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Key Stage 2 Thematic Units of Work

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Contents Year 3 Units

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: RECONCILIATION AND DISCIPLESHIP Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: SUBMISSION Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: KARMA AND SAMSARA Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION Theme: PARABLES AND THE CROSS Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: BELIEFS IN ACTION Theme: KINGDOM OF GOD AND MISSION Religion: JUDAISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS IN ACTION AND BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: COVENANT AND MITZVOT

Year 4 Units

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE Theme: INCARNATION, SALVATION, SIN Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE Theme: RISALAH (message), PROPHETHOOD Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE Theme: AVATAR

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Religion: SIKHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE AND SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION Theme: GURU AND IK ONKAR Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY Theme: BAPTISM / BODY OF CHRIST Religion: SIKHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY Theme: KHALSA AND LANGAR

Year 5 Units

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: GOSPEL / TESTAMENT Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: REVELATION Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: YOGA / MOKSHA Religion: JUDAISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: TORAH Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: YEAR 5 WORSHIP, PILGRIMAGE AND SACRED PLACES Theme: EUCHARIST / PILGRIM PEOPLE Religion: HUMANISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: HAPPINESS / RESPONSIBILITY

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Year 6 Units

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: TRINITY / IMAGE OF GOD Religion: ISLAM Area of Study BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: TAWHID / AKHIRAH Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: BRAHMAN / ATMAN Religion: BUDDHISM Area of Study: REVISITING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: BUDDHA / DUKKHA Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH Theme: FAITH RESURRECTION Religion: BUDDHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH Theme: DHAMMA / NIRVANA

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Farmington Institute Beth Boast June 2009 Key Stage 2 Thematic Units of Work

[email protected] For further information about Farmington Fellowships please see the Farmington Institute website http://www.farmington.ac.uk

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Introduction These units of work were created in response to a need in my school; we faced the challenge of changing from a 7 ­ 12 middle school to a 5 ­ 11 primary at the same time that we also wanted to embrace a more creative approach to the curriculum. Having taught Religious Education for many years, I was struck by how easy it was to teach about religion, and how very difficult it was to challenge the children to reflect on, analyse and evaluate larger issues and concepts. Whilst I was developing the children's understanding and knowledge of beliefs and practices on one level, I was aware that I struggled at times to develop their ability to reflect on their own beliefs, values and experiences on a deeper level. Children were happy to respond to questions as long as they felt they knew the "right answer" and talked freely in discussions but often not in a relevant way. There were many lessons when children were engaged but seemed to have missed the point; many discussions sidetracked by seemingly random and unconnected thoughts expressed by children who earlier had seemed to have very good understanding; some rather surprising contributions in class when elements of different religions were mixed together in strange combinations. It was clear that children were finding it difficult to separate what they had been taught about different beliefs and traditions when they were also being asked to find similarities within and between religions often with months separating the units. It was becoming equally clear that it was difficult to be really confident that children had understood the deeper concepts behind expressions of faith and practices. Building in more time for discussion in class didn't seem to help; more timid children were still unwilling to share their ideas and experiences and discussions could be too easily dominated by a few confident speakers. What I didn't want was more superficial sharing; I wanted deeper sharing. How could this be achieved? Another problem I tried repeatedly to resolve was striking a balance with assessment: how could I help teachers to assess a child without relying on written work such as worksheets? If a lower ability pupil needed help to access a worksheet or written activity, how could that children be assessed? What was acceptable evidence of non-written activities? A photograph of a group of children taking part in role play didn't show which child had understood the objective or to what extent. Finding a solution to help busy non specialist primary teachers was proving difficult; in an already overcrowded day, what could I recommend that would be practical and easy to understand?

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I was searching for answers to the above questions when Helen Matter, Schools' Adviser for the Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich, suggested a thematic approach using a grant from the Farmington Institute to release me from teaching responsibilities. With her help, I was able to devise the aims of this project: to write units of work for non specialist Key Stage 2 teachers which could help children to · learn about religious beliefs and practices · recognise similarities and differences between and within religions · communicate their ideas clearly, recognising others' viewpoints · consider their own beliefs and values and those of others' · express their own and others' insights through art and design, music, dance, drama, poetry, creative writing and ICT · demonstrate what they know and understand in ways that can be assessed over a year with repeating assessment criteria so that it is not necessary to assess the whole class at the same time for the same activity. Conclusion I believe that by approaching the planning from a thematic or conceptual base, children will find it easier to make links within and between religions by having an overview of how different practices show a different approach to an idea. I hope that children will be able to better understand the beliefs behind religious practices or acts of worship and that they will see that they are learning about things that have a profound effect on how people develop as humans ­ their beliefs, values, feelings and experiences ­ and that they are not "doing Christianity" this term. Using a key theme (such as reconciliation) as a starting point for a unit of work should help teachers to better understand the real focus of a unit and its aims; this should help teachers to explore relevant ideas with the children and to be clearer in what they are trying to assess. Although the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus has Areas of Study which are already thematic, it is easy to forget that the religions covered at Key Stage 2 are examples to illustrate these areas. Exploring ideas and concepts through more open methods such as art and design, music, dance, drama, poetry, creative writing and ICT should help children to feel freer to express their feelings, to think more deeply about their own values and experiences and to become more confident in sharing with others' what they believe about the issues tackled in lessons and what affects them and their lives. I hope that these units help teachers in their RE work and that they are useful, practical and easy to use.

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Long Term Plans

Time allowed for each block is a half term or 6 ­ 8 hours

Year 3 Religion and the individual Symbols and religious expression Christianity Parables / cross Encountering Beliefs in Action / Beliefs and Questions Christianity Judaism Kingdom Covenant / Mitzvot of God / mission Beliefs in action

Christianity Reconciliation and discipleship

Islam Submission and Jihad

Hinduism Karma and Samsara

Year 4

Inspirational people

Encountering

Inspirational people / symbolism

Religion, family and community Christianity Baptism / body of Christ

Encountering

Religion, family and community

Christianity Incarnation, salvation, sin

Islam Hinduism Risalah / Avatar prophethood

Sikhism Guru / ik onkar

Sikhism Khalsa / langar

Year 5

Teachings and Authority

Encountering

teachings and authority

Christianity Gospel / testament

Islam Revelation

Hinduism Yoga / Moksha

Judaism Torah / kedusha

Worship, pilgrimage and sacred places Christianity Eucharist / pilgrim people

Encountering

teachings and authority

Humanism Happiness / responsibility

Year 6

Beliefs and Questions

Encountering

Beliefs and Questions

Christianity Trinity / image of God

Islam Tawhid / Akhirah

Hinduism Brahman / Atman

Buddhism Dukkha / Buddha

Journey of Life and Death Christianity Faith resurrection

Encountering

Journey of Life and Death

Buddhism Dhamma / Nirvana

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YEAR 3 RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL ­ CHRISTIANITY RECONCILIATION AND DISCIPLESHIP

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Look at the lives and work of Christians who have been reconcilers like Desmond Tutu. What did he do that helped bring peace / reconciliation?

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· Look at what Jesus told his followers ­ make peace, blessed are the peace makers (Matthew 5) ­ read the Bible to see who / what Jesus thought was special. Discuss the ideas in the sermon on the mount. Make list of beatitudes ­ blessed are .....and how they should be rewarded with each group contributing. Use themes of peace and reconciliation.

The Corrymeela Singers' work in Northern Ireland ­ look at some stories of people helped by the Corrymeela Community. Look at song words for Mystery by Roger Courtney ­ the pollen of peace / flowers and seeds of love. Look at seeds and discuss what they grow into. What would flowers of love look like? Art work to design a seed packet for the seeds of peace showing what they would look like grown. Make plant labels explaining what the seeds of love / peace need to grow - dos and don'ts

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Christian belief that there can be no peace until there is love amongst people ­ Jesus came to bring peace between God and humanity Prayers of confession in church including RC first confession ­ possible visitor ­ priest? Take photos of the visit and class add captions of what they remembered him saying. Explore Peace Child story by Don Richardson ISBN 08307-0415-9 Make body sculptures / freeze framing in drama to explore scenes / aspects of the story · Explore the theme of "breaking down the barriers" through dance. What music would each group select? Can they make their own music? How can they express their ideas in dance? What barriers are they trying to break down?

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· · Reflective storytelling of the Prodigal Son (Luke 14)­ Godly Play available? Painting by Rembrandt plus John Piper window in Aldburgh church. Reflective writing about feelings of characters in the story. Was the father right to take the son back? Explore the Christian idea of being reconciled to God ­ how does it feel to be reconciled with someone you love? What bad things might Christians / humans have done to estrange them from God?

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Look at pictures of statues of reconciliation around the world ­ Hands across the Divide ­ Josef Locke / Slave Triangle ­ Stephen Broadbent / Coventry Cathedral ­ Josefina de Vasconcelles / Prodigal Son ­ Margaret Adams Parker. Drama ­ what would the statues say if they came to life? What questions would you like to ask them? Design a reconciliation statue for the school ­ where would you put it? What do you want the statue to mean?

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Visit to War Museum in London · Drama ­ the prodigal son and body sculptures of peace child story · Design ­ flowers and plants and reconciliation statue · Dance and music ­ breaking down the barriers · Local faith leader e.g. vicar to visit 9

YEAR 3 RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL ­ ISLAM SUBMISSION

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Who do we submit to? Why do we submit to them? What rules do we obey? What might happen if we don't submit? What rules are particularly hard to submit to? Why? Creative writing about a day when you do not obey anyone or follow any rules. Muslim means one who submits to the will of Allah. What do you think God's rules are? Is it more important to follow God's rules or other rules? Why?

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Allahu Akbar ­ the greatness of Allah, Allah is Great. Why do Muslims think Allah is great and should be obeyed? Think about the 99 names; why are there 99 and not 100 or a thousand? Explore the idea that we can't know everything about God. The Merciful, compassionate, all knowing, wise, generous one, loving, forgiving, source of peace, creator, protecting friend, guide. CEM booklet Exploring Islam has some of the names in Arabic. Allah has no equal, humans are given a position of honour by Allah. At birth, Muslims whisper in the baby's ear why? Explore the idea of what is important to give guidance to a baby from the start of his / her life. What would you whisper in a child's ear? Why? Write down what you would say and practice on a doll.

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Think of a time when you didn't listen to instructions or follow rules and got lost. How did you feel? How did you feel when you were found/ got home? Explore the concept of the right and wrong path. Draw a map showing what you might meet on each path. Some children should be encouraged to think figuratively about this as a metaphor for life / guidance. The Qur'an contains the actual words of Allah given to Muhammad. The opening Surah (chapter) is the Al Fatihah ­ show me the right path, the straight path and is said many times a day in prayers. What do you think the right path would be for Muslims?

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Explore some key rules followed by Muslims e.g. the 5 pillars: Shahadah (declaration of faith), Salah (prayer 5 times a day), Zakah (giving to those in need), Sawm (fasting during Ramadan) and Hajj (pilgrimage to Makkah). Make a simple model in groups with a roof (faith) held up by 5 labelled pillars of Islam. What happens if you remove too many of the pillars? Think about the symbolism of this. This could be done through drama where the children are the pillars holding up a box labelled faith Find a DVD / Espresso / book to show the 5 pillars Pathways of Belief may be OK.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Asking a Muslim what they find difficult when submitting to Allah · Making the 5 pillars model · Map of right and wrong paths ­ possible links with Geography? · Role play with doll

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YEAR 3 RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL ­ HINDUISM KARMA AND SAMSARA

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· · Ask the class to think about good and bad actions ­ what are the consequences they have experienced? Make a simple flow chart of someone making good and bad choices and actions and what the consequences might be. ·

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Look at a snakes and ladders game ­ this was a Hindu game originally and represents making good and bad decisions in life. Talk to class about karma. Find some info on karma In groups, produce some good and bad actions someone could make in life and what the consequences might be. Put the ideas together to make a giant snakes and ladders game ­ perhaps on the playground or if not, on large sheets of paper that could be laid on the floor. Children could be allocate a section each to work on or could be given specific jobs so that the giant game can be made. Encourage children from other year groups to play the game.

· · Every Hindu has a duty in life ­ dharma. What are our duties? What happens if we don't carry out our duties? What are the 4 Hindu duties? Explore these with the children.

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Hindus are aiming for moksha ­ freedom from rebirth or samsara. What do Christians believe happens when you die? Tie in work about heaven from unit on kingdom of God. Discuss what it might be like to be released from the constraints of your body and / or all responsibilities. What would you do? How would you feel?

Tell the story of Gandhi ­ what did he think was his duty? How did he set about it? · Children could look at things that Ghandi did or said through the internet. They could work in groups to produce a mobile showing different things that Ghandi did or said. Some useful websites might be http://www.mkgandhi.org/students/story1.htm inspiring stories http://www.mkgandhisarvodaya.org/index.html http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mahatma_ Gandhi/ for quotes http://www.spca.bc.ca/Kids/KidsClub/Gandhi.asp for an overview

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Look at the story of Prince Rama from the point of view of doing one's duty. Children could act out the story through drama. Make up scenes where people are doing the right thing or the wrong thing. What are the consequences?

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Ask in a Hindu visitor or arrange a visit if possible

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · DT / art snakes and ladders game · Drama ­ Rama stories · ICT research into Ghandi's actions to fulfil his duty · Hindu visitor 11

YEAR 3 SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION CHRISTIANITY PARABLES AND THE CROSS · · Tenants in the vineyard ­ Luke 20: 9 ­ 19 - a parable is a story with meaning and is also a symbol of a bigger idea. What was Jesus trying to say in this story? What meanings did he want people to take from this story? OR Parable of the house on the rock ­ Matt 7: 24 -28 and Luke 6: 46 -49 ­ Stories Jesus Told books by Inkpen and Butterworth tell this story very simply but in a way children really enjoy. Or http://www.request.org.uk/main/bible/jesus/builders/builders02.htm (this also has a quiz). What is the symbolism / meaning in this story? What symbolic images are created? (Rock) Read and explore the story as a class. It could be explored through drama, art or writing.

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Make an Easter garden showing the tomb and the rolled away stone ­ model making ­ useful websites for instructions

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Explore some Easter symbols ­ which do you associate with Easter? What do they mean for you? Look at the symbols of new life ­ eggs, chicks, rabbits, spring flowers, Look at the cross as a symbol. Why is it not a sad image for Christians? Ask the children to make a cross from natural things found around the school ­ leaves, twigs, stones ­ and explain the symbolism of their cross. Look at crosses of all kinds ­ what feelings / beliefs are being expressed in them? Decorate a cross (lolly sticks?) with Easter symbols.

A sad day ­ reflective story or godly play story for Easter ­ look at the Easter story and what it means for Christians. Create an Easter cycle on paper crosses where the children draw different parts of the story like the Stations of the Cross. Explore the story in senses poems, an emotions graph, hot seating, poetry, dance, song, art.

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Imagine you were in charge of planning the Easter Service. You need to include both joyous and sad elements. Why? What items would you plan for the service? In groups, write your own prayers, readings and songs you would include. Use the hymn books or Easter hymn sheets. How would you decorate the church? Why? Explain any symbols you use.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Easter service in church that the children have planned · Godly play · Easter experience plus emotions graph, hot seating, poetry, dance, song, picture gallery · Model making Easter garden · Making a cross from natural things around the school and explain symbolism used.

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YEAR 3 BELIEFS IN ACTION ­ CHRISTIANITY KINGDOM OF GOD AND MISSION

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Sent by the Lord am I ­ a traditional song from Nicaragua ­ lyrics are available on line.

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Build a throne in the classroom. Explore who might sit on a throne? Ask children to sit on it and explain how it makes them feel. Read the poem ­ If I Were a King by David Rumer ­ www.authorsden.com ­ and then ask children to write a poem about what they would do / like to happen if they were a king / queen. Children can sit on the throne to share their poems with the class.

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Look at the Christian idea that Christ means King or anointed one. What does anointed mean? Act out a coronation using the throne you have made and a willing child. How does it feel to be the anointed one? Christians believe that Jesus is part of God, who is often called King as well. What is God king of? What would God's kingdom be like? Where is it? How could you get there if you wanted to go? What kind of a king do Christians believe God is? Is he always a good, kind king? Explore the children's views of what heaven is like (or would be like if they could make a heaven) through discussion, art or poems.

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Tell a version of the story of Robin Hood which mentions how "good King Richard" comes back from the wars and helps / pardons Robin, whereas "bad King John" has been guilty of causing suffering for the people of England. Explore with the children what difference a good / bad king can make. Is it easy to be a king? What would they find hard? Who has to make the decisions? Could you be nice to everyone all the time? What if one of your subjects had done something wrong? What qualities does a good king have? What would it be like to be ruled over by a bad king?

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Explore the Christian view of heaven with the sheep and goats parable (Matthew 25: 31 ­ 46) and / or the Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6: 10 ­ 14). What do Christians think heaven will be like? What tells them about heaven? How can they try to make a heaven on earth? Look at what some Christians do to try to improve life on earth for people ­ use the internet to find out about good work done around the world by Christian groups.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · ICT Christian mission in the world · Poetry ­ If I were a king by David Rumer and children's own poems · Discussion or art for view of the kingdom of God / heaven · Role play of coronation · Exploring lyrics of Christian songs

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YEAR 3 ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS IN ACTION / BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS JUDAISM COVENANT AND MITZVOT

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Look at what it means to make a promise. What does it feel like when someone you trusted breaks a promise to you? Is it hard to make a promise? To keep a promise? To break a promise? Explore through drama the thoughts and feelings connected to making promises, keeping and breaking them and the dilemmas that may cause.

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Tell the covenant stories of Noah (Genesis 6: 9 - Gen 9: 17) and / or Abraham (covenant Genesis 17: - a lot about circumcision ­ not appropriate for children and covenant after testing Abraham with Isaac Genesis 22) and / or Moses (Exodus) What is the promise being made in this / these stories? Why are these stories important to Jews? What do they tell us about the relationship between the Jews and God?

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Doing mitzvot - try Pathways of Belief Judaism ­ Explore with the children how they feel when they have helped people. How does it feel to have been helped unexpectedly? How can you help people? What do you do to help people? What could you do to help someone that you don't do now? What effect would that extra help have on someone's life? ·

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Keeping the commandments ­ Bar Mitzvah ­ find DVD or espresso ­ to find out about what happens at a Bar Mitzvah. Reinforce this by using artefacts from a "child's" bag which contains things to do with "his" Bar Mitzvah. These bags can be an ordinary bag containing various artefacts, photos, cards etc. What did he use them for? What significance do they have? How do you think he felt when...? What promise is being made at a Bar Mitzvah? What happens if the promise is broken? How hard is it to keep the promises?

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Ask a visitor from the Jewish community to talk to the children about what it means to commit to the faith and what he / she promised during his / her bar / bat mitzvah. What do they do as mitzvot? Why do they do it? How does help them in their commitment to their faith?

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Show the class a mezuzah. Ask them to think of a question that they would like to ask about it and write it down. Tell the children what it is / contains/ goes in a home. How many of the class have had their questions answered? Try to answer the remaining questions ­ if you can't, see if the questions could be put / emailed / sent to a Jewish visitor. Look at Deuteronomy 6: 1 ­ 10. What deal or promise is God making with the Jews? What must they do to keep their side? What rules or beliefs are so important to you that you might want to keep them like the Jews keep the Shema? What code of conduct do you believe in strongly? Ask the class to produce a sentence or more on what they believe is the right way to behave and write on a little piece of paper that can be rolled and put into a "mezuzah" that they make from card. EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Visitor in from local Jewish community or a visit to them · making promises ­ keeping and breaking them ­ dilemmas / drama · make own "rule" and "mezuzah" type container · exploring artefacts 14

YEAR 4 INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE CHRISTIANITY INCARNATION, SALVATION, SIN · Set up a book at the main entrance to the school and ask all visitors to write down who they find inspirational. If the children don't know who each person is, they should try to find out.

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John 15:13 Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends. · Jesus said this ­ look at what he might have meant by that. What would you do for a person you loved? Christians believe that Jesus' sacrifice meant that they would be saved from their sins. What would it mean to save someone? How would both people feel? Who can save you? Think about different situations and people. Look at the word "saviour" and what it means for Christians. · Explore what the Salvation Army believes about rescuing in Jesus' name ­ visitor or visit to citadel locally to se the work done because of their beliefs. OR use their website to have a look at their work. www1.salvationarmy.org.uk or local citadels often have websites too. Think about why Booth (or another Christian) was inspired by Jesus so much that he felt inspired to make a difference in the world. What would you like to do to make a difference in the world? What inspires you to choose that difference?

Cash in the Attic with random objects ­ discus order of value or importance. Look at pictures of cribs / nativity scenes from around the world ­ children can Google or you can collect the pictures . Remind the class of the story so that they are all clear on who the people are. http://www.worldnativity.com/products has good pictures for different nativities from around the world or http://christmasjourney.org.uk/nativity.php - childrens' display of work. Who is depicted in a nativity set? How important are they in the story of Christmas? Ask the class to put the people in order of importance for themselves and then for Christians. Why is the little baby the most important person to Christians? Discuss what Christians believe about Jesus and his birth / importance. Work in groups to use clay / Crayola Model Magic / plasticine to make a little model of the nativity scene. When they have all made one person, ask them to arrange the scene. Why have they grouped the figures in that way? Photo their arrangements and ask them to write speech or thought bubbles for each figure to explain what they are thinking or feeling. Look at images of Jesus ­ CEM or www.rejesus.org has a section of images of Jesus that would work very well here. Discuss what the different images of Jesus are like. Why are there no photos? Which pictures do you like best? Why? What do you think the painter was trying to say about Jesus? What qualities was the painter trying to show that Jesus had? Look at some stories connected to Jesus' life and how he tried to help or rescue people. Children could draw a picture of what they think Jesus was like and try to show some of their opinions and thoughts of what Jesus was like. Look at songs telling Jesus' life story - many website have hymn lyrics and some have sound files you can play to the children. What are these songs telling Christians about Jesus? What did he do or say that has inspired people do change their life or to act? See also Salvation Army above. Look at the story of 3 trees - easy to find online if you use a search engine e.g. www.word4life.com/threetrees.html. You will need to cover some aspects of the life of Jesus before you read the story. What is the point of the story? What aspects of Jesus' life are mentioned in the story? If you were writing a Wikipedia entry for Jesus, what would you have to include? Remember that the focus is what he did that inspires people.

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · SA visitor or visit to citadel · Model making of crib figure ­ art · Drawings of Jesus with some meanings ­ art 15

YEAR 4 INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE ISLAM RISALAH (message) PROPHETHOOD

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· If God wanted to give the world a message, what would it be and who would deliver it? Write the messages and create a display. Explore Muhammmad's story ­ the seal of the prophets ­ there are lots of online information, books and DVDs available. Try Islam for children for some information. why are some people chosen to do special tasks? What special thing can you do? How does it make you feel to be chosen to do a job? How do you think that Muhammad felt when the angel came? Explore thoughts and feelings ­ possibly in poetry. If you seal an envelope or put sealing wax on it, what does that mean? If Muhammad is the seal of the prophets, what does that mean? Do you think that the last prophet is the most important? If Muhammad was the messenger, then what was the message? Where do you think Muslims can find the message? Find the Arabic words for Allah and Muhammad. Think about how a Muslim would treat these words with respect. Decorate the words with (non living) things or patterns and display them. · · ·

Think about the story of another prophet ­ Ibrahim (Abraham). He was also given messages from God ­ one in a line of prophets. Explore the story of the Kaaba and Ibrahim and what it tells Muslims about prophets and what God's messages are. This story is also present in the Jewish and Christian faiths. Talk about how Abraham is sometimes called the father of 3 religions. Find pictures of the Kaaba ­ possible ICT link

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who is the most important person in your life and why? Discuss with the class what they think. How did and does Muhammad inspire Muslims? Use of quotations from Muslims ­ try online sites (like ask a believer for Christianity) or email local Muslim places if possible. Children could write a letter where they ask a question each. If not, there are many books / sites that will have quotes by Muslims about Muhammad. Explore artefacts that might be found in a Muslim child's room. What do they tell us about his / her beliefs?

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Children's songs about the Prophet ­ try http://www.yusufislam.org.uk ­ go into SONGS - A is for Allah about different aspects of the faith Or a sample of children singing can be found http://www.astrolabe.com/product/864/We_Love_M uhammad.html Discuss what these songs say about Muhammad and what Muslims think about him. What are they teaching their children about Allah and Muhammed? Write a verse of a song for a Muslim to go with a simple tune like We love Muhammad on http://www.astrolabe.com/product/864/We_Love_M uhammad.html

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Look at quotes from the Bible and compare what is said to those from the Qur'an. Are there beliefs that Muslims and Christians share? Differences? Try a quotation website.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · ICT ­ searching for pictures of Kaaba · Poetry ­ how it feels to be chosen for an important job / how Muhammad felt · Write lyrics or music and lyrics for a verse about Muhammad for Muslim children · Exploring artefacts for a Muslim child · Ask a Muslim to talk to the children 16

YEAR 4 INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE HINDUISM AVATAR

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· · Ask the class to think about a supreme ruler of the universe. What would his job be? What qualities would it / he / she need? Draw a symbolic picture of the qualities they think of e.g. large ears for a good listener. At the end, discuss whether it matters whether the person in the drawing is true to life or not? Why?

