences. 3J. uses cultural diversity and individual student experiences to enrich instruction. 3K. uses a wide range of instructional strategies and technologies to meet and enhance diverse student needs. 3L. identifies and designs instruction appropriate to students' stages of development, learning styles, strengths and needs. 3M. identifies when and how to develop and implement strategies and interventions within the classroom and how to access appropriate services or resources to assist students with exceptional learning needs. 3N. demonstrates positive regard for individual students and their families regardless of culture, religion, gender, sexual orientation, and varying abilities.

33

Diversity in Field Experiences

The Elementary Education Program, as part of the Department of Education at Elmhurst College, supports the importance of interacting with students and professionals in multiple and diverse field experiences. The importance of diversity in field experiences is outlined in the following excerpt from the National Council of Colleges of Teacher Education [NCATE], the Department's national accreditation body: "America's classrooms are becoming increasingly diverse; more than one-third of the students in P­12 classrooms are from minority groups. The families of an increasing number of students are immigrants, many with native languages other than English and from diverse religious backgrounds. Growing numbers of students are classified as having disabilities. At the same time, minority teachers are less than 15 percent of the teaching force. As a result, most students do not have the opportunity to benefit from a diverse teaching force. Teacher candidates need to develop proficiencies for working with students from diverse backgrounds and with exceptionalities to ensure that all students have the opportunity to learn. Regardless of whether they live in areas with great diversity, candidates must develop knowledge of diversity in the United States and the world, dispositions that respect and value differences, and skills for working in diverse settings. One of the goals of this standard is the development of educators who can help all students learn and who can teach from multicultural and global perspectives that draw on the histories, experiences, and representations of students from diverse cultural backgrounds. Therefore, the unit provides opportunities for candidates to understand the role of diversity and equity in the teaching and learning process. Coursework, field experiences, and clinical practice are designed to help candidates understand the influence of culture on education and acquire the ability to develop meaningful learning experiences for all students. Candidates learn about exceptionalities and inclusion as well as gender differences and their impact on learning. Proficiencies, including those related to dispositions and diversity, are drawn from the standards of the profession, state, and institution; they are clear to candidates and are assessed as part of the unit's performance assessment system. Field experiences and clinical practice support the development of educators who can apply their knowledge of diversity, including exceptionalities, to work in schools with all students. They provide opportunities for candidates to reflect on their observations and practices in schools and communities with students and families from diverse ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups. Clinical faculty design learning experiences for candidates in field experiences and clinical practice to help candidates process diversity concepts and provide feedback to candidates about their performance." [retrieved January 14, 2003, from http://www.nacate.org/standard]

34

Documenting Diversity Experiences in the Elementary Education Program Portfolio:

A philosophy statement on diversity [What is your definition of diversity? What does it mean to learn to teach in diverse settings? Why is diversity important?]. This statement should be developed as part of your Teaching Philosophy. Your growth and development in knowledge, skills, and dispositions toward diversity should be evident in the different versions of your philosophy and in reflections on teaching. You should document multiple and varied (diverse) field experiences. For each field experience in which you observe or participate in a diverse setting, provide a reflection or a reflective course assignment in the DIVERSITY section of your portfolio. In some course assignments, the reflection on diversity will be part of the original assignment. In other field experiences the original assignment may not have focused on the diversity in your field experience or the field experience may not have involved a written reflection. The goal of this section of your program portfolio is to monitor your experiences in diverse settings, reflect upon these experiences, and evaluate the growth in your knowledge, skills, and dispositions in teaching in diverse classrooms. Multiple and varied areas of diverse field experiences include, participation with exceptional populations of students and students from different ethnic, racial, gender, socioeconomic, language, and religious groups [see the resource page for appropriate terminology at the end of this section]. The following "guiding questions" are to help in reflecting on these experiences: · In what ways was the field experience "diverse"? Be specific about the types of diversity among the students and professional staff. · How extensive was your field experience? How long did the field experience last? How much did you participate (rather than observe) in this setting? How did you interact with the students? · What issues did you confront relating to diversity that affected teaching and student learning? · What strategies did you develop for improving student learning? · How did this experience help you grow as a teacher and person? REMEMBER to document diverse experiences on your Field Experience Spreadsheet. Indicate the characteristics of each diverse setting using any of the following terms: Students with Exceptionalities (e.g., students with IEPs, students identified as gifted) Ethnic and/or Religious Diversity (may include differences in cultural characteristics, i.e., language, religion, geography/national origin, food, dress, music, etc.) Racial Diversity (e.g., African American, Asian, Eastern European, Hispanic, Latino, Native American, Middle Eastern, South American, Western European). Gender Differences Socioeconomic Diversity (e.g., middle class, lower middle class, homeless, children living in poverty, upper middle class, upper class) Linguistic Diversity (e.g., English Language Learners, Bilingual, Limited English Proficiency)

35

Terms used in discussions of "Diversity" in Education and in Educational Settings

modified from definitions compiled by Dr. Brenda Forster, Professor of Sociology ELMHURST COLLEGE

Diversity broad term referring to the variety of points of view, of experience, and of making meaning that encompasses complex differences in groups and individuals. a broad concept that encompasses everything used to describe a people; e.g., their shared ways of knowing, thinking, perceiving, creating, evaluating, interacting, and doing. cultural characteristics such as language, religion, geography/national origin, food, dress, music, etc. respectful interchange (more than recognition) between and among individuals, groups, and nations need for and benefit in interacting with, learning from, and working together any group that has less power than the majority as evidenced by lower pay, restricted opportunities, limited political access, and other forms of discrimination recognition of variety, complexity, and contributions of cultures; the recognition of the value of diversity. a social construct used to classify people on visible characteristics

Culture

Ethnicity

Intercultural

Interdependence

Minority

Multiculturalism

Race

36

INSTRUCTION PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Elementary Education Program Objective #2. Planning & Instruction. 2. a. Create instructional plans that reflect current discipline knowledge and methods and are aligned with the learning goals of individual students and curriculum standards. 2. b. Apply and revise programs in accordance with regulations, standards, and current research. [aligned with INTASC Principle #7; NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3a ; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standards #4 & 6; Elementary Education Content Area Standards #10 & 12; and Department Objectives #3, 4, 5, & 10] Elementary Education Program Objective #5. Learning Environment. 5. a. Demonstrate an understanding of human motivation by creating a learning environment that encourages social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. 5. b. Use a variety of instructional strategies for student development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance-based skills. [aligned with INTASC Principles #4 & 5; NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3c & 3d; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #5; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #11; and Department Objective #7]

37

INSTRUCTION PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION

Planning for Instruction Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, the community, and curriculum goals State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #4 and Elementary Content Standard #10 4A. understands the Illinois Learning Standards, curriculum development, content, learning theory, and student development and knows how to incorporate this knowledge in planning instruction. 4B. understands how to develop short- and long-range plans consistent with curriculum goals, learner diversity, and learning theory. Artifacts

4C. understands how to take the contextual considerations of instructional materials, individual student interests, and career needs into account in planning instruction that creates an effective bridge between students' experiences and career and educational goals. 4D. understands when and how to adjust plans based on students' responses and other contingencies.

4E. understands how to integrate technology into classroom instruction.

4F. understands how to review and evaluate educational technologies to determine instructional value.

4G. understands how to use various technological tools to access and manage information.

4H. understands the uses of technology to address students' needs.

38

State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #4 and Elementary Content Standard #10 4I. establishes expectations for students' learning.

Artifacts

4J. applies principles of scope and sequence when planning curriculum and instruction.

4K. creates short-range and long-term plans to achieve the expectations for students' learning.

4L. creates and selects learning materials and learning experiences appropriate for the discipline and curriculum goals, relevant to the students, and based on students' prior knowledge and principles of effective instruction. 4M. creates multiple learning activities that allow for variation in students' learning styles and performance modes.

4N. incorporates experiences into instructional practices that relate to the students' current life experiences and to future career and work experiences. 4O. creates approaches to learning that are interdisciplinary and that integrate multiple content areas.

