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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

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Flagler FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Project Application TAPS Number 09A071 Return to: A) Program Name: DOE USE ONLY Florida Department of Education Office of Grants Management Title IV Part A: Safe and Drug- Date Received Room 332 Turlington Building Free Schools - Entitlement 325 West Gaines Street Program Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400 Project Applications Telephone: (850) 245-0496 Suncom: 205-0496 B) Name and Address of Eligible Applicant: Flagler, PO BOX 755, BUNNELL, FL 32110 C) Total Funds Requested: $ 31,518.00 Estimated Roll Forward: $ 0.00 D) Applicant Contact Information Contact Name: First Name: Bette MI: S Last Name: Lathan Telephone Number: 386-4452438 Ext: Fax Number:386-586-2351 Mailing Address: Address P.O. Box 755 City: Bunnell State: FL Zip: 32137 SunCom Number: E-mail Address: [email protected] Project Number (DOE Assigned) 180-1039A-9CS01

DOE USE ONLY Total Approved Project: $

CERTIFICATION I Bill Delbrugge do hereby certify that all facts, figures, and representations made in this application are true, correct, and consistent with the statement of general assurances and specific programmatic assurances for this project. Furthermore, all applicable statutes, regulations, and procedures; administrative and programmatic requirements; and procedures for fiscal control and maintenance of records will be implemented to ensure proper accountability for the expenditure of funds on this project. All records necessary to substantiate these requirements will be available for review by appropriate state and federal staff. I further certify that all expenditures will be obligated on or after the effective date and prior to the termination date of the project. Disbursements will be reported only as appropriate to this project, and will not be used for matching funds on this or any special project, where prohibited. Further, I understand that it is the responsibility of the agency head to obtain from its governing body the authorization for the submission of this application. E) ________________________________________________ Signature of Agency Head

DOE 100A Dr. Eric J. Smith, Commissioner

General Assurances The Department of Education has developed and implemented a document entitled, General Terms, Assurances and Conditions for Participation in Federal and State Programs, to comply with:

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

A. 34 CFR 76.301 of the Education Department General Administration Regulations (EDGAR) which requires local educational agencies to submit a common assurance for participation in federal programs funded by the U.S. Department of Education; B. applicable regulations of other Federal agencies; and C. State regulations and laws pertaining to the expenditure of state funds. In order to receive funding, applicants must have on file with the Department of Education, Office of the Comptroller, a signed statement by the agency head certifying applicant adherence to these General Assurances for Participation in State or Federal Programs. The complete text may be found at http://www.fldoe.org/comptroller/gbook.asp School Districts, Community Colleges, Universities and State Agencies The certification of adherence filed with the Department of Education Comptroller's Office shall remain in effect indefinitely unless a change occurs in federal or state law, or there are other changes in circumstances affecting a term, assurance, or condition; and does not need to be resubmitted with this application. No Child Left Behind Assurances (Applicable to All Funded Programs) By my signature on this application, I hereby certify that the Flagler District will comply with the following requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001: The LEA assures that, under Sec. 9528, it will comply with a request by a military recruiter or an institution of higher education for secondary students' names, addresses, and telephone numbers, unless a parent has "opted out" of providing such information. The LEA assures that, under Sec. 9528, it will provide military recruiters the same access to secondary school students as it generally provides to postsecondary institutions or prospective employers.

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Persistently Dangerous Schools The LEA hereby assures that, under Sec. 9532, if the State of Florida identifies any school within the LEA as "persistently dangerous," it will offer students attending that school, as well as students who are victims of a violent criminal offense while on school property, the opportunity to transfer to a safe school. *These assurances are in addition to those previously signed by the Local Education Agency (LEA) maintained on file in the Florida Department of Education's Comptroller's Office.

Program Specific Assurances Title IV, Part A ­ Safe and Drug Free Schools By my signature on this application, I hereby certify that Flagler District will comply with ALL the following requirements: 2% Cap on Administrative Costs: The district will not use more than 2 percent of its allocation for the administrative costs (which include indirect costs) as defined by section 80.3 of EDGAR, in carrying out its responsibilities under this project [NCLB 4114(a)(2)]. Program Development: A. Timely and Meaningful Consultation - The district has developed its application through timely and meaningful consultation with State and local government representatives, representatives of schools to be served (including private, non-profit schools, teachers and other staff, parents, students, community-based organizations, and others with relevant and demonstrated expertise in drug and violence prevention activities (such as medical, mental health, and law enforcement professionals). B. Continued Consultation - The district will, on an ongoing basis, consult with above mentioned

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

representatives and organizations in order to seek advice regarding how best to coordinate activities with other related strategies, programs, and activities being conducted in the community. C. Design and Development - To ensure timely and meaningful consultation, the district at the initial stages of design and development of a program or activity shall consult with appropriate entities and persons on issues regarding the design and development of the program or activity, including efforts to meet the Principles of Effectiveness [NCLB 4114(c]. Principles of Effectiveness: The activities or programs in this project comply with the Principles of Effectiveness (POE) described in subsection 4115(a) of NCLB and foster a safe and drug-free learning environment that supports academic achievement [NCLB 4114(d)(1) and 4115(a)]. To comply with the standards set by the POE, programs and activities shall: A. Be based on an assessment of objective data about the drug and violence problems in the schools and communities to be served, including an objective analysis of the current conditions and consequences regarding said drug and violence problems that is based on ongoing local assessment or evaluation activities; B. Be based on performance measures aimed at ensuring that these schools and communities to be served have a safe, orderly, and drug-free learning environment; C. Be based on scientifically based research that provides evidence that the program to be used will reduce violence and illegal drug use; D. Be based on an analysis of the prevalence of risk factors, protective factors, buffers, assets; or other variables in schools and communities in the State identified through scientifically based research; E. Include meaningful and ongoing consultation with and input from parents in the development of the application and administration of the program or activity; F. Be evaluated periodically to assess its progress toward reducing violence and illegal drug use in schools to be served based on locally established performance measures; results shall be used: i. to refine, improve, and strengthen the program ii. to refine the performance measures, and iii. shall also be made available to the public upon request, with public notice of such availability provided. Public Review: The project application includes a request for a waiver of the requirement that programs or activities be based on scientifically-based research that provides evidence that the program will reduce violence and illegal drug use. The waiver process is found in Section V of this application and will be available for public review after submission of the application. Wrong and Harmful: The drug and violence prevention programs supported under this project convey a clear and consistent message that acts of violence and the illegal use of drugs are wrong and harmful [NCLB 4114(d)(6)]. Comprehensive Plan: The district has, or the schools to be served have, a plan for keeping schools safe and drug-free that includes: A. Discipline policies - Appropriate and effective school discipline policies that prohibit disorderly conduct, the illegal possession of weapons, and the illegal use, possession, distribution and sale of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs by students B. Security procedures - Security procedures at school and while students are on the way to and from school C. Prevention activities - Prevention activities that are designed to create and maintain safe, disciplined, and drug-free environments D. Crisis management plan - A crisis management plan for responding to violent or traumatic incidents on school grounds; and E. Code of Conduct Policy - A code of conduct policy for all students that clearly states the responsibilities of students, teachers, and administrators in maintaining a classroom environment that -- i. allows a teacher to communicate effectively with all students in the class; ii. allows all students in the class to learn; iii. has consequences that are fair, and developmentally appropriate; iv. considers the student and the circumstances of the situation; and