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Avatar = God in human form. If God were human, what would he / she be like? What would he / she do? Explore this idea in art or writing. Make a picture gallery ­ see also murti models . Ask them to share their ideas with the rest of the class. Do their "gods" have anything in common? What should a god be able to do that a human can't? If God were human, would he / she still have special powers? Talk about the Hindu concept of avatars. Show to / find with the class some pictures of murtis (statues) used by Hindus. What shows us that these avatars are not humans like the rest of us? What do you find inspiring about these Gods? Who are your heroes? What do you admire about them? Do you try to emulate them? ·

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Explore some of Krishna's childhood stories ­ how do they inspire Hindus?

What personality types are there? Explore different personalities in Drama. How can you tell what a person is like /is feeling through what they do or say or move?

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Make a murti of one of the Hindu avatars or gods­ statue or sculpture ­ in clay / Crayola model magic / plasticine. Research what Hindus think about the avatar you have made.

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Explore the story of Rama as avatar ­ reflective storytelling of exile and return ­ the Ramayana ­ Divali story. What special qualities does Rama show? How do Hindus celebrate Divali? Pupils could retell story with drama, writing, art; make divali lamps; http://www.woodlandsjunior.kent.sch.uk/Homework/religion/diwali.htm http://www.reonline.org.uk/allre/tt_links.php?17 has many links onto other sites Ask in a Hindu visitor to talk to the children about his / her beliefs.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Drama exploration of personalities · ICT ­ finding pictures of murtis · Rama as avatar ­ reflective storytelling of exile and return ­ Ramayana ­ Divali · Make a murti ­ statue or sculpture ­ clay / Crayola model magic · Hindu visitor or visit to Hindu centre 17

YEAR 4 ENCOUNTERING INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE AND SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION SIKHISM GURU AND IK ONKAR

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Guru means teacher. Discuss with the class what makes a good teacher. What qualities does he / she need to have? Design a good teacher ­ work in groups to make drawings with labels. Share groups work with the rest of the class. Could make a good display.

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Guru comes from GU ­ RU = Dark to light. Use drama to investigate the feelings and thoughts you might have in the dark and what affect light would have on that. This could be followed up with reflective writing. ·

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Tell some stories of young Nanak ­ was he a good teacher even then? What tells you that he was special even when he was young? What do these stories tell Sikhs about Nanak? What did he want to teach people?

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Look at some pictures of Guru Nanak. How is he depicted in the pictures? Do the artists show what is he like? (halo etc) Explore the symbols used in this art. Children can draw someone they know or admire or are influenced by in same style with symbols to show what they are like.

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Find an Ik onkar symbol. If you have a 3D one it could be hidden in a bag and then revealed from a bag after children have felt / explored it. Tell the class that the symbol is actually writing which say there is one god which is what Sikhs believe. Look at pictures of Sikh places of worship and see if they can find the symbol.

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Ask the class to think about where Guru Nanak's vision came from ­ his inspiration from God. Think back to work about messages from God through Muhammad. How was it different for Nanak?

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · ICT ­ site like ask a believer for Christianity ­ asking questions about what the Gurus mean to Sikhs or Sikh visitor · Explore how Guru Nanak is drawn ­ how can a drawing show what he is like? Explore symbols in art ­ draw someone in same style with symbols to show what they are like · drama about being in darkness and what affect light would have on that

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YEAR 4 RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY CHRISTIANITY BAPTISM / BODY OF CHRIST · Look at different celebrations of Christmas using pictures from around the world ­ there are many different web sites and books that cover this e.g. http://www.the-northpole.com/around/australia.html or http://www.santas.net/aroundtheworld.htm or http://www.soon.org.uk/country/christmas.htm Discuss how Christians are all around the world and are all part of a world wide community or family which believes that Jesus was the son of God.

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Ask the local vicar / faith leader / diocese who and what work goes on in the wider community where Christians are helping. · Christians = CHRISTians = belonging to Christ. Do you feel that you belong to someone? How does that make you feel? Ask the children what their Christian name is. Some will be able to tell you their first name. Why is it called a Christian name if you are not a Christian? Talk about how some people say "first name" instead of Christian name because of this but long ago in this country many people got their name when they were christened as a baby. Belonging in the church can be symbolised in baptism. Look at different baptisms ­ Orthodox, Baptist, Anglican and others. Discuss what the family feel / person feels when they are baptised. What does the water symbolise? Look at John's baptism of Jesus (John 1:19 but also Matthew 3: 13 / Mark 1: 3) The symbols in this story could be explored by the children and drawn. Ask a local Christian leader e.g. vicar to carry out a simulated baptism with a doll. Children can act as Godparents and congregation. Discuss what happens and how they feel about making promises. Children can organise the whole "service". Think about what it means to join the church ­ like joining a family. What would happen to someone if they joined your family? How would you make them feel welcome?

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Look at the prayer that Jesus taught his disciples - Our father . Discuss what Jesus meant with this prayer. Why does he call God "Father"? What is he trying to tell people about God and how they should view God? Does this mean that we are all children of God and belong to the same family? Does that mean we should treat each other differently? How do you treat the people in your family especially your father? Look at the Lord's Prayer in different languages website of the Convent of Pater Noster in Israel has all languages written up and you can see all the languages of the world including some past languages no longer spoken. http://www.christusrex.org/www1/pater/index.htmlhttp:/ /www.christusrex.org/www1/pater/index.html or www.christusrex.org

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· · Look for other ideas in the Cracking RE project by Margaret Cooling - Rainbow people ­ Desmond Tutu

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Visitor to perform doll baptism and organising "service" · ICT look at the pictures of the Convent of the Pater Noster · Art work drawing baptism of Jesus and the symbols involved ·

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YEAR 4 ENCOUNTERING RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SIKHISM KHALSA AND LANGAR · · Who would you share your meal with? Would it only be people you liked? If you asked the whole class to a meal, what would you like to serve everyone with? Would everyone get the same food? Would you give your friends better food that people you didn't like? How would that make others feel? How could you make everyone feel included and wanted? Children could draw a picture of giant plate or saucepan with food in which people are sharing. How could we show that everyone is equal? Explore the Sikh belief that all humans are equal. One way in which this is shown is in the Langar in the Gurdwara ­ a meal made and shared by all. Everyone contributes and is made to feel welcome. Everyone eats the same food as all are equal. Espresso has a very good section on this. If you are near a Sikh Gurdwara, a visit might be appropriate. If not, there are good internet resources or DVDs. ·

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Explore a Sikh festival like Baisakhi with the children with an emphasis on how it brings the community together. What are the beliefs behind the festival? There is a lot of information on the internet about sikh festivals as well as books and DVDs. Look at some of the events as part of the celebration. How does it make Sikhs feel to belong to the community? How would a Sikh feel if he / she has no community for help, support and to celebrate with? How would you feel if there was no one with whom you could share things or celebrate with? Possible DT / food connections ­ find recipes of festival food that children could make http://www.infoaboutsikhs.com/sikh_festivals. htm or http://festivals.iloveindia.com/baisakhi/index.h tml has some very good recipes for food

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Read the story of the Khalsa to the children. What does it say about making a commitment to your faith? What would you make that kind of commitment for? What would you be willing to die for? Life times series ­ Growing up from child to adult by Anita Ganeri covers the story well, as do many other books. Look at what happens in the Amrit ceremony. Children could act out their own commitment ceremony, saying what they would make a commitment to in their own lives.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Possible DT / food connections ­ find recipes of festival food that children could make and serve up a meal to others · Visit to a Gurdwara where possible · Drama in their own commitment ceremonies

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YEAR 5 TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY CHRISTIANITY GOSPEL / TESTAMENT

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gospel (from Old English, gd spell "good news") gospel as good news. What was the good news for Christians? What good news would you like? How do you react when someone brings you good news? What feelings does it create? What kinds of good news are there? Drama miming news items

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what would you want someone to write in your biography? What wouldn't you want them to write? Write both versions ­ explore feelings when good / bad things are exposed ­ could be in poetry or drama. What do Christians think about Jesus? Where do they get their information about Jesus from? What does the Bible say about Jesus? Are there any bad things written about Jesus in the Bible? Why? How would Christians feel if someone wrote bad things about Jesus? Why is he important to them? · · Look at the life of Jesus. Why was he good news for Christians? Look at some of the main events in his life or the things he said or did. Ask children to make a list of what they think are the 10 most important. Discuss why they think the top 3 on their list of 10 are more important than other things about Jesus. What might a Christian put as the top 10 / top 3? Are they different to yours? Why? Make or design a set of beads which represent the 10 most important things that Jesus did or said as discussed above e.g. red bead or a cross for death, gold and green for resurrection, a white bead or dove shape for baptism etc ­ use rolled up paper, Crayola Model Magic, clay, plasticine- whatever is available to you. String them together on a bracelet for life of Jesus. Professional examples of this can be found on sale in many Christian shops / Cathedral shops ­ see www.roman.com Children should explain what their beads symbolise and why they have chosen to make / design them.

Make a display of good news the children have had recently / this year. This could be in the form of speech bubbles, newspaper front pages, breaking news tickertapes. Include in the display some aspects of the good news for Christians.

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Testament means covenant (agreement, promise or contract) or a statement of one's beliefs or principles. Who do Christians feel has made a promise? What is the difference between the OT and NT? How do Christians use the Bible? Ask a Christian (local priest?) to talk to the children about what the Bible means to them; how and why they read it and use it for support and guidance. Books would also be able to give this information if a visitor was unavailable. Children should discuss who they go to for support and guidance; what books do they think would help them in their life?

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Drama in showing reaction to good news / acting out good news · Art / design in making or designing beads · Poetry or drama in expressing feelings about how people think of you · Talk to / interview a Christian about the Bible 21

· YEAR 5 TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY ISLAM REVELATION

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Look at something hidden then revealed ­ pop up books / lift the flap books etc. Explain that these things are hidden and then revealed. What does it feel like to have something revealed to you? Does it make it more special if you could not see it before but suddenly you can? Discuss how it makes you feel. Make boxes with a hidden precious thing inside

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Reflect on quotations from the Qur'an with the class. What do they tell us about Muslim beliefs or about what Allah wanted to tell Muhammad? Make a page each to go into a book or on a display which shows something hidden and then revealed ­ a question which is answered with a quotation from the Qur'an when the flap is lifted / the page opened pops up.

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Show the class a Qur'an by first washing your hands, getting it down from the highest shelf in the room, unwrapping it and resting it on a stand, all done very seriously and with concentration. Tell the class that for some people this book is the most important book in the world because every word in it was told to a special person by an angel. For them, these are God's words. Look at how the Qur'an was revealed to Muhammed ­ storytelling with class ­ try if possible to know the story by heart or use a big book that children can share with you. Refer again to the book. What do you think is in the book? What do you think God wanted to tell people? What is it that was hidden but then revealed? Discuss. Ask a Muslim to talk to the children about what makes the Qur'an special for them.

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Look again at the revelation to Muhammad. Discuss what was hidden and then revealed. Discuss with the children (LFR) - what secret of the universe would you like revealed to you? What would you do with this revelation? Could be expressed as creative writing. ·

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What does the Qur'an teach Muslims about God, the World and human life? Why does it start "In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful." The Holy Qur'an, 1;1 Look at other suras ­ 16.1 -21, 66 ­ 70, 77 ­ 83 for example. Try also "You who believe, when you rise up for prayer, wash your faces and your hands up to the elbows, and lightly rub your heads and wash your feet up to the ankles." The Holy Qur'an, 5;6 "Your Lord has ordered that you worship none but Him and show kindness to your parents....Never ....be harsh with them, but speak to them kindly." The Holy Qur'an, 17; 23-24 "This is the book; in it is guidance sure, without doubt, to those who fear Allah; who believe in the Unseen..." The Holy Qur'an, 2: 2-3

Discuss - how important is your family in guiding you? Who do you listen to in your family? Are there people outside your family that you pay more attention to?

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · DT links? making a page for a pop up / lift the flap book / pictures to show quotation from the Qur'an · Creative writing in what secret they would like to have revealed to them and what they would do with the revelation · Storytelling to class · Muslim visitor 22

YEAR 5 TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY HINDUISM YOGA / MOKSHA · · · Use a large space like hall or playground. Take turns to guide a partner around who has eyes closed ­ how does it feel to guide and to be guided? Children or teacher could create a "senses" experience to be lead around blindfolded ­ being lead to different areas where there is something to smell, touch, hear etc. Discuss these experiences. How does a guide help you on your path? What would happen if you had no guide or you did not trust your guide? Could be explored through art or creative writing. Discuss - how important is your family in guiding you? Who do you listen to in your family? Are there people outside your family that you pay more attention to?

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Explore the Hindu concept of Moksha (liberation from rebirth). What do Hindus believe about the journey of life and death? Refer back to the ideas the children had earlier about this. How does it compare to what a Christian believes? Where do these ideas come from? Look at extracts or prayers from Hindu scriptures (e.g. Gayatri Mantra) to see what they teach. What does it tell Hindus about human life, God and the world? Discuss with class - where does your path in life lead you? What is the real goal of life on earth? Draw their own path which shows their own path through life and death. Ask in a Hindu visitor to talk to the children

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Explore how paths and labyrinths have been used as spiritual guidance in many cultures. There are simple ways to draw a labyrinth ­ which is different from a maze­ available from internet. What is it a metaphor for? Reflect on life as a journey. What is the start if the journey? What is the end? Look at this from the children's beliefs rather than those of Hinduism at this point.

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Walking a labyrinth is said to be a relaxing or cathartic experience; an aid to concentration. Design a labyrinth on paper; follow it with your finger slowly, concentrating fully. How does it make you feel? Does doing this repeatedly make you feel calmer? Make a labyrinth with the class perhaps on the playground. Use boxes, stones, little bean bags, chalk lines etc as markers. This could be semi permanent for the whole school to explore at play times. Explore feelings in walking the labyrinth through poetry or expressive writing.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Guiding and being guided in a "senses" experience plus creative writing from the experience · Visit to Cathedral for their labyrinth e.g. Norwich · Design and make a labyrinth in school ­ possible DT link with structures? · Hindu visitor 23 ·

YEAR 5 ENCOUNTERING TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY JUDAISM TORAH · ·

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Discuss - what life rules do you think are the most important? Whose advice do you listen to? Make a book of the best advice that people have given the class

Examine extracts from the Tenakh or Jewish Bible ­ laws, psalms, proverbs, stories ­to understand some of its teachings. What teachings do they contain about God, the world and human life?

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Look at how the Torah is treated, handled, read. Why is it treated in such a way? Look at how it is copied, dressing the scroll, using a Yad. Look at how Jews show respect to the Torah as a sign of their covenant with God. How do you take care of something you think is precious? How do you show respect?

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What do you think is an important message for the world today? How would you ensure that people got the message? Would you do it through television or radio? Would you try talking or writing to everyone?

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Look at a Jewish / OT story and use puppets to act it out. Children could make their own character puppets if there is time. If not, they could draw faces to make masks of the characters and act out the story. What is meaning of this story for Jews? What does it tell them about God, the world and human life? · Consider possible reasons for reading the Torah in weekly portions at the Synagogue, valuing the study of the Torah and celebrating Simchat Torah every year.

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Why is it important for Jews to have their traditions and teachings written down and to study them regularly?

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Make scrolls using rolls of card, foil etc with parchment coloured paper joining them. On the scroll, children could try writing a short sentence in Hebrew, extracts from the Tenakh and / or their own ideas or prayers about something important to them. Make mantles and yads ­ poss DT link with textiles HAPs could put on their scroll a short version of a story from the Jewish scriptures / Old Testament ­ easy to find in school bibles

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Visitor from the Jewish community or visit to a synagogue Make scrolls with extracts from the Tenakh and / or their own ideas or prayers about something important to them. Make mantles and yads ­ possible DT link · Making puppets and acting out a Jewish / OT story · · 24

YEAR 5 WORSHIP, PILGRIMAGE AND SACRED PLACES CHRISTIANITY EUCHARIST / PILGRIM PEOPLE · Eucharist comes from the Greek word meaning thanksgiving. What are Christians thankful for? What are you thankful for? Make a class thank you for ... box where these can be recorded and put in the box. · Jesus said - Do this in memory of me ­ what would you like people to do in memory of you? Make a banner for the local church about the last supper / eucharist ­ ask the vicar / church member in and children should ask them what they would want on such a banner. What symbols? Why? What words? Why? Colours? Children could design banners; church selects best; children work together to make a large banner to give to church.

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Guided story / acting out as you read the story of last supper having googled Jerusalem on Google Earth ­ get closer and closer as you zoom in. Hotseating ­ ask a confident child to be Jesus or one of the disciples at the last supper so that the others can ask questions. Teacher could take the role of Jesus is children weren't confident. Why do people go to Jerusalem? Look at a map of the Holy Land, and mark on it the places where events happened in Jesus's life. Find travel brochures of the Holy Land ­ where do they are the most important? Do they have pictures you could cut out and use? Write your own travel brochure. Make a large map with the children ­ could be a 3D experience that is laid out in the hall or on playground ­ at each place on the map, different groups could act / tell the story connected to that place. Children going around the map could have a passport which is stamped at every station they stop at. Find someone who has been to the Holy Land and ask them in to talk about their visit. What did they think or feel in different places? What did they see that shows that this is a special place for Christians? Make a 3D room where the last supper took place. Make some small figures for Jesus, Judas and the disciples. What colours will you dress them in? · Find images of the last supper by different artists. Stanley Spencer. Barcelona ­ Segrada familia carvings. What are the artists trying to show about their / Christians' beliefs?

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Last supper / eucharist ­ what is their thankfulness for? What happens in service which shows thanks? What prayers, actions and songs reflect saying thank you for the saviour, crucifixion, gift of Christ etc? Ask local vicar / priest in to do a simulated service or ask if children could go to church during a service to observe. Children could make bread and plan readings for this or their own pretend service. What songs will they choose? Can they find some eucharist songs from around the world that a group can learn?

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As an alternative to the large map make a labyrinth for the children to walk. At different points, have events leading up to the last supper and Gethsemane

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Visit to Walsingham ­ history Model ­ upper room Large map and story telling experiences Making a pilgrimage labyrinth Learning songs about Eucharist Visitor of someone who has been to the Holy Land

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YEAR 5 ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS HUMANISM HAPPINESS / RESPONSIBILITY · · Art / poetry / reflective writing about happiness ­ a time when they were very happy, or what they think would make them happy. Ask the children to look at a recipe (literacy links ­ instruction writing) and explore the features. What might a recipe for happiness look like? What would the ingredients be? In what proportions? Ask the class to write their own recipe for happiness. · Discuss with the children - Can people be happier than they are? Can you teach people to be happy? Some schools are trying to improve children's happiness. If your school was going to start happiness lessons, what do you think they should be like? What form would the lessons take? What would the lesson content be? How could you assess whether the class were happier at the end of the lesson? ·

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What makes you happy? See if you can find the happy dance that Snoopy does in the Peanuts cartoons. If snoopy has a happy dance, what would your happy dance be? Ask children to make up their own happy dance

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The Humanist logo is called the happy human. Ask selected children to the front to draw someone happy in 30 seconds. What different views of happiness are there? Do you have to be smiling to be happy? Ask the children to design a new logo for the Humanist society that reflects their belief that the best thing we can do in life is try to be happy.

· · Use a sheet with the Humanist logo in the centre with arrows pointing inwards towards it. Ask the children to complete the sheet by writing what makes a happy human on it. Discuss with the class. Do the sheet again but from a different approach ­ instead of the arrows pointing inwards in a self centred way, turn them pointing outwards and complete the sheet with thoughts about how we can make others happy. Ask the class to make a list that has responsibilities which balance the things they think will make them happy e.g. I want to play with my friends - I must not interfere with other people who are playing and upset them.

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What do Humanists believe about happiness? Ask a visitor from the humanist society to talk to the children about beliefs about happiness and responsibility.

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Creative writing ­ ask the children to make up a story or play to act out about causing unhappiness / creating happiness.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Visitor from the Humanist society or local Buddhist centre. · Art / poetry / reflective writing about happiness e.g. recipe writing (literacy) · Happy Dance · Drama / role play about being happy / unhappy · Design a new logo for the humanist society. 26

YEAR 6 BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS CHRISTIANITY TRINITY / IMAGE OF GOD

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· Create Mobius strips. How do they work? Can it be easily explained? It is like a mystery. Christians often speak of Jesus as a mystery. Look at the idea of mystery and what it means to not know everything about something. A mystery is something beyond ideas and there are different ways of explaining it. Tell the children that in this unit they may think of their own way to explain it.

Explore the Three in One trinity and images of God. There are many images of the Trinity on the internet. Try to find ones that shows the Trinity in different ways e.g. as a native American. Discuss the images with the children. Look at Christian songs and prayers ­ children could make up their own prayer or song verse ­ possible music link

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Look at Celtic trinity symbols (e.g. Book of Kells) and Celtic crosses ­ discuss what the circle might means around the cross. Look at the patterns that are one big loop ­ symbolic of God as eternal and never ending. Use St Patrick's image of the shamrock. Ask the children to make a tied loop with wool or string. Cross it over itself to make patterns and swirls ­ it is more complicated but still one circle. Make a three pointed shape with it ­ it is still one piece although it has 3 corners. Children can make their own Celtic type pattern to show oneness of God. Art. · Early Christians came from a tradition where God was unseeable; Jesus however was, so how could they reconcile the two ideas? "He is the image of the invisible God" God was above them, Jesus was God along side them, and the Holy Spirit was God inside them. Look at mentions of the Holy Spirit appearing in the Bible; Matt 3:13 but same passage appears in other gospels; look also the Pentecost story Acts 2: 1 - 5

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What is a good mother? Write down qualities as children think of them. What are the qualities that a good king should have? A good shield? A good father? Creator? Judge? Look at these in groups. Share what they groups have produced for their own word as you write them up. Discuss who might have all of these qualities? These are all ways that God is viewed by Christians. Which of these qualities would you like to have / be? Would you like to talk to someone who had all these qualities? Using the words produced earlier, ask class to list the ones they associate with God ­ could be list, spider diagram, poem, picture with labels.

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Design an altar front for a local church. What images of God / trinity would be suitable? Ask a member of the church in to discuss with the children what they would like. Children should then design an altar front. Church could pick their favourite which the children could make if they have time. DT textiles link.

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Try to find an image of Rublev's Icon. Try Website from NZ ­ emergent Kiwi or prodigal kiwi ­ which has a scripted talk that explains different images in the icon. Ask the children to work in pairs to give a talk on the symbols in this image or in others of your choice.

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Visitor from local church to talk about view of God and the mystery of the Trinity so that children can make an altar front design. · Mobius strips investigation · Making up own songs about the trinity / images in art27

YEAR 6 BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS ISLAM TAWHID (the oneness of God) / AKHIRAH (the last things) · · How do you behave when the teacher is not looking? How would you behave if you were left alone at home? Do you behave differently if people are watching you? Why? Akhirah means belief in the last things, judgement and everlasting life after death. This life is a preparation for the life to come. What Muslims do in this life is noted down and will be judged on the last day. If Muslims believe this, how would that change the way they live their lives? The Qur'an contains the actual words of Allah given to Muhammad. The opening Surah (chapter) is the Al Fatihah ­ show me the right path, the straight path and is said many times a day in prayers. What do you think the right path would be for Muslims? ·

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What are the main articles of Muslim belief? Investigate with the class ­ possible group work ­ so that they can make a booklet or a poster or presentation to the class. This could be done through a powerpoint presentation Find quotes from the surahs about heaven, life and death ­ surah 30:14 ­ 16, surah 69: 13 ­ 37 about judgement. Surah 17: 18 -19 about striving for the hereafter. Surah 2: 156, surah 20:57 returning to Allah.

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What questions would the children like to ask about life and death? Send selected questions to different faith communities to find out how they answer. Groups can collate the responses as they come in. What questions do Muslims ask about life and death? Ask in a Muslim and talk to him / her about he / she believes.

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Make a book to go at reception / office to ask visitors to say what they believe.