4P. develops plans based on students' responses and provides for different pathways based on students' needs.

4Q. uses teaching resources and materials, which have been evaluated for accuracy and usefulness.

4R. accesses and uses a wide range of information and instructional technologies to enhance students' learning.

4S. uses individualized education program (IEP) goals and objectives to plan instruction for students with disabilities.

39

Elementary Education Program Lesson Plan Guidelines Purpose of Written Lesson Plans

Lesson planning is an important part of professional and pedagogical development for all educators. However, beginning teachers need more detailed, formal, written lesson plans than experienced teachers. Even for preservice teachers who have taught as substitute teachers or aides, the new curriculum and pedagogical skills being learned as a certified elementary education teacher need to be carefully chosen, applied, and assessed through lesson planning. Moreover, it is the teacher's responsibility to insure that the State learning goals and district curriculum goals are being met and new teachers use planning as a way to connect student needs to curricular goals. Written lesson plans are necessary to guide a daily lesson as well as sequence instruction and integrate content across lessons. All teachers are more effective when they follow a written plan. Mentor teachers, college supervisors, and professors can provide more constructive feedback if preservice teachers have well-written plans. The lesson plan books that overview a week of instruction in a series of "boxes" are not sufficient for a beginning teacher to think through all the components of effective instruction. Experienced teachers may be able to keep objectives, sequencing, and assessments "in their heads" or pick up a teacher's manual and use it effectively because they have taught the same or similar lessons. However beginning teachers need to explicitly consider the elements of a well-planned instruction by writing lesson plans. Basic Guidelines for Lesson Plans In the Elementary Education Program at Elmhurst College, the professors and college supervisors have developed a series of "Standard Lesson Plans." Just like in the professional field of education, individual educator preferences reflect the variety of ways in which to plan lessons. Although there is no "best way" to lesson plan, the following guidelines are shared among all faculty members. The guidelines in underlined bold-faced type are standard requirements. The guidelines in italics provide examples of optional requirements and may vary by school district, mentor teacher, or college faculty member. All lesson plans include a minimum of the following four components: 1. Objectives 2. Materials 3. Instructional Sequence 4. Assessment Additional components such as differentiation of instruction, modifications or adaptations for students with special needs, and self-assessment are commonly required.

40

Objectives: Objectives must be written in terms of measurable student learning and aligned with State Learning Goals or district curriculum standards. School districts, mentor teachers, college supervisors or professors may require the teacher candidate to specifically identify the State goal, standard, or benchmark. Others may require identification of the type (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) or level (e.g., application, comprehension, etc.) of the learning objective. Materials: A list of needed materials, including technology, standard student materials, page numbers, is always required. As an organizational tool, this section of the lesson plan may vary widely by subject area. Instructional Sequence: A detailed sequence of instructional activities with an introduction and closure are required. Other common aspects of this sequence that may be required are guided practice or providing a rationale for the lesson. Specific questions may be required for each part of the sequence. An instructional sequence always begins with an introduction [a preview, advance organizer, or connection between prior knowledge and what is to be learned] and ends with a closing [a summary or overview of what has been learned]. Assessments: Assessment(s) aligned with the learning objective(s) is required. One comprehensive assessment may measure and evaluate all the objectives, or there may be one or more assessments per objective. Some faculty members ask the teacher candidates to label assessment types (formative, summative, diagnostic, performance, etc.) or attach the actual assessments to the plan.

NOTE. Diagnostic assessments are used as evaluation tools of student prior knowledge or current competencies for planning instruction. Formative assessments evaluate learning in progress. Summative assessments are used as final evaluation tools at the completion of an instructional goal.

Basic Components versus Faculty Requirements for Lesson Plans The basic 4 components for lesson plans will not vary across courses or among faculty members. However, faculty members will require different types of lesson planning in their courses and field supervision because of their different areas of expertise and the content areas of their courses. The 4 basic guidelines are a minimal standard for lesson planning. Learning different lesson plan formats is important because (a) some teacher candidates need more opportunities and more extensive planning to acquire and demonstrate their knowledge and skills proficiently, and (b) a variety of planning formats and components will help teacher candidates determine which are most effective for them. It is not uncommon, for the same college supervisor to have student teachers submitting very different lesson plans, depending on their development as teachers and their classroom settings. At the same time, it is not uncommon for a college supervisor to require some student teachers to write comprehensive plans for each instructional activity, while other student teachers are scaffolded in writing less comprehensive lesson plans because they no longer need the written detail. Lesson planning is a critical area of pedagogical knowledge that requires unique components in the development of a new teacher.

41

Rationale for Written Lesson Plans

Your mentor teacher or cooperating teacher might have forgotten how important written lesson plans are for a new teacher. Please share this rationale with your mentor as well as a copy of the previous lesson planning guidelines.

Classroom management and organization are two of the most challenging areas for new teachers. However, well-planned lessons are a major way to PREVENT classroom management problems. Careful planning helps teachers implement instruction more effectively because they have mentally practiced the plan and have anticipated the students' needs. Written lesson plans help new teachers develop self-reflection skills. As you write new lessons, you consider past lessons and improve upon them. Also, as you complete lessons, you have a written record to which you may add notes and comments as you reflect upon each success or area for improvement. Written lesson plans provide a record that you can use in future teaching and planning activities. They are "professional logs" of objectives, materials, activities, and assessments. They also are records that mentors and administrators can use to provide you with feedback and for you to use in documenting your growth in teaching. Written lesson plans are a necessary part of collaborative and professional responsibilities. They are communication tools among colleagues who are co-teaching that help coordinate efforts (i.e., "Who will do what when?"). Plans also are necessary for substitute teachers so the students' learning is not interrupted in a teacher's absence. Written lesson plans improve student learning because all students' needs are given careful consideration in the preparation of plans: modifications are noted, instruction is differentiated, and alternative approaches are considered. They also reflect instruction and assessment that are aligned with curriculum goals. Well-written lesson plans reflect your resourcefulness and creativity as a teacher. They also demonstrate a high level of commitment to students. The extra time and efforts you spend on planning, not only improve your teaching and your students' learning, but they show that you are committed to excellence in teaching.

======================================

adapted from Kellough, R. D., & Roberts, P. L. (1991). A resource guide for elementary school teaching: Planning for competence (3rd ed.). New York: Macmillan College Publishing.

42

INSTRUCTION INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY

Instructional Delivery Artifact Summary Sheet

The candidate demonstrates an understanding of and valuing of how students differ in their learning approaches by creating learning opportunities adapted to the diverse needs of all students. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #3 and Artifacts Elementary Content Standard #9 6A.understands the cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning and how these processes can be stimulated. 6B.understands principles and techniques, along with advantages and limitations, associated with various instructional strategies. 6C.knows how to enhance learning through the use of a wide variety of materials as well as human and technological resources. 6D.understands the disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to learning and how they relate to life and career experiences. 6E.knows techniques for modifying instructional methods, materials, and the environment to facilitate learning for students with disabilities and/or diverse learning characteristics. 6F.evaluates how to achieve learning goals, choosing alternative teaching strategies and materials to achieve different instructional purposes and to meet students' needs. 6G.uses multiple teaching and learning strategies to engage students in active learning opportunities that promote the development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance capabilities and that help students assume responsibility for identifying and using learning resources. 6H.monitors and adjusts strategies in response to learners' feedback.

6I.varies his or her role in the instructional process as instructor, facilitator, coach, or audience in relation to the content and purposes of instruction and the needs of students. 6J.develops a variety of clear, accurate presentations and representations of concepts, using alternative explanations to assist students' understanding and presenting diverse perspectives to encourage critical thinking.

43

6K.uses a wide range of instructional technologies to enhance students' learning.

6L.develops curriculum that demonstrates an interconnection between subject areas that will reflect life and career experiences. 6M.uses strategies and techniques for facilitating meaningful inclusion of individuals with disabilities.

6N.uses technology appropriately to accomplish instructional objectives.

