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THE EMPIRE STATE

SUMMER 2004

223RD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION RECAP ST. JOHN'S DAY DEDICATION AND RIBBON CUTTING AT THE NEW HEALTH PAVILION SATURDAY JUNE 26TH 8:30 AM CAMP TURK SESSIONS SESSION I JULY 4TH - 17TH SESSION II JULY 18 - 31ST SESSION III AUG. 1ST - 14TH DEDICATION MMRL GENETICS WING AND RAM CONFERENCE ROOM SATURDAY, JUNE 26TH, 11:00 AM GRAND MASTER'S FAMILY DAY AT CAMP TURK JULY 24TH GRAND MASTER'S FAMILY DAY AT WEST POINT OCTOBER 2ND GRAND MASTER'S BALL OCTOBER 23RD

MASON

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from the grand east

Edward R. Trosin, Grand Master One Elmwood Park West, Tonawanda, NY 14150-3314 (716) 693-6812 e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE My Brothers: As I begin my term as your Grand Master, I want to thank all of you for the confidence you have shown by electing me to this exalted office. I promise you that I will give my undivided attention to the duties and responsibilities of my office for the next two years. During my term of office, we will continue to emphasize the programs of your Grand Lodge that have been successful in the past, and attempt to add a few improvements. Our number one priority has always been, and will continue to be Membership Development and Retention. Over the past two years, you did an outstanding job of turning our membership recruiting around. The One-Day Class and subsequent membership acquisition has been absolutely magnificent. Please continue to keep up your efforts. The second half of this equation is membership retention. It is vitally important that each Lodge have a program planned for each Communication. There should never be a Lodge bulletin distributed that describes a meeting as a Stated Communication. Work with the Grand Lodge Officers in your District to develop interesting and varied programs. Make every lodge meeting an event the Brothers won't want to miss. Our most visible program over the past few years has been our Child ID (CHIP) Program. This will be our primary program over the next two years. The Child ID program has undergone a facelift over the past few months. The core of the program continues to be the taking of videos of children, but we have developed a partnership with the New York State Dental Association to have tooth impressions taken at our sessions. We are also developing a partnership with the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, the Amber Alert people, to provide our program with fingerprinting capabilities. There are other plans still in the works that will make this the most comprehensive program of its type. You all can be proud of this service we offer to our communities. Next February, Grand Lodge is sponsoring the vacation of a lifetime! We are having a cruise to Hawaii. That's right, Hawaii. Start making your vacation plans now to be part of this fabulous vacation cruise. We will be leaving from Los Angeles on February 3rd, visiting 5 islands in Hawaii, and returning to Los Angeles on February 18th. Please consider joining us on this wonderful vacation cruise. Finally, my Brothers, I want to thank each of you for your continued support of this great Fraternity. Your dedication to your local Lodges is the foundation upon which this Brotherhood is built. Continue enthusiastic support of the entire Family of Masonry. It is only through your efforts that this great Fraternity of ours can grow and prosper! May God bless each of you, always.

Edward R. Trosin Grand Master

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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table of contents

TRUSTEES OF THE MASONIC HALL AND ASYLUM FUND Publisher THE EMPIRE STATE MASON is an Official Publication of the Trustees of the Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund. Edited by the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York, for the members of the Masonic Fraternity and their families. THE INSTALLATION OF THE GRAND MASTER 2004-2006 R\W\ Paul R. Gleason, Jr., Grand Chaplain of NYS from Rochester, NY blessing M\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Grand Master while he istaking his Obligation. The Bible used is that of the same when President George Washington took his Oath of Office on April 30, 1789. (St. John's Lodge No.1 is the keeper of the Bible) TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURES From the Grand East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Community Service Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Grand Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Masonic Care Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Acacia Village . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Masonic Brotherhood Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 MMRL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Educational Assistance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Camp Turk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 CHIP Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Masonic Student Assistance Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Years of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Newly Raised Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 New York Masonic Youth Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Committee on Youth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Masonic Fellowship Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Masonic Kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Grand Historian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 "We See Through a Glass Darkly" by Richard Bateman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Grand Chaplain's Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Grand Lecturer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Grand Lodge Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 SPECIAL INTEREST Elected Grand Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Appointed Grand Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Masonic Family Day at West Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Hallways to Households . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 "One Country, One Flag" by Gene Vollmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 "On Certain Masonic Symbols" by Gene Vollmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Grand Master's Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Grand Master's Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Metro Interfaith Breakfast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 47th Annual Masonic Cruise by Barbara Trosin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 ANNOUNCEMENTS Masonic Family Day at West Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Grand Master's Day at Camp Turk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 St. John's Family Day Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Grand Master's Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 NYS Golf Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Dates to Remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Publications Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 ESM Publications Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Grand Secretary's Golf Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 48th Annual Cruise to Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

Subscription $6.00 Domestic, $15.00 Foreign per year. Subscription free to all members of constituent Lodges of the Grand Lodge F. & A.M. State of New York. Copyright 2004 by the Trustees of the Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund. All rights reserved. Reproduction by recognized Masonic organizations is permitted with credit. All others must obtain written permission. Published quarterly in Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter months by The Trustees of the Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund, 71 West 23rd Street, NY, NY 10010-4149. THE EMPIRE STATE MASON (ISSN 0013-6794 ­ Published at 71 West 23rd Street, NY, NY 10010-4149). Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to: THE EMPIRE STATE MASON, Circulation Dept., 71 West 23rd Street, NY, NY 10010-4149. Periodicals Class Publication No. 568740 1-(800) 362-7664 · Website at www.nymasons.org

VOLUME 52 NUMBER 2

EDWARD R. TROSIN Grand Master Editor in Chief NEAL I. BIDNICK Deputy Grand Master Consultant JAMES E. SULLIVAN Senior Grand Warden Consultant DENNIS A. BREHENY Junior Grand Warden Consultant VINCENT LIBONE Grand Treasurer Consultant GILBERT SAVITZKY Grand Secretary Consultant BEN LEE Design and Layout Art Director RONALD N. BOWER Managing Editor and Chairman of the Publications Committee

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elected grand line

M\W\ Edward R. Trosin Grand Master

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE M\W\ Edward R. Trosin is a member of Tonawanda Lodge No. 247 and served as Master in 1981. He was appointed Junior Grand Deacon, 1993-1995 and Senior Grand Deacon, 1995-1998. He has also served as Deputy Grand Marshal and Grand Marshal, 2998-2002. He was elected Deputy Grand Master in 2002-2004. M\W\ Trosin is very active in many Grand Lodge Committees, including serving as Chairman of the Grand Master's Advisory Committee. He is also a member of several concordant bodies. M\W\ Trosin graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelor Degree in Business Administration. His business career was focused on the data processing industry. He is retired from Bell Aerospace Textron. M\W\ Trosin married in 1964, and he and Barbara have two married daughters, Rhonda and Heather. Heather is married to Aaron Marshal. They have one daughter, Lauren. Rhonda, who is married to Chris Brown have two children, Miranda and Eric Mason.

R\W\ Neal I. Bidnick Deputy Grand Master

R\W\ Neal I. Bidnick was raised in Bredablick Lodge No. 880 in 1975 and was Master in 1982-1983. He is also a member of Justice Lodge No. 750, as well as, an honorary member of four other Lodges. He is also a member of several Concordant Bodies. R\W\ Bidnick was elected Grand Treasurer in 2002-2004. He was appointed District Deputy Grand Master of the Sixth Manhattan District in 1986-1987. He has served on several local, District and Grand Lodge Committees. He was a member of Grand Master's One-Day Class Coordinating Committee and Chairman of the Grand Lodge Committee on Lodges and Buildings from 2000-2003. He was a Director of the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory in Utica from 1990-1999 and served as the Treasurer from 1996-1999. R\W\ Neal I. Bidnick and Joyce were married in 1954 and they have one son, Brian. R\W\ Bidnick has a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from Brooklyn College and also attended City University of New York.

R\W\ James E. Sullivan Senior Grand Warden

R\W\ James E. Sullivan was raised in Red Jacket Lodge No. 646 in 1979. He served as Master in 1985 and as Secretary of the Lodge from 2000present. He was elected Junior Grand Warden 2002-2004. R\W\ Sullivan was appointed District Deputy Grand Master from 1992-1994 for the Niagara-Orleans District. He has served on several local, District and Grand Lodge Committees, including acting as Chairman of the Educational Assistance Program from 1996-2003. He has seen the program grow from 135 recipients in 1996 to 937 recipients in 2002. He is also a member of several Concordant Bodies. In 1969 R\W\ Sullivan married his wife Gail and they have two children, Michael and Lynn. Michael is married to Jennifer and they have two sons, Nicholas and Benjamin. Lynn is married to James Fox and they have one daughter, Alexandra. R\W\ Sullivan taught Mathematics and Computers in the Lockport City School system for 34 years and retired in June 2000.

R\W\ Dennis A. Breheny Junior Grand Warden

R\W\ Dennis A. Breheny was raised in 1980 in Carducci Lodge No. 924 and Master in 1985-1987 and 1989. He is a member of Utica Lodge No. 47; Master and Charter Member of Infinity Lodge; Member and Master of Sauquoit Lodge No. 150 in 20022003, during his term his Lodge raised over 75 members; Member of Utica Lodge No. 47; Member of Nortrip Lodge No. 998. R\W\ Breheny was District Deputy Grand Master of the First Oneida District in 1992-1994. He is active in many Grand Lodge Committees, including the Camp Turk Committee, which he is Chairman, and the Grand Master's and Deputy Grand Master's Advisory Committee. He is very active in several concordant bodies. R\W\ Breheny and Judy were married in 1970. They have two daughters, Jennifer and Erin. He is, by trade, a licensed electrician and a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers for over 35 years.

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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appointed grand line

R\W\ Vincent Libone Grand Treasurer

R\W\ Vincent Libone was raised in Garibaldi Lodge No. 542 in 1973 and Master in 1980. Grand Master Robert Singer appointed him District Deputy of the Tenth Manhattan District in 1987-88. He was appointed Deputy Grand Marshal in 1995-1998 and Grand Marshal in 1998-2000. He has served on several District and Grand Lodge Committees, including the Grand Lodge Convention Committee, which he was Vice Chairman in 2002-2004. He also served on the Grand Master's and Deputy Grand Master's Advisory Board Committee from 2002-2004. M\W\ Earle J. Hino presented R\W\ Libone with the Livingston Medal in 1998. R\W\ Libone and Virginia were married in 1968 and have two daughters, Nicole and Daria. Daria is married to Brother Hiram Cintron and they have one daughter Miranda. R\W\ Libone is the President of the Enobil Partition, Inc. He has been a Union Carpenter Foreman and Supervisor and is presently Interior General Contractor.

R\W\ Gilbert Savitzky Grand Secretary

R\W\ Gilbert Savitzky was raised in John Hancock Lodge No. 70 and was Master in 1974. He was appointed District Deputy Grand Master of the First Manhattan District in 19791980. He was elected Grand Treasurer in 1989-1990. R\W\ Savitzky was elected Trustee to the Masonic Hall and Home in 1985-1989. He served on many committees and was elected Treasurer of the Trustee of the Masonic Hall and Home. He was also appointed Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge to Israel in 2003-present. He has served on several local, District and Grand Lodge Committees. He was a Founder and State Chairman of the Grand Lodge "Masonic Toys for Tot". R\W\ Gilbert Savitzky and his wife Barbara have two daughters Margie and Lisa. R\W\ Savitzky has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration from the University of Buffalo. He is a New York State Licensed Real Estate Salesperson. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

APPOINTED GRAND LINE 2004 -2006 Row 2 (l-r) R\ W\ W. Bruce Renner, Grand Marshal; R\ W\ Joseph A. Quarequio, Grand Tiler; R\ W\ Stanley A. Schimmel, Grand Organist; R\ W\ Richard W. Bateman, Assistant Grand Secretary; R\ W\ Edward G. Gilbert, Grand Lecturer. Row 1 (l-r) R\ W\ Biagio Valenti, Deputy Grand Standard Bearer; R\ W\ Robert S. Finley, Grand Standard Bearer; R\ W\ Alfred Dais, Junior Grand Deacon; R\ W\ Griffith Jones III, Senior Grand Deacon; R\ W\ William M. Sardone, Deputy Grand Marshal

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community service committee

R\W\ Thomas D. White 23 Pebbleridge Dr., Medina, NY 14103 (585) 798-4180, e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE It would appear that a lot of the Lodges do not understand the purpose of the DeWitt Clinton Award. It is to be given to NonMasonic individuals or groups who exhibit OUTSTANDING or DISTINGUISHED VOLUNTARY service to their community. Not the policeman, fireman or doctor who has saved a life, not the service person who has spend 20 years in defending our country--although these people unquestionably deserve some sort of recognition, just not the DeWitt Clinton. This committee has in recent months received Dewitt Clinton nominations for doctors who have saved lives. It just does not fit the qualifications for the Dewitt Clinton. Service Clubs such as the Rotary, Lions, Kiwanis, Rescue Squads are doing just what they are suppose to do ­therefore they NORMALLY will not qualify for the DeWitt Clinton Award. The Community Service Committee will continue to be very selective in who gets this distinguished award, we will not just "Rubber Stamp" the nomination. By all means feel free to generate your own awards. Present not just a certificate but have made up perhaps a glass plate, trophy, vase or medal and have it inscribed. In filling out the forms for the DeWitt Clinton, the Heart and Hands and the Grand Masters Award for Community Service, PLEASE ­PLEASE print very plainly---type if you can, give us your name and address and email address, so we can contact you easily if we have any questions. CHECK your spelling, we have had the name of the nominee spelled three different ways on a nomination form. Don't get mad at us if you look like a fool when you present the award and they say, "My name is misspelled", do your homework. Again, give us facts of VOLUNTARY service, not a history of the jobs they have done. Work with you local Public Awareness Chairman for suggestions and ideas on the presentation. Contact your local newspaper. Make a night of it, not just a two-minute ceremony during a Lodge meeting. The above forms can be found at the following web sites www.esmason,com and www.nymasons.org What is your Lodge doing to be involved with community service? Do the people in your community know who are the Masons and what we stand for? We must become more visible in our communities. There is more to being Masons than just giving awards, scholarships or money to this and that charity. We have to roll up our sleeves and get our hands dirty. Clean up the road side in your town, plant flowers in the city park, build a playground-baseball diamond, run a bike Road-D-O, get involved with Child ID, help repair a Senior Citizen Center. Donate your physical skills to your town on a worthwhile project and let your local newspaper know about it. Read over your "Community Service Guide" it has a host of ideas that are successful and will benefit you, your Lodge and your community. IF IT IS TO BE IT IS UP TO ME.

OGDENSBURGH ACACIAN LODGE NO. 138 PRESENTS DANIEL CARTER BEARD AWARD

Ogdensburg, New York

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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(l-r) William F. Gokey, Secretary; W\ David R. Flight, Master and recipient of award; R\W\ Timothy W. Pitcher, District Deputy Grand Master of the First St. Lawrence District Back Row (l-r) William F. Gokey, W\ David R. Flight and R\W\ Timothy W. Pitcher with the Cub Scout Members of St. Mary's Pack No. 62

On January 22nd at the St. Mary's School Sym-a-tera in Canton, New York W\ David R. Flight, Cub-Master of St. Mary's Pack No. 62 Cub Scouts, and also sitting Master of Ogdensburgh Acacian Lodge No. 128 received the Daniel Carter Beard Masonic Scouter Award. R\W\ Timothy W. Pitcher, District Deputy Grand Master of the First St. Lawrence Masonic District assisted by Secretary Brother William F. Gokey presented the award. Cory Haynes, Senior District Executive Boy Scouts of America was also present.

from the grand secretary

R\W\ Gilbert Savitzky, Grand Secretary Masonic Hall 71 West 23rd Street New York, NY 10010-4149 (800) 362-7664 e-mail: [email protected]

BE IT KNOWN

May 13, 2004 TO: The Officers of the Grand Line, All Permanent Members, District Deputy Grand Masters, Grand Sword Bearers, Grand Directors of Ceremonies, Grand Stewards, Grand Chaplains, Trustees of the Masonic Hall & Home, Directors of the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory, Trustees of the Chancellor Robert R Livingston Library, Masonic War Veterans, Commissioners of Appeal, Grand Lodge Committee Members, Grand Representatives of other Grand Lodges, and to all Worshipful Masters, Wardens and Secretaries of each Lodge under the Jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge. BE IT KNOWN, that at the Two Hundred-Twenty-Third Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York, held at the Masonic Hall, New York City, on the 3rd and 4th days of May, 2004, A.L. 6004, the following Brethren were elected, installed and proclaimed Grand Lodge Officers for the ensuing year: M\W\ Edward R. Trosin R\W\ Neal I. Bidnick R\W\ James E. Sullivan R\W\ Dennis A. Breheny R\W\ Vincent Libone R\W\ Gilbert Savitzky Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Senior Grand Warden Junior Grand Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY Joseph Heath, term expired; R\W\ R. Curtiss Montgomery SERVICE II for three years in place of R\W\ R. Curtiss Montgomery II, term expired; R\W\ Eugene D. Schmidt for three years in place of R\W\ Eugene D. Schmidt, term expired; R\W\ Sheldon D. Stachel for three years in place of R\W\ Sheldon D. Stachel, term expired; R\W\ Laurence I. Sussman for one year in place of R\W\ John Malfatti, resigned; Continuing in unexpired terms are; R\W\ Michael T. Brockbank (2005), R\W\ Edward S. Newsham (2005), R\W\ Albert J. Wright III (2005), R\W\ John P. Dietzel (2005), R\W\ Anthony V. Boccabella (2006), R\W\ John R. Fuller (2006), R\W\ William H. Getman (2006),R\W\ David F. Schneeweiss (2006) and R\W\ Stephen L. Zabriski (2006). TRUSTEES OF THE CHANCELLOR ROBERT R LIVINGSTON MASONIC LIBRARY OF GRAND LODGE elected or reelected were R\W\ John P. Deveney for three years in place of R\W\ John P. Deveney, term expired; R\W\ Charles J. Haskin for three years in place of R\W\ Charles J. Haskin, term expired, R\W\ Kenneth T. Gibbons for three years in place of R\W\ Kenneth T. Gibbons, term expired; R\W\ Fred G. Hickein for three years in place of R\W\ Fred G. Hickein, term expired; R\W\ William L. Dupree for three years in place of R\W\ William L. Dupree, term expired; Continuing in unexpired terms are; R\W\ Richard H. Eberle (2005), R\W\ Edward P. Fagan Jr., (2005), R\W\ Ronald W. White (2005), R\W\ Melvin H. Levy (2005) and R\W\ Richard W. Ward (2005), R\W\ Barry Mallah (2006), R\W\ Michael A. Rosson (2006), R\W\ Gerald B. Showalter (2006), R\W\ Harold J. Van Buren Jr.(2006) and R\W\ Richard Vang (2006). DIRECTORS OF THE MASONIC WAR VETERANS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, INC. elected or reelected were, R\W\ Melvin R. Hennen for one year in place of R\W\ Melvin R. Hennen term expired, R\W\ Thomas P. Donnelly for one year in place of R\W\ Thomas P. Donnelly, term expired and R\W\ Frank E. Galati for one year in place of R\W\ Frank E. Galati, term expired, Brother Barry R. Cox, Sr. for one year in place of Brother Barry R. Cox, Sr. term expired and R\W\ Raymond G. Barber for one year in place of W\ Al DeBard, term expired. GRAND LINE OFICERS appointed were R\W\ W. Bruce Renner; Grand Marshal; R\W\ William M. Sardone, Deputy Grand Marshal; R\W\ Griffith Jones III, Senior Grand Deacon; R\W\ Alfred B. Dais, Junior Grand Deacon; R\W\ Robert S. Finley, Grand Standard Bearer; R\W\ Biaggio Valenti, Deputy Grand Standard Bearer; R\W\ Daniel M. Semel, Judge Advocate; R\W\ Harvey A. Eysman, Proctor; R\W\ George Peter, Grand Historian; R\W\ Edward G. Gilbert, Grand Lecturer; M\W\ Calvin

COMMISIONERS OF APPEALS confirmed were R\W\ Jeffrey W. Halbreich for three years in place of R\W\ Jeffrey W. Halbreich, term expired; R\W\ Stanley Parness for three years in place of R\W\ Stanley Parness, term expired; Continuing in unexpired terms are; R\W\ Louis R. Rosenthal (2005); R\W\ Ellsworth A.Van Graafeiland (2005), R\W\ Jay Dankberg (2005), R\W\ Albert K. Hill (2006) and R\W\ John M. Leventhal (2006). TRUSTEES OF THE MASONIC HALL AND HOME elected or reelected were R\W\ George D. Blasch for three years in place of R\W\ George D. Blasch, term expired; R\W\ Manuel Abad for three years in place of R\W\ Manuel Abad, term expired; R\W\ David Stoy for three years in place of R\W\ Kenneth B. Mathers, term expired; continuing in unexpired terms are R\W\ Donald Darrohn III (2005); R\W\ Gilbert G. Adams (2005); R\W\ Werner Kniesel (2005); M\W\ Richard P. Thomas (2006); R\W\ Michael Brzoza (2006) and R\W\ Dominick Grippo (2006). DIRECTORS OF THE MASONIC MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY elected or reelected were R\W\ H. Joseph Heath for three years in place of R\W\ H.

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from the grand secretary

G. Bond, Grand Lecturer Emeritus; M\W\ Gary A. Henningsen, Grand Secretary Emeritus, R\W\ Richard W. Bateman, Grand Pursuivant; R\W\ Joseph A. Quarequio, Grand Tiler; R\W\ Jack W. Ovitt, Grand Organist and R\W\ Stanley A. Shimmel, Grand Organist. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE DISTRICT GRAND LINE OFFICERS FOR THE DISTRICT OF SYRIA - LEBANON appointed was R\W\ Noureddine Kabbani, District Grand Master. THE GRAND LODGE MEDAL FOR DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT was presented to Brother and Congressman Thomas M. Reynolds. THE CHARLES HENRY JOHNSON MEDAL was presented to M\W\ Charles Lewis, P.G.M., North Carolina, R\W\ Richard W. Bateman, Assistant Grand Secretary, M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Past Grand Master. THE CHANCELLOR ROBERT R LIVINGSTON MEDAL was presented to R\W\'s Arthur Vosatka, Clarence Eckhoff and Sheldon D. Stachel. THE GRAND MASTER'S AWARD OF APPRECIATION was presented to W\ James G. Parese, Brother James A. Todd, R\W\'s Ronald J. Steiner, Michael Spagnuolo, Biaggio Valenti and Robert T. Mascialino, Brothers Robert F. Leonard and Mario Zinerco. FINAL READING AND APPROVAL ON SECOND READING. Section 600.7 A proposal to increase per capita dues $ 9.50, commencing 2004 (to be billed in 2005) and an additional $ 3.00 commencing 2006 (to be billed in 2007) was approved. Section 109.1 An elected officer of Grand Lodge may not hold an elected Grand Office in a related or concordant grand body during his term of office was approved. FINAL READING REJECTED A proposal to mandate the presentation of membership every five years commencing at fifty years was rejected. PROPOSALS TABLED. Section 345 To amend the petition for membership was tabled until the membership can be better informed. A Proposal to forgive the per capita dues for members of the Armed Forces who are on Active Duty was referred to the incoming Grand Master who looks favorably on the proposal and will address it at St. John's Day. Masonic Lodges that are delinquent in filing their Annual Returns for 2003 and/or their Per Capita Dues for 2003, were placed on notice by the Grand Master that they have until June 15, 2004 to submit the same or be subject to Suspension. The Committee on Masonic Jurisprudence approved all the actions, including his edicts, taken or issued by the Grand Master between the Annual Communications of this Grand Lodge. The Grand Master announced that, in accordance with Section 103 of the Constitutions, he would convene the 224th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge at the Masonic Hall, New York City, on May 2-3, 2005. The Grand Master also announced that the minutes of the 223rd Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge would appear in the published Proceedings of this Grand Lodge. It was announced that the District Deputy Grand Masters, Grand Lodge Staff Officers, Grand Chaplains and others would receive their commissions at the public Investiture Ceremonies held at the Masonic Home in Utica, New York, on Saturday afternoon, June 26, 2004, during the St. John's Day Weekend. Given under my hand and seal of the Grand Lodge, this 13th day of May 2004, A.L. 6004

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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Gilbert Savitzky Grand Secretary

NEW PROPOSALS APPROVED FIRST READING Section 600.2 Delete Charge for Charters 600.3 Delete Charges for Diplomas 600.4 Delete Charges for Traveling Certificates (All of the above have set prices that have been established in the Lodge Services Department) 600.7 Delete the $ 1.00 Registry Fee required for every Entered Apprentice made by the Lodge. Section 110 To Consolidate the First and Second Onondaga Districts to be known as the Onondaga District.

west point

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

MASONIC FAMILY DAY AT WEST POINT SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2004

MASONIC FAMILY DAY AT WEST POINT TICKET ORDER FORM

SEND TO: R\W\ Lou Juers, Coordinator Masonic Family Day at West Point 58 Schofield Street - Bronx, NY 19464-1530 Tel: (718) 885-1865 or Fax: (718) 885-1868 e-mail: [email protected] Name Address

Telephone Lodge and District

EVENTS SCHEDULE

FROM 7 AM ­ 9 AM Masons' parking at K Parking Area (Old PX Lot) $5.00 per car in advance* designated by PAID LOT PASS ONLY 9:00 AM Masonic Memorial Service at the Brother Douglas MacArthur Monument (Opposite George Washington) 10:00 AM Parade of Cadets on the Plain LUNCH Tailgate Party in Old PX Area (K Parking Area) 1:00 PM Football Game; Army vs TCU (Texas Chrstian University) at Michie Stadium ($26.00 per ticket) Shuttle Bus Service Available TO and FROM Masonic Parking Area (Old PX Area) and the Various Sites Above at NO Charge.

Enclosed is my check made payable to: MASONIC SPECIAL EVENTS in the amount of $_________.00 for _____ tickets (at $26.00 each) for the Army football game on October 2ND, 2004, and ______ PX Lot parking pass(es) ($5.00 per car*). Please send paid gate pass(es) and directions for ____ vehicle(s), parade ID(s), and game ticket(s) to the above address. I will return unused tickets before Thursday, September 16TH. After September 16 , NO REFUND POSSIBLE on unused tickets. (No tickets may be returned directly to West Point which forbids the sale of tickets at the stadium gates.)

TH

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Please allow extra time to get into the stadium. *Fee per bus is $25.00 in advance.

the masonic care community

William J. Luley, Executive Director 2150 Bleecker Street, Utica, NY 13501 800 322-8826 www.masonichomeny.org BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

WE TRY HARDER

"Progress is our most important product", General Electric; "We try harder", Avis. When people hear these slogans, they can immediately recognize the company that it represents. However, more important is that these slogans represent the culture of each of those companies. The Masonic Care Community is there "for life's transitions". This represents the fact that as people age and as they need long-term care services the Masonic Care Community will be there to provide them the best services possible. As we move forward into the future, the Masonic Care Community will be able to provide Masons and non-Masons alike services in home care, independent living, adult care and skilled nursing services. As individuals age, we are faced with many challenges. When these challenges present us with health concerns, the Masonic Care Community can assist you in meeting those concerns. The newest addition to our family of services is the certified and licensed home care services, located at our campus in Utica for Oneida County residents. As the Government continues to encourage the use of non-institutional services, the home care agencies will be able to provide these services from our campus. Acacia Village, our independent living facility, allows individuals to enjoy their retirement years without the worries of maintaining their own home. At Acacia Village we provide residents with housekeeping services, activities, scheduled transportation and the evening meal on a beautifully landscaped community setting. At Wiley Hall, individuals with moderate health care needs can reside knowing that their life will be more meaningful and enjoyable as our staff monitors their health and insures their well being. Services in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and hearing therapy, medical services, barber and beauty, activities of daily living, medication administration are all available to Wiley Hall residents. The Activity Department at Wiley Hall provides the residents many opportunities to go into the community or to participate in the different activity areas located in Wiley Hall. Please visit our web site to view the many activities that take place at the Masonic Care Community at www.MasonicCommunityNY.org The Health Pavilion, which is currently undergoing major reconstruction and renovation, will be the premier skilled nursing facility in the country when it is completed. Not only will the physical environment provide residents with the feeling of home, but the cultural change that is taking place on the Masonic Care Community campus will provide the residents with the feeling that all employees are members of their extended family. When you hear the words "for life's transitions" in the future, we believe that you will immediately identify that slogan with the Masonic Care Community as we build our reputation as the finest long-term care facility.

William J. Luley Executive Director

IT'S NEVER TOO LATE...

a rehabilitation resident at our Masonic Care Community. "I would highly recommend therapy at the Masonic Care Community for anyone needing it" says Eula who was originally admitted on September 3, 2003. After surgery from a local hospital, Eula was transferred to us for rehabilitation. She did quite well and was able to return to her home. However, after a short time she developed an infection in her leg, which resulted in an amputation. She received a prosthetic leg in March and is making great progress. Eula said the therapy at the Masonic Care Community has been "excellent." Eula is originally from Blakely, Georgia. When asked how she ended up in Utica. She said her family moved to this area in

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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(l-r) Eula Bass, resident and Kana Brelinsky, CNA A prosthetic leg at the age of 91 and a resident full of hope that she will be able to go home soon so she can walk in her kitchen and prepare a good meal for her husband.....That's the goal of Eula Bass,

1940 due to her father `s job relocation. She is a delightful, sweet, charming lady with a very positive attitude. Although she is 91 years of age, she doesn't look it or act it. Her drive to walk again is incredible. She also said when considering therapy, the Masonic Care Community was her clear choice after looking at all her options. As soon as Eula adjusts to her new leg, she will be leaving to go home....where her husband is anxiously waiting for his home-cooked meal. She is eagerly looking forward to that, but at the same time will miss the relationships she has made during her stay at the Masonic Care Community. We too will miss Eula and wish her the very best!

the masonic care community

JR. OPTIMIST CLUB SURPRISED RESIDENTS WITH GIFTS

For Your Charitable Contributions

Americans and especially members of the Masonic Fraternity are well-known for volunteering their time and other resources for the benefit of causes in which they believe. As a result, all our lives are enriched. According to Ira B. Cooperman, CFRE, Director of Development for the Masonic Care Community of New York, many individuals also choose to include their charitable interests in their long-range financial planning. "Making an ultimate charitable gift can go hand-in-hand with preserving economic security for one's self and loved ones, thanks to many available methods of planning," he suggests. A Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE), Brother Cooperman is very knowledgeable about the different methods how one can make a charitable contribution and also provide some financial security for one's family. One's Last Will and Testament is one of the most popular vehicles for making long-range gifts. But so are Pooled Income Funds, Charitable Gift Annuities, Charitable Remainder Trusts, Charitable Lead Trusts, and gifts of insurance policies. Indeed, the economic stability of non-profit causes of all types -- including the Masonic Care Community -- has been built largely upon charitable bequests. By the way, you also can make a contribution to honor someone living, or to honor the memory of a loved one or friend. When such a contribution is made, an acknowledgement expressing the sincere gratitude of the Trustees of the Masonic Care Community is sent to the donor and to anyone else whom the donor desires. Memorial and honorial gifts may be designated for the Endowment Fund or for the institution's general operating purposes. Concerning bequests and estate planning, to insure that a donation is made to the Masonic Care Community, a formal clause can be put in a Will indicating the donor's intention to leave all or part of an estate to the "Masonic Care Community of New York." All such contributions and bequests will be recognized appropriately and will be gratefully received. For more information about ways you can make money by planning to give away some of your funds in the future -- and lessen your tax burden at the same time, contact: Ira B. Cooperman, CFRE Director of Development Masonic Care Community of NY 2150 Bleecker Street · Utica, NY 13501-1788 (800) 322-8826 or (315) 798-4703 www.MasonicCommunityNY.org

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

On March 25th, 25 members of the Jr. Optimist Club from Albany School in Utica surprised our residents with gifts for the Easter holiday season. Shown in photo are two students presenting a gift to Fred Roberts, a resident on 1 Master Mason. In appreciation of the gifts residents are sending thank you notes to the organization for their kindness.