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

v. is enforced accordingly. [NCLB 4114(d)(7)] Required Reports: The district will submit to the Florida Department of Education such information, and at such intervals, that the Department requires to complete the State Report required by the United States Secretary of Education including information on the prevalence of drug use and violence by youth in the schools and the community. Such information shall be made readily available to the public. [NCLB 4116(b)(1)] Smoking within Indoor Facility: No person permits smoking within any indoor facility owned or leased or contracted for, and utilized by, such person for provision of routine or regular kindergarten, elementary, or secondary education or library services to children or of regular or routine health care or day care or early childhood development (Head Start ) services. [NCLB 4303(a) and (b)(1)] Supplement not Supplant: SDFS funds are used to increase the level of State, local, and other non-Federal funds that would, in the absence of funds under SDFS, be made available for programs and activities authorized under SDFS, and are in no case used to supplant such State, local, and other non-Federal funds. [NCLB 4114(d)(4)]

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Programmatic Use of Funds: The district will spend funds on authorized activities including activities associated with implementation of the Principles of Effectiveness and on authorized district activities. The district will comply with limitations placed on expenditures for security personnel and equipment, as mandated by law. Not more than 40 percent of funds will be spent on the following: A. B. C. D. E. Metal detectors or related equipment and technologies; Reporting criminal offenses; School security plans; Safe zones of passage; Security personnel.

Not more that 50 percent of the above 40 percent will be spent on activities a-d. (NCLB 4115)

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

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General Education Provisions Act

In accordance with the requirements of Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) Public Law 103-382, each applicant must ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its program for students, teachers, and other program beneficiaries with special needs. For details refer to URL: http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/gepa427.pdf

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BUDGET DESCRIPTION FORM

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A. NAME OF THE NCLB PROGRAM: Title IV Part A: Safe and Drug-Free Schools Entitlement Program B. NAME OF ELIGIBLE RECIPIENT: Flagler C. Project Number (DOE USE ONLY): 180-1039A-9CS01 (1) (2) (3) Function Object Description 5100 5100 200 510 Benefits for substitutes at each of the schools for further training and meetings. Consumable materials for school trainings and meetings-index cards, markers, folders- $50/schools-9 schools and the alternative school. Books for the Charter School to support Ophelia Project on bullying to support the reduction of violence, bullying and other targeted behaviors.($400) Non consumable materials- notebooks for each teachers receving training- @ 9 schools and 1 alternative school. ($125 per school) 5100 5100 620 693 DVDs for Private School- support SDFS using Character Education (Character Counts) to support positive behaviors in the schools and reduce the incidences of violence, bullying, and disruptive behaviors. Licensing and Support for SWISS- an online reporting system for Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) for data Salary for subs for on going planning and training for Single School Culture (SSC) and Positive Behavioral Support (PBS). 84 subs at $95/day (average) for trainings and meetings-3 for Pathways (alternative school), 9 for each of the 9 schools.

TAPS Number 09A071

(4) FTE 0.000 0.000

(5) Amount 2,000.00 546.12

5100

590

0.000

1,650.00

0.000 0.000

500.00 1,750.00

5100

750

0.000

8,000.00

6300 6300 6300 6300 6300 6300 6300 6300 6300 6300 7200

160 210 220 221 230 231 240 310 330 370 790

Clerical assistance for project- includes tracking program progress, collecting data from schools, scheduling district level meetings, printing 0.250 materials and marketing programs, keep the training data for each school and schedule NEFEC and Adler for further trainings. Retirement Social Security Medicare Insurance Insurance protection Workman`s Compensation Consultant for Single School Culture- Allison Adler 1 day per high school- ($3,000)NEFEC- additional training for Single School Culture and Champs ($1,000) Program Evaluation ($848)Consultant to evaluate program-($1,000)May 09. Travel to Technical Assistance and Bullying Conference Marketing, printing and mailing Administrative-Indirect Cost 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

7,246.00 568.00 450.00 107.00 1,000.00 34.00 45.00 5,848.00 800.00 400.00 573.88

TOTAL: 31,518.00

DOE 101

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

Eric J. Smith, Commissioner

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Consultation with Private School Officials

To ensure timely and meaningful consultation, the local education agency shall consult with appropriate private school officials for the design and development of programs [NCLB: section 9501] for 2009-2010. Include the timeline and frequency of activities that outline the plan of action for providing timely and meaningful consultation, and equitable services, to children, teachers, and parents in private schools within the local education agency (ies') service area. For details, refer to the US Department of Education's Non-Regulatory Guidance for Private Schools: Title I, Part A: http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/psguidance.doc Title IX ­ General Provisions: http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/equitableserguidance.doc