6O.adapts the general curriculum and uses instructional strategies and materials according to characteristics of the learner. 6P.implements and evaluates individual learning objectives.

44

INSTRUCTION LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Learning Environment Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #5 and Elementary Content Standard #11 5A.understands principles of and strategies for effective classroom management. Artifacts

5B.understands how individuals influence groups and how groups function in society.

5C.understands how to help students work cooperatively and productively in groups.

5D.understands factors that influence motivation and engagement and how to help students become selfmotivated.

5E.knows procedures for inventorying the instructional environment to determine when and how best to meet a student's individual needs.

5F.knows applicable statutes, rules and regulations, procedural safeguards, and ethical considerations regarding planning and implementing behavioral change programs for individuals with disabilities. 5G.knows strategies for intervening in situations to prevent crises from developing or escalating.

5H.knows environmental arrangements that promote positive behavior and learning for students with diverse learning characteristics.

45

5I.maintains proper classroom decorum.

5J.maximizes the amount of class time spent in learning by creating expectations and processes for communication and behavior along with a physical setting conducive to achieving classroom goals. 5K.uses strategies to create a smoothly functioning learning community in which students assume responsibility for themselves and one another, participate in decision-making, work collaboratively and independently, use appropriate technology, and engage in purposeful learning activities. 5L.analyzes the classroom environment and makes decisions to enhance social relationships, students' motivation and engagement in productive work through mutual respect, cooperation, and support for one another. 5M.organizes, allocates, and manages time, materials, and physical space to provide active and equitable engagement of students in productive tasks.

5N.engages students in and monitors individual and group learning activities that help them develop the motivation to achieve.

5O.demonstrates a variety of effective behavior management techniques appropriate to the needs of all students, including those with disabilities (including implementing the least intrusive intervention consistent with the needs of these students). 5P.modifies the learning environment (including the schedule and physical arrangement) to facilitate appropriate behaviors and learning for students with diverse learning characteristics. 5Q.uses a variety of approaches to promote social interaction between students with disabilities and students without disabilities.

5R.uses effective methods for teaching social skill development in all students.

46

ASSESSMENT

Elementary Education Program Objective #3. Assessment. Use multiple and appropriate formal and informal assessment strategies to measure and evaluate the continuous intellectual and social development of all learners and plan for future learning experiences. [aligned with INTASC Principle #8; NCATE/ACEI Assessment, 4;State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #8; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #14; and Department Objective #5]

Assessment Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #8 and Elementary Content Standard #14 8A.understands assessment as a means of evaluating how students learn, what they know and are able to do in meeting the Illinois Learning Standards, and what kinds of experiences will support their further growth and development. 8B.understands the purposes, characteristics, and limitations of different kinds of assessments. Artifacts

8C.understands measurement theory and assessmentrelated issues, such as validity, reliability, bias, and scoring. 8D.understands how to use the results of assessment to reflect on and modify teaching.

8E.understands how to select, construct, and use assessment strategies and instruments for diagnosis and evaluation of learning and instruction. 8F.knows legal provisions, regulations, and guidelines regarding assessment (and inclusion in statewide assessments) of individuals with disabilities. 8G.knows methods for monitoring progress of individuals with disabilities.

47

8H.knows strategies that consider the influence of diversity and disability on assessment, eligibility, programming, and placement of students with disabilities. 8I.uses assessment results to diagnose students' learning needs, align and modify instruction, and design teaching strategies. 8J.appropriately uses a variety of formal and informal assessments to evaluate the understanding, progress, and performance of the individual student and the class as a whole. 8K.involves students in self-assessment activities to help them become aware of their strengths and needs and encourages them to establish goals for learning. 8L.maintains useful and accurate records of students' work and performance and communicates students' progress knowledgeably and responsibly to students', parents and colleagues. 8M.uses appropriate technologies to monitor and assess students' progress.

8N.collaborates with families and other professionals involved in the assessment of individuals with disabilities. 8O.uses various types of assessment procedures appropriately, including the adaptation of procedures for individual students in specific contexts. 8P.uses technology appropriately in conducting assessments and interpreting results.

8Q.uses assessment strategies and devices, which are nondiscriminatory and take into consideration the impact of disabilities, methods of communication, cultural background, and primary language on measuring knowledge and performance of students.

48

COMMUNICATION LANGUAGE ARTS STANDARDS TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS

Elementary Education Program Objective #8. Communication Skills Use effective written, verbal, nonverbal, visual and electronic communication to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom and in professional development. [aligned with INTASC Principle #6; NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3e; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #7; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #13; and Department Objectives #3 & 9]

The communication indicators within the Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #7 overlap with the Elementary Content Standard for Language Arts #2, the core Language Arts Standards [in this section], as well as other Illinois Professional Teaching Standards. This overlap is illustrated on the outcomes summary sheet on the next page. Candidates should document artifacts for the Communications section of their portfolios using the Language Arts summary sheets and verification sheets for the Technology outcomes.

49

Communication Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, non-verbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #7 and Elementary Content Standard #13 7A.understands communication theory, language development, and the role of language in learning. 7B.understands how cultural and gender differences can affect communication in the classroom. 7C.understands the social, intellectual, and political implications of language use and how they influence meaning. 7D.understands the importance of audience and purpose when selecting ways to communicate ideas. 7E.models accurate, effective communication when conveying ideas and information and when asking questions and responding to students. 7F.uses effective questioning techniques and stimulates discussion in different ways for specific instructional purposes. 7G.creates varied opportunities for all students to use effective written, verbal, non-verbal, and visual communication. 7H.communicates with and challenges students in a supportive manner and provides students with constructive feedback. 7I.uses a variety of communication modes to effectively communicate with a diverse student population. Same as or similar to artifacts for the following indicators)

Language Arts Standard 1A Illinois Professional Teaching Standard (Diversity) 3B & 3C Language Arts Standard 3D Illinois Professional Teaching Standard (Diversity) 3C Language Arts Standard 3D Language Arts Standard 3A Language Arts Standard 1D Language Arts Standard 2C Language Arts Standard 1F Language Arts Standard 3E Language Arts Standard 1E Language Arts Standard 3B, 3E, & 3G

Illinois Professional Teaching Standard (Assessment) 8Q Language Arts Standard 1C & 1G Language Arts Standard 2E Language Arts Standard 3E 7J.practices effective listening, conflict resolution, and Language Arts Standard 2H

group-facilitation skills as a team member. 7K.communicates using a variety of communication tools to enrich learning opportunities.

Language Arts Elementary Content Indicator 2K Language Arts Standard 3F

50

LANGUAGE ARTS STANDARDS

Illinois Core Language Arts Standards

STANDARD 1 All teachers must know a broad range of literacy techniques and strategies for every aspect of communication and must be able to develop each student's ability to read, write, speak and listen to his or her potential within the demands of the discipline. STANDARD 2 All teachers should model effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills during their direct and indirect instructional activities. The most important communicator in the classroom is the teacher, who should model English language arts skills. STANDARD 3 All teachers should give constructive instruction and feedback to students in both written and oral contexts while being aware of diverse learner needs. Teachers should effectively provide a variety of instructional strategies, constructive feedback, criticism, and improvement strategies.

Documentation of Language Arts Outcomes A completed language arts section of this portfolio should include the following components: 1. Documentation of artifacts on the Language Arts Standards summary sheets for each standard [see the following pages]. 2. The same artifact(s) may be used to demonstrate multiple indicators across standards. Note. These artifacts may be placed in a different section of the portfolio or as part of an appendix. 3. Once the majority of indicators have been documented, any member of the Faculty in the Department of Education (advisors, professors, or college supervisors) may verify the completion of the standard. The professor signing for the standard should initial all indicators that were used in satisfying the standard. All verification signatures should be completed prior to portfolio checkpoint interviews. 4. Candidates should continue to document additional indicators after a standard has been verified. Completion of all indicators for the three language standards is evidence of a distinguished level of performance at exit from the program (Checkpoint #3).

