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2011-2013 CATALOG

2011-2013 CATALOG

Phoenix, Mesa, Online

EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX

Phoenix Campus

Main Campus 10400 N. 25th Ave, Suite 190 Phoenix, AZ 85021 Tel. (602) 942-4141 Fax. (602) 943-0960

Mesa Campus

A branch of the Phoenix Campus 5416 E. Baseline Road, Suite 200 Mesa, AZ 85206 Tel. (480) 830-5151 Fax. (480) 830-1824

Online Division

An Online Division of the Phoenix Campus 8160 S. Hardy Drive, Suite 102 Tempe, AZ 85284-1117 Tel. (800) 921-8640 Local (480) 598-6991 Fax. (480) 598-2609

http://www.everestcollegephoenix.edu/

CC-575-576-ECP

Accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, and a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

Publishing Date June 15, 2011

Copyright © 2011 Everest College Phoenix, Inc. Phoenix, Arizona 85021. All rights reserved.

Effective June 15, 2011, through June 15, 2013

This school is a business corporation authorized by the State of Oregon to offer and confer the academic degrees described herein, following a determination that state academic standards will be satisfied under OAR 583-030. Inquiries concerning the standards or school compliance may be directed to the Office of Degree Authorization, 1500 Valley River Drive, Suite 100, Eugene, OR 97401.

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FROM THE PRESIDENTS

Welcome to Everest College Phoenix!

Everest College Phoenix is a part of Corinthian Colleges, Inc., which consists of 112 private, postsecondary learning institutions throughout the United States and Canada. Everest College Phoenix was founded in 1982. The College offers separate professional programs in accounting, business, paralegal, criminal justice and investigations, nursing, medical insurance billing and coding and medical assistant. Our goal is to graduate well-educated, well-trained, dedicated adults who are qualified to begin work in responsible positions in their chosen professions. The faculty members at Everest College Phoenix are drawn from the workplace so that students may be educated and trained for real-world careers. Everest College Phoenix has a tradition of helping people develop their skills and abilities with the objective of making their lives richer and more rewarding. Everest College Phoenix is committed to helping you achieve your goals by providing you with the tools you need to be successful. Give us your enthusiasm and a desire to succeed, and we will repay your efforts with new knowledge and a solid foundation for your new career. Welcome!

Dr. Ed Johnson President, Everest College Phoenix

Dr. Michael Berry Provost Everest College Phoenix

Todd McDonald President, Phoenix Campus

Mary Ritter President, Mesa Campus

Steve Corrozi Chief Operating Officer, Everest College Phoenix

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This catalog is the official announcement of the programs, requirements, and regulations of Everest College Phoenix. Students enrolling in the College are subject to the provisions stated herein and therefore should read this catalog carefully. Students are responsible for knowing the rules, regulations, and policies of the College, and enrollment constitutes an agreement by the student to abide by them. Failure to read this catalog does not excuse students from the requirements and regulations described herein. The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The College reserves the right to make and designate the effective date of changes in College policies and procedures at any time such changes are considered to be desirable or necessary.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABOUT EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX ............................ 1 MISSION AND OBJECTIVES ....................................... 1 VISION .......................................................................... 1 VALUES ........................................................................ 1 HISTORY AND OWNERSHIP ...................................... 1 ACCREDITATION, APPROVALS AND LICENSURE ................................................................. 2 COLLEGE FACILITIES ................................................. 2 BUSINESS HOURS ...................................................... 2 LIBRARY RESOURCES FOR PHOENIX AND MESA ON-GROUND STUDENTS ................................ 2 LIBRARY RESOURCES FOR ONLINE STUDENTS.... 3 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS ............................................ 3 REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES ...................... 3 CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK ............................ 3 SUPPORTING CREDENTIALS .................................... 4 ACADEMIC SKILLS ASSESSMENT ............................ 4 ONLINE PROGRAMS AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS ......................................................... 4 DESCRIPTION ............................................................. 4 REQUIREMENTS ......................................................... 4 ACADEMIC POLICIES ......................................................... 5 GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM ........................... 5 THE GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM CORE LEARNING PRINCIPLES (CLP) ................................... 5 STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT PROGRAM .......................................... 6 ACADEMIC FREEDOM ................................................ 6 ORIENTATION ............................................................. 6 ACADEMIC UNIT OF CREDIT ..................................... 6 PROGRAM LENGTH .................................................... 6 SCHEDULING .............................................................. 7 TRANSFER STUDENTS WITH CREDITS EARNED AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS .......................... 7 TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES .............................................. 7 TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR PARALEGAL PROGRAM ................................................................... 7 TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR NURSING PROGRAM ................................................................... 7 AWARD OF CREDIT FOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT ............................................................. 8 AWARD OF CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING ........ 8 AWARD OF CREDIT FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PORTFOLIO .............................................. 8 AWARD OF CREDIT THROUGH PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION ............................................................. 8 AWARD OF CREDIT THROUGH DIRECTED STUDY .......................................................................... 8 TRANSFER TO OTHER COLLEGES ........................... 9 ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS ................................. 9 GRADING SYSTEM AND PROGRESS REPORTS ..... 9 GPA AND CGPA CALCULATIONS .............................. 9 STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) ....................................................... 9 EVALUATION PERIODS FOR SAP ............................. 9 RATE OF PROGRESS TOWARD COMPLETION (ROP) REQUIREMENTS .............................................. 9 MAXIMUM TIME IN WHICH TO COMPLETE (MTF) .. 10 GRADING SCALE ...................................................... 10 APPLICATION OF GRADES AND CREDITS ............. 11 TRANSFER CREDITS AND CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE, GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND RATE OF PROGRESS .................... 11 TRANSFER CREDITS AND REPEATED COURSES .................................................................. 11 ACADEMIC PROBATION ........................................... 12 NOTIFICATION OF PROBATION ............................... 12 SUSPENSION ............................................................. 12 ACADEMIC APPEALS ................................................ 12 REINSTATEMENT FOLLOWING SUSPENSION ....... 12 DISMISSAL ................................................................. 13 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS TABLES ....................................................................... 13 ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR THE COLLEGE ........... 13 ESTABLISHING ATTENDANCE / VERIFYING ENROLLMENT ............................................................ 13 MONITORING STUDENT ATTENDANCE .................. 14 CONSECUTIVE ABSENCE RULE (ALL PROGRAMS) .............................................................. 14 PERCENTAGE ABSENCE RULE (DIPLOMA PROGRAMS) .............................................................. 14 PERCENTAGE ABSENCE RULE (QUARTERBASED PROGRAMS) ................................................. 14 ADD/DROP PERIOD ................................................... 14 DATE OF WITHDRAWAL ........................................... 15 DATE OF DETERMINATION (DOD) ........................... 15 ATTENDANCE RECORDS ......................................... 15 ATTENDANCE POLICY (ON-GROUND) .................... 15 ATTENDANCE POLICY (ONLINE) ............................. 15 ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING PROGRAM ................................ 16 LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY (DIPLOMA PROGRAMS ONLY).................................................... 16 RE-ADMISSION FOLLOWING A LEAVE OF ABSENCE ................................................................... 16 FAILURE TO RETURN FROM A LEAVE OF ABSENCE ................................................................... 16 POSSIBLE EFFECTS OF LEAVE OF ABSENCE ...... 16 WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURES ................................. 16 REENTRY POLICY (ON-GROUND) ........................... 17 REENTRY POLICY (ONLINE) .................................... 17 EXTERNSHIPS ........................................................... 17 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS............................... 17 COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES ............................ 17 VETERAN'S EDUCATION BENEFITS ....................... 17 PREVIOUS CREDIT FOR VETERANS AFFAIRS BENEFICIARIES ......................................................... 17 ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR VETERAN STUDENTS ................................................................. 17 VETERANS' LEAVE OF ABSENCE (DIPLOMA PROGRAMS ONLY).................................................... 18 MAKE-UP ASSIGNMENTS ......................................... 18 MAXIMUM TIME FRAME FOR VETERAN STUDENTS ................................................................. 18 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR STUDENTS RECEIVING VETERANS AFFAIRS BENEFITS ................................................................... 18 VETERANS REINSTATEMENT AFTER SUCCESSFUL APPEAL OF TERMINATION.............. 18 APPEALS POLICY ...................................................... 18 STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEALS POLICY ................ 18 ASSIGNMENT/TEST GRADES .................................. 19 FINAL COURSE GRADES .......................................... 19 ATTENDANCE VIOLATIONS...................................... 19 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) APPEALS .................................................................... 19 STUDENT FINANCE ........................................................... 19 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL OBLIGATION .............. 19 TUITION AND FEES ................................................... 20 TUITION AND FEES (ONLINE) .................................. 20 CASH INSTALLMENT PAYMENTS ............................ 20 FULL-TIME STATUS ................................................... 20

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BOOKSTORE (PHOENIX AND MESA CAMPUSES)............................................................... 20 TEXTBOOKS (ONLINE) ............................................. 20 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS AND FINANCIAL AID .......................................................... 20 BUYER'S RIGHT TO CANCEL ................................... 21 OFFICIAL WITHDRAWALS ........................................ 21 DATE OF WITHDRAWAL VERSUS DATE OF DETERMINATION (DOD) ........................................... 21 FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID REFUND POLICY .......... 21 STUDENT FINANCIAL AID (SFA) .............................. 21 RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS CALCULATION AND POLICY .............................................................. 21 TIMEFRAME WITHIN WHICH INSTITUTION IS TO RETURN UNEARNED TITLE IV FUNDS ................... 22 EFFECT OF LEAVES OF ABSENCE ON RETURNS................................................................... 22 REFUND POLICY ....................................................... 22 INSTITUTIONAL REFUND CALCULATION FOR FIRST-TIME STUDENTS ........................................... 22 INSTITUTIONAL REFUND POLICY FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS IN QUARTER-BASED PROGRAMS ............................................................... 23 TEXTBOOK AND EQUIPMENT RETURN/REFUND POLICY ....................................................................... 23 EFFECT OF LEAVES OF ABSENCE ON REFUNDS................................................................... 23 TIMEFRAME WITHIN WHICH INSTITUTION IS TO ISSUE REFUNDS ....................................................... 23 STUDENTS CALLED TO ACTIVE MILITARY DUTY . 23 NEWLY ADMITTED STUDENTS ............................... 23 CONTINUING STUDENTS ......................................... 23 CONTINUING MODULAR DIPLOMA STUDENTS ..... 23 STUDENT FINANCING OPTIONS ............................. 23 STUDENT ELIGIBILITY .............................................. 24 FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS ................... 24 ALTERNATIVE LOAN PROGRAMS ........................... 24 SCHOLARSHIPS ........................................................ 24 DREAM AWARD PROGRAM AND SCHOLARSHIPS ........................................................ 24 IMAGINE AMERICA SCHOLARSHIPS ...................... 25 YELLOW RIBBON PROGRAM/POST-9/11 VETERANS EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE ACT SCHOLARSHIP .......................................................... 25 ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY SCHOLARSHIPS (EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX ONLINE ONLY)..... 25 ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES ............................................ 25 STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION ................ 25 STUDENT DISABILITY SERVICES/ACCOMMODATIONS .............................. 26 CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT ............................... 26 CONDUCT AFFECTING THE SAFETY OF THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY ............................................. 26 OTHER PROHIBITED CONDUCT ............................. 26 LIMITATIONS ON STUDENTS WITH PENDING DISCIPLINARY MATTERS ......................................... 27 INQUIRY BY THE CAMPUS PRESIDENT ................. 27 CONDUCT WHICH DOES NOT WARRANT A SUSPENSION OR DISMISSAL .................................. 27 CONDUCT WHICH WARRANTS A SUSPENSION OR DISMISSAL .......................................................... 27 ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE STATEMENT .............................................................. 27 STUDENT USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES POLICY ..................... 27 COPYRIGHT POLICY................................................. 28 SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY.............................. 28 CONDUCT SANCTIONS ............................................ 28 APPEAL PROCESS ................................................... 28

RECORD OF DISCIPLINARY MATTER ..................... 29 STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE ONGROUND CAMPUSES ............................................... 29 STUDENT GRIEVANCE/COMPLAINT PROCEDURE (ONLINE) ............................................. 29 DRESS CODE ............................................................. 31 NOTIFICATION OF RIGHT UNDER FERPA .............. 31 ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPTS, DEGREES, AND DIPLOMAS .................................................................. 32 CAMPUS SECURITY AND CRIME AWARENESS POLICIES .................................................................... 32 DRUG AWARENESS .................................................. 32 STATISTICAL INFORMATION.................................... 33 CAMPUS COMPLETION RATE REPORTS ............... 33 STUDENT SERVICES ........................................................ 33 HEALTH SERVICES ................................................... 33 HOUSING (ON-GROUND STUDENTS ONLY) ........... 33 STUDENT ADVISING ................................................. 33 EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX CARE PROGRAM .. 33 PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE ....................................... 33 PROGRAMS BY LOCATION .............................................. 34 ACCOUNTING ............................................................ 35 BUSINESS .................................................................. 37 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION .................................. 39 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE COMPLETION OPTION .............................................. 41 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS .................................... 43 CRIMINAL JUSTICE (AS) ........................................... 44 CRIMINAL JUSTICE (BS) ........................................... 45 CRIMINAL JUSTICE, BS DEGREE COMPLETION OPTION ....................................................................... 47 MEDICAL ASSISTANT ............................................... 49 MEDICAL INSURANCE BILLING AND CODING........ 52 NURSING .................................................................... 55 PARALEGAL ............................................................... 57 COURSE OFFERINGS ....................................................... 59 COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM .............................. 59 ADVISORY BOARDS ......................................................... 72 APPENDIX A: ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY AND STAFF ................................................................................. 74 APPENDIX B: TUITION AND FEES ................................... 81 APPENDIX C: CALENDARS .............................................. 83 DEGREE PROGRAM CALENDARS ........................... 83 DIPLOMA PROGRAM CALENDARS .......................... 87

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ABOUT EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX

Everest College Phoenix is a specialized College dedicated to education for accounting, business, paralegal, criminal justice, criminal investigations, nursing, medical assistant and medical insurance billing and coding careers. The professional setting of the College prepares students for the workplace and continuing educational opportunities. Attractive surroundings, well-equipped classrooms and labs set the tone for concentrated and dedicated study. The Phoenix and Mesa campuses are located in the greater metropolitan Phoenix area, which is well known for its year-round sunny skies and warm temperatures. The weather is conducive to all types of outdoor activities and sports. Trips to the famous Grand Canyon can easily be arranged. In addition, Phoenix is a metropolitan city offering a variety of cultural attractions. Classes are also available via the Internet through the online division of Everest College Phoenix.

MISSION AND OBJECTIVES

Everest College Phoenix provides students the opportunity to seek career-oriented learning with a general education background and to develop intellectually and socially in their careers and as citizens in a world of increasing technological and cultural diversity.

VISION

Graduates of Everest College Phoenix are proficient in communicating, analyzing, and evaluating information necessary for a successful career as well as lifelong learning. Graduates make decisions based on sound judgment, respect for diversity, an appreciation of the past, and an awareness of the connections among academic disciplines, the workplace, the community, and the world. They use critical thinking, information, and technology skills necessary for success and are commendable employees, involved citizens, and impassioned leaders.

VALUES

Everest College Phoenix: Continually improves its educational process to develop essential skills, competencies, and attitudes that students need for successful careers and life-long learning. Is committed to quality in teaching and excellence in student learning by recruiting qualified faculty who bring excitement to the classroom and stimulate students' enthusiasm and eagerness for learning and by providing ongoing professional development opportunities. Provides positive role models, emotional support, and opportunities to develop new and beneficial relationships in order to develop mature citizens who contribute to their communities through individual expression of opinions. Is dedicated to preparing students for their careers and assisting graduates in securing employment in their chosen fields. Values creativity, teamwork, integrity, and diversity. Values a faculty that consults with advisory boards when planning curricula to keep pace with workplace developments and to reflect local employers' needs. Continues, as part of our belief in the value of life-long learning, to secure articulation agreements or other cooperative agreements for students to continue their education at other accredited institutions. Offers courses and programs in both online and campus formats to address diverse learning styles. Uses a variety of assessments to validate student learning and to improve the curriculum and teaching methods. Everest College Phoenix students, staff, and faculty contribute to their communities through externships, internships, service learning projects, and volunteer activities.

HISTORY AND OWNERSHIP

Everest College Phoenix was founded in 1982 and was formerly named Academy of Business College. It was approved for training by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education in the same year. The Academy of Business College was accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools in 1984 and transferred accrediting bodies in 1997 after achieving accreditation with the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA). Rhodes Colleges, Inc. purchased the Academy of Business College June 1, 2000. The name was changed to Rhodes College in August 2000. In April 2002, the College was renamed Everest College. In 2005 the Mesa campus opened for classes. The College received approval to offer online courses in October 2001. The College was renamed Everest College Phoenix in 2009. Corinthian Colleges, Inc., the parent corporation of Rhodes Colleges, Inc., owns and operates over 110 institutions throughout the United States and Canada and is headquartered in Santa Ana, California.

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ACCREDITATION, APPROVALS AND LICENSURE

Accredited by the Higher Learning Commission North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. (312) 2630456, www.ncahlc.org. APPROVALS: The Paralegal program at the Phoenix and Mesa campuses of Everest College Phoenix is approved by the American Bar Association, Standing Committee on Paralegals, 321 N. Clark Street, MS 19.1, Chicago, IL. 60654-7598, http://apps.americanbar.org/legalservices/paralegals/. The Nursing Program at the Phoenix campus was granted provisional approval by the Arizona State Board of Nursing pursuant to R4-19-207(G). Approved for the training of Veterans and eligible persons under the provisions of Title 38, United States Code. LICENSURE: Everest College Phoenix is licensed by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, 1400 West Washington, Room 260, Phoenix, Arizona 85007, (602) 542-5709, fax (602) 542-1253. Everest College Phoenix Online is licensed by the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education pursuant to the Alabama Private License Law, Code of Alabama, Title 16-46-1 through 10. Everest College Phoenix Online is authorized by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education as a Non Resident Institution to offer approved programs. Everest College Phoenix Online is licensed by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education. Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board certification does not constitute an endorsement of any institution, course or degree program. Such certification merely indicates that certain minimum standards have been met under the rules and regulations of institutional certification as defined in Arkansas Code § 6-61-301. The admissions representatives (agents) who enroll Colorado students for totally online programs are licensed by the Colorado Department of Higher Education, Private Occupational School Board. Everest College Phoenix Online is certified under the Kansas Board of Regents, 1000 SW Jackson, Suite 520, Topeka, KS 66612-1368, Tel 785-296-3421, Fax 785-296-0983. Everest College Phoenix Online is licensed by the State of Wyoming as a post secondary proprietary school under W.S. 21-11-101 through 21-11-107. Copies of accreditation, approval and licensure documentation is available for inspection at each campus. Please contact the campus president to review this material.

COLLEGE FACILITIES

The Everest College Phoenix main campus is conveniently located near the intersection of I-17 and Peoria Avenue at 10400 N. 25th Ave., Suite 190, Phoenix, AZ 85021. The facilities include spacious quarters, well-designed offices and administrative areas, a library, medical laboratories, nursing skills lab with wet lab, crime scene lab, classrooms equipped with computers, and a student lounge. Free student parking and convenient transit services are available. The Mesa branch campus is located at 5416 E. Baseline Road, Suite 200, Mesa, Arizona 85206. The 21,200square-foot facility includes a medical laboratory, a library, classrooms equipped with computers, student lounge and administrative areas. Everest College Phoenix - Online is located at 8160 S. Hardy Drive, Suite 102, Tempe, AZ 85284-1117. The Tempe facility has over 37,000 square feet of administrative office space to support the online programs of Everest College Phoenix.

BUSINESS HOURS

The College maintains the following business hours: Phoenix Campus and Online Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Mesa Campus Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Classes may be scheduled Monday through Sunday between 6:00 a.m. and 9:50 p.m. Classes at the Mesa campus are scheduled Monday through Sunday between 6:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m.

LIBRARY RESOURCES FOR PHOENIX AND MESA ON-GROUND STUDENTS

The Phoenix and Mesa on-ground campuses of the College maintain libraries that support the various curricula and provide learning resources for students and faculty. The Libraries' collections include materials in both print and

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electronic formats. There is subject area coverage in books, journal articles, and DVDs/videos for all programs taught. Online databases and eBooks provide research capability with remote access, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Library of Congress system is used to classify materials and standard check-out and return policies are followed. To ensure that the College curriculum is supported and all students' educational needs are met, the library expands its print and digital collections on a continuous basis, and faculty members have a significant role in the process of selecting these materials and databases. Research assistance is available and InterLibrary Loan services are also provided at the on-ground campuses. For Paralegal students, Everest College Phoenix maintains print and online legal reference works in full compliance with the American Bar Association Guidelines applicable to ABA approved programs. Since an integral component of legal research is the knowledge and skills necessary to utilize multiple legal collections, students in the Paralegal program may be required to conduct research at various law libraries located in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Students enrolled in the Paralegal program should plan for the additional time and transportation needs associated with the utilization of law libraries and legal resources available in the surrounding legal community.

LIBRARY RESOURCES FOR ONLINE STUDENTS

The College Library resources support the curriculum and provide information for online students, faculty, and staff through multiple online information reference sources. Some of the academic online databases available are InfoTrac, ProQuest, JSTOR, NewsBank, Access Business News, as well as NetLibrary eBooks.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES

Application for admission to Everest College Phoenix may be granted to any person who meets at least ONE of the following criteria: 1. Has an advanced, Bachelor's, or Associate's degree from an accredited college with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a four-point scale, or 2. Is a graduate of an Everest College Phoenix-recognized accredited high school (a normal approaching, meeting, or exceeding score on the Arizona AIMS Reading and Writing tests is required for all post-2005 non-tribal Arizona high school graduates), or 3. Has a General Education Development (GED) certificate of high school equivalency. In addition to the above requirements, prospective online students are asked to complete a distance learning quiz to assess the student's ability to complete an online course, and Arkansas students must transfer in 12 quarter credit hours, including 2 laboratories, of Science curriculum in order to receive a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. Enrollment in the Everest College Phoenix' Nursing Program is contingent upon meeting all of the following criteria: 1. Has a High School Diploma or GED certificate; 2. Obtains a passing score on the designated nursing entrance test(s); 3. Submission of a written essay to be reviewed and scored by members of the Nursing department; 4. Completion of a personal interview with designated members of the Nursing Department; 5. Successfully passes a criminal background check In addition to the above, all individuals accepted and enrolled in the Nursing program must complete the following PRIOR to clinical: 1. Undergo and provide proof of a physical examination by a licensed practitioner; 2. Provide proof of current immunizations as required by the designated clinical agencies; 3. Possess current CPR-BLS card 4. Successfully pass fingerprinting clearance and drug screening

CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK

In an effort to provide each student with the opportunity to receive the maximum benefits available from his/her educational experience at Everest College Phoenix and to enhance the student's chances of successful entry into his/her desired professional field, students wishing to enroll in the College's nursing, criminal justice and criminal investigation programs must consent to and successfully pass a criminal background check prior to enrollment into any of the designated programs. This requirement is made pursuant to various occupational, employment, clinical, internship placement requirements or licensure standards prevalent in the allied health and criminal justice fields.

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What constitutes successful criminal background clearance is within the sole discretion of the College and enrollment may be denied, but is not limited to background checks that identify a conviction, pending case or unresolved deferral/diversion for any felonies or misdemeanors. The College contracts with an outside agency to perform the criminal background checks and report on the status of an individual's criminal background clearance. In the event an individual is unable to obtain criminal background clearance that precludes enrollment into or completion of a program or clinical or internship placement or interferes in job placement, it is the individual's responsibility, and not that of the College's, to contact the agency to verify or dispute the information

SUPPORTING CREDENTIALS

Prospective students must present evidence to Everest College Phoenix of graduation from accredited high schools that are recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or recognized foreign high schools that are equivalent to U.S. standards. Students who have satisfactorily completed the General Educational Development (GED) test must submit documentary evidence of passing test scores. High school transcripts or GED test scores must be sent directly to the Academic Office within 30 calendar days of the date of enrollment. Students with international transcripts must provide the College with an official translation, at their own expense, within 30 calendar days of the date of enrollment, from one of the following translation services: World Education Services, Inc., P.O. Box 745 Old Chelsea Station, New York, New York 10113-0745, (212) 966-6311 Josef Silny & Associates, Inc., International Educational Consultants, P.O. Box 248233, Coral Gables, Florida 33124, (305) 666-0233, www.jsilny.com World Education Services, Inc., P.O. Box 01-5060, Miami, Florida 33101, (305) 358-6688, www.wes.org Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc., P.O. Box 514070, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202-3470, (414) 2893400, www.ece.org Documents that Everest College Phoenix cannot accept for admission to the College include: 1. Certificate of Completion which is awarded to a student without graduating. 2. Diploma based primarily on remedial special education.

ACADEMIC SKILLS ASSESSMENT

All students are required to go through the institution's assessment process.

ONLINE PROGRAMS AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS DESCRIPTION

Not all courses and programs of study are offered in an online format. Courses and programs of study that are offered in an online format are offered via the Internet, and interaction between the students and faculty occurs using an online environment that encourages participation. Course objectives and outcomes are identical to those for the on-ground mode, although more individual effort and initiative will be required to successfully master the material. Onground students may be required to take some coursework online when courses are not available on-ground to complete their programs within the standard program length.

REQUIREMENTS

To maximize student success within the online courses and programs, students must: Have a computer with a system profile that meets or exceeds requirements listed on the Online Program Application at the time of enrollment; Have Internet access and an established email account; Commence online contact with the course site within the first week of the term; Understand that participation is required on a weekly basis; Complete and turn in assignments on a weekly basis for a grade to be assigned. To maximize success within the online courses, students must have a computer with a system profile that meets or exceeds the following: Windows Systems Windows 2000, XP, or Vista 64 MB Ram 28.8 kbps modem (56K recommended) Sound Card & Speakers Recommended Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 Recommended Browser: Mozilla Firefox 2.0 Mac Systems Mac OS X or higher (in classic mode) 32 MB RAM (64 recommended) 28.8 kbps modem (56K recommended) Sound Card & Speakers Recommended Browser: Safari 3.0 Recommended Browser: Mozilla Firefox 2.0 Supported Browser: Safari 2.0

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Supported Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 Supported Browser: Mozilla Firefox 3.0

Supported Browser: Mozilla Firefox 3.0

Complete the application only once but check quarterly to make sure they are maintaining the correct systems profile; Have Internet access and an established email account; Verify their email account/address with their Online Coordinator at the time of registration each quarter; Commence online course work as soon as they have access to their courses; Understand that student participation and class activities occur weekly throughout the course; Understand that if a student fails to attend as outlined in the Online Attendance section of this catalog during two consecutive weekly periods of a 6-week course or three consecutive periods of a 12-week course, the student may be withdrawn from the course and may not be allowed to reenter the course during that term.

ACADEMIC POLICIES

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

In furtherance of the College's Mission the degree programs combine general education core learning principles with career education. The general education portion of a degree program allows students to broaden their understanding of the world and culture around them. The general education component of each degree program is designed to meet the goals of the College's general education program as well as standards for accreditation. Everest College Phoenix believes that general education is the hallmark of any education program. Students use these foundational skills to build upon as they advance in their continued education, careers, or personal endeavors.

THE GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM CORE LEARNING PRINCIPLES (CLP)

Communicating Listen actively and respectfully to evaluate people's arguments. Read effectively and analytically to comprehend material at the college level. Identify meaning and value within artistic expression and its context. Organize ideas for a variety of audience types and occasions. Speak and write in an understandable and organized manner to explain ideas, express feelings, or support a point of view using graphics, electronic media, computers and quantified data. Analyzing and Evaluating Discuss complex issues and connections among ideas to achieve valid, independent conclusions. Examine diverse attitudes and values from a variety of situations and cultures, and consider their implications and consequences. Combine experience, logic, and critical thinking to make valid judgments. Problem Solving Define problems and their causes by using a range of abilities and resources to reach decisions. Make recommendations, or carry out plans. Use decision- making strategies. Identify personal strengths and areas for improvement. Participate effectively in teams and other group efforts to make decisions and arrive at agreements. Follow directions carefully to successfully complete tasks. Using Information Use technology to gather, process, and communicate information. Evaluate printed materials, personal communications, observation, and electronic resources. Conduct research at an academic level that is necessary to achieve personal, professional and education success. Global Perspective and Civic Engagement Examine multicultural and international outlooks through proper research methods. Demonstrate awareness of contemporary issues and their historical contexts to reach informed judgments.

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Students receiving a degree from Everest College Phoenix must complete all of the general education courses included in their specific program listed in this catalog. Students must also complete an Academic Writing portfolio or eCore Learning Principles Portfolio in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Criteria for the Portfolio will be set forth in SLS1505, Strategies for Success, or in other presentations by the Academic Portfolio Coordinator, and discussed throughout the student's course of study.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

The purpose of assessment at Everest College Phoenix is to improve student academic learning and student development. The primary goals for outcomes assessment include the improvement of the teaching and learning process; the improvement of the learning environment; the linking of the College's objectives to measure student learning and development; and the maintenance of the College's accountability to the students and the professional communities it serves. The Assessment Program stems from the mission and objectives of the institution and evaluates student learning at the classroom, program, and college level. The program is led by the Director of Outcomes Assessment and Regulatory Affairs with participation of Academic Program Directors, and faculty from every department in the College. Participants make decisions about what methods and measures will be used for assessment. The assessment process involves systematically gathering, interpreting, and using information about student learning and knowledge. Four levels of assessment that evaluate student academic achievement are identified in the Student Outcomes Assessment Program as: Assignment or Student Interaction Level Class or Service Level Department or Program Level Institutional Level While building an environment of assessment, students might be involved with any of the following activities: Standardized Tests, Program Projects, Artifacts for Portfolios, Pre/Post Testing, Externships, Demonstrations, Certifications, and Capstone Courses.

ACADEMIC FREEDOM

Instructors, while in the classroom, have the freedom to discuss subject matter they believe is appropriate to the classroom learning experience. Instructors should not allow irrelevant material into the instructional proceedings. Given these limitations, the College protects the rights of both students and instructors to a "free search for educational truth and the free expression of this knowledge." The College respects the right of instructors as citizens but believes their positions with the College impose of them special obligations. Therefore, inst5ructors are free from institutional censorship or discipline when they speak, write, or act as private citizens. However, instructors should be aware the public might judge the College by their behavior. Therefore, every effort should be made to be accurate with information, to show respect for the opinions of others, and to ensure students know and understand that instructors are not spokespersons for the College.

ORIENTATION

For the Phoenix and Mesa on-ground campuses, all new students are required to attend an orientation session and will be notified by email of the time and date of the next orientation session. Students unable to attend should contact their admissions representative and make special arrangements. Students enrolling in an online course or program are required to participate in an online orientation course developed by Everest College Phoenix Online. The orientation course includes information on Everest College Phoenix Online and the online degree programs as well as how to access the course, find the syllabus, and use the major platform tools.