Response: Flagler County Schools' Office of Federal Grants sends a letter in March of each year to invite the private schools in the district to attend a meeting to discuss federally funded programs that private schools may be interested in participating in with the district. Private schools that attend the March meeting are given an outline of a Comprehensive Needs Assessment to complete and return to the district at the April meeting. At that time needs are reviewed and the private schools outline what it will feels it would use the allocated dollars at their school site. The needs of the private school are taken in to consideration when the grants are being developed. Equitable services and eligibilities are discussed along with the process of determining the allocation for the private schools for any of the Title grants. Teacher trainings and parent participation requirements are outlined. Collaborative discussions determine the services that will be delivered to the Title I students in the private school. Professional development activities are reviewed and discussed that will involve any of the Title grants. Suggestions are given. The private school will make a final request for the services after they have collaborated with their dioceses. Professional development activities as well as materials and equipment to be ordered through any entitlement grant are outlined. Final approval rests with the district. The private school surveys families to determine eligibility for Title I allocations. The free and reduced income guidelines are used on their survey. A home address is used to determine which school zone the family would be in if the student attended a public school. Per pupil allocations are determined using that data. The number of eligible students times the allocation determines the Title I allocation for the private school. Other entitlement programs use a per pupil allocation according to the enrollment data for the school. Students are actually selected for Title I services based on their academic scores at the beginning of the school year. Students who are Level I in reading or math, regardless of their economic status, are eligible to receive services. The private school administrator and the Title I coordinator meet to determine how to best serve the number of students who need the additional assistance. The delivery of service and by who is tentatively agreed upon before the close of the school year after the diocese is consulted. A final decision at the August Private School/Title I Coordinator meeting determines how, where and by who the services are delivered. Final allocations are distributed for all of the entitlement grants in August. Follow up meetings are scheduled throughout the school year. Meetings are scheduled at least every other month and more often as needed for planning or issues that may need to be resolved. Meeting agendas and sign in sheets are kept on file from each meeting. Our Exceptional Student Education Director is invited to attend meetings to discuss any issues that arise with the private school participant regarding testing and services from the ESE Department.

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

The district has developed a handbook for the private schools that includes general responsibilities, record keeping procedures, and outline of the complaint process, directions for completing requisitions and an appendix with necessary forms to assist the private schools and the district in having a good working relationship. Flagler currently has one private school that participates in the federal projects with the district.

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Uploaded File: Click here to view the file Uploaded File: Click here to view the file

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SECTION I: NEEDS ASSESSMENT Flagler

NCLB Requirement Programs funded by Title IV, Part A, must be based on an assessment of objective data regarding the incidence of violence and illegal drug use in the schools served. Analysis of the conditions and consequences must include delinquency and serious discipline problems among students who attend such schools (including private school students who participate in the district drug and/or violence prevention programs). 1. School /Community Characteristics Identify several community characteristics and/or unique community features that impact student ATOD use and violence behavior . As appropriate, include community demographics (economic indicators, income levels, rural/urban settings, race/ethnicity...). Response: Flagler County is located in the northeast costal sector of Florida. Our county has had a tremendous growth spurt which has created a stress on our school system. The 2000 federal census shows Flagler County as having a population of 49,832 residents. In a 2006 Flagler County Chamber of Commerce Census, Flagler had a population of 83,804. Although the 2007-2008 economic indicators showed Florida Counties to have slowed in the growth rate, Flagler did show an increase in our student enrollment population. Flagler went from 11,800 students in the 2006-2007 school year to 12,600 in the 20072008 school year. Manual labor, home construction and tourism were the foundation in Flagler's economy. With the housing bust in 2007-2008 our poverty rate in the school district had a tremendous increase. Our current February 2007 school district economic survey shows that 41.4% of our school students participate in the Federal Food Program. The unemployment rate in Flagler is the highest in the state. Residents have lost employment in real estate, house building, title companies and other affiliated jobs. The rising cost of gas has severely diminished the tourism and restaurant business in the county. The largest employer in the district is the Flagler County School District. Hiring within the school district is on hold. The district homeless rate among our student population has risen from an average per year homeless rate of 12 students to over 40 students at the close of the 2007-2008 school year. Our current rate is higher that the homeless numbers reported after the August 2005 hurricanes when our school enrollment increased due to families moving here post- Hurricane Katrina. Families in our county are in crisis. The most recent unemployment rate in Flagler County is 8.3%. Our students are dealing with stressors at home and at school. In September of 2007, 317 homes were in foreclosure, October of 2007 208 homes were in foreclosure and by November an additional 175 homes were in the foreclosure process. Students are moving frequently during the year due to home evictions or lack of money to pay rent.

2. County-/State-level Student Behavior Trend Data To assist in identifying prevention needs, review district-level data below. School Environmental Safety Incident Reporting (SESIR) http://www.fldoe.org/safeschools/sesir.asp Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey (FYSAS) http://www.dcf.state.fl.us/mentalhealth/publications/fysas/countyreports06.shtml Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS) http://www.doh.state.fl.us/disease_ctrl/epi/Chronic_Disease/FYTS/Reports.htm

3. School-level Student Behavior Data Sources Provide the names of any local-level objective data sources that can be used to identify SDFS prevention needs in your district. For each source listed, provide a brief explanation of what the data source measures. Limited to 1800 characters or about 600 words. Response: The 2006 Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey shows that over-all in the past 30 days , alcohol use increased 3.1 percentage points. Among middle school students, usage decreased 1.7 percentage points and increased 5.8 percentage points for high school students. The 30 day usage of cigarettes in 2006 is higher in Flagler County than compared to the state of Florida as a whole. Overall, 15.2% of students surveyed reported the use of cigarettes in the past 30 days while 10.6 % of students used cigarettes statewide. Smokeless tobacco use is substantially lower than cigarette usage. Overall, 13.3% of surveyed Flagler County

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

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students reported using smokeless tobacco in their lifetimes. The past 30 day use is 5.8% overall, with 4.4% among middle school students and 7.0% among high school students. SESIR trends reported for 2004-2007 report that use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs for the district actually declined in 2005-2006 but increased in 2006-2007. The SESIR data for 2007-2008 for Flagler County reported 9 incidents of alcohol use, 2 incidents of drug distribution /sale, 15 incidences of drug possession and 19 incidences of tobacco usage. Most reports were from middle and high schools but there were 4 reports from elementary school for drug possession and tobacco. Comparison of the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 SESIR reports shows an increase in the use of alcohol (+.03%), tobacco usage (+.08%) and a decrease (-.04%) in drug distribution, possession and sale. The School Resource Officers (SRO) report from August 2007- May 2008 reported 10 cases of drug possession, 1 drug sale and 13 tobacco cases. Not all schools have a resource officer which may explain conflicting data. Comparing the 2006-2007 SRO report, drug possession decreased as did tobacco usage and possession. Threats and intimidation (including bullying) on the SESIR increased 16.9% during the 2007-2008 school year as compared to the 2006-2007 school year. Violence incidents that include fighting, weapons and disorderly conduct increased .5% when comparing 2006-2007 to 2007-2008 school year SESIR data.