51

Language Arts Standard #1

All teachers must know a broad range of literacy techniques and strategies for every aspect of communication and must be able to develop each student's ability to read, write, speak and listen to his or her potential within the demands of the discipline.

Indicator[4 of 7 required for completion] Artifact description Artifact location

3A Understands and can articulate the needs for literacy development in general and in specific disciplines or at specific grade levels. Initial__________ 3B Understands effective literacy techniques to activate prior student knowledge and build schema to enhance comprehension of "text. Initial__________ 3C Knows strategies and techniques for teaching communication skills to those students whose first language is not English. Initial__________ 3D Practices effectively the language processes of reading, writing, and oral communication in the daily classroom exchange between student and teacher, between student and student, between teacher and "text" and between student and "text. Initial__________ 3E Practices effective literacy techniques to make reading purposeful and meaningful. Initial__________ 3F Practices effective questioning and discussion techniques to extend content knowledge acquired from "text. Initial__________ 3G Uses a variety of "text" and research resources with students in an attempt to enhance student learning from reading, learning from writing, and learning from oral communication. Initial__________ Verification requires completion of the majority of indicators (4 of 7). Initial each indicator being verified.

Standard verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name:

52

Language Arts Standard #2

All teachers should model effective reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills during their direct and indirect instructional activities. The most important communicator in the classroom is the teacher, who should model English language arts skills.

Indicator[5 of 8 required for completion] Artifact description Artifact location

2A Knows and understands the rules of English grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and syntax for both written and oral contexts. Initial__________ 2B Understands how to communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes. Initial__________ 2C Models the rules of English grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and syntax in both written and oral contexts. Initial__________ 2D Reads, understands, and clearly conveys ideas from texts or other supplementary materials. Initial__________ 2E Writes and speaks in a well-organized and coherent manner that adapts to the individual needs of readers/listeners. Initial__________ 2F Expresses ideas orally with explanations, examples, and support in a clear, succinct style. Initial__________ 2G Helps students understand a variety of modes of writing (persuasive, descriptive, informative, and narrative). Initial__________ 2H Listens well. Initial__________ Verification requires completion of the majority of indicators (5 of 8). Initial each indicator being verified.

Standard verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name:

53

Language Arts Standard #3

All teachers should give constructive instruction and feedback to students in both written and oral contexts while being aware of diverse learner needs. Teachers should effectively provide a variety of instructional strategies, constructive feedback, criticism, and improvement strategies.

Indicator[4 of 7 required for completion] Artifact description Artifact location

3A Understands how to analyze an audience to determine culturally appropriate communication strategies to share ideas effectively in both written and oral formats with students and their families, other faculty and administrators and the community and business in general. Initial__________ 3B Understands how to use diverse instructional strategies and assessments that include an appropriate balance of lecture, discussion, activity, and written and oral work. Initial__________ 3C Analyzes content materials to determine appropriate strategies and techniques to create successful learning through reading, writing, speaking and listening. Initial__________ 3D Assists students whose communication skills may be impeded by learning, language, and/or cultural differences, especially those whose first language is not English. Initial__________ 3E Conducts effective classroom discussions by managing groups, asking questions, eliciting and probing responses, and summarizing for comprehension. Initial__________ 3F Uses a variety of media to enhance and supplement instruction. Initial__________ 3G Uses multi-disciplinary instructional approaches. Initial__________ Verification requires completion of the majority of indicators (4 of 7). Initial each indicator being verified.

Standard verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

54

TECHNOLOGY

In this portfolio section the teacher candidate documents technology competencies to demonstrate growth and proficiency of technology integration in classroom instruction. The final two pages of this section provide a sample of the "Technology Assessment Rubric," which must be completed and signed by the College Supervisor during the clinical/student teaching term and submitted for Checkpoint #3. All candidates for certification must evidence a proficient or distinguished level of performance on each of the 8 technology standards to be recommended for certification. All documented competencies are aligned with the Illinois Technology Standards for Teachers and the following Department Objectives: The primary purpose of the Department of Education is to prepare teachers who will be able to: Apply professional knowledge, competencies, and skills in the actual classroom setting. Acquire and use new information through review and synthesis of current research, methodology, technology, materials, techniques, and strategies in order to develop and implement an integrative, holistic curriculum. Use a variety of methods, strategies, techniques, and technologies to assess students' needs and learning; individualizing instruction to plan for and prize the uniqueness of each student.

55

Illinois Core Technology Standards

In addition to the State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standards and Language Arts Standards, there are eight general areas of technology standards for all teachers as follow: STANDARD 1 - Basic Computer/Technology Operations and Concepts

The competent teacher will use computer systems to run software; to access, generate, and manipulate data; and to publish results. He or she will also evaluate performance of hardware and software components of computer systems and apply basic troubleshooting strategies as needed.

STANDARD 2 - Personal and Professional Use of Technology

The competent teacher will apply tools for enhancing personal professional growth and productivity; will use technology in communicating, collaborating, conducting research, and solving problems and will promote equitable, ethical, and legal use of computer/technology resources.

STANDARD 3 - Application of Technology in Instruction

The competent teacher will apply learning technologies that support instruction in their grade level and subject areas. He or she must plan and deliver instructional units that integrate a variety of software, applications, and learning tools. Lessons developed must reflect effective grouping and assessment strategies for diverse populations.

STANDARD 4 - Social, Ethical and Human Issues

The competent teacher will apply concepts and skills in making decisions concerning the social, ethical, and human issues related to computing and technology. The competent teacher will understand the changes in information technologies, their effects on workplace and society, their potential to address lifelong learning and workplace needs, and the consequences of misuse.

STANDARD 5 - Productivity Tools

The competent teacher will integrate advanced features of technology-based productivity tools to support instruction, extend communication outside the classroom, enhance classroom management, perform administrative routines more effectively, and become more productive in daily tasks.

STANDARD 6 - Telecommunications and Information Access

The competent teacher will use telecommunications and information-access resources to support instruction.

STANDARD 7 - Research, Problem Solving, and Product Development.

The competent teacher will use computers and other technologies in research, problem solving, and product development. The competent teacher will appropriately use a variety of media, presentation, and authoring packages; plan and participate in team and collaborative projects that require critical analysis and evaluation; and present products developed.

STANDARD 8 - Information Literacy Skills:

The competent teacher will develop information literacy skills to be able to access, evaluate and use information to improve teaching and learning.

56

Completion of Department of Education Technology Requirements

A completed technology section should include the following 4 components organized for easy identification: 1. Documentation of indicators. Competencies must be documented for all eight knowledge indicators and the minimum number of performance indicators with appropriate artifacts at three checkpoints: Portfolio Checkpoint #1: Prior to Admission to Program

unsatisfactory

Does not meet basic number and types of indicators.

basic

2 knowledge & 2 performance indicators

proficient

3 knowledge & 3 performance indicators

distinguished

4 or more knowledge & 4 or more performance indicators

Portfolio Checkpoint #2: Prior to Student Teaching/Clinical Semester

unsatisfactory

Does not meet basic number and types of indicators.

basic

Fulfills two standards prior to clinical semester.

proficient

Fulfills three-four standards prior to clinical semester.

distinguished

Fulfills 5 or more standards prior to clinical semester.

Portfolio Checkpoint #3: Exit from Student Teaching/Clinical Semester

The final number of competencies are denoted on the "Technology Assessment Rubric" unsatisfactory basic* proficient

Does not demonstrate acceptable competence on a sufficient number of knowledge and performance indicators for each standard. Demonstrates competence on the knowledge indicator and less than half of the performance indicators for each standard. Demonstrates competence on the knowledge indicator and a preponderance of the performance indicators for each standard.

distinguished

Demonstrates competence on all indicators (knowledge and performance) for each standard.

*A "basic" level of performance is not accepted for a "pass" on portfolio checkpoint #3.