ACADEMIC UNIT OF CREDIT

The academic unit of credit awarded at Everest College Phoenix is the quarter credit hour. Each quarter credit hour is equal to 10 lecture contact hours, 20 laboratory contact hours, 30 externship/clinical contact hours, or a combination of these three. The first academic year concludes at the end of 36 quarter credit hours and when 36 weeks have been completed. The second academic year concludes at the end of 72 quarter credit hours and when 72 weeks have been completed.

PROGRAM LENGTH

Program lengths are approximate. Schedule changes or modifications, change of program, unsuccessful completion of courses, or withdrawal from class will affect program length. Every reasonable effort is made to achieve completion goals at the stated times; however, the College reserves the right to cancel or substitute any course that fails to meet minimum enrollment requirements or for other legitimate business or educational reasons.

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SCHEDULING

When students enter a particular program of study, they are automatically registered for each course in that program. Not all courses are offered each term; however, all reasonable efforts will be made to offer a sufficient number of courses to allow students to complete their programs appropriately. Students enrolled at the Phoenix and Mesa campuses may need to attend one or more courses online to complete their program within the expected amount of time. Improvements to curricula sometimes cause scheduling alterations, resulting in courses being substituted for those listed in the catalog. If substitutions are made, all new courses will contribute to the general objective of the program and will not alter the integrity of the education students will receive.

TRANSFER STUDENTS WITH CREDITS EARNED AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS

Students with earned college credits from another accredited institution may apply for credit transfer to the College. Credit will be accepted only for courses that are compatible with the student's program of study at the College and for courses in which a grade of C or higher was earned. The award of transfer credits is at the discretion of the College and subject to time limitations and specific program requirements. Grades earned more than 10 years ago are not accepted except to fulfill certain general education and college core requirements. Courses in the medical sciences and paralegal fields have a five-year time limit for transfer. Students wishing to transfer credits must have official transcripts mailed directly to the Office of the Registrar. Official transcripts must be received prior to the end of the first term of enrollment. Transcripts received after the end of the first term may be considered at the discretion of the Academic Dean. Students receiving veteran's benefits are required by the Veterans Administration to provide transcripts of credit from all schools previously attended. All prior education and training must be evaluated upon enrollment. The College will provide notice to the student and the Department of Veterans Affairs of the total number of transfer credits awarded. To be granted an undergraduate degree from the College, students must complete a minimum of 25% of all program hours in residence unless otherwise expressly specified in this catalog. In residence means credit hours earned while enrolled at Everest College Phoenix through any combination of classroom, online, or Directed Study coursework (see "Directed Study" section for more information). Transfer credits, Proficiency Examinations, and credits earned through the Prior Learning Assessment program do not count toward satisfying the residency requirement.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES

Subject to certain limitations and program requirements, coursework in general education subject areas (i.e., humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and science) may be transferred at the College's discretion to fulfill the equivalent subject area general education requirements of the student's program of study. Details on this policy may be obtained in the office of the Academic Dean.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR PARALEGAL PROGRAM

Students entering the American Bar Association-approved Paralegal program at the Phoenix and Mesa campuses with earned college credits from another ABA-approved paralegal program may apply for credit transfer to the paralegal program. Students with credits earned at another ABA-approved paralegal program must complete at least 40% of the paralegal program's major core required and elective courses in residence (i.e., 40% of the 48 required credits of legal specialty courses that cover substantive law or legal procedures or process developed for paralegals and that emphasize practical paralegal skills). Students entering the American Bar Association-approved Paralegal program at the College's Phoenix and Mesa campuses with earned college credits from a non-ABA-approved paralegal program may apply for credit transfer to the paralegal program. Students with credits earned at a non-ABA-approved paralegal program must complete at least 60% of the paralegal program's major core required and elective courses in residence (i.e., 60% of the 48 required credits of legal specialty courses that cover substantive law or legal procedures or process developed for paralegals and that emphasize practical legal skills).

TRANSFER OF CREDIT FOR NURSING PROGRAM

Eligibility for the award of transfer credits for nursing courses is determined by the Nursing Faculty and Nursing Admissions Committee on a case by case basis. The Nursing Faculty and Nursing Admissions Committee will review all previous nursing courses including: Accredited registered nursing courses Armed services nursing courses Other courses the Nursing Faculty and Admissions Committee determines to be equivalent to courses in the program

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All general education courses will be reviewed by the General Education Academic Program Director, at which time he/ she will determine which course(s) can be transferred based on the following criteria: Anatomy & Physiology I, Developmental Psychology, and Pathophysiology must be completed within five (5) years or less. Anatomy & Physiology II, Microbiology, and Chemistry must be completed within five (5) years or less AND must achieve a score of 80% or better on the HESI Entrance Exam. Microbiology and Chemistry must be transferred in together as they are the equivalent to the transfer credit for Microbiology/ Chemistry course. If a student has an AS or BS degree, credits for all courses listed above will transfer regardless of the length of time since taking the course(s). No transfer credit can be transferred in without an official college transcript. A transcript is only official if it is sent from the college of origin to Everest College Phoenix via US Postal Service. If a student chooses to take a general education course elsewhere while enrolled in the nursing program, the student must complete the course no later than the nine (9) week mark of the quarter preceding the quarter in which the class will officially be offered. Upon completion of the course, the student must immediately submit proof of the final grade earned (i.e.: email from online instructor, unofficial transcripts, etc) as proof of a passing grade. The student must also immediately request an official transcript to be sent to Everest College Phoenix so the credit can be transferred in the campus' computer system as soon as possible.

AWARD OF CREDIT FOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT

The College accepts appropriate credits transferred from the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES subject testing, and certain other professional certification examination programs. Contact the Academic Dean for the current list of approved exams and minimum scores required for transfer. Official test scores must be sent to the Office of the Registrar.

AWARD OF CREDIT FOR MILITARY TRAINING

The College may award credit for occupational experience and training courses completed while serving in the Armed Services of the United States as recommended by the American Council on Education. Veterans or active duty service members may submit the ACE military transcript applicable to their branch of service to the Office of the Registrar for evaluation.

AWARD OF CREDIT FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PORTFOLIO

Students may earn credit for life experience through the Prior Learning Assessment program. This program is designed to translate personal and professional experiences into academic credit. Not all courses in all programs are eligible for Prior Learning Assessment Credit. Procedures for applying for credit through experiential learning are available in the Academic Dean's office. Credits earned through the Prior Learning Assessment program, in conjunction with successful completion of Proficiency Examinations, may be used to satisfy up to 50% of the credits required for program completion. Students in the ABA-approved paralegal program at the Phoenix and Mesa campuses may earn credit for life experience through the Prior Learning Assessment Program for the program's general education and college core courses only. The program's major core required or elective courses are not eligible for Prior Learning Assessment credit.

AWARD OF CREDIT THROUGH PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION

Undergraduate students may attempt to challenge the requirement to certain selected courses by demonstrating a proficiency level based on special qualifications, skills or knowledge obtained through work or other experience that is sufficient to warrant the granting of academic credit for a course through a Proficiency Examination. All requests for Proficiency Examinations must be approved by the appropriate Academic Program Director or the Academic Dean.

AWARD OF CREDIT THROUGH DIRECTED STUDY

There may be times during the student's course of study when the student is unable to take a specific required course due to work schedule conflicts, emergency situations, or course scheduling conflicts. Should such an instance arise, the student may request permission from the Academic Program Director and Academic Dean to complete a course through Directed Study. If approved and scheduled for a directed study course, the student will be assigned to a faculty member who will provide the student with syllabus, assignments, and directions for course completion. The student will be required to meet with the faculty member on a weekly basis, complete all reading and writing assignments and examinations, and submit any required research or term papers, all of which will be used to determine the final course grade as defined in the syllabus. Students in the ABA-approved paralegal program at the

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College's Phoenix and Mesa campuses may not take more than one (1) of the program's major core and elective courses through Directed Study. Not all courses are eligible for directed study.

TRANSFER TO OTHER COLLEGES

Everest College Phoenix neither implies nor guarantees that credits completed at Everest College Phoenix will be accepted in transfer at other institutions. Each institution has policies that govern the acceptance of credit from other institutions as policies and grade requirements vary from institution to institution. Transfer of credit is a privilege granted by the institution to which a student may seek admission. Students intending to transfer credits to other institutions should contact those institutions regarding the policies and procedures governing the transfer of credits. The diploma programs of Everest College Phoenix are intended to be terminal in nature and are designed primarily to prepare the graduate for employment. If a student is planning on continuing his/her education, the office of the Academic Dean will offer information on articulation agreements with other institutions.

ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS

Everest College Phoenix has articulation agreements with several other colleges and universities. Students should contact the Everest College Phoenix Dean for additional information on articulation agreement transfer terms and conditions.

GRADING SYSTEM AND PROGRESS REPORTS

Final grades are reported at the completion of each grading term and are provided to each student. If mailed, they are sent to the student's home address. NOTE: The D grade is not used for any modules in the Medical Assistant and Medical Insurance Billing and Coding diploma programs. A grade of 70% or higher is required to pass these courses. Scores of 69% or less in diploma programs are considered failing grades. Failed courses must be repeated and are calculated as an attempt in Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) calculations. In the Nursing program, a grade of C is required to progress. A grade of less than 76% is considered a failing grade. A D grade (68-75%) is utilized for a CGPA calculation purposes only.

GPA AND CGPA CALCULATIONS

The grade point average (GPA) for each term and cumulative grade point average (CGPA) are calculated on residence courses taken at the College. The GPA for each term is calculated by dividing the quality points earned that term by the total cumulative credits attempted for the GPA. The CGPA is calculated by dividing the total cumulative quality points earned by the total cumulative credits attempted for the GPA. At the end of each academic term, the student's cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is reviewed to determine the student's qualitative progress. When a student repeats a course, the student's CGPA will be recalculated based on the higher of the two grades earned. Grades for withdrawals, transfer credits, incompletes, non-punitive (Pass), and non-credit remedial courses have no effect on the student's CGPA. Students must attain a minimum CGPA of 1.0 at the end of the first 25% of the program and a 1.5 CGPA at the midpoint of the program.

STANDARDS OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP)

Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress in order to remain eligible to continue as regularly enrolled students of the College. Additionally, satisfactory academic progress must be maintained in order to remain eligible to continue receiving federal financial assistance. Accreditor and federal regulations require that all students progress at a reasonable rate (i.e. make satisfactory academic progress) toward the completion of their academic program. Satisfactory academic progress is measured by: 1) The student's cumulative grade point average (CGPA) 2) The student's rate of progress toward completion (ROP) 3) The maximum time frame allowed to complete the academic program (150% for all programs).

EVALUATION PERIODS FOR SAP

Satisfactory academic progress is measured at the end of each academic term, which includes the 25% point, the midpoint, the end of each academic year, and the end of the program. Should the 25% point or the midpoint occur within a term, the evaluation will occur at the end of the preceding academic term.

RATE OF PROGRESS TOWARD COMPLETION (ROP) REQUIREMENTS

The College catalog contains a schedule designating the minimum percentage or amount of work that a student must successfully complete at the end of each evaluation period to complete their educational program within the maximum time frame (150%). Quantitative progress is determined by dividing the number of credit hours earned by

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the total number of credit hours in courses attempted. Credit hours attempted include completed hours, transfer credits, withdrawals, and repeated courses. Non-credit remedial courses have no effect on the student's ROP.

MAXIMUM TIME IN WHICH TO COMPLETE (MTF)

The maximum time frame for completion of all programs is limited by federal regulation to 150% of the published length of the program. The College calculates the maximum time frame using credit hours for courses attempted. The total scheduled credit hours for all courses attempted, which include completed courses, transfer courses, withdrawals, and repeated classes, count toward the maximum number of credit hours allowed to complete the program. Non-credit remedial courses have no effect on the student's ROP. A student is not allowed to attempt more than 1.5 times or 150% of the credit hours in the standard length of the program in order to complete the requirements for graduation.

GRADING SCALE

QUALITY POINTS PER QUARTER HOUR 4 3 2 1 0 Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated Not Calculated

GRADE A B C D F/Fail IP**** W WZ TR TA PE PL PASS PP PF FAIL

OTHER DEGREE DIPLOMA NURSING PROGRAM PROGRAMS PROGRAMS 92-100% 90-100% 90-100% 84-91% 80-89% 80-89% 76-83% 70-79% 70-79% 68-75%*** 60-69%* * Below 68%*** or see Below 60% or ** see Below 70% note for clinical grades note In progress (for externship/internship or thesis courses only) Used in the Nursing program for the NCLEX Review Course if the HESI Exit Exam is not successfully passed within 2 attempts. Withdrawal after drop/add period, not calculated in the CGPA. This grade indicates the course will be calculated for purposes of determining rate of progress (SAP). Withdrawal for students called to immediate active military duty. This grade indicates the course will not be calculated for purposes of determining rate of progress (SAP) Transfer credit not calculated for CGPA (SAP). This grade will be calculated for determining rate of progress (SAP). Transfer Associates (Criminal Justice and Business degree completion options only) EVALUATION Excellent Good Average Below Average Failed to Meet Course Objectives Passed by Proficiency Challenge Exam Prior Learning Portfolio Course objectives met in capstone course or nursing lab/clinical courses as per Catalog. This grade indicates the course will be calculated for purposes of determining rate of progress (SAP). Preparatory Class passed (Preparatory classes only). This grade indicates that the course will not be calculated for purposes of determining rate of progress or CGPA (SAP) Preparatory Class failed (Preparatory classes only). This grade indicates that the course will not be calculated for purposes of determining rate of progress or CGPA (SAP) Course objectives NOT met in capstone course or nursing lab/clinical courses as per Catalog. This grade indicates the course will be calculated for purposes of determining rate of progress (SAP)

* A grade of D is not awarded for modular courses or capstone courses. ** In Criminal Justice and Criminal Investigations, capstone courses, a grade of FAIL is awarded for an average of 79% or below. In Paralegal capstone courses, a grade of FAIL is awarded for an average of 69% or below. In Nursing lab/clinical courses, a grade of FAIL is a failure to meet competencies per Catalog Nursing Policy. *** Nursing students who receive D grades cannot progress in Nursing. The D grade is strictly given for calculation of GPA for the term. ****If the required degree externship/internship hours are not completed within one term, the student will receive an IP (In Progress) grade and a zero credit Externship/Internship Extension course will be scheduled in the following term. Once the required hours are completed, the student's grade will be entered in both courses.

Applies To All Courses Course Repeat Codes 1 Student must repeat this class R Student in the process of repeating this class 2 Course repeated - original grade no longer calculated in CGPA

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Treatment of Grades in the Satisfactory Academic Progress/Rate of Progress Calculation Included in Counted as Counted as GPA attempted earned Grade calculation? credits? credits? A Y Y Y B Y Y Y C Y Y Y D Y Y Y F or Fail Y Y N P or Pass N Y Y PF N N Y PP N N Y IP N Y N PL N N N PE N Y Y W N Y N WZ N Y N FAIL N Y N

APPLICATION OF GRADES AND CREDITS

Grades A through F are included in the calculation of CGPA and are included in the Total Number of Credit Hours Attempted. Transfer credits (TR) are not included in the calculation of CGPA but are included in the Total Number of Credit Hours Attempted in order to determine the required levels for CGPA and rate of progress. Transfer credits are included as credit hours attempted and successfully completed in calculating the rate of progress. Developmental courses, (PF, PP) are graded on a pass/fail basis and are not included in the calculation of progress toward completion or the student's CGAP. For calculating rate of progress, F grades and W grades are counted as hours attempted but are not counted as hours successfully completed. Grades of IP (In Progress) will also be counted as hours attempted but not as hours successfully completed. When a course is repeated, the higher of the two grades is used in the calculation of CGPA, and the total clock hours for the original course and the repeated course are included in the Total Clock Hours Attempted in order to determine the required progress level. The clock hours for the original attempt are considered as not successfully completed.

TRANSFER CREDITS AND CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE, GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND RATE OF PROGRESS

Students may receive transfer credit for courses taken at another accredited college. Courses for which a student receives transfer credit are counted as attempted and successfully completed for purposes of satisfactory academic progress. As a result, courses for which a student receives transfer credit provide the student with advanced standing, which is applied to the student's progress in calculation of the percentage of maximum time frame for the program that the student has completed. When a student transfers from or completes one program at Everest College Phoenix and enrolls in another program at the College, and all courses completed in the original program are acceptable for credit in the new program, all courses attempted and grades received in the original program are counted in the new program for calculation of the student's satisfactory academic progress in the new program. When a student transfers from or completes one program at the College and enrolls in another program at the College and all courses completed in the original program are NOT accepted for credit in the new program, all attempts of courses taken in the original program that are part of the new program will be counted in the calculation of the student's satisfactory academic progress upon entry into the new program, and the grades for the courses that are a part of the new program that were taken at the same institution will be used in the student's Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) calculation.

TRANSFER CREDITS AND REPEATED COURSES

Transfer credits are not included in the calculation of CGPA but are included in the "Total Number of Credits Attempted" (in the Satisfactory Academic Progress charts listed in this catalog) in order to determine the required levels for CGPA and percentage of credits completed. Transfer credits are included as credits successfully completed. The College, at its sole discretion, reserves the right to determine what transfer credits, if any, will be

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accepted. Official transcripts must be received prior to the end of the first term of enrollment. Official transcripts received after the end of the first term may be considered at the discretion of the Academic Dean. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis are not included in calculating CGPA; however, capstone courses taken on a pass/fail basis are considered as hours attempted in the determination of progression toward completion. Preparatory courses taken on a pass/fail basis are not considered as hours attempted in the determination of progression toward completion. When a course is repeated, the higher of the two grades is used in the calculation of CGPA; however, the original course credits remain included in the "Total Number of Credits Attempted" in order to determine the required levels for percentage of credits completed. The original credits are considered as not successfully completed. Note: Courses taken in diploma programs do not transfer in under the standard transfer credit procedure, but may qualify for credit under Prior Learning Assessment. The requirements for rate of progress are to assure that students are progressing at a rate at which they will be able to complete their programs within the maximum time frame. The maximum allowable attempted credit hours are noted in the following tables.

ACADEMIC PROBATION

Probation is the period of time during which a student's progress is monitored under an advising plan. During the period of probation, students are considered to be making Satisfactory Academic Progress for both academic and financial aid eligibility. Students on probation must participate in academic advising as deemed necessary by the College as a condition of their probation. Academic advising shall be documented using the Academic Advising Plan and the Evaluation of Progress Form which shall be kept in the student's academic file. The Academic Advising Plan will be updated at the end of each evaluation period that the student is on probation. If, at the end of any evaluation period, a student falls below the required academic progress standards (CGPA, ROP, or other standards) for his/her program as stated in the catalog, the student shall receive a written warning and be placed on probation. Probation will begin at the start of the next evaluation period. The student will remain on academic probation as long as his or her CGPA or ROP remains in the probation ranges specified in the catalog. When both the CGPA and ROP are above the probation ranges, the student is removed from probation. In addition, students whose probation status extends over multiple academic terms may be directed to participate in extra tutorial sessions or developmental classes.

NOTIFICATION OF PROBATION

The Academic Dean (or designee) must provide written notice of probationary status to all students placed on academic probation. Additionally, all students on probation must participate in academic advising. The following timelines apply for all students placed on academic on probation: For programs with an Add/Drop period; o Students must be notified in writing by the end of the add/drop period of the probationary term; and o Must receive academic advising within thirty (30) days from the start date of the probationary term. For programs without an Add/Drop period: o Students must be notified in writing by the end of the first week of the probationary term; and o Must receive academic advising by the end of the second week of the probationary term. If a student's probationary status extends over consecutive academic terms, a second written Notice of Academic Probation is not required. However, the Academic Advising Plan and the Evaluation of Progress form must be updated at the end of each academic term/evaluation period that the student is on probation.

SUSPENSION

If, at the end of any evaluation period, a student's CGPA or ROP falls into the suspension ranges specified in the College catalog, the student is considered not to be making SAP. Students not making SAP must be placed on suspension and withdrawn from the program unless the student successfully appeals the suspension in accordance with the Student Academic Appeals Policy.

ACADEMIC APPEALS

Any student may submit an appeal of a decision of suspension or dismissal in accordance with the Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeals Policy.

REINSTATEMENT FOLLOWING SUSPENSION

Students who successfully appeal a suspension or dismissal may return to school under the following conditions: The student must develop an academic advising plan with an advisor. The student must bring his or her CGPA up to the probation range by the end of the evaluation period following the appeal. If the student meets the above conditions, s/he may remain in school and is considered to be making SAP so long as the student's CGPA does not fall below the probation range.

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DISMISSAL

Students who have been readmitted following academic suspension who fail to improve their CGPA and/or ROP into the applicable probation range by the end of the first evaluation period after readmission may be dismissed from the program. However, students who do not achieve a CGPA of at least 70 percent or 2.0 but do achieve a GPA of at least 70 percent or 2.0 for the term are eligible for a second probationary period. Students who have been dismissed from a program are not eligible for readmission.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS TABLES

47 Quarter Credit Hour Program. Total credits that may be attempted: 70 (150% of 47). Probation if CGPA is below Suspension if Rate of Progress is Below Suspension if CGPA is below Probation if Rate of Progress is Below Total Credits Attempted 96, 97, & 98 Quarter Credit Hour Program. Total credits that may be attempted: 144 (150% of 96). Probation if CGPA is below Suspension if CGPA is below Suspension if Rate of Progress is Below N/A 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 55% 60% 63% 66.66% Suspension if Rate of Progress is Below N/A 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 55% 60% 63% 66.66% Probation if Rate of Progress is Below 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% N/A 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% N/A

Total Credits Attempted

1-18 19-24 25-30 31-36 37-42 43-48 49-70

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 N/A

N/A 0.5 0.75 1.0 1.4 1.7 2.0

66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% N/A

N/A 25% 40% 50% 60% 63% 66.66%

1-24 25-36 37-48 49-60 61-72 73-84 85-96 97-108 109-120 121-144

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 N/A

N/A 0.25 0.50 1.10 1.50 1.80 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00

108 Quarter Credit Hour Program. Total credits that may be attempted: 162 (150% of 108). Suspension if CGAP is below Suspension if Rate of Progress is Below Total Credits Attempted Probation if Rate of Progress is Below Probation if CGAP is below Total Credits Attempted

192 Quarter Credit Hour Program. Total credits that may be attempted: 288 (150% of 192). Probation if CGPA is below Suspension if CGPA is below N/A 0.25 0.50 1.10 1.50 1.80 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Probation if Rate of Progress is Below

1-16 17-32 33-48 49-64 65-80 81-96 97-112 113-128 129-144 145-162

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 N/A

N/A 1.0 1.25 1.5 1.75 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% 66.66% N/A

N/A N/A 20% 25% 40% 50% 57% 62% 65% 66.66%

1-24 25-36 37-48 49-60 61-72 73-84 85-96 97-108 109-120 121-288

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 N/A

ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR THE COLLEGE ESTABLISHING ATTENDANCE / VERIFYING ENROLLMENT

Attendance is taken in each class beginning with the first day of scheduled classes. For programs with an add/drop period, the taking of attendance for students enrolling during the add/drop period shall begin the first scheduled class session following the students' enrollment. In programs without an add/drop period, students registered for a class shall attend by the second scheduled class session or be withdrawn.

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MONITORING STUDENT ATTENDANCE

Attendance is monitored on the basis of both consecutive absences (the "Consecutive Absence Rule") and absences as a percentage of the hours in the class/program (the "Percentage Absence Rule"). A student may appeal an attendance dismissal pursuant to the Student Academic Appeals Policy only if: (a) the student returns to class the next scheduled class session following the attendance violation and (b) the student has no absences while the appeal is pending. Note: Should an appeal be granted, the student is not withdrawn but shall be monitored with an advising plan. Should an appeal not be granted, the student shall be withdrawn from all classes for which the appeal was denied and shall not be charged for any attendance in those classes while the appeal was pending. The Date of Withdrawal shall be the earlier of a violation of the Consecutive Absence Rule or the Percentage Absence Rule.

CONSECUTIVE ABSENCE RULE (ALL PROGRAMS)

When a student's absences from any course or module exceed fourteen (14) consecutive calendar days, excluding holidays and scheduled breaks, the Academic Dean or designee will determine whether the student plans to return to school or has withdrawn. The following guidelines shall be followed: All students who state they will not return to school shall be promptly withdrawn. All students who state they will return must: 1. Attend their next scheduled class session; 2. File an appeal within five (5) calendar days of the violation; 3. Have perfect attendance while the appeal is pending. Any student who has promised to return to school but does not attend the next scheduled class session shall be withdrawn from all courses and dismissed from the College Note: For degree programs, the Consecutive Absence Rule is applied to days missed in a single term. For diploma programs, the consecutive absence rule is applied to days missed in the total program.

PERCENTAGE ABSENCE RULE (DIPLOMA PROGRAMS)

For students who have not previously violated the attendance policy, the following rule shall apply: Percentage 15% of the total classroom hours missed 20% of the total classroom hours missed Action Taken Attendance warning letter sent Withdrawn from the module and dismissed from school

For students who have been dismissed for violating the attendance policy, or would have been dismissed without a successful appeal, the following rule shall apply: Percentage 15% of the remaining classroom hours missed 20% of the remaining classroom hours missed Action Taken Attendance warning letter sent Withdrawn from the module and dismissed from school

PERCENTAGE ABSENCE RULE (QUARTER-BASED PROGRAMS)

For students in quarter-based programs, the following rule shall apply: Percentage 25% of the total hours for all courses in a term 40% of the total hours for all courses in a term Action Taken Attendance warning letter sent Withdrawn from the course and dismissed from school

Note: The Percentage Absence Rule (quarter based programs) does not apply to online programs as attendance is measured on a weekly basis, rather than by classroom hours.

ADD/DROP PERIOD

The first 14 calendar days of each academic quarter are designated as the add/drop period for students in 12week courses in quarter-based programs. This period allows for adjustments to student schedules that may be necessary. This is the period when students may add or delete courses in order to finalize their schedules. Holidays that fall during this timeframe are not counted as part of the add/drop period. Students who wish to make course changes must request approval from their Academic Program Director, the Academic Dean and the Student Finance Office. The student charges for the term will be determined by the classes the student has attended by the end of the second week of the term. There are no charges for classes dropped during the add/drop period. A student who

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attends a class beyond the add/drop period or who attends a class and does not drop it within the add/drop period will be charged for the class. For this reason it is important that students drop classes in a timely manner. Students may drop a degree course through week 11 and will receive a W grade that will be counted as a part of their overall rate of progress. Students whose names appear on the final roster will receive a final grade (week 12). For students enrolled in 6-week courses and/or the mini-term, the first five days of the six-week course/mini-term are considered the add/drop period. Holidays that fall during this timeframe are not counted as part of the add/drop period. There is no add/drop period for students in diploma programs.

DATE OF WITHDRAWAL

When a student is withdrawn for consecutive absences within the term or module, the date of the student's withdrawal shall be the student's last date of attendance (LDA). The LDA is the date that shall be reported on the Student Status Confirmation Report (SSCR). When a student is withdrawn for violating the applicable percentage absence rule, the Date of Withdrawal shall be the date of the violation and shall be reported on the SSCR. Note: The Date of Withdrawal shall be the earlier of a violation of the Consecutive Absence Rule or the Percentage Absence Rule.

DATE OF DETERMINATION (DOD)

The Date of Determination (DOD) shall be the date the College determined the student would not return to class. This is the date used to determine the timeliness of the refund and return to Title IV calculations. The DOD is the earliest of the following three (3) dates: The date the student notifies the College (verbally or in writing) that s/he is not returning to class; The date the student violates the published attendance policy; No later than the fourteenth calendar day after the LDA; scheduled breaks are excluded when calculating the DOD. For students who fail to return after an official Leave of Absence (LOA), the DOD shall be the date the student was scheduled to return to class (for campuses that offer leaves of absence).

ATTENDANCE RECORDS

Schools shall maintain attendance records in computer form for all programs required to take attendance. The computer attendance database is the official record of attendance. The official record may be challenged by filing an attendance appeal within five (5) calendar days following the end of a session. See "Student Academic Appeal Policy." Without an appeal, after the fourteenth calendar day following the end of the session, the computer attendance database shall be considered final. Notwithstanding this requirement, any attendance roster that has been used to verify the accuracy of attendance as part of any audit procedure shall be maintained for eighteen (18) months.

ATTENDANCE POLICY (ON-GROUND)

Attendance in class is critical to a student's academic success. This policy sets standards that provide for dismissal from the college for students whose absences from all classes exceed a set rate. Normally, a student is considered present if s/he is in the assigned classroom for the scheduled amount of time, i.e., neither late for class (tardy) nor leaving before the end of class (leave early). An instructor may consider a student present who does not attend the entire class session if (a) the criteria used to make the determination are stated in the course syllabus and (b) the amount of time missed does not exceed 50% of the class session. A lack of student attendance is a basis for student academic advising or if greater than 40% absences in all classes, dismissal from the college. At the beginning of each course, faculty shall advise students of the following: The policy regarding absences The importance of regular attendance That attendance is required to receive credit for the course.

ATTENDANCE POLICY (ONLINE)

For a student to be counted as present (P) in a given week, the student must complete at least one of the following activities: Complete a unit quiz; Complete a homework assignment; Post at least twice to a relevant class discussion board (either discussion or teamwork). If a student fails to complete at least one of these activities, the student is marked as absent (A).

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ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING PROGRAM

Students in the Nursing program may not be absent for more than (6) days during the entire program. Students may not be absent more than two (2) days per quarter. After two (2) absences in one quarter, the student will be placed on probation for the remainder of the quarter. While on probation, the student must have perfect attendance. Failure to achieve perfect attendance during the probationary period is subject to dismissal from the program. A student dismissed from the program for violation of the Nursing program's attendance policy may file an appeal pursuant to the Appeals Process identified in the catalog. Any absence occurring during a clinical course must be made up.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY (DIPLOMA PROGRAMS ONLY)

Leaves of absence are not available in all programs. Students enrolled in the diploma programs may request a leave of absence (LOA) as long as the leaves do not exceed a total of 180 days during any 12-month period and as long as there are documented, legitimate extenuating circumstances that require a student to interrupt his/her education. Extenuating circumstances include, but are not limited to, jury duty, military obligations, birth or adoption of a child, or serious health condition of the student or a spouse, child or parent. In order for a student to be granted a LOA, the student must submit a completed, signed and dated Leave of Absence Request Form to the Academic Dean. Students requesting an unanticipated leave of absence must submit a Leave of Absence Request Form within 10 days of their last day of attendance (LDA).

RE-ADMISSION FOLLOWING A LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Upon return from leave, the student will be required to repeat the module and receive final grades for the courses from which the student took leave when the courses are next offered in the normal sequence for students in the class into which the student has re-entered. The student will not be charged any fee for the repeat of courses from which the student took leave or for re-entry from the leave of absence. The date the student returns to class is normally scheduled for the beginning of a module. A student may return at any appropriate module, not only the module from which the student withdrew.