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The Qur'an says that on the last day the living and the dead will be raised and brought to the plain of judgement. Each person will be given the book of their life. What do you think about the idea of good and evil being sorted out in a final judgement? Why are people saddened by death? Did you know someone who died? How did that make you feel? Discuss with children how death has had an impact on them. Talk about how people cope with death and bereavement. Is there a visitor who could come in for this e.g. school nurse / counsellor / learning mentor? How do they help people to cope? Reflect on death as a chance to celebrate someone's life. If you were given a book of your life, what good things would be recorded? What bad things? Make a book which records some of the good deeds in your life or in the life of someone you knew who has died. 28

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Try to find some images of Muslim Heaven in Persian art. What do the images tell us about what Muslims believe about life after death? Could they represent their idea of heaven without using images of any living things? Discuss with the children what they believe about what happens when people die.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Muslim visitor · Make a book of good deeds · Presentation / booklet / poster / powerpoint to the class · Make a book to go at reception / office · Send questions to faith communities and collect responses

YEAR 6 BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS HINDUISM BRAHMAN / ATMAN

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Ask the class to tell you what they have remembered about previous units on Hinduism. Most will remember different gods. Explain that for Hindus, they are all part of one truth, one being called Brahman.

Brahman is everywhere and in everything. There is nothing without Brahman. Discuss with the children - if God was in everything, what difference would that make to how you treat the world, people and animals? Make up pictures of nature, the world around us, school, people etc where they are made up of the word Brahman ­ like pointillism but with words creating the picture in different colours. Should be done in a very detailed way so that from a distance you can't see the separate words. · Brahman is not like the Judeo/ Christian view of God; Hindus believe that Brahman is the nature of truth, knowledge and infinity (Taittariya Upanishad). Think about that with the children. What is truth? What is infinity? Think about the biggest number you can and then add one. Think about the stars in the sky; the grains of sand on a beach; the molecules in a tree or person; think of the vast numbers in the universe and that is still not infinite. Look at symbols of infinity like a circle or an 8 shape. Can the class think of another symbol? · Look at the concept of Atman (immortal soul or true self). Discuss with the children what makes you, you? What makes you unique? Do you belief that there is a soul (Christianity) or life force (Buddhism) or true self that is part of each person? Ask the children to try to draw their atman. Christians believe that if you lead a good life you will go to heaven. Hindus believe that your actions affect who you are and what happens to you in the next life. Investigate Karma (actions), samsara (reincarnation), moksha (liberation from rebirth). People want to escape the cycle of life and death so that they can be at one with Brahman. ·

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What do Hindus teach their children about God? Explore the stories told to explain the nature of Brahman ­ the salt in the water, pomegranate seeds and Svetaketu the student. www.vedantaatlanta.org/stories/Svetaketu.html or www.teachingideas.co.uk/re/file s/hinduteachchildrenaboutgod.p df What does this teach children about the nature of God?

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Look at www.woodlandsjunior.kent.sch.uk which has good general information about Hinduism. Try also www.hindukids.org (stories, festivals etc) and www.hinduism.about.com which has a kids section. Create a fact file.

Ask in a Hindu visitor to ask him / her about the beliefs Hindus have of Brahman and Atman.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Hindu visitor · Make up pictures of nature, the world around us, school, people etc where they are made up of the word God ­ like pointillism but with words -art · Drawing your atman ­ art · ICT researching Hindu beliefs 29

YEAR 6 REVISITING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS BUDDHISM · Recap the main points of the Buddha life story again and ask the children to work in groups to act it out. Freeze frame them at different points and ask the characters what they are thinking or feeling. Drama

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· · Think of a time when you were unhappy or suffered. Explore that with the class. Look at the concept of suffering ­ Dukkha and the four Noble truths. Discuss with the class - what are your thoughts about the 4 noble truths? Make a collage of pictures / text from magazines / internet showing different forms of Dukkha e.g. famine, war, wanting more, poverty, homelessness, bullying, crying etc.

Explain to the children that Buddha is seen as a guide, teacher, historical, enlightened person but not viewed as a god. For Buddhists the question of whether there is a creator or personal God is unanswerable and less important than asking other questions about life. Quest creation stories DVD explains this very well. A man who asks lots of questions is said to be like someone who has been shot with an arrow asking questions about where it came from and what it is made from ­ unnecessary questions that are not going to help him. Draw a little cartoon man shot with an arrow. Around him write some questions where he needs to know the answers (where can I get help, do I need a doctor?) and some questions which are unnecessary (why did I leave the house today, what is the arrow made from?) What questions do you have about life, God, the world? (possible overlap with Islam unit year 6). Make a list. Look at the life story of Buddha through reflective questions. As you tell the story, ask the children pertinent questions at selected points to make them reflect on the story: What did his father want for him? How can a parent protect a child from everything? Should children be protected from all things? Do you think the prince should stay in the palace or not? When he leaves the palace what do you think he might see that will surprise him? What do you think he was thinking as he returned to the palace? What do you think he is going to do now? etc Discuss with the class - Why do Buddhists choose to leave the question of God unanswered? What are atheists and agnostics? Why do some people say that you can't "know" about God? Use the list of ultimate questions from the children to ask them to draw some cartoon people of different beliefs ­ atheist, agnostic, Buddhist, Christian; other faiths could be represented depending on time. Put speech bubbles around each person showing how they might answer the children's ultimate questions in different ways.

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Ask in a visitor from a local Buddhist centre or arrange a visit.

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Make a short animated story about what the Buddha said or some aspect of his life - poss links with ICT ­ digital blue software? If possible.

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Visitor or visit to Buddhist centre Collage of text and images to show aspects of Dukkha Reflective storytelling ­ life story of Buddha Make a short animated story - ICT ­ digital blue software? Drama act out Buddha life story 30

YEAR 6 THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH CHRISTIANITY FAITH RESURRECTION · Read The Wish List by Eoin Colfer with the children. What does it say about life, death, heaven and hell? Also covered in Islam unit - why are people saddened by death? Did you know someone who died? How did that make you feel? Discuss with children how death has had an impact on them. Talk about how people cope with death and bereavement. Discuss what happens at a Christian funeral. Is there a visitor who could come in for this e.g. school nurse / counsellor / learning mentor? How do they help people to cope? Reflect on death as a chance to celebrate someone's life. Make a wall of memories celebrating people who have died in poetry such as haiku. Discuss with the children - Do you think how you have lived will affect what happens when you die? If you believe that you are going to go to heaven or hell depending on your behaviour, would you try harder to behave well? What do you think "behaving well" means for a Christian? Recap Buddhist / Hindu views about reincarnation. Discuss with class ­ if you believe that you are going to be reincarnated, would that have an impact on the way you live your life now? In what way?

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If life is a journey, what is the end of the journey? What do Christians believe about life after death? Look at quotations from the Bible. What do they tell Christians about Heaven / hell. Look at some Christian songs that talk about Heaven. Ask the children to write a verse about heaven to go with a simple tune that they already know. Ask the children to express Christian views of Heaven through Art work and / or reflective writing about heaven. This could take the form of a small book or poster for Christian children. Try to encourage HAPs to include some quotations from the Bible about Heaven. Recap Year 3 work - Mary Chapin Carpenter song ­ My Heaven. Write own version of song lyrics.

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Look at Extracts from A Pilgrims Progress ­ video clips available on line. Discuss how the work is allegorical. Who are the characters who help / hinder Christian on his journey? Look at the connection between names and characteristics. Through drama, ask the class to act out scenarios with some of the characters e.g. hope, Obstinate, Pliable etc. Ask the class to make up their own characters. Would they help or hinder Christian? Could be written or through art / drama. Look at the story of Pilgrim's Progress as a life of faith, as a journey, race or battle. What is it a journey, race or battle for? What is the goal for Christians? For you? Discuss. Work in groups to make a "board game" of Christian's journey through the story. This could be done literally as a board game or as a large physical experience that the children have to walk through as Christian, meeting characters alone the way played by children in the class. See Jerusalem unit in year 5 Pilgrim people unit. · Compare beliefs of life after death with other religions the children have explored.

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Recap of year 3 unit - Mary Chapin Carpenter song ­ My Heaven. Write own version of song lyrics. · Art work / reflective writing about heaven for Christian children. · Drama / art work. Can they make up their own characters? Would they help or hinder Christian? · Make board game or large interactive drama experience for story of Pilgrim's progress. 31

YEAR 6 ENCOUNTERING THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH BUDDHISM DHAMMA / NIRVANA · ·

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why do Buddhists choose to leave the question of God unanswered? LFR What are atheists and agnostics? Why do some people say you can't "know" about God?

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Look at Buddhist teachings about Nirvana ­ how is this achieved? Explore Buddhist beliefs about what it might mean to be released from the circle of birth, life and rebirth. Nirvana is not like Heaven. Can Nirvana be expressed through colours and symbols in art? Ask the children to think about words they associate with Nirvana ­ possibly these could be incorporated into the art work or expressed in a piece of creative writing. Ask the class to think about being enlightened and reaching the state of Nirvana. What important questions would they like to ask someone who was enlightened? What answers do they think they might receive?

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Explore what Buddhists believe about death / life / reincarnation / samsara / nirvana / karma / enlightenment. Recap work on the Four Noble Truths. Look at the Eightfold Path. Make spiral like a spring in clay / wire / papier mache to represent birth and rebirth upwards to Nirvana or a simpler form as a circle as the cycle is unending until enlightenment. A good material to use is bubble wrap around wire or pipe cleaners. On to the spiral pin / write main life events or milestones that are important in someone's life. Add the teachings of the Eightfold Path and the Four Noble Truths. What can go at the end of the spring shape to show enlightenment? Discuss some symbolic ways that this could be shown. Ask the class to consider the similarities and differences between Buddhist beliefs and those of other religions the children have encountered, especially Christian views of what happens after death. Why are there so many beliefs about what happens after death? THIS IS A RECAP OF THE CHRISTIAN LIFE AND DEATH UNIT. If this has already been covered, use it as a quick revision exercise. · Use the Clearvision website www.clearvision.org to explore Buddhist beliefs and teachings. Use the link to www.dharmagames.org which has non violent computer games for the children to play which teach them about the teachings of the Buddha. Ask the children to make a poster of 10 things they have learned from playing the games.

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Ask in a Buddhist visitor to talk to the children or arrange a visit to a Buddhist centre.

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Look at the Buddhist story of Kisa Gotami ­ on Clear Vision DVD but can be found in many different places including wikipedia and the Clearvision website. What does it say about Buddhist attitudes about suffering, grief and death? What meaning would a Buddhist see in this story? Look at the story of Angulimala (also on website). What meaning would a Buddhist see in this story? Children could act out the stories ­ drama.

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EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES Visitor or visit. Contact a local Buddhist centre. Stories ­ Kisa Gotami or Angulimala ­ drama Make spiral to represent birth and rebirth upwards ­ art Nirvana ­ art, poetry or other creative writing ICT dharma games

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Farmington Institute Scheme of Work by Beth Boast 2009

Year 3 Units

These units are planned on the expectation that they will be taught in blocks rather than discrete one hour lessons; however, that does not mean that they cannot be taught in that format. The total time that the units should take vary but overall should meet the requirements of the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus which states that RE should be allocated a minimum of 5% curriculum time i.e. approximately 45 hours per year at Key Stage 2 and that each area of study should be seen as requiring the equivalent of one half term's work in Religious Education i.e. no less than 6 hours. Therefore these units have been planned to take between 6 and 9 hours each. Although not all aspects of RE can be assessed, there are assessment opportunities built in to these units where appropriate. The majority of pupils at the end of Key Stage 1 are expected to have achieved Level 2. These units are planned around Levels 2 and 3 with some elements of Level 4 where appropriate, although pupils should achieve Level 4 at the end of Key Stage 2.

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: RECONCILIATION AND DISCIPLESHIP Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: SUBMISSION Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: KARMA AND SAMSARA Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION Theme: PARABLES AND THE CROSS Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: BELIEFS IN ACTION Theme: KINGDOM OF GOD AND MISSION Religion: JUDAISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS IN ACTION AND BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: COVENANT AND MITZVOT Christmas (not included)

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Year 3

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: RECONCILIATION AND DISCIPLESHIP

Reconciliation Statue at Coventry Cathedral by Josefina de Vasconcelles

Photo by Alex Thomson

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the theme of reconciliation; between people and also between Christians and God. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Religion and the Individual from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what is expected of a believer following a religion and the impact of belief on people's lives?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of conflict and reconciliation, explores the meaning of reconciliation through story or art and then moves onto the teachings of Jesus: love between people, the peacemakers, the story of the prodigal son and the nature of forgiveness. Children then look at how Jesus' teachings have been implemented in real life situations such as the Corrymeela community in Northern Ireland and the work of a leading Christian figure such as Desmond Tutu. The Christian desire to be reconciled with God is also explored. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Religion and the Individual (Hinduism and Islam) but does not necessarily have to be taught first. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. a World War II topic / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Ask the class to think about a time when they had an argument with someone or a "falling out" with a friend. How did it happen? How did they feel at the time? Were they able to become friends again? How? How did it feel to be friends again? Who has experience of an

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argument that did not lead to a "making up"? How did that feel? Encourage the children to talk about their own experiences and to listen to those of others. Introduce the word reconciliation. How does it feel to be reconciled? What might happen if no one was ever reconciled? (PSHE) · Explore Peace Child ­ a story by Don Richardson (ISBN 0-83070415-9) with the children. This is about missionaries trying to teach a tribe about God and Jesus through the use of "redemptive analogies". Some of the text is available through Google book search ­ it will give you a flavour of the style of the book and some of the events. Draw out the theme of reconciliation with the children. Using a large space, ask the class to make body sculptures / freeze frames / living tableaux to explore some of the scenes / aspects of the story that either you have highlighted as being the most relevant or that they have chosen as being particularly striking. Ask children why they have chosen that pose and what they are thinking at that point. Take digital photos as the children work which can then be printed out and given to children ­ ask them to write on the picture (or on post it notes to stick on the photo) what they were thinking / what the statue was thinking. This can then be kept as evidence. (Drama) AND / OR · Look at some pictures of statues of reconciliation around the world ­ some suggested are Hands across the Divide by Josef Locke, the Slave Triangle statues by Stephen Broadbent (the most easily found on the internet seems to be the one in Richmond, Virginia USA but the other two in the triangle are in Benin and Liverpool), Reconciliation statue at Coventry Cathedral by Josefina de Vasconcelles and the Prodigal Son by Margaret Adams Parker. If you are lucky there may be a reconciliation / peace statue or memorial near you that you can photograph or visit. I was fortunate that a friend's brother, Alex Thomson, works in Coventry and was kind enough to take photos for me for this unit ­ they are available as part of the project. Otherwise, use a search engine to find reconciliation statues or memorials and show them to the class. You might find it easier to create a powerpoint or word document with the ones you prefer. You could print and laminate some so that they can be passed around the class. Explore with the class what is happening in the statues. What is the sculptor trying to show us or tell us in his / her work? Which do you prefer and why? Are the titles of the statues meaningful? In what way? What does reconciliation mean in each of these statues? Is forgiveness the same as reconciliation?

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· Ask the class to work in groups (according to what statue they are using) and to repeat the body sculptures / freeze frames / living tableaux exercise (drama) if you did not choose to explore the story above. If you have already done this, you could ask the class to think about what the statues might say if they came to life. What questions would you like to ask them? Questions can be oral, scribed by a classroom assistant if you have one or written by children. Some could be kept as evidence of assessment. (Drama) Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 pupils ask, and respond sensitively to, questions about their own and others' experiences and feelings OR AT2 L3 they ask important questions about religions and beliefs, making links between their own and others' responses OR AT2 L4 pupils raise, and suggest answers to, questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. · Ask the class to think about what the main point of reconciliation is. If you were asked to design a reconciliation statue at school, where would you put it? Why? Design / draw / paint / model a reconciliation statue for the school showing where you would put it and why, and what you want the statue to mean to people when they look at it. (Art)

· Christians believe that there can be no peace until there is love amongst people and that Jesus came to bring peace between God and humanity. Look at what Jesus told his followers and listeners in the Sermon in the Mount ­ make peace, blessed are the peace makers, offer the other cheek, love your enemies and pray for your persecutors (Matthew 5: 1 ­ 16, 38 - 48). Read these extracts from the Bible with the class to see who / what Jesus thought was important. Discuss the ideas in the Sermon on the Mount. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 ­ make links between beliefs and sources · Put the children in pairs or small groups. Ask each pair to think of a sentence starting "blessed are the ...." and what reward they will be given. Put the sentences from different pairs / groups together to make a list of beatitudes that can be displayed / copied by the children as a model. Remember to use themes of peace and reconciliation where possible. · Use reflective storytelling of the Prodigal Son (Luke 14) with the class ­a Godly Play set might be available for this ­ see

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Developing the Theme

www.godlyplay.org.uk. These are sets of simple wooden and cloth equipment that are used in reflective storytelling with a script based on questions that encourage the children to reflect on what is happening in the story, as well as the motivation, thoughts and feelings of the characters. There is a painting by Rembrandt which looks at this story and also some churches have windows telling this story ­ check out your local area. e.g. the John Piper window in Aldburgh church. Explore the feelings of the characters in the story. Was the father right to take the son back? Discuss with the class. Ask children to write a simple version of the story, expressing the thoughts and feelings of the characters. Low Ability Pupils could be asked to draw a picture of the characters in the story with speech bubbles scribed by a class room assistant / helper / a more able pupil. MAPs could write a simple short version and HAPs should be encouraged to refer to the bible story without copying it. The emphasis should be on reconciliation and feelings in the story. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories. AT2 L2 ­ in relation to matters of right and wrong, recognise their own values and those of others · Explore the Christian idea of being reconciled to God ­ how does it feel to be reconciled with someone you love? What bad things might Christians / humans have done to estrange them from God? What might make God cross with someone? Why is it important that Christians are reconciled with God? Recap the work done at the start of the unit about their own experiences of this. · Investigate the Prayers of Confession in church including the Roman Catholic first confession. This could lead to a visitor e.g. the local Catholic priest coming into the school to explain what this means for him and his congregation, and to be interviewed by the children about what reconciliation with God means. They could also ask him about the differences between Christian groups. Take photos of the visit and ask the class afterwards to add captions of what they remembered him saying. · Find information about the The Corrymeela community's work in Northern Ireland and look at some stories of people helped by the Corrymeela Community. This is available through Cracking RE from The Stapleford Centre although it can also be found through the internet ­ www.corrymeela.org. Why were Christians fighting each other? What differences are there between Catholic and Protestant Christians? Why did some people decide to stop fighting

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and start the reconciliation process? What affect did it have on some people? What beliefs do some Christians share? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ begin to show awareness of similarities in religions OR AT1 L3 ­ describe some key features of religions, recognising similarities and differences · Look at song words for The Pollen of Peace by Roger Courtney (can be found in the Complete Come and Praise BBC) ­ the pollen of peace comes from the flowers and seeds of love that Christ has sown. Look at seeds from a packet and discuss what they grow into. What would flowers of love look like? Ask the children to design a seed packet for the seeds of peace showing what they would look like grown. Ideas explored more fully in Cracking RE. (science) (art) · Make plant labels explaining what the seeds of love / peace need to grow - dos and don'ts

· Look at the lives and work of Christians who have been reconcilers like Desmond Tutu. What did he do that helped bring peace / reconciliation? Can the children identify the theme of reconciliation in the work of someone like Desmond Tutu? Have they understood enough to be able to show why he does what he can to help with peace and reconciliation? Can they make a direct link to a faith / belief / teachings of Jesus in the Bible and the work done by Christians in the world? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 ­ begin to identify the impact religion has on believers' lives · Explore the theme of "breaking down the barriers" through dance. What music would each group select? Can they make their own music? How can they express their ideas in dance? What barriers are they trying to break down?

Reviewing

· Visit to War Museum in London? or to a reconciliation statue if appropriate · Drama · Design and art · Dance and music

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 3

Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: SUBMISSION

View towards Mount Cook NZ

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the theme of submission; this is what Islam means - submission to the will of Allah. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Religion and the Individual from a Muslim viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what is expected of a believer following a religion and the impact of belief on people's lives?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of what submission means; it does not necessarily mean being weak or giving up; children reflect on to whom they submit and whose rules they follow. The unit then moves on to explore how Muslims view Allah and some rules or religious practices reflect their desire to submit to Allah's will and the impact that this may have on a believers' life. Children are then asked to explore the idea expressed in the opening Surah (chapter) of the Qur'an: the Al Fatihah (show me the right path, the straight path) and show what they have understood about what the right path for Muslims is and what this means in terms of the life they lead in submitting to Allah and following his path. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Religion and the Individual (Hinduism and Christianity) but does not necessarily have to be taught in any particular order. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. PSHE (rules we follow)? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity. Please bear in mind that Muslims do not draw pictures of God and the Prophet Muhammad. It would be offensive to them if children were asked to do so in class.

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Remember that Muslims often use pbuh (peace be upon him) after the name of Muhammad. I haven't done so here to save time, not through a lack of respect.

· Ask the children to think about a wrestling match. When a wrestler gives up and admits that the opponent is stronger, what does he do / say? Hopefully one of the children will know the word submission. How does the wrestler feel when he submits? Is he angry because he has been beaten? Does he want revenge? Does he feel relieved because his pain and suffering has stopped? Who do we submit to? Why do we submit to them? How do we feel about submitting? What are the good things about accepting that there is someone who is in charge of us and who is stronger? What do they do for us that helps us? · What rules do we obey or submit to? What might happen if we don't submit? What rules are particularly hard to submit to? Why? Ask the class to produce a short piece of creative writing about a day when they do not obey anyone or follow any rules. (Literacy). LAPs could be given a writing frame which starts each paragraph for events during the day; MAPs should be able to write a short piece and HAPs should be encouraged to write a story if they can.

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· Allahu Akbar means the greatness of Allah, Allah is Great. Why do Muslims think Allah is great and should be obeyed? Think about the 99 names. What do they tell us about what Muslims think about Allah? Muslim means one who submits to the will of Allah. What do you think God's rules are? Is it more important to follow God's rules or other rules? Why? Discuss. · At birth, Muslims whisper in the baby's ear - why? What words do they whisper? Explore the idea of how it is important to give guidance to a baby from the start of his / her life. What would you whisper in a child's ear? Why? Write down what you would say and practice on a doll. What rules would you want a child of yours to follow? · Explore some key rules followed by Muslims e.g. the Five Pillars: Shahadah (declaration of faith), Salah (prayer 5 times a day), Zakah (giving to those in need), Sawm (fasting during Ramadan) and Hajj (pilgrimage to Makkah). What does each pillar entail? What impact

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does each pillar have on a believer trying to submit to the will of Allah? · Make a simple model in groups with a roof (labelled faith or Islam) held up by 5 pillars labelled as the five pillars of Islam. What happens if you remove too many of the pillars? Think about the symbolism of this. This could be done through drama where the children are the pillars holding up a box labelled faith. Can you submit to the will of Allah and not try to follow all five of the Pillars? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people OR AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions; begin to identify the impact religion has on believers' lives; describe some forms of religious expression · Ask a Muslim visitor into class to talk about he / she tries to submit to Allah. What do they find difficult / easy / enjoy about their faith? Do they feel like the wrestler discussed at the start of the unit? What do they feel is the right path for them to follow through life? Take photos of the visit and ask the class afterwards to add captions of what they remembered him / her saying. · Ask the class to reflect on the commitments made by believers and what they are committed to. Muslims try to follow the rules because they value them, are committed to them and are trying to submit to the will of Allah. Why do you follow rules? What do you value? What rule or code of behaviour do you follow that shows that you think it is important e.g. not bullying, looking after other people's things? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments, and their own attitudes and behaviour

Reviewing

· Ask the children to think of a time when they didn't listen to instructions or follow rules and got lost as a consequence. Encourage them to think quietly for a moment about it without talking. Ask children to work in pairs to explore this idea. Explain that they should take it in turns to ask questions about their partner's experience e.g. how did you feel when you were lost? Why did you get lost? Did you do as you were told? Was it an accident? Did you panic? How did

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you get home? Did someone find you? How did you feel when you were found/ got home? Share some of the stories with the class. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 pupils ask, and respond sensitively to, questions about their own and others' experiences and feelings · Explore the concept of the right and the wrong path. Draw a map with the class showing what you might meet on each path. Ask the children to think about a path as a metaphor for life / guidance through life / making the right or wrong decisions. HAPs will be able to grasp this figurative idea and should be encouraged to draw their own map through life / decision making. LAPs who find difficulty understanding this idea could draw a map of how to get from school to home with the safe / right path marked on it. (Geography) · For Muslims, the Qur'an contains the actual words of Allah given to Muhammad. The opening Surah (chapter) is the Al Fatihah (show me the right path, the straight path) and is said many times a day in prayers. What do you think the right path would be for Muslims? Would it be different to your path that you have explored above? In what way? Can the children show that they have understood what it means for a Muslim to submit to the will of Allah? Do they understand that the right path for a Muslim is to try to follow all the rules set out in the Qur'an because they are the word of God? Can they explain how following the Five Pillars of Islam has a profound affect on the lives of believers?