Each standard is divided into individual indicator verification "boxes." The teacher candidate should complete all information in a box, including printing the professor's or mentor teacher's name who observed the indicator being demonstrated. Artifacts should be maintained for each indicator. If an artifact is not possible, the professor or mentor should sign and date the specific indicator box. Artifacts that are evidence for technology indicators may be organized in an appendix or in other sections of the program portfolio. 2. Verification of the documentation. When a candidate completes a standard at the proficient or distinguished level, a professor should verify the standard. All indicators should be initialed if they are completely documented and sufficient evidence has been provided.* If the knowledge indicator ("A") and the appropriate number of performance indicators have been successfully demonstrated, the professor signs and dates the bottom of the standard. *"Sufficient evidence" may be an artifact or a verification signature and date by another professor or mentor teacher for an indicator. Separate verification sheets signed by professors for multiple indicators in their courses also may be used.

57

3. References for all verification signatures. A "Technology Reference List" that includes the names, titles/positions, institutions/companies, and contact e-mail addresses or phone numbers for all persons verifying competencies should be included and updated at each checkpoint. A sample is provided. 4. Final assessment rubric. The completed "Technology Assessment Rubric" signed and dated by the college supervisor at Checkpoint #3. A sample is provided. Also Recommended: A Technology Philosophy Statement on the integration of technology in the classroom that reflects applications in your areas of certification, including components of 1F, 4A, 4B, & 4C. EDU 112 ­ Educational Technology ­ is a one-credit elective course that is highly recommended for all teacher candidates. The course provides the learning opportunities for the majority of the technology indicators and the course professor verifies each of these indicators. BASIC DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES AND FORMATTING REQUIREMENTS Format guidelines and templates are included in these technology materials. However, teacher candidates are encouraged to adapt these forms on personal computers or create similar forms that include all relevant information. These materials are available on the Department of Education web site and program Blackboard pages. · · · Forms may be adapted or created using applicable software. Only College or school-based faculty and staff may verify technology indicators or standards. This "Technology Section" of the program portfolio should be completed and submitted to the College Supervisor before the last day of student teaching. It is the student teacher's responsibility to present the technology standards to the college supervisor by the last observation. Proficiency in all 8 Technology Standards is a requirement of Portfolio Checkpoint #3. Applications for certification will not be issued until all student teaching requirements are completed successfully, including verification at a "proficient" level or higher for each technology standard. A Department of Education letter attesting to a teacher candidate's level of technology competency will be made available with the official teaching certificate application at the end of student teaching.

· ·

·

58

How to Document Technology Competencies

Within each of the eight technology standards, there are two types of indicators: one knowledge indicators and two or more performance indicators. Indicators require complete documentation that include: date (e.g.., March 16, 2004); location (e.g., Sandburg Middle School), activity/artifact (e.g., 8th grade social studies reports using PowerPoint, see Appendix G), and professor/mentor who can verify the indicator (e.g., Ms. Jennifer Swain). The information should be documented using a format similar the verification boxes that identify the specific indicator.

Knowledge Indicator 1A [required]: Understands how to run computer software; access, generate and manipulate data; and publish results. Date: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

The same artifact may be used to represent multiple indicators.

Performance Indicators [3 of 5 required] 1B. Operates a multimedia computer system with related peripheral devices to successfully install and use a variety of software packages. Date: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

School-based mentors who verify indicators should sign and date the individual indicator box. Professors may verify indicators by: · Signing and dating the appropriate indicator box, or · Providing a separate verification form for their courses (if so, these should be referenced in each indicator box by the teacher candidate and maintained as an artifact), or · Signing and dating a standard upon its completion. Artifacts may be placed in an appendix or in other sections of the portfolio. Candidates should identify an artifact's location as part of its description. The same artifact may be used to demonstrate knowledge or skills across indicators and standards for any section of a program portfolio.

59

Final Requirements for Proficiency in Technology

By the completion of the clinical/student teaching term, Elmhurst College teacher candidates must have documented completion of the following: · All eight knowledge indicators (one in each standard), and · The minimum number of performance indicators as identified below to satisfy a "proficient level of performance." REQUIREMENT 1 - Basic Computer/Technology Operations and Concepts

5 performance indicators: 2 or fewer does not meet requirement 3-4 satisfies proficient requirement 5 fulfills standard

REQUIREMENT 2 - Personal and Professional Use of Technology

10 performance indicators: 4 or fewer does not meet requirement 5-9 satisfies proficient requirement 10 fulfills standard

REQUIREMENT 3 - Application of Technology in Instruction

5 performance indicators: 4 or fewer does not meet requirement N/A satisfies proficient requirement 5 fulfills standard

REQUIREMENT 4 - Social, Ethical and Human Issues

2 performance indicators: 0 or fewer does not meet requirement 1 satisfies proficient requirement 2 fulfills standard

REQUIREMENT 5 - Productivity Tools

7 performance indicators: 3 or fewer does not meet requirement 4-6 satisfies proficient requirement 7 fulfills standard

REQUIREMENT 6 - Telecommunications and Information Access

3 performance indicators: 1 or fewer does not meet requirement 2 satisfies proficient requirement 3 fulfills standard

REQUIREMENT 7 - Research, Problem Solving, and Product Development. 11 performance indicators: 5 or fewer 6-10 does not meet satisfies requirement proficient requirement REQUIREMENT 8 - Information Literacy Skills: 4 performance indicators: 1 or fewer does not meet requirement

11 fulfills standard

2-3 satisfies proficient requirement

4 fulfills standard

60

STANDARD 1 ­

Basic Computer/Technology Operations and Concepts

The competent teacher will use computer systems to run software; to access, generate, and manipulate data; and to publish results. He or she will also evaluate performance of hardware and software components of computer systems and apply basic troubleshooting strategies as needed. Knowledge Indicator 1A [required]: Understands how to run computer software; access, generate and manipulate data; and publish results. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [3 of 5 required] 1B. Operates a multimedia computer system with related peripheral devices to successfully install and use a variety of software packages. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 1C. Uses appropriate terminology related to computers and technology in written and oral communications. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 1D. Describes and implements basic troubleshooting techniques for multimedia computer systems with related peripheral devices. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 1E. Uses imaging devices such as scanners, digital cameras, and/or video cameras with computer systems and software. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 1F. Demonstrates knowledge of uses of computers and technology in education, business and industry, and society. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

61

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #1 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name:

62

STANDARD 2 ­

Personal and Professional Use of Technology

The competent teacher will apply tools for enhancing personal professional growth and productivity; use technology in communicating, collaborating, conducting research, and solving problems and will promote equitable, ethical, and legal use of computer/technology resources. Knowledge Indicator 2A [required]: Understands how to use technology in communicating, collaborating, conducting research, and solving problems. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [5 of 9 required]: 2B. Identifies computer and other related technology resources for facilitating lifelong learning and emerging roles of the learner and the educator in engaged, collaborative learning environments. Date demonstrated: Location: Description activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2C. Uses computers and other learning technologies to support problem solving, data collection, information management, communications, presentations, and decision making. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2D. Uses productivity tools for word processing, database management, and spreadsheet applications, and basic multi-media presentations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2E. Uses computer-based technologies including telecommunications to access information and enhance personal and professional productivity. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

63

2F. Demonstrates awareness of resources for adaptive/assistive devices for students with special needs. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2G. Demonstrates knowledge of ethical & legal issues concerning use of computers & technology. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2H. Adheres to copyright laws & guidelines in the access & use of information from various technologies. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2I. Demonstrates knowledge of broadcast instruction, audio/video conferencing, & other distant learning applications. Date demonstrated: Location: Description activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 2J. Ensures policies and practices are in place to provide equal access to media and technology resources for students regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion or socioeconomic status. Date demonstrated: Location: Description activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #2 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