FAILURE TO RETURN FROM A LEAVE OF ABSENCE

A student who fails to return from a LOA on or before the date indicated in the written request will be terminated from the program, and the institution will invoke the cancellation/refund policy. As required by federal statute and regulations, the student's last date of attendance prior to the approved LOA will be used in order to determine the amount of funds the institution earned and make any refunds that may be required under federal, state, or institutional policy (see "Cancellation/Refund Policy"). Students who have received federal student loans must be made aware that failure to return from an approved LOA, depending on the length of the LOA, may have an adverse effect on the students' loan repayment schedules. Federal loan programs provide students with a "grace period" that delays the students' obligation to begin repaying their loan debt for six months (180 days) from the last date of attendance. If a student takes a lengthy LOA and fails to return to school after its conclusion, some or all of the grace period may be exhausted--forcing the borrower to begin making repayments immediately.

POSSIBLE EFFECTS OF LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Students who are contemplating a leave of absence should be cautioned that one or more of the following factors may affect their eligibility to graduate within the maximum program completion time: Students returning from a leave of absence are not guaranteed that the module required to maintain the normal progress in their training program will be available at the time of reentry; They may have to wait for the appropriate module to be offered; They may be required to repeat the entire module from which they elected to withdraw prior to receiving a final grade; Financial aid may be affected. When a student returns from a leave of absence and completes the course from which the student withdrew, the hours for which the student receives a passing grade are counted as earned; the grade, hours, and attendance for the original attempt prior to the official leave of absence are not counted for purpose of the rate of progress toward completion calculation, and the original grade is not counted in the CGPA calculation.

WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURES

Students finding it necessary to withdraw from the College are requested to notify the College in writing as to the date and reason for their own withdrawal and to complete all necessary paperwork with the College. Failure to do so will delay out-processing and may result in a delay of any refund that may be due the student or the funding source. Withdrawal from any individual course must be approved by the Academic Dean or designee. Upon withdrawal, grades will be assigned in accordance with the applicable Grading System.

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REENTRY POLICY (ON-GROUND)

Any student withdrawn from the College may petition for reentry. If the student was withdrawn from the College for failure to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), the student may not petition for re-entry until he or she has been out of the College for a full quarter. The application petition must be completed by the student and addressed to the Academic Dean. The petition will be reviewed by the Readmission Committee and approved or rejected depending on attendance, academic and financial history. Students who reenter the College will sign a new Enrollment Agreement and will be subject to the tuition rates and program requirements in effect at the time of reentry. Students may petition to reenter no more than two times unless they receive approval from the Campus President.

REENTRY POLICY (ONLINE)

Withdrawn students requesting reentry must petition the Readmission Committee. Information concerning the readmission procedure may be obtained by calling the student's Student Services Representative. If a student is permitted reentry, the student must normally meet all conditions of the catalog and tuition and fee structure in effect at the time of readmission. The reentry student may petition the Academic Dean for permission to reenter under his or her prior catalog curriculum. The Academic Dean will make the final determination on all such petitions.

EXTERNSHIPS

Some degree and diploma programs include an Externship Program that provides eligible students the opportunity to gain valuable experience in a related environment while earning college credit. Students receive college credit for their participation in the Externship Program. Students in the diploma programs offering an Externship Program should refer to the Student Handbook for externship requirements and contact the Director of Career Services to apply for the program. Externships may or may not provide compensation. Externships are scheduled through interested employers, as they become available. Externships are not offered in all programs and are not available to online students.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

All candidates must make application for graduation with the Registrar one term prior to graduation. To be eligible for graduation, the candidate must fulfill the following requirements: 1. Successfully complete all classes required within the maximum credits that may be attempted; 2. Achieve a 2.0 overall grade point average and have successfully passed all program courses; 3. Return all library books and pay any library fines; 4. Satisfy all financial obligations. All services including but not limited to issuance of any degree or diploma will be withheld pending verification of receipt of payment of all indebtedness to the College; 5. Establish a complete career development file with the Director of Career Services; 6. Evidence of attendance at an exit counseling session; 7. Earn at least 25% of required credits at Everest College Phoenix for all degree programs except the Paralegal program and 50% of required credits for diploma programs; and 8. Submit a Core Learning Portfolio in degree programs. (See "General Education Program" section for details.) Each graduate is encouraged to participate in commencement ceremonies. Students in the ABA-approved Paralegal program at the Phoenix and Mesa campuses must earn a minimum of 40% of the program's major core required and elective courses in residence at Everest College Phoenix.

COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES

Four commencement ceremonies are held each year for Everest College Phoenix graduates, including online graduates, during the spring, summer, fall and winter quarters. All graduates are strongly encouraged to participate in the ceremony.

VETERAN'S EDUCATION BENEFITS PREVIOUS CREDIT FOR VETERANS AFFAIRS BENEFICIARIES

All Veterans Affairs beneficiaries are required to disclose prior postsecondary school attendance and provide copies of transcripts for all postsecondary education and training. Upon enrollment, the College will request and obtain official written records of all previous education and experience, grant credit where appropriate, and advise the Veterans Affairs claimant and the Department of Veterans Affairs in accordance with VA regulations.

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR VETERAN STUDENTS

The Veterans Administration (VA) requires that students receiving funds based on their enrollment in school complete their course of studies in the standard length of the program. In order to meet this requirement, students must attend class on a regular basis. The VA requires that it be notified when a veteran student receives any type of

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probation or warning related to failure to attend. Such notification may result in the termination of veteran benefits. All attendance warnings or dismissals of students funded through the VA shall be reported to the VA by the certifying official for the College.

VETERANS' LEAVE OF ABSENCE (DIPLOMA PROGRAMS ONLY)

A student may be granted no more than one leave of absence for a minimum period of 60 days. A written request must be made in advance or the absence will be considered unexcused. VA will be notified immediately when a veteran student is granted leave.

MAKE-UP ASSIGNMENTS

Make up work and assignments may not be certified for veteran students for Veterans Administration pay purposes.

MAXIMUM TIME FRAME FOR VETERAN STUDENTS

The maximum time frame for veteran students to receive veteran benefits is the standard length of the program, not time and a half. Students funded by the Veterans Administration must complete their programs within the program's standard time frame in order to receive veteran benefits. A veteran student may not be funded for benefits following the standard program length.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR STUDENTS RECEIVING VETERANS AFFAIRS BENEFITS

A veteran student who fails to meet the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress as stated in the institutional policy is automatically placed on academic probation for one grading period. Any change in enrollment status, including when a veteran is placed on academic probation, changes schedules, or terminates or is dismissed from training, will be reported to the Veterans Administration. The College retains documentation of probation in a student's file. Students on academic probation may be required to participate in tutoring sessions outside class hours as a condition to continued enrollment. At the end of a probationary period, a student's progress is re-evaluated. If the student has met minimum standards for satisfactory academic progress and any written conditions of probation that may have been required, the student is removed from probation and returned to regular student status. A veteran who fails to regain satisfactory academic progress status after one grading period will be treated as all other students under the institutional policy described above, with one exception. A veteran who fails to meet satisfactory academic progress status following one grading period on probation will be reported to the Veterans Administration, and his or her benefits will be terminated.

VETERANS REINSTATEMENT AFTER SUCCESSFUL APPEAL OF TERMINATION

A student who successfully appeals termination from the College due to failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress may be reinstated. A reinstated student enters under an extended probationary period. This probationary period will extend for one grading period, after which a student must meet minimum standards of satisfactory progress to remain in school. The Department of Veterans Administration will determine whether or not to resume payments of Veterans Administration education benefits to a reinstated student.

APPEALS POLICY STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEALS POLICY

Academic appeals include those appeals related to final grades, attendance violations, and academic or financial aid eligibility. All formal academic appeals must be submitted in writing on an Academic Appeal Form to the Academic Dean within five (5) calendar days of the date the student has notice of the adverse academic decision. The appeal must include: The specific academic decision at issue; The date of the decision; The reason(s) the student believes the decision was incorrect; The informal steps taken to resolve the disagreement over the decision; The resolution sought. The written appeal may be accompanied by any additional documentation (e.g., papers, doctor notes, tests, syllabi) the student believes supports the conclusion that the academic decision was incorrect. Note: Once a formal appeal is filed, no action based on the adverse academic decision may be taken until the appeal process is complete. However, in cases involving financial aid eligibility, all financial aid disbursements shall be suspended until the matter is resolved. Within five (5) calendar days of receiving the Academic Appeal Form, the Academic Dean shall convene an Appeal Committee, which should normally include the Department Chair, a member of the Student Services Staff,

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and a faculty member from another program. The Appeal Committee shall investigate the facts of the matter to the extent deemed appropriate under the circumstances. The Appeal Committee shall render a written decision within five (5) calendar days of the date the appeal was received by the Academic Dean and shall forward the decision to the student and the instructor within five (5) calendar days thereafter. Copies of all documents relating to the appeal shall be placed in the student's academic file, and the decision of the Appeal Committee shall be noted in the official student information system. The decision of the Appeal Committee is final, and no further appeals are permitted. Note: When an appeal is denied, the date of any suspension of financial aid or dismissal from the program shall be the date of the adverse academic decision. The student will not be charged for any attendance after the date of the adverse academic decision.

ASSIGNMENT/TEST GRADES

Students who disagree with an assignment/test grade should discuss it with the instructor upon receipt of the grade. Assignments/test grades are reviewed at the instructor's discretion. If the instructor is not available, the matter should be discussed with the Academic Program Director. Only final course grades are eligible for appeal.

FINAL COURSE GRADES

Appeals of final course grades must be made within five (5) calendar day of the date the grade becomes final. The Academic Dean may direct a grade to be changed only when it is determined through the appeal process that a final grade was influenced by any of the following: 1. A personal bias or arbitrary rationale; 2. Standards unreasonably different from those that were applied to other students; 3. A substantial, unreasonable, or unannounced departure from previously articulated standards; 4. The result of a clear and material mistake in calculating or recording grades or academic progress.

ATTENDANCE VIOLATIONS

Appeals of attendance violations must be made within five (5) calendar days of the violation. In order for an attendance appeal to be considered, the student must: 1. Have perfect attendance while the appeal is pending; 2. Submit a written plan to improve attendance with the Appeal Form. Provided that no applicable state requirement would be violated by doing so, an attendance appeal may be granted if the student demonstrates that the absence was caused by: 1. The death of a family member; 2. An illness or injury suffered by the student; 3. Special circumstances of an unusual nature that are not likely to recur. The Appeal Committee may, as a condition of granting the appeal, require the student to make up missed class time or assignments, place the student on probation and require the student to develop an Academic Advising Plan in conjunction with his/her advisor.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) APPEALS

SAP appeals must be made within five (5) calendar days of the date the student was notified of the violation. The student is deemed to have notice of the pending dismissal as of the date of the dismissal letter. Provided that the student can complete the program within the maximum time frame with the required minimum CGPA, a SAP appeal may be granted if the student demonstrates that sincere commitment to taking the steps required to succeed in the program and that failure to maintain the required CGPA or ROP was caused by any of the following mitigating circumstances: 1. The death of a family member; 2. An illness or injury suffered by the student; 3. Special circumstances of an unusual nature that are not likely to recur. The Appeal Committee shall, as a condition of granting the appeal, require the student to develop an Academic Advising Plan in conjunction with the advisor, and place the student on probation.

STUDENT FINANCE

The tuition and fees schedule can be found in Appendix B: Tuition and Fees in this catalog.

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL OBLIGATION

A student who has applied, is accepted, and has begun classes at Everest College Phoenix assumes a definite financial obligation. Each student is legally responsible for his or her own educational expenses for the period of enrollment. A student who is enrolled and has made payments in full or completed other financial arrangements and is current with those obligations, is entitled to all the privileges of attending classes, taking examinations, receiving

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grade reports, securing course credit, being graduated, and using the Career Services Office. Any student who is delinquent in a financial obligation to the school, or any educational financial obligation to any third party, including damage to school property, library fines, and payment of tuition and fees, is subject to exclusion from any or all of the usual privileges of the school. Everest College Phoenix may, in its sole discretion, take disciplinary action on this basis, including suspension or termination of enrollment.

TUITION AND FEES

The student's total tuition for a given quarter is determined by multiplying the number of quarter credit hours for which the student is registered at the end of the add/drop period by the then current tuition rate for that number of quarter credit hours. Arrangements for payment of tuition and book charges (if applicable) must be made in advance of the first day of classes for each term in which the student is enrolled. The College charges the student's tuition account for tuition at the beginning of each term in which the student is enrolled. Diploma programs are offered throughout the year on a schedule independent of the standard quarter calendar. When a student begins enrollment in a diploma program, the student is charged for tuition by academic year, instead of by quarter. Detailed in Appendix B are other educational expenses considered in determining the student's cost of attendance and information on how those costs were arrived. These include personal expenses, room and board, and transportation.

TUITION AND FEES (ONLINE)

Tuition for online programs will be charged on a per-quarter basis. The tuition and fees listed in Appendix B will be charged for the student's first quarter (or mid-term quarter start) in attendance. Tuition and fees for subsequent quarters will be charged at the published rate in effect at the beginning of that quarter.

CASH INSTALLMENT PAYMENTS

All students are expected to make cash payments for the academic year or term that will be set up by the Student Finance Office. Students are required to sign a promissory note and must make payments within 10 days of billing.

FULL-TIME STATUS

Full-time status is defined as at least 12 quarter credit hours per academic term. Subject to approval by their Academic Program Director, the Academic Dean and the Financial Aid Office, students may be able to take more than 12 quarter credit hours per academic term and in doing so, may complete their program in a shorter period of time.

BOOKSTORE (PHOENIX AND MESA CAMPUSES)

Textbooks and workbooks are sold through the bookstore in accordance with official College policies. At the time of issuance, textbooks become the responsibility of the students. The College is not responsible for replacing lost textbooks. Students may purchase replacements from the campus bookstore. Students are responsible for the cost of their textbooks and associated shipping charges.

TEXTBOOKS (ONLINE)

Textbooks and workbooks for online courses are included in the cost of the course and are shipped directly to the student.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS AND FINANCIAL AID

A student must meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress in order to remain eligible to continue receiving financial assistance as well as to remain eligible to continue as a student of the College. Student Financial Services will provide details to all eligible recipients. Students should read these standards carefully and refer any questions to Academic or Student Financial Services personnel. Satisfactory academic progress for purposes of determining continuing federal financial assistance is determined by applying the CGPA requirements, rate of progress requirements, maximum completion time restrictions, probation provisions, suspension and dismissal procedures, and appeals procedures as outlined in the satisfactory academic progress section of the catalog. Students on academic probation are considered to be maintaining satisfactory academic progress and are eligible to continue receiving federal financial assistance. Students who have been academically suspended or dismissed are no longer active students of the College and are ineligible for financial aid. Reinstatement of financial aid eligibility will occur only after re-admittance following suspension or in the event the student's appeal results in readmittance.

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BUYER'S RIGHT TO CANCEL

The applicant's signature on the Enrollment Agreement does not constitute admission into The School until the student has been accepted for admission by an official of The School. If the applicant is not accepted by The School, all monies paid will be refunded pursuant to the Institutional Refund Policy. The applicant may also request cancellation in writing after signing the Enrollment Agreement and receive a full refund of all monies paid, if the written request is submitted to The School within three (3) days, excluding Saturday, Sunday, and state and federal holidays, following the signing of the Enrollment Agreement. Applicants who have not visited The School prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three business days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of The School facilities and inspection of equipment where training and services are provided. Cancellation will occur when the student gives a signed and dated written notice of cancellation to the Director of Admissions or Campus President at the address shown on the Enrollment Agreement. The written notice of cancellation need not take any particular form, and, however expressed, is effective if signed and dated by the student and if it states that the student no longer wishes to be bound by the Enrollment Agreement. A notice of cancellation may be given by mail, hand delivery or telegram. The notice of cancellation, if sent by mail, is effective when deposited in the mail, properly addressed, with postage prepaid.

OFFICIAL WITHDRAWALS

An official withdrawal is considered to have occurred on the earlier of a) the date that the student provides to The School official notification of his or her intent to withdraw or b) the date that the student begins the withdrawal process. Students who must withdraw from The School are requested to notify the office of the Academic Dean/ Director of Education by telephone, in person, or in writing, to provide official notification of their intent to withdraw. Students will be asked to provide the official date of withdrawal and the reason for withdrawal in writing at the time of official notification. When the student begins the process of withdrawal, the student or the office of the Academic Dean/Director of Education will complete the necessary form(s). Quarter-based Programs: After the cancellation period, students in quarter-based programs who officially withdraw from The School prior to the end of The School's official add/drop period will be dropped from enrollment, and all monies paid will be refunded pursuant to applicable refund policies in this catalog. Modular Programs: Although there is no add/drop period in modular programs, for students who officially withdraw within the first five class days (or for weekend classes within seven calendar days from the date they started class, including the day they started class), all monies paid will be refunded pursuant to applicable refund policies in this catalog.

DATE OF WITHDRAWAL VERSUS DATE OF DETERMINATION (DOD)

The date of withdrawal, for purposes of calculating a refund, is the student's last date of attendance. The date of determination is the earlier of the date the student officially withdraws or the date The School determines the student has violated an academic standard. For example, when a student is withdrawn for violating an academic rule, the date of the student's withdrawal shall be the student's last date of attendance. The date of determination shall be the date The School determines the student has violated the academic rule, if the student has not filed an appeal. If the student files an appeal and the appeal is denied, the date of determination is the date the appeal is denied. If the student ceases attendance without providing official notification, the DOD shall be no more than 14 days from the student's last date of attendance.

FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID REFUND POLICY STUDENT FINANCIAL AID (SFA)

The School is certified by the U.S. Department of Education as an eligible participant in the Federal Student Financial Aid (SFA) programs established under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA), as amended (Title IV programs). The School is required to determine earned and unearned portions of Title IV aid for students who cancel, withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term.

RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS CALCULATION AND POLICY

The Return of Title IV Funds calculation (Return calculation) is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following calculation: Percentage of payment period or term completed = the number of days completed up to the withdrawal date divided by the total days in the payment period or term. (Any break of five days or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This percentage is also the percentage of earned aid. Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of unearned aid using the following formula: Aid to be returned = (100% of the aid that could be disbursed minus the percentage of earned aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed during the payment period or term. The School must return the lesser of:

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1. The amount of Title IV program funds that the student did not earn; or 2. The amount of institutional charges that the student incurred for the payment period or period of enrollment multiplied by the percentage of funds that were not earned. The student (or parent, if a Federal PLUS loan) must return or repay the amount by which the original overpayment amount exceeds 50% of the total grant funds received by the student for the payment period or period of enrollment, if the grant overpayment is greater than $50. (Note: If the student cannot repay the grant overpayment in full, the student must make satisfactory arrangements with the U.S. Department of Education to repay any outstanding grant balances. The Student Financial Aid Department will be available to advise the student in the event that a student repayment obligation exists. The individual will be ineligible to receive additional student financial assistance in the future if the financial obligation(s) is not satisfied.) The School must return the Title IV funds for which it is responsible in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford loans (other than PLUS loans) 2. Subsidized Direct Stafford loans 3. Federal Perkins loans 4. Direct PLUS loans 5. Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds is required 6. Academic Competitiveness Grants for which a return of funds is required 7. National Smart Grants for which a return of funds is required 8. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) for which a return of funds is required If a student withdraws after the 60% point-in-time, the student has earned all Title IV funds that he/she was scheduled to receive during the period and, thus, has no unearned funds; however, The School must still perform a Return calculation. If the student earned more aid than was disbursed to him/her, the institution would owe the student a post-withdrawal disbursement, which must be paid within 180 days of the DOD. If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, The School would be required to return a portion of the funds, and the student would be required to return a portion of the funds. Any outstanding student loans that remain are to be repaid by the student according to the terms of the student's promissory notes. After a Return calculation has been made and a state/institutional refund policy, if applicable, has been applied, any resulting credit balance (i.e. earned Title IV funds exceed institutional charges) must be paid within 14 days from the date that The School performs the Return calculation and will be paid in one of the following manners: 1. Pay authorized charges at the institution; 2. With the student's permission, reduce the student's Title IV loan debt (not limited to the student's loan debt for the period of enrollment); 3. Return to the student.

TIMEFRAME WITHIN WHICH INSTITUTION IS TO RETURN UNEARNED TITLE IV FUNDS

The School must return the amount of unearned Title IV funds for which it is responsible within 45 days after the DOD.

EFFECT OF LEAVES OF ABSENCE ON RETURNS

If a student does not return from an approved leave of absence on the date indicated on the written request, the withdrawal date is the student's last day of attendance. For more information, see the Leave of Absence section in The School catalog.

REFUND POLICY INSTITUTIONAL REFUND CALCULATION FOR FIRST-TIME STUDENTS

The College will perform a pro-rata refund calculation for students who terminate their training before completing more than 60 percent of the period of enrollment. Under a pro-rata refund calculation, the College is entitled to retain only the percentage of charges (tuition, fees, room, board, etc.) proportional to the period of enrollment completed by the student. The period of enrollment completed by the student is calculated by dividing the total number of weeks in the period of enrollment into the number of weeks completed in that period (as of the withdrawal date). The percentage of weeks attended is rounded up to the nearest 10 percent and multiplied by the College charges for the period of enrollment. A reasonable administrative fee not to exceed $100 or 5% of the total institutional charges, whichever is less, will be excluded from total charges used to calculate the pro-rata refund. The College may retain the entire contract price for the period of enrollment--including tuition, fees, and other charges--if the student terminates the training after completing more than 60 percent of the period of enrollment. Diploma Students Please Note: Since students enrolled in diploma programs are charged tuition by academic year, the charges earned and amount due under the institutional refund policy is based on the charges for the portion of the academic year completed, rather than on the portion of the quarter completed.

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INSTITUTIONAL REFUND POLICY FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS IN QUARTER-BASED PROGRAMS

Continuing students in quarter-based programs will receive a pro-rata refund according to the following schedule, based on the percentage of the period of enrollment completed by the students as calculated above and rounded up to the nearest 10%.

A Student Who Withdraws or Is Terminated During the institutional add/drop period After the institutional add/drop period up through and including 10% of the period After 10% up to and including 20% of the period After 20% up to and including 50% of the period After 50% of the period Is entitled to a Refund of... 100% 90% 50% 25% 0 The Institution is Eligible to Retain... 0 10% 50% 75% 100%

TEXTBOOK AND EQUIPMENT RETURN/REFUND POLICY

A student who was charged for and paid for textbooks, uniforms, or equipment may return the unmarked textbooks, unworn uniforms, or new equipment within 30 days following the date of the student's cancellation, termination, or withdrawal. The School shall then refund the charges paid by the student pursuant to institutional policy. Uniforms that have been worn cannot be returned because of health and sanitary reasons. If the student fails to return unmarked textbooks, unworn uniforms or new equipment within 30 days, the institution may retain the cost of the items that has been paid by the student. The student may then retain the equipment without further financial obligation to The School.

EFFECT OF LEAVES OF ABSENCE ON REFUNDS

If a student does not return from an approved leave of absence (when applicable) on the date indicated on the written request, monies will be refunded. The refund calculation will be based on the student's last date of attendance. The DOD is the date the student was scheduled to return.

TIMEFRAME WITHIN WHICH INSTITUTION IS TO ISSUE REFUNDS

Refunds will be issued within 30 days after the DOD, unless federal or state requirements provide for a shorter time period that is more favorable to the student.

STUDENTS CALLED TO ACTIVE MILITARY DUTY NEWLY ADMITTED STUDENTS

Students who are newly admitted to the school and are called to active military duty prior to the first day of class in their first term/module shall receive a full refund of all tuition and fees paid. Textbook and equipment charges shall be refunded to the student upon return of the textbooks/unused equipment to the school.

CONTINUING STUDENTS

Continuing students called to active military duty are entitled to the following: · If tuition and fees are collected in advance of the withdrawal, a strict pro rata refund of any tuition, fees, or other charges paid by the student for the program and a cancellation of any unpaid tuition, fees, or other charges owed by the student for the portion of the program the student does not complete following withdrawal for active military service ("WZ").

CONTINUING MODULAR DIPLOMA STUDENTS

Continuing modular diploma students who have completed 50% or less of their program are entitled to a full refund of tuition, fees, and other charges paid. Such students who have completed more than 50% of their program are entitled to a strict pro rata refund.

STUDENT FINANCING OPTIONS

The College offers a variety of student financing options to help students finance their educational costs. Detailed information regarding financing options available and the Financial Aid process can be obtained from the College's Student Financial Planning Brochure. Information regarding other sources of financial assistance such as benefits available through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Veterans Assistance and State Programs can be obtained through those agencies.

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STUDENT ELIGIBILITY

To receive financial assistance you must: 1. usually, have financial need; 2. be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen; 3. have a social security number; 4. if male, be registered with the Selective Service; 5. if currently attending school, be making satisfactory academic progress; 6. be enrolled as a regular student in any of the College's eligible programs; 7. not be in default on any federally-guaranteed loan; 8. have a high school diploma or its equivalent, have completed homeschooling at the postsecondary level, or have satisfactorily completed six credits of college work that are applicable to a degree or certificate offered by the school.

FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS

The following is a description of the Federal Financial Aid Programs available at the College. Additional information regarding these programs, eligibility requirements, the financial aid process and disbursement of aid can be obtained through the College's Student Financial Planning Brochure, the College's Student Finance Office, and the U.S. Department of Education's Guide to Federal Student Aid, which provides a detailed description of these programs. The guide is available online at: http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/student_guide/index.html Federal Pell Grant Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Federal Work Study (FWS) Federal Stafford Loans (FSL) Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) Federal Stafford Direct Loans (DL) Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

ALTERNATIVE LOAN PROGRAMS

If a student's primary financing option does not fully cover his or her program costs, alternative financing options can help bridge that financial gap. Private loan programs are convenient, affordable and easy to use. There are alternative loans provided by private lenders. The interest rate is variable and the loan approved and origination fees are based on credit. Repayment terms may vary based on lender programs. Student may apply on their own or with a co-borrower. Please see one of the Student Finance Planners for further information.

SCHOLARSHIPS DREAM AWARD PROGRAM AND SCHOLARSHIPS

Graduates of any Corinthian Colleges, Inc. (CCi) school may be nominated for the CCi-sponsored Dream Award program. Scholarship awards must be used within two years of the award and they are not transferable nor can they be exchanged for cash. Campus Dream Award: Each campus will nominate one recent graduate from the campus to represent the campus in the award competition. Nominations are accepted from April 1 to June 30 each year. Selection of the nominee is based on a review of recent graduates within the past three years by the Campus Selection Committee. The selected nominee should be a graduate whose life story could have gone in any direction, but whose decision to attend a CCi school was a turning point for them. The selected nominee should be an inspiration and motivation to other students. Each Campus Dream Award recipient will receive: 1. A scholarship worth $2,500 that may be used at any CCi campus for training that is more advanced than the one from which the nominee has graduated, and 2. A trophy. Corinthian Dream Award: Following the close of the nomination period for the Campus Dream Award, the Corinthian Dream Award recipient will be selected from the campus nominees by the Corinthian Colleges Selection Committee, composed of the Executive Management Team of CCi. The award will be given to the nominee with the most compelling story and highest level of achievement. The award will be announced to the winner by the end of August and will be presented at the October CCi Presidents Meeting. The award will include:

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A full scholarship that may be used at any CCi campus for training that is more advanced than the program from which the recipient has graduated, 2. An all expenses paid trip to the October Presidents Meeting, 3. A trophy, 4. A letter of recognition from the CCi CEO and COO, and 5. A nomination to the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities (APSCU) Great Award. Additional information regarding this award and scholarship program may be requested from the Campus President.

1.

IMAGINE AMERICA SCHOLARSHIPS

This institution participates in the Imagine America Scholarship Program operated by the Career Training Foundation of Washington D.C. Imagine America scholarship certificates must be given to the Financial Aid Office prior to class commencement, are non-transferable and cannot be exchanged for cash. Scholarship certificates will be accepted until the end of the year in which they are awarded.

YELLOW RIBBON PROGRAM/POST-9/11 VETERANS EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE ACT SCHOLARSHIP

The Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement Program (Yellow Ribbon Program) is a provision of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. Everest College Phoenix Mesa Branch is an active participant in this program which helps students to fund their educational pursuits. Everest College Phoenix Mesa Branch has voluntarily entered into an agreement with VA to fund tuition expenses that exceed the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition rate. Everest College Phoenix Mesa Branch will sponsor up to 25 veterans in this program awarding $1000 scholarship for each veteran that is eligible to participate in the program whose tuition expenses exceed the amount awarded by the Veterans Administration under the normal program provisions. These awards will be granted on a first come, first served basis per academic year. A participating student will be required to maintain satisfactory progress, conduct, and attendance.

ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY SCHOLARSHIPS (EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX ONLINE ONLY)

Military personnel serving in components of the Armed Forces, which include the US Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Activated Guard/Reserve and US Coast Guard, Military spouses of active military personnel serving in components of the Armed Forces, which include the US Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Guard/Reserve and US Coast Guard, and Veterans using VA Education Benefits are eligible to apply for the Military Scholarship. The scholarship includes a quarterly tuition stipend applied as a credit to the student's account. Scholarship funds are set at the beginning of each fiscal year and are awarded on a continuing basis until funds for the fiscal year are depleted. Scholarship awards may not exceed 50% of tuition charged for the term. The scholarship is non-transferrable and non-substitutable and cannot be combined with any other program. The scholarship or program with the greatest benefit to the student will be applied. Applications may be requested from the Admissions Office. Eligibility: Applicants must meet entrance requirements for program of study. Applicants must be an US military member (or be a dependant spouse), and provide proof by submitting a copy of official military documentation (valid military ID card, Leave and Earnings Statement, DD214) prior to the start of the term. The scholarship may be renewed from quarter to quarter so long as the recipient remains enrolled, maintains satisfactory academic progress, and maintains a 2.50 cumulative grade point average. Payment Schedule: Member Status US Military ­ Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Activated National Guard, and Reservists Military Spouse- spouses of active duty military personnel serving in components of the Armed Forces, which include the US Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and US Coast Guard Veteran- veterans using VA education benefits Amount 50% Tuition credit 50% Tuition credit

15% tuition credit

ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES

STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION

Everest College Phoenix does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual

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orientation, national origin, citizenship status, gender identity or status, veteran or marital status in the administration of its educational and admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, or other school-administered programs. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, Everest College Phoenix provides qualified applicants and students who have disabilities with reasonable accommodations that do not impose undue hardship.

STUDENT DISABILITY SERVICES/ACCOMMODATIONS

Everest College Phoenix provides equal educational opportunities for qualified students with disabilities in accordance with applicable state and federal laws and regulations, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Applicants or students with disabilities that wish to request disability services/accommodations must make a request to the Campus Disability Coordinator or the Campus President and provide current and comprehensive documentation of a diagnosed disability which requires accommodation and adequate information on the functional impact of the disability so that effective accommodations can be identified. Pursuant to federal law, students with disabilities are considered on a case by case basis and the College reserves the right to request additional documentation or evaluation as may be warranted. Students with disabilities that request disability services/accommodations will receive a written response to their request. Accommodation determinations may be appealed pursuant to the student grievance/complaint procedure as outlined in the Student Grievance/Complaint Policy section of this catalog.

CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT

The Code of Student Conduct applies at all times to all students. As used in this Code, a student is any individual who has been accepted or is enrolled in school. Student status lasts until an individual graduates, is withdrawn, or is otherwise not in attendance for more than 180 consecutive calendar days. Everest College Phoenix seeks to create an environment that promotes integrity, academic achievement, and personal responsibility. All schools should be free from violence, threats and intimidation, and the rights, opportunities, and welfare of students must be protected at all times. To this end, this Code sets forth the standards of behavior expected of students as well as the process that must be followed when a student is accused of violating those standards. Reasonable deviations from the procedures contained herein will not invalidate a decision or proceeding unless, in the sole discretion of the school, the deviation(s) significantly prejudice the student. The Campus President (or designee) is responsible for appropriately recording and enforcing the outcome of all disciplinary matters.

CONDUCT AFFECTING THE SAFETY OF THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY

Everest College Phoenix reserves the right to take all necessary and appropriate action to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community. The Campus President (or designee) may immediately suspend any student whose conduct threatens the health and/or safety of any person(s) or property. The suspension shall remain in effect until the matter is resolved through the disciplinary process. Such conduct includes, but is not limited to: Possessing alcohol or other intoxicants, drugs, firearms, explosives, weapons, dangerous devices, or dangerous chemicals on school premises Theft Vandalism or misuse of school or another's property Harassment or intimidation of others Endangerment, assault, or infliction of physical harm.

OTHER PROHIBITED CONDUCT

Additionally, disciplinary action may be initiated against any student based upon reasonable suspicion that the student committed or attempted to commit, or assisted in the commission of any of the following prohibited forms of conduct: Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty Forgery, falsification, alteration or misuse of documents, funds, or property Any disruptive or obstructive actions, including: The use of cell phones or other electronic devices for voice or text communication in the classroom, unless permitted by the instructor The inappropriate use of electronic or other devices designed to make an audio, video, or photographic record of any person without his/her prior knowledge and effective consent while on school premises Failure to comply with school policies or directives Any other action(s) that interfere with the learning environment or the rights of others Violations of local, state, provincial, or federal law. Note: This list is not exhaustive, but rather offers examples of unacceptable behavior that may result in disciplinary action.

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LIMITATIONS ON STUDENTS WITH PENDING DISCIPLINARY MATTERS

Any student with a pending disciplinary matter shall not be allowed to: Enroll or attend classes at another Everest College Phoenix location (including Online) Graduate or participate in graduation ceremonies Engage in any other activities proscribed by the Campus President. Additionally, if a student withdraws from school at any point during the disciplinary process, the student is not eligible for readmission to any Everest College Phoenix campus (including Online) prior to resolving the outstanding disciplinary issue.

INQUIRY BY THE CAMPUS PRESIDENT

If the Campus President (or designee), in his or her sole discretion, has reason to believe that a student has violated the Code of Student Conduct, the Campus President (or designee) shall conduct a reasonable inquiry and determine an appropriate course of action. If the Campus President (or designee) determines that a violation has not occurred, no further action shall be taken.

CONDUCT WHICH DOES NOT WARRANT A SUSPENSION OR DISMISSAL

If the Campus President (or designee), in his or her sole discretion, determines that the student's behavior may have violated this Code but does not warrant a suspension or dismissal, the Campus President (or designee) shall promptly provide the student with a written warning. Multiple written warnings may result in suspension or dismissal.

CONDUCT WHICH WARRANTS A SUSPENSION OR DISMISSAL

If the Campus President (or designee), in his or her sole discretion, determines that the student's behavior warrants suspension or dismissal, the Campus President (or designee) shall promptly provide the student with a written notice of the following: The conduct for which the sanction is being imposed The specific sanction being imposed The right to appeal if a written request is filed by the student within (5) calendar days of the date of the written notice.

ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE STATEMENT

Everest College Phoenix does not permit or condone the use or possession of marijuana, alcohol or any other illegal drug, narcotic, or controlled substance by students. Possession of these substances on campus is cause for dismissal.

STUDENT USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES POLICY

IT resources may only be used for legitimate purposes, and may not be used for any other purpose which is illegal, unethical, dishonest, damaging to the reputation of the school or likely to subject the school to liability. Impermissible uses include, but are not limited to: Harassment Libel or slander Fraud or misrepresentation Any use that violates local, state, or federal law and regulation Disruption or unauthorized monitoring of electronic communications Disruption or unauthorized changes to the configuration of antivirus software or any other security monitoring software Unauthorized copying, downloading, file sharing, or transmission of copyright-protected material, including music Violations of licensing agreements Accessing another person's account without permission Introducing computer viruses, worms, Trojan Horses, or other programs that are harmful to computer systems, computers, or software The use of restricted access computer resources or electronic information without or beyond a user's level of authorization Providing information about or lists of CCi users or students to parties outside CCi without expressed written permission Downloading or storing company or student private information on portable computers or mobile storage devices Making computing resources available to any person or entity not affiliated with the school Posting, downloading, viewing, or sending obscene, pornographic, sexually explicit, hate related, or other offensive material

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Academic dishonesty as defined in the Code of Student Conduct Use of CCi logos, trademarks, or copyrights without prior approval Use for private business or commercial purposes.

COPYRIGHT POLICY

It is the intention of Everest College Phoenix to strictly enforce a policy of zero tolerance for copyright violations and to comply with all applicable laws and regulations. Any student who engages in the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing, is subject to sanctions under the Code of Student Conduct. Additionally, a person found to have committed a copyright violation may be liable for up to $150,000 for each separate act of infringement, and may be subject to criminal prosecution. A person may be held liable even if he or she was unaware that they were violating the law.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

Everest College Phoenix strives to provide and maintain an environment free of all forms of harassment. Behavior toward any student by a member of the staff, faculty, or student body that constitutes unwelcome sexual advances will be dealt with quickly and vigorously and will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Any student who believes that he or she is a victim of sexual harassment should immediately notify the office of the Campus President. The Campus President will conduct an investigation of all allegations. Information surrounding all complaints will be documented and kept strictly confidential.

CONDUCT SANCTIONS

Sanctions should be commensurate with the nature of the student's conduct. All sanctions imposed should be designed to discourage the student from engaging in future misconduct and whenever possible should draw upon educational resources to bring about a lasting and reasoned change in behavior. Suspension ­ A sanction by which the student is not allowed to attend class for a specific period of time. Satisfactory completion of certain conditions may be required prior to the student's return at the end of the suspension period. During a period of suspension, a student shall not be admitted to any other Everest College Phoenix campus. Note: Student absences resulting from a suspension shall remain in the attendance record regardless of the outcome of any disciplinary investigation or the decision of the Student Conduct Committee. Dismissal ­ A sanction by which the student is withdrawn from school. Such students may only reapply for admission with the approval of the Campus President. Students dismissed for violations of this Code remain responsible for any outstanding balance owed to the school.

APPEAL PROCESS

Students are entitled to appeal any conduct sanction that results in suspension or dismissal. The appeal must be in writing and filed within five (5) calendar days of the date of the written notice. If the student files a timely appeal, the Campus President (or designee) shall convene a Student Conduct Committee to conduct the hearing. The Committee shall generally include the Campus President, the Academic Dean, a Program or Department Chair, the Student Services Coordinator, or a faculty member. The members of the Committee shall select a Chair. The Committee Chair shall timely schedule a hearing date, and provide written notice to the student. The notice must be mailed or otherwise delivered to the student at least two (2) calendar days prior to the scheduled hearing date, and include notice that the student may: Appear in person, but is not required to appear Submit a written statement Respond to evidence and question the statements of others Present testimony from relevant witnesses Submit notarized written statements from relevant witnesses. Attendance at the hearing is limited to those directly involved or those requested to appear. Hearings are not open to the public and are not recorded. The Student Conduct Committee shall: Provide the student a full and reasonable opportunity to explain his/her conduct Invite relevant witnesses to testify or submit signed statements Reach a decision based upon the information submitted prior to the hearing and the testimony and information of the student and witnesses at the hearing. If the student fails to appear, the Committee may proceed in the student's absence and the decision will have the same force and effect as if the student had been present The Student Conduct Committee shall issue a written decision to the student within five (5) calendar days of the date of the hearing which may: Affirm the finding and sanction imposed for suspension or dismissal. Affirm the finding and modify the sanction Sanctions may only be reduced if found to be grossly disproportionate to the offense.

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Disagree with the previous finding and sanction and dismiss the matter A matter may be dismissed only if the original finding is found to be arbitrary and capricious. The decision of the Student Conduct Committee is final, and no further appeal is permitted.

RECORD OF DISCIPLINARY MATTER

All disciplinary files shall be kept separate from the student academic files until resolved. Disciplinary files for students who have violated the Code of Student Conduct shall be retained as part of the student's academic file and considered "education records" as appropriate, pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). When circumstances warrant, disciplinary matters shall be referred to the appropriate law enforcement authorities for investigation and prosecution. Additionally, disciplinary records may be reported to third parties as applicable (e.g. Veteran's Affairs).

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE ON-GROUND CAMPUSES

In the event a student feels his/her rights have been violated, the following procedures should be followed: 1. The student must first try to resolve the issue with the College staff or faculty member involved. 2. If the matter is not resolved, the student should schedule a meeting with his/her Academic Program Director. 3. If the matter is still not resolved, the student should reschedule a meeting with the Academic Dean. If the matter is still not resolved, the student should request in writing through the Academic Dean a grievance hearing that will give him/her an opportunity to present his/her position and supporting documentation. A Grievance Committee is selected by the Academic Dean and is comprised of five (5) disinterested persons from the faculty and administration, plus the Academic Dean (as a non-voter). The Provost may also be a member of the Committee. After the hearing, the committee shall make a decision by a simple majority vote and communicate, in writing, the decision to the Academic Dean. The Academic Dean will notify the student of the resolution of the grievance.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE/COMPLAINT PROCEDURE (ONLINE)

In the event a student feels his/her rights have been violated, the following procedures should be followed if you are a student from Alabama, Kansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Utah or Wyoming. 1. The student must first try to resolve the issue with the College staff or faculty member involved. 2. If the matter is not resolved, the student should schedule a telephone meeting with the Online Site Director for non-academic issues and the Online APD for academic issues. Toll free number 1-800-921-8640. 3. If the matter is still not resolved, the student should request in writing or via email through the Online Academic Program Director for academic issues or the Online Site Director for non-academic issues a grievance hearing that will give him/her an opportunity to present his/her position and supporting documentation. This hearing will be conducted by telephone. A Grievance Committee is selected by the Online Academic Program Director for academic issues, and the Online Site Director for non-academic issues, and is comprised of five (5) disinterested persons from the faculty and administration, plus the Academic Program Director/Site Director (as a non-voter). The Provost or the Chief Operating Officer may also be a member of the Committee. After the hearing, the committee shall make a decision by a simple majority vote and communicate, in writing, the decision to the Online Academic Program Director/Online Site Director, whichever is appropriate. The student will be notified the student of the resolution of the grievance. Individuals other than active students who may wish to lodge a complaint against the College are required to follow the steps below: 1. The individual must first try to resolve the issue of concern with the staff or faculty member involved. 2. If the matter is not resolved, the individual should schedule a meeting with the Online Student Services Representative. 3. If the matter is still not resolved, the individual should request in writing a telephone meeting with the Academic Dean in which he/she will be given an opportunity to present his/her position and supporting documentation, if applicable. After review and consideration of the issues, the Academic Dean will notify the complainant of the decision. Students who feel that the college has not adequately addressed a grievance or complaint may file a complaint with the state's licensure agency at the following mailing address: Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education 135 South Union Street Montgomery, AL 36104-4340 P.O. Box 302130, Montgomery, AL 36130-2130 Phone: 334.293.4500 | Fax: 334.293.4504 Alabama Commission on Higher Education 100 North Union Street Montgomery, AL 36104-3758 Telephone: (334) 242-1998 Fax: (334) 242-0268

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Kansas Board of Regents 1000 SW Jackson, Suite 520 Topeka, KS 66612-1368 785.296.4917 Topeka, KS 66612-1368 Tel 785.296.3421 | fax 785.296.0983 Oregon Office of Degree Authorization 1500 Valley River Drive Suite 100 Eugene, OR 97401 (541) 687-7478 Wyoming Department of Education 2300 Capitol Avenue Hathaway Building, 2nd Floor Cheyenne, WY 82002-0050 (307) 777-7690 (307) 777-6234 fax

Minnesota Office of Higher Education 1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 350 St. Paul, MN 55108-5227 Phone: (651) 642-0567 Toll Free: (800) 657-3866 Fax: (651) 642-0675 Utah Division of Consumer Protection 160 East 300 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 Phone: 801-530-6601 Toll-Free: 1-800-721-SAFE Fax: 801-530-6001

IF YOU ARE A RESIDENT OF ARKANSAS, THE FOLLOWING GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE WOULD APPLY: Arkansas Department of Higher Education (ADHE) requires the certified institution to make a decision on the student grievance following the institution's public policy. Inquiries into student grievances must be limited to Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board certified (under Arkansas Code § 6-61-301) courses/degree programs and institutions and to matters related to the criteria for certification. Within 20 days of completing the institution's grievance procedures, the student may file the complaint in writing with the ICAC Coordinator, Arkansas Department of Higher Education, 114 East Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201. The grievant must provide a statement from the institution verifying that the institution's appeal process has been followed. ADHE will notify the institution of the grievance within 15 days of the filing. Within 10 days after ADHE notification, the institution must submit a written response to ADHE. Other action may be taken by ADHE as needed. ICAC Coordinator Arkansas Department of Higher Education 114 East Capitol Little Rock, AR 72201 http://www.adhe.edu/Pages/home.aspx IF YOU ARE A RESIDENT OF ARIZONA, THE FOLLOWING GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE WOULD APPLY: A. If a student has a complaint against a licensed institution or program and exhausts all available grievance procedures established by the institution, the student may file a written complaint with the Board. A complaint must be filed within three years of the student's last date of attendance. B. The Board's staff shall investigate the complaint. Upon completion of Board staff's investigation, the complaint shall be referred to the Complaint Committee for a review and recommendation to the Board. C. After a review of the student complaint, the Complaint Committee shall: 1. Determine that the student complaint needs further investigation. Based upon the outcome of the investigation, the complaint may be re-heard by the Complaint Committee or referred to the Board; 2. Determine that the student complaint does not demonstrate that a violation of statute or rule occurred and recommend to the Board that the complaint be dismissed; or 3. Determine that the complaint demonstrates that a violation of statute or rule occurred and send a report of its findings and recommendation to the Board. D. Upon receipt of the Complaint Committee's findings and recommendation, the Board shall affirm, reverse, adopt, modify, supplement, amend, or reject the report, in whole or in part, and determine there are reasonable grounds that the complaint demonstrates a violation of Board statutes and rules. E. If the Board determines there are reasonable grounds to believe that the complaint demonstrates a violation of Board statute or rules, the Board shall set the matter for hearing under A.R.S. § 41-1092 et seq.

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Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education 1400 West Washington, Room 260 Phoenix, Arizona 85007 (602) 542-5709 http://azppse.state.az.us IF YOU ARE A RESIDENT OF COLORADO, THE FOLLOWING GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE WOULD APPLY: Complaints or claims pursuant to Section 12-59-118, C.R.S. or Section 12-59-115(6)(a), C.R.S, may be filed in writing with the Board within two years after the student discontinues his or her training at the school, or at any time prior to the commencement of training. Other complaints may be filed in writing with the Board within two years of the date the alleged injury and its cause were known or should have been known. Division of Private Occupational Schools (DPOS) 1560 Broadway, Suite 1600 Denver, Colorado 80202 Phone: 303-866-2723 FAX: 303-866-4237 http://highered.colorado.gov/dpos/ Students may also consider contacting the College's accrediting agency: All complaints submitted to the agency must be in written form. Directions for formatting the grievance are found on the Higher Learning Commission's website. Information is as follows: The Higher Learning Commission 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500 · Chicago, IL 60604 http://www.ncahlc.org

DRESS CODE

Students must adhere to the campus dress code standards and are expected to dress in a manner that would not be construed as detrimental to the student body, the educational process or wear any clothing which has expressed or implied offensive symbols or language. Students should always be cognizant of the first impression of proper dress code and grooming, and note that Everest College Phoenix promotes a business atmosphere where instructors and guests are professionals and potential employers. In addition, students may be required to wear uniforms that present a professional appearance.

NOTIFICATION OF RIGHT UNDER FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include: 1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the institution receives a request for access. A student should submit to the Registrar's Office a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar, the Registrar shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the institution to amend a record should write to the Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the institution decides not to amend the record as requested, the institution will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student's right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to provide written consent before the institution discloses personally identifiable information from the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The institution discloses education records without a student's prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person

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employed by the institution in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the institution has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of using institution employees or officials (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving the institution in an advisory capacity; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the institution. Upon request, the institution also discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. From time to time the institution publishes communications, such as graduation and honor roll lists that include students' names and programs of study. A student who wishes not to be included should put that request in writing to the Registrar. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202

ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPTS, DEGREES, AND DIPLOMAS

All student academic records are retained, secured, and disposed of in accordance with local, state, and federal regulations. Everest College Phoenix maintains complete records for each student, including grades, attendance, prior education and training, and awards received. Student academic transcripts are available upon written request by the student. Student records may be released only to the student or his/her designee as directed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Transcript and diploma requests must be made in writing to the Office of the Registrar. Official transcripts will be released to students who are current with their financial obligation to the school. Diplomas will be released to students who are current with their financial obligation upon completion of their school program.

CAMPUS SECURITY AND CRIME AWARENESS POLICIES

As required by Public Law 101-542, as amended by Public Law 102-325, Title II, Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, Section 294, Policy and Statistical Disclosures, Everest College Phoenix has established policies regarding campus security. Everest College Phoenix strives to provide its students with a secure and safe environment. Classrooms and laboratories comply with the requirements of the various federal, state and local building codes, with the Board of Health and Fire Marshal regulations. Most campuses are equipped with alarm systems to prevent unauthorized entry. Facilities are opened each morning and closed each evening by administrative personnel. Everest College Phoenix encourages all students to report criminal incidents or other emergencies, which occur on the campus directly to the Campus President, student advisor or instructor. The Campus President is responsible for investigating such reports and taking legal or other action deemed necessary by the situation. In extreme emergencies, the Campus President may immediately contact law enforcement officers or other agency personnel, such as paramedics. Everest College Phoenix will work with local and state law enforcement personnel if such involvement is necessary. A copy of the student's report and any resultant police report will be maintained by the school for a minimum of three years after the incident. Students are responsible for their own security and safety both on-campus and off-campus and must be considerate of the security and safety of others. The school has no responsibility or obligation for any personal belongings that are lost, stolen or damaged, whether on or off school premises or during any school activities. On May 17, 1996, the President of the United States signed Megan's Law into federal law. As a result, local law enforcement agencies in all 50 states must notify schools, day care centers, and parents about the presence of dangerous offenders in their area. Students are advised that the best source of information on the registered sex offenders in the community is the local sheriff's office or police department. The following link will provide you with a list of the most recent updated online information regarding registered sex offenders by state and county: http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cid/cac/registry.htm

DRUG AWARENESS

The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, Public Law 101-226, requires institutions receiving financial assistance to implement and enforce drug prevention programs and policies. Students shall receive a copy

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of the Drug-Free Schools/Drug-Free Workplace Annual Disclosure upon enrollment, and thereafter no later than January 31st of each calendar year they are enrolled. The information and referral line that directs callers to treatment centers in the local community is available through Student Services. Everest College Phoenix prohibits the manufacture and unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol by students on its property and at any school activity. If students suspect someone to be under the influence of any drug or alcohol, they should immediately bring this concern to the attention of the Academic Dean or Campus President. Violation of the institution's anti-drug policy will result in appropriate disciplinary actions and may include expulsion of the student. The appropriate law enforcement authorities may also be notified. In certain cases, students may be referred to counseling sources or substance abuse centers. If such a referral is made, continued enrollment is subject to successful completion of any prescribed counseling or treatment program.

STATISTICAL INFORMATION

Everest College Phoenix is required to report to students the occurrence of various criminal offenses on an annual basis. On or before October 1st of each year, the school will distribute a security report to students containing the required statistical information on campus crimes committed during the previous three years. A copy of this report is available to prospective students upon request.

CAMPUS COMPLETION RATE REPORTS

Under the Student Right to Know Act (20 U.S.C. § 1092(a)), Everest College Phoenix is required to annually prepare completion or graduation rate data respecting the institution's first-time, full-time undergraduate students (34 CFR 668.45(a)(1)). The College is required to make this completion or graduation rate data readily available to students approximately 12 months after the 150% point for program completion or graduation for a particular cohort of students. This completion rate report is available to students and prospective students upon request.

STUDENT SERVICES

HEALTH SERVICES

Everest College Phoenix maintains first aid supplies for minor injuries that may occur while students are in school. Students who have a medical history of illness requiring special attention are asked to notify the Student Success Coordinator during registration and include the name of the preferred physician, hospital, or clinic. The College does not charge a medical insurance fee and is not responsible for the payment of personal hospital bills or physicians' charges.

HOUSING (ON-GROUND STUDENTS ONLY)

Everest College Phoenix does not have housing facilities for the students; however, living quarters are available throughout the Phoenix metropolitan area.

STUDENT ADVISING

Academic advising is coordinated by the Academic Dean and includes satisfactory academic progress, attendance, and personal matters. The Registrar and Academic Program Directors serve as advisors and assist students in course selection and registration, dropping and adding courses, change of major, and meeting graduation requirements.

EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX CARE PROGRAM

The Everest College Phoenix CARE Student Assistance Program is a free personal-support program for our students and their families. This program provides enrolled students direct and confidential access to professional counseling. For more information, please visit the website http://www.everestcares.com or call (888) 852-6238.

PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE

Everest College Phoenix maintains an active Career Services Office to assist graduates in locating entry-level, educationally related career opportunities. The Career Services Department works directly with business, industry, and advisory board members to assist all students with access to the marketplace. The College does not, in any way, guarantee employment. It is the goal of the Career Services Department to help all students realize a high degree of personal and professional development and successful employment. Specific information on job opportunities and basic criteria applicable to all students and graduates utilizing placement services is available in the Career Services Office.

33

PROGRAMS BY LOCATION

PROGRAM Accounting Business Business Administration Business Administration Degree Completion Option Criminal Investigations Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Degree Completion Option Medical Assistant Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Nursing Paralegal CREDENTIAL Associate in Applied Science Degree Associate in Applied Science Degree Bachelor of Science Degree Bachelor of Science Degree Associate in Applied Science Degree Associate in Applied Science Degree Bachelor of Science Degree Bachelor of Science Degree Diploma Diploma Associate in Applied Science Degree Associate in Applied Science Degree PHOENIX MESA ONLINE

34

ACCOUNTING

Associate in Applied Science Degree Phoenix, Mesa and Online 24 months ­ 96 quarter credit hours V1 Accounting is the language of business and accounting procedures, and records are the basic ingredients that provide students with a broad and diverse background in professional accounting, making a variety of entry-level positions in business, industry, and governmental accounting fields available to graduates of this program. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College.

Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 2.0

Course Code Course Title COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS SLS 1105 Strategies for Success CGS 2167C Computer Applications SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) COLLEGE CORE ELECTIVE(S) - Choose one four quarter credit hour course or two (2) quarter credit hour courses from the following: OST 1141L Keyboarding* LIS 2004 Introduction to Internet Research OST 2335 Business Communications MTB 1103 Business Mathematics CGS 2510C Applied Spreadsheets TOTAL COLLEGE CORE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS APA 2111 Principles of Accounting I APA 2121 Principles of Accounting II APA 2161 Introductory Cost/Managerial Accounting ACG 2021 Introduction to Corporate Accounting APA 2141 Computerized Accounting ACO 1806 Payroll Accounting ACG 2551 Non-Profit Accounting TAX 2000 Tax Accounting MAN 1030 Introduction to Business (previously known as Introduction to Business Enterprise) BUL 2131 Applied Business Law APA 2929 Accounting Capstone Course TOTAL MAJOR CORE REQUIRED QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE ELECTIVES - Choose two (2) courses from the following: CGS 2510C Applied Spreadsheets FIN 1103 Introduction to Finance ACG 2178 Financial Statement Analysis MAN 2021 Principles of Management TOTAL MAJOR CORE ELECTIVE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ENC 1101 Composition I ENC 1102 Composition II MAT 1033 College Algebra PSY 2012 General Psychology or POS 2041 American National Government SPC 2017 Oral Communications** AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature or AMH 2030 20th Century American History or WOH 2022 World History* EVS 1001 Environmental Science SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) MAT 0099 Fundamental Mathematics ENG 0099 Fundamental English

2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 14.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 44.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 8.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 30.0 4.0 4.0

35

Course Code Course Title COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 96.0

*This class is available only on-ground. **Online students will take SPCP 2300 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication in place of SPC 2017.

36

BUSINESS

Associate in Applied Science Degree Phoenix, Mesa and Online 24 months ­ 96 quarter credit hours V1

The Associate in Applied Science programs are offered for those students whose career goals require a broad knowledge of the functional areas of business. All students will take coursework in the areas of accounting, general business, management, marketing, human resources, computer applications, and business law. In addition, students will choose an area of concentration that will comprise the balance of the courses in the major. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College. The following describes each area of concentration. Business Administration - The Business Administration concentration focuses on the structure, function, and procedures of standard business operations. The program prepares students for a variety of entry-level positions in areas such as sales, office supervision, and small business management. Management - The Management concentration focuses on the fundamental business management principles utilized by today's businesses. The graduate of this program will be prepared for entry-level positions in supervisory roles in business, industry and government. Marketing (Online only) - The concentration in Marketing (offered online only) is designed to provide students with a basic marketing background to prepare for entry-level positions in business, industry, and government.

Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 14.0

Course Code Course Title COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS SLS 1105 Strategies for Success CGS 2167C Computer Applications SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) COLLEGE CORE ELECTIVE(S) Choose one four (4) quarter credit hour course from the following: OST 1141L Keyboarding* MTB 1103 Business Math OST 2335 Business Communications LIS 2004 Introduction to Internet Research CGS 2501C Applied Word Processing CGS 2510C Applied Spreadsheets TOTAL COLLEGE CORE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS

MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS: ALL CONCENTRATIONS MAN 1030 Introduction to Business (previously known as Introduction to Business Enterprise) 4.0 MAN 2021 Principles of Management 4.0 BUL 2131 Applied Business Law 4.0 MAN 2300 Introduction to Human Resources 4.0 MAR 1011 Introduction to Marketing 4.0 APA 2111 Principles of Accounting I 4.0 APA 2121 Principles of Accounting II 4.0 BUS 2929 Business Capstone Course 4.0 TOTAL CORE REQUIRED QUARTER CREDIT HOURS 32.0 MAJOR CORE CONCENTRATION ­ Choose one (1) of concentration: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS: FIN 1103 Introduction to Finance 4.0 MAN 2727 Strategic Planning for Business 4.0 MAR 2305 Customer Relations and Servicing 4.0 BUISINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE ELECTIVES - Choose two (2) of the following courses: ACG 2178 Financial Statement Analysis 4.0 ACG 2021 Introduction to Corporate Accounting 4.0 SBM 2000 Small Business Management 4.0 APA 2161 Introductory Cost/Managerial Accounting 4.0 20.0 TOTAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS OR MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS:

37

MAR 2305 Customer Relations and Servicing FIN 1103 Introduction to Finance SBM 2000 Small Business Management MAN 1733 Management Today MAN 2604 Introduction to International Management TOTAL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS OR MARKETING CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS (Online only): MAR 2320 Advertising MAR 2141 Introduction to International Marketing MAR 2720 Marketing on the Internet MAR 2305 Customer Relations and Servicing SBM 2000 Small Business Management TOTAL MARKETING CONCENTRATION MAJOR CORE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ENC 1101 Composition I ENC 1102 Composition II MAT 1033 College Algebra PSY 2012 General Psychology or POS 2041 American National Government SPC 2017 Oral Communications** AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature or AMH 2030 20th Century American History or WOH 2022 World History* EVS 1001 Environmental Science SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) ENG 0099 Fundamental English MAT 0099 Fundamental Math RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 20.0

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 20.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 30.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 96.0

*This class is available online on-ground. **Online students will take SPCP 2300 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication in place of SPC 2017.

38

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bachelor of Science Degree Phoenix and Online 48 months ­ 192 quarter credit hours V1 The Business Administration Bachelor of Science program is designed to prepare graduates for employment in middle management positions in business, industry, or government. The program is designed to expose students to management planning, policy and leadership skills within both national and global environments. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College.

Course Code Course Title COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS SLS 1105 Strategies for Success CGS 2167C Computer Applications SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) COLLEGE CORE ELECTIVES - Choose eight (8) quarter credit hours from the following: OST 1141L* Keyboarding MTB 1103 Business Mathematics OST 2335 Business Communications LIS 2004 Introduction to Internet Research CGS 2501C Applied Word Processing CGS 2510C Applied Spreadsheets SLS 1354 Workplace Relationships TOTAL COLLEGE CORE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS MAN 1030 Introduction to Business (previously Introduction to Business Enterprise) MAN 2021 Principles of Management MAN 3450 Production and Operations Management MAN 3554 Workplace Continuity & Contingency Planning MAN 4701 Business Ethics LDR 4734 Leadership MAN 4764 Business Policy and Strategy BUL 2131 Applied Business Law MAN 2300 Introduction to Human Resources MAR 1011 Introduction to Marketing APA 2111 Principles of Accounting I APA 2121 Principles of Accounting II APA 2161 Introductory Cost/Managerial Accounting FIN 1103 Introduction to Finance FIN 3005 Principles of Finance FIN 3501 Investments MAN 2727 Strategic Planning for Business GEB 4361 Management of International Business MAR 2305 Customer Relations and Servicing MAR 3310 Public Relations SBM 2000 Small Business Management BCC 4949 Business Capstone Course TOTAL MAJOR CORE REQUIRED QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE ELECTIVES - Choose five (5) courses from the following: ACG 2021 Introduction to Corporate Accounting ACG 2178 Financial Statement Analysis GEB 4363 Import/Export Management MAN 1733 Management Today MAN 2604 Introduction to International Management MAN 3100 Human Relations in Management MAN 4400 Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining MAR 2320 Advertising MAR 3156 Global Marketing MAR 3231 Retailing MAR 3400 Salesmanship Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 18.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 88.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

39

MAR MAR BUL

Consumer Behavior E-Commerce International Business Law TOTAL MAJOR CORE ELECTIVE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS AMH 2030 20th Century American History CPO 4004 Global Politics ECO 3028 Microeconomics ECO 3007 Macroeconomics ENC 1101 Composition I ENC 1102 Composition II ENC 3211 Report Writing POS 2041 American National Government MAT 1033 College Algebra PSY 2012 General Psychology or POS 2041 American National Government SPC 2017 Oral Communications** SOP 4005 Social Psychology AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature or WOH 2022 World History*** STA 2014 Statistics SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology or POS 2041 American National Government EVS 1001 Environmental Science SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) ENG 0099 Fundamental English MAT 0099 Fundamental Math RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION *OST 1141L is available only at the Phoenix and Mesa on-ground campuses. **Online students will take SPCP 2300 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication in place of SPC 2017. ***On-ground students may substitute WOH 2022 World History for AML 2000.