MUSIC TO OUR EARS

As a result of our ad in the Masonic News Network Newspapers requesting radio donations for residents at the Masonic Care Community, we would like to publicly thank Brother Joe Raubar from Amhurst Lodge No. 981, located in Williamsville for responding to this request. Brother Joseph Bauber Brother Raubar personally donated 15 AM-FM radios so that the joy and pleasure of music can be enjoyed by our residents.

The radio donations were made in honor of: · Trustee Gil Adams · Robert Praties (Bag piper and Chaplain of Amherst Lodge No. 981) · Past Master Simon Msadoques · Judith Hirsch , professional musician, member of the Ladies of the Shrine AILIAMSI No. 12, and wife of Joe Raubar. Why did he donate these radios to the Masonic Care Community in honor of the people listed above? Brother Raubar stated that... "They have helped me to better enjoy the music of Masonic life." - A beautiful sentiment for a beautiful and giving gesture. Again, thank you Brother Joe Raubar for your radio donations. If you or your Lodge would like to brighten the day of the Masonic Care Community's residents by donating radios please contact Angie Caiola, Director of Community Relations at 800-322-8826 or e-mail her at [email protected]

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the masonic care community

AS TIME GOES BY... ROBERT AND ALTHINE WHITSITT

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE Chi is a wonderful way for seniors to maintain their balance and mobility. I hope more people will take advantage of this class in the future." reflected Bob. Prior to Acacia Village, Bob spent 10 years volunteering at the Sharon Hospital in Connecticut and at the adjoining Methodist Home. He is a trained Hospice Volunteer and was past president of the Poughkeepsie National Mended Hearts Association. When he is home, he paints. Bob is an accomplished watercolorist and caricaturist. His apartment is an array of drawings, books and interesting papers. A fun place to browse - quite the opposite of his wife's apartment. Althine has a small but beautifully decorated room. Her bookcases are filled with impressive political and historical titles, the walls and bureaus contain a timeline of family photographs, and the walls are adorned with Bob's vibrant watercolor paintings. A round table next to her bed contains a delicate collection of cranberry glass. Comfortably padded chairs are strategically placed around the room making conversation easy. If I sit with Bob I automatically straighten up in my chair and find myself searching for appropriate words. His voice, diction, and command of the English language demand respect....but with Althine I want to curl up in one of her chairs and listen while she tells her many tales. Her independence and free spirit can be detected even before she speaks. I can see why the two fell in love. Bob was born in Red Wing, Minnesota and Althine was born in Acushnet, Massachusetts. His father was a Congregational Minister and Althine's family operated a cranberry farm. In fact her father was a past president of Ocean Spray. Bob and Althine met while they were teaching at Riverdale Country School and although they seem very different ­ they compliment each other perfectly. What attracted you to each other? Althine laughed and said that "it was food that made him fall for me." As teachers they lived in a dormitory setting. She was in charge of the dining room and Bob was placed at her table. She is not one for desserts so she gave her dessert to him. This continued every night. He couldn't help but fall for a woman who would give up her éclairs! This tradition of sorts has continued for the past 54 years. The Whitsitts married in 1948 and have two talented children. Their daughter, Gail Whitsitt- Lynch is an adjunct professor of Sculpture at the Rhode Island School of Design. Their son Robert Jr. lives in California and does "fine" woodworking. He makes intricate frames that are used in museums. They also have two grandsons. Bob's educational background is enviable: BS in Political Science from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, a Masters Degree in History from Columbia Teachers College and a Doctor of Education in School Administration from Columbia in NYC. Bob modestly explained that his years of employment included President of NYS Adult Education, an officer of the National Visual Literacy Association, and he was involved in an experimental education program for the Edwin Gould Foundation as head of a special state district for dependent and neglected children. The Foundation sent him to national conferences to present papers on learning disabilities. He taught in both private and public schools and was Superintendent of the Dover Plains School District. Althine loves teaching and attended American University in Washington, DC. She studied Political Science and History graduating in 1933. "Women were scarce in the classrooms in 1933. "I was the only woman in my Constitutional Law class and they never called on me," she recalled. At 93 years old she doesn't just read history she studies history. On a lighter note she confessed her love of reading children's books especially Dr. Seuss! Althine (or Frances as she is usually known) married Bob when she was 36 years old. In those days she was considered an old maid. "That used to make me so mad", she remembered. "However, my grandmother also married at 36 years old and I remember her saying to me, `what's the hurry in getting married'"! Althine was and still is fiercely independent and head strong. "I made ~ continued on next page ~

The Masonic Care Community is truly a connected campus. Couples can still remain a couple even if they live in separate buildings. Such is the case with Althine and Bob Whitsitt from Amenia, New York. They moved to the Masonic Care Community this past winter, one resides in Independent Living and one resides at Adult Care. Bob has a spacious one bedroom apartment with a lovely bay window at Acacia Village and his bride of 54 years, Althine has a cozy tastefully decorated room in Wiley Hall. Although it is hard to live separately, Bob is only a short few blocks from Wiley Hall where he can visit with Althine at anytime. She is busy with her daily activities and Bob is forever on the move with various projects. Bob has been a Mason for 50 years. He was raised at Grammatan Lodge in Bronxville, New York and has twice been a Master at Amenia Lodge No. 672. He received the Grand Master Dedicated Service Award a few years ago. Bob still attends regular lodge meetings here on campus

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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Keeping busy is definitely not a problem for Bob. He is a daily fixture at the Health Pavilion where he visits residents in the Palliative Care unit. "I can sense what each person would really enjoy and then try to do it", he explains. He remembers reading to a man who was blind and to another person who loved poetry. He also visits Acacia Village residents who are either recuperating in the Rehab unit or who have moved to other parts of the campus. Bob is trained in the graceful art of Tai Chi and teaches a weekly class at Acacia Village and at the Health Pavilion. "Tai

the masonic care community

TEAM EFFORT MAKESRob Lauducci ADJUSTMENT EASIER Interview by

Frank Fevoli had a life changing event happen that was completely unexpected. He was driving home from church services when he felt a pain in his arm and chest. He pulled his car off the road, called for assistance, then waited, hoping whatever was wrong would eventually subside and go away. Well, it didn't go away. Frank had suffered a stroke while (l-r) Rob Lauducci, driving near Middleton, New Director of Volunteers and York. He was transported to Horton Hospital on Kimberly Paciello, Social November 2, 2003. For the Worker and Frank Fevoli next ten days Frank remained (Seated) at Horton Hospital thinking about where he would go and what long term effects the stroke would have on his future. He didn't have to think very long. Frank was transferred by our staff to the Masonic Care Community and admitted to our Health Pavilion on November 13, 2003. Frank is quite a unique case, being admitted in our Nursing Home at only 49 years of age. I interviewed Frank and his Social Worker, Kimberly Paciello, for some insight to his stay here. Q: Frank, how long have you been a Mason and what Lodge are you affiliated with? A: A little over four years. I am a member of Cornerstone Lodge No. 711 in Monroe, New York and received my 32º in Masonry from The Valley of Binghamton. Q: You are from the Middleton, New York area. What made you choose the Masonic Care Community when looking into Long Term Care Facilities? A: I read about the Masonic Care Community many times in the Empire State Mason Magazine and had planned to visit the campus sometime in the future. I was aware of the services provided. There was never any question as to where I wanted to be to receive care. The members of my Lodge were also very supportive and encouraged me to come to Utica. Q: How difficult was the initial transition when you arrived? A: It was very difficult at first. My life had totally changed. I was unsure about many things and could only hope for the best. Q: Frank, you've been at the Masonic Care Community since November 13, 2003. How has the adjustment been up to now? A: Not easy, however, through efforts from staff like Keith Heinrich, Rob Lauducci, Kimberly Paciello, Paul Stern, and others, it has gone quite well. Most of the staff have been caring and compassionate. I receive visits from many staff and volunteers. Bob Whitsitt, a volunteer who lives at Acacia Village, stops in to visit me quite regularly. Q: Frank, how have you involved yourself with the Masonic Care Community family? A: I have made it a point to associate with fellow Masons. Also, I have become a member of the Welcome/Orientation Committee for new residents. I attend many of the Resident Council meetings to stay in touch with their concerns. The staff has treated me very well and if I can assist in any way, I want to do that. Q: Kimberly, many of the residents in your caseload are in their seventies and eighties. Frank just turned fifty years old. What challenges does that present to you as a social worker? A: Making sure that the interaction and association with other residents happens. Frank has been very tolerant of less cognizant people around him. He also shows quite a bit of compassion. Q: What has been most rewarding to see regarding Frank's situation? A: The physical, emotional, and social progress he's made has been wonderful to watch. Frank has adjusted to his new lifestyle, as well as can be expected. He attributes his progress to a complete team effort from the staff and volunteers at the Masonic Care Community. It is Frank's vision that with the opening our new Health Pavilion, every New York State Mason in need, will take advantage of the outstanding services offered at our community. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

AS TIME GOES BY...

continued that clear from the beginning. He should have known that I was not going to listen to him", she laughed. As you can sense, Bob never sits still. Besides his volunteer efforts and Tai Chi, he enjoys singing, biking, fishing and kayaking. While Althine, on the other hand, has a quieter constitution.

She enjoys music, gardening, reading and teaching. The Whitsitts moved to the Masonic Care Community from a large home with beautiful gardens. I asked if it was hard to make the move. They both said yes but accepted the change and put their energy into positive living. Bob enjoys nightly dinners at Acacia Village. "There is a wide variety of professional people here so that you can enjoy a good conversation and find that you have

quite a lot in common." "Not only at Acacia Village is it wonderful with freedom and service, but at Wiley Hall extra medical care is given. There is a warm and congenial feeling among the residents and staff. It is a very caring place." So what is the secret to a long and happy marriage? "You must maintain your independence," both agreed. It seems to work ....as time goes by.

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the masonic care community

HALLWAYS TO

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Entrance to the new Health Pavilion.

Outside view of the Households.

60

Atrium

Bathroom in one of the Households.

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Kitchen in one of the Households. Hallway leading to Households.

the masonic care community

HOUSEHOLDS

On March 28, 2004, Trustee Gilbert Adams gave a guided tour of the new Health Care Facility at the Masonic Care Community (MCC) to Ronald Bower, Publication Chairman and his wife Joan, Melvin Eckhaus, Public Relations Committee Member and Stanley Schumacher, Publication Committee Member. It is our hope that through these photos you can visualize the new state of the art health facility in Utica. The Masonic Care Community demonstrates our continued commitment to provide the best healthcare available in a friendly family environment. The Masonic Care Community is our home away from home for all Masons, their wives, family and friends. This issue of the Empire State Mason magazine should provide you with a pictorial display of what awaits you on your St. John's day visit to the MCC Campus. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Windows facing the Atrium.

Framing of the Gift Shop.

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the masonic care community

RIGHT TO KNOW WHO SEES YOUR PRIVATE HEALTH INFORMATION

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE Have you noticed there's something new to read during your wait in the doctor's office ­ something besides magazines and the newspaper? That's the case since April 14, 2003. People using healthcare services in the last year should have noticed a change in the registration process. In all healthcare facilities, such as doctor's offices, hospital, nursing facilities, rehabilitation or urgent care facilities, patients are asked to sign an acknowledgment stating that they were offered or given a copy of that facility's Notice of Privacy Practices (NPP). It's required by a new federal privacy law, often referred to as HIPAA ­ The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. If you have moved from one state to another, you may have noticed that past protections of your private healthcare information (PHI) varied depending on your state of residence. State laws have set the stage. HIPAA introduces a minimum level of protection that all US healthcare providers must apply no matter there they operate. By law, the NPP must be posted in plain view. It must be made available to you in printed form ­ and if the facility has a Web site, it must also be posted there. By signing the acknowledgment, you are showing only that the healthcare provider made the information available to you. You are not stating that you agree with content. Your cooperation in this procedure will help healthcare facilities demonstrate compliance with the law. After you sign, you don't have to accept a copy of the NPP ­ but consider what you might learn if you do. The privacy law brings you new rights to your PHI and how it's handled. The law recognizes that an individual seeking healthcare services implies agreement with the use of their health information for purposes of treatment, payment and general operations. Beyond that you have choices in the uses and disclosures of your information and the NPP will advise you what those are. For example, healthcare organizations want to hear from you if you feel your privacy rights have been compromised. The Notice will tell you who to contact and how to proceed with the complaint process. It's true that this new procedure is "one more thing" to deal with when you seek healthcare services, but if you can take the time to look over the Notice of Privacy Practices, you might learn more about your healthcare privacy rights. For more information or questions, contact Masonic Care Community: Maria Centolella, Privacy Officer (315) 798-4888 [email protected] or Ken Kicak, Security Officer (315) 798-4767 [email protected] CIRCLE TRUE OR FALSE Your name and location while in the hospital may not be given out without your consent. TRUE FALSE Your clergyman or pastor will be able to find you in the hospital even if he does not know that you are there beforehand. TRUE FALSE Your doctor's office or nursing facility cannot send information to another doctor's office without your authorization. TRUE FALSE You have the right to request an amendment to the information about you contained in your medical record, if you believe it is incorrect or incomplete. TRUE FALSE You have the right to review or obtain a copy of your medical records. TRUE FALSE

HIPAA QUIZ

ANSWERS

1. FALSE. You must specifically ask not to be listed in the directory if you do not want it known that you are a patient there. 2. TRUE. Hospitals are able to disclose directory information about patients, including religious affiliation, unless the patient has specifically objected. 3. FALSE. Your care providers can share your health information with another care provider, if there is a reason to believe you will receive care there. (For example, you are referred to a doctor for a consultation or move and go to a new doctor). 4. TRUE. You may request an amendment if you encounter such circumstances. However, the doctor's office or hospital who owns the medical record may decide not to make the amendment. If that happens, you may write out a statement with your concern that it be made a part of the medical record. If the information is disclosed to anyone in the future, the written statement will be included in the records released. 5. TRUE. With a few exceptions, the HIPAA legislation gives patients the right to review or obtain a copy of their medical information. If it is your doctor's professional judgment that you or someone else might be endangered if that information is released to you, they may withhold permission for you to see the information.

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acacia village

FRESH NEW FACES WELCOME TO OUR FAMILY!

Burlington. Ernie taught Mathematics for 27 years and Christine spent several years as a Dietician at Dartmouth College. The Stockwells have been married for 57 years. They have two children and two grandchildren. Ernie enjoys bowling, a good game of scrabble and making his own cards on his computer. Christine still loves to bake and also enjoys quieter times reading. They are loving their spacious two bedroom apartment with a welcoming patio for those warmer days to come! Norma Neubauer from Easton, Connecticut: Norma's daughter and son in law live in Fly Creek near Cooperstown, NY so Norma thought moving to Acacia Village would be a great idea. Norma worked for her husband, Bob, before they were married. He was an artist who was involved in package designing. Their business relationship blossomed into marriage. Norma said that she married the boss but after their marriage SHE became the boss. Besides her love of art and antiques, Norma enjoys making shadow boxes. She is also an accomplished seamstress and music lover. Her tastefully decorated deluxe one bedroom apartment is usually bathed in the late afternoon sun. Norma is happy to be here! Connie and Brad Millet from Utica, New York: Brad is a retired surgeon who specialized in thoracic, vascular, OB-GYN and general surgery. He has been a Mason for over 40 years and was raised in Liberty Lodge, which is now Oriental Faxton Lodge No. 224. As a member of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite he has been a Prince of Jerusalem and past Potentate of Ziyara Shrine in 1982. Connie has a nursing degree specializing in surgery and psychiatry. She worked as a surgical consultant and covered the North East. After settling in Utica, she met Brad and they married in 1974. Between the two of them they have six children, eleven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren with two more on the way! Connie enjoys golf, needlepoint and bridge. Brad is an aviator and certified scuba diver. He enjoys bridge, golf, hunting, fishing, woodworking and photography. They are both "outdoor enthusiast" and enjoy the wilderness. Their one bedroom with den apartment is perfect for their busy lifestyle. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

A MASONIC RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Ed & Beatrice Gille from Kingston, New York: Ed retired from IBM Corporation after 34 years of service. He has been a member of Kingston Lodge No. 10 for 32 years, Master of his Lodge in 1976 and Grand Representative to Manitoba, Canada from 1991-1993. Photography is Ed's main hobby! His lovely wife, Beatrice is also from Kingston and retired from the Grand Union Company after 21 years as Cashier and Bookkeeper. Bea has been an Eastern Star for 33 years. She enjoys knitting, pinochle and music. The Gille's have been married for 48 years. They have a lovely one bedroom deluxe apartment with a bay window and large covered porch with storage. The Gille's can't wait to enjoy the summer months on their porch overlooking the beautiful hills of the Mohawk Valley. Marian Magnesio from Utica, New York: Marian moved to Acacia Village from her home in Utica, which was less than five minutes from Acacia! Marian has been widowed since 1984 and decided to leave her home and enjoy the easy lifestyle of retirement living. Her husband, Leonard had retired from General Electric. They had three daughters and currently have six grandchildren. Marian is a mystery buff and enjoys all the latest books in our library or from the Bookmobile. She also loves jewelry design, basket weaving and sewing. Marian has a cozy standard one bedroom apartment with a bay window. Ernie and Christine Stockwell from Rome, New York: Both Ernie and Christine grew up in Vermont and attended the University of Vermont in

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around the state

LOVE IS IN THE AIR!

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

THE AMERICAN SPIRIT

By W\ Walter Richards Past Master of Cataract Lodge No. 295 Middleport, New York

There is a tradition at Acacia Village that we have maintained for the past three years. The month of February is considered "Sweethearts Month" so in our Art Gallery we have an interesting photo display. The photos for this elaborate display are provided by our residents. The pictures come to me wrapped in sheets of carefully taped tissue paper or carried in intricate frames. They are handled lovingly and given to me with special care. These are prized photos of themselves as sweethearts with their sweetheart. The faces in these photos are fresh, young, wide-eyed, and looking ahead to a bright future. It may be a wedding day photo or an engagement photo or just a snap shot at the beach. A moment captured in time forever. Youth is in the eye of the beholder and all who participated in this display still have that twinkle in their eye! Art Chadbourne is seen here taking a closer look and trying to guess who's who.

Where is the American spirit---; I was on Lexington Green and with the embattled farmers at Concord; I went up the Missouri with Lewis and Clark; I saw the rockets red glare at Baltimore; I was with the guns at Buena Vista; I went West with the Forty-niners; I was in the cornfield at Antietam and beside the stone wall at Gettysburg; I went up San Juan Hill; I went round the world with the Great White Fleet; I was the Rock of the Marne and in the Argonne; I crossed the Atlantic with Lindbergh; I flew at Midway and went ashore a t Normandy; I was on the Pusan Perimeter and at Porkchop Hill; I landed on the moon and flew the Space Shuttle; I flew in Desert Storm. Where is the American spirit? I am still with you.

BUD GILLINGS MEMORIAL BOWLING TOURNAMENT 2004

Held this year on March 13th at the Frontier Lanes in Lewiston, hosted by the `79 and `93 Masters. The recipient of this year's tournament was Sarah Kopasz (pictured left) from Lewiston. Again this year as in years past Frontier Lanes were most cooperative, despite some lane troubles. They were most helpful and supportive as possible and donated a bowling ball, which was won by Bob Querns of Cataract Lodge No.295. (I don't know if there is any truth to the rumor that he got the award because he did the least damage to moving the pins around or not). There were 79 bowlers this year - less than in past years. There were two teams from Hamilton, Ontario, a team from Bergen and two teams of Eastern Star Ladies. The Two-Ball Cane Gang won the traveling trophy for the team with the high three games with handicap. Their score was 2,894. It is a team of Brothers who bowl in a Masonic retirees league at the Rose Garden Bowl in Bergen and come from several different Lodges in the Genesee/Wyoming and Monroe Districts. They have attended the tournament for many years. Their name will be inscribed on the plaque and they will have the plaque displayed for the coming year. The members of this team are Dick Howard, Dick Giedd, F. Jay McCullough, Gary Cornelius and John Specht. The basket of cheer, donated by the `79 Masters, was won by Marjorie Disinger (no word on when the party will start). Secret Scores first game won by Bob Arlington and Terry Winters­ Second game won by Ernie Krell, Sr., Jay McCullough and Frank Disinger. High Single (scratch) - 226 Dennis Marquis, LaSalle No.1049 High Single (w/handicap) - 242 Dennis Marquis, LaSalle No.1049 High 3 game (scratch) - 615 Cas Hoffman, Niagara Lodge No. 375 High 3 game (w/handicap) - 653 Lee Allen, Sutherland No.826 THANK YOU to all took part in this year's tournament and hope to see you next year.

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the masonic brotherhood fund

R\ W\ Robert D. Stack 1717 Lakeview, Hewlett, NY 11557 (516) 569-1951 [email protected] or [email protected] I remember my Drill Instructor (DI) in Marine Boot Camp told our platoon, during training, that "We always take care of our BROTHERHOOD buddies and that they are not ever to be left behind under any circumstances." PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY A few years later after I became a Mason, a lady, waiting for a prescription in my pharmacy, spotted my ring and said, "You Masons SERVICE take care of your own, and never tell." Well, the never tell part has changed somewhat in the years that followed, when there was an effort to open our doors to the world. The part about taking " care of our own" is and always will be, part of our Masonic teaching. The Grand Master has recently emphasized this in his message to the Craft. Freemasons contribute millions of dollars a year to charity in and outside the Fraternity. This year the Masonic Brotherhood Fund in New York State will again reach or surpass the million-dollar mark. Add to this, the efforts of the Royal Arch Masons, Scottish Rite Masons, Shrine Hospitals for Children, Knights Templar Eye Foundation, the Cryptic Masons, the Masonic Home, and the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory and you have only seen the "tip of the iceberg". Lodges and Districts have Charity Corporations, which support the above mentioned groups as well as community projects. Yes, Freemasons give freely of their earnings and savings to help others escape the bonds of distress, loneliness and despair. We must contact all our Lodge Brothers on a timely basis to see if all is well and if they are "in need of our help, aid and sympathy". They are our own, as the lady once said, and we are bound to take care of them. Many notes come to the MBF office telling of sickness and distress, and requesting the Lodge contact them. It is incumbent upon us to tighten the bonds that tie us together as a Brotherhood and look out for each other. A hand written note on linen stationary came from a grateful Brother, who had been the recipient of help when hard times fell upon him and his wife. Illness had taken its toll on both of them. "I can assure you" he wrote "that without your help, I do not think we could have made it through this difficult period. God Bless you and the Brethren, who saw fit to help us in this time in our lives." Not all Brothers express their problems to their Lodges or to anyone, but when they do, the help received from the Brotherhood Fund through the Benevolence Committee is there for them. If we can change the quality of life of those who are in need, we are indeed fulfilling our obligations as Masons. "Not even a penny? Which is to teach you that if should meet a Brother Mason or a member of the Human Family in a like destitute situation, it would be your duty to contribute to his relief as liberally as his necessities might require and your ability permit." Helping our own and others is part of our Masonic Life, and no Mason can really say, "I forgot." I never forgot the words of that DI or what I learned in my Degrees. I am sure, my Brothers, that you have the same recollections too. To those of you who have made this year a record for the MBF, and who have continued to support this Fraternity's worthwhile endeavors, I say "Thank You". If you haven't already done so, please send your contribution today. If you don't, who will? May the Great Architect bless this Craft and remind us of those who are in need, and what good we can continue to do.

Robert D. Stack, PGT State Chairman

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around the state

QUEST XXIV

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE The Queens United Education Seminar Today (QUEST), the longest continuous running seminar in the Grand Lodge of New York was held on March 13, 2004 in Advance Masonic Temple in Astoria, Queens. The theme this year was "Queens Masons in Action." The program was geared to the Masters and Officers of the District. Handouts included preprinted material from the Masonic Service Association: (1) One Hundred & One Questions about Freemasonry (2) The Hat & Gavel (3) Think Tank for Junior Wardens (4) Notebook for Masters (5) 12 Short Talk Bulletins. The printed material included: (1) Check List for Lodge Meetings (2) Lodge Visitors Information Sheet (3) I'm Master of My Lodge... What Do I Put in My Communication? (4) MASTER ­ Manager of Your Lodge; and (5) I've Just Been Installed as a Lodge Officer.... What is Expected of Me? These were the most informative QUEST handouts provided throughout the years. The Grand Treasurer R\W\ Neal I. Bidnick provided a very informative, focused and motivational Keynote address and R\W\ Herbert M. Groce, Jr. was a most inspirational luncheon speaker. He reminded us of the important role the scriptures play in our spiritual development. The 50 Brothers in attendance (including the R\W\ James Sullivan, Junior Grand Warden, and several Past Grand Treasurers, Right Worshipfuls: Robert Stack, John "Bud" Prout, Gilbert Savitzky and Past Grand Marshal Vincent Libone) along with current Grand Standard Bearer R\W\ Kenneth Wagner) were treated to a most informative morning of Masonic Education. The agenda consisted of various speakers providing presentations on: (1) Why I Joined Masonry (2) My Year(s) as Master (3) Masters/Wardens ­ Duties/Prerogatives (4) Preparation of a Meeting Notice. The entire day was video taped and will be converted from VCR tapes to DVDs into four logical groups, to be utilized as educational programs in the District/Lodges. The following are Comments and Suggestions from the Critique forms: COMMENTS: · Every speaker without exception provide a least one new idea. · Copies of the speeches/speakers should be made available at the Lodge level. · QUEST XXIV content should be brought back to the Lodges and the District. · Top notch right on target ­ all speakers had excellent knowledge of their subject. · The Q&A session provided good interaction - a great way to impart information. Prepared questions addressed subjects not covered. · The Grand Treasurer provided an excellent presentation dealing with the tragedy on Long Island ­ Grand Lodge, The Grand Master is being very proactive in the handling of the incident. SUGGESTIONS: · Provide Masonic History and ancient traditions. · How to Mentor new Brothers. · Provide "Art of Public Speaking" for non speakers. · The challenge is to do a better job promoting ­ a must for all Masters and Officers. · Those who attended have to be envoys in their Lodges to promote what they learned. · March 12, 2005 the 25th Anniversary ­ Dick Fletcher, Executive Director, MSA will be the Keynote speaker and the Grand Master M\W\ Edward Trosin will provide an address. M\W\ Bruce Widger present in 1981 at the first QUEST, will provide his input, and all previous QUEST Keynote and Luncheon speakers (a who's who of NY Masons) and all previous participants will be invited. Cordially and Fraternally, The Seminar Committee

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SHRINE BURN CENTER FOR CHILDREN

Just recently I was made aware of two children who were burned. One involved a young child who was burned on their leg from the knee to the ankle. It happened while the child was playing with other children. They were playing with matchbox cars and one child thought the cars would go faster if they put gasoline on them. The gasoline became ignited and the child was burned. For five months the Mom changed the bandage daily and after two surgeries the burn was still bright red. I arranged for them to visit the Shriners Burn Hospital in Boston. They treated the wound and the child was home in two weeks. My second incident involved a child who was at the kitchen table, noticed a cup of hot tea nearby and while reaching for it, spilled it down their front and caused chest and mouth burns. The child was initially treated in Boston, but because the family was visiting from California, treatment continued at the Shrine Burn Hospital in Sacramento. If you know of a child from birth to age 18 that needs orthopaedic or burn care, call 1-800-237-5055 or visit the Shrine website at www.shrinershq.org for more information. Sincerely and Fraternally, R\W\ William W. Dowden, Secretary Rhinebeck Lodge No. 432, Dutchess District Emeritus Member, Board of Governors, Springfield Hospital

masonic outlook 1927 issue

ONE COUNTRY, ONE FLAG

A LETTER TO THE BRETHREN

Published in the Masonic Outlook - September 1927 Research by W\ Gene Vollmer ­ Red Jacket Lodge No. 646 T WAS ONE HUNDRED and fifty years ago, and within the boundaries of our beloved State, that America's flag was first unrolled to the skies to receive its baptism in battle. By all the tokens appropriate to a devout patriotism this is, therefore, Flag Year, during which, at suitable times, as men and as Masons, it is fitting that we express our obeisance to the Emblem of our Nation. At its last Annual Communication, Grand Lodge expressed its loyalty in response to a stirring resolution presented by our revered Senior Past Grand Master, M\W\ John W. Vrooman, himself a living exemplar of patriotic dedication. In further fulfillment of the devotion there expressed I have sent to the Worshipful Masters instructions that each and every one of our Lodges shall in some appropriate manner celebrate the sesqui-centennial of the Flag, either in a separate ceremony or in conjunction with Brother George Washington'' birthday, on November 4--itself a festival of patriotism. Therefore--I now summon each of you to join with your Master and your Lodge in some heartfelt expression of your love for that Emblem which is America's visible soul. Let us pay our devotions to our land, to its government and people, remembering how that land was won at the cost of many lives, wrested from the wilderness in toil and anguish, cemented in blood, and made holy by the aspirations of the generations. We love our country--it was the land of our fathers; it is our land; it will be the land of our children. Its history is our pride, its honor our charge--its future is in our keeping. We Masons revere our country--it gave welcome two centuries ago to the pioneers of Masonry, and during the generations has been so hospitable to our brotherhood that today America is the most Masonic country in the world. Its heroes, statesmen, leaders, men of renown in every field of endeavor--countless numbers have bowed before our altars, finding in our Mysteries an expression of all that is most fundamental in our nation. Conscious, then, of that Mystic Tie which binds us to every patriot's grave, engaging our loyalty to the ideals of America, let us offer a prayer to the Sovereign Grand Architect of the Universe, beseeching Him to hold us fast in peace so long as peace is honorable, and to strengthen us for battle should honor call us to war. "Oh, thou whose equal purpose runs In drops of rain or stream of suns, And with a soft compulsion rolls The green earth on her snowy poles; O thou who keepest in thy ken The times of flowers, the dooms of men, Stretch out a mighty wing above-- |Be tender to the land we love! "When in the dark eternal tower The star-clock strikes her trial hour, And for her help no more avail Her sea-blue shield, her mountain-mail, But sweeping wide, from gulf to lakes, The battle on her forehead breaks, Throw thou a thunderous wing above-- Be lightning for the land we love!" Sincerely and fraternally,

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Grand Master

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masonic medical research laboratory

MMRL

2150 Bleecker Street · Utica, NY 13501-1787 (315) 735-2217 Donation Hotline: 1-888-888-MMRL www.mmrl.edu

BRUGADA SYNDROME DELVED INTO IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

Feb 10, 2004 New York, NY - An extensive New York Times article chronicles the early mystery surrounding Brugada syndrome, described as one of the most lethal diseases imaginable, and highlights the recent attempts to identify a genetic basis of the disease. [1] In discussing the story of Brian Nelson, a Seattle resident recently diagnosed with Brugada syndrome, the article, written by reporter Sandeep Jauhar, notes that as many as 12% of all sudden deaths and roughly 20% of deaths in patients with structurally normal hearts are attributed to the disease. Brian Nelson According to the Times, most victims die in their sleep. Moreover, once patients develop symptoms unexplained fainting being the most common there is a 50% chance patients will die within 10 years if they do not receive treatment. Currently, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the only effective treatment. "The typical patient is 40 years old, in the best moment of his life, very active, very productive, with no previous history of anything, and all of a sudden one night he never wakes up," Dr. Ramon Brugada (Masonic Medical Research Laboratory, Utica, NY) is quoted in the article. Dr. Brugada Jauhar reports that the number of diagnosed cases of Brugada syndrome has grown exponentially over the past 10 years. In Southeast Asia, the disease is endemic and is the most second most common cause of death, after motor-vehicle accidents, in men under age 40. In some areas, it affects 2% of the population, writes Jauhar. In the US, Dr. Charles Antzelvitch (Masonic Medical Research Laboratory), director of the laboratory where much of the research on the syndrome has been done, told the Times that one in 5000 people may be at risk for sudden death from Brugada syndrome. Pictures not part of original article. Furnished by MMRL.