64

STANDARD 3 ­

Application of Technology in Instruction

The competent teacher will apply learning technologies that support instruction in their grade level and subject areas. He or she must plan and deliver instructional units that integrate a variety of software, applications, and learning tools. Lessons developed must reflect effective grouping and assessment strategies for diverse populations. Knowledge Indicator 3A [required]: Understands how to apply learning technologies that support instruction in their grade level and subject areas. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [5 of 5 required]: 3B. Explores, evaluates, and uses computer/technology resources including applications, tools, educational software, and associated documentation. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3C. Describes current instructional principles, research, and appropriate assessment practices as related to the use of computers and technology resources in the curriculum. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3D. Designs, implements and assesses student learning activities that integrate computers/technology for a variety of student grouping strategies and for diverse student populations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3E. Practices socially responsible, ethical, and legal use of technology, information, and software resources. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3F. Designs student learning activities that foster equitable, ethical, and legal use of technology by students. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

65

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #3 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

66

STANDARD 3 ­

ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION Application of Technology in Instruction

Candidates who have documented more than one lesson in which student learning activities were integrated with different forms of technology should document them below as evidence of a distinguished level of performance. 3D. Designs, implements and assesses student learning activities that integrate computers/technology for a variety of student grouping strategies and for diverse student populations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3D. Designs, implements and assesses student learning activities that integrate computers/technology for a variety of student grouping strategies and for diverse student populations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3D. Designs, implements and assesses student learning activities that integrate computers/technology for a variety of student grouping strategies and for diverse student populations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3D. Designs, implements and assesses student learning activities that integrate computers/technology for a variety of student grouping strategies and for diverse student populations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 3D. Designs, implements and assesses student learning activities that integrate computers/technology for a variety of student grouping strategies and for diverse student populations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #3 Additional Artifacts verified by:________________________________ date:________

Printed name

67

STANDARD 4 ­

Social, Ethical and Human Issues

The competent teacher will apply concepts and skills in making decisions concerning the social, ethical, and human issues related to computing and technology. The competent teacher will understand the changes in information technologies, their effects on workplace and society, their potential to address lifelong learning and workplace needs, and the consequences of misuse. Knowledge Indicator 4A [required]: Understands the social, ethical, and human issues related to computing and technology. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Performance Indicators [1 of 2 required]: 4B. Describes the historical development and important trends affecting the evolution of technology and its probable future roles in society. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

4C. Describes strategies for facilitating consideration of ethical, legal and human issues involving school purchasing and policy decisions. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #4 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

68

STANDARD 5 ­

Productivity Tools

The competent teacher will integrate advanced features of technology-based productivity tools to support instruction, extend communication outside the classroom, enhance classroom management, perform administrative routines more effectively, and become more productive in daily tasks. Knowledge Indicator 5A [required]: Knows advanced features of technology-based productivity tools. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [4 of 7 required]: 5B. Uses advanced features of word processing, desktop publishing, graphics programs and utilities to develop professional products. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 5C. Uses spreadsheets for analyzing, organizing and displaying numeric data graphically. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 5D. Designs and manipulates databases and generates customized reports. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 5E. Uses teacher utility and classroom management tools to design solutions for a specific purpose. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 5F. Identifies, selects and integrates video and digital images in varying formats for use in presentations, publications and/or other products. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

69

5G. Applies specific-purpose electronic devices (such as a graphing calculator, language translator, scientific probeware, or electronic thesaurus) in appropriate content areas.

Date demonstrated: Description of activity or artifact:

Location:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 5H. Uses features of applications that integrate word processing, database, spreadsheet, communication and other tools. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #5 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

70

STANDARD 6 ­

Telecommunications and Information Access

The competent teacher will use telecommunications and information-access resources to support instruction. Knowledge Indicator 6A [required]: Knows how to access telecommunications resources to support instruction. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [2 of 3 required]: 6B. Accesses and uses telecommunications tools and resources for information sharing, remote information access and retrieval, and multimedia/hypermedia publishing. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 6C. Uses electronic mail and web browser applications for communications and for research to support instruction. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 6D. Uses automated, on-line search tools and intelligent agents to identify and index desired information resources. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #6 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

71

STANDARD 7 ­

Research, Problem Solving, and Product Development.

The competent teacher will use computers and other technologies in research, problem solving, and product development. The competent teacher will appropriately use a variety of media, presentation, and authoring packages; plan and participate in team and collaborative projects that require critical analysis and evaluation; and present products developed. Knowledge Indicator 7A [required]: Understands how to use computers and other technologies in research, problem solving, and product development. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [6 of 11 required]: 7B. Identifies basic principles of instructional design associated with the development of multimedia and hypermedia learning materials. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7C. Develops simple hypermedia and multimedia products that apply basic instructional design principles. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7D. Selects appropriate tools for communicating concepts, conducting research, and solving problems for an intended audience and purpose. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7E. Identifies examples of emerging programming, authoring, or problem solving environments. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact: Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7F. Collaborates with on-line workgroups to build bodies of knowledge around specific topics. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

72

7G. Uses a computer projection device to support and deliver oral presentations. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7H. Designs and publishes simple on-line documents that present information and include links to critical resources. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7I. Develops instructional units that involve compiling, organizing, analyzing, and synthesizing of information, and uses technology to support these processes. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7J. Conducts research and evaluates on-line sources of information that support and enhance the curriculum. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7K. Makes use of development readings and other resource materials from professional and trade organizations to improve teaching and learning. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 7L. Participates in courses and other professional development activities to enhance teaching and learning. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

73

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #7 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

74

STANDARD 8 ­

Information Literacy Skills

The competent teacher will develop information literacy skills to be able to access, evaluate and use information to improve teaching and learning. Knowledge Indicator 8A [required]: Understands how to access, evaluate and use information to improve teaching and learning. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: Performance Indicators [2 of 4 required]: 8B. Models evaluation and use of information to solve problems and make decisions. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 8C. Expects students to intellectually access, evaluate, and use information to solve problems and make decisions in all subject areas. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 8D. Structures instruction and designs learning tasks and assignments to reflect higher level thinking skills. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator: 8E. Structures and/or facilitates cooperative learning groups as part of students' tasks and assignments. Date demonstrated: Location: Description of activity or artifact:

Professor or Mentor verifying this indicator:

Verification requires completion of the knowledge indicator and a majority of performance. Initial indicators verified.

Standard #8 verified by:___________________________________ date:_______________

Printed name

75

Technology Reference List

For each signature of verification in your technology portfolio, please provide the following information: Name: Position/Title: Institution: Contact phone number/e-mail/or address Examples: Dr. Debra Meyer Professor Elmhurst College 630-617-3545 [email protected] Mr. John Hernandez Mentor Teacher Grant Elementary School PHONE/E-MAIL Ms. Tina Mason Math Department Chair Madison High School PHONE/E-MAIL Dr. Dianne Chambers Associate Professor, Elmhurst College College Supervisor PHONE/E-MAIL Professor Donna Goodwyn Associate Professor, Elmhurst College Educational Technology Instructor PHONE/E-MAIL

76

Technology Summary Checklist

Use this checklist to monitor and self-evaluate your completion of the 8 technology standards.

Number of indicators completed for each technology standard. All "A" indicators must be completed.

Check all indicators that have been verified.

77

STANDARD 1 ­ Basic Computer/Technology Operations and Concepts ___1A ___1B ___1C ___1D ___1E ___1F ___of 6(4) indicators STANDARD 2 ­ Personal and Professional Use of Technology ___2A ___2B ___2C ___2D ___2E ___2F ___2G ___2H ___2I ___2J ___of 10(6) indicators (The numbers in parentheses indicate minimum requirements for proficient level of performance.)