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· · · · · Visit from a Muslim Making the 5 pillars model Map of right and wrong paths ­ possible links with Geography Role play with doll Creative writing about a day of not obeying

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Year 3

Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: RELIGION AND THE INDIVIDUAL Theme: KARMA AND SAMSARA

Tissue paper lotus flower

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of karma and samsara; the circle of birth, life, death and rebirth; good actions being rewarded in this life or the next. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Religion and the Individual from a Hindu viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what is expected of a believer following a religion and the impact of belief on people's lives?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of good and bad actions and their consequences; they then explore the ideas around incarnation and contrast Hindu beliefs about life after death with those of Christians. They explore karma in a huge game of snakes and ladders and reflect on the idea of doing one's duty and acting for good through some of the stories of Lord Rama. How beliefs affect a believers' outlook and actions is explored in a brief study of the life of a Hindu such as Ghandi. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Religion and the Individual (Christianity and Islam) but does not necessarily have to be taught in any particular order. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art or drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Ask the class to think about good and bad actions ­ what are the consequences they have experienced when they have done something good or bad? How does it feel to do something good or bad? Model how to make a simple flow chart of someone making good and bad choices and actions and what the consequences might

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be. Ask the class at each decision point what the options and consequences are e.g. Bob walked to school and on the way he found a bag. What are his choices ­ good and bad? What might happen if he chooses the right option? The wrong option? What might happen to him next because he has taken that decision? Follow the little story through as the children guide you with examples. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 in relation to matters of right and wrong, recognise their own values and those of others · Make up scenes where people are doing the right thing or the wrong thing. What are the consequences?

Developing the Theme

· Talk to the children about the Hindu belief in karma. Hindus are aiming for moksha ­ freedom from the cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth (samsara). The more good you do now, the better your next life will be and the closer you might move to being released from the circle of birth and rebirth. Discuss the concept of reincarnation with the children and the role of Karma in it. · Discuss what it might be like to be released from the constraints of your body and / or all responsibilities. · Christians believe in doing good and in a life after death but not in the same way. What do Christians believe happens when you die? Why do they think you should do good things? Reflect the similarities and differences between the two religions. Explain to the children that noone can know for sure what happens when you die ­ it is a mystery. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 recognise that some questions cause people to wonder and are difficult to answer · If you want to assess how much the children have understood about the similarities and differences between the two religions, ask the children to draw a straight line which represents a Christian view of life. Ask them to label birth, childhood, adulthood, old age events on the line in the right place, using it like a time line. What do Christians believe happens at the end of the line when they die? Ask the children to show this with a picture or a few sentences. Then ask them to consider life as a spring or circle to show what Hindus believe about life and death. They should show birth, life and death on the circle or

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spring and then try to show what Hindus believe happens when you die. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 - describe some key features of religions, recognising similarities and differences. · Look at a snakes and ladders game ­ this was a Hindu game originally and represents making good and bad decisions in life. In groups, produce some good and bad actions someone could make in a lifetime and what the consequences might be. Put the ideas together to make a giant snakes and ladders game ­ perhaps on the playground or if not, on large sheets of paper that could be laid on the floor in the hall or on a large wall. Play the game. Make sure that the children understand the idea that doing a good deed will bring rewards but they might not be in this lifetime for Hindus. Also draw out the idea that a belief in karma has an impact on how a believer behaves. · Look at the story of Prince Rama from the point of view of doing one's duty and doing good deeds. Children could act out a story through drama. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. · Ask a Hindu visitor into class to talk about he / she feels about karma and reincarnation. Take photos of the visit and ask the class afterwards to add captions of what they remembered him / her saying.

· Tell a simple version of the main events in the life of Gandhi. What good things did he do? As a Hindu, why did he do them? What did he think was his duty? How did he set about doing what he believed was right? · Children could look at things that Ghandi did or said through the internet. They could work in groups to produce a mobile to hang in the classroom, a booklet or poster showing different things that Ghandi did or said e.g. with a picture of Ghandi with speech bubbles with some of the things he said or did. Some useful websites might be: http://www.mkgandhi.org/students/story1.htm inspiring stories http://www.mkgandhi-sarvodaya.org/index.html

Reviewing

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http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mahatma_Gandhi/ for quotes http://www.spca.bc.ca/Kids/KidsClub/Gandhi.asp for an overview. Make sure that the children are able to understand what they are using from the internet as a lot of the websites are too hard for them. Look at them first to select the most appropriate for your children. It might be useful to group HAPs, MAPs and LAPs so that all children can access the work. LAPs could be asked to find concrete information about Gandhi such as birth, death, main events in his life; MAPs could find quotes relevant to doing good and his faith; HAPs could make links between what he said or did and how that is a reflection of Hindu beliefs.

· DT / art snakes and ladders game · Drama · ICT research into Ghandi's actions to fulfil his duty / do right or to find quotes showing that he was a man of peace and who wanted to do good. · Hindu visitor if possible

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 3

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION Theme: PARABLES AND THE CROSS

Auckland Cathedral NZ

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of parables and the cross; parables are stories with deeper meanings and are therefore a kind of symbol. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Symbols and Religious Expression from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "How are religious and spiritual ideas expressed?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of everyday symbols and what a symbol is; fables and stories with morals or deeper meanings. Children look at some parables of Jesus and explore the ideas in the stories through art, drama or creative writing. Easter symbols are investigated through various activities as well as work on the Easter story and what it means to Christians. Children are asked to create their own cross from natural things found around the school and to explain the symbolic meanings they have incorporated. This can form part of an assessment, as can the suggested activity which allows children to plan an Easter service for the school. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is a stand alone unit and can be taught at any point in the year; however, given its strong focus on Easter, it would be most suitable in the weeks leading up to Easter. If you decide to ask the children to create an Easter service, please bear in mind that this unit will need to be allocated enough time to allow the children to create, plan, organise and rehearse their Easter presentation. Think about whether this unit has any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. literacy (fables) / drama / and Easter service or assembly? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? Can you book the local church so that the children's Easter assembly can take place there? Do you want to invite parents? How much advance planning will that need? Would a visit or visitor be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what

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they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Show the children some pictures of everyday symbols and ask what they mean. What does a symbol do? What is a symbol? · Tell them one of Aesop's fables. Who has heard stories like this before? It has a special meaning at the end like a lesson ­ it is supposed to teach you something. This is the moral. Discuss what the moral if the story is. Explore the idea that some stories have hidden meanings that are like symbols ­ they are something simple that stands for a more complex idea. (Literacy)

Developing the Theme

· Read the parable of the Tenants in the Vineyard ­ Luke 20: 9 ­ 19. What was Jesus trying to say in this story? What meanings did he want people to take from this story? AND / OR · Read the parable of the wise man who built his house on the rock ­ Matt 7: 24 -28 and Luke 6: 46 -49. This story is also done very nicely in the Stories Jesus Told books by Inkpen and Butterworth. It can also be found at http://www.request.org.uk/main/bible/jesus/builders/builders02.htm (this also has a quiz). What is the symbolism / meaning in this story? What symbolic images are created? (Rock) · Whichever parable you choose, read and explore the story with the class. It could be explored through drama, art or writing. · Explore some Easter symbols ­ which do you associate with Easter? What do they mean for you? Look at the symbols of new life ­ eggs, chicks, rabbits, spring flowers etc. Why are they used by Christians at Easter? · A sad day ­ reflective story or godly play story for Easter ­ look at the Easter story with the children and what it means for Christians. · Look at the cross as a symbol. Why is it not a sad image for Christians? Look at crosses of all kinds ­ what feelings / beliefs are being expressed in them?

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· Create an Easter story on paper crosses where the children draw different parts of the story like the Stations of the Cross. Put them up around the room / hall / school. · Explore the Easter story in senses poems, an emotions graph, hot seating, poetry, dance, song, art. (drama, art, PSHE, music, literacy). This is an opportunity to group the children according to ability and to give each group a different way of exploring the story. · Make an Easter garden showing the tomb and the rolled away stone ­ there are many different useful websites for instructions ­ I found very clear instructions on www.just4kidsmagazine.com but there are many others. Most Easter activity books for children will have basic instructions. · Alternatively, children could decorate an egg shell with Easter symbols and use it as a little plant pot and plant a seed or a seedling or preferably something fast growing like cress. (science)

Reviewing

· Look at the cross as a symbol. Why is it not a sad image for Christians? Take the children outside (weather permitting) and ask them to make a cross from natural things found around the school ­ leaves, twigs, stones ­ and then ask the class to look at each cross (laid out on playground if not too windy) and explain the symbolism of their cross to the rest of the class. They can do this individually or in groups. Responses should include statements like: the stones at the ends of the cross symbolise the nails that held Jesus on the cross...I have used a mixture of green and dead leaves to show that Jesus died but was resurrected to live again.... Photograph the crosses and then ask the class to write what symbols there are in their crosses as well as what they learned when making it, how they felt and what they thought. This can be very powerful and has been done very successfully at St Margarets CEVAP school in Ipswich.

· Decorate a cross with Easter symbols. What symbols have the children been able to identify as part of the Easter tradition? Can they explain to you why they have used them and what they mean to Christians? · Ask the class to imagine that they are in charge of planning the Easter Service. They need to include both joyous and sad elements. Why? What items would they plan for the service?

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· In groups, ask the children to write their own prayers, readings and songs they want to include. Use hymn books or Easter hymn sheets ­ there are a lot of songs for Christian children on the internet. One site I found was www.familyworship.org.uk but there are many others. Discuss how they would decorate the church and why they would choose to decorate in that way. What symbols would be appropriate? The children should be able to explain any symbols they want to use. LAPs will need support in this ­ perhaps the children could be ability grouped. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts AT1 L3 describe some forms of religious expression

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· Easter service in church that the children have planned including their own lyrics for songs and prayers / readings · Godly play · Easter experience plus emotions graph, hot seating, poetry, dance, song, picture gallery (drama, art, PSHE, music, literacy) · Model making Easter garden (?DT) or egg shell plant pot (science) · Exploring parables ­ Literacy?

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Year 3

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: BELIEFS IN ACTION Theme: KINGDOM OF GOD AND MISSION

Foil crown

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of the Kingdom and mission; the idea of heaven as the kingdom of God and of Jesus and God as Kings is a common theme in Christian worship. Mission is a strong manifestation of Christian belief turned into action. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Beliefs in Action in the World from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "How do religions respond to global issues?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of what it means to be a king; qualities that a king needs and what happens when the king does not have these qualities. Children consider how God / Jesus is viewed as a king as well as in other ways and investigate views of what Heaven might be like in the Bible as well as in a personal way through discussion, art or creative writing. The unit then encourages children to think about how belief in Heaven and God as Lord and King enables Christians to go into the world on mission work to help others. Organisations such as CAFOD, Christian Aid, Salvation Army, local Christian community work in the wider world to help people because of their beliefs. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is a stand alone unit that can be taught at any time during the year. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. poetry / art / ICT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity. You may need to research websites for Christian organisations before the children are asked to as many have very informative sites but they are not in language that children of this age can easily understand.

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· Using a chair and fabric, card etc, build a throne in the classroom. Explore with the children who might sit on a throne. Ask children to sit on it and explain how it makes them feel. · Read the poem ­ If I Were a King by David Rumer ­ this can be found on www.authorsden.com . Ask the children to write a poem about what they would do / like to happen if they were a king / queen ruling over a kingdom. They can use the Rumer poem as a model. Children can sit on the throne to share their poems with the class. (literacy) LAPs could be given a writing frame which has the start of lines so there is less writing for them; HAPs should be encouraged to think about more intangible things like peace, harmony etc. · Tell a version of the story of Robin Hood which mentions how "good King Richard" comes back from the wars and helps / pardons Robin, whereas "bad King John" has been guilty of causing suffering for the people of England. · Explore with the children what difference a good / bad king can make. Is it easy to be a king? What would they find hard? Who has to make the decisions? Could you be nice to everyone all the time? What if one of your subjects had done something wrong? What qualities does a good king have? What would it be like to be ruled over by a bad king?

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· Look at the Christian idea that Christ means King or anointed one. What does anointed mean? Act out a coronation using the throne you have made and a willing child. How does it feel to be the anointed one? · Christians believe that Jesus is part of God, who is often called King as well. What is God king of? What would God's kingdom be like? Where is it? How could you get there if you wanted to go? What kind of a king do Christians believe God is? Is he always a good, kind king? Look at some of the ways Christians refer to God ­ King, father, creator, judge, shield, rock etc. What does this tell you about how Christians view God? · Explore the Christian view of heaven with the sheep and goats parable (Matthew 25: 31 ­ 46) and / or the Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6: 10 ­

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14). What do Christians think heaven will be like? What tells them about heaven? How can they try to make a heaven on earth? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources · Mary Chapin Carpenter has a song (lyrics can be found on the internet or a copy is included in the resources) called My Heaven. It is quite a slow tune, but the lyrics could be used to explore what a personal view some people have of heaven. It comes from the album Between Here and Gone 2004 Sony Music. I recommend that you cut some of the lyrics to keep them shorter and easier to use; also there are some references to grandparents who have died being in heaven ­ this may cause some distress to some pupils and you must use your professional judgement as to which sections you wish to use, if any. · Explore the children's views of what the kingdom of heaven might be like (or would be like if they could make a heaven) through discussion, art, poems or preferably a combination of all three. Why does everyone have a different view of heaven? This could be an opportunity to ability group the children and give them a different task ­ painting, poems, creative writing; or to group the children in mixed ability groups where each person has a different task about heaven. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 recognise that some questions cause people to wonder and are difficult to answer

Reviewing

· Look at what some Christians do to try to improve life on earth for people ­ use the internet to find out about good work done around the world by Christian groups. Christian Aid has a kidzone which might be useful. Can the children make links between what Christians do to help people and why they do it? Can they make links between the action and the belief? Do they show an understanding that for many Christians this leads them to completely change their lives in an effort to help others (charity workers, NGOs, Salvation Army, Christian Aid, CAFOD etc) Use ICT to try to find out about the work of Christians, making sure that the children are always aware of the link between the beliefs and actions. · Investigate what the local church community does to help people. Can a member of the church visit to talk to the children about why they help people? Do they only help fellow Christians or do they help anyone? Why? Is there anyone that a Christian would not help? Why?

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· Ask a member of the Salvation Army if he / she can visit the school, or if possible arrange a visit to a local citadel where good work is done. Why do some Christians do so much to help other people? What do they believe about heaven and making a heaven on earth? What impact does this have on a believer's life? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 ­ begin to identify the impact religion has on believer's lives.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· ICT Christian mission in the world · Poetry ­ If I were a king by David Rumer and children's own poems · Discussion, art and / or poetry for each child's view of the kingdom of God / heaven · Role play of coronation · Possible visit or visitor from a Christian charity or group like the Salvation Army.

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Year 3

Religion: JUDAISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS IN ACTION AND BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: COVENANT AND MITZVOT

A BarMitzvah kippah

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of covenant and mitzvot; the idea of promises made between God and the Jews / God and humankind as well as the good deeds that Jews believe are important as a daily part of their faith. It is one way in which to encounter some aspects of the Areas of Study Beliefs in Action in the World and Beliefs and Questions from a Jewish viewpoint; it is not meant to cover the whole of the areas of study. It concentrates on the main questions "How do religions respond to global issues?" and "what is expected of a believer following a religion and the impact of belief on people's lives?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of making promises; it then moves on to stories from the Old Testament exploring promises and commitments made between God and the Jews. Children look at what promises are made at a Bar Mitzvah ceremony and doing Mitzvot in the world ­ good deeds or actions ­ in their own community or in the wider world. They explore their own experiences in doing good deeds. Children are encouraged to reflect on what promises, commitments, codes of behaviour they think are important and to create a mezuzah like box to store their thoughts. Finally they are asked to show what they have learned in the unit by discussing and asking questions about artefacts that a Jewish child might have and their significance. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is a stand alone unit that can be taught at any time during the year. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. poetry / art / ICT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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· Look at what it means to make a promise. What does it feel like when someone you trusted breaks a promise to you? Is it hard to make a promise? To keep a promise? To break a promise? Ask the class to share their thoughts and feelings around the room. · Explore through drama the thoughts and feelings connected to making promises, keeping and breaking them and the dilemmas that may cause.

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· Tell the covenant stories of Noah (Genesis 6: 9 - Gen 9: 17) to the class. Discuss what happens in the story and why God sent the flood. What was the rainbow a symbol of? What was God promising? AND / OR · Tell the story of Abraham (covenant Genesis 17: - a lot about circumcision ­ not appropriate for children and covenant after testing Abraham with Isaac Genesis 22). Discuss with the class what promise God was making in the story. Is it a promise like the one with Noah? Discuss the test that God gave Abraham. Do you think it was fair? Drama could be used with this story to encourage the children to reflect on what they main characters in the story were thinking ­ freezeframing or hotseating. AND / OR · Tell the story of Moses (Exodus) and the promises made. What promises are made? You will need to simplify these without loosing sight of the main point which is promises being made. Some children's bibles will miss this point. Exodus 6: 3 ­ 9 when God recalls his covenant with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and intends to honour it. Broken promises by the Pharaoh through the story as he says he will let the Hebrews go but then changes his mind. Exodus 20 -23 ­ commandments and God says that if they obey His rules, he will look after them. · What is the promise being made in this / these stories? Why are these stories important to Jews? What do they tell us about the relationship between the Jews and God? Is it a friendship? Is it a deal? Jews call God "Adonai" in prayer which means Lord. What does this say about their view / relationship with God?

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· Research with the class what happens at a Bar or Bat Mitzvah. What promise is being made at a Bar Mitzvah? What happens if the promise is broken? How hard is it to keep the promises? · Look at another commitment to the faith ­ Mitzvot ­ doing good and helping others. Explore with the children how they feel when they have helped people. How does it feel to have been helped unexpectedly? How can you help people? What do you do to help people? What could you do to help someone that you don't do now? What effect would that extra help have on someone's life? Ask the children to produce a drawing / painting / piece of drama about when they have performed a mitzvah. What did they do? How did it make them feel? How did the other person feel? Why is it important to do good things for other people? What other religions have they experienced that believe that doing good is important? Can they make any links between beliefs / actions across different religions? · Look at Mitzvot in the wider world. What about Jewish charities? What can the children find out about them? Try ICT so that the children could research the work done around the world by Jews to help others. Google Jewish charities ­ there are many web sites that will provide information. Could a representative from a Jewish charity come into school to talk to the children about what they do and why they do it? Do they only help Jews? Why? · Ask a visitor from the Jewish community to talk to the children about what it means to commit to the faith and what he / she promised during his / her bar / bat mitzvah. Ask the visitor also what they do as mitzvoth and good deeds for others. Why do they do it? How does help them in their commitment to their faith? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 ­ begin to identify the impact religion has on believer's lives. · Show the class a mezuzah. Ask them to think of a question that they would like to ask about it and write it down. Ask the children to see if they can suggest any answers to their own questions using their knowledge of religion, worship and the unit so far. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ask important questions about religion and beliefs AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments

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· Tell the children what it is / contains/ where it goes in a home. How many of the class have had their questions answered? Try to answer the remaining questions ­ if you can't, see if the questions could be put / emailed / sent to a Jewish visitor. · Look at Deuteronomy 6: 1 ­ 10. What deal or promise is God making with the Jews? What must they do to keep their side? · What rules or beliefs are so important to you that you might want to keep them like the Jews keep the Shema? What code of conduct do you believe in strongly? Ask the class to produce a sentence or more on what they believe is the right way to behave and write on a little piece of paper that can be rolled and put into a "mezuzah" that they make from card e.g. look after the world ­ don't pollute / reuse recycle reduce because the world is too beautiful and unique to destroy stupidly or treat other people with respect and care because we are all human / God's children etc.

· Reinforce the work on Bar Mitzvah and doing Mitzvot by using artefacts from a "child's" bag which contains things to do with "his" Bar Mitzvah / how he might help people. These bags can be an ordinary bag containing various artefacts such as a kippah (skull cap), a Jewish child's book about some aspect of Bar Mitzvah or faith, some Hebrew writing, photos or a family celebration (made up or from clip art), Bar Mitzvah cards and so on. Include some entries in a diary showing things like "helping Granny to tidy up spare room", "go to old peoples' home to do some gardening" or "listen to Deborah read for 10 minutes to help her get her merit sticker at school". Include some non religious things like pencils, stickers, reading book and so on that a child of another or no faith might also have in a bag. You may have many of these things in school in your Jewish artefact collection. They are also available in a bag as a set "a ..... child's collection" from companies like TTS for about £50 - £70 depending on religion. · Explain to the class that your neighbour's son has just been making promises at a special ceremony, and he has let you borrow his bag so that the class can have a look at some of his things. Bring them out of the bag one by one. Encourage the children to ask questions about what they are being shown and for them to suggest answers to these questions. If none are forthcoming, you should ask the class with questions such as "I wonder what he uses this for? Is this special for his religion or something that you have? What significance do they have? How do you think he felt when...? What does he do to help

Reviewing

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people?" You might also like to ask the class to believe that you have found the bag in school and are going to look through it to see if there any clues as to whom it might belong. · Which children are able to correctly identify the items that are of religious significance? Which can make links between the ceremony and the beliefs underpinning it? If you are going to assess this, ask the children to write down what they have seen and what they know. LAPs could pick out the items and talk to the teacher / helper / LSA about their significance; MAPs and HAPs could draw and write about them. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people AT1 L3 ­ use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions...

· · · · · · ·

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Visitor in from local Jewish community or a visit to them making promises dilemmas ­ drama Abraham story ­ drama Handling and asking questions about artefacts ICT researching Jewish charity work Making their own mezuzah like box Art or writing about what they do to help other people

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Farmington Institute Scheme of Work by Beth Boast 2009

Year 4 Units

These units are planned on the expectation that they will be taught in blocks rather than discrete one hour lessons; however, that does not mean that they cannot be taught in that format. The total time that the units should take vary but overall should meet the requirements of the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus which states that RE should be allocated a minimum of 5% curriculum time i.e. approximately 45 hours per year at Key Stage 2 and that each area of study should be seen as requiring the equivalent of one half term's work in Religious Education i.e. no less than 6 hours. Therefore these units have been planned to take between 6 and 9 hours each. Although not all aspects of RE can be assessed, there are assessment opportunities built in to these units where appropriate. The majority of pupils at the end of Key Stage 1 are expected to have achieved Level 2. These units are planned around Level 3 with some elements of Level 2 and Level 4 where appropriate, although pupils should achieve Level 4 at the end of Key Stage 2.

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE Theme: INCARNATION, SALVATION, SIN Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE Theme: RISALAH (message), PROPHETHOOD Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE Theme: AVATAR Religion: SIKHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE AND SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION Theme: GURU AND IK ONKAR Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY Theme: BAPTISM / BODY OF CHRIST Religion: SIKHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY Theme: KHALSA AND LANGAR Christmas (not included)

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Year 4

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PE0PLE Theme: INCARNATION, SALVATION, SIN

Soft Nativity Set

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of incarnation, salvation and sin; the Christian belief that Jesus was God made flesh, sent to earth to save us from our sins. This is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Inspirational People from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "why do some figures e.g. founders, leaders and teachers, inspire religious believers?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of what has value and what value is given to Jesus by Christians. Children are encouraged to set up a book for visitors in school (or ask them in person if possible) to see who the visitors have found inspirational and how they have altered their life / behaviour / attitude as a result of this inspiration. Children find out about the people mentioned by visitors. The unit then looks at songs and stories told by Christians about Jesus and what they tell us about what he did that Christians find inspirational. They think about the ideas of sin, salvation, sacrifice and incarnation, asking questions and reflecting on others' answers. Children discuss who inspires them. They are then asked to show what they have learned in the unit by looking at images of Jesus by different artists, and then to produce their own image which shows some elements of why Jesus has inspired people. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Inspirational People (Hinduism and Islam) but does not necessarily have to be taught first. Is there another unit included here that would better suit your needs in this term? Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. music, storytelling in literacy, art? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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· Bring in a random selection of things from home and tell the children you are going to make a show like Cash in the Attic with the objects. Give the objects to selected children and ask them and the class to put them in a line in order of value. What discussion does this create with the children? Have any of them suggested that rarity or sentimental value adds to value? Are they able to put the items in order? · Hand out nativity sets or look at pictures of cribs / nativity scenes from around the world ­ children can Google (ICT link) or you can collect the pictures and hand them out to groups. http://www.worldnativity.com/products has good pictures for different nativities from around the world but there are many online sites that you could look at. http://christmasjourney.org.uk/nativity.php has a display of children's work. · Look at who is depicted in a nativity set. How important are they in the story of Christmas? Ask the class to put the people in order of importance for themselves and then for Christians. Are the children able to explain why they have ordered the figures in that way? Is there a difference between their views and the Christian view? Why? · Ask the class to arrange the figures in a traditional way like Christians do at Christmas. Most will put the baby in the middle. Why? What does this say about what Christians believe? Why is the little baby ­ the smallest person in the set - the most important person to Christians? Discuss what Christians believe about Jesus and his birth / importance. Remind the class of the story of the birth of Jesus, looking particularly at the Christian belief that Jesus was God made flesh on earth ­ this is called incarnation. · Work in groups to use clay / Crayola Model Magic / plasticine / kitchen roll tubes to make a little model figures for the nativity scene. (DT or art link) They could draw the figures if you do not have a lot of time or even cut out outline pictures you photocopy for them. When they have all made one figure, ask them to arrange the scene the way they think reflects the importance of the figures. Why have they grouped the figures in that way? Photo their arrangements and ask them to write speech or thought bubbles for each figure to explain what they are thinking or feeling. (ICT link if the children use the photo in a document and add text) · Set up a book at the main entrance to the school and ask all visitors to write down who they find inspirational. If the children don't know who each person is, they should try to find out.