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

NIGHTMARES & WIDOW GHOSTS

The article also goes on to describe some of the earliest known theories about the disease. The paper notes that Dr. Gonzalo Aponte, a pathologist at the Naval Hospital in Guam, first wrote a paper in 1960 describing 11 cases of young Filipino men who had died in their sleep. In each case, the manner of their deaths was similar, with victims moaning, gasping for breath, and thrashing violently before dying. With nothing to explain the deaths, Aponte learned that sudden death of apparently healthy men was not uncommon in the Philippines. According to the Times, villagers called it bangungot, the Tagalog word for "nightmares," and the syndrome was described in a Philippine medical journal as far back as 1917. In Thailand, it has been called lai-tai. Quoting local legend, the Times explains that many believe "widow ghosts" take men away in the dead of night, leading some men to disguise themselves as women at bedtime in hopes of staving off such deadly specters. In the US, the disease first came to the attention of public-health authorities during the late 1970's. In 1986, Dr. Pedro Brugada saw the first case in Europe, although the case was not recognized as such at the time; on examining the patient's EKG, he saw an unusual pattern, the signal shaped almost like a shark's fin. After collecting eight of these highly unusual EKGs, Brugada and his brother, Dr. Josep Brugada, published their results in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, where the new clinical entity was later named Brugada syndrome. During the late 1990's, a consortium led by Antzelvitch and the Brugada brothers set out to discover the genetic basis of the disease. Basing their research on the genetic pool of three families with the disease, the scientists identified a mutation in SCN5a, a gene that controls the flow of sodium ions into heart cells. When the gene was sequenced in 200 control patients, none had the mutation, Jauhar reports. The Times explains that, unlike most heart-rhythm abnormalities, those that accompany Brugada are set off by a slow heartbeat, explaining why the deaths usually occur at night. The paper notes that the first randomized trial of ICDs in Brugada patients was published last year in Circulation. The small study was stopped early as ICDs appeared to extend patients' lives, the Times reports. The paper notes that experts believe most cases of Brugada syndrome remain undiagnosed and screening should begin early in the teenage years. "The sooner you get it, the more likely you are to catch something before it becomes a problem," Antzelvitch told the Times.

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educational assistance progam

R\W\ H. Stephen Lieb, Chairman 33 Nelson Road, Scarsdale, NY 10583 (914) 723-4476 e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

THE PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE RECIPIENTS OF THE 2004 EDUCATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:

Saturday, July 10, 2004 Damascus Shrine Temple 979 Bay Rd. Webster, NY. At 1 P.M. Sunday, July 11, 2004 Masonic Community Center 394 Princetown Rd. Schenectady, NY At 5 P.M. Saturday, July 10, 2004 Ismailia Shrine Temple 1600 Southwestern Blvd Buffalo, NY At 5 P.M. Sunday, July 25, 2004 Centerville Lodge 648 Centerville Place N. Syracuse, NY At 1 P.M. Saturday, July 11, 2004 Masonic Home Campus 2150 Bleeker Street Utica, NY At 1 P.M. Saturday, July 31, 2004 Grand Lodge Building 71 West 23rd Street New York, NY At 1P.M.

All Brethren are cordially invited to attend the 2004 Education Assistance Program Presentations at the above locations and dates. Our Grand Master, M\W\ Edward R. Trosin, will be present at these presentations and will continue the tradition of congratulating the students and families. The programs will start promptly at 1:00 or 5:00 PM. Assisting the Grand Master will be the Trustees of the Masonic Hall and Home who have funded the program for the children, grandchildren and widows of our Fraternity. Special thanks to the Lodge Secretaries who assisted the Scholarship Candidates with their applications. This will be the ninth-year for this outstanding program. Your Grand Lodge and Trustees have assisted over 4,500 students, with grants totaling almost 4 million dollars, in their pursuit of higher learning. All Brethren and their families are welcome to be part of these special events. Help us congratulate the children, grandchildren, and widows of the members in our Fraternity. Make reservations with your District Deputy if you would like to attend.

AKRON LODGE NO. 527 PRESENTS DEWITT CLINTON AWARD

Anthony E. Jacobik, District Deputy Grand Master of the Third Erie District. A proud husband, R\W\ Norman Taylor, escorted his wife Natalie to a standing ovation from the audience. Norman and Natalie Taylor are well known in their hometown of Alden for their unselfish volunteer work. Mrs. Taylor volunteers her time and talent at the Erie County Home, the Alden Senior Citizens Center, her church and to a Boy Scout Troop of all handicapped adults known to be the only such Troop in the country. (l-r) R\W\ Anthony E. Jacobik, R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Mrs. Natalie Taylor and R\W\ Norman Taylor The Akron Lodge was filled to capacity as family, friends, community leaders and Masons from both Akron and Alden gathered to witness the presentation of the highly coveted DeWitt Clinton Award for outstanding community service to Mrs. Natalie Taylor. The award is the highest form of recognition to a non-Mason given by the Grand Lodge of the State of New York. The award ceremony was honored by the presence of R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master and R\W\ Following the presentation of the Certificate and a donation by the Lodge to Mrs. Taylor's chosen charity by R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, the gathering was moved by her acceptance speech, which further revealed Natalie's touchstone is Challenge. It is said, every person has the ability to do good things. No matter what their field of endeavor, a person must measure themselves against the demands of the world. To rise to the challenge. Ultimately this is the reason people build bridges, climb mountains, and do thousands of other things that manifest personal achievement and satisfaction.

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around the state

CHERRY CREEK WAVERLY LODGE NO. 350 LODGE NO. 384 MASON RECEIVES 55-YEAR MASON CELEBRATES AWARD IN FLORIDA Sarasota, Florida 60 YEARS OF SERVICE

Cherry Creek, New York

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

(l-r) David Stalker and R\W\ Charles Van Etten In January 2004 R\W\ Charles Van Etten celebrated 60 years of Masonry and also celebrated his 80th birthday. Brother Van Etten is a living treasure for our Masonic Community and is still an active member participating in degree work.

(l-r) M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master;W\ Arthur Wilkinson and R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master In January 2004 at the Sojourners Luncheon in Sarasota M\W\ Carl J. Fitje presented a 55-Year Certificate to W\ Arthur Wilkinson. W\ Arthur Wilkinson was Master of Waverly Lodge No. 350, which is in the Chemung-Schuyler-Tioga District.

BROTHER KENNETH W. BONESTEEL RECEIVES DANIEL CARTER BEARD MASONIC SCOUTER AWARD FROM PHOENIX LODGE NO. 58

Troy, New York On May 16, 2003, Phoenix Lodge No.58 in Lansingburgh, honored Brother Kenneth W. Bonesteel at a gala event with the Daniel Carter Beard Masonic Scouter Award. Daniel Carter Beard was one of the founders of the Boy Scout Movement worldwide. Daniel Carter Beard founded a male youth program in the late 1800's and later became the first National Commissioner of the Boy Scouts of America. Brother Beard was raised as a Master Mason in Mariners Lodge No. 67, in NYC. This award is a national recognition approved by the Boy Scouts of America and promoted by the Grand Lodge of the State of New York. Freemasonry is based on service and the exemplification of moral truth, which is essential to good role models. Brother Bonesteel exemplifies those principles and was recognized for his years of continued dedication to scouting and personal involvement in camping and summer camp. Ken has been involved with scouting for over 50 years having been a Provisional Scoutmaster at Rotary Scout Reservation and affectionately known as "Mr. Summer Camp". In 1995 he received The Silver Beaver award, the highest scouting award a civilian can get in the United States.

Row 2 (l-r) John Tybush, Scout Troop Leader, Troop No. 537; Michael Maxwell, District Director for the Rensselaer County, representing Twin Rivers Council, Boy Scouts of America. Row 1 (l-r) W\ Ralph Shaffer, Past Master of Phoenix Lodge No. 58 and Master of Ceremonies; R\W\ David E. Barnes, District Deputy Grand Master of the Rensselaer-Schenectady Masonic District; Mrs. Kenneth W. Bonesteel; Kenneth W. Bonesteel, Scouter Award Recipient; R\W\ Richard L. Alber, Grand Director of Ceremonies; W\ Kenneth Stannard, Past Master of Phoenix Lodge No. 58.

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masonic outlook 1927 issue

ON CERTAIN MASONIC SYMBOLS

Embodied in the ritual of the Craft are age-old aspirations, ideals and beliefs

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE Written by H. L. Haywood, Frontispiece by F. R. Gruger Published in the Masonic Outlook, September 1927 · Researched by W\ Gene Vollmer, Red Jacket Lodge No. 646 ALTHOUGH THE RITUAL, as used in our Lodges, owes much to the past two centuries, both in content and form, and owes still more to the practices of medieval Operative Masons, there are elements in it that never could have been created by modern or by medieval men. Those elements, bearing unmistakably a primitive stamp, embody germs of thought or ceremony that must have originated thousands of years ago. Like all cultural materials that survive through many changes of civilization, they have undergone many transformations, changing from time to time in conformity with changed views of life and the world, so that they have a meaning for us today quite different from that which they bore in ancient times; nevertheless the primitive stamp remains, and that stamp is often a clue to correct interpretation. It is difficult to discuss any part of the esoteric ritual in print, because our obligation forbids us to write anything by which the profane might secure the secrets of Freemasonry unlawfully. It may be possible, however, to discuss certain points in a manner that will not violate that obligation and yet will be intelligible to the initiated. In so doing this article will not attempt to exhaust the meanings of the symbols or ceremonies in question, but will seek rather to reveal in a measure their great antiquity, so that when the reader next witnesses them he will be able to detect the ancient voices which, like the sunken bell in the old tale, toll through them with old-world notes. When a man takes a mystic journey from East to West by way of the south he is repeating a ceremony that was widely practiced tens of thousands of years ago, and continues to be practiced, in one form or another, by most of the peoples throughout the northern hemisphere. That ceremony grew out of the primitive belief that men may gain control over the forces of nature by imitating them. So believing, it was natural for men to seek to control the sun, the shining of which, with its reappearance after its apparent departure in mid-winter, was so necessary to the maintenance of human existence. To make sure that the sun would continue to pour down on them its effulgence of light and warmth, that never, however hard beset by winter winds and the long nights, would it fail to re-visit them in the spring, they imitated its movements across the sky by their own solemn movement about an altar, from East to West by way of the South ­ thereby, according to their own beliefs in such magic, helping him to overthrow his ruffian enemies and to carry on his all-important tasks. Such an idea has not yet died out of the world. The Indian medicine man among the desert tribes in our own Southwest seeks by the same method to bring rain to the sun-burned fields. Dressing himself in ceremonial costume, he imitates the rain, carrying a painted image of the sun on his breast, swishing a wand to imitate the wind, pounding a drum to make thunder, hurling darts lightning-like, and tossing sand in the air after the fashion of falling rain. According to the fond beliefs of his tribe this brings clouds up from the ocean across the mountains, bellying with rain to be emptied on the scant patches of gourd, pumpkin, and grain. Such was the germ of the idea at the centre of the mystic journey which a man takes from East to West by way of the South. It is a ceremonial by which he expresses his sense of kinship with all natural forces. It is an expression of the idea of teamwork, of cooperation, of esprit de corps. Left to his own resources an individual is helpless; it is only when his own life is geared into the lives of his fellows, so that he keeps step with them, his energies rhyming with theirs, that he is able even to survive, to say nothing of accomplishing anything in those arts by which he is able to lift himself above the animal-like level of mere subsistence. THE ANTIQUITY of this ceremony-- called "circumambulation" in the technical language of the Craft--wells into modernity tying the present to an ancient time, and so establishing a brotherhood of thought across many centuries. The same may be said of another ceremony, occurring in only one of the Degrees, which concern itself mysteriously, in a fashion that must puzzle nearly everybody, with certain things of a metallic character. What have metallic tokens to do with Masonic life? What point is there in having a candidate for the brotherly circle give any thought to matters so strange? This ceremony also harks back to primitive times--probably in large measure to the ancient Babylonians, the influence of whose religion and culture poured into the world through many channels, even to this day. According to this ancient belief each planet, including the sun and the moon, wielded a fateful influence over men. Out of such a belief came astrology, which even yet is a living thing for many persons-- the theory being that every individual is born under the influence of a star, or a house of stars, so that from one's birth hour the astrologer strives to predict fortunes that will ensue. At a remote time the planets, as then known, and including the sun and moon, were arranged in this sequence: Moon, Mercury, Venus, Sun, mars, Jupiter, Saturn. Now it chanced that the metals known at that period were also seven in number, and men divined a connection between the lustre of those metals and of the planets, whence developed the belief that each planet had on earth a corresponding metal-- gold for the sun, silver for the Moon, iron for Mars, quicksilver for mercury, tin for Jupiter, copper for Venus, and lead for Saturn. As the astrologers developed their theories about such matters they came to attach to each planet and its corresponding metal a definite character: Mercury was the prince of wisdom, artifice, and cunning; Venus was the lady of love; Mars was ruler of violence and war; Jupiter was a ruler of gods and men; Saturn was lord of turculence; both the Sun and the Moon were propitious, the former by day, the latter by night.

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masonic outlook 1927 issue

Believing that a metal called down the influence of a planet, the Now it happens that in the written form of Hebrew no vowels astrologers were careful as to how they handled the metals, what were used, these being understood by the reader, so that the metals they could keep in their possession, and where they Sacred Name, as transliterated in English, was written as could safely take them. Iron might lead one into warfare, priJHWH. When it came to pass, due perhaps to some calamity, vate or tribal, under the influence of Mars; cooper might like the Babylonian wars, that he High Priest died, or was killed involve one in troublous affairs of the heart; lead might draw before he could pass the pronunciation on to a successor, the down Saturn's truculence, and lead to quarrels--and so on. It Name was lost. The consonants, however, remained on is easy to understand that when a group of men were to gather record--but what were the vowels? How had it been spoken? in conference, or were to meet to form In due course substitutes were found (the some social circle, they would see to it writing "Jehovah" contains one substitute that nobody had in his possession a metal set of vowels), but always there was a THE MYSTIC Journey which a that might draw upon them influences to search for That Which Had Been Lost. man takes from East to West by cause disunion, bickerings, and quarrels. Also we can understand that in their reliThis search took many shapes. It became way of the South, it is a ceregious and other solemn convocations, as a ruling idea among the Jewish theolomonial by which he expresses in initiation into their mysteries, they gians in Alexandria; and long afterwards, his sense of kinship with all would be even more careful to shut out perhaps in the thirteenth century, it natural forces. It is an expresall disturbing influences by seeing to it emerged as a central motif in Kabbalism, sion of the idea of teamwork, of that metals were left outside. a system of Jewish theosophy which profoundly affected theologians in Europe, cooperation, of esprit de corps. The original idea in our own ceremony during and following the Reformation, Left to his own resources an involving certain things of a metallic kind and which, so many authorities believed, individual is helpless; it is only now becomes clear. We are not to supfiltered somewhat into Freemasonry when his own life is geared into pose that our Masonic forbears had any before the Grand Lodge era. the lives of his fellows, so that thought of enforcing astrological ideas he keeps step with them, his upon us by retaining this survived fragDuring the Middle Ages the old tradiment of primitive lore in our Ritual; we tion, merged with the story of the Fall in energies rhyming with theirs, may rather believe that they--to whom Eden, and associated with a plethora of that he is able even to survive, the astrological practices were not yet an folk-tales, myths, and legends, became to say nothing of accomplishaltogether forgotten tradition--saw in the center of a system of symbolism in its ing anything in those arts by this fragment a happy symbol by which own right. As such it emerged into literawhich he is able to lift himself the candidate would be reminded that ture, music, drama, and art, taking a the first law of a lodge is harmony, and thousand disguises. Now it is the Holy above the animal-like level of that no man has any claim on its fellowGraal that is lost, and Arthur and his mere subsistence." ship until he has divested himself of the Knights go in search of it; now it is the small ambitions, the unhappy prejudices, Lost Sanctuary, dreamed of by mystics; and the mean traits of nature or habit by again it is Jerusalem that is lost, and the which the music of harmony is swallowed up by the jangling Crusaders seek to recover it; or it is a key to some city, or a Book brass of disunion. of Wisdom, or the Philosopher's Stone, or the Elixir of Life. In our own times we find it emerging in VanDyke's "The Blue The two examples thus far cited--the mystic journey and the Flower," in Maeterlinck's "The Blue Bird," while in Kipling's things of a metallic character--suffice to make it clear that he delectable "Kim" it is a sacred river for which search is made. who enters our Masonic house of symbolism will find there But whether it is flower, bird, river, sanctuary, the sacred chalthings very old, even ancient, many of the meanings of which ice--always it is something rare and precious that is lost, like have become lost to most men in our times. In a certain sense the chord from a strain of music. There is a loss; there is a parhe must search for that which has become lost. tial recovery; and in the end the seekers must be content with some substitute. The fact reminds us of another of our ceremonies, also brought to us from past times, which shines out in the dark mysteriousIn our own version of the ancient legend it is not merely a word ness of our Third Degree. It is the search for That which Was of so many letters to seek which we set out on a journey; it is a Lost, always understand as a Lost word, or Ineffable Name, the secret of wisdom, symbolized by Masonic Light--wisdom in a recovery of which is wisdom's rarest trophy. This singularly world where the wisest are as children seeking a way, the wisbeautiful page of symbolism is like the book which St. John saw dom that springs from experience, based on knowledge, and in his vision, written within and without in strange speech, diflying at the service of good character. The youth (Apprentice) ficult for a man to read in these days. But it is possible to read sees a gleam of it, but lacks experience; the man at his meridisomewhat in that page, here a little and there a little, sufficient an, possessed of both experience and knowledge (Fellow Craft), to show us what its message is. has gone midway but lacks yet the final testings of character; it is the Master, in his maturity, having known the suffering of There is an old tradition among the Jews, partly based on hissorrow, and perhaps tragedy, who learns it, perhaps in fragtory no doubt, partly imaginative, which may be briefly recamentary form, but real nevertheless. pitulated, overlooking many details, after this fashion: Such is but a hint concerning a deep matter in our ritual. It is The ancient Hebrews, like other peoples of their time, held all filled with deep matters, each with its own light and lore, their name of God to be too sacred for common use. One of worthy of study and research. Blended of old and new, of glanctheir early laws forbade them to speak it distinctly; all of their ing lights and half-lights, interwritten with the most ancient laws hedged it about against profane or idle use, so that in daily wisdom and the most modern ideas, it stands to offer rich speech men referred to Deity in an elliptical manner, as The reward to every Mason who reflects upon it. Highest, the All Wise, etc. In time, only the High Priest was permitted to use it at all, and he only on the great Day of Atonement.

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

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27

camp turk

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

THERE'S STILL TIME TO PUT A BOY IN THIS PICTURE THIS JULY!

STOP! Please read this important message. You can make a difference in a young boy's summer this year, but you must act now. LOOK! We still have limited openings in this summer's two 2-week Camp Turk sessions for boys only, starting July 4th. Sorry the girls encampment is full! The price is still a great bargain... only $450 for two full weeks. Help a deserving young man have a summer vacation to remember...you'll be glad you helped! CALL CAMP TURK NOW (315) 942-6716 or email [email protected] CAMP TURK THE MASONIC YOUTH CAMP This is going to be another exciting summer at Camp Turk! Our campers will be enjoying swimming, wakeboarding, water-skiing, knee-boarding, tubing, kayaks, canoes, rowboats, sailboats, windsurfing, fishing, tennis, softball, baseball, archery, volleyball, badminton, basketball, field hockey, soccer, Olympics, arts and crafts, computer instruction, hiking (in and out of camp), one overnight hike (on camp grounds), day trips, drama, band, chorus, aerobics, library, movies, newspaper, talent shows, plays, dances - JUST TO NAME A FEW!!! WHAT IS CAMP TURK? Camp Turk is an overnight camp for children between the ages of 9 to 16 years of age subsidized by the Trustees of the Masonic Hall and Home and by the Masons of New York. Participation is open to children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews of Masons, as well as order of Constellation for Girls, DeMolay, Rainbow and Triangle. Any active Mason may also sponsor a camper who does not come from a Masonic family. AGE LIMITS We accept campers between the ages of 9 to 16. COSTS The costs are $400.00 for a two-week session, plus a $50.00 non-refundable registration fee - $450.00 total. Fees for the first session are due by June 1st for the first session and by July 1st for the second and third sessions. APPLICATION DEADLINE There is no application deadline. We will except campers as long as we have room for them. Camp is on a first come first serve basis. NOTE: At the present time we only have openings for Session I and Session II (boys camp) we have NO GIRLS openings for the 2004 camping sessions. If you are interested in adding a girl's name to the waiting list in the event we receive a cancellation, please give Mollie Denslow a call at (315) 942-6716. DIRECTIONS TO CAMP TURK Camp Turk is located in Woodgate, New York: From east or west, take the New York State Thruway (I-90) to Exit 31 - Utica, N.Y. Travel north on New York State Route 12 to Alder Creek. Bear right at Alder Creek on Route 28, north to Woodgate. One mile north of the blinking caution light you will see a sign "Masonic Home Camp, Round Lake." Bear to the left on Round Lake Road. Continue 2 1/2 miles on Round Lake Road to Camp.

IMPORTANT DATES FOR 2004

June 26th St. John's Day at the Masonic Care Community in Utica, New York (stop in and visit our booth) June 27th ­ July 4th Staff orientation (Staff ONLY) July 4th - July 17th Session I: Boys' Encampment (13 ­ 16 years of age) July 18th - August 31st Session II: Boys' Encampment (9 ­ 12 years of age) August 1st ­ 14th Session III:Girls' Encampment (9 ­16 years of age) July 24th Grand Master's Day / Family Day (see attached for further details)

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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camp turk

ST. JOHN'S DAY IN UTICA, NEW YORK Stop by and visit our booth on St. John's Day ­ June 26th at the Masonic Home in Utica, New York. If you would like to have more information about camp, we will have our new brochure/application packet available along with videotape of the camp to view and many new items for sale. INTERESTED IN VIEWING A VCR TAPE OR SLIDE PROGRAM? There is NO charge to view the Camp Turk video tape. Simply call Al Washburn at (315) 7380301 and he will send you the video tape along with a self addressed envelope to return it. HAVE QUESTIONS OR NEED ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONTACT: BEFORE JUNE 25TH AND AFTER AUGUST 16TH Mollie Denslow, Camp Turk Secretary PO Box 132 4055 State Route 12D Boonville, NY 13309 Telephone/Fax: (315) 942-6716 Email: [email protected] FROM JUNE 25TH TO AUGUST 16TH Camp Turk Attn: Mollie Denslow Round Lake Road Woodgate, NY 13494 Telephone: (315) 392-2081 Fax: (315) 392-2028 Email: [email protected] The Camp Turk Committee would once again like to thank all those who contributed to the CHARLES J. SCHWENK SR. SCHOLARSHIP FUND, and those who made contributions to our summer camping program. Camp Turk would not be the success it is today without your support!

CAMP TURK BOOTH AT ST. JOHN'S DAY

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

(l-r) Mollie Denslow, Administrative Assistant; Al Washburn Take time out and visit our booth on St. John's Day. We have hats, T-shirts, sweatshirts and pants, stuffed animals for sale. You name it we have it for yourself or your children. We are open on Saturday, June 26th from 9:00 a.m. ­ 4:00 p.m.

MILLENNIUM LODGE NO. 1179 BROTHER RECEIVES 55-YEAR AWARD AT ORLANDO LUNCHEON

(l-r) R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master; Brother Gilbert C. Ringleben, recipient; M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master On January 29, 2004, a luncheon was held at Bahia Shrine Temple in Orlando, Florida, at which time Brother Gilbert C. Ringleben (Millennium Lodge No. 1179, Amherst, New York) was presented his 55-Year Certificate and Pin by M\W\ Carl J. Fitje and R\W\ Edward R. Trosin. Brother Ringleben was accompanied by his wife, Shirley, Past Matron of Bethlehem Chapter No. 634 Order of the Eastern Star, Kenmore, New York and his daughter, Gail Blackburn, Past Beloved Queen of Gamma Triangle, Kenmore, New York. The Florida Sojourners Luncheons are held annually in Orlando, Lake Worth, Sarasota and Tampa for the benefit of New York Masons living or visiting in Florida to be able to meet with the Grand Master and other Grand Line Officers.

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camp turk

GRAND MASTER'S DAY AT CAMP TURK SATURDAY, JULY 24, 2004

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

8:15 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. Flag Ceremony At flag pole by waterfront Breakfast for Grand Line Officers and their guests with the campers in the dining hall Campers scheduled activities Chicken Barbecue Everyone is welcome! Eat together near barbecue pit located between dining hall and lake (Please remember to make a reservation) Background music by band Ball Game - Athletic Field (Grand Master's Team vs. the Tours of Camp Rides on the Lady of the Lake Camp Store Open 3:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. cue area) 6:30 p.m. Flag Ceremony at flagpole by waterfront Talent Show Open activity for campers Visitors leave Light Supper for Grand Line and campers ONLY Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Salads, Cold Drinks, Coffee (in barbe-

EVERYONE IS WELCOME!

Have you ever been to Camp Turk? Well now is the time to come! Bring your family and friends and future campers to Camp Turk. You are all cordially and fraternally invited to join with Grand Master M\W\ Edward R. Trosin at the annual Grand Master's Day / Family Day at Camp Turk which is hosted by the Committee on Camp Turk, R\W\ Dennis Breheny, Chairman of the Camp Turk Committee. This year's fun-filled Grand Master's Day / Family Day will take place Saturday, July 24, 2004, which is during the second boy's camping season. This is an excellent opportunity to visit and observe activities at one of the jewels of Grand Lodge. We would like to have you bring a child who will be able to attend camp in the near future so they can see the camp and become familiar with the camp programs. You will notice the steady improvements to the campgrounds, buildings and the variety of programs offered to the campers, thanks to the Trustees, the generosity of the New York State Masons and the Camp Turk staff. The Committee hopes you will take this opportunity to see for yourself what a great and magnificent place Camp Turk has become that gives our young people three weeks in the beautiful Adirondack Mountains. In order to assure ample food and beverages, please complete the coupon and forward it, by July 1st, to Mollie A. Denslow, Administrative Assistant to Camp Turk, PO Box 132, Boonville, New York, 13309. There is NO charge for food, etc. For information, please call (315) 942-6716. See Camp Turk article for directions to the camp.

2:00 p.m. Campers)

GRAND MASTER'S DAY / FAMILY DAY AT CAMP TURK - SATURDAY, JULY 24, 2004

Yes! I want to be a part of the Grand Master's Day / Family Day at Camp Turk on Saturday, July 24th Please make reservations for _____ people including myself for the barbecue at Noon on Saturday Name:________________________________________________ Lodge Name and No.____________________________________ Home Address:_________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

NOTES FOR VISITORS

No dogs allowed No smoking allowed Swimming will be allowed in the roped off area only No use of boats except rides on the Lady of the Lake Other activities are permitted upon availability of counselors for supervision Please understand that these rules are in effect for the campers and visitors safety.

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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Day Telephone No. (

) ____________________________

RETURN TO: Mollie A. Denslow, Administrative Assistant to Camp Turk PO Box 132 · Boonville, NY 13309 or call: (315) 942-6716 or email: [email protected]

around the state

MOUNT VERNON LODGE NO. 263 BROTHERS RECEIVE 45-YEAR CERTIFICATES IN FLORIDA

R\W\MOSES HYMAN RECEIVES CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION

New York City

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

(l-r) Brother Robert E. Devling, R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master; Brother David W. Smith and R\W\ Frank A. Smith (are brothers of M\W\ Carl J. Smith); M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master The Class of November 24, 1958 raised at Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 263 received their 45-Year Certificates from the M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master and assisted by R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master at the New York Luncheon in Tampa, Florida on January 24, 2004. (l-r) R\W\ Thomas Paglia, R\W\ Moses Hyman and M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master

FIRST KINGS HOLD FLORIDA LUNCHEON

(l-r) R\W\ Anthony Barbato, R\W\ Sheldon Altenhaus, M\W\ Gary Henningsen, M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, R\W\ Cyril Francis and R\W\ Dennis Corlette The First Kings Masonic District held their Second Annual Florida Luncheon on Friday, January 30, 2004 at Gabby's Restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Not forgetting is not in the lexicon of these Masons. Started in 2003, the Brothers in Brooklyn have decided to hold their own Florida function, and this year, the Grand Line joined in the festivities. Also, a number of Brothers came down from New York to add to the celebration. This luncheon was started in 2003 as a means of thanking the Florida Brothers for their continued support and to provide a means of having those residing permanently in Florida, our well known "snow birds" and the Northern contingent to interact on a social level. The event has grown from the first one and it was most impressive that the Grand Line was in attendance, especially the Grand Master and Grand Secretary, both of whom hail from Brooklyn Lodges. Co-organized by R\W\ Sheldon Altenhaus (in Florida) and R\W\ Robert C. Rodie (in New York), and over 50 Brothers and ladies were in attendance. At the conclusion of this luncheon, plans are already started for the 2005 event, which should be even larger, hopefully to include the First, Second and Third Kings Districts. Speakers included emcee R\W\ Sheldon Altenhaus, R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master and M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master.

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grand ball

GRAND MASTER'S BALL HONORING M\W\ EDWARD R. TROSIN

GRAND MASTER OF MASONS IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE HOSTED BY THE THREE ERIE MASONIC DISTRICTS AND NIAGARA-ORLEANS DISTRICT, F. & A.M.