STANDARD 3 - Application of Technology in Instruction ___3A ___3B ___3C ___3D ___3E ___3F ___of 6(6) indicators STANDARD 4 ­ Social, Ethical and Human Issues ___4A ___4B ___4C

___of 3(2) indicators

STANDARD 6 Telecommunications and Information Access ___6A ___6B ___6C ___6D ___of 4(3) indicators STANDARD 7 ­ Research, Problem Solving, and Product Development. ___7A ___7B ___7C ___7D ___7E ___7F ___7G ___7H ___7I ___7J ___7K ___7L ___of 12(7) indicators STANDARD 8 Information Literacy Skills ___8A ___8B ___8C ___8D ___8E ___of 5(3) indicators

STANDARD 5 - Productivity Tools ___5A ___5B ___5C ___5D ___5E ___5F ___5G ___5H ___of 8(5) indicators

78

Numbers in ( ) indicate minimal # of indicators including the knowledge indicator

FINAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PORTFOLIO CHECKPOINT #3 To check your completion of all technology requirements by your college supervisor's last observation visit during student teaching, answer the following questions? All 8 knowledge indicators verified (e.g., 1A, 2A, etc.)? _____No Minimal number of indicators verified in each standard? _____No 5 technology-integrated lessons evidenced in portfolio?* _____No All verification signatures identified on Reference List? _____No

*Artifact requirements are program-specific.

_____Yes _____Yes _____Yes _____Yes

79

TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT RUBRIC 2004-05

Teacher Candidate: Technology verification signatures checked? Each technology indicator fully documented? Technology reference list included? _____Yes _____Yes _____Yes _____No _____No _____No

Each standard contains one knowledge indicator and all candidates must document competence in the knowledge indicator under each of the eight ISBE Core Technology Standards.

Standard 1 Knowledge Indicator Completed #Completed Performance Indicators Level of Performance for Standard (Use numbers)

Standard 2

Standard 3

Standard 4

Standard 5

Standard 6

Standard 7

Standard 8

U= Unsatisfactory (0) Explanation of rubric ratings for each standard:

B=Basic (1)

P=Proficient (2)

D=Distinguished (3)

Unsatisfactory ­ Candidate has not yet demonstrated acceptable competence on a sufficient number of ISBE skill indicators under this standard and/or has not yet demonstrated competence on the knowledge indicator for this standard. (There is one knowledge indicator for each ISBE Core Technology Standard. Competence under this knowledge indicator must be documented in order to exceed the "unsatisfactory" level for each Core Technology Standard.) Basic ­ Candidate has demonstrated competence on the knowledge indicator and less than half of the skill indicators under this standard. Proficient ­ Candidate has demonstrated competence on the knowledge indicator and a preponderance (majority) of the skill indicators under this standard. Distinguished - Candidate has demonstrated competence on the knowledge and all skill indicators under this standard. Candidates must score at the "Proficient" level or above on each of the ISBE Core Technology Standards to successfully complete the Department of Education's technology requirement at the completion of the clinical /student teaching term.

College Supervisor's signature:______________________________________ date:___________ Overall Rating: _____Proficient _____Distinguished

80

Certification Program: ___EARLY CHILDHOOD ___ELEMENTARY ___K-12 ART/ MUSIC/PHY EDU ___ SECONDARY ___SPECIAL EDUCATION

Level Description Expanded Description Level 0 Unsatisfactory Does not yet demonstrate competence on a sufficient number of skill indicators and/or on the knowledge indicator. 1-2 performance indicators: none at an acceptable level 4 or fewer performance indicators: none at an acceptable level Level 1 Basic Demonstrated competence on the knowledge indicator and on less than half of the skill indicators. 1-2 acceptable performance indicators 1-4 acceptable performance indicators Level 2 Proficient Demonstrated competence on the knowledge indicator and on a preponderance of the skill indicators. 3-4 acceptable performance indicators 5-9 acceptable performance indicators Level 3 Distinguished Demonstrated competence on the knowledge indicator and on all skill indicators.

STANDARD #1 Basic Computer Technology Operations and Concepts Knowledge Indicator 1A___ STANDARD #2 Personal and Professional Use Of Technology Knowledge Indicator 2A___ STANDARD #3 Application of Technology in Instruction Knowledge Indicator 3A ___ STANDARD #4 Social, Ethical, and Human Issues Knowledge Indicator 4A__ STANDARD #5 Productivity Tools Knowledge Indicator 5A ___ STANDARD #6 Telecommunications and Information Access Knowledge Indicator 6A ___ STANDARD #7 Research, Problem-Solving, and Product Development Knowledge Indicator 7A ___ STANDARD #8 Information Literacy Skills Knowledge Indicator 8A ___

All 5 performance indicators at an acceptable level All 10 performance indicators at an acceptable level

2 or fewer performance indicators: none at an acceptable level

1-4 acceptable performance indicators

All 5 performance indicators at an acceptable level

Could exceed the required number of artifacts in this category [e.g., > 5 lessons with technology integration]. Both performance indicators at an acceptable level

No performance indicators documented at an acceptable level

Not applicable [only two indicators]

1acceptable performance indicator

3 or fewer performance indicators: none at an acceptable level

1-3 acceptable performance indicators

4-6 acceptable performance indicators

All 7 acceptable performance indicators

1 or no performance indicator: none at an acceptable level

1 acceptable performance indicator

2 acceptable performance indicators

All 3 acceptable performance indicators

5 or fewer performance indicators: none at an acceptable level

1-5 acceptable performance indicators

6-10 acceptable performance indicators

All 11 acceptable performance indicators

1 or no performance indicator: none at an acceptable level

1 acceptable performance indicator

2-3 acceptable performance indicators

All 4 acceptable performance Indicators

Verification signature and the corresponding artifact indicate acceptable levels of performance.

81

E L E M E N T A R Y

E D U C A T I O N

2 0 0 4 - 2 0 0 5

TECHNOLOGY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Teacherworld.com's Top Ten Web Sites for Teachers

Created on January 6, 2004, Listed in alphabetical order AskEric Educator's Reference Desk http://www.eduref.org AskEric has closed and is under revision but this site still contains excellent resources. DiscoverySchool.com http://school.discovery.com Numerous Resources for Teachers! EduHound.com http://www.eduhound.com If you are looking for a HUGE list of web sites for teaching and an excellent FREE subscription to a technology magazine for educators, this is the place! FirstGov.gov http://firstgov.com Links to all government web sites! Google http://www.google.com/ The number one search engine! Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/eval.html Resources for one of the most important activities that teachers can do with children: critical evaluation of web sites. NASA http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html Some of the web's best links and activities for both students and teachers. SearchengineWatch.com http://searchenginewatch.com Everything you wanted to know about searching and search engines! The WebQuest Page http://webquest.sdsu.edu Great resource for bringing the Internet into the schools for the 21st century! US Department of Education http://www.ed.gov/index.jhtml Many excellent resources!

RECOMMENDED BOOKS ON TECHNOLOGY

Barrett, J.R. (2002). Teaching and learning about computers: A classroom guide for teachers, librarians, media specialists, and students. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. Calvert, S.L., Jordan, B, & Cocking, R.R. (Eds.) (2002). Children in the digital age: Influences of electronic media on development. Westport, CN: Praeger, 2002. Casey, J. M. (2000). Creating the early literacy classroom: Activities for using technology to empower elementary students. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited. Curtis, M., et al. (2003). Palm handheld computers: A complete resource for classroom teachers. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education. Firek, H. (2003). 10 easy ways to use technology in the English classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Grabe, M. & Grabe, C. (2004). Integrating technology for meaningful learning. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Healy, J. M. (1998). Failure to connect: How computers affect our children's minds, for better and worse. New York: Simon & Schuster. Jacobson, M.J., & Kozma, R.B. (Eds.) (2000). Innovations in science and mathematics education: Advanced designs for technologies of learning. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. McKenzie, W. (2002). Multiple intelligences and instructional technology: A manual for every mind. Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education. McNabb, M.L. (1999). Technology connections for school improvement: Teacher's guide. Oak Brook, IL: North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. Ormiston, M. J. (2004). Conquering infoclutter: Timesaving technology solutions for teachers. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Shelly, G. B., & Cashman, T.B. (2003). Teachers discovering and integrating Microsoft Office: Essential concepts and techniques. Cambridge, MA: Course Technology. The Alliance for Technology Access. (2002). Computer and web resources for people with disabilities: A guide to exploring today's assistive technology. Alameda, CA: Hunter House Publishers. Thouvenelle, S. & Bewick, C. (2003). Completing the computer puzzle: A guide for early childhood educators. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