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Section I Needs Assessment Flagler

4. Prioritized List of Needs: List 3-7 needs in order of priority. Provide a rationale that justifies the identified need by including: (a) the data indicator(s) used; (b) name and year(s) of data source(s); and (c) a trend and/or comparison analysis. Begin with school-level data whenever possible. List needs in terms of student behavior, direction of change, and specific target population. If a need is not justified by the data, provide a rationale for its priority. Priority Student Behavior Incidences of fighting, weapons and disorderly conduct Direction of Change Target Population Rationale

1

Decreasing these behaviors district wide will increase student achievement and provide healthier learning environments.District wide the 2007-2008 Students in SESIR report showed +.5% increase in these behaviors in grades K-12. decrease grades KPrograms chosen by the Charter School and the private school will support 12 the reduction of these behaviors. The charter school will use the OPHELIA materials and the private school will use character education program. Students decrease grades 612 Decreasing alcohol useage in grades 6-12 will help students make healthier choices and provide healthier learning environments. The 2007-2008 SESIR showed +.03% increase in the use of alcohol, +.08% increase in tobacco and -.03% decrease in drugs and drug possessions. The 2006 FYSAS shows +3.1% increase in the use of alcohol at middle and high school levels. Decreasing tobacco useage in grades 6-12 will help students make healthier choices and provide healthier learning environments. The 2006 FYSAS indicates that 15.2% of Flagler middle and high school students use cigarettes which is 4.6% above the state average.

2

Incidences of alcohol and drug use

3

Students Use of tobacco decrease grades 6by students 12

4

Incidences of threats and intimidation including bullying

Decreasing these behaviors district wide will increase student achievement, foster better peer relationships and provide healthier learning environments.The 2007-2008 SESIR report indicates a 16.9% increase in Students in these behaviors including bullying at the middle and high school decrease grades Klevels.Programs chosen by the private school and the charter school will 12 support the decrease in these tupes of behaviors. The Ophelia materials have a heavy emphasis on bullying and will be used by the charter school. The private school will use Character Counts to focus on these behaviors.

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SECTION III: DISTRICT-DEVELOPED GOALS NCLB Requirement Programs funded by Title IV, Part A funds must be based on performance measures aimed at ensuring that recipient schools and communities have a safe, orderly, and drug-free learning environment. Performance measures, thus, must include goals that relate to reducing violence or drug use. Recipients may also adopt goals related to changing attitudes that are predictors of or precursors to youth drug use or violent behavior or goals related to the quality of program implementation. Write your own district developed long-term goals (terminating June 30, 2012) that will specifically address your district's identified needs. **Include a minimum of one violence prevention goal and one ATOD goal.** District: Flagler Date Target Population Direction Amount of of Change Change Data Element Incidents of bullying per 1,000 students incidencts of violence (includes fighting, harrassment, weapons, and disorderly conduct) Baseline Baseline Data Year Source Baseline Statistic

Students 1 6/30/2012 in K-12

decrease 5%

SESIR

2007-08

to be determined

Students 2 6/30/2012 in grades 6-8

decrease 5%

2% of middle schools Florida students School were 2005-06 Indicators reported Report for "incidents of violence" 43.6% middle school students report using alcohol in past 30 days 27.1% of middle school students report having used tobacco in past 30 days

Students 3 6/30/2012 in grades 6-8

decrease 5%

percentage of past 30day alcohol use

FYSAS

2006

Students 4 6/30/2012 in grades 6-8

decrease 5%

percentage of past 30day tobacco use

FYSAS

2006

Students 5 6/30/2012 in grades K-12

decrease 5%

Incidences of threats and intimidation per 1,000 students

SESIR

3.92 per 2005-06 1,000 students

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Section III Collaboration: Flagler

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Provide the following information regarding collaborations in the district. A collaboration is a joint effort between the local school district and another funding source/agency; no SDFS funds are used in implementing these collaborations. Identify at least 3 and a maximum of 5 collaborations. Complete this form for each collaboration to be implemented in the 200820092008-20092008-20092008-2009 school year. 1. Agency Name: Flagler County Focus on Flagler Youth Coalition 2. Program Title (explain acronyms): Focus on Flagler Youth 3. Type of Collaborator: Federal State Local Title I Dropout Prevention Community Coalition Department of Juvenile Justice Law Enforcement Title II Title IV - 21st Century Schools Coordinated School Health Program County Government Title V Department of Health Grantee County Health Department Other Community-Based Organization School -to-Work CSAP Department of Children and Families Service Clubs Safe Drug Free community (SDFC) Prevention Partnership Grantee Other District Program Other 4. Type of program ATOD Prevention School-wide Climate Violence Prevention Student Discipline Parent Involvement Other, If other please specify:

5. Specify the prioritized need(s) identified in Section I that are addressed through this program. 1 Incidences of fighting, weapons and disorderly conduct 2 Incidences of alcohol and drug use 6. Primary Target Group(s) to Be Served: (List specific grade levels) Elementary Middle High Students School Staff Parents Private, Non-Profit Other: Total schools served 5 2 2 7. Describe the program activities/strategies implemented through this collaboration. EXAMPLE Response: FFY is a local coalition that provides activities for students after school, during vacations and special events. The group has programs to implement in the schools, programs for parents and provides information to students, staff and families about socal service agencies that can assist families according to needs.