Starting the Unit

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· Look at songs or stories which show different aspects of Jesus - God, human, saviour and so on. Many websites have hymn lyrics and some have sound files you can play to the children. Ask your music teacher to see what resources are available in school. Incarnation is mentioned in many songs about Jesus e.g. Once in Royal David's City, He came down that we may have ... (Iona Community). Stories that might be suitable include the stilling of the storm (miracle worker, God like qualities, not human); the lost sheep (teacher, someone who understands the nature of God); the Garden of Gethsemane (prayer, asking to be spared, acceptance, self sacrifice, non violence). Don't try to cover all of the stories about Jesus' life ­ think about what the story tells us about how Jesus is viewed. Think about why the gospel writer chose to include that particular story about Jesus instead of another. What did the gospel writer want us to learn about Jesus from that story? Remember the focus of the unit. What are these songs or stories telling Christians about Jesus? What did he do or say that has inspired people do change their life or to act in a way that tries to emulate Jesus? See also Salvation Army in previous units. · The above songs and stories can be explored through guided storytelling, drama, music, art as you choose. · Look at the story of 3 trees - easy to find online if you use a search engine e.g. www.word4life.com/threetrees.html. You will need to cover some aspects of the life of Jesus before you read the story. What is the point of the story? What aspects of Jesus' life are mentioned in the story? · If you were writing a Wikipedia entry for Jesus, what would you have to include? Remember that the focus is what he did that inspires people. LAPs could be given a framework to write in so that they are clearer on what the objectives of this writing is. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts. AT 1 L3 begin to identify the impact religion has on believers' lives · John 15:13 Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends. What is meant by that? What would you do for a person you loved? Would you lay down your life? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ­ make links between values and commitments, and their own attitudes and behaviour.

Developing the Theme

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· Christians believe that Jesus' gave his human life - a sacrifice - so that humankind could be saved from their sins. What would it mean to save someone? How would both people feel? Who do you think can save you? Think about different situations and different people who save. What different things can you be saved from? Look at the word "saviour" and what it means for Christians. · What are sins? What have you done wrong in your life that you are sorry for? Is there anyone who has no sins? If you sin, does that mean that you will go to hell? How bad does a sin have to be? Ask a local vicar / priest in to discuss this ­ a contrast might be found in the RC and Anglican churches. What questions do the children have about sin, salvation and the incarnation of Jesus? Possible Assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ask important questions about religion and beliefs, making links between their own and others' responses AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments · Explore what the Salvation Army believes about rescuing in Jesus' name ­ visitor or visit to citadel locally to se the work done because of their beliefs. OR use their website to have a look at their work. www1.salvationarmy.org.uk or local citadels often have websites too. Think about why Booth (or another Christian like Mother Theresa) was inspired by Jesus so much that he (she) felt inspired to make a difference in the world. What would you like to do to make a difference in the world? What inspires you to choose that difference? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 ­ begin to identify the impact religion has on believer's lives. · Look at some stories connected to Jesus' life and how he tried to help or rescue people.

Reviewing

· Look at images of Jesus ­ CEM or www.rejesus.org has a section on images of Jesus that would work very well here. Discuss what the different images of Jesus are like. Why are there no photos? Which pictures do you like best? Why? What do you think the painter was trying to say about Jesus? What qualities was the painter trying to show that Jesus had that are inspirational? This could be used as an assessment in writing / discussion

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· Children could draw a picture of what they think Jesus was like and try to show some of their opinions and thoughts of what Jesus was like ­ art . · Look at the work of a Christian who was inspired by the life and teachings of Jesus and who, in turn, was an inspiration to others e.g. Mother Theresa, Elizabeth Fry. Can the children show that they understand what it means to be inspired by someone, and how the chosen person was inspired and in turn was inspirational. This could be done as a presentation to the class, a poster, a little booklet or as a short piece of writing depending on the ability of the child. Information on Elizabeth Fry can be found from various sites including BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/famouspeople/teachers/index.shtml The 'Famous People' website looks at the life and times of ten famous people: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Christopher Columbus, Elizabeth Fry, Henry VIII, Edward Jenner, Florence Nightingale, Samuel Pepys, Pocahontas, Mary Seacole and George Stephenson. The site supports the history curriculum at Key Stage One and its requirement for young children to find out about significant men, women and children and events from the recent and more distant past, including those from Britain and the wider world. The selection of people was made to reflect different time periods and to introduce the wider world aspect. This site has been designed to be easy to use by the children themselves. The site will work best for the child if an adult initially makes them familiar with the help icon and its function. ICT

· SA visitor or visit to citadel or visitor to talk about who has inspired them to change their life in a certain way · Model making of crib figure ­ art · Drawings of Jesus with some meanings ­ art · ICT various activities · Keeping a visitor book to ask about inspiration people · Local Christian faith leader to talk about sin · Drama, art, storytelling, music for stories and songs about Jesus · Possible presentation to the class about a famous Christian who was inspirational because they themselves were inspired by Jesus.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 4

Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PE0PLE Theme: RISALAH (message), PROPHETHOOD

Prayer Mat

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of risalah (message) and prophethood; Muslims believe that the Muhammad is the messenger of Allah, who revealed the truth to Muhammad through the Angel Gabriel. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Inspirational People from a Muslim viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "why do some figures e.g. founders, leaders and teachers, inspire religious believers?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of what God's message to the world might be and who they would pick as a messenger; children are asked to recall what Christians believe about prophets or messengers of God from other religions e.g. Old Testament and Jesus. Children then look at stories about Muhammad that show why he is an inspiration to Muslims. They explore what it feels like to be chosen to do something special, possibly through poetry. Children use the qur'an and songs relating to Muhammad to help them understand why he inspires Muslims and are encouraged to write a verse of a song for a Muslim child. If there is time, children could explore the story of Ibrahim and how he inspires Muslims. Children look at artefacts that a Muslim child might have in his / her room and what they tell us about Muslim beliefs. In reviewing the unit, children are asked to show what they have understood in explaining how and why Muhammad is an inspirational figure through symbolic art. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Inspirational People (Hinduism and Christianity) but does not necessarily have to be taught in a particular order. Is there another unit included here that would better suit your needs in this term? Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / symbols / music? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what

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they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity. Remember that Muslims often use pbuh (peace be upon him) after the name of Muhammad. I haven't done so here to save time, not through a lack of respect.

· Ask the children to think about this question: If God wanted to give the world a message, what would it be and who would deliver it? Would it be someone very important? Would the message be believed? What would God want to say in the message? Discuss. · Children should write the messages that they think would be sent and create a display ­ perhaps on little scrolls or made to look like little emails from God. They could draw pictures of who their messenger would be and explain why they thought of that image. · What do Christians believe about God's message? Do the children remember any stories about when God has sent a message? Remind them about stories like Noah (Old Testament Judaism and Christianity) and stories of Jesus from the previous unit. Muslims think of Jesus as a prophet but that Muhammad was the seal (last and most important) of the prophets. They do not believe that Jesus was the son of God. Use this opportunity to recap on Jesus / Muhammad differences. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions, recognising similarities and differences

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· Look at the Shehadah ­ the declaration of faith which is the first of the five pillars of Islam. It says "There is no god but Allah and Muhammad is his messenger". What does this tell us about what Muslims believe about God and Muhammad? They call Muhammad the seal of the prophets. What does it mean if you seal something? If you seal an envelope or put sealing wax on it, what does that mean? If you have sealing wax you could show the children how letters and documents used to be sealed to show that they were finished / not to be reopened / official. If Muhammad is the seal of the prophets, what does that mean? Do you think that the last prophet is the most important? What does it say about Muhammad that Allah did not need to have any more messengers after him?

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· Explore Muhammmad's story ­ there are lots of online information, books and DVDs available. Try Islam For Children for information. Remember that the focus of the unit is why Muhammad inspires Muslims. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts · Why are some people chosen to do special tasks? What special thing can you do? How does it make you feel to be chosen to do a job? Explore with the children how Muhammad might have felt when the Angel appeared to him. How did it feel to be God's messenger? Explore thoughts and feelings associated with being chosen to do something special ­ possibly in poetry or drama. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ... make links between aspects of their own and others' experiences · If Muhammad was the messenger, then what was the message? Where do you think Muslims can find the message? You could explore some quotations from the Qur'an about Muhammad and what Allah tells him. See also year 5 unit on teaching and authority. · Ask "who is the most important person in your life and why?" Discuss with the class what they think. · How did and does Muhammad inspire Muslims? Ask a visitor or use of quotations from Muslims ­ try online sites (ICT links) (like ask a believer for Christianity) or email local Muslim groups if possible. Children could write a letter where they ask a question each. (literacy links) If not, there are many books / sites that will have quotes by Muslims about Muhammad and why he inspires them. http://www.religioustolerance.org/isl_qura.htm or http://thinkexist.com/quotes/quran/ or http://www.the-prophetmuhammad.net/islam/quotations_from_quran.html (quite difficult in places) or http://www.eislamicarabic.com/islamic-quotes.html (prayers in Arabic and English) or http://www.squidoo.com/religiousquotes (quotes from different religions including Islam) but there are many different sites that you can look at. · If pupils are asking questions, possible assessment opportunity with AT2 L2 ask and respond sensitively to questions about their own and others' experiences and feelings or AT 2 L3 ask important questions about religion and beliefs ...

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· Explore Muslim children's songs about the Prophet ­ try http://www.yusufislam.org.uk ­ go into SONGS - A is for Allah about different aspects of the faith or a sample of children singing can be found at http://www.astrolabe.com/product/864/We_Love_Muhammad.html · Discuss what these songs say about Muhammad and what Muslims think about him. What are Muslim children taught about Muhammed through songs like this? Write a verse of a song for a Muslim child to go with a simple tune like We love Muhammad on http://www.astrolabe.com/product/864/We_Love_Muhammad.html or use a simple tune that all the children know already. The children could work in groups on their lyrics ­ they should be able to comment on what their words say about Muhammad as well as how it shows how he inspires Muslims. If you have the opportunity, children could make up their own tune which they could play to the rest of the class or which you could record. · If you have time, you could ask the class to think about the story of another prophet ­ Ibrahim (Abraham). He was also given messages from God ­ one in a line of prophets. Explore the story of the Kaaba and Ibrahim and what it tells Muslims about prophets and what God's messages are. Children could make a model of the Kaaba from a box, with a painted or cloth covering. Find pictures of the Kaaba ­ possible ICT link? This story is also present in the Jewish and Christian faiths. Talk about how Abraham is sometimes called the father of 3 religions. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 begin to show awareness of similarities in religions or AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions recognising similarities and differences · Exploring artefacts for a Muslim child ­ look at what might be found in a Muslim child's room and what they tell us about their beliefs. Use any artefacts you have in school or use pictures of things that are easily found on the internet. Remember to include things that any child might have in their room e.g. TV , books, homework, toys etc.

Reviewing

· Find the Arabic words for Allah and Muhammad. Ask the children to think about how and why a Muslim would treat these words with

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respect. Write about what they have learned about why and how Muhammad inspires Muslims. LAPs may find it easier to explain their picture to an adult who can scribe for them or who can simply assess them and note down that there was enough oral evidence for an assessment. · Decorate the words with (non living) things or patterns and display them. · Ask the children to show Muhammad in a painting but explain that they can't show him like they could if they were painting Jesus. Explain that Muslims find it very disrespectful to show Muhammad in a picture. Ask them to think about how he inspires Muslims and to paint some of the feelings and experiences they have looked at in the unit to show how Muhammad is viewed e.g. bright happy colours to show he is loved; gold or white used as a symbol that he was chosen by Allah; a symbol to show that he was the seal of the prophets; something to show that he was special etc using shapes, colours, textures, symbols. Write a paragraph to show what their paintings mean. · Ask the children to think about who has inspired them; what did they do, what do you do to change your life / behaviour / attitude in response to that inspiration? Draw / find a picture of that person and write about this. Why is that person valuable to you? If you had to order the people in your life in terms of value, where would this person go in your list? LAPs may find it easier to explain their picture to an adult who can scribe for them or who can simply assess them and note down that there was enough oral evidence for an assessment. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments and their own attitudes and behaviour AT2 L3 identify what influences them, making links between aspects of their own and others' experiences AT2 L4 describe what influences themselves and others

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· ICT ­ searching for pictures of Kaaba · Poetry ­ how it feels to be chosen for an important job / how Muhammad felt

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· Write lyrics or music and lyrics for a verse about Muhammad for Muslim children · Ask questions of believers about why Muhammad inspires them ­ email (ICT) or letter (literacy) · Painting using symbols, colour etc for Muhammad. Art · Exploring artefacts for a Muslim child

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Year 4

Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: INSPIRATIONAL PE0PLE Theme: AVATAR

Storytelling doll

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the theme of Avatar; avatar means a deity incarnate; a god in human form. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Inspirational People from a Hindu viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "why do some figures e.g. founders, leaders and teachers, inspire religious believers?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of the nature of deity and symbolic representations of aspects of deity. They explore the belief that Hindus have in one supreme being (Brahman) who has many aspects shown in different gods, goddesses and avatars like a person can show different sides of him / herself; this is explored in drama and / or creative writing. Hindus find them inspirational; children are encouraged to find out why and to express their own opinions on how / why an avatar can be an inspiration through art. The unit then looks at stories connected to Rama and their significance for Hindus. Children are asked to show what they have understood in the unit by taking a story about an avatar and explaining what there is in it that would be inspirational for Hindus. If possible, children will have the opportunity to talk to a Hindu about who / what has inspired them to change their life in some way. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Inspirational People (Christianity and Islam) but does not necessarily have to be taught in any particular order. Is there another unit included here that would better suit your needs in this term? Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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Starting the Unit

· Ask the class to think about a supreme ruler of the universe. What would his job be? What qualities would it / he / she need? Draw a symbolic picture of the qualities at the front of the room as they think of them e.g. large ears for a good listener, big muscles for powerful. At the end of the drawing, discuss whether it matters whether the person in the drawing is true to life or not? Why? Remind the class about symbols and how they stand for bigger or more complex ideas. · In groups, give the children a title for a supreme ruler / god / superhero such as Lord of Time or Ruler of Justice or God of Love. Ask them to draw a symbolic representation of this ruler and then present it to the class, explaining their symbols.

· Discuss what personality types there are. Explore different personalities in drama. How can you tell what a person is like /is feeling through what they do or say or move? Ask them to do everyday tasks in the way that a grumpy / happy / fearful person would. Can a person have different personalities? Are grumpy people always grumpy? · Explain that the word Avatar means a god in human form ­ incarnate. Recall that Jesus is called God Incarnate by Christians who believe he is part of God made in human form. If God were human, what would he / she / it be like? What would he / she / it do? Who would God want to talk to? Who would believe that person was really God? Would you? Explore this idea in art or creative writing. · Ask them to share their ideas with the rest of the class. Do their "gods" have anything in common? What should a god be able to do that a human can't? If God were human, would he / she still have special powers? · Talk about the Hindu concept of avatars. Link this to the drama work done on personality ­ Hindus believe that there is one supreme being who has many forms as gods and goddesses, who have many avatars when they have come to earth with humans. They show different aspects of Brahman the one supreme being like a person can show different personalities. Show to the class (or find with them some online pictures) of murtis (statues) or gods / goddesses / avatars used by Hindus. What shows us that these avatars are not humans like the rest of us? What do you think are the symbols used in murtis? e.g.

Developing the Theme

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durga riding a tiger, Shiva dancing on a demon. There are many websites that will show you murtis. Here are some: http://www.mandir.org/mandir/murtis.htm (about murtis in the mandir ­ temple) http://www.alibaba.com/productgs/213329813/Resin_Hindu_Gods_Hinduism_Gods_Murti.html (sales) http://www.moortiarts.com/ (lots of pictures) http://www.gmb.in/ (lots of pictures) · Discuss - what do you find inspiring about these gods / goddesses / avatars? Which figure do admire most? Why? What quality does this god / goddess / avatar show that you find an inspiration? Make a drawing (or 3D murti from clay / plasticine / Crayola model magic) of the god / goddess / avatar that you most admire, explaining why you have chosen that figure. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people. AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions... · Explore the story of Rama as avatar through reflective storytelling of exile and return ­ the Ramayana ­ Divali story. What special qualities does Rama show? How might he be an inspiration to others? · How do Hindus celebrate Divali? Pupils could retell the story with drama, writing, art; make divali lamps; http://www.woodlandsjunior.kent.sch.uk/Homework/religion/diwali.htm has some good information or http://www.reonline.org.uk/allre/tt_links.php?17 has many links onto other sites, although Divali is one of the best resourced stories in most schools and on the internet. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. · Ask a Hindu visitor in to school if possible to discuss what they feel about avatars / famous Hindu people / teachers with the children. Who do they find inspirational? What have they changed in their lives as a result of being inspired by these beliefs?

Reviewing

Look at other stories connected to avatars. If possible, have some laminated so that they can be passed around the class. Ask the children to

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pick a story and use it to explain what a Hindu might find inspirational in it / what it tells us about Hindu belief in these inspirational figures. LAPs may need a person to read to them and help in drawing out what they understand. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts AT1 L3 describe some forms of religious expression · Who are your heroes? What do you admire about them? Do you try to emulate them? How? What do your heroes do that have made you change your attitude or behaviour in some way? Look at the unit on year 4 Christianity Inspirational People. If you are using this unit before the Christianity unit, you may want to build the following in here: · Ask the children to think about who has inspired them; what did they do, what do you do to change your life / behaviour / attitude in response to that inspiration? Draw / find a picture of that person and write about this. Why is that person valuable to you? If you had to order the people in your life in terms of value, where would this person go in your list? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments and their own attitudes and behaviour AT2 L3 identify what influences them, making links between aspects of their own and others' experiences AT2 L4 describe what influences themselves and others If you have already covered this in the Christian or Muslim unit, you could remind the children of the work they did at that point.

· Drama exploration of personalities · ICT ­ finding pictures of murtis · Rama as avatar ­ reflective storytelling of exile and return ­ Ramayana ­ Divali · Make a murti ­ statue or sculpture ­ clay / Crayola model magic or drawing ­ art · Visit or visitor in school

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 4

Religion: SIKHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE AND SYMBOLS AND RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION Theme: GURU AND IK ONKAR

Ik Onkar symbol in brass

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of guru and Ik Onkar; guru means teacher and Ik Onkar reflects a belief that there is one God. It is one way in which to encounter the Areas of Study Inspirational People and Symbols and Religious Expression from a Sikh viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "why do some figures e.g. founders, leaders and teachers, inspire religious believers?" and "how are religious and spiritual ideas expressed?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of dark and light expressed through art, poetry, creative writing or dance; thoughts about the qualities of a good teacher are also explored. The children then look at pictures of Guru Nanak and learn some stories told about him, investigating how he inspired his followers who were inspirational in turn. They then look at the symbol used to express believe in one God and its use in Sikhism before looking at symbols in other religions. To review the unit, children should create a piece of work showing similarities and differences between Sikhism and other religions they have looked at. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be a stand alone unit but could be taught close to the other Sikh unit for year 4 on Khalsa and Langar. If it is taught before the Christian, Muslim and Hindu units, the review activity will have to be moved into the last unit you cover on inspirational people. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. dance / drama / poetry? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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Starting the Unit

· Guru means teacher. Discuss with the class what makes a good teacher. What qualities does he / she need to have? Ask the class to work in groups to design a good teacher - drawings with labels. Share the groups work with the rest of the class. This could make a good display. · Guru comes from GU ­ RU = Dark to light. Use drama to investigate the feelings and thoughts you might have in the dark and what affect light would have on that. If you can, make the classroom very dark and ask the children to think about what thoughts, feelings and memories they have associated with the dark. Then light a candle and repeat the exercise thinking about light; then repeat in full light. This should generate enough material for the children to talk or write about their feelings and experiences of light and dark. This could expressed in reflective writing, poetry, art or dance.

· Look at some pictures of Guru Nanak. Many can be found in text books or on the internet. How is he depicted in the pictures? Do the artists show what he was he like as a person? How do they try to tell is something about the Guru? Explore the symbols used in this art. · Ask the class to think of someone that they admire. Ask them to draw that person in the same style with symbols to show what they are like / what people to think about them. Art. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments and their own attitudes and behaviour AT2 L3 identify what influences them, making links between aspects of their own and others' experiences AT2 L4 describe what influences themselves and others · Tell the children some stories of Nanak ­ was he always a good teacher? What tells you that he was special even when he was young? What do these stories tell Sikhs about Nanak? What did he want to teach people / what are the stories meant to teach people? · Ask the class to think about where Guru Nanak's vision came from ­ his inspiration from God. He was inspired by God and in turn he has inspired many followers. Look at some information about the other Gurus who came after Guru Nanak. Ask the children to work in groups or individually to write / discuss / make a poster about what one of the Gurus did that was inspirational for Sikhs. They can then

Developing the Theme

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share their thoughts with the rest of the class. This may be an opportunity to organise the groups in mixed ability or in LAP / MAP / HAP groups as you choose. In mixed groups, children could be organised so that they have specific jobs to do to contribute to the end product / presentation. Single ability groups could have help from an adult or groups could be given different Gurus to research and give a presentation about. LAP groups should be given easy to read information and pictures; MAPs and HAPs should be encouraged to research independently as far as they can. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts AT1 L2 use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people. AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions... · Find an Ik Onkar symbol. If you have a 3D one in school it could be hidden in a bag and then revealed from a bag after children have felt / explored it. If not, they are easy to find on the internet ­ print, laminate and cut it out so that it can still be passed around. Ask the class to suggest what it might be and see if they can use their knowledge from other units to think of feasible answers. · Tell the class that the symbol is actually writing which says there is one god. Can they remember which other religions they have studied which also believe that there is one God? Can they think of symbols used by other religions? Investigate these symbols if there is time. · Look at pictures of Sikh places of worship and see if they can find the symbol. It should not be too hard to find ­ usually pictures of Gurdwaras show the symbol on the flag outside as well as the building. Children could use the internet to try to find some pictures of the symbol. ICT · Ask a Sikh visitor to talk to the children about what the belief in one God means to them and what they have changed in their life as a result of being inspired by Guru Nanak or another Guru. If this is not possible, ask the children to prepare questions that could be emailed to a local Sikh centre or website. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 ask and respond sensitively to questions about their own and others' experiences and feelings or AT 2 L3 ask important questions about religion and beliefs ...

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· Think back to work about messages from God through Muhammad and what Christians believe about Jesus. Ask the children to consider what similarities there are between religions, especially with regard to inspirational figures. They should be able to make a Venn diagram showing similarities and differences. They could make the circles the same colour as is used in RE for religions e.g. blue for Judaism, green for Islam etc and use the symbols they have investigated above. More able children should be encouraged to do some independent research from library books, school text books or the internet. LAPs will need support with this activity. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 begin to show awareness of similarities in religions or AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions recognising similarities and differences

Reviewing

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· Ask a visitor in to school or ICT ­ use a site like ask a believer for Christianity ­ asking questions about what the Gurus mean to Sikhs · Explore how Guru Nanak is drawn ­ how can a drawing show what he is like? Explore symbols in art ­ draw someone in same style with symbols to show what they are like · Drama, dance, poetry, creative writing about being in darkness and what affect light would have on that · ICT looking for pictures of how the symbol IK Onkar is used in Sikhism.