Saturday, October 23, 2004

TO BE HELD AT: BUFFALO MARRIOTT 1340 Millersport Hwy., Amherst, NY 14221 Tel: (716) 689-6900 · Fax: (716) 689-0483 For Room Reservations Call 1-800-334-4040 $99.00 - Single or Double Occupancy | (Check-in ­ Noon) (60 Rooms blocked until September 30, 2004) Social Hour: 5:30 - 7:00 PM Open Bar w/ Hot/Cold Hors d'oeuvres Music for your listing pleasure by Kevin Clark on the piano 7:15 PM Grand Line Entrance · Dinner to Follow 7:30 PM Music for your Dancing Pleasure by Buffalo Swing Orchestra DONATION $65.00 PER PERSON

MENU

Minestrone Soup Mixed Green Salad with Choice of Dressing Variety of Rolls with Butter CHOICE OF ENTREES PRIME RIB OF BEEF Slow-Roasted with Natural Juices · Oven Roasted Potato CHICKEN WELLINGTON Chicken Breast wrapped in a Pastry Shell · Topped off with a Creole Mustard Sauce · Oven Roasted Potato FRESH ATLANTIC SALMON Seared and served with a Dill Sauce · Rice Pilaf Chef's choice of Vegetable Fresh Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee, Assorted Herbal Teas Carmel Apple Granny MEN'S ATTIRE Tux or Dark Suit WOMEN'S ATTIRE: Semi-Formal

GRAND MASTERS BALL RESERVATION

for reservations to the Grand Master's Ball on October 23, 2004. Make Checks Payable to: "The Masonic Brotherhood Fund" (RESERVATION DEADLINE IS OCTOBER 13, 2004. NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE DOOR.) Enclosed is $

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

32

Name Address City Phone Lodge MEAL SELECTION: ___ Prime Rib of Beef

Wife

Title

State

Zip

No. ___ Chicken Wellington

District ___ Fresh Atlantic Salmon or OTHER

I Prefer to be seated with LODGE NO.

ALL SEATING IS RESERVED or DISTRICT

REMIT TO: W. King Mix, 248 Poinciana Pkwy., Cheektowaga, NY 14225-5212

grand ball

GRAND MASTER'S JOURNAL HONORING M\W\ EDWARD R. TROSIN

GRAND MASTER OF MASONS IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK

We agree to place the following advertisement

Make Checks Payable To: "THE MASONIC BROTHERHOOD FUND"

Gold Page (5x8 in.) . . . . . . . . . . . .$250.00 Silver Page (5x8 in.) . . . . . . . . . . .$200.00 Full White Page (5x8 in.) . . . . . . .$150.00 Half White Page (5x4 in.) . . . . . . . .$90.00 Quarter White Page (5x2 in.) . . . . .$50.00 Booster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00

Signature: (Please make a copy for your records)

Please Mail Contracts & Remittance to: W. King Mix 248 Poinciana Pkwy Cheektowaga, NY 14225-5212 Tel: (716) 684-5946 e-mail: [email protected] Make Checks Payable To: "THE MASONIC BROTHERHOOD FUND" Journal to be Distributed at the Grand Master's Ball on October 23, 2004 All Proceeds will go to "Child I.D. Program" ATTACH COPY OF AD: The Actual size of Journal will be 5" x 8" DEADLINE FOR JOURNAL ADS IS AUGUST 1, 2004

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO THE MASONIC BROTHERHOOD FUND REMITTANCE TO W. King Mix 248 Poinciana Pkwy., Cheektowaga, NY 14225-5212 Tel: (716) 684-5946 E-mail [email protected]

ALL PROCEEDS WILL GO TO "CHILD I.D. PROGRAM" "

GRAND MASTER'S JOURNAL

ATTACH YOUR AD, GRAPHICS, LOGOS, TEXT and REMIT

BOOSTER AD

$10.00 PER LINE OF 50 LETTERS (INCLUDES CHARACTERS AND SPACES) PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

Journal to be distributed at The Grand Master's Ball On October 23, 2004 SELLER LODGE/DISTRICT

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33

st. john's day

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Meet your new Grand Master, District Deputies and Staff Officers Tour the new Health Pavilion

Thur.& Fri., 8am to 4 pm Sat., every 1/2 hr.,10 am to 5 pm Sunday, 11 am to 3 pm

The New MMRL Molecular Genetics and Molecular Biology Wing

Tour the new MMRL Molecular Genetics and Molecular Biology Wing

Saturday, 10 am to 3 pm 11 am Dedication of Wing and RAM Conference Room

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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Schedule of Events also available on FORMS page of www.ESMason.com

Complimentary Breakfast

Sun., 9:30 am, prior to 10:30 am Service in Tompkins Chapel RSVP: (315) 798-4768 by June 21st

st. john's day

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

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35

chip program

Clarence J. Eckhoff, Chairman P.O. Box 118 Sackets Harbor, NY 13685 (315) 646-3564 e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY This article was written with the assistance of R\W\ Max Bovee of Rising Light Lodge No. 637, Belleville, New York in SERVICE Jefferson Masonic District. R\W\ Brother Bovee is a retired teacher and administrator and was primarily responsible for opening EVERY Elementary School (public and parochial) in Jefferson County to the Child Identification Program.

CHILD ID PROGRAM (CHIP)

OPENING THOSE SCHOOL HOUSE DOORS

The ultimate goal of Masons in offering the Child Identification Program as a community service throughout New York State, is to place in the hands of as many parents as possible the most valuable resource known to assist law enforcement officers in the identification and safe return of missing children. The most effective method of accomplishing this task is to provide the resources to videotape students, with parental permission, in the school building, during school hours, with a minimal loss of instructional time. In the Jefferson Masonic District, the Child ID Program, with the cooperation and support of all public and parochial schools is offered to all students in grades K through 6, every third year. This provides parents with new videotape at least twice during a child's elementary grades, once in Primary grades K through 3 and again in Intermediate grades 4 through 6. Parents receive the only copy of the video, properly labeled and dated, the same day the student is video taped at school. Using two cameras, a classroom of students can be completed within a 30-minute period, with a minimum disruption to the school day. It is essential that you work with the Superintendent and elementary principals to assure them how little disruption the Child ID Program causes in the typical school day. The school principal schedules the classes so as not to interfere with other scheduled activities and the school provides a suitable location to conduct the video taping session. Once the tape is verified for quality it is given to the child to take home. In each school setting we have easily been able to adjust and operate the program within the space and time allotted. Obviously, some situations work better than others. This is achieved by using the following procedure: · Meet with the School Superintendent. Explain the purpose of the program and how it can be conducted in his/her schools with minimum disruption. · Meet with school principal. Recommend classes can participate when they are scheduled for music, gym and/or art class. Children can do class work while waiting their turn to be taped before returning to their classroom. · Examine the areas where the cameras are to be set up. Both cameras in the gym may be OK, but both cameras in the gym while a class is being conducted is unsatisfactory. · Be courteous and be willing to bend. · Invite the principal and teachers to observe the event while in progress. · Upon completion present the principal with a Certificate of Appreciation.

HELP WANTED

Master Mason with professional Marketing experience OBJECTIVE To sell the Child Identification Program to the Fraternity and the Public. Those interested contact Clarence Eckhoff (Program Chairman) [email protected]

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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While some Lodges have offered the program to the schools in their community, on their own, we have found it most efficient to work together as a Masonic District team, to provide the service, using our own equipment and manpower. Occasionally TV sets and VCR's belonging to the school are used, if available. Over the past ten years we have received parental permission to videotape more than 90% of the enrolled students, on a consistent basis.

around the state

DIAMOND THISTLE LODGE NO. 555 HOST VISIT BY GRAND MASTER

Tarrytown, New York musical selections by Brother Frank Miller with solos by R\W\ Henry Battestin. The Diamond Thistle Degree Team, well known throughout the State from Long Island to Albany for portrayal of the Hiramic Drama displayed their marching prowess by spelling out the Grand Master's name in a crowded Lodge room. All were then treated to a unique and traditional Diamond Thistle Lodge presentation of Brother Robbie Burns, famous Scottish Poem, and "Address to the Haggis". W\ Joe Passaretti dressed in chefs jacket and hat marched into Lodge between the degree team honorary column to bagpipes and drums, placing the "Haggis" in the northeast corner of the Lodge followed by W\ Hugh Beveridge, as he does annually, performing the poetic address in the traditional Scottish brogue to the delight of all present. With "wages to be paid to those due" in order, both men were paid and toasts followed to the President of the United States by R\W\ Henry Prescott; the Armed Forces of the United States of America by R\W\ J. C. Maggiola; the Grand Master by Brother Robert Perdock (a Grand Master's One-Day Class graduate) and then to the Worshipful Master by R\W\ Donald Travis, District Deputy Grand Master. With the "Haggis" retired to the collation room, presentations to the Grand Master were made by R\W\ Mauricio Loo, Grand Representative to the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Panama on behalf of their Grand Master and by the W\ Robert Bronnes, who presented the Grand Master as a unanimously elected "Honorary" member of Diamond Thistle Lodge. The Lodge then gave the Grand Master a check for $1,000, which he said would be used in the CHIP program. Our District Deputy Grand Master R\W\ Donald Travis then presented the Grand Master with a crystal paperweight carved with all the "working tools". The Grand Master was delighted with the evening and gave enthusiastic remarks on the Fraternity and its future. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

M\W\ Carl J. Fitje receiving the $1,000 check from Diamond Thistle Lodge by W\ Robert Bronnes, Master A First Westchester-Putnam District Lodge, rich in Scottish history and a flair for the unique, hosted M\W\ Carl J. Fitje and members of his Grand Line on February 20th. The Lodge treated their guests with remarks by the W\ Robert Bronnes as to the history of the Lodge and their traditions of wearing Scottish "Stuart Tartans" complete with Drummer and Bagpipes. The W\ Robert Bronnes remarked that the Lodge was delighted to host the Grand Master's visit, as it was but 39 years earlier that while celebrating its 100th Anniversary in 1995, Grand Master M\W\ Clarence J. Henry visited. Again in 1990, the Lodge was honored by the visit of Grand Master M\W\ Richard P. Thomas at the 125th Anniversary. When the Lodge celebrated its 300th Communication in 1997 they were honored to have District Deputy Grand Master, then R\W\ Stewart C. McCloud. The program for the evening, included introductions of the Brothers raised at the Grand Master's One-Day Class and

COMPOSITE LODGE NO. 819 WINS 7th CONSECUTIVE POTTS AWARD

Sixth Manhattan, New York Composite Lodge No. 819 qualified for its seventh Potts Award in as many years on March 23rd. All of the Lodge's elected and appointed officers, including Tiler were present for the Grand Lecturer's Convention in the Sixth Manhattan District. W\ David Ragoonath could not suppress his smiles, as the proud Master accepted the congratulations of R\W\ Grand Lecturer Edward Gilbert. Work of the evening was the Masonic Memorial Service, which is a part of the ritual seemingly neglected until it time to do the work. R\W\ Brother Gilbert gave a number of helpful tips, including entering and retiring from the service. He complimented AGL V\W\ William Sardone and the District for the work. R\W\ Michael Rossen surprised everyone, including the Grand Lecturer, as he brought a sprig of real acacia to the convention. The sprig came from Israel. Brother Rossen was recently named as Trustee of the Livingston Library.

R\W\ Grand Lecturer Edward Gilbert and V\W\ Bill Sardone flank Memorial Service Ritual participants in the Sixth Manhattan's Grand Lecturer's Convention on March 23.

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masonic student assistance training

Thomas M. "Tim" McMullin, MSAT Chairman 110 West Edward Street, Endicott, NY 13760-4770 Phone: (888) 694-0511 e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

NEW CHAIRMAN FOR MSAT

The next audience we need to reach is that of the public education community. We will mail information to every School District Superintendent and every BOCES Superintendent. We will try to get the word out through professional publications that reach the desks of administrators and school board members. However, nothing can compare to the personal touch. If you know Masons in the education field, speak to them about the program and recruit them to help our committee. Let me know names, phone numbers and e-mail addresses and I will see that they get information. Of course, if you know school board members, principals, guidance counselors, tell them about the program and have them call the toll free number 888-694-0511 for more information. First, permit me to introduce myself as the new Chairman of MSAT. I do not know if, I or anyone could fill the shoes of Dave Sampson, who has passed the Chairmanship on to me. Thank you, David. You got the program up and running in October 2001, and you never looked back. We are grateful for all of the time and talent you have put into this very worthwhile program. Because of you, we are looking forward to next year as being another successful one. A little about myself. I am a retired principal, retiring for the last time in February 2004, after six months of "filling in." As principal I saw first hand the needs for a Student Assistance Program. Kids need help! Drugs, alcohol, depression, even suicide threatens our young people. Masonic Student Assistance Training shows educators how to work as a team to identify young people at risk, and to do something about it. As a principal, I knew that we had Drug Free Schools Legislation and SAVE mandates to follow, and I saw how the MSAT Program met those guidelines. The team from my school attended the February, 2004 training; I recruited two more local schools to send teams in March 2004, and we have received enthusiastic endorsements. Our committee is made up of Masons who care about young people. During the weeks ahead we have an important job to do. Over the next twelve months we want to train teams from sixty more schools. To do that we need to spread the word to two audiences. First, we need to reach the Lodges, and through them, the Masons in the state. To that end Ron Steiner, PR in Grand Lodge, and Harris Mandel are helping with the development of a new brochure. We hope to have it available for distribution at Grand Lodge, and also as a mailing to all of the Lodges in New York State. The new District Deputies should also receive information about the program. Our goal for the 2004-2005 school year is to have an MSAP team be trained from at least one school in every county. Furthermore, to reach Masons, we will also continue to publish articles in the Empire State Mason, and to have press releases in the local papers. We will also mail directly to the editors of Masonic Publications, so that they can help spread information throughout the Masonic community. Any efforts that you make, at Lodge or District meetings, to talk, even briefly, to Brother Masons will help. In these times it is easy for young people to get lost. Faced with problems, students can turn to alcohol and drugs, join gangs, or suffer from depression. Grades can suffer, attendance can be spotty, and, unless something is done, everyone loses ­ kids, families, schools and communities. New York Masons care about young people and have been doing something about it. The Masonic Student Assistance Program is a research-based, staff development program that trains teams of educators from New York's public schools to help young people deal with a myriad of at-risk behaviors. The program began in October 2001, and New York State Masons have been offering these workshops for educators on the campus of the Masonic Home in Utica. To date, twelve workshops have been offered to a total of 645 educators. One hundred seventeen (117) Student Assistance Teams have been trained and returned to their public schools. The goal is to have trained teams working with children in every school in New York State. The Masonic Student Assistance Program training is an innovative, intensive, three-day workshop that builds educators skills in identifying at-risk students, and then providing appropriate guidance to get those students back on track. The program uses a team approach to student assistance. The training sessions, led by nationally recognized trainers, build educator's skills in assisting troubled students. School teams focus on educational concerns where schools have legal and ethical responsibilities. Masonic Student Assistance Program Training helps good teachers become even better by training them to work with student assistance teams. The MSAP approach considers the child as a whole, identifying all of the factors that might contribute to the student's behavior and inability to learn. The team collaboration is what leads to a solution, giving troubled students a greater chance of staying in school and becoming productive members of society. In these times of tight school budgets, the Masonic Student Assistance Training has not only proven to be successful, it is also a bargain. There is virtually no cost to the school district to participate! New York State Masons pay for all training materials, lodging, meals, and transportation to and from the campus of the Masonic Home in Utica. The school districts are responsible for providing substitutes for participating teachers.

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masonic student assistance training

Incidentally and importantly, this program meets the NYS Education Department guidelines for effective programs, the SDFSCA guidelines, and the mandates of the SAVE Legislation. Who should attend? A school district should send six to eight workshop participants per school who will form a core MSAP team at their school. Team members may include administrators, counselors, regular and special education teachers, school nurse, drug/alcohol abuse counselors, or mental health providers. In 2004 there have been two training sessions to date. For the MSAP Training conducted on Feb 10, 11, 12, 2004, thirty educators from the following schools participated: Linnaeus West Elementary School, Ann McGuinness Elementary School, Charles F Johnson Elementary School, Thomas J Watson Elementary School, Jennie F Snapp Middle School, Livonia CSD, and East Irondequoit Middle School. The following month, on March 23-25, 2004, one of the largest groups to date (59 educators) from these schools participated: York Central Schools, The Tuscarora Indian School, Livonia CSD, Brockport High School, Kashequa Schools, Frontier Middle School, Canandaigua Schools, George W Johnson Elementary School, and Maine Endwell Senior High School. There are four workshops scheduled for the 2004-2005 school year. Masonic Student Assistance Program Training sessions for the 2004-2005 school year are scheduled for October 26-28, `04; November 30-December 2, `04; February 1-3, `05; and April 12-14, `05. Schools should register early (this year) to be assured of a slot. The goal for next year is to have teams trained from every county in New York, so educators can visit a local school and see, first hand, how the team approach works. To register a school team for a training session or to obtain more information, contact Tim McMullin, Chairman, Masonic Student Assistance Program (MSAP), 110 West Edward Street, Endicott, NY 13760-4770. Tim's e-mail is [email protected] . You may also call, toll free, 1-888-694-0511. The MSAP Committee needs your help recruiting school teams by getting the word out. The Committee needs local Masons and their families to encourage school districts to participate by registering and attending the MSAT sessions in Utica. If you know of a Brother Mason who has a background in education ­ a teacher, an administrator, or a school board member - who can devote some time meeting with School District Superintendents and School Principals, please contact the Chairman, Tim McMullin.

MASONIC STUDENT ASSISTANCE TRAINING PROGRAM

Community Agency The New York State Masons' Committee on Drug and Alcohol Abuse Tim McMullin, Chairperson 888-694-0511 Joyce Zeh, Assistant 585- 476-2714 ABOUT THE PROGRAM The Student Assistance Training Program is a new, research-based, promising program for New York's public schools that is promoted and funded by the New York State Masons. This program meets the NYS Education Department's guidelines for effective programs, the SDFSCA guidelines and the SAVE Legislation. The goal is to train a core team in the identification of children who are "at risk" of becoming involved in substance abuse, gangs, vandalism and who are insubordinate, disorderly, and disruptive, whose conduct endangers the safety, morals, health or welfare of others. The program is designed for school personnel (K-12). The Pennsylvania Student Assistance Program serves as the model for this program and has been evaluated by the University of Pittsburgh and the St. Francis Institute for Psychiatric and Addiction Services. To make a successful impact in your school the Student Assistance Training needs the "Right People for the Job". They need to actively participate and take the information back to their respective schools. A core team of individuals will be trained. We strongly encourage each school's team to include one building administrator and/or a school counselor. The principal's training and involvement on the core team, even if limited to ad-hoc is crucial to the team's support, implementation and success. THE CORE TEAM MEMBERS MAY INCLUDE: · One building administrator · One or more counselors · Two or more teachers-regular education/special education · One school nurse, school psychologist, in-school suspension coordinator · One drug/alcohol service provider, and/or mental health provider WHERE AND WHEN This three-day training takes place on the campus of the Masonic Home in Utica, New York. Participants will stay at a local motel FREE of charge. Trainings are scheduled for: October 26-28, 2004 November 30 and December 1 & 2, 2004 February 1-3, 2005 April 12-14, 2005 COSTS - FREE Training fees and materials, meals, and lodging will be covered by the Grand Lodge of New York (up to 8 participants per team). Districts are encouraged to send a team for each building. Substitute teacher costs will be the responsibility of the school district. Nationally recognized education consultant Thom Stecher and Master Trainer Associates provide the training. Sincerely and fraternally, Tim McMullin

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

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around the state

WAKAN-HUBBARD LODGE NO. 154 CELEBRATES CENTENNIAL OF BUILDING AND GROUNDS

Penfield, New York BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Wakan-Hubbard Lodge No. 154 On March 22, 2004, Wakan-Hubbard Lodge No. 154 rededicated their building and grounds. They originally purchased the land in 1903 from the Methodist Church. Wakan-Hubbard Lodge No. 154 was constituted in 1991 with the merge with Penfield Union Lodge. Penfield Union first petitioned the Grand Lodge in 1816. Its was constituted in 1828 as Lodge No. 355. In 1849 it was constituted as Lodge No. 154. W.C. Hubbard Lodge was constituted in 1919 as Lodge No. 964. Wakan was constituted in 1926 as No. 1054.

(l-r) R\W\ Joseph Homer, Senior Grand Deacon; R\W\ Griffith Jones III, Junior Grand Deacon; W\ Joseph Oelgoetz; R\W\ Charles Roberts, Grand Chaplain M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, along with the Grand Line performed the rededicated ceremony of the building and ground.

(l-r) Frank Allkasker, County Supervisor Representative; Gary Lehmann, President of the Penfield Heritage Association; Renee Fitje, M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master; W\ Joseph Oelgoetz of Wakan-Hubbard Lodge No. 154

GRAND MASTER PRESENTS DUAL 50 YEAR AWARDS Members of the Rochester Tartan Square Club, along with Brother Sidney Curran and the M\W\ Carl J. Fitje M\W\ Carl J. Fitje presented Brother Sidney Curran, member of Wakan-Hubbard Lodge No. 154 with his Grand Lodge of New York 50-Year Award, along with a similar award from the Grand Lodge of Scotland. The awards were presented at the Wakan-Hubbard Lodge Building Centennial on March 22, 2004. Brother Curran is also a member of the Rochester Tartar Square Club and his Mother Lodge is Queen Margaret No. 1440.

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(l-r) R\W\ John Zabel, District Deputy of the Monroe District; M\W\ Carl J. Fitje; W\ Joseph Oelgoetz Dinner at the Penfield Country Club preceded the ceremony that was conducted in the Lodge room. The Grand Master was presented with an Honorary Membership to Wakan-Hubbard Lodge No. 154.

years of service

APRIL 2004 84 YEARS 0659 L'HOMMEDIEU, RICHARD, F. 82 YEARS 0103 BAILEY, PAUL, J. 80 YEARS 0917 KAHN, BERNARD, 79 YEARS 0400 HAYNES, HOWARD, E. 76 YEARS 0195 ESSON, ANTHONY, C. 0240 KOCH, KARL, WIGGER 75 YEARS 0058 NICOLL, EDWARD, DUNCAN 0132 WARREN, A, JOHN 0311 THOMAS, WILLIAM, DAVID 0944 POST, PHILIP, B. 74 YEARS 0195 KONTAK, CARL, F. 73 YEARS 0922 JACOBY, JOSEPH, 0968 FINEBERG, MANUEL, 72 YEARS 0013 UPHAM, FRANK, A. 0120 BASHER, WILLIAM, J. 0445 SCHALL, HYMAN, W. 0487 CHOYCE SR, NICHOLAS, 71 YEARS 0063 THOMSON, HARRY, 0087 PANITCH, MAX, E. 0150 STAURING, ADELBERT, E. 0586 HALLENBECK, GILMAN, H. 0696 BUTTON, LEON, E. 70 YEARS 0306 HANKS, FREDERICK, G. 0534 GILTNER, HERBERT, PAUL 0689 WRIGHT, KINSMAN, E. 65 YEARS 0046 PELTON, GRANT, R. 0178 DUBINER, MORRIS, 0205 UPTON, WILLIAM, 0240 SCHERFF, ELMER, A. 0266 TAYLOR, DONALD, D. 0328 SCHNEIDER, FRANK, R. 0378 HASTINGS, WALTER, F. 0713 HALL, DARWIN, D. 0758 LESLIE, HERBERT, B. 0890 LEVISON, NATHANIEL, 0922 ONISH, ROBERT, I. 1068 FLINK, ABRAHAM, 60 YEARS 0006 VIVIAN, WILLIAM, T. 0019 ROTHMAN, RUDOLPH, 0031 NIVEN JR, ALEXANDER, 0051 GIBSON, DOANLD, ELLIS 0056 LEMKEN, HENRY, L. 0066 HOFFMAN, DAVID, N. 0085 SHERWOOD, JACK, R. 0095 FISCHER, EUGENE, I. 0095 HARRISON, GEORGE, S. 0123 LANE, CLAUDE, E. 0129 LEWIS, RICHARD, 0145 BOOTEY III, E, ROBERT 0150 PARKER, WILLIAM, D. 0152 JORDAN, ETHELBERT, H. 0163 HAUSER, WALTER, F. 0165 KOTARY, WILLIAM, E. 0165 PAYNE, WILLIAM, B. 0219 MOUNT, CYRUS, A. 0224 MCKIBBEN, HARRY, S. 0241 GORDON, IRVING, M. 0246 EPSTEIN, JACK, 0292 GREEN, ARCHIE, 0294 KINDE, FREDERICK, G. 0315 FOSTER, CLINTON, R. 0320 CRAWFORD JR, CARLTON, M. 0336 LIVINGSTON, DAVID, H. 0350 CANOLL, CHARLES, H. 0352 POTTER, BERNARD, W. 0404 GINGERICH, ROBERT, D. 0404 PARKER, FLETCHER, 0415 NEWSOM, JESSE, R. 0417 MORAN, GEORGE, 0423 0439 0441 0473 0473 0478 0481 0486 0494 0501 0513 0514 0520 0521 0559 0575 0589 0602 0634 0651 0696 0698 0712 0739 0755 0758 0806 0820 0846 0872 0922 0969 1035 1141 1174 1178 1180 1180 MURRAY, GROSVENOR, LEAL, JOHN, H. CART, EDWARD, G. PHILCOX, NORMAN, W. SCHLICHTING, LEONARD, W. ROBINSON, HARRY, H. MCINTOSH, ROBERT, T. ALSON, JACK, WRIGHT, HOWARD, L. DORN, ROBERT, W. RABE, RICHARD, A. RUPP, HAROLD, P. TALLMADGE, ALTON, G. DEAN, ARCHIE, T. SUROTT, MAURICE, RENSKERS, WILBUR, R. HEPFER, FRANK, F. EDMONDS, ADRIAN, C. MARSHALL, ANDREW, B. HARTMAN, JOSEPH, JOHNSON, LEWIS, H. SMITH, BILLY, SADLER, EDWARD, C. MORRELL, MURRAY, FAUCETT, RAY, J. DEWAR, JOHN, A. SMITH, SAMUEL, GEORGE MARTIN, WILLIS, E. ENDRESS, ARTHUR, A. CAPUTO, LEONARDO, R. KLEIN, JUDAH, B. ROSS, RAYMOND, F. KAYE, HENRY, JACOBS, RAYMOND, H. SHULER JR, SANFORD, A. BAKER, CHARLES, WILLIAM REYNOLDS, ALBERT, EUGENE RIDER, LEON, R. 0342 0347 0350 0365 0371 0392 0393 0399 0404 0404 0420 0420 0433 0434 0434 0442 0458 0463 0491 0491 0493 0513 0524 0531 0533 0546 0549 0551 0553 0555 0565 0586 0589 0611 0634 0637 0637 0637 0646 0647 0651 0653 0708 0713 0713 0722 0722 0737 0754 0754 0776 0782 0793 0794 0795 0801 0801 0801 0815 0827 0837 0839 0842 0859 0877 0882 0882 0911 0912 0946 0985 0985 0992 1057 1066 1088 1088 1092 1174 1174 1180 GLEAN, CHARLES, D. OSSONT, ROBERT, WILKINSON, ARTHUR, F. JOHNSON, CLIFFORD, A. VOLLHEIM, WILLIAM, H. BAKER, MERRELL, E. MCCARTHY, RICHARD, G. MOORE, DEE, YANCEY DEGROFF, CRANDALL, PATTRIDGE, WILLARD, BENTLEY, MARVIN, A. EVERHART, RICHARD, E. SWARTZ, ROGER, H. SMITH, JOHN, R. VEENSTRA, CONRAD, E. MACK, EDWARD, A. FOWX, LEGRAND, I. PITCHER, KENNETH, H. PARSONS, ROBERT, H. SUMNER, ROBERT, C. REICH, GEORGE, F. WELLS, PRESTON, E. PURSEY, CLIFFORD, DIGIORGI, COLOMBO, V. JONES, HARRY, R. FRANSEN, JOHN, A. KOHLER, JOHN, W. MARTHA, FRANK, ARNOLD, ROBERT, C. HOUSTON, GORDON, THOBAE, HERBERT, R. CERNEK, JOHN, J. GREEN, EUCLA, JACK MACLAUGHLIN, WILLIAM, G. DAUER, MAX, BARNARD, JAMES, E. CHAMBERLAIN, ALLAN, C. SMITH, WILLIAM, G. DIXON, LEONARD, R. MAYER JR, JOHN, J. FISCHER, STANLEY, H. LORING, MORTON, A. FEILE JR, ARTHUR, S. HANSEN, GEORGE, H. KNAPP, YORKE, F. DEWITT, EUGENE, H. ROSENTRETER, HAROLD, E. KLAPP, MATTHIAS, H. EMPIE, PAUL, H. ROCKSTROH JR, GORDON, B. HOPPE, WILBUR, G. KARTEN, JUDAH, STECHER, ANTON, J. ALLEN, DESMOND, H. THOMAS, WALTER, R. BICKOS, CHRIS, G. BICKOS, JOHN, PAPASTRAT, GEORGE, H. STOWELL, OMAR, D. TROGISCH, RICHARD, E. BLUE, GILBERT, W. BROWN, CURT, G. BUNDT, RICHARD, I. LLOYD, REV DONALD, W. DICKINSON III, WADE, GATTO, VICTOR, VENTRUDO, DONALD, P. FRENCH, G, THOMAS GARBUTT JR, GEORGE, W. HARRIS, WILLIAM, T. PADAVANA, SALVATORE, SILLIFANT, ALFRED, E. DAMBROSI, ANTHONY, L. HALCROW, JAMES, DICK, MAURICE, L. JUDD, ROBERT, W. RUPP, EDWARD, E. HAHL, HENRY, E. FORTE, DONALD, E. ROBERTS, GLYNN, W. JAGGER, ROBERT, K. 0075 GILLETT, SAMUEL, W. 0075 RETALLICK, ROBERT, R. 0085 COHEN, LEO, 0085 TURK, HAROLD, S. 0087 METZGER, H, ALAN 0093 POSTMA, WILLIS, C. 0095 GIBB JR, DAVID, F. 0109 DWORKIN, WILLIAM, 0109 KOTZIN, GORDON, L. 0139 WEIGERT, EDWARD, R. 0144 BARTHOLOMEW, EARL, E. 0144 LUDINGTON, RAMSEY, G. 0145 FORSBERG, CHARLES, E. 0154 NEELY, WARREN, W. 0159 LEENHOUTS, RICHARD, 0163 TURNER, ROBERT, A. 0165 BELLINGER, HARLAN, K. 0178 ALTMAN, MORRIS, A. 0178 MACIVOR, CHARLES, A. 0195 HUGHES JR, JOHN, E. 0201 BECKER, GEORGE, M. 0201 BECKER, WARREN, H. 0219 STAFFORD, DONALD, W. 0224 TOPOUZIAN, ARMENAG, 0240 VIZANSKI, JOHN, L. 0247 HARPSTER, WARREN, T. 0247 HOEFERT, WILLIAM, G. 0247 MARKOVITZ, ROBERT, L. 0262 DABOLT SR, PAUL, L. 0283 BUTLER, RALPH, E. 0284 PRICE JR, E, J. 0284 STELLWAGEN, ROBERT, H. 0292 DAVIS, IRWIN, N. 0305 GURNEY, WINSHIP, E. 0305 LIPPERT, HAROLD, B. 0308 PHALEN, CHARLES, W. 0324 LATTA, JOHN, 0324 MARTIN, ROBERT, S. 0334 GRAHAM, THEODORE, C. 0336 GOODWIN, DONALD, A. 0356 HANSEN, WALTER, T. 0369 KEY, CLIFFORD, C. 0394 VANNATTEN, GLENN, E. 0399 JACKSON, DONALD, G. 0412 JENSEN, EDWARD, 0415 RICHARDS, CARL, 0419 REINHARDT, FREDERICK, F. 0428 BATES, CLAUDE, A. 0449 ADAMOUR, ELI, 0479 WEINREBER, NORMAN, J. 0482 SHIMEL, WILLARD, D. 0486 BERK, MARTIN, M. 0486 NEWMAN, GEORGE, 0487 MCMILLAN, JOHN, C. 0511 TAPOLA, NIILO, A. 0517 PULSIFER, JOHN, F. 0517 PULSIFER, KENNETH, F. 0524 O'TIER, HARRY, VAUGHN 0546 GIRARDI, MICHAEL, 0546 VALLE, EMILE, R. 0555 DEATCHER, RONALD, E. 0558 DENNISON, FREEMAN, S. 0568 ADLER, HENRY, 0568 LA VIGNA, PATRICK, A. 0582 NESBITT, WILKIN, D. 0586 POLYCHRONIS, MARCO, 0588 ROSENBERG, CHARLES, H. 0647 JOHNSON, WILLIAM, L. 0647 KITTEL, HERBERT, W. 0647 KITTEL, WILLIAM, B. 0649 PARKER, DOUGLAS, P. 0673 MEHLENBACHER, RAYMOND, 0673 THOMPSON, CARL, W. 0673 WARNER, DONALD, L. 0689 GARLOUGH SR., CHARLES, CHESTER 0696 BABBITT, ROBERT, C. 0700 HEVESSY, STEPHEN, 0702 FELLOWS, EDWARD, J. 0702 KULL JR, RICHARD, N. 0729 SCHEINER, ALBERT, H. 0788 DEMMON, KEITH, I. 0806 BUCHAN, DAVID, R. 0818 HARRIS, MANLEY, G. 0819 SCHREIBER, ROBERT, B. 0819 TALSKY, THEODORE, 0834 BEATTIE, GEORGE, A. 0837 MILLER, HOLDEN, P. 0846 ADAMS, NELSON, F. 0846 GRIEBNER, ARTHUR, H. 0859 GIBIAN, LESLIE, M. 0861 STORIE, WAYNE, K. 0863 WARYHA, MICHAEL, 0878 VROOM, CHARLES, R. 0890 GOLDNER, STANLEY, 0890 ROSEN, LEONARD, 0917 0925 0934 0936 0936 0936 0956 0969 0977 0985 1016 1035 1041 1041 1066 1066 1068 1122 1138 1138 1174 1174 1174 1174 1174 1175 1176 1179 1180 CORN, CHARLES, L. MCKENZIE, ROBERT, D. STARR, ROBERT, S. HALLIDAY, ROBERT, T. MACARTHUR, NEIL, M. MACKAY, DAVID, M. ERICKSEN, OLAF, G. REIBER, GEORGE, R. MATHIES, BLAIR, MEYER, FREDERICK, E. PUNT, WILLIAM, R. EPSTEIN, EDWARD, B. INGERMAN, ARNOLD, J. LITCHMAN, CHARLES, H. HALFOND, LAWRENCE, HIRSHAN, HERBERT, PERLMUTTER, ROBERT, LEVINE, THEODORE, IHLE, HAROLD, E. PANCOOK, JAMES, J. BAUDER, D, A. SCHENK, CHARLES, WORCESTER, RICHARD, L. WRIGHT, DONALD, E. YOUNG, HOWARD, A. REUKAUF, JACK, C. KUCK, ROY, O. LOVE, BRYANT, E. RICHMOND, ANTON, E.