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Section III Collaboration: Flagler

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Provide the following information regarding collaborations in the district. A collaboration is a joint effort between the local school district and another funding source/agency; no SDFS funds are used in implementing these collaborations. Identify at least 3 and a maximum of 5 collaborations. Complete this form for each collaboration to be implemented in the 200820092008-20092008-2009 school year. 1. Agency Name: Department of Juvenile Justice 2. Program Title (explain acronyms): Agency for Youth and Youth Diversionary Programs 3. Type of Collaborator: Federal State Local Title I Dropout Prevention Community Coalition Department of Juvenile Justice Law Enforcement Title II Title IV - 21st Century Schools Coordinated School Health Program County Government Title V Department of Health Grantee County Health Department Other Community-Based Organization School -to-Work CSAP Department of Children and Families Service Clubs Safe Drug Free community (SDFC) Prevention Partnership Grantee Other District Program Other 4. Type of program ATOD Prevention School-wide Climate Violence Prevention Student Discipline Parent Involvement Other, If other please specify:

5. Specify the prioritized need(s) identified in Section I that are addressed through this program. 2 Incidences of alcohol and drug use 4 Incidences of threats and intimidation including bullying 6. Primary Target Group(s) to Be Served: (List specific grade levels) Elementary Middle High Students School Staff Parents Private, Non-Profit Other: Total schools served 2 2 7. Describe the program activities/strategies implemented through this collaboration. EXAMPLE Response: DJJ meets regularly with school staff and other community stakeholders to provide programs to help youth in our county stay out of trouble. They also provide assistance and guidance to families and youth who are in trouble with the law. They meet monthly at the Flagler County School District Office.

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

Section III Collaboration: Flagler

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Provide the following information regarding collaborations in the district. A collaboration is a joint effort between the local school district and another funding source/agency; no SDFS funds are used in implementing these collaborations. Identify at least 3 and a maximum of 5 collaborations. Complete this form for each collaboration to be implemented in the 200820092008-2009 school year. 1. Agency Name: Flagler County Health Department 2. Program Title (explain acronyms): Health Department-Tobacco Grant 3. Type of Collaborator: Federal State Local Title I Dropout Prevention Community Coalition Department of Juvenile Justice Law Enforcement Title II Title IV - 21st Century Schools Coordinated School Health Program County Government Title V Department of Health Grantee County Health Department Other Community-Based Organization School -to-Work CSAP Department of Children and Families Service Clubs Safe Drug Free community (SDFC) Prevention Partnership Grantee Other District Program Other 4. Type of program ATOD Prevention School-wide Climate Violence Prevention Student Discipline Parent Involvement Other, If other please specify:

5. Specify the prioritized need(s) identified in Section I that are addressed through this program. 3 Use of tobacco by students 6. Primary Target Group(s) to Be Served: (List specific grade levels) Elementary Middle High Students School Staff Parents Private, Non-Profit Other: Total schools served 5 2 2 7. Describe the program activities/strategies implemented through this collaboration. EXAMPLE Response: The Health Department works with the district to provide programs in the schools to help students make better choices for healthier living. The programs offered are funded used the tobacco money.

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Section III Collaboration: Flagler

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Provide the following information regarding collaborations in the district. A collaboration is a joint effort between the local school district and another funding source/agency; no SDFS funds are used in implementing these collaborations. Identify at least 3 and a maximum of 5 collaborations. Complete this form for each collaboration to be implemented in the 20082009 school year. 1. Agency Name: Flagler County Health Deparmtnet 2. Program Title (explain acronyms): School Health Advisory Committee 3. Type of Collaborator: Federal State Local Title I Dropout Prevention Community Coalition Department of Juvenile Justice Law Enforcement Title II Title IV - 21st Century Schools Coordinated School Health Program County Government Title V Department of Health Grantee County Health Department Other Community-Based Organization School -to-Work CSAP Department of Children and Families Service Clubs Safe Drug Free community (SDFC) Prevention Partnership Grantee Other District Program Other 4. Type of program ATOD Prevention School-wide Climate Violence Prevention Student Discipline Parent Involvement Other, If other please specify:

5. Specify the prioritized need(s) identified in Section I that are addressed through this program. 2 Incidences of alcohol and drug use 3 Use of tobacco by students 6. Primary Target Group(s) to Be Served: (List specific grade levels) Elementary Middle High Students School Staff Parents Private, Non-Profit Other: Total schools served 6 2 2 7. Describe the program activities/strategies implemented through this collaboration. EXAMPLE Response: The School Health Advisory Committee meets with the school district,private school representatvies, parents and health deparmtment representatives to make reccomendations for programs, polices and wellness for the school staff and students.

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SECTION IV: PARENT INVOLVEMENT

Flagler NCLB Requirement Programs funded by Title IV, Part A, must include meaningful and ongoing consultation with and input from parents in the development of the application and administration of programs and/or activities. Provide a narrative for following questions. Limit 3000 characters or about 500 words 1. Program Planning 1a. How will parents/families be made aware of opportunities to assist in the planning and implementation for violence and drug prevention activities? Response: Flagler's School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) meets quarterly to discuss needs for the district schools and students and recommend programs to be implemented in the school. These programs may be available through the Flagler County's Sheriff Office, The Flagler County Health Department and/or the Flagler County Focus on Flagler Youth. This committee is comprised of school personnel, parents of students in the school system, private school representation and other service agencies. The school district also has an ongoing GAP commission comprised of parents, grandparents and community members who focus on the achievement gap for children who are minority, special education students or students who are other language learners. The district provides data and information to this group that impact the recommendations this groups brings to the school board. They are included in the district needs assessment recommendations and the district results for the climate survey being conducted during the 2007-2008 school year. Notifications to the public are available on the district website, through informational flyers and posted in the community and student backpack mailings. Flagler County makes every effort to remove barriers for teachers, parents, students and community members in all programs. Individuals of any gender, race, national origin, age or disability are invited to participate in programs. Students and parents with special needs, families with students who speak other languages are provided support to the best of the district ability. Meetings are scheduled at various times and locations. 1b. What opportunities are available for parents/families to participate in the planning and implementation for violence and drug prevention activities? Response: Parents are notified that participation is open through the district website, school news letters, the agencies involved in SHAC, the School Advisory Councils active at each school and Parent Teacher Organizations. SHAC meets quarterly and has 42 members-six of which are parents. Recommendations made by this committee and the GAP committee are presented to the Flagler County School Board which is publicly broadcast and meeting agendas are available on line. 2. Program Participation 2a. How will parents/families be made aware of opportunities available to them in professional development, trainings or workshops in the area of violence and drug prevention activities? Response: Parents are encouraged to participate in the School Advisory Committees (SAC), and Parent Teacher Organizations. Each school hosts a beginning of the year Open House where parents and students attend the school and meet teachers and staff. Information is given about the opportunity for parents to participate in committee and decision making groups. Parents are provided with news letters and mail outs. Committee participants are notified by e-mail and phone calls of up coming committee meetings. All information on the Title IV Safe and Drug Free Schools grant is available at each school, the district office, the public libraries and the local Flagler County Chamber of Commerce.