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Year 4

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY Theme: BAPTISM / BODY OF CHRIST

Font at St Michael's Church, Beccles

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of baptism and the body of Christ; the symbolic cleansing of sins and accepting Christ into one's life and belonging to the Christian church. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Religion, Family and Community from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main questions "how do religious families and communities practise their faith and what are the contributions this makes to local life? The unit starts with the children's own experiences of a sense of belonging and moves into their knowledge of baptism. What happens at a baptism is investigated through a simulated service organised by the children, who are then encouraged to think about welcoming people into a group and making promises of joining. They think about Christians around the world who pray using the words of the Lord's Prayer and some similarities and differences in how Christians around the world celebrate Christmas. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught as a stand alone unit but it makes sense to start this work after the unit on Jesus as an inspirational figure as it covers a lot of work about Jesus. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Look at the word Christian and ask the class what word they can see inside it = CHRISTians = belonging to Christ. What is Christ? It means messiah or anointed one (kings are anointed with chrism, a

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consecrated oil used in rituals). Christians believe that Jesus was the Christ and that they belong to Christ. Do you feel that you belong to someone? How does that make you feel? Is it good to belong? What does it feel like if you don't belong? · Think about what it means to join a group like Christians do ­ like joining a family or a class. What would happen to someone if they joined your family? How would you make them feel welcome? Children could make a little booklet about joining their family or class ­ what would it need to contain to help? What information would it need? What else apart from information makes a person feel wanted and as if they belong? LAPs will need some support if this is a writing task ­ you could ask the children to give an oral presentation to the class instead.

Developing the Theme

· Ask the children what their "Christian" name is. Some will be able to tell you that this means their first name. Why is it called a Christian name if you are not a Christian? Talk about how nowadays some people say "first name" instead of "Christian name" because of this but long ago in this country many people got their name when they were christened as a baby. Use a baby name book to find out what the children's names mean and where they come from ­ which ones are actually found in the bible? If a name is in the bible, it will probably be from a Hebrew tradition and not actually "Christian" per se. Internet sites are useful for finding out where names come from and the children are usually very interested to find out where their own name comes from and what it means ­ try http://babynamesworld.parentsconnect.com/ or http://www.zelo.com/firstnames/index.asp http://www.babynamespedia.com/etymology/m (quite difficult for the children but very comprehensive) · How many of the children have been baptised or have been to a baptism? What can they tell the class about it? Encourage the class to talk about a baptism they may have been to; some may have photos that they are happy to show the class. Talk about how they felt as well as what happened. · Belonging in the church can be symbolised in baptism. Look at John's baptism of Jesus (John 1:19 but also Matthew 3: 13 / Mark 1: 3). The symbols in this story could be explored by the children in drama or drawings.

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Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. AT1 L3 ­ make links between beliefs and sources, including sacred stories and texts · Look at baptisms in different Christian traditions ­ Orthodox, Baptist, Anglican and others as you choose. Discuss what the family feel / person feels when they are baptised. What promises are made? What does the water symbolise? · Ask a local Christian leader e.g. vicar to carry out a simulated baptism with a doll. Tell the children that they are going to organise everything for the service. What do they need to know? The children should ask questions which can be used as an assessment and then should try to find out the answers to what they need to know by looking in books, asking on line, asking the local faith leader who will be leading the service, asking at home or using the internet. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ask important questions about religion and beliefs, making links between their own and others' responses AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitment · The children work in groups to organise the service, making invitations and certificates to give to the Godparents and the person being baptised. They could write out the order of service and the promises made by parents and Godparents. Children can act as Godparents and congregation and take photos which can be used later; they can bring cards they have made and pictures of presents they might give to the baby. Afterwards, use the photos to go over what happened and what significance each part of the ceremony has for Christians. Children could write underneath each picture - this could be used as an assessment. This may be an opportunity to organise the groups in mixed ability or in LAP / MAP / HAP groups as you choose. In mixed groups, children could be organised so that they have specific jobs to do to contribute to the "ceremony". Single ability groups could have help from an adult or groups could be given different jobs to do. LAP groups should be help and an adult to keep them focused; MAPs and HAPs should be encouraged to work independently as far as they can. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 describe some forms of religious expression

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· What promises does a person have to make to join the church? Discuss what they are and how they feel about these. Would they make those promises? Why? · Look at the prayer that Jesus taught his disciples - Our father. Discuss what Jesus meant with this prayer line by line. Why does he call God "Father"? There are many ways that Christians refer to God; why do you think that Jesus used the word "Father" rather than any other? Does it make a difference praying to pray to a God you call father rather than Lord? If God is our father, does that mean we are all His children? Are we all brothers and sisters? Does that mean we should treat each other differently? How do you treat the people in your family especially your father? Discuss. · Look at the Lord's Prayer in different languages ­ the website of the Convent of Pater Noster in Israel has all languages written up and you can see all the languages of the world including some past languages no longer spoken e.g. Old English. Look at it with the children. If you have any children who speak a language that is not English, look at their language and ask them to read it out loud. This has ties with Modern Foreign Primary Languages Framework. See the website at http://www.christusrex.org/www1/pater/index.htmlhttp://www.christu srex.org/www1/pater/index.html or www.christusrex.org Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources including religious stories and texts · Explore with the children how Christians put their faith into action in service of the wider community because of their beliefs. Try to interview / write to / email a chaplain of a local hospital or hospice; a person of faith in a seamen's mission or homeless shelter; Christians who work with local agencies and community in different ways. The local diocese would be able to tell you a list of people who help in the community in some way or the local church leader. This is something that could be discussed if / when the local vicar comes in to talk to the children about baptism.

Reviewing

· Discuss how Christians are found all around the world and are all part of a world wide community or family which believes that Jesus was the son of God. Look at different celebrations of Christmas using pictures from around the world ­ there are many different web sites and books that cover this e.g. http://www.the-northpole.com/around/australia.html or

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http://www.santas.net/aroundtheworld.htm or http://www.soon.org.uk/country/christmas.htm Remember that some information the children find will be secular practices ­ keep them focused on religious events. · If the celebrations on the web sites above are all about Christmas, and all the people celebrating are Christians, why don't they all celebrate in the same way? Look at how birthdays / Christmas / holidays etc are celebrated in the children's homes to show diversity. What are the similarities and differences? Children could produce a list of similarities and differences within the Christian world wide community. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 begin to show awareness of similarities in religions or AT1 L3 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions recognising similarities and differences · Other ideas can be found in the Cracking RE work by Margaret Cooling - Rainbow people ­ Desmond Tutu.

· Visitor to perform doll baptism / drama organised by the children in groups. · ICT look at the pictures of the Convent of the Pater Noster and access the different languages ­ Primary languages framework link. · Art work drawing or drama to show the baptism of Jesus and the symbols involved · Making booklet about how to make someone feel as if they belong

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 4

Religion: SIKHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING RELIGION, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY Theme: KHALSA AND LANGAR

Sikh artefacts

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of khalsa and langar; belonging to the faith that you have made a commitment to and sharing food as an act of welcome and equality. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Religion, Family and Community from a Sikh viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "how do religious families and communities practise their faith and what are the contributions this makes to local life? The unit starts with the children's own experiences on sharing food and equality; it explores the langar at a Gurdwara and the beliefs connected to it. The children learn about the Khalsa and the commitments made in joining; they investigate the Sikh festival of Baisakhi and prepare a feast for every to make and share together, reflecting on what it means to belong to a faith community. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be stand alone unit and can be taught at any point in the year. However it makes sense to teach this unit after the Inspirational People / symbols unit in year 4 as the children will then be aware of who Guru Nanak was and some information about other gurus. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. DT food technology / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity. If you prepare the feast, think about who will pay for the ingredients; how many helpers will you need; do you have the facilities in school for all of the children to help in some way; what food allergies do the children or guests have? Are all the parents happy for the children to take part?

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· Imagine you are making a meal. What meal are you making? Who would you share your meal with? Would it only be people you liked? · If you asked the whole class to a meal that you were making, you would have to work very hard. Who do you think should help you? Would everyone get the same food? Would you give your friends better food than people you didn't like? What if there are vegetarians in the class? What if the teachers were invited? Would they have to help in the same way or would they be treated differently? Why? How would that make others feel? How could you make everyone feel included and wanted? How could we show that everyone is equal at your meal? If everyone gets the same, should they all help in the same way? · Explore the Sikh belief that all humans are equal. One way in which this is shown is in the Langar in the Gurdwara ­ a meal made and shared by all. Everyone contributes and is made to feel welcome. Everyone eats the same food as all are equal. Espresso has a very good section on this but you can find information in text books and through the internet. Children could contribute to a large display picture of giant plate or saucepan with food in which people are sharing ­ they could all draw a dish / meal they like and a person to add to the display. · Show a DVD / video / Espresso clip about the langar in a Gurdwara with the sound off. The children could write some questions about what they are seeing. These could be used to assess Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ask important questions about religion and beliefs, making links between their own and others' responses AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitment Then play it with the sound on and ask the children to think about how much they had understood in their own commentary that was correct. · Visit a Sikh Gurdwara if possible. If not, there are good internet resources or DVDs. What happens in a Gurdwara that shows what Sikhs believe? Ask the children to make a list / booklet / poster to show what happens connected to the Sikh beliefs behind the actions. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 identify how religion is expressed in different ways AT1 L3 describe some forms of religious expression

Starting the Unit

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Developing the Theme

· Read the story of the Khalsa to the children. Life Times series ­ Growing up from Child to Adult by Anita Ganeri covers the story well, as do many other books. Look at what happens in the Amrit ceremony. · What does it say about making a commitment to your faith? What would you make that kind of commitment for? What would you be willing to die for? Children could act out their own commitment ceremony, saying what they would make a commitment to in their own lives. They could make their own symbols like the Sikh 5 Ks. What would serve as symbols of your own commitments and beliefs? This could be done in clay / plasticine / model magic (Crayola) or as a drawing or list. Children could find real items that serve as symbols from home, or pictures from the internet that they gather together into one document. ICT / DT links Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments, and their own attitudes and behaviour

Reviewing

· Explore a Sikh festival like Baisakhi with the children with an emphasis on how it brings the community together. What are the beliefs behind the festival? There is a lot of information on the internet about Sikh festivals as well as books and DVDs.

· Look at some of the events that form part of the celebration. How does it make Sikhs feel to belong to the community? How would a Sikh feel if he / she had no community for help, support and to celebrate with? How would you feel if there was no one with whom you could share things or celebrate with? · Ask in a Sikh visitor and ask him / her about what it means to belong to a faith community. · If possible, find recipes of festival food that children could make and let them work in groups to make a feast that they could invite people to. http://www.infoaboutsikhs.com/sikh_festivals.htm or http://festivals.iloveindia.com/baisakhi/index.html has some very good recipes for food some of which are not too complicated and don't have too many ingredients. There are possible cost implications and perhaps helpers needed to supervise. Possible links to DT food technology. What about food allergies and health and

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safety issues involved? Take photos that can be used later to see what they children have remembered about the act of sharing, community, beliefs. · Ask the children to reflect on how making the food and sharing it with a large group made them feel. Was it better or worse that doing it alone? Why? · Use the photos from the feast to ask the children to show what they have learned from the unit. LAPs will need help with the written aspect of this ­ they could be asked to help in making a video of the food making / sharing sessions with a voice over / commentary which would explain what was happening but which would also explain what they have understood. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 identify how religion is expressed in different ways AT1 L3 describe some forms of religious expression

· Possible DT / food connections ­ find recipes of festival food that children could make and prepare for a class / school feast · Visit to a Gurdwara where possible or visitor · Drama in their own commitment ceremonies · Display pictures of sharing food by children

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Farmington Institute Scheme of Work by Beth Boast 2009

Year 5 Units

These units are planned on the expectation that they will be taught in blocks rather than discrete one hour lessons; however, that does not mean that they cannot be taught in that format. The total time that the units should take vary but overall should meet the requirements of the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus which states that RE should be allocated a minimum of 5% curriculum time i.e. approximately 45 hours per year at Key Stage 2 and that each area of study should be seen as requiring the equivalent of one half term's work in Religious Education i.e. no less than 6 hours. Therefore these units have been planned to take between 6 and 9 hours each. Although not all aspects of RE can be assessed, there are assessment opportunities built in to these units where appropriate. The majority of pupils at the end of Key Stage 1 are expected to have achieved Level 2. These units are planned around Levels 3 and Level 4, although pupils should achieve Level 4 at the end of Key Stage 2.

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: GOSPEL / TESTAMENT Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: REVELATION Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: YOGA / MOKSHA Religion: JUDAISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: TORAH Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: YEAR 5 WORSHIP, PILGRIMAGE AND SACRED PLACES Theme: EUCHARIST / PILGRIM PEOPLE Religion: BUDDHISM / HUMANISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: HAPPINESS / RESPONSIBILITY Christmas (not included)

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Year 5

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: GOSPEL / TESTAMENT

Family bible

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of gospel and testament; the good news preached by Christ. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Teaching and Authority from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "What do sacred texts and other sources say about God, the world and human life?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of what they would like to be written about them and recall Jesus as a significant figure; the different approaches from Matthew and Luke take about his birth and his importance to Christians. Children reflect on what it means to receive good news and what good news there is in the bible for Christians. They investigate the different writings in the bible and their importance for Christians with an emphasis on writings about Jesus. Children consider what they think are the most important. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It was written as a stand alone unit and can be taught at any point in the year. Work the children have previously covered on Jesus would feed into this unit well and would mean less new work that had to be covered. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. a DT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Discuss with the class what a biography is. (literacy links) Ask the class to consider what could be written about their lives. What would you want someone to write in your biography? What wouldn't you want them to write? Ask the children to try to write a paragraph about both versions if they can. Ask them to explore their feelings when

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good and bad things are written. This could be done through poetry or drama. · Recap with the children what they can recall about what Christians think about Jesus. Where do Christians get their information about Jesus? What does the Bible say about Jesus? Are there any bad things written about Jesus in the Bible? Why? How would Christians feel if someone wrote bad things about Jesus? Why is he important to them? · Look at the birth of Jesus in the Gospels of Matthew (kings visit) and Luke (shepherds). What are the main differences? Why do you think that the kings and the shepherds don't actually appear in the same story? Who was Matthew trying to impress? Who was Luke trying to impress / influence? What were the writers trying to tell people about Jesus?

Developing the Theme

· gospel (from Old English, gd spell "good news") ­ the word gospel means good news preached by Christ. Ask the children what they think the good news was for Christians. What good news would you like? How do you react when someone brings you good news? What feelings does it create? What kinds of good news are there? Drama miming news items · Make a display of good news the children have had recently / this year. This could be in the form of speech bubbles, newspaper front pages, breaking news tickertapes. Include in the display some aspects of the good news for Christians that the children have thought of.

· Look at some of the stories from the life of Jesus. Why was he good news for Christians? Look at some of the main events in his life or the things he said or did. This could be done as independent research using children's bibles where the children are asked to work in pairs to find out about 3 (or 5 or more) things that were written about Jesus in the bible. They would need to be able to explain what had been written and why they think it is important for Christians. Does it count as good news for Christians? They could be asked to present their findings to the class, or to make a poster, booklet or as a more formal piece of writing. Possible assessment opportunity AT 1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and texts

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AT 1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences · After the above work has been shared with the rest of the class, ask the children to make a list of what they think are the 10 most important things that were written about Jesus. Discuss why they think the top 3 on their list of 10 are more important than other things about Jesus. What might a Christian put as the top 10 / top 3? Are they different to yours? Why? This could be done as a debate in the class where children have to defend the choices they have made. Possible assessment opportunity AT 1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and texts AT 1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences AT2 L4 describe what inspires and influences themselves and others · Make or design a set of beads which represent the 10 most important things that Jesus did or said as discussed above e.g. red bead or a cross for death, gold and green for resurrection, a white bead or dove shape for baptism etc ­ use rolled up paper, Crayola Model Magic, clay, plasticine - whatever is available to you. String them together on a bracelet or string to represent the life of Jesus. Professional examples of this can be found on sale in many Christian shops / Cathedral shops ­ see www.roman.com. Children should be able to explain what their beads symbolise and why they have chosen to make / design them in a written piece or orally to the class. · How do Christians use the Bible? Ask a Christian (local priest?) to talk to the children about what the Bible means to them; how and why they read it and use it for support and guidance. Books would also be able to give this information if a visitor was unavailable. · Children should discuss who they go to for support and guidance; what books do they think would help them in their life? What guidance would they like to help guide them through life? Make imaginary "How to..." book covers with titles showing what help / guidance they think they need in life e.g. How to make friends, how to pass tests, how to learn to drive etc.

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· Where have they heard the word "testament"? What is the difference between the Old Testament and New Testament? Testament means covenant (agreement, promise or contract) or a statement of one's beliefs or principles. Who do Christians feel has made a promise to them? Who have they made a promise to? What beliefs are shown in the bible e.g. Jesus was the son of God? · Use suitable bibles (depending on reading skills of the children) so that they can investigate the content of the bible ­ stories, history, poetry, rules, proverbs, teachings etc. Ask the children to make a list of what kinds of writings there is in a bible and what a Christian might use it for e.g. prayer, guidance, support, teaching, information, inspiration. Ask them to make a special section for those parts of the bible dealing with the life of Jesus. Why might a Christian read these? How are they different to the rest of the bible?

Reviewing

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· Drama in showing reaction to good news / acting out good news · Art / design in making or designing beads · Poetry or drama in expressing feelings about how people think of you · Talk to / interview a Christian visitor about the Bible · Making "How to..." book covers

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Year 5

Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: REVELATION

Soft book

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the theme of revelation; the words of Allah revealed to the Prophet Muhammad by the angel Jibril. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Teaching and Authority from a Muslim viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "What do sacred texts and other sources say about God, the world and human life?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences in hidden and revealed things like life the flap books and hide and seek. They discuss what is special to them that they treat with respect and look at the revelation of the Qur'an to Muhammad and its importance to Muslims. Using quotations from the Qur'an, children investigate what it tells Muslims about God, the world and human life. Children reflect on what truths they would like to be revealed to them and then use quotations from the Qur'an to develop the theme of revelation in making a lift the flap page to go in a class book answering their questions about God, the world and human life. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Teaching and Authority (Hinduism and Christianity) but does not have to be taught in any particular order. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. DT (book making) / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity. Remember that Muslims often use pbuh (peace be upon him) after the name of Muhammad. I haven't done so here to save time, not through a lack of respect.

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· Look at something hidden then revealed ­ pop up books / lift the flap books. Show the class a selection or ask them to bring some in from home. They may have made them in DT in the past and so may have experience of how they are made. Explain that these things are hidden and then revealed. Ask them to think about when they have played hide and seek. What is it like when you find someone? What does it feel like to have something revealed to you? Does it make it more special if you could not see it before but suddenly you can? Discuss how it makes you feel. · Show the children how to make a net of a cube (Numeracy links) and use it to make little boxes out of card. Inside the box put something important ­ this could be a real object the children have brought from home. However, as these objects might get lost, it is better to put a photo or piece of card that the children have written / drawn on to show what is important / precious / special to them. Surround the object / photo / card with tissue paper like a gift. Ask the children to share their boxes with others, who can look to see what was hidden that others find precious. Ask the children to discuss with those they have shared with ­ why is it important to you? What do you do to show that this is important to you? How do you feel about it? How would you feel if anything bad happened to it? You could use the boxes as a display.

Starting the Unit

· Show the class a Qur'an by first washing your hands, getting it down from the highest shelf in the room, unwrapping it and resting it on a stand, all done very seriously and with concentration. Tell the class that for some people this book is the most important book in the world because every word in it was told to a special person by an angel. For them, these are God's words. How can they tell that it is a special book? Could they see that you were treating it with respect? · Ask the class to think about what they treat with great care. What do they do to show that it is special to them? Ask them to share their thoughts with the rest of the class. · Look at how the Qur'an was revealed to Muhammed through storytelling with class ­ try if possible to know the story by heart or use a big book that children can share with you. There may be something on a DVD or Espresso that will help if you are not confident with the story. It will be in any text book about Islam.

Developing the Theme

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·

Refer again to the copy of the Qur'an. What do you think is in the book? What do you think God wanted to tell people? What is it that was hidden but then revealed? Discuss what the children think might be revealed by God and what was written down in the book.

· Reflect on quotations from the Qur'an with the class. What do they tell us about Muslim beliefs or about what Allah wanted to tell Muhammad? Try using the internet to find some quotations ­ there are many sites that have quotations but some might be too difficult for the children ­ select the ones that best fit the focus here. What does the Qur'an say about human life, God and the world? Try http://www.religioustolerance.org/isl_qura.htm or http://thinkexist.com/quotes/quran/ or http://www.the-prophetmuhammad.net/islam/quotations_from_quran.html (quite difficult in places) or http://www.eislamicarabic.com/islamic-quotes.html (prayers in Arabic and English) or http://www.squidoo.com/religiousquotes (quotes from different religions including Islam) but there are many different sites that you can look at. · What does the Qur'an teach Muslims about God, the World and human life? Why does it start "In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful." The Holy Qur'an, 1;1 · Look at other suras ­ 16.1 -21, 66 ­ 70, 77 ­ 83 for example. Try also "You who believe, when you rise up for prayer, wash your faces and your hands up to the elbows, and lightly rub your heads and wash your feet up to the ankles." The Holy Qur'an, 5;6 · "Your Lord has ordered that you worship none but Him and show kindness to your parents....Never ....be harsh with them, but speak to them kindly." The Holy Qur'an, 17; 23-24 · "This is the book; in it is guidance sure, without doubt, to those who fear Allah; who believe in the Unseen..." The Holy Qur'an, 2: 2-3 · Ask in a member of the Muslim community to talk to the children about the importance of the Qur'an or if possible arrange a visit to a mosque.

Reviewing

· Look again at the revelation to Muhammad. Discuss what was hidden and then revealed. Discuss with the children - what secret of the universe would you like revealed to you? What would you do with this revelation? Could be expressed as creative writing. Ask the children to think of some questions they would ask if they were able

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to have a truth revealed to them. Can they suggest any answers to the questions that are raised? Can they tell you how other religions might answer the questions? If they are able to do this, you may want to use this as an assessment. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 ask important questions about beliefs and sources... AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. AT1 L3 describe some key features of religions recognising similarities and differences AT1 L4 describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions · Use these questions to ask the children to make a page each to go into a large class book or on a display which shows something hidden and then revealed ­ a question about God, human life or the world (see above) which is answered with a quotation from the Qur'an when the flap is lifted / the page opened pops up. · Put the pages together to make a display or a large class book which can be used as a teaching tool for other year groups about Islam / the next year. Possible assessment opportunity AT 1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and texts AT 1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· DT links? making a page for a pop up / lift the flap book / pictures to show quotation from the Qur'an · Creative writing in what secret they would like to have revealed to them and what they would do with the revelation · Storytelling to class · Making nets and cubes to make "gift" boxes ­ numeracy · Visit or visitor

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Year 5

Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: YOGA / MOKSHA

Labyrinth

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of yoga and moksha; the path you take through life and the liberation from the circle of life, death and rebirth. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Teaching and Authority from a Hindu viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "What do sacred texts and other sources say about God, the world and human life?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of mazes and labyrinths and asks them to draw their own labyrinth which they then follow with their finger on paper as an aid to concentration and meditation. Children could then make a senses labyrinth which they guide a classmate through and then change roles; this helps children to reflect on being guided through life and the metaphor of life as a journey along a path that twists and turns. This leads into a discussion about guidance in life and how the lack of guidance can affect someone's life. Children look at the Hindu beliefs of yoga and moksha and where the teachings come from in the scriptures. They then explore their own ideas by drawing their own path which shows their own path through life. Children could make a large labyrinth that they could walk ­ perhaps on the playground. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Teaching and Authority (Christianity and Islam) but does not have to be taught last of the three. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. imagery in literacy / DT? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? If you build a labyrinth, are there any health and safety issues that you should think about? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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· Ask the class to take a pencil and draw a wandering line on a piece of paper. Now ask them to follow the line with their finger. Was it difficult? Did they get lost when the lines crossed over? Was it confusing? · Ask the children what they know about mazes and labyrinths. Have any of them walked a maze or labyrinth? What did it feel like? Was it hard or easy? Was it confusing? · Find some pictures of mazes and labyrinths. Explain that they are two different things and ask the children to see if they can identify what makes them different. A labyrinth is unicursal ­ it only has one path that winds about ­ you can't get lost. A maze has many paths and you have to choose which path to follow ­ you can get lost. This unit is concerned with labyrinths only NOT mazes, so try to focus on them at this point. · Investigate how to draw a labyrinth. There are simple ways that the children will be able to do with some support. Many are easily found on the internet. Try www.lessons4living.com/drawing.htm which has an animation of how to draw a labyrinth. www.labyrinthcompany.com rents out labyrinths and sells finger labyrinths and shows how they can be drawn. One of the simplest set of instructions is found on www.healingway.org.uk/labyrinth.html. The Labyrinth Society website will allow you to find a labyrinth near you and look at pictures of labyrinths all over the world from different cultures and eras. · Explore how paths and labyrinths have been used as spiritual guidance in many cultures and as a metaphor for life's journey (possible Literacy links with metaphors and imagery in writing). What is it a metaphor for? Reflect on life as a journey. What is the start if the journey? What is the end? Look at this from the children's beliefs rather than those of Hinduism at this point. They will refer back to this later in the unit as they look at Hindu beliefs. · Ask the children to use the instructions you have found and to draw a simple labyrinth on paper. They should then try to follow it with their finger slowly. This is supposed to be an aid to concentration, meditation and calming. Ask the children to try to clear their minds as they follow their line. Do they feel calmer after one time? Try it several times. Do they feel different? Discuss. · Use a large space like hall or playground. Take turns to guide a partner around who has eyes closed ­ how does it feel to guide and to be guided?