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

MAY 2004 82 YEARS 0232 HERRMANN, DAVID, W. 0913 ATKINS, OMER, H. 76 YEARS 0622 GOETTEL, VERNON, S. 0710 YANKOWITZ, FRANK, 75 YEARS 0646 SPINK, EVERETT, H. 0653 WEINSTEIN, MORRIS, 1118 POTTER, ARTHUR, R. 74 YEARS 0034 KARAGEORGE, STEPHEN, A. 0627 RICHBURG JR, EDWARD, P. 1174 FORSYTHE, EDMUND, 73 YEARS 0232 GRAHAM, WILFRID, J. 0490 GOTHLER, HENRY, E. 0694 MILLER, ELMER, W. 0710 STOLZENBERGER, EDWIN, 72 YEARS 0007 SMITH, LAWRENCE, M. 0201 SESSELBERG SR, ROBERT, H. 0859 GREENE, M, WHITNEY 71 YEARS 0295 MATHER, WILLIS, J. 0295 WALLACE, WARREN, B. 0650 DEGARMO, LEWIS, 70 YEARS 0137 ARMSTRONG JR, GEORGE, W. 0147 PATTERSON JR, WILLIAM, W. 0262 BROWER, NEWTON, C. 0287 MCCANN, FORBES, E. 0399 GROATS, BURTON, E. 0476 BREWSTER, CLAYTON, F. 0703 WARNKEN, RICHARD, B. 0956 OSTHUES, ARNOLD, R. 1037 STUDEN, ROBERT, 65 YEARS 0001 DAHL, FREDERICK, G. 0095 GREENE, DONALD, G. 0132 KRAMER, JOSEPH, 0240 SCHRADER, RICHARD, G. 0396 HAGER, GEORGE, W. 0476 KNAPP, ALBERT, H. 0695 STODDARD, GEORGE, A. 0703 LUMSDEN, PERCY, 0729 DIBENEDETTO, ARMANDO, 0822 HOYT, FREDERICK, H. 0892 HARTMANN, GEORGE, R. 60 YEARS 0010 FROST, ROBERT, D. 0013 KALBUS SR, GILBERT, C. 0044 BACON, WILLIAM, L. 0090 NITCHMAN, RICHARD, E. 0097 KENDRICK, LLOYD, F.

55 YEARS 0003 BOUGHTON JR, JOHN, W. 0004 SAMMONS, HOWARD, R. 0006 MCCARTHY, JOHN, C. 0006 MILLER, JOHN, P. 0006 STEUART, GEORGE, E. 0007 FREY, HOWARD, H. 0010 NICKLAS JR, JOSEPH, EDWARD 0014 PLESS, FREDERICK, H. 0022 ROWLAND, WILFRED, R. 0023 PERKINS, MARVIN, S. 0040 ETSON, WILLIAM, L. 0051 THOUMIRE, ALEXANDER, E. 0075 CARVILL, GORDON, H. 0075 LENNON, EMMOTT, E. 0085 VOGEL, WILLIS, R. 0108 CHRISTENSEN, BERNARD, A. 0121 PHILLIPS, JAMES, H. 0122 LEVEY, GERALD, L. 0127 PERKINS, ROBERT, Q. 0155 SCRIVER, WALTER, M. 0160 CONIBER, JOHN, R. 0160 MANDIGO, KENNETH, D. 0176 O'HARA, LESTER, A. 0177 HITT JR, HOWARD, J. 0195 OELKERS, HENRY, E. 0195 ROSSELOT JR, EDWARD, N. 0195 WISSNER, WILLIAM, C. 0201 MEYER, ARTHUR, H. 0204 SIEPSER, SAUL, 0204 WECHSLER, LEO, 0205 SHAPIRO, HOWARD, 0214 ADAMSON, HERMAN, 0219 HANKS, HAYDEN, L. 0223 HYATT, EARL, F. 0224 ABEL, JAMES, E. 0224 KOMANECKY, WILLIAM, 0230 GUILD, MAX, 0230 KING, ADELBERT, J. 0230 WILLIAMS, JAMES, H. 0247 DAVIS, G, W. 0250 DAVIDIAN, GEORGE, 0252 JOHNSON, WALTER, D. 0266 CUNDY, DAVID, W. 0270 THALL, HOWARD, G. 0284 PREUSS, JOHN, M. 0284 WAGNER, THEODORE, W. 0287 MCCOWAN, WILLIAM, S. 0303 HODGE, NOLAN, 0304 BUKENBERGER, PAUL, A. 0304 EMRICH, FRED, W. 0305 RIES, GLEN, H. 0305 ROSS, RALPH, P. 0305 TUBBS, SELDEN, E. 0308 ABRAHAMS, PAUL, T. 0328 CASE, LAWRENCE, J. 0328 CULVER, EDWIN, J.

50 YEARS 0001 HENDERSON, FRANK, D. 0006 WYMAN, LEROY, L. 0010 KAKOULLIS, GEORGE, D. 0019 BIRCH, WILLIAM, LEE 0039 DURNEY, CORDYN, 0051 PATROS, THEODORE, J. 0063 BIGGS, HARVEY, F. 0063 BISHOP, ROYAL, E. 0063 FENNING, HERMANCE, L. 0063 PLANCHE, MILTON, M. 0075 COOK, ALVIN, G. 0075 FRIEDEL JR, HENRY, W. 0075 GIFFORD, PAUL, B.

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41

years of service

0103 0107 0107 0131 0134 0162 0172 0173 0203 0226 0247 0264 0309 0313 0324 0343 0343 0347 0389 0389 0441 0442 0466 0466 0476 0476 0487 0501 0511 0524 0546 0586 0589 0599 0619 0651 0651 0680 0702 0779 0779 0808 0819 0819 0846 0890 0896 0902 0911 0913 0944 0948 0981 0998 1057 1122 1134 1174 1174 1174 WEBEL, FREDERICK, H. COBB, CHARLES, D. VAN ORNUM, CARLTON, G. WOODWARD, OMAR, W. BAXTER, DONALD, J. WASHBURN, HARRIE, KIDDER WALRATH, EDISON, W. ELLIS, ROBERT, A. ORKIN, HENRY, E. DICKSON, ANDREW, C. EDWARDS, GEORGE, F. WOOD, KENNETH, E. HYNDMAN, DAVID, J. SNYDER, ARTHUR, E. HAIRE, OLIVER, W. FLOWERS JR, HARRY, A. SLEIGHT, JOHN, F. MARSH, GEORGE, K. REYNOLDS, WARD, G. ROSA, LESTER, A. STOUT, HUGH, R. NYE, W, STUART AXHOJ, AXEL, O P GOBEL, HAROLD, T. COBB, WILLIAM, G. MOLL, JOHN, A. MATICH, JOHN, G. CARNAHAN, DONALD, S. ANDRESEN, ALFRED, N. HAYDEN, HAROLD, G. BAYLIS, CLARENCE, H. YODICE, GEORGE, SIEGER JR, GEORGE, M. VOSBURGH, DONALD, R. MILLER, HAROLD, J. FROMM, LLOYD, LEIGHT, WALTER, G. HILL, JOHN, M. MOODY JR, ROBERT, COOPER, CHARLES, HARLAN ROCKCASTLE, ALAN, G. BUTLER, DANIEL, SCHULTZ, WALTER, M. WEISS, IRVING, H. VALLONE, JOSEPH, M. SCHROEGER, SIDNEY, BURGETT, GERALD, W. ROSS, VICTOR, D. PETER, CARLTON, G. SMITH, WILLIAM, L. RANDOLPH, WINFIELD, L F ALEXANDER, MELVIN, HUSON, HENRY, GOODELL, LLOYD, K. POLANSKY, LEON, RAPP, IRVIN, N. KLANE, EDWARD, BARKER, LEWIS, W. FRITZ JR, ALFRED, J. MCCARTNEY, ROBERT, C. 0252 0298 0305 0305 0309 0347 0351 0368 0392 0394 0403 0406 0412 0412 0412 0414 0426 0435 0445 0445 0445 0463 0466 0473 0486 0486 0487 0494 0501 0501 0511 0521 0522 0532 0545 0586 0602 0611 0611 0611 0611 0647 0648 0653 0667 0701 0701 0710 0710 0729 0751 0764 0776 0784 0785 0791 0791 0796 0796 0796 0797 0797 0842 0847 0849 0867 0879 0880 0880 0925 0934 0936 0941 0941 0947 0956 0958 0977 0977 0977 0981 0981 1009 1022 1022 1022 1057 1088 1141 1174 PICKUP JR, ESTES, A. WEAVER, WILLARD, W. POLLOCK, WENDELL, B. ROBERTS JR, ESTILL, G. MANTIS, ALTER, W. BROEDEL, ROBERT, G. LAZAR, LOUIS, FRASER JR, ROLAND, M. DEHULLU, EDWARD, J. AKER, DOUGLAS, W. GEOFFRION, DONALD, V. BYRNS, GLEN, A. KARASOFF, LOUIS, PETERSEN JR, OTTO, H. PETERSEN, DONALD, E. EVERSON, JOHN, R. OTTO, STANLEY, S. FRIEND, RICHARD, A. HANDELSMAN, BURTON, LOKICH, SIDNEY, NASH, DAVID, SECHRIST, CLIFFORD, E. OLSEN, EARL, L. KEARNS, STANLEY, F. HAFT, NATHAN, A. KERMIT, WILLIAM, L. DEMETROPS, CHRISTIE, BETTS, JOSEPH, T. EASSA, ALEXANDER, B. FREEMAN, S, BEVERLY MERKENT, WILLIAM, R. ROOSA, EVERETT, N. MASTERS, JOHN, R. HORTON, WILLIAM, E. SCHWEIZER, WILLIAM, E. SVOBODA, SIDNEY, C. PHINNEY, CLAYTON, S. BROWN, MELVIN, R. DAVIS, GORDON, W. DAVIS, WALTER, E. ROCKEFELLER, LESLIE, LLOYD, WILLIAM, J. GREABELL, RAYMOND, C A GAZVERDE, MARIUS, MURRER, FRANK, J. BELL, DAVID, H. STERN, WALTER, J. DECKER, JOHN, A. LLOYD, WALTER, BAILEY, ALVIN, G. SOUTO, MANUEL, HADDEN, RUSSELL, C. KEYSER, DANIEL, D. AYERS, WARD, BROWN JR, ALEXANDER, BARNHART, HUGH, ROBERT MUSSON, ALBERT, W. GILLETTE, MARSHALL, K. PALKOWSKI, JOHN, J. WALACH, MICHAEL, BEACHNER, RANDALL, G. HORTON, FRANK, J. ROBERTSON, WILLIAM, D. PARMELEE, SAMUEL, R. FUGE, GEORGE, C. SAVARESE, LOUIS, J. BOYD, JOHN, CALVIN GARLAND, WILLIAM, E. HINTZ, JULIUS, KUHN, HERBERT, ARTHUR SCHWARTZ, EZRA, D. POLESE, ALBERT, L. CRAWFORD, JESSE, R. FRIOT, HOWARD, N. COWPER, WILLIAM, H. GOTTLIEB, SEYMOUR, LEVIN, GERALD, CLOUT, EDWARD, F. CLOUT, HARRY, B. SHERRILL, HOLTON, B. BROOKS, CHARLES, R. FESSEL, KENNETH, LOWITZ, IRVING, DENTON, GILBERT, J. HENDRICKS, JACK, R. HENDRICKS, ROBERT, A. BLASS, MELVIN, VROOM, CLIFFORD, G. GOLDFARB, MAURICE, B. SEAMAN, JEROME, 0010 0010 0031 0040 0046 0048 0048 0049 0051 0055 0060 0066 0087 0108 0111 0112 0115 0121 0121 0121 0126 0131 0132 0152 0168 0172 0174 0176 0176 0177 0178 0195 0196 0196 0199 0200 0204 0221 0224 0224 0224 0232 0232 0232 0232 0233 0236 0241 0250 0252 0265 0265 0266 0284 0285 0285 0287 0297 0297 0308 0311 0342 0365 0371 0396 0402 0402 0404 0412 0412 0417 0425 0426 0432 0435 0439 0445 0445 0445 0445 0458 0471 0472 0472 0473 0473 0475 0476 0479 0481 0494 0501 0508 0513 0514 0514 ADSIT, ROBERT, F. JACKSON, WILLIAM, H. BOWIN, ROBERT, B. COOK, HARRY, M. ISBISTER, JOHN, COPLESTON, JEREMY, MORSE HOTALING, WILLIAM, WALLACE SODERQUIST, JOHN, E. HOROWITZ, VICTOR, BUXTON, JOHN, A. CHAMBERLAIN, WILLIAM, A. MERRELL, JOHN, H. EAGLE, GEORGE, BROWN, CHARLES, R. BROWN, CLISSON, E. FINK, JOEL, H. KEMP, RICHARD, EVERY, LEONARD, KHOURY JR, JABRA, OSTRANDER, DONALD, F. AUWARTER JR, JOHN, D. TEEMLEY, JAMES, M. SHAKARJIAN, ZAKAR, P. MEADOWS, NELSON, R. SPROW, ROBERT, L. WILSON, JOHN, E. SMITH, CLIFTON, H. CARTER JR, WILLIAM, CHAPPELL, MARTIN, L. CARPENTER, CHARLES, F. KANTOR, ABRAHAM, HOERTER, CHARLES, P. CAMERON, EARL, W. SMITH, ROBERT, F. BORNHOLDT, ALFRED, KAMM, ALBERT, H. PRIAL, EUGENE, COOPER, LAWRENCE, R. DOWD, ALAN, D. PRIBIS JR, STEVEN, SEWARD, BENJAMIN, S. KLONER, WILLIAM, SHAPIRO, IRVING, SIGMAN, MAX, TANNENBAUM, DONALD, M. ROTHSTEIN, SIDNEY, S. BAISCH, JOSEPH, ROMAINE, WARREN, A. LIVEOAK JR, FELIX, L. PARKER, ORIN, E. AYER, WARREN, J. SEARS, ELMO, D. SHAYO, JULES, E. RABINOWITZ, ALLAN, C. LEE, ALSON, MILES SEIBERT, EDMOND, J. SORG, CHARLES, LEDIG GARLOCK 2ND, ROYAL, C. PLIMPTON III, WILLIAM, H. KUBLI, WELLS G, BERTHIAUME, LEON, A. GORMLEY, FREDERICK, J. COON, STEPHEN, C. HARTGLASS, ABRAHAM, SCOTT, CURZON, V. BONJUKLIAN, SENEKIRIM, GRONQUIST, KARL, HAWLEY, HERBERT, J. ALLEN, GAIL, G. DIAS, MILTON, S. HAYES JR, CULVER, F. SEARLES, JAMES, B. CONVERSE, WILES, E. DOWDEN III, WILLIAM, W. RIECHERS, GEORGE, H. DICKMAN, ROBERT, M. BLACKMAN, ROBERT, GOMER, ROBERT, RODNON, HERBERT, S. SCHIFF, ROBERT, I. LOCKWOOD, GLENN, R. DEWHURST, HERBERT, A. DECKER, CLEO, R. PALMER, JOHN, EARL HILL, ARTHUR, W. ROSSELAND, TRYGVE, COLE, ROBERT, F. FULMER, LEONARD, E. MARTIN, LUTHER, P. BRIGGS, GEORGE, M. FEUER, JASON, L. WYNINGS, CLAIR, E. ARMSTRONG, LYNN, PELKEY, DWIGHT, FREEMAN FARRINGTON, W, L. LAUTENSCHLAGER, F, H. 0522 0527 0541 0546 0548 0552 0552 0563 0563 0583 0584 0586 0590 0595 0611 0616 0616 0622 0627 0648 0648 0653 0664 0664 0677 0699 0699 0701 0702 0702 0718 0722 0737 0739 0782 0782 0784 0785 0806 0814 0819 0820 0820 0821 0822 0839 0839 0843 0846 0847 0855 0863 0880 0890 0890 0890 0892 0892 0892 0912 0915 0922 0922 0923 0923 0934 0947 0947 1000 1009 1037 1066 1068 1068 1068 1118 1127 1137 1138 1165 1174 1174 1175 1175 SCHNEIDER JR, WILLIAM, M. GRAF, ROBERT, A. JENKINSON, EARL, A. WARD JR, SAMUEL, B. COLLITON, DAVID, N. EARLY, MAURICE, W. LOVELL, JOHN, F. ARCAMUZI, HARRY, E. CANNER, WILLIAM, H. SHAVER, SHIRLEY, E. MOON, WARREN, R. ZELNICK, EDWARD, F. WILSON, CHARLES, H. CHUCHUL, HAROLD, E. SALTSMAN, DONALD, DAVIES, ARTHUR, M. JENKINS, HAROLD, J. CRONK, JACK, E. SCHNEIDER, WALTER, H. ADE, FRANK, W. MARSH, EDWIN, H. KAY, MORRIS, HUFF, LEEMAN, C. ROBERTS, RALPH, W. HORTON, GEORGE, A. GIBSON, JAMES, R. HENSEN, RALPH, R. HERRON, GEORGE, BIANCHI, AMERIGO, A. BIEDERBECK, EDWARD, N. STAMATEDES, WILLIAM, B. MAYER, ELLISON, L. VANBUREN JR, HAROLD, J. PARSONT, HENRY, L. ABRAMSKY, SIDNEY, MACCLELLAND, GLENN, D. LEONARD, THOMAS, E. SEARLE, DONALD, L. HAARKE JR, THEODORE, DEAL, EDWARD, J. GATSOFF, HERMAN, B. BUTLER, RICHARD, D. SCHULTZ, WILLIAM, C. NUTTING, CARL, G. MASON, GEORGE, S. BERKOWITZ, GEORGE, LAGOIS, GEORGE, LEWIS JR, ROBERT, E. HAHNEL, PAUL, A. THOMAS, PAUL, W. CARBONARO, VICTOR, J. GORDON, GEORGE, I. GRIFFITH, FREDERICK, E. LIPKIN, HORACE, MANN, EMIL, M. STRICKLER, MAX, DEMMEL, HERBERT, K. KRENDEL, RICHARD, T. MURRAY, EVERETT, C. HERBERT JR, HOWARD, E. GARDNER, GEORGE, E. MOSKOWITZ, BERTRAM, S. WINTER, FREDERICK, KOOPS, FREDERICK, W. MAJORS, EUGENE, B. STEINER, RONALD, J. PHIPPS, LEROY, G. RUTLAND JR, RICHARD, C. KIESER JR, LEROY, ROSENTHAL, JOSEPH, S. KUNKEN, LAWRENCE, W. MILLER, ALGERNON, M. CORETS, ELLIS, H. KLEIN, ARNOLD, M. WOLK, BERNARD, M. LINARDOS, STATHIS, G. BRAYSON, ALBERT, A. BLUHM, HOWARD, H. RONK, ALLEN, E. YAKER, MARTIN, ENZ, LOYAL, K. PINCHUK, MICHAEL, GARDNER, RICHARD, M. WELLS, HARRY, J. 76 YEARS 0342 ALLARD JR, WILLIAM, E. 0484 MELLON, ABRAHAM, H. 0627 MILLIGAN, CHARLES, R. 0729 DEWITT, IRA, STEWART 75 YEARS 0292 JACQUIN, GEORGE, J. 0350 MILLER, JOHN, L. 0872 FIORDELISI, SEBASTIAN, B. 75 1111 LAMBEIN, CARL, J. 74 YEARS 0224 MCILWAIN, EDWARD, H. 0358 LLOYD, ROBERT, H. 0487 LONG, ARTHUR, T. 0890 ROTH, SYDNEY, B. 1057 ZIESCHANG, PAUL, 73 YEARS 0009 SILVERNAIL, ALBERT, 0063 GUNZER, C, RICHARD 0201 PARKIN, JOHN, STANLEY 0377 BROWN, CLIFFORD, V. 0946 HATOUNIAN, JACK, HAGOP 72 YEARS 0217 WINTERS, NELSON, BOCKUS 0533 ALDERMAN, HALSEY, C. 0847 HOFERT, NELSON, R. 0892 BOYLE, JAMES, L. 71 YEARS 0146 STEVENS, DONALD, A. 0213 JOY, CLARK, H. 0487 SMYTH, WILLIAM, 0776 DALRYMPLE, HOWELL, W. 0776 ECKERT, PHILIP, M. 70 YEARS 0082 ALSIP, RALPH, B. 0128 HICKOK, FRANK, F. 0588 GREENSTEIN, LOUIS, 0611 MCDUFFEE, LLYOD, E. 0863 JUTKOWITZ, J, DAVID 0969 KISSINGER, ORAN, E. 65 YEARS 0063 BECKER, WILLIAM, A. 0063 SCHUMACHER, STANLEY, H. 0109 MINSKY, HOWARD, G. 0139 PERRY, ROBERT, F. 0183 HAWLEY, GEORGE, 0183 PATTERSON, MAURICE, 0259 WHITE, GILBERT, 0292 GEBENSLEBEN, THORNTON, R. 0328 YOUNG, ARLINGTON, F. 0383 WESCOTT, JOSEPH, B. 0412 CRITELLI, PHILLIP, C. 0423 CRISTMAN, MARX, Q. 0473 FIDDES, ANDREW, M W 0508 PEARSON, EMIL, M. 0546 SUES, RICHARD, H. 0588 COOKE, JAMES, L. 0616 FIEDLER, HAROLD, A. 0626 JONES, HERBERT, S. 0699 HENSEN, CARLTON, I. 0725 VOGEL, LAYTON, F. 0750 ZAVON, NORTON, 0776 RAHN, GEORGE, W. 0808 VERBY, STANLEY, M. 0819 SLAVIN, PAUL, 0970 SWEITZER, MAURICE, E. 1175 BODNAR, ERNEST, F. 1178 DUNLAP JR, NIEL, B. 60 YEARS 0004 FRIDAY, DURANT, M. 0006 DESOMMA, ANTHONY, E. 0023 GREENBERG, SAUL, 0040 STALLOCH, JOHN, R. 0047 CARTER, A, KENNETH 0073 ZOERB, EDWARD, G. 0083 BUMPUS, WARD, H. 0083 POTTER, IRA, HERBERT 0111 KING, HARRY, E. 0113 BRUSH, KENNETH, L. 0120 RIEDEL, EDWIN, F. 0120 SOLLIEN, WALTER, O. 0123 SPENCE, HOWARD, C. 0127 WILSON, JAMES, B. 0136 WOODRUFF, THEODORE, C. 0154 OAKES, GORDON, W. 0154 RICHARDSON, DONALD, W. 0168 KALINICH, JOHN,

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

42

55 YEARS 0001 BRADLEY SR, DANIEL, J. 0003 CORSON, GEORGE, LEWIS 0013 HARTUNIAN, JOSEPH, 0023 SCHAFRANN, JAY, H. 0056 JOHNSTON, ROBERT, W. 0056 SEARLES, HIRAM, EDWARD 0063 JACKSON, FREDERIC, H. 0079 LOWE, CLAYTON, R. 0103 INGMIRE, HASKELL, W. 0105 KLUSSMANN, HORST, W. 0112 MCGLYNN, ROGER, E. 0120 MCLOUGHLIN, CARROLL, M. 0121 TRAVER, CEDRIC, A. 0124 HALEY, ROBERT, L. 0136 CLARK, EVERETT, L. 0137 NEWCOMB, KENNETH, 0144 PHELPS, BRUCE, B. 0146 CHAMBERLAIN JR, HUGH, D. 0159 DEFRINE, HAROLD, J. 0161 WILSON, DONALD, M. 0163 SPENCER, BRUCE, L. 0172 WINGERATH, DONALD, Y. 0178 DAVIS, MORRIS, J. 0183 ASAY, FRED, 0183 WILKINS, ROGER, S. 0204 WENIG, HAROLD, G. 0213 SEYMOUR, CARL, E. 0223 YOST, IVAN, T. 0224 MUNSELL, ROGER, H. 0241 MOFTICH, IRWIN, 0241 MUSCAT, ALFRED, 0246 EDELSON, CHARLES, D. 0250 SCHWEBACH, JOHN, H. 0250 ZOLLER, HARRY, F.