2b. What opportunities are available for parents/families to participate in professional development, trainings or workshops for them in the area of violence and drug prevention or child behavior management? Response: Notifications of activities related to trainings, workshops and events sponsored by various groups are send home with students as backpack flyers. Posters are displayed at the schools and the district office. Notifications are also run in the local newspapers. The Focus on Flagler Youth has provided the schools with a newsletter issue of all social services agencies in our county and neighboring Volusia County. They sponsor a "fair" each year when those agencies are in attendance and parents have an opportunity to have take home materials concerning drug prevention along with other issues and available services for family needs.

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

Page 18 of 26

Our Adult Education Department and the schools provide parent workshops focused on youth. Each year several of the schools provide a 6 session to parents called "How to Talk So Children Will Listen." The local Department of Juvenile Justice also participates in parent workshops. They provide programs on teen pregnancy, tobacco, alcohol and drugs.

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Page 19 of 26

Section V SDFS Program Activity Profile NCLB Requirement Programs funded by Title IV, Part A must be based on scientific research that provides evidence that the program will reduce violence and illegal drug use. A LEA may apply to the State for a waiver to allow innovative activities or programs that demonstrates substantial likelihood of success. This waiver process is addressed in Item 2. Complete one Program Profile for each SDFS funded program you plan on implementing during the 2008-2009 year. District: Flagler 1. Program Name: Positive Behavioral Support Project 2. For a Promising Program: Provide the following information for all other programs not on this list.: 2a. Is this a district-developed or commercially-developed program? Commercially-Developed 2b. Provide: A brief program description Response: Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) will be used district wide in all elementary and middle schools. It is a problem solving and pro-social behavioral program that relies on data analysis, incentives and recognitions and a school wide training and support for all staff. PBS is a school wide process for understanding and resolving problem behavior of children that is based on values and empirical research. It is an approach to understanding why a child engages in problem behaviors and strategies for preventing the behavior from reoccurring by teaching the child new skills. The program gives staff a new way to think about behavior. It results in a more positive school climate and increased academic performance. The program focuses on positive behavior and results in a creation of effective intervention plans that will impede problem behaviors, teach new skills and create support systems for the students. The program reflects school wide expected behavior and expectations for student behavior with a team approached strategies to address problematic behaviors. It works hand in hand with Response to Intervention practices implemented in all of the schools.

The rationale for using this program Response: PBS is based on why problem behaviors occur. This is a program based on a school-wide level and has evidence based strategies that assist schools to increase academic performance and increase safety, decrease problem behaviors and establish positive school cultures. It teaches appropriate social behavior skills and acknowledges appropriate behaviors. A functional behavior assessment identifies multiple strategies to help reduce problem behavior, alter environments and focus on positive behaviors. It will help reduce and eliminate the need for school suspensions and expulsions which lead to other problem behaviors in the community.

At least two primary scientifically-based research strategies implemented in this program (e.g. social skills training, mentoring, peer leaders, etc.). Include bibliographic citations from peer review articles published within the last 10 years for each strategy listed. (If you are unsure of what strategies to list, contact your program developer.) Response: PBS is based on a social skills and problem solving model to improve academics and behaviors for a more positive classroom and learning environment. When school wide PBS is implemented results indicate improvements in academic and social behavior outcomes: 20-60 % reduction in office discipline referrals for student with and without IEPs Increase the time students spend on instruction Decreases time administrators and teacher spend on addressing problem behaviors

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Improvement in the perception of school safety and decreases "risk factors" Increases "protective factors"

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It also is associated with a decrease in the number of students identified for tertiary interventions because of intensive support needs (Eber, 2005). Implementation of PBS is cost effective. It better uses existing resources. When Kennedy Middle School implemented PBS they documented student behavior with an annual reduction of 850 office discipline referrals and 25 student suspensions from the pre-implementation level. This change translated into translated time savings of 30 administrator days and 121 student school days Lewis & Sugai, 1999 and Center for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support, 2004). During 2002-2003, 52 elementary schools in Illinois using PBS to criterion were compared with 69 schools just adopting PBS. On average, 62.19% of third graders in schools using PBS met or exceeded the state reading standard. An average of 46.6% of third graders in schools not using PBS met the same standard. (Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support, 2004).

2c. If this program has been evaluated in your district, please provide: When was the last time your program was evaluated? (response limited to 650 characters) Response: This will be the first year of implementation of this program. It will be evaluated at the end of the 2008-2009 school year by a outside consultant. A summary of the most recent evaluation results demonstrating measurable program outcomes or other data about program effectiveness Response: An evaluation plan will be submitted by August 30, 2009.