Starting the Unit

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· Children or teacher could create a "senses" experience to be lead around blindfolded ­ being lead to different areas where there is something to smell, touch, hear etc. Discuss these experiences. How does a guide help you on your path? What would happen if you had no guide or you did not trust your guide? For this, you could set up the different experiences or you could split the class in two. Set A make the senses areas and guide Set B through; then Set B make a different set of areas and guide Set A through. Discuss safety before children are allowed to guide a blindfolded child around. · This could be explored through art, poetry or creative prose writing, where children are encouraged to think about how it feels to guide or be guided; what the journey is like when you can't see what is ahead; the metaphor of life as a journey along a path that twists and turns. · Discuss - how important is your family in guiding you? Who do you listen to in your family? Are there people outside your family that you pay more attention to? What happens if there is no one to guide you? What might happen to a person who had no guidance in their life?

· Explore the Hindu concepts of Yoga (path) and Moksha (liberation from rebirth). What do Hindus believe about the journey of life and death? Discuss reincarnation and refer back to the ideas the children had earlier in the unit about this. What do the texts say about God, the world and human life? Try to find quotations on the internet which could show what Hindu scriptures say about these. · Ask the class the think about how Hindu beliefs about life and death are different from Christian beliefs. What are the differences? This could be a discussion or a written assessment. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 describe some key features of religions recognising similarities and differences AT1 L4 describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions · Where do Hindu ideas come from? Look at extracts or prayers from Hindu scriptures (e.g. Gayatri Mantra) to see what they teach Hindus about the path through life. Use some of the scriptures / information the children have about Hindu beliefs to create a new labyrinth. Along the line or inside the pathway the children should write what Hindus believe. Use the quotations they have found on the internet to help with this.

Developing the Theme

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Possible assessment opportunity AT 1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and texts AT 1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences

· Discuss with class - where does your path in life lead you? What is the real goal of life on earth? Draw their own path which shows their own path through life (and death if they have views about what happens when you die). LAPs and MAPs will perhaps draw a simple line which follows the events in their life so far and some events they want to happen in later life. HAPs should be encouraged to try a more in depth approach, expressing life as a labyrinth or circle (depending on their views). The children could also draw this from a Hindu point of view, or a Christian one as a contrast. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives · Make a labyrinth with the class perhaps on the playground. Use boxes, stones, little bean bags, chalk lines etc as markers. This could be semi permanent for the whole school to explore at play times. Explore feelings in walking the labyrinth through poetry or expressive writing.

Reviewing

· Guiding and being guided in a "senses" experience ­ art, poetry or creative prose writing from the experience · Visit to a labyrinth e.g. Norwich Cathedral · Design and make a labyrinth in school ­ possible DT link with structures? · Literacy links with metaphors and imagery in writing. · Finding quotations from Hindu scriptures on internet (ICT)

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 5

Religion: JUDAISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING TEACHINGS AND AUTHORITY Theme: TORAH

Miniature Torah scroll

Photo by Beth Boast

117

First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the theme of Torah; the "law"; writings which set out how Jews should live, including laws about caring for others. It is one way in which to encounter the Area of Study Teaching and Authority from a Jewish viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "What do sacred texts and other sources say about God, the world and human life?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of rules and guidance; what advice is good and who they trust to give them good advice. Children are asked to give advice to the people of the world through a video clip. The unit then moves on to look at what the Tenakh has to tell Jews about God, the world and human life. The treatment of the Torah, particularly important as God's laws, is explored and children are asked to reflect on what the treat with great care and why. They make scrolls with mantles and yads. Children explore Jewish stories (Old Testament stories are the easiest to find) and act them out with puppets or masks they have made, exploring what the stories tell Jews about God and the world. The discuss why it is important for Jews to have their traditions and teachings written down. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be a stand alone unit but as it shares the same area of study as the units from Christianity, Hinduism and Islam it makes sense to put it with those units. However, it can be taught at any time in the year. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. DT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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· Start each session with the children by asking them to remember something ­ a short verse, a saying, a rule or a list. At the end of each session ask who can remember it. You will be coming back to this later in the unit when you discuss why it is important to have important things written down. It should serve as something that you can refer back to as a way of making the children understand that it is hard to keep a lot of information in your head all the time. · Discuss with the children - what life rules do you think are the most important? Look at school rules, but also rules at home and personal ethical rules about right and wrong. Ask the children to reflect on how these rules help them, guide them; what would happen if you didn't follow the rules? Do they know children who don't follow the same rules as they do? Do those children behave in the same way? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L2 in relation to matters of right and wrong, they recognise their own values and those of others AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments and their own attitudes and behaviour AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives · Whose advice do you listen to? Do the people around you always give you good advice? Who do you give advice to? How does advice help people? · Ask children to write out a piece of advice that can be added together to make a book of the best advice that people have given the class. · What do you think is an important message for the world today? How would you ensure that people got the message? Would you do it through television or radio? Would you try talking or writing to everyone? Discuss with the class. They could make a video clip of their best advice to the world or telling the people of the world what they should do.

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· Examine extracts from the Tenakh or Jewish Bible ­ laws, psalms, proverbs, stories ­to understand some of its teachings. The Torah (law), Nevi'im (prophets) and Ketuvim (writings) form the Tenakh. What teachings do they contain about God, the world and human life? Find information about the Tenakh and if possible use quotations from the writings to see what it says about God, the world and human life.

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Try http://www.squidoo.com/religious-quotes (quotes from different religions including Judaism) but there are many different sites that you can look at. · Look at how the Torah is treated, handled, read. Why is it treated in such a way? Look at how it is copied, dressing the scroll, using a Yad. · Look at how Jews show respect to the Torah as a sign of their covenant with God. The Torah is treated as being particularly special as it is viewed as God's law. A Torah scroll is handwritten in Hebrew by a scribe following strict rules; it takes about a year to complete one scroll. Scrolls are dressed in ornamented covers called mantles and are kept in the synagogue in the Holy Ark. A portion (sidrah) of the Torah is read weekly in the synagogue and it is considered a great honour to be "called to the Torah" to make a blessing. When the annual cycle of readings ends, it begins again at a joyful celebration called Simchat Torah. The Torah contains 613 laws (mitzvot) which set out how Jews should live, including laws about caring for others, looking after the environment, kosher (permitted) food, worship and festivals. Try Espresso although there will be information and pictures in any text book about Judaism. · Ask in a member of the Jewish community to talk about the Torah or if possible arrange a visit to a synagogue. · How do you take care of something you think is precious? How do you show respect for something that is important to you? Discuss with the class. · Make scrolls using rolls of card, foil etc with parchment coloured paper joining them. On the scroll, children could try writing a short sentence in Hebrew, extracts from the Tenakh and / or their own ideas or prayers about something important to them. · Make mantles and yads ­ possible DT link with textiles · HAPs could put on their scroll a short version of a story from the Jewish scriptures / Old Testament ­ easy to find in school bibles

Reviewing

· Look at a Jewish / OT story together with the class and draw out what it tells Jews about God, the world or human life. Ask the children to work in groups to look at other stories and use puppets to act it out. Children could make their own character puppets if there is time ­ hand or finger, shadow or string. If you are short of time, they could

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draw faces to make masks of the characters and act out the story. Groups could be given different stories to explore so that they can show their play to the rest of the class without a lot of repetition. The easiest stories to find are in the Old Testament but you can look on the internet or ask a member of the Jewish community to tell a story that has particular meaning for Jews. The stories could be differentiated. LAPs could be given a simple version of a story; MAPS and HAPS could be encouraged to finds their own stories in a children's bible. · Remember to ensure that the children not only act out the play but that they also explain - what is meaning of this story for Jews? What does it tell Jews about God, the world and human life? Possible assessment opportunity AT 1 L3 make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and texts AT 1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences · Ask the children to recall the sayings, rules or stories that you have been asking them to remember every session. How much can they remember? What make it easier to remember them? Discuss why it is important for Jews to have their traditions and teachings written down and to study them regularly ­ remembering accurately over many thousands of years; to help people to have all the information in one place; no one can remember all of the writings etc.

· Visitor from the Jewish community or visit to a synagogue · Make scrolls with extracts from the Tenakh and / or their own ideas or prayers about something important to them. Make mantles and yads ­ possible DT link · Making puppets and acting out a Jewish / OT story · Video clip of advice to the people of the world - ICT

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 5

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: WORSHIP, PILGRIMAGE AND SACRED PLACES Theme EUCHARIST / PILGRIM PEOPLE

Eucharist artefacts

Photo by Beth Boast

122

First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of eucharist and pilgrim people; thanking God through the sharing of wine and bread and special places of Christian pilgrimage. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Worship, Pilgrimage and Sacred Places from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "Where, how and why do people worship, including the importance of some particular religious sites?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of giving thanks and moves onto the events of the last supper. Stories about Jesus' life and works are connected to places in the Holy Land and children are asked to write a travel brochure for Christian visitors and to make a large map of the area that other children could "visit"; "passports" would be stamped as they visit each place where the children will tell them a story about what Jesus did in each place. Children look at what happens during worship in the eucharist; they explore how Christians give thanks at this time. Children work with members of the local church to design a banner about the last supper / eucharist which the children then present to the church. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be a stand alone unit although as there is quite a lot about the life of Jesus and the last supper, you may want to tie it in to Easter. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. DT / literacy / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? If you are making the banner, what resources do you have? Will you need to order felt / fabric paint etc? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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Starting the Unit

· Eucharist comes from the Greek word meaning thanksgiving. What are you thankful for? Make a class "thank you for..." box where these can be recorded and put in the box. What are Christians thankful for?

· Explore the story of the last supper having googled Jerusalem on Google Earth ­ get closer and closer as you zoom in. Use a guided story technique or ask selected children to act out the story as you read it aloud. · Hotseating ­ ask a confident child to be Jesus or one of the disciples at the last supper so that the others can ask questions. You could take the role of Jesus if the children aren't very confident. · Make a 3D room where the last supper took place. Make some small figures for Jesus, Judas and the disciples. What colours will you dress them in? · Find images of the last supper by different artists. Try Stanley Spencer and the cathedral in Barcelona ­ Segrada familia carvings. What are the artists trying to show about their / Christians' beliefs? · Why do people go to Jerusalem? Look at a map of the Holy Land, and mark on it the places where events happened in Jesus' life. Explore the stories connected to different places. Possible Geography links · Find travel brochures of the Holy Land ­ where do they recommend that visitors go to / think are the most important places to visit? Why do you think this is? Do the brochures have pictures you could cut out and use? Write your own travel brochure for a Christian visitor who wants to see where Jesus was. (literacy links) LAPS will need some support with this. HAPS should be encouraged to use text books and the internet to find out more information. · Make a large map of the Holy Land with the children ­ could be a 3D experience that is laid out in the hall or on playground ­ at each place on the map, different groups could act / tell the story connected to that place. Children "visiting" / going around the map could have a "passport" which is stamped at every station they stop at. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. AT1 L3 ­ make links between beliefs and sources including religious stories and texts

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Developing the Theme

AT1 L4 ­ use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. · As an alternative to the large map, make a labyrinth for the children to walk. At different points, have events leading up to the last supper and Gethsemane rather than the whole of Jesus' life. Labyrinths are covered in the Year 5 Hinduism unit on Yoga and Moksha. · Find someone who has been to the Holy Land and ask them in to talk about their visit. What did they think or feel in different places? What did they see that shows that this is a special place for Christians? Do they have any photos they could show? · Look at what happens at communion / Lord's supper / eucharist service. What are Christians thankful for? What happens in service which shows thanks? What prayers, actions and songs reflect saying thank you for the saviour, crucifixion, gift of Christ to the world etc? Look at some prayer and songs that reflect that Christians are thankful. · Ask local vicar / priest in to do a simulated service or ask if children could go to church during a service to observe. · Children could make bread and plan their own readings for this or their own pretend service. What songs will they choose? Can they find some eucharist songs from around the world that a group can learn like a choir? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L2 ­ retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. AT1 L3 ­ make links between beliefs and sources including religious stories and texts AT1 L4 ­ use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences.

· Discuss with the children that Jesus said - Do this in memory of me ­ what would you like people to do in memory of you? · Make a banner for the local church about the last supper / eucharist ­ ask the vicar / church member in and children should ask them what they would want on such a banner. What symbols? Why? What words? Why? Colours?

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Reviewing

· Children could design banners; the church could be asked to select the best design and then the children could work together to make a large banner to give to church. This could then be presented. · If possible arrange a visit to a place of pilgrimage like Walsingham. If not possible, see if you can invite in someone who has been to a place of pilgrimage.

· · · · · · · · · ·

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Visit to Walsingham ­ history link Model making ­ upper room of the last supper DT links Large map and story telling experiences Making a pilgrimage labyrinth alternative to map Learning songs about Eucharist or planning a eucharist service ICT google earth getting closer to Jerusalem Hotseating for last supper ­ drama Exploring maps of the Holy Land ­ geography links Writing a travel brochure of the Holy Land for Christians ­ literacy Make a banner for the local church ­ design and textiles DT link

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Year 5

Religion: HUMANISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: HAPPINESS and RESPONSIBILITY

Happy model by Year 6 pupil

Photo By Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of happiness and responsibility; how people can find happiness and what responsibilities people have in life. It is one way in which to encounter the Area of Study Beliefs and Questions from a Humanist viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what key beliefs do people hold about God, the world and humans?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of what makes them happy expressed through discussion, dance and creative writing. Children look at the idea that you can help people to become happier and what Humanists believe about happiness and responsibility. Children reflect on what they think about happiness and responsibility. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be a stand alone unit and can be taught at any point in the year. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. dance / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

· Discuss with the children - What makes you happy? · See if you can find the happy dance that Snoopy does in the Peanuts cartoons ­ use a search engine ­ there are lots of simple examples of the dance on the internet. If Snoopy has a happy dance, what would your happy dance be? Ask children to make up their own happy dance.

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· Art / poetry / reflective writing about happiness ­ a time when they were very happy, or what they think would make them happy.

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· Ask the children to look at a recipe (literacy links ­ instruction writing) and explore the features. What might a recipe for happiness look like? What would the ingredients be? In what proportions? Ask the class to write their own recipe for happiness. ­ LAPs may need a writing frame. · Discuss with the children - Can people be happier than they are? Can you teach people to be happy? Some schools are trying to improve children's happiness. If your school was going to start happiness lessons, what do you think they should be like? What form would the lessons take? What would the lesson content be? How could you assess whether the class were happier at the end of the lesson? This could take the form of a written exercise or a discussion. Children could write a lesson plan ­ LAPs will need a writing frame. · The Humanist logo is called the happy human. Ask selected children to the front to draw someone happy in 30 seconds. What different views of happiness are there? Do you have to be smiling to be happy? · Ask the children to design a new logo for the Humanist society that reflects their belief that the best thing we can do in life is try to be happy. · What do Humanists believe about happiness and responsibility? Ask a visitor from the humanist society to talk to the children about beliefs about happiness and responsibility. What do they believe about God, human life and the world? If this is not possible, find out about the Humanist society through the internet. Try www.humanism.org.uk and www.humanismforschools.org.uk which has lesson plans, assembly ideas, "toolkits" and whiteboard presentations for different key stages. Toolkit 2 should be useful in this unit. · Ask the children to make up a story or play to act out about causing unhappiness / creating happiness - creative writing or drama links. · Ask the class to make a list that has responsibilities which balance the things they think will make them happy e.g. I want to play with my friends - I must not interfere with other people who are playing and upset them.

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· Use a sheet with the Humanist logo in the centre with arrows pointing inwards towards it. Ask the children to complete the sheet by writing what makes a happy human on it. Discuss with the class. · Do the sheet again but from a different approach ­ instead of the arrows pointing inwards in a self centred way, turn them pointing outwards and complete the sheet with thoughts about how we can make others happy. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L3 make links between values and commitments and their own attitudes and behaviour AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives · What similarities and differences are there between Humanist beliefs about God, the world and human life and beliefs of religions that the children can remember? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L3 describe some key features of religions recognising similarities and differences AT1 L4 describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions

Reviewing

· Visitor from the Humanist society or ICT research. · Art / poetry / reflective writing about happiness e.g. recipe writing (literacy) · Happy Dance · Drama / role play about being happy / unhappy · Design a new logo for the humanist society.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Farmington Institute Scheme of Work by Beth Boast 2009

Year 6 Units

These units are planned on the expectation that they will be taught in blocks rather than discrete one hour lessons; however, that does not mean that they cannot be taught in that format. The total time that the units should take vary but overall should meet the requirements of the Norfolk Agreed Syllabus which states that RE should be allocated a minimum of 5% curriculum time i.e. approximately 45 hours per year at Key Stage 2 and that each area of study should be seen as requiring the equivalent of one half term's work in Religious Education i.e. no less than 6 hours. Therefore these units have been planned to take between 6 and 9 hours each. Although not all aspects of RE can be assessed, there are assessment opportunities built in to these units where appropriate. The majority of pupils at the end of Key Stage 1 are expected to have achieved Level 2. These units are planned around Level 4 with some elements of Levels 3 and 5 where appropriate, although pupils should achieve Level 4 at the end of Key Stage 2 and Level 5 or 6 at the end of Key Stage 3.

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: TRINITY / IMAGE OF GOD Religion: ISLAM Area of Study BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: TAWHID / AKHIRAH Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: BRAHMAN / ATMAN Religion: BUDDHISM Area of Study: REVISITING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: BUDDHA / DUKKHA Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH Theme: FAITH RESURRECTION Religion: BUDDHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH Theme: DHAMMA / NIRVANA Christmas (not included)

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Year 6

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: TRINITY / IMAGE OF GOD

Celtic pattern embroidery

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of trinity and the image of God; God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Beliefs and Questions from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what key beliefs do people hold about God, the world and humans?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of mystery through Mobius strips. They explore Celtic and other Christian symbols of trinity and try to make their own complicated pattern that represents oneness. They investigate how the Holy Spirit is seen in the Bible and how the trinity is expressed in Christian art and music in different ways. They create their own image or song to try to explain the ideas. They talk to a member of a local church to find out about their views on the image of God / Trinity and use them to design an altar cloth which could then be selected by the church and made by the class. Children work together to prepare a talk like an expert or teacher to explain symbolism in a selected image of God / trinity. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Beliefs and Questions (Hinduism and Islam) but does not necessarily have to be taught first. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / DT? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Create Mobius strips. (maths links possible here) A mobius strip is a long strip of paper made into a loop with a half twist put in) Try http://mathssquad.questacon.edu.au/mobius_strip.html for easy ideas

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and instructions or www.dadcando.com. There is a picture by Escher which shows this ­ Mobius Strip II (Red Ants). How many sides does it have (inside and outside). Colour the strip by starting at the join on the outside and work your way around. What happens? (you keep colouring until you come back to where you started) So how many sides does it have? How is this possible? Cut the loop in half along the strip. What happens? Do you get 2 new loops? (one large loop). Try cutting the loop starting about one third of the way down and keeping that distance all the way down (like peeling an apple in one strip). What happens? (you get a big loop with a little one connected to it). Try putting two twists in the circle and cut it. Try different things with the strips. How do they work? Can it be easily explained? It is like a mystery. Christians often speak of Jesus as a mystery. · Look at the idea of mystery and what it means to not know everything about something. A mystery is something beyond ideas and there are different ways of explaining it. Tell the children that in this unit they may think of their own way to explain it.

Developing the Theme

· Look at Celtic trinity symbols (e.g. Book of Kells ­ try http://historymedren.about.com for lots of free images or www.celticnetwork.com for general information) and Celtic crosses and designs­ try www.celticcolours.com for information and images. Discuss what the circle might means around the cross. Look at the patterns that are one big loop ­ symbolic of God as eternal and never ending. Use St Patrick's image of the shamrock ­ three leaves but one plant. · Ask the children to make a tied loop with wool or string. Cross it over itself to make patterns and swirls ­ it is more complicated but still one circle. Make a three pointed shape with it ­ it is still one piece although it has 3 corners. · Children can make their own Celtic type pattern to show oneness of God. Art.

· Early Christians came from a tradition where God was unseeable; Jesus, however was clearly visible to them and the disciples, so how could they reconcile the two ideas? "He is the image of the invisible God." They decided to explain that God was above them, Jesus was God along side them, and the Holy Spirit was God inside them. · Look at mentions of the Holy Spirit appearing in the Bible; Matt 3:13 but same passage appears in other gospels; look also the Pentecost story Acts 2: 1 - 5

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· Explore the Three in One / trinity and images of God. There are many images of the Trinity on the internet. Try to find ones that show the Trinity in different ways e.g. as a native American. Discuss the images with the children. They could create their own visual representation of the Trinity. Try www.faithclipart.com or www.textweek.com has a lot of images that might be useful. · Look at Christian songs and prayers that mention the image of God or the Trinity. Children could make up their own prayer or song verse ­ possible music link. E.g. www.truevinemusic.com has a good song called Glory Be which explores the trinity. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. AT1 L5 explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions... · Design an altar front for a local church. What images of God / trinity would be suitable? Ask a member of the church in to discuss with the children what the church would like / is appropriate. Children should then design an altar front. The Church could then pick their favourite design which the children could make. DT textiles link. · Try to find an image of Rublev's Icon. Look at Rublev's Icon: contemplating the Trinity, Inwardly and Outwardly by Paul Fromont ­ can be found through the prodigal kiwi site. This explains different images in the icon. · Ask the children to work in pairs to give a talk on the symbols in this image or in others of your choice.

Reviewing

· What is a good mother? Write down qualities as children think of them. What are the qualities that a good king should have? A good shield? A good father? Creator? Judge? Look at these in groups. Share what they groups have produced for their own word as you write them up. Discuss who might have all of these qualities? These are all ways that God is viewed by Christians. Which of these qualities would you like to have / be? Would you like to talk to someone who had all these qualities? · http://www.ceosyd.catholic.edu.au has teacher notes and ideas about views of God found in the Bible.

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· Using the words produced earlier, ask class to list the ones they associate with God ­ could be list, spider diagram, poem, picture with labels.

· Visitor from local church to talk about view of God and the mystery of the Trinity so that children can make an altar front design. · Mobius strips (numeracy links here ­ investigations and shape) · Children could make up their own prayer or song verse ­ possible music link · Design an altar front for a local church. DT textiles link. · Prepared talk on images ­ speaking in Literacy links

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 6

Religion: ISLAM Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: TAWHID / AKHIRAH

Shehadah from soft book

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of Tawid and Akhirah; the oneness of Allah and the last things - everlasting life after death. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Beliefs and Questions from a Muslim viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what key beliefs do people hold about God, the world and humans?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of how their behaviour might change if they are being watching and their actions recorded; this is linked to the Muslim belief that angels are recording what people do in a book of their life, ready for the day of judgement. Children are asked to think of questions they would like the answers to about life and death; they are then sent to faith communities and the responses used to feedback to the class or to make a display with information showing the similarities and differences in faiths ­ this is ongoing through the unit. A Muslim visitor can be asked about their beliefs. Images of heaven are explored. Main Muslims beliefs are investigated and views on God, the world and humans are explored. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Beliefs and Questions (Hinduism and Christianity) but does not necessarily have to be taught in a particular order. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. maths / ICT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity. Remember that Muslims often use pbuh (peace be upon him) after the name of Muhammad. I haven't done so here to save time, not through a lack of respect.