JUNE 2004 79 YEARS 0822 LIEBETRUTH, OTTO, 78 YEARS 0213 SPICER, RUSSELL, F. 77 YEARS 0664 MALLORY, ROLLIN, C. 1068 MONTAG, SAMUEL, JOSEPH

50 YEARS 0006 BYSTER, THEODORE, ANDREW 0006 ESMANN, LEE, H. 0006 VAN FECHTMANN, WILLIAM, R. 0007 BLEDSOE, HAROLD, F.

years of service

0178 0196 0238 0252 0305 0341 0342 0362 0406 0406 0445 0466 0472 0486 0520 0522 0524 0550 0565 0565 0616 0620 0622 0626 0646 0701 0718 0722 0776 0779 0781 0797 0826 0843 0847 0890 0902 0913 0916 0956 0958 0977 1016 1035 1053 1141 1179 BRANDLER, SAUL, WRIGHT, ELLERY, C. HODGE, HAROLD, E. CHISHOLM, JAMES, M. HAPPICK, RICHARD, J. MEADE, HAROLD, A. GRANDEFELD, JOHN, J. HEALD, DOUGLAS, W. SMART, THOMAS, A. WAGMAKER, REGINALD, ROSENFELD, HARRY, A. RIESEN, GOTTFRIED, G. BAYS, ROBERT, J. WASSERMAN, HERBERT, TAPPER, WAYNE, V. HUNT, DONALD, H. ROBINSON, THOMAS, S. HARRIS, ROY, M. DEBOLD, CONRAD, SLADKY, JERRY, HARRISON, DONALD, I. VOLK, WALTER, F. TRAUB JR, GEORGE, CASE, MAXWELL, HOMER HOBBS, HOWARD, W. LUNDIN, AXEL, HERBERT IGOU, ORIN, LINCOLN DECHAU, CARL, L. PETERSON, NORMAN, F. WYANT, ALFRED, T. GELSER, CLAIR, W. COOPER, JAMES, S D MILEHAM, JAMES, T. RYAN, CHARLES, H. WOODS, RAYMOND, R. SHERMAN, IRVING, L. DAITCH, HERBERT, B. SHINGLER, ROBERT, F. LEESON, FRANCIS, A. WIGLEY, FRANK, B. HOTCH, HAROLD, S. KETCHAM, LESTER, E. HODDINOTT, EMERSON, V. BOTKIN, SAMUEL, I. LARSSON, KARL, L. GOULD, ALAN, D. GILMOUR, WILLIAM, E. 0166 0168 0177 0178 0183 0195 0196 0201 0201 0205 0213 0223 0224 0236 0247 0266 0268 0273 0273 0284 0284 0284 0287 0287 0298 0306 0308 0313 0315 0315 0350 0350 0350 0362 0371 0375 0383 0385 0397 0403 0415 0419 0441 0442 0445 0454 0471 0471 0476 0477 0479 0480 0483 0494 0506 0506 0511 0513 0514 0516 0520 0520 0520 0524 0531 0546 0546 0549 0565 0565 0575 0581 0588 0588 0588 0588 CURRIE, WILLIAM, J. DAVIES, RICHARD, DARRAH, WILLIAM, A. CHELNICK, MARTIN, JENNINGS, GEORGE, KIRKMAN, CHARLES, W. MCLARTY, ARCHIBALD, HELLMERS, JOHN, O. KRAMER, ROBERT, H. VERU, THEODORE, D. WILLIAMS, RICHARD, F. BEERS, ALBERT, H. KESSLER, GLENN, D. HART, ROBERT, MARVIN WENSKE, FRANKLIN, A. KUTZ, LESTER, M. RIEGE, FRITZ, H. ALLISON, WILLIAM, J. KING, HERBERT, O. FREY, MILTON, S W HIMER, CHARLES, W. JACOBSON, ALVIN, NEUBAUER, JOHN, ALFRED PETERSEN, HENRY, HITRICK JR, ALEXANDER, E. CORBIN, DEAN, A. STEELE, ROBERT, O. PHILLIPS, ROBERT, E. CLUCAS, RICHARD, A. TROJAN, EVERETT, G. AULT, ALFRED, L. DENNIS, DURWOOD, L. GRANT, DAVID, H. GAY, ROBERT, CHASE GERWINER, ROBERT, T. COCHRAN, JAMES, W. MIZENER, CLIFFORD, BAUER, ALFRED, B. MUSHENO JR, CLYDE, F. CAMPBELL, H, E. HASTINGS, PERRY, W. SCHAEFER, GERALD, L. NISBET, ARTHUR, M. PALMER, RAYMOND, KAPLAN, HYMAN, J. WATERS, BARBER, L. ASDAL, JOHN, T. LAWSON, JOHN, D. CORNELL, MAURICE, J. CURTIS, MILFORD, M. STOLLERY, ELMER, EDWIN DUNCAN, KENNETH, T. SAFFERMAN, GERALD, GUSOVIUS, KENNETH, H. BROWN, LEWIS, L. REYNOLDS, LLOYD, B. NESTER, WILLIAM, F. BASMAJIAN, WALTER, MURPHY, DAVID, F. GORDON, HARRY, E. CLARK, MONROE, F. COLE, EDWARD, S. STATHIS, DEMOSTHENES, C. GANN JR, BEN, OLIVER NOVAK, FREDERICK, MICHAEL GRANT JR, GEORGE, R. MULLER, WARREN, E. ELLICOTT, ANDREW, M. VITARIUS, GEORGE, W. WATTS, JOHN, E. BORIA, DEMENTER, M. WHEELER, ROBERT, C. DAVIDOFF, SEYMOUR, FACIO, VICTOR, J. HOWARD, SHELDON, MACHADO, HAROLD, A. 0588 0588 0598 0627 0634 0637 0646 0646 0648 0648 0682 0693 0696 0699 0701 0702 0702 0702 0702 0710 0711 0716 0716 0725 0755 0776 0776 0778 0790 0790 0793 0808 0808 0814 0819 0835 0835 0837 0839 0846 0855 0872 0878 0879 0890 0890 0890 0915 0915 0922 0934 0934 0956 0956 0970 0970 0981 0981 0992 1041 1057 1057 1057 1088 1088 1111 1118 1141 1174 1179 SCHLAU, MARTIN, R. SOLOMON, JACK, J. SARAYIOTES, JAMES, C. TEED, ARTHUR, D. HALBER, JERRY, ENGLERT, GEORGE, W. DISINGER, FRANK, A. ZIMMERMAN, FREDERICK, E. FEATHERSTONE, R, D. WILLIAMS, RUSSELL, S. BURT, RICHARD, E. WEBBER JR, THOMAS, T. BENNINK, WILLIAM, H. DEKDEBRUN, ALLEN, E. OTTEN, LOUIS, R. MOTTOLA, ROBERT, W. SMITH, F, EDWARD SMITH, JOHN, E. WILSON, RICHARD, H. SJURSEN, GEORGE, A. DOREMUS, JOHN, FRED O'CONNELL, FRED, E. PETER, GEORGE, SWAN, THEODORE, C. WHITEHEAD, CLIFFORD, F. JANTZEN JR, ALFRED, H. SUESENS, RICHARD, HAGER, CHARLES, RAY BLAKELY, SYLVESTER, F. MAICUS, CARL, R. CALABRIA, JOSEPH, GLANTZ, LEONARD, WIEDERMAN, MAXWELL, S. TODD, JOHN, S. ROTHBAUM, MURRAY, A. BURGER JR, WILLIAM, R. NEILSON, ROBERT, M. WILCOX, G, HARRIS BAUMAN, HARRY, MEYERS, WILLIAM, E. DAVIES, FRANK, VITANZA, THEODORE, BOYE, RAYMOND, PETERSON, EARL, A. FISHER, EDWIN, GELBERMAN DD, JOSEPH, H. GELLER, JULIAN, K. JOHNSON, MERRIL, E. MORRIS, THOMAS, G. FLEISHER, BERNARD, PHILLIPS, IRA, H. SCHWARTZ, ALFRED, H. KIEFER, DONALD, J. LAUBER, JOHN, G. KOHL, GILBERT, E. SCOTT, RALPH, V. KIBLER, HARVEY, E. MENA, EDWIN, G. RODRIGUEZ JR, ROGER, GLASSER, NATHAN, BLADES, ARTHUR, H. FRANKS JR, ARTHUR, S. JAKOBY, RALPH, CONE, EDWARD, L. OGBORNE, FREDERICK, R. ROTHENBERGER, RALPH, C. GOVER, HIRAM, T. FRANK, MITCHELL, M. SIMON, ROBERT, F. MUNRO, DUANE, E. 0019 0022 0023 0033 0034 0039 0047 0051 0053 0063 0066 0087 0098 0105 0132 0138 0145 0147 0147 0149 0150 0154 0160 0167 0168 0168 0176 0201 0203 0224 0232 0240 0247 0252 0252 0256 0266 0290 0290 0292 0301 0309 0324 0347 0349 0350 0368 0375 0378 0378 0396 0419 0425 0441 0447 0455 0458 0466 0481 0481 0481 0486 0486 0487 0501 0514 0524 0524 0533 0544 0546 0558 0558 0563 0565 0565 STALLMAN JR, RUDOLPH, E. STRAIGHT, RONALD, B. HAUSEN, SIDNEY, I. VAN SCOTEN, MAX, L. MILLER, GEORGE, J. HENRY, WILLIAM, E. THOMPSON, EMMET, B. DICKINSON, DONALD, W. LORTIE, LEON, A. PFIZENMAYER, WALTER, J. MERRILL JR, RALPH, P. RISTAU, HENRY, W. RINGER, RAYMOND, H. MARKOFF, MARK, K. DEXTER, LLOYD, K. BLACKSMITH, DANIEL, A. GLATZ, HARRY, E. PITCHER, WALTER, J. TANNER, CORAL, W. GIBSON JR, CLAUDE, E. JONES JR, GRIFFITH, EMLER, CHARLES, F. LYONS, SAMUEL, E. MULKINS, GEORGE, F. COOK, CHESTER, C. EVEY, GAYLORD, H. TUCKER, ROSCOE, L. BARGHAAN, ROBERT, W. SHAW, DAVID, S. SERGI, FRANK, J. GOLDSMITH, MARVIN, BASTIAN SR, CARL, E. KATZ, HELMUTH, W. CARLSON, CURTIS, L. PRESTON, EUGENE, C. SEAMAN, RAYMOND, E. SCHAEDLICH, OTTO, A. STONE, JOHN, A. WILD, ROBERT, C. TROPMAN JR, CLARENCE, G. KUTNER, WILLIAM, A. LAROCCA, FRANK, BRACK, CHARLES, V. GRECK, EDWARD, T. HULSE JR, FREDERICK, E. FREDERICK, DONALD, B. JOHANSON, EDWARD, F. DEACON, CHARLES, A. GILBERT, FREDERICK, KLINE, PAUL, L. WILCOX, STEWART, E. BRAY, KENNETH, M. HILL, ROYCE, KING, WILLIAM, F. FUERTH, LOTHAR, STUBBA, WILLIAM, HALLAS, NICHOLAS, E. VANBUREN, LANDIN, I. LYBERT JR, ELMER, J. ORTON, ALLEN, S. PRESLER, LAWRENCE, W. COHEN, MARVIN, STOKES, GEORGE, R. LUCATOS, JOHN, J. MARQUART, GILES, MOORE, THEODORE, J. NIELSEN, DOUGLAS, A. ROSA, EARL, LAVERNE AVERY, KENNETH, L. HAINES, ERNEST, R. CORSO, LEONARD, CARTER, WAYNE, H. DECK, ROBERT, A. KIEFER, JOHN, A. JACKSON, CURTIS, M. TOY, DONALD, H. 0586 0588 0588 0622 0624 0639 0647 0647 0647 0651 0666 0684 0684 0693 0693 0694 0695 0699 0701 0711 0711 0711 0711 0712 0712 0715 0720 0729 0737 0759 0779 0779 0793 0796 0797 0806 0822 0826 0835 0837 0839 0842 0859 0877 0877 0892 0917 0923 0934 0956 0956 1001 1001 1001 1041 1041 1057 1066 1066 1088 1111 1132 1138 1143 1180 KOESTER, GERALD, LEFFLER, STANLEY, S. SOBEL, THEODORE, MATTICE, RICHARD, E. TAMM, ROLAND, FOOTE, ROGER, A. ANTON, DAVID, DONTIS, JAMES, L. WILLIAMSON, ISAAC, BOHRER, HARRY, BOOTH, KENNETH, BUNZEY, KENNETH, R. MITCHELL, CLINTON, E. MACK, FRED, J. MICHAELSEN, FRITZ, G. CORNELL, WILMONT, L. DODGE, JOHN, E. KEIM, MILTON, C. SALT JR, FRANCIS, E. ABRAMS, ELMER, A. BAILEY, WILLIAM, R. BIRNBAUM, JOSEPH, E. LAURENCE, LEO, E. HILD, HERBERT, A. TAYLOR, NORMAN, C. WRISLEY, ALTON, T. MATTESON, WILLIAM, S. KUBU, GEORGE, V. EMMETT JR, JOHN, E. DUNN, LAWRENCE, W. BAXTER, ROBERT, MINER FEIL, NORMAN, MIMOZO, MICHAEL, J. VOORHEES, ERNEST, R. BREWER, ALLEN, M. MACKENZIE, IAN, B. BOYCE, HOWARD, W. HEINRICH, ARTHUR, C. WRIGHT III, ALBERT, J. DYKINS, FRED, A. NENNER, DAVID, WARREN, DONALD, E. HANNIGAN, HAROLD, R. BALTSAS, STAVROS, G. PERRY, MICHAEL, M. MEINZINGER, JOSEPH, EMANUEL, JOSEPH, M. GERSTNER, JOHN, E. SILVERSTEIN, MAX, KORENBERG, JOSEPH, ROGERS, CHARLES, A. GREENBLOTT, RONALD, MILLER JR, HARRY, A. MILLER, WENDELL, H. AULD, JAMES, D. BORROK, HOWARD, E. THEISS, WILLIAM, C. FROST, JEROME, P. SCHWIMMER, MAX, BENNETT, JOHN, D. DEGRAFF, DONALD, H. SINGER, RALPH, G. CHRISTOPHERSON JR, S. E. CHISHOLM, NOEL, J. HAMMOND, FRANK, E.

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

55 YEARS 0006 RODGERS SR, ARTHUR, J. 0010 BELL, CLIFFORD, J. 0014 BRANDOW, JOHN, E. 0019 SCHEMPP, ALFRED, F. 0019 TEBO JR, ROBERT, P. 0023 COOPER, BEN, 0044 GOODRICH, ROBERT, E. 0049 AHLHEIM, JOHN, G. 0055 JONES, ROBERT, O. 0055 ROBERTS, FRED, D. 0060 WRIGLEY, ALBERT, H. 0063 BRICKNER, CHRISTIAN, P. 0063 NEWMAN, WILLIAM, I. 0066 MERRELL JR, THOMAS, W. 0082 CURRIE, WILLIAM, J. 0082 KIRCHNER JR, JOHN, A. 0095 MILLSPAUGH, STANLEY, C. 0098 TUBBS, HOWARD, P. 0105 EDGCOMB, RICHARD, C. 0105 MOEHLAU JR, HARRY, O. 0108 FOSTER, JOHN, WILLETT 0129 ELLSWORTH, CARL, L. 0144 KITTS, DONALD, W. 0154 CURCHIN, HAROLD, J. 0154 ELLIS, ROBERT, LYMAN 0163 BENNETT, GORDON, D. 0164 MAHON, JAMES, F.

50 YEARS 0004 ENGELMAN JR, GEORGE, T. 0004 MILLER, ALBERT, 0014 WYLD JR, CHARLES, W. 0019 LEMPFERT, GEORGE, R.

newly raised brothers

JANUARY 2004 0002 FENDRICH,WALTER, 0009 PRATT,RUSSELL,L. 0012 DONOHUE,PATRICK,F. 0012 MCGLYNN,THOMAS,F. 0012 STEIN,FREDERICK,F. 0012 SUSLAN,JULES, 0012 WITHJACK,PAUL,W. 0098 MIER,PAUL,DAVID 0164 CARPENTER,JARETT,W. 0200 DURSO,STEPHEN,THOMAS 0200 WALTI,BRIAN,SCOTT 0259 SMITH,EDWARD,EARL 0263 SCHELL,MICHAEL,F. 0271 MARTINEZ,ANTONIO, 0285 0285 0285 0294 0306 0306 0308 0352 0352 0358 0358 0362 0379 0399 0413 SAXE,EUGENE,GERARD SWIFT,PATRICK,THOMAS VIEIRA JR,LUIZ,GARCIA GARNER,VINCENT,RANDELL FRANCIS,HAL,WILLIAM SCOTT,FRANK,JAMES LEONARD,PHILIP,L. OLIVER,WILLIAM,I. OLIVER,BENJAMIN,J. NOWAKOWSKI,THEODORE,M A SALT,JOHN,D. HADCOCK,STEPHEN,ELLIS ROBINSON,ARTHUR,DAVID KETCHAM,JEFFREY,K. BAETZOLD,PAUL,MICHAEL 0413 0455 0455 0470 0471 0527 0534 0537 0537 0537 0537 0537 0653 0653 0694 GERHARDT,WILLIAM,G. SHAFER,CHARLES,G. STUBBA,SCOTT,K. GIACCO,LUCIANO, SANCHEZ III,CARMELO, SCHAEFER JR,CARL,W. BURNS,DONALD,J. CRUZ,REYNALDO,C. DE GUZMAN,ALEX,L. GALFO,ROGELIO,J. UMBAO,EDGAR,P. VILLAROMAN,JOSEFINO, CHAREST,MICHAEL, IAROPOLI,ROBERT,F. DURANTE JR,CHARLES,R. 0698 0703 0703 0703 0703 0703 0715 0715 0754 0796 0796 0796 0806 0806 0806 VEGA,FREDDY, GONZALEZ SR,RODERICK,A. GUERREDO,AUGUSTINO, HAMIDEH,MAHMUD, LABOY JR,WILFREDO, SANCHEZ,JOSE,R. DEMOURA,DANIEL, ROCKEFELLER,RICHARD,K. ARCHIBALD,KENNETH,DAVID BARNES,DOUGLAS, HELMER,ADAM, WILLIAMS,STEVEN,R. CARRERA,CARLOS,R. DALY,MICHAEL,R. YOUNGS,NORMAN,S. 0814 0838 0838 0863 0863 0877 0877 0877 0911 0911 0948 0948 0948 1035 1092 CRONIZER III,HERBERT,H. ROSSKAMP,PAUL,WILLIAM STREEK,WILLIAM,WALTER GRUPPUSO,DOMINICK,D. SLIVKO,AVI, MONTGOMERY,BRIAN,ALLEN RIVERA,ANGELO,R. VSEVOLOZHSKY,GREGORY, DOMNISSEY,JOSEPH,WADE PASSINO,PETER,RICHARD BENDES,ALVIN,EARL HANIFORD,NEIL,MARK KORNMEHL,NATHAN, SPACCARELLI,NICK,JOSEPH PETERSON,JEFFREY,

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newly raised brothers

1111 ROOF,TIMOTHY,M. 1111 ZUPPA,ANTHONY,W. FEBRUARY 2004 0008 FOWLER,SCUDDER,T. 0008 PERKINS,STEPHEN,DIX 0017 CHIRUMBERRO,FRANCOIS, 0017 GUILBERT,PATRICK,J-P 0041 BAXTER,TERRANCE,L. 0041 RUFFINI,ANTHONY,J. 0128 ARNO,PHILLIP,JOHN 0128 WELLS,MICHAEL,F. 0217 MCINTYRE,GARY,LEE 0320 CLARK,GLENN,NORMAN 0320 VOLZER,ROBERT,P. 0447 MISRA,LATCHMAN, 0447 SHAMSOONPAR,MAHATAM, 0447 TOWNSEND,JOHN,ARTHUR 0477 FARR,ADAM,WAYNE 0524 SUNG,TZEWEI, 0565 DIFORIO,MARK, 0651 CASTRO,CHARLES, 0651 COLON,JOHN, 0651 LEE,KA-KWE, 0651 MORALES JR,WILLIAM, 0651 SALTZMAN,DANIEL,R. 0699 CRANE JR,PAUL,EDWARD 0699 LITWIN,JONATHAN,CONRAD 0758 HUMMEL,JOSEPH,M. 0758 MAGLIO,ANTHONY, 0837 JOHNSON,MARK,J. 0837 LITTLEJOHN,SETH,JON 0842 0875 0875 0875 0925 0969 1134 1134 HAUGHT,RICHARD,W. LILEY,TERENCE,G. MARTINEZ,HOMERO,A. SMITH III,ARTHUR, POSS JR,HARRY,R. EULL,NICHOLAS,A. HUGHES,DAVID,CHARLES SHAUGHNESSY,KARL,L. 0224 FREED,DAVID,GERALD 0224 JOSWICK,STEPHEN,M. 0224 PACIELLO,ROGER,G. 0224 SOKAL,ROBERT,JOHN 0224 WILSON,JAMES,V. 0224 ZAMMIELLO,CARMEN, 0233 BARROW,KIRK,CADIZ 0233 FRANCIS,FREDERICK,ARMSTRONG 0233 GRANT,MERRITT,AA 0233 JONES,DARRELL,KEITH 0233 MATTOCKS,WILLIAM,EARL 0233 PINNOCK,EVERTON, 0273 APONTE JR,MIGUEL, 0273 FUZIA,THOMAS,J. 0273 MANN,ROBERT,ARTHUR 0273 MULLER,HARRY,J. 0273 ORTIZ,ELEAZIN, 0283 SANCHEZ,ANDRES, 0334 VAN AVERY,ALAN, 0334 VISCOSI,JOHN,R. 0334 VISCOSI,DANIEL,N. 0395 LONGSHORE,THOMAS,LEE 0417 OLBRYCH,JOSEPH,J. 0417 SUSSER,BRUCE,J. 0428 DOMINY,DAVID,M. 0438 WHITE,MARLIN,CURTIS 0490 CRISTOBAL,CARLOS, 0490 GERENIA III,PHILIP, 0490 LUCERO,GIOVANNI,D. 0490 PAL,DEO,ANGELO XENOS 0490 TOMALE,SAMUEL, 0517 0517 0517 0521 0532 0533 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0608 0634 0634 0634 0634 0647 0647 0647 0647 0647 0703 DUMONT,WALLACE, SMITH,JEFFREY,BRIAN STAIB,J,C. DEAN,CRAIG,GEORGE MISNER,DAVID,A. STEENBURG,JACK,LEE BARBITSCH,KEVIN,J. CAMPIONE,LOUIS,J. HOEFFERLE,ROBERT,J. KIKEL,DANIEL,J. KRESSE,JOSEPH,F. KRESSE,EDWARD,A. LEHNER,WERNER,J. LOESER,MARCUS, LOESER,KURT, MARSH,RICHARD,J. MIHELIC,WALTER, OEFFL,PETER, SCHLICHTER,ROBERT,W. SNELL,MARTIN,J. WAGNER,RICHARD,E. WEIGANG,TIMOTHY, ANTAR,ROBERT, BOCHKOR,LASZLO, KALOUDIS,NIKOLAOS, VERNOVSKY,IGOR, FEINBERG,DAVID,LAURENCE MARCHLEWSKI,ARTUR, MURRAY,WILLIAM,WALTER THOMPSON,JEFFREY,VICTOR WIRENIUS,JOHN,F. DIECKMANN,CHRISTOPHER,G. 0737 0737 0737 0737 0750 0750 0750 0750 0779 0779 0779 0779 0849 0849 0934 0934 0934 0977 0977 1009 1009 1035 1122 1165 1165 1165 1180 1180 GRAVES,DAVID,WILLIAM HEEPS,GORDON,THOMAS MAHONEY,CRAIG,ANTHONY WOOD,NATHAN,JOSEPH DUFRESNE JR,CHARLES,H. ESTLING,RHAN,HOWARD FULLER,ROBERT, KELSEY,PATRICK,ALAN HARMON,JOSHUA,R. ROBINSON,JEFFREY,J. SASSONE,FRANK,I. THOMPSON,NATHAN,WILLIAM CROFUT,CASEY,CLARK SMITH,BLAKE,A. AVILES,DONNIE, COLEMAN,MARK,V. SUERO,ODELL,ARTURO BRITE,JEREMY,KARL EDINGTON,ROGER, RODRIGUEZ,MANUEL, SINGER,STUART,H. ROGERS,WISTER, DAVIS,JOHN,R. CURRY,GERARD,F. JAIMES,JAIRO,F. O'LEARY,KRISTIAN,L. BELL,RONALD,L. FRIEDMAN,ALAN,E.

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

MARCH 2004 0003 GROSE,JOHN,ROBERT 0003 MALASKY JR,JOHN,JOSEPH 0003 SMITH,GARY,EDMUND 0003 SWEENY,LIAM,MICHAEL 0003 SWEENY,ROBERT,HUGH 0051 LEHTONON,MICHAEL,G. 0121 LIU SR,MONTY,F. 0131 JOHNSON,THOMAS,A. 0145 FURLOW,KENNETH,C. 0145 RICKARDS,JOSEPH,J. 0150 ALVAREZ,MARLON, 0150 DELEONARDO,ANTHONY,W. 0150 DYER,ANQUAN,GEORGE 0150 GOUSE,RICHARD,CHARLES 0150 JOSEPH JR,LOUIS,A. 0150 KOLWAITE,SCOTT,ROGER 0150 MORRISSEY,DAVID,MATTHEW 0150 SACCOIA,JOSEPH, 0150 SHANNON,MATTHEW,J. 0205 DUBOIS,PIERRE, 0224 COOPERMAN,IRA,BARRY 0224 DUNCKEL,MARTIN,JOSEPH

NEW YORK STATE MASONS GOLF ASSOCIATION

To All Masonic Golfers: Welcome to the 52nd New York State Masons Golf Tournament. It will be held at Cee Jay Golf Course located near Laurens, N.Y. off NY Route 23 in Otsego Co. You may invite a non-Mason friend and the ladies are most welcome. Friday and Saturday the 9th & 10th of July are reserved for the tournament. Shot-gun start on Friday or Saturday at 10:00 AM On Thursday there will be a Scramble for the Directors, Masons and their guests. A Shot Gun start at 11:00 AM is planned. Cost for the scramble will be $35.00, which will include greens fees, cart, prizes, with hamburgers, hotdogs and salads after the Scramble. Send a check for the $35.00 if you plan to play in the scramble. Bring your own team or we will team you with someone. As usual we will use the Callaway Handicap System. Prizes will be for the first 3 places in up to 4 flights. 4,3 & 2 Man Below are directions to the Golf Course and if anyone would like to sponsor a hole, the cost is $25. For those traveling I-88, Exit 13 (NY 205) to NY 23 toward Morris, turn right on Potato Farm Road, about a mile take first right to Cee Jay GC. For those traveling south on NY Route 8, in New Berlin turn left by Quickway on Lake Street which turns into Otsego CR 13, to Morris the east on NY 23 to Potato Farm Road turn left then first right Cee Jay GC. For those traveling north on NY Route 8 to South New Berlin then right on NY Route 23 through Morris then left on Potato Farm Road and then first right to Cee Jay GC. Application can be found on: www.ESMason.com Forms Page

THE EMPIRE STATE MASON SUMMER 2004

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Lodge Trophy and/or individual prizes; Closest to the pin for both men and ladies plus many other prizes.

ENTRY FORM FOR THURSDAY SCRAMBLE: Player Names Address Phone

n.y. masonic youth organizations

CONSTELLATION OF JUNIOR STARS Mrs. Joyce C. Bidnick President of the Grand Council of Sponsors 11 Mark Lane New City, New York 10956-6737 Phone: 845-638-3128 Fax: 845-639-1832 Email: [email protected] Website: constellationny.org

NEW YORK RAINBOW FOR GIRLS Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Willis Supreme Inspector and Supreme Nature 7298 North Street Road Auburn, New York 13021 Phone: 315-252-2683 Website: iorg.org

ORGANIZATION OF TRIANGLES, INC. Mrs. Amylou Lynch - State Director 4900 Route 9N Corinth, New York 12822 Phone: 518-654-6407 Fax: 518-654-9106 Email: [email protected] Website: nytriangle.org

NY DEMOLAY HEADQUARTERS Bruce N. Hazard-Executive Officer Gregory M. Kita-Executive Director 2150 Bleecker Street, Utica, New York 13501 Toll Free 1-888-4-DeMolay Phone (315) 798-4922 Fax (315) 798-4798 E-mail: [email protected] Web Site: www.nydemolay.org

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

CONSTELLATION GIRLS

The Order of the Constellation of Junior Stars is a unique sorority designed for young women. Part of the Masonic family, Constellation was established in 1949 by the Order of the Eastern Star. Since then, the members of the Constellation of Junior Stars have been helping to prepare young girls to meet the challenges of an ever-changing society. Pre-teen and teenage girls growing up in today's world are especially vulnerable to experiencing low self-esteem. Constellation allows a girl to discover herself, her talents, and her confidence in a safe and supportive environment. Members are encouraged to build upon their natural leadership, organizational, and public speaking abilities by planning and organizing business meetings, social events, and fund-raisers. Each year Constellation chooses a charity to support and have made a significant impact on the world around them. Constellation girls have raised over $150,000 for charities such as the Cancer Society, Leukemia Foundation, Parkinson's Disease Foundation, Child I.D. Program, Rusk Institute and Strong Memorial Hospital. Supportive, interested adults are crucial in the development of a young woman's positive self-image. Constellation members would be unable to achieve the high standards that their organization sets for them without the support of caring adults, including Masonic Family members. Many young women, especially those who may not enjoy adequate support at home, have benefited a great deal from the encouragement of "moms and grandmothers" in Eastern Star Chapters and "dads and grandfathers" in Masonic Lodges. For those adults looking to make even a small impact on the future generation, working with Constellation members will offer great rewards. Membership in the Constellation of Junior Stars is composed of young girls between the ages of 10 and 21, with Masonic Sponsorship. There are individual Constellations throughout New York State, and we are in the process of starting new ones. Constellation holds an Annual Convocation of its members, which this year will be held at Utica College, the week-end of August 5th through 8th. All Master Masons and Eastern Star members are welcomed to attend. The Installation of new Grand Officers will be held on August 7th at 7:30 PM at the Masonic Home in Utica. [email protected], or visit our website at: www.constellationny.org

Jessica McMullen Grand Exalted Star of Light and Love

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n.y. masonic youth organizations

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

PETER WILLIAM BRUSOE, INTERNATIONAL MASTER COUNCILOR OF DEMOLAY AND MASTER MASON IN MASTERS LODGE NO. 5

Albany, New York ership Peter has made many friends in Masonry all of whom are active in some manner with DeMolay. Masters Lodge is proud to announce that a Degree Team was assembled of the many Masonic/DeMolay friends he has made. Every part was filled with Masonic/DeMolay guests and friends. The officers for the First Section were: R\W\ Edward R. Trosin, Deputy Grand Master Conferring Master R\W\ Neal Bidnick, Grand Treasurer Senior Warden R\W\ James E. Sullivan, Junior Grand Warden Junior Warden R\W\ John R. "Bud" Prout, Past Grand Treasurer Senior Deacon W\ Gary Burke, Deputy Member DeMolay International Marshall R\W\ William Clizbe, Past Chapter Dad & HVD Dad Sr. Master of Ceremonies V\W\ Joseph Leo, Chapter Dad Jr. M of Master of Ceremonies Greg Kita, Executive Director NY DeMolay Working Tools, Chaplain R\W\ Robert S. Walenta, Chapter Dad Bible Presentation All of the above members are currently active in DeMolay. The Second Section of the Degree as well consisted of an all DeMolay Cast. DeMolay does forever change in a positive way a young man. The guidance and lessons taught in the Chapter room groom the young men of DeMolay to be future leaders in Masonry and in the world.

(l-r) R\W\ Edward Trosin , Brother Peter W. Brusoe and W\ Daniel Halloran, Master of Masters Lodge On Monday March 22nd Masters Lodge, in great Masonic ceremony, raised to the Degree of Master Mason, Brother Peter William Brusoe. Peter is an active member of DeMolay and has risen to the office of International Master Councilor. This is the highest office in the world for a young man in DeMolay, the equivalent of being Grand Master on an International Level if there was such a position. Peter is the first from New York State to hold this position and he has proven himself a remarkable young man in DeMolay. Because of his years in DeMolay lead-

CAMBRIDGE-SALEM LODGE NO. 481 PRESENTS 75-YEAR AWARD

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R\W\ Jeffrey E. McMorris, W\ Edwin T. Mook, W\ John C. W. Rowley, W\ Robert Endee and W\M\ F. William Wager Cambridge, New York On October 27, 2003, W\ Edwin T. Mook was presented with a Certificate and Pin in honor of his 75 years as an active Mason. A congratulatory letter accompanied the Certificate from Grand Secretary M\W. Gary A. Henningsen. On that same evening awards were presented by R\W\ Jeffrey E. McMorris, District Deputy Grand Master and assisted by W\ F. William Wager, Master to W\ John C. W. Rowley, who was the recipient of the Daniel Carter Beard Award for his service to the Boy Scouts. Also a 40-Year Certificate was presented to W\ Robert Endee.

committee on youth

GRAND LODGE REPORT ON YOUTH

Realizing the importance of Youth, as the future of the Fraternity, it is our goal to assist Lodges and their members in the development and growth of programs that provide and promote youth activities, in all communities in New York State. Each Lodge and District is encouraged to support youth activities in its community whether Masonic or not. We must support our own Masonic Youth Organizations as well, advising our eligible youths on all Grand Lodge Programs available to them, such as Camp Turk and Scholarship Assistance, while also providing worthwhile and wholesome activities for all to engage in. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

FRANK M. TOTTON ESSAY CONTEST

The Fifth Manhattan District's Endowment Fund once again supported the Frank M. Totton Essay Contest. Many thanks to R\W\ Ronald N. Bower, managing editor of the Empire State Mason who advertised the contest in two issues this year. In addition, the entry form is now available for download on the Empire State Mason magazine website. This year's contest had as its first prize $1500.00 with nine other cash prize winners. We join with all concerned in thanking the Fifth Manhattan District Endowment Fund for their generosity and support.