3503 4011 2261

4.0 4.0 4.0 20.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 66.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 192.0

40

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE COMPLETION OPTION

Bachelor of Science Degree Phoenix and Online 24 months (minimum) ­ 192 quarter credit hours (minus Associate degree transfer credits) V2 The Bachelor of Science Business Administration integrates the technical knowledge gained through an applied science degree with coursework designed to prepare the student for leadership roles in their chosen field. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College. Students who have completed an accredited Associate's degree program (recognized by the Department of Education as seen at www.chea.org) will receive 50 major core transfer credits. The remainder of the transcript will be evaluated to determine appropriate transfer credits. The maximum number of Associate Degree transferrable credits will be 96. Degree Completion Requirements: The Business Administration degree completion option is comprised of 192 quarter credit hour credits transferred in from your accredited Associate's Degree program. The Business Administration degree major core section composed of 84 credits focuses on the knowledge and skills required by today's business professionals. A 58 credit General Education component that provides students in this field of study with a broad perspective on the social and ethical issues related to business administration. Students may complete the requirements for the degree through a combination of transfer credit, coursework taken through the College, credit earned through the submission of an experiential learning portfolio, and credit by exam. Upon admittance to the program, the student will work with an Academic Advisor or Program Director to develop an approved plan to complete all requirements for the degree within the required time limits. This plan will be periodically evaluated and updated by the student and the Academic Advisor or Program Director. Students admitted to program: Must complete the degree requirements as described below. Credits Requirements for Degree: Students must complete a minimum of 192 credits in the major core, general education, and elective categories, with at least 60 credits taken in the upper division. See information below. Communications (minimum of 12 credits) o Must include ENC 1101, ENC 1102 o May include ENC 3211, SPC 2300, SPC 2017 Humanities (minimum of 8 credits) o Must include SLS 1505 o May include AML 2000, AMH 2030, POS 2041, WOH 2022 Social Sciences (minimum of 12 credits) o May include SYG 2000, SOP 4005, CPO 4004, AMH 2030, POS 2041, ECO 1021, ECO 3007, ECO 3028, DEP2000 PSY2012, WOH 2022 Mathematics (minimum of 8 credits) o Must include MAT 1033 (or higher) o Must include: STA 2014 Science (minimum 4 credits) o May include EVS 1001

Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

Course Code Course Title MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS APA 2111 Principles of Accounting I APA 2121 Principles of Accounting II FIN 1103 Introduction to Finance ACG 2021 Introduction to Corporate Accounting MAN 1030 Introduction to Business (previously Introduction to Business Enterprise) MAN 2021 Principles of Management MAR 1011 Introduction to Marketing SBM 2000 Small Business Management FIN 3005 Principles of Finance LDR 4734 Leadership MAN 3100 Human Relations in Management MAN 3554 Workplace Continuity & Contingency Planning MAN 4302 Management of Human Resources MAN 4701 Business Ethics MAR 3310 Public Relations

41

BCC

Business Capstone Course TOTAL MAJOR CORE REQUIRED QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE ELECTIVES - Choose five (5) courses from the following: ACG 2178 Financial Statement Analysis BUL 2131 Applied Business Law BUL 2261 International Business Law FIN 3501 Investments GEB 4363 Import/Export Management MAN 1733 Management Today MAN 2300 Introduction to Human Resources MAN 2604 Introduction to International Management MAN 3450 Production and Operations Management MAN 4400 Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining MAN 4764 Business Policy and Strategy MAR 2305 Customer Relations and Servicing MAR 2320 Advertising MAR 3156 Global Marketing MAR 3231 Retailing MAR 3400 Salesmanship MAR 3500 Consumer Behavior MAR 4011 E-Commerce TOTAL MAJOR CORE ELECTIVE QUARTER CREDIT HOURS TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATE DEGREE TRANSFER CREDIT/REQUIREMENTS TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

4949

4.0 64.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 20.0 58.0 50.0 192.0

42

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS

Associate in Applied Science Degree Phoenix, Mesa and Online 24 months ­ 96 quarter credit hours V1 The Criminal Investigations associate degree program provides understanding of the theoretical and scientific aspects of the investigative process. The program prepares graduates for entry-level career opportunities in law enforcement, private investigations, and/or security as evidence and crime technicians. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College.

Course Code Course Title COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS SLS 1105 Strategies for Success SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) CGS 2167C Computer Applications TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS CJE 1640 Criminalistics I CJE 1641 Criminalistics II CJE 2673 Graphics & Documentation I CJE 2602 Graphics & Documentation II CJE 2671 Fingerprints Classification & Latents I CJE 2672 Fingerprints Classification & Latents II CJE 1770 Crime Scene Photography I CJE 1772 Crime Scene Photography II CJE 2676 Biological Evidence I CJE 2682 Biological Evidence II CJE 2929 Criminal Investigations Capstone Course TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS Students will select 8 additional credits from following courses: CJE 2640 Crime Scene Dynamics I CJE 2679 Crime Scene Dynamics II CJE 2690 Technology Crimes I CJE 2691 Technology Crimes II CJL 2614 Collecting and Presenting Audio & Visual Evidence CCJ 2358 Criminal Justice Communications TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS ENC 1101 Composition I ENC 1102 Composition II SPC 2017 Oral Communications* SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology or POS 2041 American National Government MAT 1033 College Algebra PSY 2012 General Psychology or POS 2041 American National Government SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature or AMH 2030 20th Century American History or WOH 2022 World History** EVS 1001 Environmental Science or TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) ENG 0099 Fundamental English MAT 0099 Fundamental Math RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 2.0 4.0 10.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 44.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 8.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 96.0

* Online students will take SPCP 2300 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication in place of SPC 2017. ** Offered on-ground only

43

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Associate in Applied Science Degree Phoenix, Mesa and Online 24 months ­ 96 quarter credit hours V1 The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College.

Course Code Course Title COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS SLS 1105 Strategies for Success SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) CGS 2167C Computer Applications TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS CCJ 2002 Criminal Law CCJ 1017 Criminology CCJ 1020 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJL 2130 Criminal Evidence CJL 2134 Criminal Procedure and the Constitution CJE 1600 Criminal Investigations CCJ 2358 Criminal Justice Communications CJC 2000 Introduction to Corrections CJE 2580 Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations DSC 2002 Introduction to Terrorism CCJ 2929 Criminal Justice Capstone Course TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS Associate degree students will take 8.0 quarter credit hours from the following courses: CCJ 2501 Juvenile Justice CJE 2100 Policing in America CCJ 2288 Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional* CCJ 2679 Introduction to Victims Advocacy CCJ 2943 Current Issues in Criminal Justice CJE 2670 Introduction to Forensics CCJ 1910 Career Choices in Criminal Justice TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS ENC 1101 Composition I ENC 1102 Composition II SPC 2017 Oral Communications** SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology or POS 2041 American National Government MAT 1033 College Algebra PSY 2012 General Psychology or POS 2041 American National Government SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature or AMH 2030 20th Century American History or WOH 2022 World History*** EVS 1001 Environmental Science or TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) ENG 0099 Fundamental English MAT 0099 Fundamental Math RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

*CCJ 2288 is available only at the Phoenix and Mesa on-ground campuses. **Online students will take SPCP 2300 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication in place of SPC 2017. ***Offered on-ground only.

Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 2.0 4.0 10.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 44.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 8.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 96.0

44

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Bachelor of Science Degree Phoenix, Mesa and Online 48 months ­ 192 quarter credit hours V1

The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College. The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice enhances the study of the criminal justice system and expands into areas such as gang activity, drug operations, and criminal justice management. Graduates are prepared for entry-level and middle management positions in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The Criminal justice programs are not training programs for law enforcement officers.

Course Code Course COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS SLS 1105 Strategies for Success SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) CGS 2167C Computer Applications TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS CCJ 2002 Criminal Law CCJ 1017 Criminology CCJ 1020 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJL 2130 Criminal Evidence CJL 2134 Criminal Procedure and the Constitution CJE 1600 Criminal Investigations CCJ 2358 Criminal Justice Communications CJC 2000 Introduction to Corrections CJE 2580 Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations DSC 2002 Introduction to Terrorism CCJ 2501 Juvenile Justice CJE 2673 Graphics & Documentation I CCJ 3450 Criminal Justice Management CCJ 4127 Criminal Justice in the Community CCJ 4656 Gang Activity and Drug Operations CCJ 2250 Constitutional Law for the Criminal Justice Professional CCJ 3334 Alternatives to Incarceration CCJ 4400 Criminal Justice Senior Capstone Experience DSC 3214 Catastrophic Event Response Planning TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS Complete 44.0 credits from the following courses: CJE 2100 Policing in America CCJ 2288 Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional CCJ 2679 Introduction to Victims Advocacy CCJ 2943 Current Issues in Criminal Justice CJE 2670 Introduction to Forensics CCJ 1910 Career Choices in Criminal Justice CJE 4668 Computer Crime CCJ 4129 Cultural Diversity for Criminal Justice Professionals CJL 3215 Concepts of Criminal Law INV 3100 Theoretical Aspects of Conspiracy Investigations SCC 3004 Private Investigations I INV 3300 Methodology of Economic Crime TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS Complete courses as specified Communications ENC 1101 Composition I ENC 1102 Composition II Quarter Credit Hours 4.0 2.0 4.0 10.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 76.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 44.0

4.0 4.0

45

SPC 2017 Oral Communications* ENC 3211 Report Writing Humanities Students must complete SLS 1505 and 4 additional credits SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature or AMH 2030 20th Century American History or WOH 2022 World History Social Sciences CCJ 3675 Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice CCJ 3666 Victimology CCJ 4054 Criminal Justice Ethics and Liability Social Science Electives Students complete 16 credits AMH 2030 20th Century American History SOP 4005 Social Psychology CPO 4004 Global Politics SLS 3130 Principles and Applications of Adult Learning ECO 3007 Macroeconomics ECO 3028 Microeconomics SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology or POS 2041 American National Government PSY 2012 General Psychology or POS 2041 American National Government WOH 2022 World History** Mathematics MAT 1033 College Algebra STA 2014 Statistics Science EVS 1001 Environmental Science or TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) ENG 0099 Fundamental English MAT 0099 Fundamental Math RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

4.0 4.0

16.0

2.0 4.0 6.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

12.0

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 16.0

8.0 4.0 62.0

4.0 4.0 4.0 192.0

* Online students will take SPCP 2300 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication in place of SPC 2017. **Offered on-ground only

46

CRIMINAL JUSTICE, BS DEGREE COMPLETION OPTION

Bachelor of Science Degree Phoenix, Mesa and Online 24 months (minimum) ­ 192 quarter credit hours (minus Associates degree transfer credits) V1 The Criminal Justice program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and prepares graduates for entry-level career opportunities in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College. The Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice enhances the study of the criminal justice system and expands into areas such as gang activity, drug operations, and criminal justice management. Graduates are prepared for entry-level and middle management positions in probation, corrections, immigration, law enforcement, and/or security. The Criminal justice programs are not training programs for law enforcement officers. Students who have completed an accredited Associate's degree program (recognized by the Department of Education as seen at www.chea.org) will receive 50 major core transfer credits. The remainder of the transcript will be evaluated to determine appropriate transfer credits. The maximum number of Associate Degree transferrable credits will be 96. Degree Completion Requirements: The Criminal Justice degree completion option is comprised of 192 quarter credit hours minus the credits transferred in from your accredited Associate's Degree program. The major core section composed of 80 credits focuses on the knowledge and skills required by today's criminal justice professionals. A 16-quarter-credit-hour General Education component provides students in this field of study with a broad perspective on the social and ethical issues related to criminal justice. Students may complete the requirements for the degree through a combination of transfer credit, coursework taken through the College, credit earned through the submission of an experiential learning portfolio, and credit by exam. Upon admittance to the program, the student will work with an Academic Advisor to develop an approved plan to complete all requirements for the degree within the required time limits. This plan will be periodically evaluated and updated by the student and Academic Advisor. Students admitted to program: Must complete the degree requirements as described below. Credits Requirements for Degree: Students must complete a minimum of 192 credits in the major core, general education, and elective categories, with at least 60 credits taken in the upper division. See information below. Communications, 16 credits o Must include ENC 1101, ENC 1102 o Communications Elective (8 credits): may include SPC 2017*, SPC 2300, ENC 3211 Humanities, 8 credits o Must include SLS 1505 o Humanities Elective (4 credits): may include AML 2000, WOH 2022*, AMH 2030 Social Sciences, 12 credits o Social Sciences Electives: may include SYG 2000, PSY 2012, SOP 4005, CPO 4004, AMH 2030, POS 2041, ECO 3007, ECO 3028, WOH 2022*, Mathematics, 8 credits o Must include MAT 1033 (or higher) o Mathematics Elective (4 credits): may include STA 2014 Science and Technology, 4 credits o Science and Technology Elective: EVS 1001 *Classes offered only on-ground. Elective Requirements: Students may fulfill the balance of the credit requirements for the degree by completing up to 50 credits in the electives category.

Course Code MAJOR CORE Lower division CCJ 1020 CJL 2134 CJE 1600 CJL 2130 CJC 2000 CJE 2580 DSC 2002 Course Title Quarter Credit Hours

Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal Procedure and the Constitution Criminal Investigations Criminal Evidence Introduction to Corrections Introduction to Interviews and Interrogation Introduction to Terrorism

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

47

CCJ 2358 Criminal Justice Communications Major Core Lower Division: Upper division CCJ 3450 Criminal Justice Management CCJ 4127 Criminal Justice in the Community CCJ 4656 Gang Activity and Drug Ops CCJ 3334 Alternatives to Incarceration DSC 3214 Catastrophic Event Response CJE 4668 Computer Crime CJL 3215 Concepts of Criminal Law CCJ 4129 Cultural Diversity for the Criminal Justice Professional CCJ 4400 Criminal Justice Senior Capstone Experience INV 3100 Theoretical Aspects of Conspiracy Investigations SCC 3004 Private Investigation I INV 3300 Methodology of Economic Crimes Major Core Upper Division: TOTAL MAJOR CORE CREDIT HOURS: GENERAL EDUCATION SLS 3130 Principles and Applications of Adult Learning CCJ 3675 Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice CCJ 3666 Victimology CCJ 4054 Criminal Justice Ethics and Liability General Education: ASSOCIATE DEGREE TRANSFER CREDITS/ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS: TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FOR DEGREE COMPLETION:

4.0 32.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 48.0 80.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 16.0 96.0 192.0

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MEDICAL ASSISTANT

Diploma Program Phoenix and Mesa 8 months ­ 720 hours - 47 quarter credit hours V1

The Medical Assistant program (diploma) is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as medical assistants in a variety of health care settings. Students study the structure and function of the major body systems in conjunction with medical terminology, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, computer skills, administrative processes, bookkeeping and accounting practices, and the processing of medical insurance forms and claims. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College. The Medical Assistant diploma program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as medical assistants in a variety of health care settings. Students learn the structure and function of the major body systems in conjunction with medical terminology, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, computer skills, administrative processes, bookkeeping and accounting practices, and the processing of medical insurance forms and claims. In recent years, the Medical Assistant profession has become indispensable to the health care field. Physicians have become more reliant on medical assistants for their front and back office skills, and their services are being sought by medical offices, and ambulatory care providers, clinics, urgent care centers and insurance providers. This diploma program prepares graduates to fill entry-level positions such as clinical or administrative assistant, medical receptionist, and medical insurance biller. This program is divided into eight learning units called modules. The first seven modules, A through G, are classroom modules. Each stands alone as a unit of study and is not dependent upon the completion of any previous or subsequent module. If students do not complete any portion of a module, the entire module must be repeated. Students may enter the program in any of the seven modules and continue through these modules until all have been completed. Following the successful completion of the first seven modules, A through G, students participate in a 160-hour externship. Completion of the Medical Assistant diploma program is acknowledged by the awarding of a diploma. The goal of the Medical Assistant diploma program is to prepare competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains required and necessary to prepare them for entry level positions such as clinical or administrative assistant, medical receptionist, and medical insurance biller. Students study the structure and function of the major body systems in conjunction with medical terminology, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, computer skills, administrative processes, bookkeeping and accounting practices, and the processing of medical insurance forms and claims. Upon successful completion of this program, the graduate will be able to: Demonstrate professionalism and ethical behavior. Discuss the history of Medical Assistant as it relates to medical practice and professional organizations. Recognize and respond to verbal and non-verbal communication, and use appropriate communication techniques. Demonstrate knowledge of and use appropriate terminology for the different body systems, illnesses and injuries associated with those systems, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Apply principles of infection control and use appropriate aseptic technique. Perform clinical responsibilities, including preparing patients for examination and procedures, preparing and administering medications as directed, collecting and processing specimens, recognizing emergencies, and performing CPR and first aid. Identify minor surgical procedures and demonstrate the ability to assist with those procedures. Instruct and teach patients methods of health promotion and disease prevention. Maintain accurate patient records. Perform administrative procedures that include telephone techniques, appointment scheduling, record management, and insurance billing procedures. Demonstrate skills related to word processing, medical transcription, the processing of insurance claims, and simulated computerized medical office applications. Implement current procedural and diagnostic coding. Accurately complete bookkeeping, banking, and financial procedures. Demonstrate acceptable speed and accuracy in computer keyboarding. Develop a resume and identify a career plan that includes potential job leads, networking contacts, a job search schedule, and five year goals.

Course Number Module A Module B Course Title Patient Care and Communication Clinical Assisting and Pharmacology Total Clock Hours 80 80 Quarter Credit Hours 6.0 6.0

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Module C Module D Module E Module F Module G Module X

Medical Insurance, Bookkeeping and Health Sciences Cardiopulmonary and Electrocardiography Laboratory Procedures Endocrinology and Reproduction Medical Law, Ethics, and Psychology Externship Program Total

80 80 80 80 80 160 720

6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 5.0 47.0

MODULE A - Patient Care and Communication 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module A emphasizes patient care, including examinations and procedures related to the eyes and ears, the nervous system, and the integumentary system. Students will have an opportunity to work with and review patient charts and perform front office skills related to records management, appointment scheduling, and bookkeeping. Students gain skills in communication (verbal and nonverbal) when working with patients both on the phone and in person. Students develop working knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology of the special senses (eyes and ears), nervous and integumentary system, common diseases and disorders, and medical terminology related to these systems. Students build on keyboarding and word processing skills, and develop the self-directed job search process by learning how to cultivate the right on-the-job attitude, assembling a working wardrobe, and identifying the strategies it takes to become the best in their new job so that they can advance in their career. Lecture 40 Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE B - Clinical Assisting and Pharmacology 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module B stresses the importance of asepsis and sterile technique in today's health care environment. Students learn about basic bacteriology and its relationship to infection and disease control. Students identify the purpose and expectations of the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) and the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regarding disease transmission in the medical facility. Students learn the principles and various methods of administering medication. Basic pharmacology, therapeutic drugs, their uses, inventory, and classification and effects on the body are included. Students participate in positioning and draping of patients for various examinations and prepare for and assist with minor office surgical procedures. Students gain working knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology of the muscular system, common diseases and disorders, and medical terminology related to this system. Students build on their keyboarding and word processing skills, and develop the self-directed job search process by identifying their personal career objective, create a neat, accurate, well organized cover letter, resume, and job application. Lecture 40 Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE C - Medical Insurance, Bookkeeping and Health Sciences 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module C introduces students to the health care environment and office emergencies and first aid, with an emphasis on bandaging techniques for wounds and injuries. Students learn medical insurance, billing and coding, bookkeeping procedures, accounts payable and receivable, financial management, banking, and check writing procedures that are essential to the successful operation of the medical office. Students develop working knowledge of good health nutrition and weight control and strategies in promoting good health in patients. Students gain working knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology of the digestive system, common diseases and disorders, and medical terminology related to this system. Students build on their keyboarding and word processing skills, and develop the self-directed job search process through career networking techniques that will assist them in being successful in the medical field. Lecture 40 Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE D - Cardiopulmonary and Electrocardiography 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module D examines the circulatory and respiratory systems, including the structure and function of the heart and lungs, and diseases, disorders, and diagnostic tests associated with these systems. Students learn about the electrical pathways of the heart muscle in preparation for applying electrocardiography (ECG or EKG) leads and recording a 12lead electrocardiogram. A cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course is taught which enables students to respond to cardiac emergencies. Students check vital signs and differentiate between normal values for pediatric and adult patients. They obtain blood samples and prepare syringes and medications for administration. Students learn essential medical terminology, build on their keyboarding and word processing skills, and develop the self-directed job search process by identifying and demonstrating what a successful job interview contains and how to answer common interview questions accurately. Lecture 40 Cl Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE E - Laboratory Procedures 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module E introduces microbiology and laboratory procedures commonly performed in a physician's office or medical clinic. Students learn specimen identification, collection, handling and transportation procedures, and practice venipuncture and routine diagnostic hematology. Maintenance and care of laboratory equipment and supplies are discussed. Students gain working knowledge in radiology and nuclear medicine, in addition to various radiological examinations and the patient preparation for these exams. Anatomy and physiology of the urinary system, and the body's immunity, including the structure and functions, as well as common diagnostic exams and disorders related to these systems is presented. Students perform common laboratory tests, check vital signs, and perform selected invasive procedures. Students learn essential medical terminology, build on their keyboarding and word processing

50

skills, and develop the self-directed job search by learning how to set their own career goals. Lecture 40 Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE F - Endocrinology and Reproduction 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module F covers general anatomy and physiology, including an overview of the study of biology and the various body structures and systems. This module also identifies and examines the basic structural components and functions of the skeletal, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Students learn about child growth and development, and how hereditary, cultural, and environmental aspects affect behavior. Students gain working knowledge of assisting in a pediatrician's office and learn the important differences that are specific to the pediatric field. Some of the skills students learn in this area are height, weight, measurements and restraining techniques used for infants and children. They check vital signs, assist with diagnostic examinations and laboratory tests, instruct patients regarding health promotion practices, and perform certain invasive procedures. Students learn essential medical terminology, build on their keyboarding and word processing skills, and develop the self-directed job search process by learning all about how to become a mentor and learn from mentoring. Lecture 40 Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE G - Medical Law, Ethics and Psychology 6.0 Quarter Credit Hours Module G covers the history and science of the medical field, as well as the Medical Assistant profession and how it fits into the big picture. Students gain working knowledge of concepts related to patient reception in the medical office and preparing for the day. Students learn what it takes to become an office manager and the responsibilities an office manager has to the office, the staff, and the physician. Students are introduced to medical office safety, security, and emergency provisions, and how they can best be dealt with. Students learn how to maintain equipment and inventory. Computers in the medical office are discussed and how ergonomics plays an important role in the health of the staff and patients. Students learn how to provide mobility assistance and support to patients with special physical and emotional needs. Basic principles of psychology are discussed, as well as psychological disorders and diseases and treatments available. Medical law and ethics and various physical therapy modalities are discussed. Students check vital signs, obtain blood samples, and prepare and administer intramuscular injections. Students learn essential medical terminology, build on their keyboarding and word processing skills, and develop the self-directed job search process by learning how to dress for success. Lecture 40 Hrs (20 in Theory/10 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer lab). Lab 40 Hrs (30 in Clinical Lab/10 in Computer Lab). Prerequisite: None MODULE X - Medical Assistant Diploma Program Externship 5.0 Quarter Credit Hours Upon successful completion of Modules A through G, Medical Assistant students participate in a 160 hour externship at an approved facility. The externship provides the student an opportunity to apply principles and practices learned in the program and utilize entry level Medical Assistant skills in working with patients. Medical Assistant Diploma Program externs work under the direct supervision of qualified personnel at the participating externship sites, and under general supervision of the College staff. Externs are evaluated by supervisory personnel at the site at 80- and 160-hour intervals. Completed evaluation forms are placed in the students' permanent records. Students must successfully complete their externship experience in order to fulfill requirements for graduation. Lec 00 Hrs/Lab 00 Cl Hrs/Extern 160 Hrs/5 Quarter Credit Hours) Prerequisite: Module A-G

51

MEDICAL INSURANCE BILLING AND CODING

Diploma Program Phoenix and Mesa 8 months ­ 720 hours - 47 quarter credit hours V2

Medical Insurance Billing and Coding professionals perform a variety of administrative health information functions, including those associated with organizing, analyzing, and technically evaluating health insurance claim forms and coding diseases, surgeries, medical procedures, and other therapies for billing and collection. The curriculum emphasizes the Core Learning Principles adopted by the College. The objective of the Medical Insurance Billing and Coding program is to provide the student with the appropriate didactic theory and hands-on skills necessary to prepare them for entry-level positions as medical insurance billers and coders in today's health care offices, clinics, and facilities. Students will learn diagnostic and procedural terminology as it relates to the accurate completion of medical insurance claims. Utilizing a format of medical specialties, relevant terms will also be introduced and studied. The Medical Insurance Billing and Coding program is a 720 clock hour/47.0 quarter credit hour course of study, consisting of seven individual learning units, called modules. Students are required to complete all modules, starting with Module MEDINTRO and continuing in any sequence until all seven modules have been completed. After the MEDINTRO Introductory Module is completed, the remaining six modules stand alone as units of study. If students do not complete any portion of one of these modules, the entire module must be repeated. Upon successful completion of all modules, students participate in an externship. This consists of 160 clock hours of hands-on experience working in an outside facility in the field of medical insurance billing and coding.

Module Module Title Clock Hours 80 MEDINTRO Introduction to Medical Terminology, Keyboarding, Word Processing, Basic Math, Insurance Coding, and Administrative Duties of Medical Personnel Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 80 MIBCL Coding of the Cardiovascular and Lymphatic Systems Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 80 MIBGU Coding of the Genitourinary System Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 80 MIBIE Coding of the Integumentary and Endocrine Systems, and Pathology Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 80 MIBMS Coding of the Musculoskeletal System Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 80 MIBRG Coding of the Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Systems Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 80 MIBSN Coding of the Sensory and Nervous Systems, and Psychology Externship 160 MIBE Program Total 720 Quarter Credit Hours 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 5.0 47

Module MEDINTRO-Introduction to Medical Terminology, Keyboarding, Word Processing, 40/40/6.0 Basic Math, Insurance Coding, and Administrative Duties of Medical Personnel This module presents basic prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols. Also covered is medical jurisprudence and medical ethics. Legal aspects of office procedure are covered, including a discussion of various medical/ethical issues in today's medical environment. Students will learn basic computer skills and acquire knowledge of basic medical insurance billing and coding. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment including basic keyboarding, Word and Excel. In addition, basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9 and CPT are covered with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines, as well as an introduction to the use of the coding reference books. Basic math is introduced. Career skills and development of proper study and homework habits are introduced as well as professionalism needed in the healthcare environment. Prerequisite: None

52

Module MIBCL ­ Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 40/40/6.0 Coding of the Cardiovascular and Lymphatic Systems This module presents a study of basic medical terminology focused on the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system. A word-building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are introduced as related terms are presented within the module. A study of the human body's diseases and disorders, including signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment, is accomplished following the modular subject areas. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment, including medical billing software, Word and Excel. The major medical insurances and claims form processing is presented in an ongoing approach to build this skill set. It will include information on national and other common insurance plans as well as claim form completion and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily financial practices to include patient fee determining, credit arrangements and bookkeeping and bankkeeping procedures will be discussed. Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Basic and advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT will be taught with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines. The evaluation and management documentation guidelines will be discussed, as well as the proper use of modifiers. Basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM diagnosis coding and medical necessity with CPT pairing will be stressed, as well as the use of a natural language encoder program. Various aspects of pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the medications prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases within the modular subject area. Included in this are drug actions and medication uses in relation to body systems and medical terminology. To prepare the student to comprehend the complexity of the health care system and the life cycle of a medical practice, areas that will be discussed include personnel management, compliance, technology, and the many roles of office management. Prerequisite: MEDINTRO Module MIBGU ­ Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 40/40/6.0 Coding of the Genitourinary System This module presents a study of basic medical terminology focused on the genitourinary system. A word-building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are introduced as related terms are presented within the module. A study of the human body's diseases and disorders, including signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment, is accomplished following the modular subject areas. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment, including medical billing software, Word and Excel. The major medical insurances and claims form processing is presented in an ongoing approach to build this skill set. It will include information on national and other common insurance plans as well as claim form completion and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily financial practices to include patient fee determining, credit arrangements and bookkeeping and bank-keeping procedures will be discussed. Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Basic and advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT will be taught with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines. The evaluation and management documentation guidelines will be discussed, as well as the proper use of modifiers. Basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM diagnosis coding and medical necessity with CPT pairing will be stressed, as well as the use of a natural language encoder program. Various aspects of pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the medications prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases within the modular subject area. Included in this are drug actions and medication uses in relation to body systems and medical terminology. To prepare the student to comprehend the complexity of the health care system and the life cycle of a medical practice, areas that will be discussed include personnel management, compliance, technology, and the many roles of office management. Prerequisite: MEDINTRO Module MIBIE ­ Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 40/40/6.0 Coding of the Integumentary and Endocrine Systems, and Pathology This module presents a study of basic medical terminology focused on the integumentary system, the endocrine system, and pathology. A word-building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are introduced as related terms are presented within the module. A study of the human body's diseases and disorders, including signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment, is accomplished following the modular subject areas. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment, including medical billing software, Word and Excel. The major medical insurances and claims form processing is presented in an ongoing approach to build this skill set. It will include information on national and other common insurance plans as well as claim form completion and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily financial practices to include patient fee determining, credit arrangements and bookkeeping and bankkeeping procedures will be discussed. Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Basic and advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT will be taught with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines. The evaluation and management documentation guidelines will be discussed, as well as the proper use of modifiers. Basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM diagnosis coding and medical necessity with CPT pairing will be stressed, as well as the use of a natural language encoder program. Various aspects of pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the medications prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases within the modular subject area. Included in this are drug actions and medication uses in relation to body systems and medical terminology. To prepare the student to comprehend the complexity of the health care system and the life cycle of a medical practice, areas that will be discussed include personnel management, compliance, technology, and the many roles of office management. Prerequisite: MEDINTRO Module MIBMS ­ Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 40/40/6.0 Coding of the Musculoskeletal System This module presents a study of basic medical terminology focused on the musculoskeletal system. A word-building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are introduced as related terms are presented within the module. A study of the human body's

53

diseases and disorders, including signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment, is accomplished following the modular subject areas. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment, including medical billing software, Word and Excel. The major medical insurances and claims form processing is presented in an ongoing approach to build this skill set. It will include information on national and other common insurance plans as well as claim form completion and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily financial practices to include patient fee determining, credit arrangements and bookkeeping and bank-keeping procedures will be discussed. Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Basic and advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT will be taught with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines. The evaluation and management documentation guidelines will be discussed, as well as the proper use of modifiers. Basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM diagnosis coding and medical necessity with CPT pairing will be stressed, as well as the use of a natural language encoder program. Various aspects of pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the medications prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases within the modular subject area. Included in this are drug actions and medication uses in relation to body systems and medical terminology. To prepare the student to comprehend the complexity of the health care system and the life cycle of a medical practice, areas that will be discussed include personnel management, compliance, technology, and the many roles of office management. Prerequisite: MEDINTRO Module MIBRG ­ Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 40/40/6.0 Coding of the Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Systems This module presents a study of basic medical terminology focused on the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal system. A word-building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are introduced as related terms are presented within the module. A study of the human body's diseases and disorders, including signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment, is accomplished following the modular subject areas. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment, including medical billing software, Word and Excel. The major medical insurances and claims form processing is presented in an ongoing approach to build this skill set. It will include information on national and other common insurance plans as well as claim form completion and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily financial practices to include patient fee determining, credit arrangements and bookkeeping and bankkeeping procedures will be discussed. Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Basic and advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT will be taught with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines. The evaluation and management documentation guidelines will be discussed, as well as the proper use of modifiers. Basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM diagnosis coding and medical necessity with CPT pairing will be stressed, as well as the use of a natural language encoder program. Various aspects of pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the medications prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases within the modular subject area. Included in this are drug actions and medication uses in relation to body systems and medical terminology. To prepare the student to comprehend the complexity of the health care system and the life cycle of a medical practice, areas that will be discussed include personnel management, compliance, technology, and the many roles of office management. Prerequisite: MEDINTRO Module MIBSN ­ Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, Diagnostic and Procedural 40/40/6.0 Coding of the Sensory and Nervous Systems, and Psychology This module presents a study of basic medical terminology focused on the sensory system, the nervous system, and psychology. A word-building systems approach is used to learn word parts for constructing or analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are introduced as related terms are presented within the module. A study of the human body's diseases and disorders, including signs, symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment, is accomplished following the modular subject areas. Students are provided exposure to computer software applications used in the health care environment, including medical billing software, Word and Excel. The major medical insurances and claims form processing is presented in an ongoing approach to build this skill set. It will include information on national and other common insurance plans as well as claim form completion and ICD and CPT coding. Problem solving and managed care systems will also be discussed. Daily financial practices to include patient fee determining, credit arrangements and bookkeeping and bankkeeping procedures will be discussed. Computer use in the ambulatory environment will also be taught. Basic and advanced guidelines and coding conventions in CPT will be taught with focus on the professional (outpatient) guidelines. The evaluation and management documentation guidelines will be discussed, as well as the proper use of modifiers. Basic guidelines and coding conventions in ICD-9-CM diagnosis coding and medical necessity with CPT pairing will be stressed, as well as the use of a natural language encoder program. Various aspects of pharmacology will be discussed including a study of the medications prescribed for the treatment of illnesses and diseases within the modular subject area. Included in this are drug actions and medication uses in relation to body systems and medical terminology. To prepare the student to comprehend the complexity of the health care system and the life cycle of a medical practice, areas that will be discussed include personnel management, compliance, technology, and the many roles of office management. Prerequisite: MEDINTRO Module MIBE ­ Externship 0/160/5.0 Upon successful completion of Modules MIBINTRO. MIBCL, MIBGU, MIBIE, MIBMS, MIBRG, and MIBSN, medical insurance billing/coding students participate in a 160-hour externship. Students are expected to work a full-time (40 hours per week) schedule if possible. Serving in an externship at an approved facility gives externs an opportunity to work with the principles and practices learned in the classroom. Externs work under the direct supervision of qualified personnel in participating institutions and under general supervision of the College staff. Supervisory personnel will evaluate externs at 80 and 160-hour intervals. Completed evaluation forms are placed in the students' permanent records. Students must successfully complete their externship training in order to fulfill requirements for graduation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Modules MIBINTRO. MIBCL, MIBGU, MIBIE, MIBMS, MIBRG, and MIBSN.