83

PROFESSIONALISM COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS REFLECTION & PROFESSIONAL GROWTH PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT & LEADERSHIP

Elementary Education Program Objective #7. Professional, Family & Community Collaboration. Develop and maintain collaborative relationships with colleagues, families, and the community to support student learning and well-being. [aligned with INTASC Principle #10; NCATE/ACEI Instruction, 3e & Professionalism, 5c & 5d; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #9; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #15; and Department Objectives #8, 9, & 11] Elementary Education Program Objective #9. Professional Knowledge & Ethics 9. a. Demonstrate knowledge of the philosophical, historical, social, and psychological foundations of education, including the legal and moral dimensions of instructional decisions and practices. 9. b. Demonstrate standards of professional conduct and ethics through leadership and child advocacy to improve student learning and well-being. [aligned with NCATE/ACEI Professionalism, 5d; State of Illinois Professional Standard #11; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #17; and Department Objectives #3 & 12] Elementary Education Program Objective #10. Professional Development 10. a. Continuously evaluate how choices and actions affect students, families, and other professionals in the learning community. 10. b. Continuously seek opportunities to grow professionally and study their own practice through synthesizing theory, research, and pedagogy. [aligned with INTASC Principle #9; NCATE/ACEI Professionalism, 5a & 5b; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #10; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #16; and Department Objectives #10, 11, & 12] Elementary Education Program Objective #11. Personal Development Demonstrate caring guidance for the learning and development of all children through studentcentered instruction and continuous self-reflection. [aligned with INTASC Principle #9; NCATE/ACEI Professionalism, 5b; State of Illinois Professional Teaching Standard #10; Elementary Education Content Area Standard #16; and Department Objective #12]

84

PROFESSIONALISM COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS

Collaborative Relationships Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support students' learning and well-being. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #9 and Artifacts Elementary Content Standard #15 9A. understands schools as organizations within the larger community context.

9B. understands the benefits, barriers, and techniques involved in parent/family relationships.

9C. understands school- and work-based learning environments and the need for collaboration with business organizations in the community. 9D. understands the collaborative process.

9E. understands collaborative skills, which are necessary to carry out the collaborative process.

9F. understands concerns of parents of individuals with disabilities and knows appropriate strategies to collaborate with parents in addressing these concerns. 9G. understands roles of individuals with disabilities, parents, teachers, and other school and community personnel in planning individualized education programs for students with disabilities. 9H. initiates collaboration with others and creates situations where collaboration with others will enhance students' learning. 9I. works with colleagues to develop an effective learning climate within the school.

9J. participates in collaborative decision-making and problem-solving with other professionals to achieve success for students.

85

9K. develops relationships with parents and guardians to acquire an understanding of the students' lives outside of the school in a professional manner that is fair and equitable. 9L. works effectively with parents/guardians and other members of the community from diverse home and community situations and seeks to develop cooperative partnerships in order to promote students' learning and well-being. 9M. identifies and uses community resources to enhance students' learning and to provide opportunities for students to explore career opportunities. 9N. collaborates in the development of comprehensive individualized education programs for students with disabilities. 9O. coordinates and/or collaborates in directing the activities of a classroom para-educator, volunteer, or peer tutor. 9P. collaborates with the student and family in setting instructional goals and charting progress of students with disabilities. 9Q. communicates with team members about characteristics and needs of individuals with specific disabilities. 9R. implements and monitors individual students' programs, working in collaboration with team members. 9S. plan. demonstrates the ability to co-teach and co-

Note. Collaboration should be demonstrated in two different contexts: with other educational professionals and (2) with families and the school community.

86

PROFESSIONALISM REFLECTION & PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

Reflection & Professional Growth Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #10 Artifacts and Elementary Content Standard #16 10A. understands that reflection is an integral part of professional growth and improvement of instruction. 10B. understands methods of inquiry that provide for a variety of self-assessment and problem-solving strategies for reflecting on practice. 10C. understands major areas of research on the learning process and resources that are available for professional development. 10D. understands teachers' attitudes and behaviors that positively or negatively influence behavior of individuals with disabilities. 10E. uses classroom observation, information about students, pedagogical knowledge, and research as sources for active reflection, evaluation, and revision of practice. 10F. collaborates with other professionals as resources for problem-solving, generating new ideas, sharing experiences, and seeking and giving feedback. 10G. participates in professional dialogue and continuous learning to support his/her own development as a learner and a teacher. 10H. actively seeks and collaboratively shares a variety of instructional resources with colleagues. 10I. assesses his or her own needs for knowledge and skills related to teaching students with disabilities and seeks assistance and resources.

Professional development experiences must be represented by more than a certificate of participation. The Candidate also should evidence that professional development was implemented in practice.

87

PROFESSIONALISM PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT & LEADERSHIP

Within this section of the portfolio, candidates should present evidence of their commitment to students, the ethic of caring, and advocacy for all students and their families, as well as for the profession.

Professional Conduct & Leadership Artifact Summary Sheet

The competent teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve students' learning and well-being. State of Illinois Indicators for IPTS Standard #11 Artifacts and Elementary Content Standard #17 11A. understands the unique characteristics of education as a profession. 11B. understands how school systems are organized and operate. 11C. 11D. understands school policies and procedures. understands legal issues in education.

11E. understands the importance of active participation and leadership in professional organizations. 11F. is familiar with the rights of students with disabilities. 11G. knows the roles and responsibilities of teachers, parents, students, and other professionals related to special education. 11H. knows identification and referral procedures for students with disabilities. 11I. contributes knowledge and expertise about teaching and learning to the profession. 11J. follows codes of professional conduct and exhibits knowledge and expectations of current legal directives. 11K. follows school policy and procedures, respecting the boundaries of professional responsibilities, when working with students, colleagues, and families. 11L. initiates and develops educational projects and programs.

88

11M. actively participates in or leads in such activities as curriculum development, staff development, and student organizations. 11N. participates, as appropriate, in policy design and development at the local level, with professional organizations, and/or with community organizations. 11O. demonstrates commitment to developing the highest educational and quality-of-life potential of individuals with disabilities. 11P. demonstrates positive regard for individual students and their families regardless of culture, religion, gender, and sexual orientation. 11Q. promotes and maintains a high level of integrity in the practice of the profession. 11R. complies with local, State, and federal monitoring and evaluation requirements related to students with disabilities. 11S. complies with local, State, and federal regulations and policies related to students with disabilities. 11T. uses a variety of instructional and intervention strategies prior to initiating a referral of a student for special education.

89

DIRECTIONS FOR CREATING ARTIFACT APPENDICES

This final section of a candidate's program portfolio should be organized as a series of subsections that are numbered (1, 2, 3 . . . 24, etc.) or lettered (A, B, C . . .X, etc.). The purpose of the artifact appendices is to organize materials that require that fulfill several different standards simultaneously (e.g., Artifact #K: Science Unit on Nutrition, or Artifact #13: Number the Stars Novel Study. It may be more appropriate and efficient to insert some artifacts within a specific section of the portfolio (e.g., a resume in Professional Materials, a field experience involving administering a spelling test in Assessment, reflections on and documentation of participation at a parent-teacher conference in Collaboration). Portfolio Artifacts are replaced as better exemplars are placed in the portfolio. For example, artifacts used for Portfolio Checkpoint #1 and Checkpoint #2 should be removed from the portfolio unless they represent authentic teaching experiences with K-8 students. At Portfolio Checkpoint #3, the candidate should create a professional portfolio for the exit interview that represents only the best and most comprehensive example of their teaching experiences. All artifacts used for this checkpoint must represent authentic K-8 teaching experiences. At least half of the artifacts must represent the student teaching experience. Therefore, some artifacts from Checkpoint #2 may be used again at Checkpoint #3, if they remain the best examples of a candidate's knowledge and skills in a particular outcome area. REMEMBER: The first appendix (Appendix #1 or A) should be the standards, goals, and objectives provided at the front of this packet of materials.

90

Information

90 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

125623