Joshua M. Formanek Winner of Totton Essay

This year's topic was, "What is a Leader?" There were 78 entries this year, of which 74 were eligible. Winners of the Frank M. Totton Essay Contest are as follows: First Place Second Place Third Place Fourth Place Fifth Place Sixth PlaceSeventh Place Eighth Place Ninth Place Tenth Place Joshua M Formanek Lindsay C Rathert Lisalotte Marie Hyde Kathleen Anna Ellis Sean Michael Bates Danielle Dewey John Colan Lindsay Fisher Jessica Crump Peter O'Brien Deposit No. 396 Alcyone No. 695 Delaware No. 561 Charles W Cushman No. 879 Oriental-Faxton No. 224 Olive No. 575 Mineola No. 985 Erac No. 163 Waddington No. 393 Drumlin Square No. 1180 Delaware District Suffolk District Sullivan District Third Erie District Second Oneida District Chautauqua District Second Nassau District Monroe District Second St. Lawrence District Wayne District

Honorable mention winners will be announced at Grand Lodge session and time permitting, the winner will read his essay. All who served on the committee are to be commended for their attention to details, and the fine performance of reading and grading the essays The Daniel Carter Beard Masonic Scouter Award, is a national recognition approved by the Boy Scouts of America to recognize outstanding service to the youth of our communities through service connected with the Scouting movement, for qualified Masons. As of this writing (March 15, 2004), 88 recognitions have been received by worthy Brothers throughout New York State. General Douglas MacArthur Awards for Exemplary Service to Youth, as of this writing (March 15, 2004) 24 individuals or organizations throughout New York State have been recognized for their voluntary service to their community's youth during this current year. Eagle Scout Commendation - Grand Lodge now offers to those qualified as Eagle Scouts, a special commendation. Included is a personal letter of congratulation from our Grand Master, accompanied with a Boy Scout nationally approved bronze medallion. The medallion, with the Masonic Square and Compasses, along with the words "New York Masons" and "Citizenship", emblazoned on it, are most impressive. As of this writing (March 15, 2004), 95 worthy Eagle Scouts have received the recognition in its new form. As a fairly new committee chairperson, I would like to thank our Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master and Grand Secretary for their advice and assistance. I thank the District Deputy Grand Masters and Grand Lodge Staff Officers as well as the members of this committee for their feedback and suggestions. I also thank the Lodge Secretaries who have been in contact with our committee in regards to the various functions of this committee. In the past three years, over 200 Lodges have participated in the Frank M. Totton Essay Contest! I also must take this opportunity to thank R\W\ Ray Alvarez, W Thomas Wilder, R\W\ Ron Bower, R\W\ Richard Friedman, W\ Alan Kerner, along with David Cabral, Bridget Primo, Jamey Sadowick, and Andrew Beatrice, for their assistance in the performance of this committee's duties. There is still much to be done to achieve the goals of this committee and work is underway to achieve these goals. A questionnaire has gone out to all Lodges and District Deputy Grand Masters. All responses are being collated so that future plans may be made. We will develop plans that will introduce more and more children, as well as their parents, to Masonry and its ideals of Friendship- Morality- Brotherly Love and Charity. Grand Master Nathan Turk often used this quote while serving as chairman of this committee- "Who mentors a boy, by the Master's plan, shapes the course of the future man." How true it is today even more than ever before. We will take the Masonic principles and teachings where no Mason can go: Into the hearts and minds of our young people. The committee wishes to thank Grand Master M\W\ Carl J. Fitje for giving us the opportunity to serve our youth, and our beloved Fraternity. Respectfully submitted, Cary S. Cohn, Chairman

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masonic fellowship committee

D. Joseph Bradley, Jr. 33 Delaware Avenue, Rensselaer, New York 12144-4919 (518) 477-6279 e-mail [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

2003 NEW YORK STATE MASONIC FISHING CONTEST

enced anglers. Guides will take you to the fish and recommend or provide equipment and correct bait and lures. Their knowledge of the river and the area will make your day on the river virtually trouble free, and will allow you to enjoy the world class fishing and scenery the Salmon River can provide. Guide fees are reasonable, and more than well worth it. If wasting time and squandering travel money, motel costs, and money for replacing broken or inappropriate equipment isn't your idea of fun, and catching fish IS...then hire a New York State Licensed Guide." The Grand Lodge sponsor the fishing contest. For more information the New York State Masonic Fresh and Salt Water Fishing Contest contact: New York Masonic Fellowship Chairman R\W\ D. Joseph Bradley, 33 Delaware Avenue, Renssaelaer, New York 12144-4919, phone ­ (518) 477-6269 or e-mail [email protected] 2003 New York State Masonic Fishing Contest Results NAME FAMILY ENTRY Tom Loughlin Sr. SALT WATER ENTRIES Arthur Rumph Dave Borrill Dave Borrill Dave Borrill FISH Brown Trout Fluke Fluke Striped Bass Porgy LENGTH 25" 20" 23" 43 1/2" 16 5/12 " 25" 30 1/2 " 24" 17 3/4" 24 1/2" 25 1/2" 36 1/2" 24" 31" 25 1/2" 26 1/2" 25 3/4" 18 1/2" 19 1/2" WEIGHT 9 lbs. 4 lb. 2 oz. 5 lb. 6 oz. 37 lb. 8 oz. 3 lb. 9 oz 7 lb. 8 oz. 10 lb. 10 lb. 2 lb.1 oz. 5 lb. 2 oz. 9 lb. 6 lb. 1 oz. 14 lb. 6 oz. 4 lb. 8 oz. 4 lb. 8 oz. 2 lb.8 oz. 2 lb 1 oz. 4 lb

(l-r) Brother Thomas E. Loughlin, Jr., Individual winner; Brother Thomas E. Loughlin, Sr., Family Winner; Brother Jeff Edwards, Senior Warden, Oriental-Faxton Lodge No. 224; R\W\ D. Joseph Bradley, Jr., Fellowship Committee Chairman; Note: The two large trophies are the Travelling State ones and the smaller ones are to the Lodge and individual. The 2003 New York State Masonic Fishing Trophy was presented to Utica's 413 member Oriental-Faxton Lodge No. 224 and individual championship to Thomas E. Loughlin, Jr. at the "Mid Winter Barbecue" at the 106-year old Utica Masonic Hall on Genesee Street, Utica, New York. Other anglers, including Loughlin's 88-year old father, Tom Sr. winner of the non-member family division competition, and sportsman-artist Tom Yacovella, the 2002 champion also of Utica, received awards. R\W\ D. Joseph Bradley, Fellowship Committee Chairman presented the honors to Loughlin and son, also bestowing the long-dormant Lodge "Traveling Trophy" to Oriental-Faxton Lodge No. 224 of the Second Oneida Masonic District. The Lodge award was given to the Masonic Lodge contributing the largest number of official entries to the contest. Addressing an audience of nearly 100, Bradley explained that the 2003 contest's entry participation had reached the number, which New York Masonic rules permitted the Lodge Trophy to be deemed meaningful, and presented the first time since 1994 that such a prize had been added to the individual championships. In accepting the individual championship Tom Loughlin, Jr. Vowed a concerted effort to keep the Traveling Trophy in the Oriental Faxton trophy case for years to come. He quickly credited Guide Jeff Murteza of Fishin' Hawk Guide Service in Oswego for making the win possible. Both elder and younger Loughlins recommended that any new angler wishing to enjoy fishing success along with the outdoor experience at Salmon River and Oswego hire a professional, licensed guide for at least their first trip. Tom Jr. Elaborated, saying, "Hiring a professional guide will put you on nearly equal footing with all, but the most experi-

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FRESH WATER DIVISION Thomas E. Loughlin Jr. Walleye Pike Walleye Pike Steelhead Brown Trout Brown Trout Brown trout Northern Pike Rainbow Trout Salmon Douglas R. Russell Walleye Pike Northern Pike Steelhead Brown Trout Rainbow Trout

Jim Smith

Additional entry blanks may be obtained by going to: www.ESMason.com and clicking on forms.

from the masonic kitchen

SPINACHBower SALAD By Joan

1 lb. Fresh spinach 1 can drained bean sprouts 1 can water chestnuts, drained and sliced thin 3-4 boiled eggs sliced 6-8 sliced bacons (fry bacon till crisp and drain. Then broken into pieces.) Mix spinach, chestnuts, bean sprouts, eggs, add bacon and top with dressing. DRESSING 1 cup oil ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 medium onion (grated) or ¼ cup frozen onions cup catsup ½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup vinegar 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce Combine all of the above ingredients.

CHICKEN CACCIATORE By Stanley Schumacher

2 to 3 lb. Chicken legs and thighs or thighs only cup olive oil ¾ cup chopped onions 1 green pepper, thinly sliced 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper ¼ teaspoon oregano 1 cup peeled chopped tomatoes ¾ cup dry red wine ¼ lb. Mushrooms, sliced Skin the chicken parts (the skin contains most of the fat in chicken). Heat the oil in a Dutch oven; brown the chicken in it. Add the onions, green pepper, garlic, salt, pepper and oregano; cook for 10 minutes. Mix and add the tomatoes and wine; cover and cook over low heat for 30 minutes or until chicken is almost tender. Add the mushrooms; recover and cook for 15 minutes longer. Taste for seasoning. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

HEAVENLY PIE By Jean Laird

4 egg whites beaten until stiff (not dry) ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar 1 cup granulated sugar (add gradually) to egg whites and cream of tartar Bake in a 9" or 10" Pyrex pie pan for one hour at 275 º. Cool slightly before adding filling. (Use spoon and put on bottom and along the sides.) FILLING: 4 egg yolks beaten ¼ cup granulated sugar 3 tablespoons lemon juice Rind of 1 lemon Cook until thickened in a double boiler. Fold 1-cup of whip cream into lemon mixture. Spread the filling into shell leave a little crust along the side. Refrigerator 24 hours. Garnish with whip cream, if desired.

BROCCOLI SALAD By Norma Osborne

MIX TOGETHER: 4 cups chopped broccoli ½ cup chopped sweet onion ¼ cup raisins 8 slices cooked bacon, crumbled MIX TOGETHER: ¾ cup Mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Red Wine Vinegar ¼ cup sugar Pour over first mixture. Let marinate. Can be made ahead. Keeps well.

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from the grand historian

George Peter, Grand Historian PO Box 242, Aurora, NY 13026-0242 (315) 364-8455 e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

BACK TO BASICS

In 1988 The Lodge Service Committee prepared a Lodge Service Letter #8801. The title was, "Back to Basics" and dealt with the importance of Lodge programs of substance. Parts of that article are submitted for serious consideration by Masonic Lodges. Those Lodges, who have implemented parts or, all of the program, are Lodges who are vibrant and growing. It happens because people are too busy to attend a Masonic communication which contains no more than the paying of bills and handling minutia. The article proposed that Masonic Lodges re-establish study groups. These could be formal or very informal structures. The Master would request and encourage those interested in doing so to write short papers. A sampling of subjects: · Masonic history · Masonic philosophy · Masonic charity · Masonic events · Individual Freemasons, famous or otherwise · Other? As a start it might be good to request short papers of a page or two in length, but if there is interest in writing a more lengthy report, it should be encouraged also. The program committee of the Lodge should review these papers and arrange to have the best ones read in lodge as evening programs. The best ones should be submitted for publication in local newsletters and should be submitted for consideration to be published in the Empire State Mason. All papers should be distributed to the membership via mail. A second part of such a program could be to solicit talks from the members. These should be 3 to 5 minutes in length. Four or five such talks could be selected to make up an evening program. It could be left to the individual brother to select a topic of his choice. This makes a good ladies night program with ladies encouraged to be prepared to speak also. The best of these could be submitted for publication. Some Lodges may want to set up a contest. Others may prefer to keep it very informal and uncompetitive. The possibilities and variations to these kinds of programs are unlimited. RATIONALE: 1. Freemasonry teaches that we are to seek light. Light is knowledge. A reason that Freemasonry may not be attracting as many thinking people is that we have strayed away from the BASIC function of early Freemasonry, which was to provide a place for philosophical study and contemplation. 2. Over the years more emphasis has been placed on ritual than on contemplation. Study is the essence of Freemasonry. It is not possible to grasp the full power of Freemasonry by ritual alone. We offer study courses but without pointing and showing the way. 3. Those Brothers who stay away from Lodge miss all of the power of it. By sharing ideas and information about Freemasonry with them, we can stimulate and reactivate their enthusiasm for the power of Freemasonry. 4. Some concordant bodies provide such study and publications but the average Freemason does not have access to the material. This type of program belongs in Symbolic Freemasonry. We need to return to basics.

GREAT KILLS LODGE NO. 912 DONATES FOR EAGLE SCOUT PROJECT

Staten Island, New York

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Life Scout Scott Capela of Troop 6 at Eltingville Lutheran School needed to complete an Eagle Project in order to receive the Rank of Eagle. The troop was unable to financially help him to obtain the needed supplies for his project. Brother William Welsh, Senior Warden of Great Kills Lodge No. 912, learned of his plight and approached the Lodge for a donation. The members of Great Kills Lodge approved a donation that enabled Scout Scott to purchase the necessary materials to complete his Eagle Project. Brother Bill Welsh, Senior Warden; Scout Scott Capela, Junior Assistant Scout Master

dates to remember

JUNE 2004 6 RCC Annual Assembly 7 Idaho Nite - James W. Husted-Fiat Lux No.1068 - NYC 9-7/2 Supreme Council Grotto ­ Overland Park, KS 16-19 Supreme Council Grotto ­ Memphis, TN 15 Law Enforcement Committee Pro Bono Program Why You Need a Will to Protect Your Love One - Call (212) 573-6064 Also ­ How Much in Gifts Can I Give My Children in 2004 24-27 St. John's Weekend ­ Utica, NY 29 Last day to register for England Trip JULY 4-17 9,10 10 2004 Session I , Boys 13-16 ­ Camp Turk Boilermaker Health & Fitness Expo - Utica Campus Educational Assistance Program Presentations ­ Buffalo & Rochester 11 Educational Assistance Program Presentations ­ Utica & Schenectady 16-18 Council of Deliberation, Annual Convocation ­ Utica, NY 18-31 Session II, Boys 10-12 ­ Camp Turk 20 Law Enforcement Committee Pro Bono Program Employment Discrimination Cases Call (212) 573-6064 Also ­ Corporation/Business Problems I am Facing 24 Grand Master's Day at Camp Turk 25 Educational Assistance Program Presentations ­ Syracuse 31 Educational Assistance Program Presentations ­ NYC AUGUST 2004 1-14 Session III, Girls 10-16 ­ Camp Turk 9-23 Grand Lodge Summer Trip to England, Wales and Scotland 13 Grand Chapter RAM, York Rite College Annual Assembly ­ Utica, NY 20, 21 181 st Annual Assembly of the Grand Council Cryptic Masons of NY · Ronkonkoma, NY. For more information refer to the web site http://www.nycryptic.org 24 Law Enforcement Committee Pro Bono Program Divorce and Separation Problems Call (212) 573-6064 Also ­ Selling or Buying a House or Condo SEPTEMBER 2004 13 Grand Lecturers Convention Clinton District 14 Grand Lecturers Convention Franklin-Hamilton 14 Law Enforcement Committee Pro Bono Program What Do I Do if I am in an Automobile Accident Call (212) 573-6064 Also ­ What if I Fall in a Building, Street, Park, etc. 15 Grand Lecturers Convention First and Second St. Lawrence District 15-17 Rosh Hashana 16-19 Grand Commandery - Buffalo, NY 16 Grand Lecturers Convention Jefferson-Lewis District 17 Grand Lecturers Convention Jefferson District 17 Gala Benefit Banquet, Hilton Hotel ­ NYC 18 German-American Steuben Parade 11:30 AM ­ NYC 19-21 Council of Deliberation, Annual Meeting Supreme Council, AASR ­ Milwaukee, WI 20 Grand Lecturers Convention Essex District 21 Grand Lecturers Convention Rensselaer-Schenectady District 22 Grand Lecturers Convention Saratoga-Warren District 23 Grand Lecturers Convention Washington District 24-25 Yom Kippur 27 Grand Lecturers Convention Chautauqua District 28 Grand Lecturers Convention Cattaraugus District 29 Grand Lecturers Convention Allegany District 29-1 Sukkot 30 Grand Lecturers Convention Steuben District

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

In Memoriam of Serina Smith

Serina Smith passed from this life on Wednesday, May 12, 2004. Serina, the beloved wife of our Past Grand Master, M\W\ Brother Carl J. Smith, bravely fought a long battle with cancer. Our Grand Master, M\W\ Edward R. Trosin, the entire Grand Line, Brothers and friends offer their sincere sympathies and prayers to M\W\ Carl Smith and the Smith Family for their loss. Serina has always been a ray sunshine and kindness throughout this jurisdiction and she will be missed by all.

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freemasonry

R\W\Richard W. Bateman Assistant Grand Secretary Grand Pursuivant BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

"WE SEE THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY"

Contined from Empire State Mason Spring 2004 Equally resolute and immutable was the call to be chaste to the laws of the order and its prohibition against carnal knowledge. "Templar wore sheepskin drawers that were never to be removed... Even conversation with any woman was discouraged, and often forbidden." Lastly, all of the Templar was subject to strict obedience to their superiors and to hold steadfast fidelity to the Pope. The Knights Templar were comprised of three distinct grades, the highest being those accepted into knighthood, to which class being freeborn and of noble blood was an essential ingredient. The knights were distinguished sporting full-beards as was the custom and the wearing of their familiar white frock symbolic of purity emblazoned with an eight-pointed red cross of the order. According to Unholy Worship?, written by Stephen Dafoe, the red cross was bestowed by Pope Eugene III in the year 1148 as a symbol of protection to be worn above the heart by all Knights Templar. Attending to the knights as "men-at-arms, sentries, manservants and stewards" were the second grade of Templar known as sergeants, who were identified by their black or dark colored habit also bearing the eight-pointed red cross of the order. Amongst many of the sergeant grade of Templar are the freeborn plebeians and bourgeoisie of the European community. The last but certainly not the least grade of Knights Templar was the chaplains and prelates. Unlike their fellow knights and sergeants of the order, where emphasis was placed on honing their martial skills, the ecclesiastic grade of Templar in addition to being adept on matters of church liturgy were also well versed and skilled in maintaining the books, accounts and records of the order. Hence they frequently held the dual post of Scribe and Chaplain. Their clean-shaven faces and the wearing of green frocks bearing the red Templar cross together with white gloves easily identified them as the prelates of the order. The Standard of the Knights Templar was designed in the form of an upright crest separated into two halves with one-half black and the other white, exemplifying the Templar's crossing over to the purity of light from the darkness of sin. The order's motto and the name of their standard was the "Beau Seant", which is Old French and translates into "Be Glorious". The Order of Knights Templar grew in size and wealth exponentially over the next two hundred years of their existence, becoming a true force to be reckoned with, as if it were a Kingdom unto itself. Its rank and file exceeded over that period some twenty thousand members who in strict compliance with their puritanical vows of poverty quickly aided the order by filling its coffers with all of their worldly possessions, gold, jewelry, money and property. Further, the Church in Rome made frequent charitable donations to the order and abetted the monarchs of England and France to do likewise. Not surprisingly, the Knights Templar evolved into a "world bank", establishing ground rules for changing money, acting as collectors of rent for properties, taxes and other revenues, and providing a primitive yet worthy means of transferring funds to travelers. The Knights Templar has been credited as the innovator of paper currency. But most importantly, the Knights Templar successfully provided a sanctuary where the treasures of kings, princes and noblemen could be safely deposited, guarded and managed. To all of which, the Knights Templar received payment for these services by keeping much of the revenues generated from the properties held until such time as they were claimed. Thus avoiding the prohibition from the church on usury. The original intent of the medieval Crusades of which there were several was to purge the Holy Land of the alleged infidels or non-believers of the Christian religion. After enjoying the fruitful bounty of many successful campaigns, gradually the tide began to turn against the Knights Templar during the later part of the 13th century. By 1280 AD, the Mongolian clansmen commandeered by the warlords and descendants of Genghis Khan had entered into and conquered Persia and the territory between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. Further to the east, Syria, Palestine and Egypt came under the Moslem rule of the Sultan Kala'un, known as the Sultan of the Mamelukes until his death eleven years later. The term Mameluke derives from the Arabic tongue mamluk, meaning a slave or captive. Completing the mission began by his late father to destroy the last vestige of Christianity in the Middle East, the Sultan alAshraf led the Mamelukes in April 1291 AD to launch an unmerciful attack against the last middle eastern stronghold of the Knights Templar in the city of Acre mortally wounding Guillaume de Beaujeu, then Grand Master of the Knights Templar. Subsequently, the remaining cities and fortresses held by the Knights Templar began to fall like dominoes. For the first time in nearly two hundred years, the Knights Templar no longer had a foothold within the Holy Land. Retreating to the island of Cyprus with the treasury of the Knights Templar safely stowed onboard his ship, the newly elected Grand Master of the Order, Tibald Gaudin landed on Cyprus in hopes of finding reinforcements, which would enable him to return to the Holy Land and take back that which was lost. But in escaping to the island of Cyprus, Tibald Gaudin discovered that King Henry of Cyprus, who believed that his royal lineage entitled him to absolute dominion over all forces located upon his small island kingdom, including the Knights Templar, did not exceedingly welcome his flight. This power struggle was very short lived, as Tibald Gaudin succumbed to an illness of natural causes and died within the year, opening the office of Grand Master to his protégé Jacque de Molay. continued on www.ESMason.com see forms page for full article

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around the state

METRO INTERFAITH BREAKFAST 2004

Remarks from Senator Johnson America in 1620 at Massachusetts Bay, they drew up the Mayflower Compact which was the document establishing rules by which the Plymouth Colony was to be governed and which began "in the name of God Amen" demonstrating how important God was to those whose faith supported them on their perilous journey to a new home in a new world. Although they arrived at a New World, they did not find a new nation; they and their descendants remained subject to the rule of a British Monarch for the next 160 years. During the 1700's an organization came to the American Colonies which led men to search for the means of attaining moral, intellectual and religious perfection. As we now Pledge Allegiance to Our Flag, the members of this new organization after being instructed and having the light revealed to them, pledged their fidelity to the organization and its principles. They became Masons. In the early 1700's Masonic rituals, moral symbols and instruction taught values that both justified elite status and provided a means of identifying with it. The Masonic obligation is a moral one, and binding on the party who made it, in conscience and according to moral justice. This pledge requires him to perform certain acts and to refrain from certain other acts, which are forbidden. "A Master Mason is one who has learned to be master of himself. When is a man not master of himself? When his will is divided against itself; when the lower man proves more powerful than the higher man." Through Masonry we are taught the way for the higher man to prevail in our lives. The Master Mason is the master of himself. The quality of self mastery, and of brotherhood, faith, loyalty and patriotism is exemplified by the example of General Joseph Warren, Grand Master of the Ancient Grand Lodge of Massachusetts who died while leading his "minutemen" at the battle of Bunker Hill in June 1775 when the first shot was fired in the Revolutionary War, which eventually won our freedom from British rule. Although Bostonians were divided in their loyalties concerning the American Revolution, the strong patriot contingent in the Boston Lodge kept the loyalists in their ranks from having much influence, and thus contributing to Masonry's reputation as a strongly patriotic organization. Here in New York State on June 24, 1779 more than 100 Masonic Brothers, all continental officers from West Point met with General (Brother) George Washington and General Paterson who established the first Military Lodge "The Washington Lodge". At least 42 percent of General's commissioned by the Continental Congress were or became Free Masons. Patriotism in Upstate New York was demonstrated when more than half the members of the St. George's Lodge in Schenectady served in the Revolution, and members in Solomon's Lodge in Poughkeepsie quickly erased the name of Benedict Arnold from the Lodge records after his betrayal of the Patriot Cause. We won our battle for independence with the support of Masonic patriots and other signers of the Declaration of Independence, many of whom died or lost family members and their fortunes during the eight long years of war. Under the subsequent unsatisfactory government of the articles of confederation, Masons were then to help establish a new government. Masons ­ General George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and Alexander Hamilton, among others, then participated in what was described as a miracle by Catherine Drinker Bowen in her book entitled, "Miracle at Philadelphia"; the Constitutional Convention in 1787 which established the Constitution of the United States of America, under which we are presently governed. I have previously referred to the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America; the pledge continues ­ "and to the republic for which it stands." ~continued on page 55~ BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

(l-r)Honorable Brother Senator Owen Johnson and M\W\ Carl J. Fitje I would like to extend greetings to M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master and the Grand Lodge Officers, who have accompanied him to this morning's meeting. Also to the many officers and members of constituent Lodges in attendance and to all my Brother Masons, their spouses, and family, and especially to Brother Mel Hennen who extended the invitation to me to be here this morning. I am embarrassed to admit and realize that I have explored Masonic and United State history more in the last 40 hours perhaps, than I have in the 40 years since I was made a Master Mason. Frankly, were it not for time restraints I would still be into my books, for the material is so enlightening. It may be presumptuous of me to recite Masonic history to you who are no doubt more learned in the topic than I, but here it goes... We know that the Masonic Fraternity emphasizes good citizenship, brotherhood, morality, belief in God, respect for our flag, care for our families, widows, and orphans, and of course our many other charities. Good citizenship should come naturally to American being fortunate to live in this "special" nation, founded by Godfearing emigrants seeking freedom to worship in their own way and finding that opportunity in this "new world" as our present North America was then referred to. Before the Pilgrims set foot in North

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around the state

INTERFAITH BREAKFAST

Remarks by M\W\ Carl J. Fitje Good morning, I would like to thank the Chaplains for their wonderful sermon this morning. Thanks to your hosts, Metro DDGM's, President R\W\ Richard Eberle and the Convention Committee for their hard work that continues to make this a special event year after year. Wonderful to meet freely and openly again like this because we are from different religions and backgrounds all with common bond uniting us, that bond is family. In other parts of the world and even in some places within our country we still see conflicts between religious parties, yet we are here this morning of different faiths, enjoying one another's company. We do have problems in our society today reflecting changes in morality and life styles, and that brings me to the subject of my talk this morning on principles, our Masonic principles and how they can affect people and society. Today, too many people are willing to compromise their principles and it's affecting our Fraternity. Too many people have given first class loyalty to second class causes and those causes have betrayed them. The "furthermores" we took at the Masonic altar with our hands resting on the Holy Bible, square and compasses constitute the finest guidelines ever compiled by the mind of man. One sometimes wonders if some of our Brethren leave some of those furthermores lying on the altar instead of taking them and incorporating them into their every day living. Ryme goes, "A song is not a song until you sing it, a bell is not a bell until you ring it, God did not put love in your heart to stay, love is not love until you give it away" to which we might add: Masonry is not what you get from it and what you give it, but Masonry is when you live it. In other words, are you putting as much into Masonry as you get out of it. No freedom ever lasted unless it involved responsibilities as well as rights and privileges. The present day cry for rights, should be accompanied by a pledge and assumption of responsibilities. When God gave each of us ability, he also gave us a responsibility to make good use of those talents. Next to religion there is no other body that does more to establish the Brotherhood of Man and the Fatherhood of God than Freemasonry. To fail to use the full potential of Freemasonry is a crime of negligence. Are we proud enough of Freemasonry to make it a priceless legacy for those who come after us? Or do we simply bask in the reflected glory of having been Masons? We need Masons who understand and who proclaim the influence of Masonry on the individual, family, community, nation and the world. We need Masons who, by their example will attract others to Freemasonry. We need Masons who appreciate and will protect our Masonic legacy. The more we know about Masonry the more we will appreciate it. President Lincoln in referring to the State of the Nation said, "Nothing from the outside can defeat us. If destruction be our lot, we ourselves must be its author and its finisher." Edmund Burke, a British statesman said, "To do nothing." The mood of an age is revealed in many ways; thru its music, literature, arts, movies, and TV. Twenty-five years ago we used to say, "Do your best" now we say, "Take it easy". Our motto used to be, "Save for a rainy day," now its "Enjoy now pay later." We used to say, "He has a most commendable character," now we say, "He has a marvelous personality". Freemasonry has demonstrated its power to improve the world. Never has there been a greater need for men of quality and character than there is right now. When human beings cease to feel that we have any purpose in serving mankind, we begin to fail. We live in deeds, not years, in thought, not in markings on a dial. Who lives the best and thinks the most will make his life worthwhile. John Hall said it very nicely in his poem, titled "At Days End" and it goes like this: Is anybody happier because you passed his way? Does anyone remember that you spoke to him today? Their day is almost over and its toiling time is thru, is there anyone to offer now, a kindly word for you? Can you say tonite in parting with the day that's slipping fast that you helped a single brother of the many you have passed? Is a single heart rejoicing over what you did or said? Can the man whose hopes were fading now with courage look ahead? Did you waste the day or lose it, was it well or sorely spent? Did you leave a trail of kindness, or a scar of discontent? As you close your eyes in slumber, do you think that God will say, you deserve one more tomorrow by the work you did today. Each kindly word and friendly greeting, yes each helpful deed; all are building stones we send on ahead for the building of that heavenly home "That house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens." Illustration: Brother in a car accident in a cast, back to work in a few days and was impressed by the kindness shown him. They carried his briefcase, brought him coffee and other thoughtful things. When the cast was removed, he still suffered stiffness and some pain, but what a difference in the office. No one brought him coffee, carried his briefcase or offered to open the door for him. The truth then dawned on him. Too many people were concerned with symptoms instead of the person. When the symptom was removed (the cast) no one paid attention to the person. We have made more technical advancements in the last 50 years than in any 500 year period before. The human mind is capable of successfully confronting the new changes that today challenge the very survival of civilization. The future may bring some changes but the greatest influence will be how much Masonic dedication you or I have. What Masonry offers to the next generation depends upon us. BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

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around the state

So it is that I challenge you change the course of our Craft's declining membership that threatens our survival over the past 20 years by continuing to be aggressive in membership by "bringing in your replacement". That should be everyone's primary mission. Our ritual is our basic teaching and foundation and should always be included in our trestleboards. The work we do, the fruitful enthusiasm we display for Freemasonry can be extremely rewarding. Our founders have left us a priceless legacy. To lose it thru apathy, complacency or lack of members would be a crime. If every Master Mason would truly live all of his "furthermores" Masonry will yet see its finest hour. Remember the words in the Holy Bible that says, "Inasmuch as you do it unto the least of these, you do it unto me." Isn't that exactly what we are taught in Masonry? In closing I want to ask you to remember and put aside a moment or two to reflect on the victims and rescue workers of September 11, 2001. We seem to be forgetting them. The US service men and women who sacrifice themselves daily for us so that we could enjoy this wonderful day here together and continue to live in freedom. Renee and I along with the Deputy Grand Master, Grand Line and their ladies wish all of you good health, happiness and all the best in the year ahead. God Bless you, God Bless the Craft and God Bless the USA. See you soon on the level.

METRO INTERFAITH continued...