54

NURSING

Associate in Applied Science Degree Phoenix 24 months ­ 108 quarter credit hours V1

The Associate Degree Nursing program will prepare the nursing student for entry level roles of the registered nurse in the ever-evolving health care field. The program includes a focus on theories, concepts, and principles of nursing. It also delves into the important area of leading and managing as well as pertinent legal issues faced by nursing leaders and managers. A graduate of this nursing program will be prepared to assume the entry level role of health provider in a global society. He or she will be able to deliver culturally proficient care while meeting the physical, spiritual and psychosocial needs of clients. At the completion of this program, the nursing student will be prepared to take the NCLEX-RN exam for registered nursing licensure. Once licensed, the individual may use the title of Registered Nurse and practice in entrylevel staff positions in various health care agencies.

Lecture Contact Hours 40 0 40 0 40 120 30 0 40 0 20 90 30 0 40 40 0 110 30 0 40 40 110 40 0 40 10 90 30 0 30 0 10 70 30 0 20 Lab/Clinical Contact Hours 0 40 0 40 0 80/0 0 20/80 0 40 0 60/80 0 20/80 0 0 40 60/80 0 20/80 0 0 20/80 0 20/80 0 0 20/80 0 20/80 0 20/40 0 40/120 0 20/80 0 Total Contact Hours 40 40 40 40 40 200 30 100 40 40 20 230 30 100 40 40 40 250 30 100 40 40 210 40 100 40 10 190 30 100 30 60 10 230 30 100 20 Quarter Credit Hours 4 2 4 2 4 16 3 3 4 2 2 14 3 3 4 4 2 16 3 3 4 4 14 4 3 4 1 12 3 3 3 2 1 12 3 3 2

Quarter I NSG 1008 NSG1008L BIO1088 BIO 1088L MAT 1033 Quarter II NSG1014 NSG1014L BIO1089 BIO 1089L NSG 1028 Quarter III NSG 1040 NSG 1040L PSY 2012 MCB 1087 MCB 1087L Quarter IV NSG 1042 NSG 1042L BIO 2024 DEP 2000 Quarter V NSG 1044 NSG 1044L ENC 1101 NSG 2024 Quarter VI NSG 2012 NSG 2012L NSG 2022 NSG 2022L NSG 2028 Quarter VII NSG 2042 NSG 2042L NSG 2034

Quarter I Fundamentals I Fundamentals Clinical I Anatomy & Physiology I Anatomy & Physiology I Lab Algebra Total Hours Quarter II Fundamentals II Fundamentals Clinical II Anatomy & Physiology II Anatomy & Physiology II Lab Pharmacology for Nurses I Total Hours Quarter III Med Surg I Med/Surg I Clinical General Psychology Intro Micro/Chemistry Intro Micro/Chemistry Lab Total Hours Quarter IV Med Surg II Med Surg Clinical II Pathophysiology Developmental Psychology Total Hours Quarter V Maternal/Child Maternal/Child Clinical Comp I Pharmacology IIa Total Hours Quarter VI Psych Nursing Psych Nursing Clinical Community Health Nursing Community Health Nursing Clinical Pharmacology IIb Total Hours Quarter VII Critical Care Nursing Critical Care Nursing Clinical Pharmacology

55

ENC 1102 Quarter VIII NSG 2050 NSG 2050L NSG 2062

Comp II Total Hours

40 90

0 20/80

40 190

4 12

Quarter VIII Leadership Nursing 30 0 Leadership Nursing Clinical 0 20/80 NCLEX Review 20 0 Humanities Elective 40 0 Total Hours 90 20/80 Total Program Hours 770 320/600 Total Nursing Clinical Hours 800 Nursing clinical hours may be completed in the skills lab and are subject to change.

30 100 20 40 190 1690

3 3 2 4 12 108

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PARALEGAL

Associate in Applied Science Degree Phoenix and Mesa 24 months ­ 96 quarter credit hours V1

Students in the College's ABA approved Paralegal program are provided with the knowledge and skill sets needed to enter the paralegal profession upon graduation and perform the duties expected of an entry level paralegal in the legal community. Graduates of the Paralegal program are prepared to gather, review and analyze factual situations, interview witnesses and clients, perform legal research and to prepare and interpret legal documents under the direction of an attorney. Graduates of the program may find employment in legal offices, state and federal government agencies, corporate legal departments, consumer groups, insurance companies, banks, title companies, and legal aid societies. The Paralegal program is a terminal degree in that it trains individuals for entry-level positions and is not a preparatory curriculum for law school. More information about the program can be viewed at http://www.EverestPhxParalegals.com. Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law. The ABA approved Paralegal program is offered only at Everest College Phoenix - Phoenix and Mesa on-ground campuses. The Paralegal Program's major core required and elective courses (i.e., legal specialty courses that cover substantive law or legal procedures or process developed for paralegals and that emphasize practical paralegal skills) are not offered in an online format, however, students in the paralegal program at the Phoenix and Mesa campuses may take the program's college core and general education requirements online.

Quarter Credit Course Code Course Hours COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS CGS 2167C Computer Applications 4.0 SLS 1105 Strategies for Success 4.0 SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) 2.0 CGS 2501C Applied Word Processing 4.0 TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS 14.0 MAJOR CORE REQUIREMENTS PLA 1003 Introduction to Paralegal* 4.0 PLA 2363 Criminal Procedure and the Constitution* 4.0 PLA 1105 Legal Research and Writing I* 4.0 PLA 2106 Legal Research and Writing II* 4.0 PLA 2273 Torts* 4.0 PLA 2423 Contract Law* 4.0 PLA 2600 Wills, Trusts, and Probate* 4.0 PLA 2800 Family Law* 4.0 PLA 2763 Law Office Management* 4.0 PLA 2203 Civil Procedure* 4.0 PLA 2929 Paralegal Capstone Course* 4.0 TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS 44.0 The Associate student will select one 4.0 quarter credit hour elective course from the following list: PLA 2460 Bankruptcy* 4.0 PLA 2930 Contemporary Issues and Law* 4.0 PLA 2433 Business Organizations* 4.0 PLA 2483 Introduction to Administrative Law* 4.0 PLA 2610 Real Estate Law* 4.0 TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS 4.0 GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS ENC 1101 Composition I 4.0 ENC 1102 Composition II 4.0 SPC 2017 Oral Communications* 4.0 SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology or 4.0 POS 2041 American National Government MAT 1033 College Algebra 4.0 PSY 2012 General Psychology or 4.0 POS 2041 American National Government SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking 2.0 AML 2000 4.0 Introduction to American Literature or

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AMH WOH EVS

20th Century American History or World History* or Environmental Science or TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS FUNDAMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS (as determined by assessment test) ENG 0099 Fundamental English MAT 0099 Fundamental Math RDG 0099 Fundamentals Reading TOTAL QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

2030 2022 1001

4.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 96.0

Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law. *Available on-ground only.

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COURSE OFFERINGS

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

0000-0099 1000-2999 3000-4999 Preparatory courses Lower division (first and second year) courses Upper division (third and fourth year) courses

Note: Prerequisite requirements not applicable to non-matriculating students.

ACG 2021 Introduction to Corporate Accounting 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course defines financial accounting objectives and their relationship to business. The student is introduced to the fundamental principles of accounting and the accounting cycle as it applies to corporations. Prerequisite: APA 2121. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 ACG 2178 Financial Statement Analysis 4 Quarter Credit Hours The basics of financial statement analysis in directing a firm's operations are covered in this course. The student will gain an understanding of how funds are acquired in financial markets and the criteria used by investors in deciding where to place their funds. Prerequisite: ACG 2021 or APA 2121. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 ACG 2551 Non-Profit Accounting 4 Quarter Credit Hours In this course the student explores accounting systems unique to non-profit organizations. Accounting principles for hospitals and educational organizations are examined. Prerequisite ACG 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 ACO 1806 Payroll Accounting 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides students with a working knowledge of payroll laws, principles, practices, methods and systems. Students gain hands-on experience performing the payroll function. Prerequisite: APA 2111. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 AMH 2030 20th Century American History 4 Quarter Credit Hours A survey of the events of the modern era of American history. The course begins with the Spanish American War, the watershed of the 20th Century, and covers the political, social and diplomatic developments including the populist movement, World War I, the Treaty of Versailles, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Atomic Age, the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam conflicts, the information age, civil rights and feminism. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS1505. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 AML 2000 Introduction to American Literature 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course concentrates on the major writers of modern American literature. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS 1505. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 APA 2111 Principles of Accounting I 4 Quarter Credit Hours Accrual accounting based upon generally accepted accounting principles is stressed in this course. Analysis of income statement procedures, computerized accounting applications and the accounting cycle are highlighted. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 APA 2121 Principles of Accounting II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course emphasizes accounting theory and applications as they apply to the accounting cycle. Various aspects are explored in depth including cash analysis, bank statement reconciliation, bad debt, accounts receivable, notes receivable, accounts payable, notes payable, various methods of inventory pricing, fixed asset allocations, intangible assets, and natural resources. Prerequisite: APA 2111. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 APA 2141 Computerized Accounting 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course emphasizes the practical application of fundamental accounting principles through the use of automated accounting software. Students will gain experience in integrated software designed to handle general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, financial statement analysis, fixed assets, sales order processing, inventory, and payroll. Prerequisite: APA 2121. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 APA 2161 Introductory Cost/Managerial Accounting 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines the development and operation of cost accounting systems. Topics include basic cost concepts and product costing techniques including job order, process costing, and standard costing with emphasis on managerial application. Prerequisite: APA 2121. Lec. Hrs. 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 APA 2929 Accounting Capstone Course 4 Quarter Credit Hours This capstone course provides graduating accounting students the opportunity to use their evaluative and analytical skills. Using the knowledge acquired from their academic general education and accounting studies, the students will evaluate the accounting practices of several different companies. Financial analysis of these companies will include using computerized accounting and written and oral reporting skills. Prerequisite: Students must be in one of their last two quarters of their program. Must be taken in one of the last two quarters of the program. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 BCC 4949 Business Capstone Course 4 Quarter Credit Hours This simulated course is designed to provide students with a practical experience in running a company. Students develop real-world strategic management skills integrating theory with the application of business principles across functional areas. Prerequisites: Must be taken in one of the last two quarters of the program. APA 2161, MAN 2300, MAN 3450,

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MAN 3554, MAR 1011, SBM 2000 and FIN 3501. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs: 020. Lab Hrs: 040. Other Hrs: 000. BIO 1027C Introduction to Microbiology/Chemistry 6 Quarter Credit Hours This course is an introduction to the basic foundations of microbiology and chemistry, with a focus on the practical application and problem solving components of each discipline. The approach is integrative and exclusive in aspects of organic and biochemistry, medically related microbiology, as well as the physiology and pathology of micro-organisms. Pre-requisites: None Lec Hrs: 040; Lab Hrs: 040; Other 000 BIO 1088 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a scientific study that provides an understanding of the basic concepts and principles of anatomy and physiology through a lecture experience. It integrates the structure and function of the human body and its parts as related to cells, tissues, skeletal, muscular, nervous systems, sense organs, and stress. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 BIO 1088L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 2 Quarter Credit Hours This course is the laboratory section of BIO 1088. It is a scientific study that provides an understanding of the basic BIO concepts and principles of anatomy and physiology through the laboratory experience. It integrates the structure and function of the human body and its systems as related to cells, tissues, skeletal, muscular, nervous systems, sense organs, and stress. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: BIO 1088. Lec. Hrs: 000 Lab Hrs: 040 Other Hrs: 000. BIO 1089 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides a scientific study and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of anatomy and physiology through a lecture experience. It integrates the structure and function of the human body systems as related to blood, nutrition, acid-base balance, fluids and electrolytes. The endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems will also be studied. Prerequisites: BIO 1088 for Nursing students only, other program students: none. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 BIO 1089L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 2 Quarter Credit Hours This course is the laboratory section taught in conjunction with BIO 1089, which provides a scientific study and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of anatomy and physiology through the laboratory experience. It integrates the structure and function of the human body systems as related to blood, nutrition, acid-base balance, fluids and electrolytes. The endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems will also be studied. Laboratory exercises include human and animal dissection, microscopic review of structures, and application of physiological principles through observation and practical experiments applied for the nursing student. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: BIO 1089. Lec. Hrs: 000 Lab Hrs: 040 Other Hrs: 000 BIO 2024 Pathophysicology 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is an introduction to the normal and abnormal functioning of the human body and is designed to build on the basic knowledge of normal anatomy and physiology. It will introduce students to commonly occurring disease processes and their effect on individual body systems. General areas that will be covered include inflammation, immunity, hereditary, degeneration, congenital, and neoplasia. Prerequisite: None Lec. Hrs 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 BUL 2131 Applied Business Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to provide students with information on the essentials of the nature of law and the functions of the judicial system in the business environment. An overview of legal characteristics of a sole proprietorship, partnerships and corporations are discussed. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 BUL 2261 International Business Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides a survey of international laws and regulations affecting the international business arena. A special emphasis will be placed on the evolving changes in international regulation and its impact on multinational companies. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 BUS 2929 Business Capstone Course 4 Quarter Credit Hours This simulated course is designed to provide students with a practical experience in running a company. Students develop real-world strategic management skills integrating theory with the application of business principles across functional areas. Prerequisites: Must be taken in one of the last two quarters of the program. (MAN 1030 or MAN 2021, BUL 2131, MAN 2300, MAR 1011, APA 2111 and APA 2121. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 1017 Criminology 4 Quarter Credit Hours The study of crime and causes of crime, the types of crime, and crime prevention strategies and society's response to crime. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 1020 Introduction to Criminal Justice 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides an overview and introduction to criminal justice. Focus on the nature of crime, law and criminal justice, the Police and Law Enforcement, the makeup of the courts, the adjudication system, the issues facing police, corrections, and a review of the nature and history of the juvenile justice system. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 0 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 1600 Criminal Investigations 4 Quarter Credit Hours Basic investigative techniques, taking witness statements, interviews and reports are covered. An overview of police procedures is also included. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 1910 Career Choices in Criminal Justice 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides an overview of employment in the criminal justice field. Topics include nature of the work, employment opportunities, median income, training, opportunity for advancement, employment outlook for ten different general classifications. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000

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CCJ 2002 Criminal Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will provide an introduction to substantive criminal law, including classifications, general definitions, elements, specific offenses, and parties to crimes. Students will learn to use criminal statutes and codes as a tool in identifying criminal acts. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2250 Constitutional Law for the Criminal Justice Professional 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines the United States Constitution and its implications for criminal justice system policies and practices. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2288 Spanish for the Criminal Justice Professional 4 Quarter Credit Hours An action-oriented course that addresses the needs of real law enforcement-criminal justice professionals. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJC 2000 Introduction to Corrections 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will examine an overview of the history of corrections and punishment in America with a review of the correctional process including: probation, intermediate sanctions, restorative justice, imprisonment and the death penalty. The organization, management and operation of correctional facilities, inmate life and environment will be examined, including the legal foundation of prisoners' rights. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2358 Criminal Justice Communications 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will introduce the student to proper communication techniques within the community and the law enforcement environment. Interviewing techniques; written communication, report writing; and testimony will be a part of this course. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020, ENC 1102 None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2501 Juvenile Justice 4 Quarter Credit Hours Examination of the historical development of concepts of delinquency and modern juvenile justice systems. Theories of delinquency, juvenile court processes, intake services, remedial procedures and the effects of the system are included in this course. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2679 Introduction to Victims Advocacy 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines criminal victimization in the United States. The topics include the historical treatment of victims of crime, the character and extent of modern criminal victimization, the nature of victimization experience, victim treatment at the hands of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2929 Criminal Justice Capstone Course 4 Quarter Credit Hours This capstone course provides an opportunity for students to merge the knowledge and experience from their previous courses. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the theory and practical application of the components of the Criminal Justice system through written assignments, group projects, class presentations, and role-playing scenarios. Prerequisite: Students must be in one of the last two quarters. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 2943 Current Issues in Criminal Justice 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course presents an analysis of significant issues confronting modern day criminal justice practitioners. Critical concepts law enforcement. The courts, corrections, and juvenile justice will be addressed. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 3334 Alternatives to Incarceration 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is an overview of contemporary non-institutional methods of correction utilized by the American correctional system. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 3450 Criminal Justice Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours An examination of front-line supervision, executive development, administrative leadership, and recent theories and research in criminal justice management. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 3666 Victimology 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines criminal victimization in the United States. Topics covered include the historical treatment of victims of crime, the character and the extent of modern criminal victimization, the nature of the victimization experience, victim treatment at the hands of the justice system, and reforms implemented to enhance the justice-system response to victimization. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 3675 Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides an examination of the role women play as perpetrators of crime, crime victims, and professionals working in the criminal justice system. In addition, theories of female criminality and the general social forces influencing the treatment of women as offenders, victims, and justice system staff will be covered. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 4054 Criminal Justice Ethics and Liability 4 Quarter Credit Hours The various forms of corruption, misconduct and abuse of authority that exist within the criminal justice system will be identified and analyzed. Areas of negligence, which lead to liability, will be explored. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 4127 Criminal Justice in the Community 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course explores the interrelationships and role expectations among the various administrations of justice practitioners, their agencies and the public. Principal emphasis will be placed upon the professional image of the system of justice administration and the development of positive relationships between members of the system and the public. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 4129 Cultural Diversity for Criminal Justice Professionals 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course focuses on understanding various cultural perspectives and appropriate law enforcement policy as it pertains

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to diverse cultural expectations. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 4400 Criminal Justice Senior Capstone Experience 4 Quarter Credit Hours This capstone course will support students in learning to pose significant questions grounded in existing theory and inquiry, select and use methods appropriate to the questions and research context, produce appropriate evidence, subject to analysis, respond to critiques and provide advice and comments for others' research, organize oral and written presentations to in response to fair and open critiques. Prerequisite: Must be in the final two quarters of the program. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs:040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CCJ 4656 Gang Activity and Drug Operations 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course focuses on the establishment of gangs, organizational structure, behavior patterns, and recruitment of members. The course also examines the criminal justice response to gang-related problems, including violence and drug trafficking. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CGS 2167C Computer Applications 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course introduces the essential concepts necessary to make effective use of the computer. Students achieve an understanding of what a computer can do, how it works, and how it can be used to create documents using word processing and spreadsheet applications for personal and business use. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 030 Lab Hrs: 020 Other Hrs: 000 CGS 2501C Applied Word Processing 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers the various techniques used in intermediate to advanced word processing. Emphasis will be placed on using and creating templates, developing multi-page documents, building forms, and working with charts and diagrams. In addition, students will learn document collaboration techniques and customization with macros. Prerequisite: CGS 2167C. Lec. Hrs: 030 Lab Hrs: 020 Other Hrs: 000 CGS 2510C Applied Spreadsheets 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers the various techniques used in developing spreadsheet applications for business information tracking and analysis. Course topics include using formulas, employing creative formatting, and using charts. Additional skills coverage includes use of graphics, developing pivot tables, and managing lists. Prerequisite: CGS 2167C. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 1770 Crime Scene Photography I 4 Quarter Credit Hours Upon successful completion of the course, the students will be able to understand the role of a photographer in a crime scene. The students will become familiar with the history of photography and comprehend fundamental concepts of general camera use. The students will also be able to apply photography concepts and practical applications to vehicular accidents, vehicle examinations, and crimes against property. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 1772 Crime Scene Photography II 4 Quarter Credit Hours Upon successful completion of the course the students will be able to understand the role of a photographer in a crime scene. The students will comprehend fundamental concepts of general camera use and be able to apply photographic concepts and protocols to crimes against persons such as assault and homicide scenes, autopsy, and special issues covering arson, alternative light sources, and SMAT (Scars, Marks, and Tattoos). Prerequisite: CJE 1770. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2580 Introduction to Interviews and Interrogations 4 Quarter Credit Hours Interviews and interrogation focuses on techniques and philosophies of conducting human communication in a criminal justice or legal environment in which the goal is to obtain accurate information. Students will learn and apply specialized techniques and approaches to interviews and interrogations as well as legal implications based on a variety of situations. Obtaining eyewitness information in an investigative environment is also discussed. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 1640 Criminalistics I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to introduce the concepts involved in the field of Criminalistics. The students will be introduced to the concepts of "Criminalistics" from the professional and scientific disciplines dedicated to the recognition, collection, identification, and individualization of physical evidence and the application of the natural sciences to the matters of the law will be examined. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 1641 Criminalistics II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course continues the introduction to the concepts involved in the field of Criminalistics. The students will be introduced to the concepts of "Criminalistics" from the professional and scientific disciplines dedicated to the recognition, collection, identification, and individualization of physical evidence and the application of the natural sciences to the matters of the law will be examined. Prerequisite: CJE 1640. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2100 Policing in America 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides a solid foundation by tracking the historical development of policing in America from its English roots to the first organized municipal police departments in the 1830s. It describes various federal law enforcement organizations and how they relate to state and local police. There is examination of the police subculture, explanation of the manner in which police agencies are organized and managed, community policing and problem solving, patrol and criminal investigations, impact of technology on police and discussion of the future. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2602 Graphics & Documentation II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a continuation of Graphics & Documentation I and will provide the students with a further understanding of the procedures of crime scene observation, note taking and documentation. Students will also be introduced to the preparation of visual exhibits for court presentation. Prerequisite: CJE 2673. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000

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CJE 2670 Introduction to Forensics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will explore and explain the application of applied science to those criminal and civil matters that are investigated by various agencies. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2673 Graphics & Documentation I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will provide the students with an understanding of the procedures of crime scene observation, note taking, photography and report writing. Prerequisite: CJE 1640 Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2676 Biological Evidence I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This introductory course will introduce the students to the types of biological evidence commonly found at crime scenes and how to collect it. Specific biological evidence discussed includes blood, semen, saliva, urine, feces, hair, and fingernails. Additional topics include autopsy, the basic departments of the crime laboratory, toxicology, forensic entomology, and uncollectible biological evidence. Prerequisite: CJE 1640. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2640 Crime Scene Dynamics I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to introduce the investigative concepts involved in the "Crime Scene Dynamics" of processing the aftermath of a criminal incident. The students will be exposed to how to respond to crime scenes, and examine the multitude of responsibilities involved, such as: the evidence must be identified and preserved, witnesses must be isolated and interviewed, the scene must be isolated and protected, fingerprints must be developed, and suspects must be identified and located. Prerequisite: CJE 1640. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2679 Crime Scene Dynamics II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course continues the introduction to the investigative concepts involved in the "Crime Scene Dynamics" of processing the aftermath of a criminal incident. The students will be exposed to how to respond to crime scenes, and examine the multitude of responsibilities involved, such as: the evidence must be identified and preserved, witnesses must be isolated and interviewed, the scene must be isolated and protected, fingerprints must be developed, and suspects must be identified and located. Prerequisite: CJE 2678. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2682 Biological Evidence II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will continue to discuss the biological evidence commonly found at crime scenes. Packaging, preservation, and care of biological evidence will be discussed. Chain of custody will be explained. Additional topics include DNA, case studies, courtroom testimony, and exhibits for the courtroom. Students will participate in a moot court and a mock crime scene. Prerequisite: CJE 2676. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2690 Technology Crimes I 4 Quarter Credit Hours At the conclusion of this course, the students will have an understanding of technology-based crimes as they apply to modern criminal acts such as identity theft, extortion, intellectual property crimes, fraud, Internet pornography, and online gambling. Students will also examine issues of evidence involving crime scene management, chain of custody issues, and accepted investigative practices. Prerequisite:CJE 1640. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2691 Technology Crimes II 4 Quarter Credit Hours At the conclusion of this course, the students will have an understanding of procedural law issues, investigative issues and techniques, forensics, and communications skills required to describe technology-based crimes. Students will also be able to compare and contrast the roles and responsibilities of local, state, and federal agencies responsible for investigating technology-based crimes. Prerequisite: CJE 2690. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2929 Criminal Investigations Capstone Course 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to integrate the best practices in the field of Criminal Investigations. Students will demonstrate the fundamentals involved in processing a crime scene, including the recognition, collection, identification, and packaging of physical evidence. Students will demonstrate their ability to communicate both in writing and verbally through writing assignments and role-playing exercises. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in one of the last two quarters of the program. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 4668 Computer Crime 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course focuses on the use of the computer in committing crimes, both within organizations and among private entities. It will also examine the justice system's response to this new form of deviance. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJL 2130 Criminal Evidence 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course focuses on the nature of evidence as it relates to the pretrial and trial process, including: witnesses, hearsay, admissions and confessions, and the exclusionary rule. Emphasis is placed on specific types of evidence: circumstantial, documentary, physical, documentary and recorded. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJL 2134 Criminal Procedure and the Constitution 4 Quarter Credit Hours There will be a discussion of the Constitutional aspects of criminal procedure. The student will learn procedural aspects of the criminal system from arrest or summons through pretrial motions, trial, post-conviction and appellate processes. A study of the Constitution at work in the court system with current applications. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJL 3215 Concepts of Criminal Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers the historical development and philosophy of criminal law. Discussion includes definitions, legal classifications of crimes, constitutional provisions, legal research, study of case law, and significance of law as a social force. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CPO 4004 Global Politics 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the classical concepts and dynamic factors of international politics, and their reflection in the structures, institutions, and processes of contemporary international relations. Particular attention is paid to power, national interest, diplomacy, sovereignty, foreign policy formulation, alliances, war and peace, and the importance of ideological and