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· Discuss with the children - How do you behave when the teacher is not looking? How would you behave if you were left alone at home? Do you behave differently if people are watching you? Why? Does it depend on who is watching? Ask the children to work in pairs to produce a little scene where someone behaves differently when someone is watching / not watching. Drama · Akhirah means belief in the last things, judgement and everlasting life after death. This life is a preparation for the life to come. What Muslims do in this life is noted down and will be judged on the last day. Muslims believe that at the end, there will be a Judgement Day when the living and the dead will be brought before Allah and handed a book of their life. Angels have been recording good and bad deeds / thoughts in the book for every person's life. If the book is put into their right hand, they will go to heaven (al' Jannah ­ the garden or paradise). Heaven is a place with streams, flowers, plants like a garden where they will be happy forever. If they are given the book in their left hand they will go to hell (Jahannan ­ place of fire and torment forever). · As Muslims believe this, how would that change the way they live their lives? The Qur'an contains the actual words of Allah given to Muhammad. The opening Surah (chapter) is the Al Fatihah ­ show me the right path, the straight path and is said many times a day in prayers. What do you think the right path would be for Muslims? What would they have to do to make sure that they went to Heaven? Discuss with the class. Would you change the way you behave if you believed that angels were recording everything? What might you do differently? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives

Starting the Unit

Developing the Theme

· What questions would the children like to ask about life and death? Ask them to work in pairs to think of some questions that they have about life and death. Some of these will hopefully be ultimate questions so point out to the children that there isn't only one way of answering questions like these. Put the questions on the board / paper and ask the class to categorize them a) questions we could answer ourselves in school (not ultimate probably) b) questions we can't answer but that could be sent to a believer such as a local vicar / member of a faith community / regular faith visitor / website

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such as Ask a Believer so they can try to answer. Try to find out the answers in school (fact based questions) and to ask believers for their views. Children can work in groups to pick suitable questions to send to a faith community ­ one religion per group. Try also the Humanist Society for their views. LAPs will need support for this. LAPs should be encouraged to try to find out the contact addresses through the internet (you will need to monitor this). Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. AT2 L5 ask and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments relating them to their own and others' lives. · Make a book to go at reception / school office to ask visitors to the school to say what they believe about life after death or to answer the questions the children have raised. Appoint a couple or children to check the book once a day and add any new responses to the end display. · What questions do Muslims ask about life and death? Ask in a Muslim and talk to him / her about he / she believes. · Try to find some images of Muslim Heaven in Persian art. I found these difficult to find. What do the images tell us about what Muslims believe about life after death? Could they represent their idea of heaven without using images of any living things? Ideas of heaven are explored more fully in a Christian Life and Death unit in year 6. · Discuss with the children what they believe happens when people die. · Muslims have to submit to the will of Allah. What do they have to do / believe that will help them get into heaven? What are the main 6 articles of Muslim belief? Investigate with the class ­ possible group work ­ so that they can make a booklet or a poster or presentation to the class. This could be done through a powerpoint presentation. · Try www.muslim-ed-trust.org.uk which gives an idea of what Muslims teach their children about Islam. · The 6 articles of belief are: Tawhid ­ oneness (of God)

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Nabi and Rusul ­ prophets and messengers Kutub ­ divinely revealed books (Qur'an) Mala'ikah ­ angels Qiyamah ­ judgement day Qadr - fate Alternatively, as a lot of this information can be hard to find in terms that the children can understand, find out about what Muslims believe about God, human life and the world. · Find quotes from the surahs about heaven, life and death ­ surah 30:14 ­ 16, surah 69: 13 ­ 37 about judgement. · Surah 17: 18 -19 about striving for the hereafter. · Surah 2: 156, surah 20:57 returning to Allah. · There are many website that offer quotations. Try www.religioustolerance.org or http://thinkexist.com or www.quotemountain.com or www.landofwisdom.com. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. AT1 L5 explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues ... · The Qur'an says that on the last day the living and the dead will be raised and brought to the plain of judgement. Each person will be given the book of their life. What do you think about the idea of good and evil being sorted out in a final judgement? · Why are people saddened by death? Did you know someone who died? How did that make you feel? Discuss with children how death has had an impact on them. Talk about how people cope with death and bereavement. Is there a visitor who could come in for this e.g. school nurse / counsellor / learning mentor? How do they help people to cope? Reflect on death as a chance to celebrate someone's life. · If you were given a book of your life, what good things would be recorded? What bad things? · Make a book which records some of the good deeds in your life or in the life of someone you knew who has died.

Reviewing

· When the information from different faith communities comes in during the course of the unit, ask each group "in charge" of that

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religion to tell the class what replies have been sent. The responses could form part of a display or when all of the information is in, ask the class to make a large Venn diagram (numeracy links) on a wall that each group can add information to ­ one circle for each religion who responded with the common beliefs in the overlapping areas. This could be done with large PE hoops on the floor and children could put their information on cards in the appropriate spaces. Colour coding will make this easier to read. You could ask the children to use colours used in RE for each religion ­ Christianity = purple, Islam = green, Hinduism = red, Judaism = blue, Buddhism = orange, Sikhism = yellow (can be hard to read). Humanism could be in any colour. If no response comes from a faith community and no information can be found to answer a question, then put it in the display as unanswered ­ part of a mystery that could be part of an ongoing investigation. LAPs will needs support with this. HAPs could add their own responses and beliefs if they chose. (L5) Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions. AT1 L5 understand that similarities and differences illustrate distinctive beliefs within and between religions and suggest possible reasons for this.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· Muslim visitor · Make a book of good deeds · Presentation / booklet / poster / powerpoint to the class ICT / literacy / speaking on beliefs · Drama acting out a scene · Sending questions to faith communities and collating answers possibly through a Venn diagram (maths links) · Make a book to go at reception / school office

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Year 6

Religion: HINDUISM Area of Study: BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: BRAHMAN / ATMAN

Puja set

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of Brahman and Atman; the one supreme being (like a God) and the true self (like a soul). It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Beliefs and Questions from a Hindu viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what key beliefs do people hold about God, the world and humans?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of Hinduism from previous units and the concept of truth and the infinite. The unit looks at the nature of Brahman and Brahman's presence in all things, which the children try to reflect in art. They use traditional stories to explore how Hindus try to explain the nature of Brahman. They reflect on the concept of Atman and their own ideas about true self or soul. They use the internet to find out more about Hindu beliefs about God, the world and human life. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be taught with the other two units on Beliefs and Questions (Christianity and Islam) but does not necessarily have to be taught in ant set order. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / ICT? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

Starting the Unit

· Ask the class to tell you what they have remembered about previous units on Hinduism. Most will remember different gods. · Explain that for Hindus, they are all part of one truth, one being called Brahman.

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· Brahman is not like the Judeo/ Christian view of God; Hindus believe that Brahman is the nature of truth, knowledge and infinity (Taittariya Upanishad). Think about that with the children. What is truth? Can you see it? Touch it? Explain it? · What is infinity? Think about the biggest number you can and then add one. Think about the stars in the sky; the grains of sand on a beach; the molecules in a tree or person; think of the vast numbers in the universe and that is still not infinite. Look at symbols of infinity like a circle or an 8 shape. Can the class think of another symbol? Look at pictures of the universe / the natural world to help LAPs who may have trouble with visualisation.

· Brahman is everywhere and in everything. There is nothing without Brahman. Discuss with the children - if God was in everything, what difference would that make to how you treat the world, people and animals? Would you still eat meat? Would you treat people differently if you thought God was in everything? Would you look after yourself more? Would you have a higher opinion of yourself? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 describe the impact of religion on people's lives · Make up pictures of nature, the world around us, school, people etc where they are made up of the word Brahman ­ like pointillism but with words creating the picture in different colours. Should be done in a very detailed way so that from a distance you can't see the separate words. · What do Hindus teach their children about God? Explore the stories told to explain the nature of Brahman ­ the salt in the water, pomegranate seeds and Svetaketu the student. They can be found at www.vedanta-atlanta.org/stories/Sveta-ketu.html or www.teachingideas.co.uk/re/files/hinduteachchildrenaboutgod.pdf although there are many other sites that have the stories. You can try doing the things in the stories if you want ­ dissolving salt in water (science links) and cutting open a pomegranate or other fruit to show children. · What does this teach children about the nature of God? · Look at the concept of Atman (immortal soul or true self). Discuss with the children what makes you, you? What makes you unique? Do

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Developing the Theme

you belief that there is a soul (Christianity) or life force (Buddhism) or true self that is part of each person? Ask the children to try to draw their atman. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives · Hindus believe that your actions affect who you are and what happens to you in the next life. Investigate Karma (actions), samsara (reincarnation), moksha (liberation from rebirth). People want to escape the cycle of life and death so that they can be at one with Brahman. Look at www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk which has good general information about Hinduism. Try also www.hindukids.org (stories, festivals etc) and www.hinduism.about.com which has a kids section. ICT links · Create a fact file about what Hindus believe about God, the world and humans. This could be done in a word document, powerpoint, booklet, poster; group or individual. · Ask in a Hindu visitor to ask him / her about the beliefs Hindus have of Brahman and Atman

· Ask the children to present what they have found out Hindu beliefs about God, the world and human life. Could be used as an assessment. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. AT1 L5 explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues ...

Reviewing

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· Hindu visitor · Make up pictures of nature, the world around us, school, people etc where they are made up of the word God ­ like pointillism but with words -art · Drawing your atman ­ art · ICT researching Hindu beliefs

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Year 6

Religion: BUDDHISM Area of Study: REVISITING BELIEFS AND QUESTIONS Theme: BUDDHA / DUKKHA

Buddha face by year 6 pupil

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of Buddha and Dukkha; Buddha means enlightened one and Dukkha means suffering. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study Beliefs and Questions from a Buddhist viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "what key beliefs do people hold about God, the world and humans?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of suffering or unhappiness and views of suffering in the world. They look at the four Noble truths and what Buddhists believe about ultimate questions. Children learn about the life of Buddha through story and drama and reflect on his choices. Children look at the beliefs of atheists and agnostics and find similarities and differences between their own beliefs and those of other faiths. They talk to a Buddhist about these views. If the equipment is available, children are encouraged to make a short animation about the Buddha or Buddhist beliefs; alternatively they could make small statues of Buddha having researched Buddhist symbolism in art. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is meant to be a stand alone unit but could be taught next to the year 6 Buddhism unit on the Journey of Life and Death. There are links here to the year 6 Islam unit on Beliefs and Questions which you might want to consider before you decide where this unit will be taught. You may decide to teach it in the autumn term as the Buddhism units also can be linked to the year 5 unit on Humanism. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / ICT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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· Think of a time when you were unhappy or suffered. Explore these times with the class, looking at how they felt and how the situation was resolved. Did the sad time last forever? · Make a collage of pictures / text from magazines / internet showing different forms of Dukkha e.g. famine, war, wanting more, poverty, homelessness, bullying, crying etc. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives · Look at the concept of suffering ­ Dukkha and the four Noble truths of the Buddha. Discuss with the class - what are your thoughts about the 4 noble truths? Do you think that the Buddha was right? What do you think it would be like to be enlightened and not suffer any more?

Starting the Unit

· Explain to the children that Buddha is seen as a guide, teacher, historical, enlightened person but not viewed as a god. For Buddhists the question of whether there is a creator or personal God is unanswerable and less important than asking other questions about life. Quest creation stories DVD explains this very well. A man who asks lots of questions about God, the world and life is said to be like someone who has been shot with an arrow who is asking questions about where it came from and what it is made from ­ unnecessary questions that are not going to help him. · Draw a little cartoon man shot with an arrow. Around him write some questions to which he needs to know the answers (where can I get help, do I need a doctor?) and some questions which are unnecessary (why did I leave the house today, what is the arrow made from, why do bad things happen to me?) · What questions do you have about life, God, the world? (possible overlap with Islam unit year 6 ­ depends if this unit has been taught before the Islam unit. If the children have already spent a long time working on ultimate questions, make this a short list as revision; if not, spend some time encouraging the children to think of ultimate questions that are difficult to answer). Make a list than can be shared with the class and used later in the unit. Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments.

Developing the Theme

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AT2 L5 ask and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments relating them to their own and others' lives. · Look at the life story of Buddha through reflective questions. As you tell the story, ask the children pertinent questions at selected points to make them reflect on the story: · What did his father want for him? · How can a parent protect a child from everything? Should children be protected from all things? · Do you think the prince should stay in the palace or not? · When he leaves the palace what do you think he might see that will surprise him? · What do you think he was thinking as he returned to the palace? · What do you think he is going to do now? · How do you think he felt as he left everything behind? What would you miss the most if you had to leave everything behind? · What do you think about what the wise men in the forest were trying to do? · Is Buddha's middle way the best? · Can you free the mind by ignoring the body? · What do you think happened to the Buddha when he reached enlightenment? How do you think it felt? · Would you like to become enlightened? · What do you think that Buddha thought when he was old? · Recap the main points of the Buddha life story again and ask the children to work in groups to act it out. Freeze frame them at different points and ask the characters what they are thinking or feeling. Drama · Discuss with the class - Why do Buddhists choose to leave the question of God unanswered? Does it matter if there is a God? · What are atheists and agnostics? Explore the meanings with the class. Ask them to reflect on what they believe about God. · Why do some people say that you can't "know" about God? Is God too big a concept for us to grasp? (possible overlap with year 6 Hinduism unit). · Use the list of ultimate questions from the children to ask them to draw some cartoon people of different beliefs ­ atheist, agnostic, Buddhist, Christian, themselves; other faiths could be represented

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depending on time. Put speech bubbles around each person showing how they might answer the children's ultimate questions in different ways. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. AT1 L5 explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues ... Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions. AT1 L5 understand that similarities and differences illustrate distinctive beliefs within and between religions and suggest possible reasons for this. · Ask in a visitor from a local Buddhist centre or arrange a visit.

Reviewing

· Make a short animated story about what the Buddha said or some aspect of his life - possible links with ICT ­ digital blue software? If this is not possible, children could make small statues of the Buddha using some of the symbols associated with Buddhist art. Explore the different hand positions ­ mudras ­ which have symbolic meaning. Use plasticine, clay, Crayola model magic etc.

Visitor or visit to Buddhist centre Collage of text and images to show aspects of Dukkha Reflective storytelling ­ life story of Buddha Make a short animated story - ICT ­ digital blue software? Or make a small statue of the Buddha incorporating some Buddhism symbolism ­ art / DT · Drama act out Buddha life story

· · · ·

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

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Year 6

Religion: CHRISTIANITY Area of Study: THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH Theme: FAITH RESURRECTION

Headstone Church of St Peter and St John, Kirkley, Lowestoft

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the theme of faith resurrection; Christian beliefs about the journey of life and death and views of Heaven. It is one way in which to explore the Area of Study The Journey of Life and Death from a Christian viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "why are some occasions sacred to believers and what do people think about life after death?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of death and funerals. Children are encouraged to reflect on death as an occasion to celebrate someone's life and to express the happy memories in poetry or reflective writing. They talk to people who deal with death and bereavement. They reflect on whether a belief in life after death changes the way people behave from their own, Christian and Buddhist viewpoints. They investigate Christian beliefs about Heaven and Hell in the Bible and Christian songs. They try to write a verse of a song about Christian heaven and explore views of heaven through art or writing. The children look at the allegorical story of Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan and explore the characters through drama. They end the unit by finding similarities and differences between religions about life and death, reviewing previous work. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is designed as a stand alone but contains a review of other religions which means it may be best suited to the end of the year. Since the children need a certain degree of emotional maturity to be able to discuss these issues, the summer term seems the best place to me; this has to be your choice however. Please be careful when discussing death and bereavement with children ­ think about their personal circumstances and be sensitive to their needs. The Wish List by Eoin Colfer is a children's book with some interesting ideas about what happens when you die. A girl is send back to earth as her good and bad deeds in life are too balanced for her to be selected for heaven or hell. She must try to do good in order to get into heaven but is hindered by hell trying to make her slip up. I recommend that this is read to the children in small sections throughout the unit. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / music / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you

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have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

· Read The Wish List by Eoin Colfer with the children. What does it say about life, death, heaven and hell? · Also covered in Islam unit - why are people saddened by death? Did you know someone who died? How did that make you feel? Discuss with children how death has had an impact on them. Talk about how people cope with death and bereavement. Discuss what happens at a Christian funeral. Ask in a local vicar / faith leader to talk about how he / she deals with funerals and helping the bereaved. · Think about the possiblity of another visitor who could come in for this e.g. school nurse / counsellor / learning mentor / local doctor (possibly a parent)? How do they help people to cope? · Reflect on death as a chance to celebrate someone's life. Make a wall of memories celebrating people who have died in poetry such as haiku.

Starting the Unit

· Discuss with the children - Do you think how you have lived will affect what happens when you die? · If you believe that you are going to go to heaven or hell depending on your behaviour, would you try harder to behave well? What do you think "behaving well" means for a Christian? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 apply their ideas to their own and other people's lives AT2 L4 describe what inspires and influences themselves and others · Recap Buddhist / Hindu views about reincarnation. Discuss with class ­ if you believe that you are going to be reincarnated, would that have an impact on the way you live your life now? In what way? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 describe the impact of religion on people's lives AT1 L5 ... explain the impact of beliefs on individuals and communities

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Developing the Theme

· If life is a journey, what is the end of the journey? What do Christians believe about life after death? Look at quotations from the Bible. What do they tell Christians about Heaven / hell. · Look at some Christian songs that talk about Heaven. Ask the children to write a verse about heaven to go with a simple tune that they already know. · Ask the children to express Christian views of Heaven through Art work and / or reflective writing about heaven. This could take the form of a small book or poster for Christian children. Try to encourage HAPs to include some quotations from the Bible about Heaven. · Recap Year 3 work - Mary Chapin Carpenter song ­ My Heaven. Write own version of song lyrics. The Mary Chapin Carpenter song (lyrics can be found on the internet or a copy is included in the yr 3 resources) called My Heaven. It is quite a slow tune, but the lyrics could be used to explore what a personal view some people have of heaven. It comes from the album Between Here and Gone 2004 Sony Music. I recommend that you cut some of the lyrics to keep them shorter and easier to use; also there are some references to grandparents who have died being in heaven ­ this may cause some distress to some pupils and you must use your professional judgement as to which sections you wish to use, if any. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences AT1 L5 explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions... · Look at a plot overview and extracts from A Pilgrims Progress by John Bunyan ­ video clips are available on line through video google or www.youtube.com. You can get extracts free from www.ccel.org/ccel/bunyan/pilgrim.html. Wikipedia also has extracts you can use as well as good plot summary with the main characters. Discuss how the work is allegorical. · Who are the characters who help / hinder Christian on his journey? Look at the connection between names and characteristics. Through drama, ask the class to act out scenarios with some of the characters e.g. Hope, Obstinate, Pliable, Despair, Ignorance etc. · Ask the class to make up their own characters. Would they help or hinder Christian? Could be written or through art / drama.

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· Look at the story of Pilgrim's Progress as a life of faith, as a journey, race or battle. What is it a journey, race or battle for? What is the goal for Christians? For you? Discuss. · Work in groups to make a "board game" of Christian's journey through the story. This could be done literally as a board game or as a large physical experience that the children have to walk through as Christian, meeting characters along the way played by children in the class. See Jerusalem unit in year 5 Pilgrim people unit.

· Compare beliefs of life after death with other religions the children have explored. Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions AT1 L4 understand that similarities and differences illustrate distinctive beliefs within and between religions and suggest possible reasons for this.

Reviewing

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES

· Visitor ­ e.g. vicar to talk about dealing with funerals and helping the bereaved. · Poetry work to celebrate people's lives · Recap of year 3 unit - Mary Chapin Carpenter song ­ My Heaven. Write own version of song lyrics. · Art work / reflective writing about heaven for Christian children. · Drama / art work. Can they make up their own characters? Would they help or hinder Christian? · Make board game or large interactive drama experience for story of Pilgrim's progress.

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Year 6

Religion: BUDDHISM Area of Study: ENCOUNTERING THE JOURNEY OF LIFE AND DEATH Theme: DHAMMA / NIRVANA

Lotus flower

Photo by Beth Boast

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First Steps

The main focus of this unit comes from the themes of Dhamma and Nirvana; the "truth" or teachings of the Buddha and the release from the cycle of reincarnation to the blissful state of enlightenment. It is one way in which to encounter the Area of Study the Journey of Life and Death from a Buddhist viewpoint. It concentrates on the main question "why are some occasions sacred to believers and what do people think about life after death?" The unit starts with the children's own experiences of Buddhism and the idea of enlightenment leading to Nirvana. The children explore their ideas of Nirvana through art and expressive writing. They think of questions they would like to ask someone who has reached enlightenment and think of some answers they might receive. Children learn about the teachings of the Buddha with the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path. They make a physical representation of the cycle of life and death leading to enlightenment and Nirvana. They talk to a Buddhist, explore Buddhist stories and use Buddhist ICT games to learn about what Buddhists believe. They review their learning by looking for similarities and differences between religions. Consider the best place to teach this unit in the year. It is designed as a stand alone unit but I feel it is best taught after the Year 6 Buddhist unit on the Buddha. There is overlap in this unit with other year 6 reviews where the children look for similarities and differences between religions. You will need to consider if this review of learning is necessary depending on what units have already been covered. Does it have any cross curricular links that you can tie in e.g. art / ICT / drama? Are there any visits planned that might have links to this unit? When are they taking place? Do you want to book a visit or visitor to coincide with this unit? How much advance planning will that need? Would it be better at the start or the end of the unit? Will there be a cost implication? What resources do you already have in school that could be used? Do you have text books in school that could be used to give information to the children or teachers? If the text is not useful, are there pictures in the books that children might find useful? Do you have any artefacts that will be useful in this unit? Can software like Espresso help you? Finally, how will you assess what they children have achieved? How will you keep a record their work when it is not a written piece? Encourage the children to write on photos you take of their activities expressing what they felt and thought when they were working and to reflect on what they have learned by doing the activity.

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Starting the Unit

· Ask the children what they know about Buddhist beliefs from a previous unit. If this is their first encounter with Buddhism, ask them what they know, if anything, and recap the story of who the Buddha was. · Look at Buddhist teachings about Nirvana ­ how is this achieved? · Explore Buddhist beliefs about what it might mean to be released from the circle of birth, life and rebirth. · Nirvana is not like a Christian view of Heaven. Can Nirvana be expressed through colours and symbols in art? Ask the children to think about words they associate with Nirvana ­ possibly these could be incorporated into the art work or expressed in a piece of creative writing.

· Ask the class to think about being enlightened and reaching the state of Nirvana. What important questions would they like to ask someone who was enlightened? What answers do they think they might receive? Possible assessment opportunity AT2 L4 raise and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments AT2 L5 ask and suggest answers to questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments relating them to their own and other's lives

Developing the Theme

· Explore what Buddhists believe about death / life / reincarnation / samsara / nirvana / karma / enlightenment. Recap work on the Four Noble Truths. · Look at the Eightfold Path. What do you think you would find the most difficult? Possible assessment opportunity AT1 L4 describe the impact of religion on people's lives AT1 L5 explain the impact of beliefs on individuals and communities · Ask the children to make a spiral like a spring in clay / wire / papier mache to represent birth and rebirth upwards to Nirvana or a simpler form as a circle as the cycle is unending until enlightenment. A good material to use is bubble wrap around wire or pipe cleaners. On to the spiral pin / write main life events or milestones that are important in someone's life. Add the teachings

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of the Eightfold Path and the Four Noble Truths as you get closer to the top of the spiral. · What can go at the end of the spring shape to show enlightenment and Nirvana? Discuss some symbolic ways that this could be shown. · Ask in a Buddhist visitor to talk to the children or arrange a visit to a Buddhist centre. · Use the Clearvision website www.clear-vision.org to explore Buddhist beliefs and teachings. Use the link to www.dharmagames.org which has non violent computer games for the children to play which teach them about the teachings of the Buddha. · Ask the children to make a poster of 10 things they have learned from playing the games. · Look at the Buddhist story of Kisa Gotami ­ on Clear Vision DVD but can be found in many different places including wikipedia and the Clearvision website. What does it say about Buddhist attitudes about suffering, grief and death? What meaning would a Buddhist see in this story? · Look at the story of Angulimala (also on website). What meaning would a Buddhist see in this story about how to live your life? · Children could act out the stories ­ drama.

Reviewing

· Ask the class to consider the similarities and differences between Buddhist beliefs and those of other religions the children have encountered, especially Christian views of what happens after death. Why are there so many beliefs about what happens after death? THIS IS A RECAP OF THE CHRISTIAN LIFE AND DEATH UNIT. If this has already been covered, use it as a quick revision exercise.

EXPERIENCES AND OPPORTUNITIES · Visitor or visit. Contact a local Buddhist centre. · Stories ­ Kisa Gotami or Angulimala ­ drama · Make spiral to represent birth and rebirth upwards ­ art · Nirvana ­ art, poetry or other creative writing · ICT dharma games

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Photos

Statue photos by Alex Thomson who gives his permission for them to be used by teachers using these units. All other photos by Beth Boast.

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