Thomas Jefferson stated in a letter written in 1790 ­ "The Republican is the only form of Government, which is not eternally at open or secret war with the rights of mankind." Our founding fathers bestowed on our nation a republican form of government ­ thus the reference to "the republic" in the pledge. Masonic teaching stresses "virtue", the rejection of self-interest in favor ofmoral rules and the good of the whole, which was deemed essential to provide the foundation of a republican society. Leaders had always required self-control to withstand he temptations of power and corruption, but republics unlike monarchical or aristocratic governments did not depend solely on their leaders. In a republic the people's character ultimately determined the health and prosperity of a society. Without the strong government and traditional restraints, which had previously maintained social order, many Americans feared the virtue could not be sustained, allowing our republic to degenerate into either despotism or anarchy. George Washington's farewell address in 1796 thus called morality one of the great pillars of "human happiness" and "political prosperity". Masonry helped to provide the foundation for thus building, training, and teaching Americans to reinforce "the duties of men and citizens." As Washington noted in a letter to his Brothers a few months later, America needed to become what Masonry already was, "a Lodge for the virtues." Thomas Jefferson on the 50th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence on June 24th, 1826. Wrote the following in a letter to Roger C. Weightman which illustrated his use of the Masonic concepts. "May the Declaration of Independence be to the world what I believe it will be; The signal of arousing men to bust the chains under which ignorance and superstition have persuaded them to bind themselves and assume the blessings and security of self-government. The Form, which we have substituted, restores the free right of the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. Alleys are opened or opening to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth that he mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs ready to ride them by the grace of God. There are grounds of hope for others." The thanks that we as Masons owe to those who have come before us, for the light they have provided to us as individuals and which has transformed our lives, is invaluable. The enlightened form of government bequeathed to our nation and the spread of representative constitutional government around the world through efforts of members of the Masonic Fraternity over centuries is of such a benefit to mankind that it is truly incalculable. I hope that you will leave here with a greater appreciation of, and enhanced pride in, the Fraternity of which you are a member and will keep in mind the Bothers and their family members, both here and on foreign soil, who are continuing the fight to protect our nation and to extend our constitutional form of government to others around the world. I cannot end without saying how pleased I am to note that Masonry is growing again in New York State under the energetic leadership of our Grand Master, Carl J. Fitje. Although I spoke about our past history, it appears to me that Masons are still making history and that our best days are yet to come! Congratulations and may God continue to Bless you, your families and our Fraternity! BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

Carl J. Fitje Grand Master

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annual esm cruise

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

47TH ANNUAL EMPIRE STATE MASON CRUISE

By Barbara Trosin Boarding time started at noon. Staff members were stationed on each level to assist us in locating our room. Passenger emergency life boat drill and procedure was first on the agenda. We boarded early enough to have an Embarkation Lunch in the Lido Restaurant. The food on the ship, no matter where you ate was superb. The Lido Restaurant offered a buffet style setting for breakfast, lunch, and casual dinner. The Rotterdam Dining Room was more formal, featuring entrees for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Deputy Grand Master, Ed Trosin, and I had the pleasure to dine with our good friends, Grand Chaplain Ronald J. Reid, and his wife Georgiana, Raymond and Loraine Manuel from Virginia, Douglas North from Port St. Lucie, Florida, and Edward and Hazel Parry from Utica. We had a lot of laughs, drank a lot of wine, and discussed what we did during the day. Leonel and Joan Cortizo were at the table next to us. Ed and I were anxious to tour the ship to meet and greet old and new friends. There was everything imaginable on the ship, shopping, playing in the casino, running track, exercise room, library, beauty salon, massages and art gallery. The Wajang Theatre on deck 4 featured movies such as: Out of Time, Under the Tuscan Sun, Radio, Intolerable Cruelty, Lost in Translation, School of Rock, and many more. Two pools were inviting to cool off in, and there was entertainment nightly in the Franz Hals Lounge. There were various other lounges throughout the ship. The Crows Nest was open for late night entertainment. There was also hamburgs and hot dogs at the Lido Pool Grill, and we looked forward to visiting the ice cream bar daily, a great variety of flavors every day. Ed enjoyed getting bread pudding with vanilla sauce most days from the dessert bar. There was a great sandwich bar where most of our group got their lunch and then went and ate by the pool. Our cruise director, Rick Hinkson, presented Show Time every evening in the Franz Hals Lounge, where singers and dancers presented: `Dream Vacation', `Las Vegas Night', `Copacabana', and `Show Stoppers'; Jason McPherson entertained us with his unique brand of physical comedy; Paul Pappas, Pianist Extraordenaire; Devlin ­ Matador of Magic; Steven J. Daniels, who did a unique brand of humor and uncanny voice impersonations; Great Pretenders, fellow guests were in this show (lots of laughs); World Champion Juggler Mike Price; The Farwell Variety Show featuring all the entertainers for the week. The Volendam Orchestra was fabulous. The nightly dinner in the Rotterdam Dining Room has two seatings. Deputy Grand Master Ed and I had the early seating. Grand Master Carl Fitje and his lovely wife Renee had the late seating. Seated with them were Senior Grand Deacon Joe Homer and his wife Anita, Grand Standard Bearer Kenneth Wagner and his wife Carolyn, along with Jim and Helen Buckley and their daughter Marie Buckley. We sailed at 5:00 pm for Half Moon Cay, Bahamas. This is Holland America's private island. It is the exclusive domain of Holland America Line,

Welcome to our 47 Annual Empire State Mason Cruise on the luxury Holland America vessel, the MS Volendam. Our captain, Wieger van der Zie and hotel manager Jan William Kuipers and the entire staff were on board ready to welcome us to a vacation of a lifetime. Our cruise made stops in the Southern and Eastern Caribbean, Half Moon Cay, Bahamas, Bridgetown, Barbados, Roseau, and Cabrits, Dominica, Road Town, Tortola, St. Thomas, USVI and Nassau, Bahamas. We left Fort Lauderdale, Florida where it was in the mid 70's. We left Tonawanda, New York where it was -3, yes, minus 3. Ed and I thought maybe we weren't meant to leave Tonawanda. Our flight was cancelled at 8:30 the night before we were to leave, but Ed was determined to get us out of the cold weather, and was able to reschedule a flight early the next morning. Ed's Junior Grand Deacon arrived at our house at 4 o'clock in the morning to get us to the airport for a 6 o'clock flight. We had a stop over in Chicago, and just before our flight was to leave for Florida, guess what? Cancelled again. We finally left later in the day and arrived ready to enjoy the warm weather.

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BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

and we had the opportunity to explore an area which Columbus viewed over 500 years ago. The island is uninhabited, and has a magnificent crescent shaped beach, crystal blue water and a pristine natural environment. We were taken ashore by tenders. Grand Master Carl, Renee, Ken Wagner, Georgiana and Ron Reid, and Joe Homer went parasailing. Somehow Joe got left behind and they had to go back to get him before they even got started. All did great, even though it was very windy. Joe did much better this year, I guess practice makes perfect. Way to go Joe! When this group finally got on the island, they decided to go for a ride on the banana boat. All went well until Joe leaned too far to one side and they all fell off. They were laughing so hard they had trouble getting back on. In fact they wouldn't let Joe back on, so he had to go in the big boat. Poor Joe, better luck next year. There is a lot to do on this island. Leonel and Joan Cortizo and others went on the Glass Bottom Boat. Ray and Loraine Manuel took a walking tour of the island. Ed and I laid on the beach and got a nice sunburn. Carl and Renee joined us for a swim in the ocean and both guys lost their glasses. Some fish is seeing much better now. A good time was had by all here. Our second day at sea, we received a Welcome Aboard invitation from Cruise Enterprises and the Grand Lodge of New York. We went to the Wajang Theatre to meet and renew old friendships and to greet new friends. Ephraim Abramson greeted all and introduced all the Masons and wives, and each couple received a red carry on bag with the Masonic Logo on it. Robert and Betty Stoll from Niagara Falls gave

Ed a copy of the front page of the Niagara Gazette, which had Ed's picture and a large article about Ed and the Masons. We hadn't seen the article so Ed was very pleased that Bob had brought it. Lou Fish announced he had remembered to bring his underwear this year, and pulled his shorts down to prove it. Helene hid her head along with Sigi Schwenk. We all had a good laugh over this. We visited with Past Grand Patron Lawrence Unger and Frieda along with Dorothea Tewes and Barbara Suffin. Grand Master Carl and Deputy Grand Master Ed greeted all and said that it was good to see a lot of familiar faces, and several new ones. They hope everyone would have a great voyage. Ephraim Abramson announced that he would meet with Deputy Grand Master Ed and discuss the itinerary for the 2005 Cruise and announce it later on the cruise. (Surprise, Surprise). Michael Formato asked if he could entertain us one evening while on the ship. Of course we said ok. Diane Formato only had 14 pairs of shoes and purses this year. But I'm sure by the time she went home there were more. It was announced that Ron and Georgiana Reid would celebrate their 50th Wedding Anniversary on March 6th, and Ken and Carolyn Wagner would celebrate their 50th on December 28th. Congratulations to both couples. Grand Master Carl said he wasn't quite sure if he would reach 50 years of marriage. Renee said he had a lot of explaining to do about that remark. Good luck, Carl. We were treated to a pre-lunch cocktail party the next day where we met our Masonic friends again.

While we were at sea, Ken and Carolyn Wagner, Joe and Anita Homer, Ed and I met at 4:15 to play Snowball Jackpot Bingo with Steve. Ken, Carolyn and Anita were winners. Not us. Ken and Carolyn were also winners in the casino. After two days at sea, we arrived in Barbados where we were met at the dock by Ron Joseph and the Grand Master of Barbados. They had a bus waiting for us, and they took us on a great tour of the whole island. We had a great time. Timothy Walker of Cornucopia Lodge, along with his daughter, hosted a luncheon for us in his home. We wish to thank Timothy for his hospitality. Grand Master Carl presented The Grand Master of Barbados with a replica of the Statue of Liberty, and we all received gifts from him and Timothy. We got back on the bus and returned to the ship. Some went to the beauty/massage salon on the Lido deck, some visited the boutiques and most of us went to the pool. That evening we were entertained by the Liars Club, a panel of experts who give you their definition of some unusual words, but only one of them is telling the truth. We had to choose the one telling the truth. Lots of fun. On Monday, we arrived in Roseau, Dominica. Dominica is a small island 15 miles wide by 29 miles long in the Caribbean. It is located between Guadiloupe and Martinique. The population is approximately 74,000. This island has had many hurricanes. In 1979, hurricane David struck killing 37 people and leaving approximately 80% of the population homeless. Agriculture, especially bananas and coconuts remain the core of the island's economy. It was a beautiful day, and Ed and I went ashore and did some shopping, came

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annual esm cruise

back to the ship, and spent some time by the pool. Grand Master Carl, Renee, Ken, Carolyn, Joe, and Anita joined us and we had a great time. Anita was trying to get an all over tan, and I did laps in the pool (ha ha). Then we were off to Bingo at 4:15. We were entertained that evening in the Franz Hals Lounge by the entertainers doing the show `Copacabana'. Great Show. Some folks went up for dancing in the Crows Nest, some went to see what flavor of ice cream was featured. No matter where you went on or offshore, someone was taking your picture, so, of course, we all had to go to see our pictures everyday and purchase the ones you wanted and put the bad ones in a box to be discarded. There were plenty of those. Most days, Ken and Carolyn worked out in the Ocean Spa Gym. Ed got up and walked most mornings at 7. Not me, I stayed in bed! Tuesday, we arrived in Tortola, which has a population of 13,000 is the largest and busiest of the British Virgin Islands. It is a beautiful island, covered with mango, palm and banana trees, colorful foliage and jagged mountains. Pastel colored storefronts dot the landscape. Here, Ed and I took a 3½ hour tour in an open-air bus, which took us up Fort Hill, and along Ridge Road, passing local villages before arriving at Sky World. Here we stopped and viewed the island from the observation deck. It was just beautiful. Then we were off to the beach for an hour and then went back to the ship. That evening, in the Franz Hals Lounge, the Filipino crewmembers were proud to present modern and traditional entertainment from their homeland. They were very entertaining. The next day, we docked in St. Thomas. Its principal town, Charlotte Amalie is the capital of the U.S. Virgin Islands. It is one of the most visited cruise ship ports in the Caribbean. We were one of ten cruise ships docked that day. In 1724, it became a free port where goods were exempt from duties and regulation. Charlotte Amalie remains a duty free haven where visitors flock for some of the bargains in merchandise this side of Hong Kong. There are also many beautiful beaches. Everyone went ashore. Ed and I visited a linen shop where we met other friends from the ship who were also looking for bargains. Many visited the various jewelry stores. Grand Master Carl, Renee, Ken and Carol Wagner, Joe Homer, and Georgie and Ron Reid went on the ScreaminEagle Jet Boat adventure. Anita Homer stayed on the ship, and Joe was to meet her at noon. Never happened. This boat was a 700 HP turbo-charged jet boat which went at high speed, 180 degree spins and awesome power brakes. Those who went had a fabulous ride, and got very wet. Ed and I got back to the ship around noon, and met Carolyn and Ken at the pool. Carol said she had never had such a good time, and never was so wet. Anita was waiting and waiting and waiting for Joe to show up on the pier. He was sorry he was late, I can tell you. That evening, we enjoyed World Champion Juggler Mike Price. Also, some enjoyed listening to the Champagne Strings in the Explorers Lounge. We are at sea today, Thursday. My how the time has flown by! Eph Abramson hosted a pre-lunch cocktail party for us. The Grand Master welcomed all and gave out gifts. Some group pictures were taken. Afterward Eph Abramson announced the cruise for next year will be from February 4th through the 19th. We will be going to Hawaii, yes, I said Hawaii. How wonderful it will be. Spend Valentines Day in Hawaii, so please think about joining Ed and me on this fabulous cruise. We met for lunch by the pool, and discussed the good times we were having and the items we had bought and Joe talked about the food he had eaten and the food he was eating and the food he was going to eat later. Joe and food go together. (Dessert extravaganza at midnight). Ed, Renee, Anita and I enjoyed watching the ice sculpture demonstration while we were in the hot tub. Carol went to have her hair done as tonight's dress was formal, and she wanted to look her best. We celebrated Ray Manuel's birthday at dinner that evening. The entertainment that evening was the cast of the Volendam in `Showstoppers'; very good. Later, we met in the Piano Bar, where a group played Name That Tune. Our group won DAM cups. Later we were entertained by Michael Formato who sang a number of songs. You were great Michael. Well, it's the last day of our cruise. We went to the Disembarkation Talk and Crew Farwell at 10 am. At 11:30 we arrived in Nassau, a colonial city on the north side of New Providence Island, and the capital of the Bahamas. It has the island's best sightseeing and historic buildings. Today, Nassau is one of the busiest cruise ship ports in the world. Everyone that went ashore visited the famous Straw Market. Anita had to do a lot of shopping here since she didn't get to go in St. Thomas because Joe was late. They visited the Atlantis Hotel which has a casino and Crystal Shopping Court. That evening, we went to the Mariners Society Reception where Mariners awards were presented to 95% of our group. Congratulations to each of you. We went to the Farwell Variety Show and then on to see our photos which had been taken all week. Ed and I went back to our cabin to pack and set our luggage in the hall. Well, our shore excursions have ended and the ms Volendam is headed back to Ft. Lauderdale. I enjoyed this beautiful experience meeting many Masons and friends again. A special Thank You to Eph Abramson, Paul and Seena Abramson and Judy Stern for organizing and planning this cruise. I hope to see everyone again next year, bring a friend and enjoy our cruise to Hawaii with us from February 4th through February 19th, 2005. Looking forward to being with all of you then. I would like to share the top ten silliest questions asked on a cruise with you: 10. Do I put my luggage out before or after I go to bed? 9. Where is the bus for the walking tour? 8. Is this island surrounded by water? 7. What is our current elevation? 6. What time is the midnight buffet? 5. What do they do with the ice carvings after they melt? 4 Is the TV satellite or cable? 3. Do these stairs go up or down? 2. Do the crew sleep on board? 1. How do I know which photos are mine? God Bless you all, Barbara J. Trosin

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

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announcements

THE PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE

Is planning a Seminar on at the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory's Auditorium. Come join us for an Educational ­ Interesting ­ Exciting ­ Inspiring ­ and designed to turn On participants. We are inviting a number of Committee Chairman to educate us through this program. Attending this Seminar are: Mollie Denslow Camp Turk Administrative Assistant Gilbert Adams Trustee Masonic Hall & Home Clarence Eckhoff CHIP Chairman Ira Cooperman Director of Development Masonic Care Community Cindy Dardano Director of Marketing Acacia Village Ron Kamp Director of Development Masonic Medical Research Laboratory Tim McMullin Chairman MSAT Thomas White Chairman Community Service Seminar starts at 8:00 a.m. through 2:00 p.m. Light Breakfast & Lunch will be served. All are welcome, including your ladies. Sponsored by the State Publications Committee, Bro. Ron Bower, Chairman For reservations call :Bro. Ron Bower at (716) 434-4946 or e-mail: [email protected]

ESM PUBLICATION SCHEDULE

ARTICLES DEADLINE July 1ST October 1ST January 1ST April 1ST ESM ISSUE Fall Winter Spring Summer MAILING DATE September 1ST December 1ST March 1ST June 1ST BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

October 16, 2004

The Address Of THE EMPIRE STATE MASON 37 Oliver Street · Lockport, NY 14094-4615 Managing Editor & Publications Ronald N. Bower, Chairman (716) 434-4946 both phone and fax. E-Mail: [email protected] If you would like to submit articles to THE EMPIRE STATE MASON you can e-mail your document to [email protected] or Simply copy to a disk using any of the current word processing programs (e.g. Microsoft Word) and mail the disk to: The Empire State Mason Magazine Attn: Ron Bower 37 Oliver Street Lockport NY 14094-4615 Articles provided in an electronic format are preferred and will be given priority status. All documents should be typed in Times Font. Replace all \ with \ (the backslash) For spacing and alignment purposes, use TABS and not spaces. Remember to include your photos (Color and Black & White) No Digital Photos If you are providing your own graphic program layouts, please e-mail [email protected] for acceptable file format and resolutions. IF THIS IS NOT FOLLOWED, THE CONSEQUENCES ARE YOUR OWN!

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the grand chaplain's corner

R\W\ Brother David J. Williamson, Grand Chaplain Emeritus 14 Robbins Road, Kensington, CT 06037-2610 (860) 828-6753 e-mail: [email protected] BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE My 10 year old son, James, received an air hockey game for Christmas from his grandfather. It's been very popular with his friends (and his parents!), and we've had several "championship tournaments" in our basement over the last few months. In air hockey, the puck rides on a cushion of air. There are hundreds of tiny holes all over the table, and a small fan creates the air needed to keep the puck in motion. We have discovered that if the table isn't dusted regularly with a clean, lint-free cloth, or if we use too much furniture polish to wax the table, the holes become plugged. As a result, the puck doesn't float freely, the game slows down, and the table gets scratches. Masonry reminds us that Life is supposed to work that way. How do we "make good men better?" We lift one another up. How do we direct our energies beyond the superfluities of Life, to focus on what's really important? We lift one another up. How do we enrich our minds, and the world around us? The Fellowcraft Degree points to the study of the liberal arts and sciences ­ in other words, the learned men who have gone before us lift us up. Remember the Scripture lesson of the Entered Apprentice Degree? "Behold, how good and pleasant it is when Brethren dwell together in unity?" Anyone can dwell together ­ the only requirement is proximity. But to dwell together in unity requires that we work together, building each other up. And it is that synergy which is rewarded, according to the Psalmist. The apostle Paul, writing to the early Christian church in Corinth, echoes that sentiment. "Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor." In his letter to the Galatians, he adds, "So then, whenever we have an opportunity, let us work for the good of all. . ." We all need to refocus our energies to lifting one another up. Just look at the Presidential campaign ­ instead of focusing on what the candidates can do better, people are putting their energies into telling you what the other candidate is doing wrong. And sadly, we reward that kind of behavior; the experts tell us that negative campaigns change minds (and votes) more than positive campaigns. Closer to home, each of our Lodges has a new Master, and our Grand Lodge has a new Grand Master. Too many Brothers, unfortunately, greet them with cynicism or apathy. "That will never work." "We've never done it that way before." "We already tried that and it didn't work." What great things could we accomplish, for them, for our Lodges, and for Masonry in general, if we greeted their ideas and plans with enthusiasm and a will to make things work for the good of all. (At the very least, we need to give them the benefit of the doubt and believe they have our best interests at heart!) We must lift our leaders up and give them every opportunity to lift us up. God lifts us up. "Surely I know the plans I have for you, says the LORD, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope. Then when you call upon me and come and pray to me, I will hear you. When you search for me, you will find me; if you seek me with all your heart, I will let you find me, says the LORD. . ." (Jeremiah 29:11-14a). Since that is the Great Architect of the Universe's way with us, let us strive to do the same for our brothers and sisters, particularly those who lead us into this new term.

HAPPY 50TH MASONIC BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED IN THE SEVENTH MANHATTAN

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Close to two hundred Brethren, ladies and friends gathered recently to mark the 50th Masonic Birthday of R\W\ Harold H. Halper, a Past District Deputy Grand Master of the Seventh Manhattan District and one of the most active "young" Masons you would ever hope to meet. M\W\ Carl J. Fitje, Grand Master was on hand to present Harold's 50-Year Certificate and a special Grand Master's Award of Appreciation for his many years of selfless service to the Craft. M\W\ Gary A. Henningsen, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary, presented the 50-Year Pin (l-r) R\W\ Harold Halper and M\W\ Carl J. Fitje

around the state

ARCHIMEDE ROMA LODGE NO. 854 PRESENTS HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

Floral Park, New York

THE LODGE OF ANTIQUITY NO. 11 PRESENTS 60-YEAR AWARD

Suffolk, New York

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

R\W\ Dominick Grippo, W\ Arthur Smith, Master, R\W\ Joseph Quarequio, Grand Tiler On November 24, 2003, R\W\ Dominick Grippo was presented an Honorary Membership to Archimede Roma Lodge No. 854, which is in the Tenth Manhattan District.

(l-r) W\ Randall O'Toole, Master; R\W\ Lawrence Gordon, Grand Director of Ceremonies; W\ Gottfried Mahler; R\W\ John Beird; W\ Edwin Lepperd; R\W\ Robert Sikora, District Deputy Grand Master of the Suffolk District On April 24, 2003, The Lodge of Antiquity No. 11 presented a 60-Year Pin and Certificate to R\W\ John Beird and 25-Year Awards to W\ Gottfried Mahler (for his son Godfrey) and W\ Edwin Lepperd. A buffet preceded the award presentation.

7TH ANNUAL GRAND SECRETARY'S GOLF OUTING

September 9TH, 2004

Continental Breakfast 7:00 A.M. Shotgun Tee 8:00 A.M. Timber Point Country Club

Great River, Long Island

Dinner After Golf

FREEMASONRY IN THE EMPIRE STATE

Great Fellowship & Great Golf Just $125.00 per person

Call: George Blasch at (212) 337-6610 or Harold Wissing at (212) 337-6617

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from the grand lecturer

R\W\ Edward G. Gilbert 159 Potters Road, Buffalo, NY 14220-2036 Res: (716) 822-2051 · Bus: (212) 924-0764 · Fax: (212) 633-2639 BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE Q: Is there a proper place to put the Bible Markers (Ribbons) on the Altar when Opening or Closing Lodge and Degree work? A: There is no set standard where to place the Bible Marker, some Lodges do not use them. If they are used a suggestion is, they can be placed on the Altar next to the Great Light, but not left on the page covering the passage of the Degree. Q: In the First and Third Degree (page 42 and 158) the Master of Ceremonies take a position in front of their respective chairs. Why do they then, in the Second Degree (page 102) take a position in about the center space between the West and the Altar? Why is there a difference between the First and Third Degree? A: On Page 102 the directions are wrong, it is a printing error. There was one other printing error, where it states in the 2001 Revised Edition of the Cipher Book that the Masters of Ceremony immediately start for the East dressing the lines. Which should state "the Master of Ceremonies immediately start for the East and dress the lines back to the West which should be brought reasonably close to the Altar. By dressing the lines back to the West, it gives the Brothers in Lodge time to form the walls. The forming of the Symbolic Temple is formed the same in all three Degrees. Q: What is meant by "not standard work"? A: In the Opening and Closing of Lodge it states certain sections are not standard work. On page 11 of the Cipher Book states and explains two kinds of Lodge meetings and their agendas. It also explains that if a Lodge's By-Laws do not specify otherwise, the following is a suggested order of business for a Stated Communication. With the excepting of Balloting and the Conferral of Degrees the business meeting is not standard work. However, the following wording is suggested. By not standard, it is not required at every stated meeting such as deaths/draping the altar, applications for membership, report of Investigating Committee on Petitions, Reports of other Lodge Committees, notice and correspondence, motions, resolutions and miscellaneous business, unless needed. The Opening and Closing, Balloting and Conferral of Degrees is Standard Work and must be followed exactly as in the Cipher Book, with nothing left out. My Brothers: This brings to mind the last article I wrote in the Empire State Mason about the Standard Work of our Ritual. We must instill in every Brother of this Jurisdiction the Dignity and Decorum of our Ritual. We must all review what we said in our obligations at the Sacred Altar of Freemasonry, and never forget how we should act as was told to us as you stood in the Northeast corner. Our Ritual is a precious heritage which we all wish to preserve and transmit to posterity.

GRAND LECTURER'S CONVENTION SCHEDULE

SEPTEMBER 2004 13 CLINTON DISTRICT 14 FRANKLIN-HAMILTON DISTRICT 15 FIRST AND SECOND ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT 16 JEFFERSON-LEWIS DISTRICT 17 JEFFERSON DISTRICT 20 ESSEX DISTRICT 21 RENSSELAER-SCHENECTADY DISTRICT 22 SARATOGA-WARREN DISTRICT 23 WASHINGTON DISTRICT 27 CHAUTAUQUA DISTRICT 28 CATTARAUGUS DISTRICT 29 ALLEGANY DISTRICT 30 STEUBEN DISTRICT OCTOBER 2004 1 CHEMUNG-SCHUYLER-TIOGA DISTRICT 4 DELAWARE DISTRICT 5 SULLIVAN DISTRICT 6 OTSEGO-SCHOHARIE DISTRICT 7 9 11 12 13 14 18 19 20 21 22 26 27 CAYUGA-TOMPKINS DISTRICT BROOME-CHENANGO DISTRICT FIRST ERIE DISTRICT NIAGARA-ORLEANS DISTRICT GENESEE-WYOMING DISTRICT LIVINGSTON DISTRICT ALBANY DISTRICT FULTON-MONTGOMERY DISTRICT CHEMUNG-SCHUYLER-TIOGA DISTRICT SECOND ONEIDA DISTRICT FIRST AND SECOND ONONDAGA DISTRICTS MONROE DISTRICT WAYNE DISTRICT 9 10 11 29 FIRST ONEIDA DISTRICT CORTLAND-MADISON DISTRICT OSWEGO DISTRICT SECOND ERIE DISTRICT 3 4 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 28 EIGHTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT TENTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT SIXTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT QUEENS DISTRICT SECOND KINGS DISTRICT SECOND NASSAU DISTRICT SUFFOLK DISTRICT FIRST NASSAU DISTRICT RICHMOND DISTRICT THIRD ERIE DISTRICT

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FEBRUARY 2005 1 FIRST MANHATTAN DISTRICT 2 FIFTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT 4 FOURTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT 7 ORANGE-ROCKLAND DISTRICT 8 THIRD KINGS DISTRICT 9 SEVENTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT 10 SECOND MANHATTAN DISTRICT 11 NINTH MANHATTAN DISTRICT 15 BRONX DISTRICT 18 FIRST KINGS DISTRICT MARCH 2005 1 SECOND WESTCHESTERPUTNAM DISTRICT 2 FIRST WESTCHESTER-PUTNAM DISTRICT

APRIL 2005 5 GREENE-ULSTER DISTRICT 6 COLUMBIA DISTRICT 7 DUTCHESS DISTRICT

NOVEMBER 2004 1 CAYUGA-TOMPKINS DISTRICT 3 NIAGARA-ORLEANS DISTRICT 4 ONTARIO-SENECA-YATES DISTRICT 8 HERKIMER DISTRICT

grand lodge fund

THE GRAND LODGE FUND

To Preserve and Protect Our Brothers, Our Lodges, Our Future!

Our membership has always responded to the needs of our Brothers, their widows and their orphans. The Grand Lodge Fund has been created to continue this aid and assistance in these difficult times. As members age and numbers decline, Lodges may merge or lose their buildings, and a distressed Brother may have no place to turn for special aid or assistance. This is the reason for the Grand Lodge Fund. The Grand Lodge Committee on Endowments is asking for your special support for this Fund.

BROTHERHOOD PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY SERVICE

DONATIONS TODAY

Your contributions now will provide a "QUICK START" to grow this Fund rapidly and allow for immediate response to needy Brothers. For your immediate response: Checks payable to: THE GRAND LODGE FUND Mail to: Grand Lodge 71 West 23rd Street New York, NY 10010 ATTN: Grand Secretary

DONATIONS TOMORROW

Your future contributions and bequests will provide a STEADY AND SECURE growth for the needs of our family. For your future response: Specify in your will: THE GRAND LODGE FUND Don't forget to tell your lawyer.

Thanks for Your Support

(NOT TAX DEDUCTIBLE)

ESM ONLINE VISIT THE ESM WEBSITE ESMASON.COM

63

CRUISE TO HAWAII ON "THE LOVE BOAT!"

Cruise Enterprises Proudly Announces

THE 48TH ANNUAL EMPIRE STATE MASON CRUISE

February 3-18, 2005

Round Trip Los Angeles to the Hawaiian Islands on the Island Princess with inexpensive Private Excursions in Honolulu to the "Big Mo" and the Royal Palace for extraordinary Masonic interest.

ALOHA!!!! You are cordially invited to join us, your fellow Masons and friends as we set sail on an exciting exploration of America's 50th State. Be a part of this once-in-a-lifetime voyage on board Princess Cruises' Island Princess. FARES: INSIDE CATEGORY II $2,175 per person (including government and port taxes) OUTSIDE OBSTRUCTED VIEW CATEGORY F $2,345 per person (including government and port taxes) OUTSIDE W/BALCONY CATEGORY BC $2,745 per person (including government and port taxes)

DAY

Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

DATE

February 3 February 4 February 5 February 6 February 7 February 8 February 9 February 10 February 11 February 12 February 13 February 14 February 15 February 16 February 17 February 18

PORT

Los Angeles, CA At Sea At Sea At Sea At Sea Kona, HI Hilo, HI Honolulu, Oahu, HI Nawiliwili,Kauai, HI Lahaina, Maui, HI At Sea At Sea At Sea At Sea Encenada, Mexico Los Angeles, CA

ARRIVE DEPART

5:00 PM

MINI-SUITE W/BALCONY CATEGORY AC $3,045 per person (including government and port taxes) MINI-SUITE W/BALCONY CATEGORY AB $3,115 per person (including government and port taxes)

9:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM

7:00 PM 6:00 PM 11:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:00 PM

We have an allotment of cabins as listed above. Minimum rate for these accommodations in Inside Category II is $2,175 per person, double occupancy. A deposit of $600 per person is required to hold a reservation. The rates above do not include air or insurance, which we will be pleased to arrange. Single and triple rates and deck plans on request.

7:00 PM 6:00 AM

8:00 PM

Contact us early to book the best available space!

For complete information, contact us at:

CRUISE ENTERPRISES, INC.

630 Ninth Ave., Suite 203 New York, NY 10036-64752 (888) 727-8922 (Toll Free) (212) 957-7868 (212) 265-6615 (FAX) [email protected]

Information

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