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economic factors. Prerequisite: ENC 1102. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000. DEP 2000 Developmental Psychology 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will explore the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional processes across the life span. Readings and lecture will focus on how individuals and defined classes develop psychologically. Key emphasis will focus on the behaviors at various ages and stages of development and the influence of family, culture, and spiritual considerations in human development and transition. Prerequisite: PSY 2012, Lec. Hrs 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 DSC 2002 Introduction to Terrorism 4 Quarter Credit Hours Students in this course gain a valuable overview of terrorism: its history, current activities, and projected future. Topics include: domestic and international terrorism, terrorist training, weapons of mass destruction, defenses against terrorism, legal aspects, and the impact of the media. Prerequisites: CCJ 1020. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 DSC 3214 Catastrophic Event Response 4 Quarter Credit Hours Students in this course gain a valuable overview of terrorism: its history, current activities, and projected future. Topics include: domestic and international terrorism, terrorist training, weapons of mass destruction, defenses against terrorism, legal aspects, and the impact of the media. Prerequisite: CCJ 1020 Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 ECO 3007 Macroeconomics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of economics and cultural changes within the economic system, its development by free competition under the capitalistic system, the nature and evolution of money, the banking system, price determination and wages, monopoly, the laws of supply and demand, and production control. Prerequisite: ENC1102 Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 ECO 3028 Microeconomics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is the study of economic analysis and includes the market price theory, the theory of the firm, and the theories of production and distribution. Prerequisite: ENC 1102. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 ENC 1101 Composition I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides instruction and practice in expository writing and emphasizes grammatical and mechanical accuracy and proper essay form. Emphasis is placed on clarity, logical organization, unity, and coherence of central idea and supporting material. Prerequisite: Successful completion of assessment test or ENG 0099. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 ENC 1102 Composition II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course builds on the foundation of the written communication skills developed in Composition I. It further develops the students' skills in composing essays and other written communication, including the documented research paper. Prerequisite: ENC 1101. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 ENC 3211 Report Writing 4 Quarter Credit Hours Examination, analysis and preparation of written communicative techniques are presented. Emphasis is also placed on research gathering techniques, assimilation of data, and preparation of written reports. Prerequisite: ENC 1102. Lec Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 ENG 0099 Fundamental English 4 Quarter Credit Hours Review of spelling and vocabulary rules, punctuation and grammar usage with concentration on sentence and paragraph structure. This course does not apply towards credits needed to graduate in any program. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 EVS 1001 Environmental Science 4 Quarter Credit Hours This non-laboratory course introduces students to environmental issues through an understanding of the interrelationships of humans and their planet. Attention is focused on ecosystems, pollution, energy, and improvement or prevention of problems. Environmental concerns are explored through readings, research, and discussion. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs 040 Lab Hrs 000 Other Hrs 000 FIN 1103 Introduction to Finance 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a survey of the financial considerations encountered during life, including purchases, credit, banking, taxes, insurance, investments, retirement and estate planning. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 FIN 3005 Principles of Finance 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines the financial decisions that impact management and corporate financial officers. It is also an introduction to financial theory, principles and terminology. Prerequisite: MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 FIN 3501 Investments 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of securities and securities markets; analysis of various categories of corporate securities, public securities, and other investments; types of risks and taxes that affect investment policy timing, selection and investment values. Prerequisite: MAN 1030, FIN 3005. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 GEB 4361 Management of International Business 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of the characteristics, operation, and function of business in the global market of the 1990's. The following topics are included in the course; political economy, political culture, international trade and investment, the global monetary system, and management and business structures for the international business environment. Prerequisite: MAN 1030 or MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 GEB 4363 Import/Export Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers the functions and range of traffic management services performed by freight forwarders; changing governmental restrictions, rules and regulations applicable to different countries, ports, and trade routes; and provides complete documentation forms to facilitate and coordinate the movement of goods in international trade. Lec. Hrs: 040

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Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 DSC 3214 Catastrophic Event Response Planning 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines the response protocol, logistics, responsibilities, interagency support, and concepts of front end planning involved in preparation for a catastrophic event. Students will be introduced to the development of an Emergency Response Plan that will include concepts such as lookout; awareness; communications; escape; safety (LACES); training; and various agency relationships. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 HUN 1001 Basic Nutrition 2 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of basic nutrition including a discussion of vitamins and minerals necessary to maintain good health, cultural and religious differences that affect nutrition and an analysis of medical diets utilized in the treatment of disease and the maintenance of good health. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 020, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2671 Fingerprints Classification & Latents I 4 Quarter Credit Hours Upon successful completion of the course, the students will be able to understand the historical background of the science of fingerprints and legal aspects. The students will learn and be able to classify fingerprint cards using the Henry Classification System, to recognize fingerprint patterns and sections of the hand, terminology, obtain ten prints and major case prints, and to understand the New Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems. The students will also be able to individualize one fingerprint card from another. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJE 2672 Fingerprints Classification & Latents II 4 Quarter Credit Hours Upon successful completion of the course, the students will be able to understand the historical background of the science of fingerprints. The students will learn and be able to classify fingerprint cards using the Henry Classification System, to recognize fingerprint patterns, terminology, and to understand the New Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems. The students will also be able to individualize one fingerprint card from another and to demonstrate the ability to locate, process, and recover latent prints in the field and lab. Prerequisite: CJE 2671. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 CJL 2614 Collecting and Presenting Audio & Visual Evidence 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to introduce the concepts involved in collecting and presenting audio and visual evidence. The students will also be introduced to the documentation methods for preserving visual evidence. This course will allow the students to understand the courtroom technology available for presentation methods utilizing audio and visual means. These disciplines will include digital photography, film photography, video, voice and audio recordings. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 INV 3100 Theoretical Aspects of Conspiracy Investigations 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to provide students with a basic and philosophical understanding of the investigatory process regarding conspiracy crime(s). The students will explore the fundamental and advanced features of investigation, duties and responsibilities of relevant criminal justice entities, information-gathering skills, collection, preservation, and testing of evidence, use of technology, and types of evidence. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 INV 3300 Methodology of Economic Crime 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will explore current trends in economic crimes and the investigative techniques used to combat these offenses. Relationships between victims and offenders will be examined. Students will understand motives and common methods of operation associated with economic crimes. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 SCC 3004 Private Investigations I 4 Quarter Credit Hours The students will be able to compare and contrast the role of a private investigator to the role of government investigators. The students will also learn to identify strategies for business development and environment and be able to analyze ethical and liability issues involving private investigations. The student will develop skills for practice techniques and surveillance. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 LDR 4734 Leadership 4 Quarter Credit Hours The course will cover the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of Leadership versus Management Theory to increase individual, group, organizational and industry effectiveness. Students will have an opportunity to apply learned concepts while developing and building leadership and team skills using experiential learning activities, survey instruments, games and role plays. Prerequisite: MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 LIS 2004 Introduction To Internet Research 2 Quarter Credit Hours Provides instruction on the basic use of the Internet and the use of search engines. Students will have hands-on access to the Internet. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 010 Lab Hrs: 020 Other Hrs: 000

MAN 1030 Introduction to Business (previously known as Introduction to Business Enterprise) 4 Quarter Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the terminology, functions, and procedures related to the organization and operation of a business enterprise as an institution in an economic society. Particular emphasis is given to accounting, ownership, human resources, marketing, and managerial functions within the business enterprise. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 1733 Management Today 4 Quarter Credit Hours Examines and reviews classical and contemporary managerial thought in strategy formulation, planning, leadership, and decision-making. Use of case studies emphasizes today's managerial practices. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 2021 Principles of Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours The course covers an analysis of fundamental management principles integrated with concepts of the behavioral sciences. Management processes, resources, and organizational structure are introduced. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 2300 Introduction to Human Resources 4 Quarter Credit Hours

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This course is an introduction to the workings of the human resources aspect of a business operation. It includes a discussion of wage and salary considerations, performance evaluations, benefits, employee hiring and firing, and policy and procedure implementation. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 2604 Introduction to International Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours A comparative study of international management thoughts and practices with special attention to the transferability of these practices across border lines. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 2727 Strategic Planning for Business 4 Quarter Credit Hours Designed to help students to understand how to integrate knowledge of the various business disciplines and apply that knowledge to planning and managing strategic business activities. Following an examination of policy and strategy concepts, the student will complete studies, which integrate and apply what is learned Prerequisites: MAN 1030, FIN 1103 and APA 2121. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 MAN 3100 Human Relations in Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of individual interpersonal, group, inter-group, and intra-group problems in business organizations. Prerequisite MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 3450 Production and Operations Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours Examines problems encountered in planning, operating, and controlling production in manufacturing and service industries. . Topics include: waiting-line management, total quality management, production systems, supply chainmanagement, project management, inventory and work force management. Prerequisite MAN 2021 and APA 2161 or ACG 2021 Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 3554 Workplace Continuity & Contingency Planning 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course presents an introduction to workplace continuity and contingency planning. Topics include the need for planning, analyzing the worksite, employee safety and evacuation, risk and threat analysis, operational factors, back up of systems and data, government and corporate planning, prevention, incident response, relocation, and disaster recovery. Prerequisites: MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040. Lab Hrs: 000. Other Hrs: 000. MAN 4302 Management of Human Resources 4 Quarter Credit Hours An advanced analysis of personnel functions including manpower planning, recruiting and selecting, evaluating, performance appraisal, training and development, and wage and salary considerations. Prerequisite: MAN 2300 or MAN 3100. Lec Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 4400 Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the environmental, historical, and legal framework of union-management relations; union structure at all levels; and collective bargaining, with an emphasis on issues of wages, economic supplements, and union security. Prerequisite: MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 4701 Business Ethics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course applies an ethical dimension to business decisions in today's complex political, social, economic and technological environment. Prerequisite None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAN 4764 Business Policy and Strategy 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of long-term strategy and planning management as it relates to the decision making process. Strategic management is introduced as the set of decisions and actions that will result in the design and activation of strategies to achieve the objectives of an organization. Prerequisite: MAN 2021. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 MAR 1011 Introduction to Marketing 4 Quarter Credit Hours The course deals with the distribution of goods from producer to consumer and covers such topics as characteristics of markets for consumer goods, marketing functions and the organizations that perform them, marketing methods and techniques, price policies, and the cost of marketing. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 2141 Introduction to International Marketing 4 Quarter Credit Hours Examines the basic principles of marketing in an international environment. Major areas of the cultural, political and economic environments affecting multinational marketing management are reviewed for analysis of international marketing problems. Prerequisite: MAR 1011. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 2305 Customer Relations and Servicing 4 Quarter Credit Hours Explores the basic functions relating to customers on a one-on-one basis. It teaches the skills needed to work with people to enhance the company, its public image, and satisfy the client or customer. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 2320 Advertising 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the principles and institutions involved in mass selling techniques. The student is introduced to the role of advertising as a sales and communications tool for business. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 2720 Marketing on the Internet 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the use of the Internet as a marketing and advertising medium. A study of the types of businesses and services utilizing the medium, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of doing business on the Internet. Prerequisite: MAR 1011. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 MAR 3156 Global Marketing 4 Quarter Credit Hours The study of essential issues and unique considerations confronting the marketing decision makers in a global environment. Comparative advantages, disadvantages, the interdependence of global marketing, and the importance of global research and market perceptions will be analyzed. Prerequisite: MAR 1011 or MAR 2141. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs:

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000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 3231 Retailing 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course gives an introduction to the nature and scope of retail merchandising as seen within the total economic structure of the market. Emphasis is placed on the many functions of a retail business, including employee relations and customer relations. Prerequisite: MAN 1030 or MAR 1011. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 3310 Public Relations 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of the principles and techniques involved in creating and maintaining a favorable public image. Various methods and factors involved in public relations are examined and discussed. Prerequisite: MAR 1011. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 3400 Salesmanship 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the basic principles and techniques of selling. Effective presentations and communications in selling are emphasized. Selling is studied as a marketing process in retail and industrial markets. Prerequisite None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 3503 Consumer Behavior 4 Quarter Credit Hours An extensive study of the behavioral aspects of the marketing process from producer to consumer. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of consumer motivation and factors leading to ultimate consumer buying decisions. Prerequisite: MAR 1011 or MAR 2320. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAR 4011 E-Commerce 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the background, current and future potential of electronic marketing, e-marketing, in the United States and globally as part of the larger set of concepts and theories in the marketing discipline including marketing knowledge, consumer behavior, segmentation, differentiation and positioning , 4-Ps of marketing, and customer relationship management. Students will learn common e-marketing business models and plan, develop and implement an emarketing plan that helps an organization of their choice generate revenue and deliver customer value. Prerequisite: MAR 1011 . Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MAT 0099 Fundamental Mathematics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to provide students with basic mathematical tools Includes fractions, signed number calculations, order of arithmetic operations, and an introduction to exponents. This course does not apply towards credits needed to graduate in any program. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 MAT 1033 College Algebra 4 Quarter Credit Hours The algebra of linear and quadratic equations, graphing, functions, inequalities, rational expressions, radicals, and system of equations. The course emphasizes critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: Assessment Test. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000. MCB 1087 Foundations of Microbiology-Chemistry 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides for the understanding of the basic foundations of chemistry and microbiology using an integrated approach for conceptual and teamwork strategies. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of the two disciplines through total integration and problem-solving approaches. Basic chemistry, organic and biochemistry, including cellular structure, function characteristics, classifications, physiology and pathology of microorganisms are part of the course. Pre-requisites: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 MCB 1087L Foundations of Microbiology-Chemistry Lab 2 Quarter Credit Hours Course Description: This course is the laboratory section of BIO 1087 and provides for the understanding of the basic foundations of chemistry and microbiology using an integrated approach for conceptual and teamwork strategies. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of the two disciplines through total integration and problem-solving approaches. Basic chemistry, organic and biochemistry, including cellular structure, function characteristics; classifications, physiology and pathology of microorganisms are medically applied through chemical and microbiology lab techniques. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in MCB 1087. Lec. Hrs: 000 Lab Hrs: 040 Other Hrs: 000 MTB 1103 Business Mathematics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course presents a comprehensive review of computational skills as they apply to the business world. Topics include fractions, decimals, banking and credit card transaction, equations, percents, discounting process (trade and cash), markups and markdowns, simple and compound interest, and payroll functions. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 NSG 1008 Nursing Fundamentals and Skills 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to introduce the student to the art and science of nursing. The focus will be on the development of a beginning understanding of the nursing process and the development of fundamental nursing skills essential to the provision of professional nursing care. Prerequisites: NSG1000. Co requisites: BIO1086C, NSG1008L, NSG2036. Course Notes: NSG1008 & NSG1008L must be successfully completed concurrently to meet program requirements. NSG 1008L Nursing Fundamentals and Skills Clinical I 2 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion of the Fundamentals of Nursing I course integrates the theory in on-campus labs for the purpose of practicing foundational skills in preparation for entry into a healthcare agency. NSG 1014L Nursing Fundamentals and Skills Clinical II 3 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion of the Fundamentals of Nursing II course integrates the theory in on-campus labs and healthcare agencies for the purpose of skills practice and competency. NSG 1014 Nursing Fundamentals and Skills II 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed as a continuance of NSG 1008. The courses are designed to progressively introduce the student to the art and science of nursing. The focus will be on further development of a foundational understanding of the nursing

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process and of fundamental nursing skills essential to the provision of professional nursing care. NSG 1028 Pharmacology for Nurses I 2 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to provide nursing students with knowledge of biological factors influencing drug actions; predictable effects of medications on a physiological problem; modifiers of the predictable effects; commonalities and variations between the actions of medications employed for comparable therapeutic effects; adverse effects of medications that can and do commonly occur. The application of the nursing process in drug therapy is presented throughout the course. This course will include a mathematics review, the foundations of pharmacology, antimicrobials, as well as drugs used for pain management. Medications affecting the urinary, autonomic, and central nervous systems; digestive, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems will be discussed. NSG 1040 Medical Surgical Nursing I 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course addresses the standards of practice for less complex nursing care of adults of all ages (to include geriatric clients) and focuses on the use of the nursing process in assisting clients to adapt to their ever-changing health needs. NSG 1040L Medical Surgical Nursing Clinical I 3 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion of the Care of the Adult Client I course integrates application of the theory learned to use in a variety of settings when caring for the adult/geriatric client with consultation with and availability of multiple health care resources. NSG 1042 Medical Surgical Nursing II 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course builds on the course content of NSG 1022 and focuses on the nursing care of the adult/geriatric client with altered health states. The nursing process is used as a continuing theme to integrate classroom theory with more complex clinical nursing care. NSG 1042L Medical Surgical Nursing Clinical II 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course builds on the course content of NSG 1042 and focuses on the nursing care of the adult/geriatric client with altered health states. The nursing process is used as a continuing theme to integrate classroom theory with more complex clinical nursing care. NSG 1044 Maternal Child Nursing 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to present the concepts of health and illness from conception through adolescence. The nursing process, growth and development and the family are integrated throughout. NSG 1044L Maternal Child Nursing Clinical 3 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion of Maternal Child nursing integrates and applies the theory learned to provide care with obstetric and pediatric clients in acute care agencies, community health agencies, schools and in simulated experiences in the nursing computer and skills lab. NSG 2012 Psychiatric Nursing 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course is a study of the dynamic relationship between adjustment mechanisms, stress and their effect on the personality with a focus on the nurse's role in caring for clients experiencing alterations in mental health and illness throughout the life span. NSG 2012L Psychiatric Nursing Clinical 3 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion of the Mental Health Nursing course integrates the theory learned in class to various mental health agencies. The focus is on the role of the nurse in mental health and illness through the lifespan utilizing the nursing process. NSG 2022 Community Health Nursing 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course focuses on the role of the nurse in the community setting. Emphasis is based on concepts and theories related to Community Health Nursing. Special consideration is given to the community as a client with emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. NSG 2022L Community Health Nursing Clinical 2 Quarter Credit Hours This clinical portion of the Contemporary Nursing in Community Settings course integrates the theory into various community settings. The focus is on nursing care for clients in alternative settings within the community and throughout the lifespan. NSG 2024 Pharmacology IIA 1 Quarter Credit Hour This course is a continuation of NSG 1028, Pharmacology for Nurses I, and is designed to build on and provide nursing students with a knowledge of biological factors influencing drug actions; predictable effects of medications on a physiological problem; modifiers of the predictable effects; commonalities and variations between the actions of medications employed for comparable therapeutic effects; adverse effects of medications that can and do commonly occur. The application of the nursing process in drug therapy is presented throughout the course. Prerequisites: Quarter IV; Co-requisites: NSG 1044, NSG 1044L, ENC 1101. Lec. Hrs: 010 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 NSG 2028 Pharmacology IIb 1 Quarter Credit Hour This course is a continuation of NSG 2024, Pharmacology IIA, and is designed to build on and provide nursing students with a knowledge of biological factors influencing drug actions; predictable effects of medications on a physiological problem; modifiers of the predictable effects; commonalities and variations between the actions of medications employed for comparable therapeutic effects; adverse effects of medications that can and do commonly occur. The application of the nursing process in drug therapy is presented throughout the course. Prerequisites: Quarter V NSG courses; Corequisites: NSG 2012, NSG 2012L, NSG 2022, NSG 2022L. Lec. Hrs: 010 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 NSG 2034 Pharmacology IIc 1 Quarter Credit Hour This course is a continuation of NSG 2028, Pharmacology IIb, and is designed to build on and provide nursing students with a knowledge of biological factors influencing drug actions; predictable effects of medications on a physiological problem; modifiers of the predictable effects; commonalities and variations between the actions of medications employed

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for comparable therapeutic effects; adverse effects of medications that can and do commonly occur. The application of the nursing process in drug therapy is presented throughout the course. Prerequisites: Quarter VI; Co-requisites: NSG 2042, NSG 2042L. Lec. Hrs: 010 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 NSG 2042 Critical Care Nursing 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course builds on the content of the previous nursing courses and continues the focus on nursing care of clients with altered health states of a very complex nature. The nursing process is used as a continuing theme to integrate advanced classroom theory with clinical practice. Principles of pathophysiology and nutrition are integrated into the course. NSG 2042L Critical Care Nursing Clinical 3 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion the Advanced Nursing Care course integrates and applies the theory learned by focusing on providing complex care to clients in various age groups in multiple clinical sites. Students are expected to coordinate the plan of care with the health care team and to function within the team as a member of the team. NSG 2050 Nursing Leadership & Management 3 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to develop beginning leadership skills for the Associate Degree Nursing students that are necessary to manage clients and health care workers. NSG 2050L Nursing Leadership & Management Clinical 3 Quarter Credit Hours The clinical portion of the course integrates the theoretical aspects of the course in a variety of settings. Students will be able to choose a preceptor, approved by the instructor, who is a nurse manager/leader and obtain experiences that will assist in molding the student for future management/leadership opportunities. NSG 2062 NCLEX Review 2 Quarter Credit Hours Focus of this course is on achievement of academic success in preparation for taking the NCLEX-RN licensure examination. Preparation for NCLEX-RN will be the focus of the course by providing a systematic review of nursing material with special emphasis on the NCLEX-RN test plan. OST 1141L Keyboarding 2 Quarter Credit Hours Designed to familiarize the student with basic keyboarding and develop minimum typing skills. Prerequisite: None . Lec. Hrs: 000 Lab Hrs: 040 Other Hrs: 000 OST 2335 Business Communications 4 Quarter Credit Hours Practical written communications skills for business are studied in this advanced course. This course includes the mechanics and principles of effective letter writing and methods of researching and compiling reports. Focus is on a better understanding of writing styles appropriate to the business world. Prerequisite: ENC 1102. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 1003 Introduction to Paralegal 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course introduces students to the paralegal's role and the nature of a career as a legal assistant. Legal procedures are presented in real-world context with a basic introduction to necessary skills, such as legal research, law office operations, technology in the law, and litigation. Vocabulary is learned in context. In-depth coverage is begun on legal ethics, professional regulation, trends and issues in the field, and the legal system. Career management for paralegal professionals is covered thoroughly. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 1105 Legal Research and Writing I 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers the basics of legal research, legal writing, and legal analysis for the legal assistant. Students learn to use a law library, perform legal research, analyze legal problems, and write a legal memorandum. Students are taught to locate and use both primary, secondary, and CALR legal research sources to solve legal problems. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2106 Legal Research and Writing II 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers advanced aspects of legal research, legal writing, and legal analysis for the legal assistant, with an emphasis on legal writing and analysis of complex issues. Students strengthen their legal research skills using a variety of primary and secondary sources, analyze complex legal problems, and write a persuasive memorandum or brief. Students also develop skills in computer assisted legal research and are introduced to fee-based services such as Westlaw, LEXIS as well as free Internet legal sources. Prerequisite: PLA 1105. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2203 Civil Procedure 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides the student with an introduction and overview to the procedures applicable to and governing civil matters, including procedures related to pleading, motions, discovery, trial practice, post-trial motions and other issues. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2273 Torts 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides an introduction to the substantive law of torts, including elements, defenses, and damages applicable to intentional torts, and to unintentional torts based on negligence, product liability, strict liability, and professional malpractice. The course provides opportunities for students to practice and improve their interviewing, investigation, document drafting and negotiation skills. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2363 Criminal Procedure and the Constitution 4 Quarter Credit Hours There will be a discussion of the Constitutional aspects of criminal procedure. The student will learn procedural aspects of the criminal system from arrest or summons through pretrial motions, trial, post-conviction and appellate processes. A study of the Constitution at work in the court system with current applications. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2423 Contract Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours

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The principles of contract law are addressed and discussed in this course including the major provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Basic contract provisions and drafting techniques are explained and practiced through the drafting of various types of contracts. Contract Litigation is also covered. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2433 Business Organizations 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course covers the principles of Business Organizations, including the formation, operation, and dissolution of various types of business organizations. Topics include sole proprietorships, corporations, partnerships, the law of agency, and employment agreements. Prerequisite: PLA 1003, PLA 2423. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2460 Bankruptcy 4 Quarter Credit Hours Bankruptcy law and procedure, including commencement of a case, preparing schedules, operating and liquidating procedures, adversary matters and litigation in bankruptcy court, debtors' and creditors' rights and obligations, technical terminology, and practical direction for paralegals. Forms used in bankruptcy court and proceedings under Chapter 7, Chapter 13, and, to a lesser extent, Chapter 11 and proceedings under Chapters 9 and 12 are also covered. The rights of creditors, including secured transactions, consensual and nonconsensual liens, UCC transactions, and the unique position of real estate, will be reviewed. The course also teaches garnishments and other judicial attachments of property. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2483 Introduction to Administrative Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines basic concepts of law and procedure in federal and state administrative agencies, with emphasis on the paralegal's role in the administrative process. Students will learn both formal and informal advocacy techniques, including representing clients before administrative bodies. Substantive topics will include administrative delegation of power, rulemaking, agency discretionary powers, remedies, open government, and judicial review. Procedural topics will include agency operation, adjudication, hearing preparation, and administrative and judicial appeals. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2600 Wills, Trusts, and Probate 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines legal concepts of wills, trusts, intestacy, guardianships, and conservatorships: analysis of client needs: drafting of simple wills: and study of various types of trusts and their application to particular client needs. Study of probate procedures, the administration of assets, methods of compiling both probate and non-probate estate and simple tax implications. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2610 Real Estate Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is an introduction to Real Estate law. Topics include property rights, principles of land ownership, sale, financing and conveyance, contracts, liens, mortgage financing, mortgages or deeds of trust, deeds, recording, settlement concepts, condominiums and cooperatives, leasing and other property concepts. Prerequisite: PLA 1003, PLA 2423 Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2763 Law Office Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines the fundamentals of law office management and organization. Subjects covered include basic principles and structure of law practice management, law practice structures, organization, and governance, client systems, timekeeping and accounting systems, human resources, marketing and strategic planning, administrative and substantive systems in the law office, and law practice technology. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2800 Family Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours Students are instructed in the theory of law governing marriage, divorce, annulment, property settlement agreements, child custody and support obligations, paternity, adoption, alimony, pre-nuptial agreements, name changes, and domestic violence. Students will be introduced to state-specific procedures and prepare various pleadings or documents related to these topics. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2929 Paralegal Capstone Course 4 Quarter Credit Hours In this capstone course, students will apply their broad knowledge of the paralegal profession through specific projects, integrating work-related competencies with academic information. This course will involve the students in practical problem-solving and hands-on scenarios that occur in the daily practice of law. Prerequisite: Students must be in the last two quarters of their program. Pass grade for this course is 70% or above. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 PLA 2930 Contemporary Issues and Law 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course examines contemporary law, including contemporary legal issues as well as practicing law in today's environment. Prerequisite: PLA 1003. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 POS 2041 American National Government 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of the Constitutional structure and dynamics of the American Federal system; included is an examination of the current structure, organization, powers, and procedures of the American national government. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS 1505. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 PSY 2012 General Psychology 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the general principles of psychology and theories underlying modern psychology. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS1505. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 RDG 0099 Fundamental Reading 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course will improve basic reading and study skills, with emphasis on vocabulary and comprehension. It is recommended to all students whose placement test scores indicate a need for instruction and practice in reading comprehension. Prerequisite: Assessment Score Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SBM 2000 Small Business Management 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course acquaints the student with principles of small business management. It introduces tools needed for effective

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planning, organizing, directing, and controlling of small business ownership. The course helps to prepare the student for management and/or ownership of a small business. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs:040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 SLS 1105 Strategies for Success 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to equip students for transitions in their education and life. The course includes introduction to the University and its resources, study skills, and personal resource management skills. Students will be actively involved in learning and integrating practical applications to promote success. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SLS 1321 Career Skills and Portfolio Development (previously known as Career Skills) 2 Quarter Credit Hours A course designed to assist students with personal and professional development for successful employment with a concentration on developing a positive self-image, assessing competitiveness strengths, career expectations, learning job search techniques, in addition to written skills and current resume preparation. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 020 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SLS 1354 Workplace Relationships 2 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides students the opportunity to study the building of appropriate interpersonal business relationships with coworkers, supervisors, and customers. Specific focus will be on developing and practicing effective customer service principles for building successful business networks. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 020 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SLS 1505 Basic Critical Thinking 2 Quarter Credit Hours This course introduces the students to the concepts of critical thinking. Topics covered include self critique and understanding, fair-minded thinking, the levels of thinking, the parts and standards for thinking, and developing ethical and strategic thinking. Students will examine effective ways to think more critically, and will apply these tools in course assignments. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 020 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SLS 3130 Principles and Applications of Adult Learning 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course offers an exploration of the principles and applications of adult learning theory, including goal-directed orientations to learning, participation factors for adult learners, and adult learner demographics. The course also addresses the connection between memory, cognition, and the brain, as they relate to the adult learning process. Prerequisite: None. Lec. Hrs: 040, Lab Hrs: 000, Other Hrs: 000 SOP 4005 Social Psychology 4 Quarter Credit Hours Many aspects of human interaction are investigated in this course, including topics such as aggression, attraction and love, conformity, sexual behavior, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: PSY 2012. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SPC 2017 Oral Communications 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course is designed to develop students' ability to communicate effectively. Emphasis is placed upon the basic elements of communication in order to strengthen students' interpersonal and professional speaking skills. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS 1505 None. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SPC 2300 Interpersonal Communications 4 Quarter Credit Hours The dynamics of interaction between people in personal, social, and workplace situations are explored to better understand how interpersonal communication shapes relationships. Exploration will occur through readings, discussion, and application exercises. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS 1505 Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 STA 2014 Statistics 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course introduces students to statistical techniques. Methods of describing, summarizing, and analyzing data are presented. Prerequisite: MAT 1033. Lec. Hrs: 040 Lab Hrs: 000 Other Hrs: 000 SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology 4 Quarter Credit Hours A study of cultural heritage, of the cultural influence of human nature and personality, and of social interaction. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS 1505 Lec. Hrs 040 Lab Hrs 000 Other Hrs 000 TAX 2000 Tax Accounting 4 Quarter Credit Hours This is a survey course covering the laws, procedures, returns, and subsidiary schedules involved in the preparation of Federal personal tax returns. Prerequisite: APA 2121. Lec. Hrs: 030, Lab Hrs: 020, Other Hrs: 000 WOH 2022 World History 4 Quarter Credit Hours This course provides an understanding of the major historical events, which have contributed to the development of today's civilization. Course content will also include a study of the philosophical, religious, and political traditions of Western civilizations. Prerequisite: ENC 1102, SLS 1505. Lec. Hrs 040 Lab Hrs 000 Other Hrs 000

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ADVISORY BOARDS

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX Dr. William M. Talboys, Chairman Beth Wilson Dr. Rick Simpson Michael H. Trujillo, M.D. Susan Morton Dr. Cedric Page BUSINESS ADVISORY BOARD Dr. N. Joseph Bacchus President and CEO Dr. Sue Murphy Vice President Rosalind Pereira Academic Dean Joseph Schnurr CFO Jason Smith Controller Dan Wright Division Dean CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADVISORY BOARD Michael Campbell Lieutenant Ron Lugay Detective Steve O'Dell MSFS, CCSA William Redmond Supervising Special Agent Fred Ruhland Commander Jerry Smith Children's Justice Coordinator Caroline Thompson Behavioral Health Technician Rosa Vega Youth Supervisor GENERAL EDUCATION ADVISORY BOARD Adele R. Cook Organization and Management Development Administrator Diana Furman Librarian Kenneth Kulhawy Senior Instructor General Education Norma Morales Senior Account Manager MEDICAL EDUCATION ADVISORY BOARD LeShonza Alexis Office Manager Ivette Campos Head Medical Assistant Meghan Comer Nurse Barbara Dodson Medical Assistant Instructor Georgianna Farias Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Justin Fossum Office Manager Terri Franklin Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Jon Frye Office Manager Alyssa Gentry Human Resource Manager Bonnie Hollins Medical Assistant Anu Kalyanam Medical Office Operations Manager George Medinca Biller Gloria Medina Office Manager Michaela Palomares Office Manager Rene Palmomares Office Manager Deb Ryan Office Manager Stephanie Safis Office Manager Robert Seabolt Human Resource Manager Svedana Shehu Medical Doctor Jill Tom President Julie Wolfer Office Supervisor Tiffany Woods Medical Billing and Coding PARALEGAL ADVISORY BOARD Joan Dalton Public Sector Paralegal Betty Haddock Private Sector Paralegal