The year of the most recent evaluation: NA 2d. Do you intend to evaluate this program in the 2008-2009 school year? Yes 3. Type of Program ATOD Prevention School-wide Climate

Student Violence Prevention Student Discipline

Parent Involvement Other If other, please specify:

4. Prioritized Need(s) Specify the prioritized need(s) identified in Section I that are addressed through this program. If the program does not address any of your prioritized needs specifically, provide a rationale for this program choice. 1 Incidences of fighting, weapons and disorderly conduct 4 Incidences of threats and intimidation including bullying

If the program does not address any of your prioritized needs specifically, provide a rationale for this program choice. 5. Primary Target Group(s) to be served: Elementary Students School Staff: Parents pk 5 pk 5 pk 5 pk k k k 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 Middle 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 7 7 7 High 9 12 9 12 9 12 8 9 10 10 10 11 11 11

k

1

2

3

4

7

10

11

12

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Private Other if other, specify: Total schools served 5 pk 5 k 1 2 3 4 8 6 8 7 12 9 12 10 11

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Elementary: 5

Middle: 2

High: 0

6. Targeted Changes (check all that apply): Attitude Behavior/Skills Knowledge Perceptions 7. Implementation Plan for this Program 7a. In how many schools, in what grade(s) specifically, and during what time period or content area will the program be implemented? Please explain details not provided thru question #5. Number of Schools: 7 What grade(s): PRE-K-8th Time period or content area: August 2008-June 2009 7b. Who will be responsible for delivering program activities and services directly to students? Response: The teachers will be responsible for delivering services to the students. Training will be held over the summer and at pre-planning before school opening in August 2008 for the teachers. The school counselors and the dean and/or assistant principals will be a support to the teachers.

7c. How will personnel directly responsible for delivering program curriculum and activities be trained? Response: Each school had teachers and a team with a minimum of 2-3 individuals that were trained in June 2008. This team will begin implementation at the schools- elementary and middle schools at the start of the 2008-2009 school year. Additional training will occur during professional development days in September 2008 and October 2008. The teams will meet with teachers and staff to provide support and help implement the data element that will be used to support the program. The teams will meet quarterly at the district level.

7d. Has this program been implemented in your district in the past (regardless of funding source)? If so, provide a brief history describing the number of years implemented, program expansion, program sustainability, etc. no If yes, Response:

7e. If program was used in past years (7d is yes), Identify any challenges with program implementation that schools experienced; and, Response:

Identify any strategies that will be used to address these challenges for the 2008-2009 school year. Response:

7f. What tracking forms (implementation checklist, report form, or other monitoring instrument) will be used to assess accountability of program implementation at the classroom level and at the school level? In the text box below, clearly provide the title of each instrument and state its purpose. In addition, upload a copy of each instrument as a Word file or

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

Page 22 of 26

PDF file. 1. 2. 3. 4. File previously uploaded, click here to view Response: The Implementation Support Form will be done at the beginning of the school year at the building level training. A team from each school will collaborate with staff to complete this form. The Classroom Behavior Tracking Form will be used by the teacher in the classroom. The teacher and the support team will be responsible for the Behavior Tracking Sheet. The teachers will be responsible for reporting to the designated staff person doing the reporting the data. The support team at each school will be responsible for entering data into the SWISS program.

7g. Who at the school level will be responsible for filling out the above tracking form(s)? Response: The Classroom Behavior Tracking Form will be used by the teacher in the classroom. The teacher and the support team will be responsible for the Behavior Tracking Sheet. The support team at each school will be responsible for entering data into the SWISS program.

9. Program Specific Objectives Program performance measures should be directly related to the results of the program and linked to the district's established goals. Provide at least one program outcome objective that measures a change in student behavior or attitude. (Program outcome objectives include performance measures that relate to reduced violence or drug-use, changing attitudes that are predictors of or precursors to youth drug abuse or violent behavior.) Provide at least one program process (implementation) objective that measures fidelity of program delivery. (Program process objectives should include performance measures that relate to the fidelity of program implementation.) Objectives for Positive Behavioral Support Project count Objective Date Type Direction Amount Target Data of of Population Element Change Change Number of teachers receiving inservice training for PBS Baseline Baseline Baseline DataSource Year Statistic

1

process

Teachers of students 06/30/2009 increase in grades K-8

90%

Logs for 2008Professional 2009 Development

0%

2

outcome

06/30/2009

Students in decrease 10% grades K-8

Number of Discipliinary School Referrals Referral for physical Reports contact

20072008

Middle schools 11.7% and Elementary School23% physical contact which includes fighting, hitting and striking.

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District: Flagler 1. Program Name: Single School Culture 2. For a Promising Program: Provide the following information for all other programs not on this list.: 2a. Is this a district-developed or commercially-developed program? Commercially-Developed 2b. Provide: A brief program description Response: Single School Culture is a school wide process that connects academic, behavior and climate to foster the belief that positive change can occur for students and teachers when teachers and students develop and improve self-efficacy. This program will be used in both high schools in Flagler County and our alternative school, Pathways (grades 6-12), beginning in August 2008. These schools received the initial training in June 2008. Professional development will be ongoing through the 2008-2009 school year. School staff and leadership receive training on the process and implementation of SSC. The district climate survey is analyzed by each school to determine the climate of the school and what concepts and attitudes need to be worked on. The process uses a data-feedback-strategy method and includes the students. Curriculum is aligned with assessments. Staff meets to change targeted practices that will result in a healthier school climate. Test scores, attendance and behavioral data is tracked and analyzed. Each high school and the alternative school has a team to plan interventions for student needs and meets on a regular basis. The single school culture uses specific and consistent strategies to improve academics, behavior and school climate. Teams at each school are instructed on how to use data, information and models to help them assess their own learning environments and develop action plans. Teams complete a follow up evaluation and adjust the plans as needed.

The rationale for using this program Response: Review of data concerning student achievement, school climate, student referrals and discipline records helped the district determine that there was a need to implement Single School Culture (SSC) in our two high schools and alternative school. Strategies used in this program were grounded in educational research. The long term impact on the program will decrease referrals and reduce absenteeism as well as problematic behaviors among students. Rapid growth in our district and changes in personnel have led to unclear expectations for students, parents and teachers. SSC will help identify problematic behaviors and practices and develop a long term plan for establishing campus wide norms. This will lead to a more focused and cohesive method of communicating clear expectations for all stakeholders and build better student/teacher/parent relationships. In the classroom teachers promote effective resiliency attitudes of: social competence, problem solving, autonomy and independence as well as a sense of purpose. Students gain confidence and competence, they believe that listening to them is a priority and they believe someone cares about them.