J-Bac & Associates, Inc. Academic and Institutional Services Everest College PhoenixOnline Division Handling Systems, Inc. Redburn Tire Company Science and Communication Arts Superior Police Department Scottsdale Police Department Phoenix Police Department U.S. Secret Service Mesa Police Department Family Advocacy Center Grand Canyon University Maricopa County Probation Department Department of Economic Security Everest College Phoenix Collins College Latino Perspectives Magazine Goodman and Partridge, OBGYN Pueblo Pedicatrics Mayo Clinic and Hospital Everest College Phoenix Insurance Administration Corporation Silver Tree Health Everest College Phoenix Pierpont Family Medicine Associated Billing Services Arizona Kidney Disease and Hypertension Center Arizona Multidisciplinary Pain Center Ventec Group Ventec Group Gilbert Primary Care Gilbert Primary Care Arizona Home care Foot and Ankle Specialty Goodman and Partridge, OBGYN Everest College Phoenix Kachina Valley Coders Tri City Cardiology Recovery Innovations Attorney General's Office Next Step for Families

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Rick Johnson Lead Instructor, Paralegal program Meredith Larabee Private Sector Paralegal Manager J. Kenneth Mangum Superior Court Judge Melvin McDonald Private Sector Attorney Nancy Scalarcio Paralegal Cari Shehorn Private Sector Paralegal Barbara Ochs General Public Member Jason Venditti Private Sector Attorney Nathan Watts Public Sector Attorney NURSING ADVISORY BOARD Amanda Aguirre Student Dina Capek Director of Health Services David Cresap Vice President of Nursing Class Terry Duffy Education Consultant Pamela Ohls RN Clinical Education Specialist Pat Ray Workforce Development Stacy Saunders Alternate of Nursing Class Paul Sitto Alternate of Nursing Class Stephanie Templeton Executive Director Daniel Tetting Retired; formerly MCCD clinical coordinator and director of Phoenix College nursing program Clinical Coordinator

Everest College Phoenix Snell & Wilmer, PLLC Maricopa County Jones, Skelton & Hoculi Hastings and Hastings Iafrate & Associates Petrie & Venditti, PLC City of Phoenix Prosecutor's Office Everest College Phoenix Royal Oaks Everest College Phoenix John. C. Lincoln Hospital Banner Desert Medical Center Banner Sun Health Everest College Phoenix Everest College Phoenix The Stratford Maricopa Community Colleges

Jane Werth

Maricopa Community College

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APPENDIX A: ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY AND STAFF

Administration Dr. Edward Johnson Dr. Michael Berry Steve Corrozi Annie Preston Karen Phelps Ken Griego PHOENIX CAMPUS Todd McDonald Meghan Booth ACADEMICS Joellyn Schnurr Ella Dawson Maud Chesnutt Julia Davis Sharon Rudy Susan Barnfield Julie Carpenter Jeremy Sierra Elaine Raker Julie Carpenter Susan Gonda Corey McMillin Kelly Chesnutt Valerie Smith Dr. Simone Abou-Arraj Kim Steinmetz Rebecca Patton Steve Ripple Annette Munster Rayna Young Kim Davidson ADMISSIONS Nick Thoreson Cathy Williams Ray James Karen Littleton Tom McLaughlin Joan Orr Sandy Sacs Rodger Walker Susan Berger Caleb Clausing Kelly Merrell Tammy Watson Connie Kloos Sandra Mason Jennifer Vicente Correna Wauneka President, Everest College Phoenix Provost, Everest College Phoenix Chief Operating Officer, Everest College Phoenix Faculty Mentor Online Academic Program Director Academic Project Specialist Campus President Senior Administrative Assistant

Academic Dean Associate Academic Dean Registrar Registrar Attendance Clerk Student Success Coordinator Student Success Coordinator Campus Network Administrator Director of Outcomes Assessment and Regulatory Affairs Campus Disability Student Coordinator Director School of Nursing Nursing Administrative Assistant General Education Academic Program Director Business & Accounting Academic Program Director Medical Academic Program Director Paralegal Academic Program Director Paralegal Administrative Assistant Criminal Justice & Criminal Investigations Academic Program Director Education Administrative Assistant Instructional Support Technician Online Coordinator Director of Admissions Admissions Team Leader Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative High School Admissions Representative High School Admissions Representative High School Admissions Coordinator High School Admissions Coordinator Receptionist Receptionist Receptionist Receptionist

STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES Josephine Chani Director of Finance Melvin "Bud" Mercer Director of Student Accounts Kelly Reyes Student Finance Processor Marvie Young Student Finance Processor Alicia Flippin Student Finance Processor Ernesto Valencia Student Finance Planner

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Alexander Hernandez James Carroll Richard Neubert LIBRARY Diana Furman Melissa Jessens CAREER SERVICES Renee' Mayo Beth Ciaramello Ann Fennell Justine Barton Jo Carson Troy Maskell Jinkee Pacifico Liz Cielma Leslie Lohn Karen Brown Joseph Bourcier

Student Finance Planner Student Finance Planner Student Account Representative Everest College Phoenix Librarian Library Assistant Director of Career Services Administrative Assistant Medical Assistant Externship Coordinator Medical Assistant Externship Coordinator Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Externship Coordinator Career Services Representative Career Services Representative Career Services Representative Career Services Representative Account Representative Account Representative

PHOENIX CAMPUS ­ FACULTY

Name David Allen Mark Allen Karie Anderson Patrice Augustyniak Dr. Nathan Joseph Bacchus Lucy Bard Carla Beck Michelle Becker Linda Benjamin Mary Borunda Ted Brewster Lewis Bright Maria Cimpoiasu Valeriu Cimpoiasu Ann Marie Crawford Lisa DeMatteo Daniel Faretta Discipline Paralegal Business Medical Assistant Medical Assistant General Education, Business Medical Assistant General Education Medical Assistant Nursing Nursing General Education Nursing Medical Assistant Medical Assistant General Education General Education Nursing Credentials JD, BA, University of Arizona Post Baccalaureate Certificate, Stanford Graduate School of Business Executive Program Diploma, Long Medical Institute Diploma, Aristotle College Diploma, Redfern College PhD, Capella University MBA, Western International University BS, University of Arizona AB, University of Georgia AD, Augusta State University MEd, University of Phoenix BS, University of South Dakota Diploma, Aristotle College MSN, Walden University BSN, University of Phoenix ASN, Mesa Community College MBA, Kent State University MSN, Kent State University BSN, Kent State University MS, Brigham Young University BS, Southern Connecticut State University BSN, University of Mississippi Medical Center MD, Romania MD, Romania BBA, MBA, Western International University BSN University of Mississippi Medical Center MBA, University of Phoenix MA, Fairleigh Dickinson University BA, University of South Florida BSN, Arizona State University AAS, Gateway Community College BS, University of MD Europe AAS, Southwest Academy of Technology MSN ­ ED University of Phoenix BSN, Indiana University ADN, Indiana University MBA, BS, Western International University MS, Grand Canyon University BSN, Arizona State University

Rhonda Faretta Georgianna Farris Sarah Fazz

Nursing Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Nursing

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Name Josie Foreman Mark Fowler Terri Franklin Dwight Galda Vinson Goddard Patricia Guillen Lupe' Hedrick Michael Hice Barry Horodner John Humphrey Bruce Janis

Discipline Criminal Investigations Paralegal Medical Insurance Billing and Coding General Education, Business, Accounting Criminal Justice Business Medical Assistant Criminal Justice General Education Criminal Justice Accounting, Business

Calvin Janney Jill Jones Katherine Kazanas Kevin Khalili Jon Knight Angela Kruszynski Carol Lanzotti Timothy Lawrence Corazon Lawton Peter Leonard David Lish Michael Macdonald Kenneth Mangum Linda Mazion Marlene McKnight Willis Jack McNabb Daniel Mosbrucker Sharon Moser Craig Mumpton David Nelson Charlotte Newman Christina Pennington

Nursing Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Criminal Investigations General Education Medical Billing and Coding Paralegal Nursing Criminal Justice Nursing Business Criminal Justice, Criminal Investigations, Paralegal, General Education English, College Core Paralegal Medical Assistant Medical Assistant General Education General Education, Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Medical Insurance Billing and Coding General Education Business Nursing

Credentials AAS, Central Arizona College JD, Texas Tech University BA University of Texas Certificate, Maric College of Medical Careers MBA, Texas Christian University MS, MPA, University of Texas BA, Widener University JD Willamette University BS, Drake University M.A., University of Phoenix B.S., University of Phoenix Diploma, Southwestern Medical Society Certificate, Cross Country University BS, Western Michigan University MS, BS, Herbert Lehman College M.S., Northern Arizona University B.S., Arizona State University MBA, Yale University Post Baccalaureate Certificate Accountancy, Arizona State University Post Baccalaureate ABT, New York University B.A., Emory University BSN, University of Texas Health Science Center Certified Medical Insurance Biller and Coder BS, University of Arizona MS, University of Phoenix BS, University of Tulsa BS, University of Oklahoma ASC University of Maryland JD, Creighton University BA, College of St. Mary M.S., Grand Canyon University BSN, University of Phoenix AND, Oakland Community College MAOM, University of Phoenix BS, University of Phoenix MEd, Wayne State University BSN, University of Detroit MBA, Ottawa University BS, Southwestern College JD, BA, Arizona State University MA, Northern Arizona University BA, Arizona State University JD, University of Chicago BA, Brigham Young University DC, Logan College CSDE, Parker College FIACA, New York Chiropractic AS, Anthem College PhD, University of Utah MA, BA California State University BS, DC, Palmer College AAS, American Institute BS, State University of New York MFA, Arizona State University BA, The Evergreen State College MA, Webster University BSM University of North Texas Ed.D., North Central University MSN, University of Phoenix

76

Name Robert Pitassi Maricar Puno Landon Richardson Craig Rodriguez Dwight Salas Svedana Shehu Aubrei Smith Richard Solita Doris Spoerner Zachary Stahmer Wendy Taines Robert Tavernaro Nathan Watts Stephen Weston Katrina Washington Susan White Michelle Williams Mariam Youssef

Discipline Paralegal Nursing Nursing Business, Accounting General Education Medical Assistant General Education Criminal Justice, Criminal Investigation Nursing Business Medical Assistant Criminal Investigation Paralegal General Education Medical Assistant Nursing, General Education Criminal Justice, Criminal Investigation Medical Assistant

Credentials BSN, Arizona State University LLM, Boston University JD, Boston College of Law AB, Providence College BSN, Grand Canyon University ADN, Mesa/Boswell School of Nursing BSN, Northern Arizona University AASN, Central Arizona University MBA, University of Phoenix BS, Western International University MA, Kings College, London, U.K. BA, University of Arizona MD, Equivalent Turkish Medical School Bam Equivalent Turkish College MA, University of San Diego BA, Northern Arizona University MS, Arizona State University BS, Lewis University MSN, University of Phoenix BS, University of St. Francis AND, Purdue University MBA, University of Phoenix BS, Marquette University BA, University of Phoenix Certified Latent Fingerprint Examiner JD, BA, University of Arizona MA, New England College BS, Park University Diploma, Technical Career Institute DC, Parker College of Chiropractic BA, University of Oregon MS, National University BS, Northern Arizona University BA, Faculty of Medicine Diploma, American University

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MESA CAMPUS

ADMINISTRATION Mary Ritter Colleen Kantarze Tiffany Obenour Christine Lal Mark Hernandez ACADEMICS Michael D. Cook David Ashe Dr. Michael Sims Kim Steinmetz David Thompson Jacqueline Troupe Stacey Hoffman Elise Alva Cindy Maple Laura Decker Richard Adams Amanda Estravit Brittany Hodge-Dail Bea Pidal ADMISSIONS Chris Fogarty James Hunt Curbris James Gene Lambert Garrett Thomas Tara White Rochel Cobb Vickie Stefaniak Lisa Aguilar Kelly Gates Campus President Director of First Impressions Director of First Impressions Administrative Assistant Network Administrator

Academic Dean Criminal Justice and Criminal Investigations Academic Program Director Medical Assistant and Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Academic Program Director Paralegal Academic Program Director General Education, Accounting, and Business Academic Program Director Librarian Compliance Specialist Student Success Coordinator Registrar Assistant Registrar Instructional Support Technician Instructional Support Technician Instructional Support Technician Instructional Support Technician

Director of Admissions Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative Admissions Representative High School Enroller High School Enroller High School Admissions Representative High School Admissions Representative

STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES Meliza Ella Director of Finance and Student Accounts Joseph Freeman Student Finance Planner Kelli Peters Student Finance Planner Lindsay Reed Student Finance Planner Jennifer Manley Student Finance Representative Daniel Shaw Student Finance Representative CAREER SERVICES Elise Alva Elaine Cummings Rod Garcia Crystal Ezcurra Stephanie Esterline Gabriel Johnson Carol Kirkendoll

Interim Director of Career Services Account Representative Account Representative Externship Administrator Externship Administrator Career Services Representative Career Services Representative

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MESA CAMPUS - FACULTY

Name Gary Adams Marshan Andre Monya Ashe Melissa Bahle Joan Barnes Mahdi Brown Michael Campbell David Cutchen Justine Dusanek Jonathan Dutcher Donna Fine Noreen Forcelli Julie Gambell Melissa Giudici Lynda Hagler Mark Hernandez Richard Johnson Coy Johnston Jr. Wanda Little Donna Manaraze Discipline Criminal Justice Medical Assistant General Education General Education General Education Medical Assistant Justice Studies General Education Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Paralegal Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Medical Assistant General Education General Education Medical Assistant General Education Paralegal Studies Justice Studies Medical Assistant General Education Credentials MA, State University of New York College at Buffalo BS, The American University Diploma, Lawton Institute of Medical Studies M.B.A. University of Phoenix B.A. Arizona State University M.A. Western Governors University B.A. Edinboro University of Pennsylvania M.B.A. University of Phoenix B.S. Arizona State University N.D. Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine B.S. University of Phoenix M.Ed. Northern Arizona University B.S. Brigham Young University J.D. McGeorge School of Law Diploma, Everest College Phoenix JD ,Arizona State University BS, Brigham Young University AAS, Nassau Community College Diploma, Everest College Phoenix MA, Northern Arizona University BA, Arizona State University AS, Snow College BA. Arizona State University A.A. Palm Beach Community College MAEd, University of Phoenix BSN, Milliken University MBA, Western International University BS, University of Phoenix J.D. Arizona State University M.C. Arizona State University B.S. University of New Mexico M.A. Northern Arizona University B.S. University of Phoenix Diploma, Bryman College M. Ed. University of Phoenix B.R.E. Citadel Bible College Nicole Marthaler Brian McCabe Amber Metz Hanifah Muhammad John Nanni Kristen Oleksik Carolyn Queen Kavona Reyes Nathan Riggs Janet Romo Evette Ruinard Rebekkah Sax Mary Scott General Education Business Justice Studies Medical Assistant Business Justice Studies Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Business General Education Medical Assistant Medical Assistant Medical Insurance Billing and Coding M.S. Carnegie Mellon University B.S. Northern Arizona University M.S.F. Loyola College Maryland B.S. York College of Pennsylvania M.S. University of Central Oklahoma B.S. Oklahoma State University N.D. Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine M.P.H. Morehouse School of Medicine B.A. Spelman College MBA, University of Texas at Dallas BS, Northern Arizona University M.S. Albany State University B.A. Miami University of Ohio BS, University of Central Oklahoma Diploma, Everest College M.B.A. University of Phoenix B.A. Arizona State University M.A. Ottawa University B.A. Arizona State University BS, University of Maryland N.D. Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine B.S. North Dakota State University A.A.S.Gateway Community College

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Name Susan Shannon Scott Shields Cheryl Sperling Roberta Stanfield Bryon Stones Linda Walker Gary Wolf Ayesha Worsham Vanessa Zuniga

Discipline Medical Insurance Billing and Coding General Education Justice Studies Medical Assistant Criminal Investigations Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Justice Studies Medical Assistant Medical Insurance Billing and Coding

Credentials Diploma, Everest College Phoenix Certificate, American Academy of Professional Coders M.Ed. Arizona State University J.D. Golden Gate University B.A. California State University Chico Diploma, Everest College Phoenix BS, University of Phoenix AS, Ventura Community College Diploma, Everest College M.S. Minot State University B.A. Minot State University N.D. Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine B.S. DePaul University Diploma, Everest College

EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX- ONLINE OPERATIONS Kalani Morris Online Site Director Rosalind Pereira Senior Registrar Crystal Coon Director, Student Services Michael Del Valle Director, Student Services D'Aisha Parks Director, Student Accounts Jason Barnhardt Director, Student Finance Montaque Stevens Director, Student Finance Catherine Sybrant Director, Career Services EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX ­ ONLINE ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION At the time of the publication of this catalog, there were over 150 online adjunct instructors. Online adjunct instructors are managed by Karen Phelps, Academic Program Director of Online Instruction and Dr. Michael Berry, Everest College Phoenix Provost. For information about specific instructors, please contact: Dr Michael Berry Everest College Phoenix, Provost Karen Phelps Academic Program Director of Online Instruction Ilene Calderon Academic Support Coordinator-Online Cynthia Jansen Faculty Support Coordinator-Online

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APPENDIX B: TUITION AND FEES

MESA CAMPUS Program Program Length 24 Months 24-48 Months 8 Months Quarter Credit Hours 96-104 96-200 47 47 47 47 Textbooks and Equipment (estimated) $355 per quarter $355 per quarter $1,261 $1,261 $1,916 $1,916

Tuition $313 Per Credit $313 Per Credit $13,295 $12,795 $13,049 $12,549

Associate Degree Programs Bachelor Degree Programs

Medical Assistant Diploma Medical Assistant Diploma (afternoons 8 Months session) Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Diploma 8 Months Version 2 Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Diploma 8 Months Version 2 (afternoon sessions) Other fees: *Criminal Investigations kit and camera fee: $600 (estimated) Effective January 1, 2011 MESA CAMPUS Program

Program Length 24 Months 24-48 Months 8 Months

Quarter Credit Hours 96-104 96-200 47 47 47 47

Tuition $313 Per Credit $313 Per Credit $13,295 $12,795 $13,049 $12,549

Associate Degree Programs Bachelor Degree Programs

Medical Assistant Diploma Medical Assistant Diploma (afternoons 8 Months session) Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Diploma 8 Months Version 2 Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Diploma 8 Months Version 2 (afternoon sessions) Other fees: *Criminal Investigations kit and camera fee: $600 (estimated) Effective July 1, 2011 PHOENIX CAMPUS Program Program Length Quarter Credit Hours

Textbooks and Equipment (estimated) $355 per quarter $355 per quarter $1,276 $1,276 $1,955 $1,955

Tuition $313 Per Credit $313 Per Credit $13,295 $12,795 $13,049 $12,549 $401 per credit

Associate Degree Programs 24 Months 96-104 Bachelor Degree Programs 24-48 Months 96-200 Medical Assistant Diploma 8 Months 47 Medical Assistant Diploma 8 Months 47 (Afternoon Session) Medical Insurance Billing and 8 Months 47 Coding Diploma 8 months 47 Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Diploma (afternoon session) Registered Nursing Program 24 months 108 Other fees: *Criminal Investigations kit and camera fee: $600 (estimated) Effective January 1, 2011

Textbooks and Equipment (estimated) $355 per quarter $355 per quarter $1,288 $1,288 $1,921 $1,921 $525 per quarter

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PHOENIX CAMPUS Program Program Length Quarter Credit Hours Textbooks and Equipment (estimated) $355 per quarter $355 per quarter $1,303 $1,303 $1,981 $1,981 $525 per quarter

Tuition $313 Per Credit $313 Per Credit $13,295 $12,795 $13,049 $12,549 $401 per credit

Associate Degree Programs 24 Months 96-104 Bachelor Degree Programs 24-48 Months 96-200 Medical Assistant Diploma 8 Months 47 Medical Assistant Diploma 8 Months 47 (Afternoon Session) Medical Insurance Billing and 8 Months 47 Coding Diploma 8 months 47 Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Diploma (afternoon session) Registered Nursing Program 24 months 108 Other fees: *Criminal Investigations kit and camera fee: $600 (estimated) Effective July 1, 2011

EVEREST COLLEGE PHOENIX ONLINE Program Continuing Students Associates and Bachelors with start dates prior to July 2008

New Students Associates and Bachelors and continuing students with start dates July 2008 and later First term tuition ­ Associates and Bachelors Mini Term Start students (subsequent $3230 per quarter terms at above continuing student quarterly price) First term tuition ­ Associates and Bachelors Micro Term Start students (subsequent $1615 per quarter terms at above continuing student quarterly price) Criminal Investigations Kit and Camera Fee: $600 (estimated) effective for new enrollments beginning the October 2008 quarter. There is a one time fee of $200.00 for all students enrolled in online classes. Tuition effective October 1, 2008

Tuition $404 per quarter credit hour $4844 per quarter

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APPENDIX C: CALENDARS

DEGREE PROGRAM CALENDARS

Academic Calendar 2010 ­ 2011 Summer Term Starts July Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline July Mini-Term Starts August Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline August Labor Day Holiday September Micro-Term Starts September Summer Term Ends October Fall Break From: To: October October October October November November November December December December January January January January January January January January February February March March April April April April May May May June June July July July July 12 25 23 29 6 13 3 4 10 11 24 22 25 26 1 13 23 2 3 9 10 16 17 18 31 21 28 6 21 10 11 17 18 2 30 31 6 20 4 10 11 17 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Thanksgiving Day Holiday Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday Classes Resume Fall Term Ends Winter Break M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Starts Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation

From: To:

From: To:

From: To:

From: To:

Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Independence Day Holiday Spring Term Ends Summer Vacation

From: To:

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FY 2011 ­ 2012 Academic Calendar Summer Term Starts July Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline July Mini-Term Starts August Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline September Labor Day Holiday September Micro-Term Starts September Summer Term Ends October Fall Break From: To: October October October October From: To: November November November December December December January January January January January January February February March March April April April April April May May June June July July July July

18 31 29 4 5 19 9 10 16 17 30

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

FY 2013 Academic Calendar Summer Term Starts July Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline July Mini-Term Starts August Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline September Labor Day Holiday September Micro-Term Starts September Summer Term Ends October Fall Break From: To: October October October October From: To: November November November December December December January January January January January January February February March March April April April April April May May June June July July July July

16 29 27 2 3 17 7 8 14 15 28

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Thanksgiving Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday Classes Resume Fall Term Ends M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Starts Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation

24 25 28 4 19 23 2 3 15 16 17 30 20 27 4 19 8 9 15 16 29 28 29 4 18 4 8 9 15

Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Thanksgiving Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday Classes Resume Fall Term Ends Winter Term Starts M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

22 23 26 2 17 22 1 2 13 14 21

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

From: To:

From: To:

28 18 25 3 18 7 8 14 15 28 27 28 3 17 4 7 8 14

2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

From: To:

From: To:

Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Independence Day Holiday Spring Term Ends Summer Vacation

From: To:

Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Independence Day Holiday Spring Term Ends Summer Vacation

From: To:

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FY 2014 Academic Calendar Summer Term Starts July Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline July Mini-Term Starts August Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline September Labor Day Holiday September Micro-Term Starts September Summer Term Ends October Fall Break From: To: October October October October November From: To: November November December December December January January January January January January February February March March April April April April April May May June June July July July July

15 28 26 1 2 16 6 7 13 14 27 25 28 29 3 16 23 1 2 12 13 20

2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014

FY 2015 Academic Calendar Summer Term Starts July Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline July Mini-Term Starts August Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline August Labor Day Holiday September Micro-Term Starts September Summer Term Ends October Fall Break From: To: October October October October November From: To: November November December December December January January January January January January February February March March April April April April April May May June June From: To: From: To: July July July July July

14 27 25 31 1 15 5 6 12 13 26 24 27 28 2 15 23 2 3 11 12 19

2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015

Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Thanksgiving Day Holiday Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday Classes Resume Fall Term Ends Winter Term Starts M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation

Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Thanksgiving Day Holiday Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday Classes Resume Fall Term Ends Winter Term Starts M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation

From: To:

From: To:

27 17 24 2 17 6 7 13 14 28 26 27 2 16 4 6 7 13

2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014

26 16 23 1 16 5 6 12 13 26 25 26 1 15 3 4 5 6 12

2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015

From: To:

From: To:

Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Independence Day Holiday Spring Term Ends Summer Vacation

Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Independence Day Holiday Spring Term Ends Summer Vacation

From: To:

85

Academic Year 2015 - 2016 Summer Term Starts Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Labor Day Holiday Micro-Term Starts Summer Term Ends Fall Break From: To: Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Thanksgiving Day Holiday From: To: Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday From: To: Classes Resume Fall Term Ends Winter Term Starts M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation From: To: Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Spring Term Ends Independence Day Holiday Summer Vacation

July July August August September September October October October October October November November November December December December January January January January January January February February February March April April April April April May May May June July

13 27 24 31

2015 2015 2015 2015 2015

Academic Year 2016 - 2017 Summer Term Starts Summer Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Labor Day Holiday Micro-Term Starts Summer Term Ends Fall Break From: To:

July July August August September September October October October October October November

11 25 22 29 5 12 2 3 9 10 24 21 24 27 28 12 24 1 2 8 9 16

2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017

7 14 4 5 11 12 26 23 26 29 7 14 24 3 4 10 11

2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016

Fall Term Start Fall Term Drop/Add Deadline Mini-Term Starts Thanksgiving Day Holiday Mini-Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Holiday Classes Resume Fall Term Ends Winter Term Starts M.L. King Jr. Birthday Holiday Winter Term Drop/Add Deadline Presidents' Day Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Winter Term Ends Spring Vacation

From: To:

November November November December December January January January January January January February February February March April April April April April May May May June July

From: To:

18 2016 25 15 22 29 21 3 4 10 11 2016 25 2016 30 23 31 13 3 4 4 10 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016 2016

23 20 21 28 13 2 3 9 10 24 29 22 30 12 2 4 3 9

2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017

From: To:

Spring Term Starts Spring Term Drop/Add Deadline Memorial Day Holiday Mini-Term Starts Mini Term Drop/Add Deadline Micro-Term Starts Spring Term Ends Independence Day Holiday Summer Vacation

From: To:

July July July

From: To:

July July July

86

DIPLOMA PROGRAM CALENDARS Phoenix Campus

Medical Assistant, Medical Insurance Billing and Coding AM/PM/Eve

Start 2/24/11 3/24/11 4/28/11 5/26/11 6/24/11 7/29/11 8/29/11 9/27/11 10/25/11 11/22/11 12/22/11 1/30/12 2/28/12 3/27/12 4/24/12 5/22/12 6/20/12 End 3/23/11 4/27/11 5/25/11 6/23/11 7/28/11 8/25/11 9/26/11 10/24/11 11/21/11 12/21/11 1/27/12 2/27/12 3/26/12 4/23/12 5/21/12 6/19/12 7/24/12 Medical Assistant, Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Weekend Schedule Start 02/12/11 03/12/11 04/09/11 05/14/11 06/18/11 7/23/11 8/20/11 9/24/11 10/22/11 11/19/11 1/7/12 2/4/12 3/3/12 3/31/12 5/5/12 6/9/12 End 03/06/11 04/03/11 05/08/11 06/12/11 07/17/11 8/14/11 9/18/11 10/16/11 11/13/11 12/18/11 1/29/12 2/26/12 3/25/12 4/29/12 6/3/12 7/1/12

Student Breaks Weekday Schedule

Spring Break Holiday Summer Break No Class Holiday Holiday Winter Break Holiday Holiday Holiday Summer Break 4/11 ­ 4/15/11 5/30/11 7/2 ­ 7/8/11 8/26 ­ 8/26/11 9/8 ­ 9/8/11 11/24 ­ 11/25/11 12/24/11 ­ 1/2/12 1/16/12 2/20/12 5/28/12 7/9 ­ 7/13/12

Student Breaks Weekend Schedule

Spring Break Holiday Summer Break Holiday Holiday Winter Break Holiday Holiday Summer Break 4/23 ­ 4/24/11 5/28 ­ 5/29/11 7/2 ­ 7/3/11 9/3 ­ 9/4/11 11/26 ­ 11/27/11 12/24/11 ­ 1/2/12 4/7 ­ 4/8/12 5/26 ­ 5/27/12 7/9 ­ 7/13/12

87

Mesa campus

Medical Assistant, Medical Insurance Billing and Coding AM, PM, Eve Schedule 2011-2012 Start End 2/14/11 3/14/11 3/15/11 4/18/11 4/19/11 5/16/11 5/17/11 6/14/11 6/15/11 7/19/11 7/20/11 8/16/11 8/17/11 9/14/11 9/15/11 10/19/11 10/20/11 11/16/11 11/17/11 12/16/11 12/19/11 1/25/12 Medical Insurance Billing and Coding Weekend Schedule 2011 Start End 3/5/11 3/27/11 4/2/11 5/1/11 5/7/11 6/5/11 6/11/11 7/10/11 7/16/11 8/7/11 8/13/11 9/11/11 9/17/11 10/9/11 10/22/11 11/13/11 11/19/11 12/18/11 Medical Assistant Weekend Schedule 2011 Start End 3/4/11 3/26/11 4/1/11 4/30/11 5/6/11 6/4/11 6/10/11 7/9/11 7/15/11 8/6/11 8/12/11 9/10/11 9/16/11 10/8/11 10/21/11 11/12/11 11/18/11 12/17/11

Mesa Diploma Programs Weekend Schedule Friday and Saturday 2011 Start End 02/18/2011 03/18/2011 04/22/2011 05/20/2011 06/17/2011 07/22/2011 08/19/2011 09/16/2011 03/12/2011 04/09/2011 05/14/2011 06/11/2011 07/09/2011 08/13/2011 09/10/2011 10/08/2011

Mesa Diploma Programs Weekend Schedule Saturday and Sunday 2011 Start End 02/26/2011 03/26/2011 04/30/2011 05/28/2o11 06/25/2011 07/30/2011 08/27/2011 03/20/2011 04/24/2011 05/22/2011 06/19/2011 07/24/2011 08/21/2011 09/18/2011

Mesa Diploma Programs Student Breaks Weekday Schedule 2011 4/4/20114/8/2011 7/4/20117/8/2011

Spring Break Summer Break

Day Monday Monday Monday Monday Monday Monday

Mesa Diploma Calendar Evening Medical Assistant Start Day 2/7/2011 Thursday 3/7/2011 Thursday 4/11/2011 Thursday Spring Break 4/4/2011-4/8/2011 5/9/2011 Thursday 6/6/2011 Thursday 7/11/2011 Thursday Summer Break 7/4/2011-7/8/2011

End 3/3/2011 3/31/2011 5/5/2011 6/2/2011 6/30/2011 8/4/2011

Mesa Medical Assistant Diploma Program Early AM/AM/Midday/EVE Schedule 2011 Day Start Day End Monday 2/7/2011 Thursday 3/3/2011 Monday 3/7/2011 Thursday 3/31/2011 Monday 4/4/2011 Thursday 5/5/2011 Spring Break 4/11/2011-4/17/2011 Monday 5/9/2011 Thursday 6/2/2011 Monday 6/6/2011 Thursday 6/30/2011 Monday 7/4/2011 Thursday 8/4/2011 Summer Break 7/11/2011-7/17/2011

88

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