At least two primary scientifically-based research strategies implemented in this program (e.g. social skills training, mentoring, peer leaders, etc.). Include bibliographic citations from peer review articles published within the last 10 years for each strategy listed. (If you are unsure of what strategies to list, contact your program developer.) Response: SCC uses problem solving, peer leaders and social skills models in their process of creating healthier school cultures, increasing student achievement and reducing problematic behaviors . According to a synthesis of research studies for SSC when curriculum is well articulated, aligned to assessments and monitored, student achievement is raised. Simply articulating a curriculum and ensuring it is taught raises students test scores by 7 percentile points. When the curriculum is aligned to assessments and the extent to which it is actually taught is monitored, the measurable impact increases from 7 percentile to 31 percentile points (Marzano, 2000). McREL researchers found that "high expectations" for student achievement is associated with a grain in student achievement of 11 percentile points. It means placing a clear focus on mastery of basic subjects,

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establishing high performance expectations for all students, and carefully monitoring student progress. (Marzano, 2000).

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School that implement SSC demonstrate significant student achievement measured by FCAT. The percentage of students meeting high standards and making learning gains and the lowest 25% making gains in reading, all increased dramatically (Brezin, FLDOE, 2003). Targeted SSC schools at the elementary, middle and high school level report a range of 50%-60% reduction in discipline referrals during the implementation school year versus the previous school year (Brezin, FLDOE, 2003).

2c. If this program has been evaluated in your district, please provide: When was the last time your program was evaluated? (response limited to 650 characters) Response: NO A summary of the most recent evaluation results demonstrating measurable program outcomes or other data about program effectiveness Response: This is the first year of implementation.

The year of the most recent evaluation: June 2009 2d. Do you intend to evaluate this program in the 2008-2009 school year? Yes 3. Type of Program ATOD Prevention School-wide Climate

Student Violence Prevention Student Discipline

Parent Involvement Other If other, please specify:

4. Prioritized Need(s) Specify the prioritized need(s) identified in Section I that are addressed through this program. If the program does not address any of your prioritized needs specifically, provide a rationale for this program choice. 1 Incidences of fighting, weapons and disorderly conduct 2 Incidences of alcohol and drug use 3 Use of tobacco by students 4 Incidences of threats and intimidation including bullying

If the program does not address any of your prioritized needs specifically, provide a rationale for this program choice. Providing a positive school culture will increase student time on tasks and academic achievement, additional participation in school activiies and reduced problematic behaviors. 5. Primary Target Group(s) to be served: Elementary Students School Staff: Parents Private Other pk 5 pk 5 pk 5 pk 5 pk 5 k k k k k 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 Middle 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 7 7 7 7 7 High 9 12 9 12 9 12 9 12 9 12 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11

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if other, specify: Total schools served

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Elementary: 0

Middle: 1

High: 2

6. Targeted Changes (check all that apply): Attitude Behavior/Skills Knowledge Perceptions 7. Implementation Plan for this Program 7a. In how many schools, in what grade(s) specifically, and during what time period or content area will the program be implemented? Please explain details not provided thru question #5. Number of Schools: 3 What grade(s): 6-12 Time period or content area: School day 7b. Who will be responsible for delivering program activities and services directly to students? Response: Teachers will be responsible for delivering activities and services in the classroom. A district training was held in June so that teachers at each school and a training team at the school are ready to implement the program at the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year. Teachers will receive additional training on professional development days during the 2008-2009 school year.

7c. How will personnel directly responsible for delivering program curriculum and activities be trained? Response: The school level team and teachers received training at the district office in June 2008. Those identified team members will go back to the schools and provide additional training during September and October professional development days. A SSC consultant will deliver additional training at each school during the school year. The leadership team will meet quarterly.

7d. Has this program been implemented in your district in the past (regardless of funding source)? If so, provide a brief history describing the number of years implemented, program expansion, program sustainability, etc. no If yes, Response:

7e. If program was used in past years (7d is yes), Identify any challenges with program implementation that schools experienced; and, Response:

Identify any strategies that will be used to address these challenges for the 2008-2009 school year. Response:

7f. What tracking forms (implementation checklist, report form, or other monitoring instrument) will be used to assess accountability of program implementation at the classroom level and at the school level? In the text box below, clearly provide the title of each instrument and state its purpose. In addition, upload a copy of each instrument as a Word file or PDF file. 1. File previously uploaded, click here to view 2. File previously uploaded, click here to view

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Florida Department of Education - Title IV

3. File previously uploaded, click here to view 4.

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Response: The disciplinary referral form will be used by Flagler Palm Coast High School teachers and data will be pulled from SESIR based on codes entered from the disciplinary reports. Matanza High School is using the SCC survey for school climate and it will be used as a pre and post test. SESIR reports will be pulled for both schools at the end of the 2008-2009 school year.

7g. Who at the school level will be responsible for filling out the above tracking form(s)? Response: FPC teachers fill out disciplinary reports. The support team tracks reports. MHS teachers have done a "pre" climate survey to determine common rules to be implemented for the school year. It will be followed by a "post" survey at the end of the year. The SESIR report s will be run quarterly.

9. Program Specific Objectives Program performance measures should be directly related to the results of the program and linked to the district's established goals. Provide at least one program outcome objective that measures a change in student behavior or attitude. (Program outcome objectives include performance measures that relate to reduced violence or drug-use, changing attitudes that are predictors of or precursors to youth drug abuse or violent behavior.) Provide at least one program process (implementation) objective that measures fidelity of program delivery. (Program process objectives should include performance measures that relate to the fidelity of program implementation.) Objectives for Single School Culture count Objective Date Type Direction Amount Target of of Data Element Population Change Change Number of teachers trained in using SSC Baseline Baseline Baseline DataSource Year Statistic Logs for professional 2008development 2009 trainings

1

process

Teachers of students 06/30/2009 increase in grades 9-12

90%

0%

2

outcome

Students in 06/30/2009 grades 9decrease 10% 12

Number of students reported at the high schools for problematic behaviors that School include Incident classroom Report disruption, disorderly conduct, disrespect and insubordination.

20072008

21.6% of high school incidents involve classroom disruption, disorderly conduct, disrespect and insubordination.

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