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Taking Back the Classroom (an effective learning Strategies and Rigor)

"An Ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"

ACADEMIC Rigor

· What is your definition of Academic rigor? g · How do you use academic rigor in your teaching and learning?

Some definitions of Academic Rigor

· Academic rigor is learning in which students demonstrate a thorough, in-depth y g g p mastery of challenging tasks to develop cognitive skills through reflective thought, analysis, problem solving, evaluation or creativity. ti it · It is the quality of thinking, not the quantity, th t defines academic rigor. tit that d fi d i i http://www.iasb.com/journal/j050607_02.cfm

Defining Academic Rigor

· "Rigor is a highly personalized element of the Rigor teaching/learning partnership in which the teacher lights a fire of academic ambition and personal responsibility in the learner and shares with the learner a mutual accountability for stoking that fire with hi h expectations, t ki th t fi ith high t ti achievement and continuous growth" (Dr. (Dr hank Rubin dean College of Education Rubin, dean, Education, university of South Dakota, Fall 2004)

Defining Rigor

· "Rigor is the teaching learning and Rigor teaching, learning, assessment which promotes student growth in knowledge of the discipline and the ability to analyze, synthesize, and critically evaluate the content under study" study (author k ( th unknown) )

Defining Rigor

· Rigor has less to do with how demanding the material is that the teacher covers than p what competencies students have mastered as a result of the lesson · It has to do with what it means to be an educated adult · Higher q g quality y · Clearer contribution Wagner, T, (2006). Rigor on trial. Edu. week

Academic Rigor - Teaching

· Requires more than presenting facts and asking for recitation · Requires thinking

­ What is the objective/purpose of the assignment/class/program ­ Why is important to learn/know ­H How i th student challenged t thi k is the t d t h ll d to think ­ How will it be applied

Operationalizing Rigor

· Students should be "jury ­ ready" jury ready

­ Analyze an argument ­ Weigh evidence ­ Recognize bias (their own and others) ­ Distinguish fact from Opinion g p ­ Balance the sometimes competing principles ­ Communicate what is understood ­ Work with others Adapted from "Rigor on Trial" Tony Wagner

Taking back our Classroom

· How do we get students to work with us? · How do we get students to take responsibility of their learning? · How do we implement Rigor in our institution? · What are your experiences so far as you try the get your students work with you in support of their learning, academic growth p growth? and personal g

Observed Student Behaviors:

· Talking (Signing) and disruptive activities in the classroom · Ringing p g g g pagers/cell p phones and answering them g in class or leaving class to answer phones. g · Confrontational or argumentative behavior with faculty and other students · Inability to pay attention and stay focused in class or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) proliferation.

Observed Student Behaviors:

· Unwillingness or inability to accept responsibility for their actions or preparation · Generation Y or the "Feel good generation generation" with inadequate skill and educational preparation.

Observed Student Behaviors:

· Students with severe emotional disabilities either those identified by Office of Student with disability (OSWD) or unidentified. There are time bombs waiting to explode in our classrooms. Even those receiving support and service from OSWD are unknown to us because of k t b f confidentiality issue (VA Technique Shooter) · People from the community in general who just come in to facilities and meeting who are upset or emotionally impaired impaired.

Flashpoint Between Faculty and Students S d

· Grading · Disruptive Classroom Behavior ­ talking (signing). (signing) Pager/cell phones sleeping etc phones, sleeping, · Lack of Attendance/tardiness/leaving Early. E l · Unprepared and Under prepared for classes

Flashpoint Between Faculty and Students S d

· Conflict in Team or Collaborative Assignments · Emotionally Challenged Students ­ Those with identified emotional disabilities and those unidentified by OSWD. OSWD

Useful faculty Tools

1. 1 Syllabus ­ the syllabus is the legal contract between the students and teacher. teacher What should be included?

­ Course Description, objectives, methodology, methodology and required materials ­ Identify the skills and outcomes the students are expected to develop and achieve

Useful faculty Tools

­ Faculty Contact information ­ Identify any prerequisites, co-requisites, or course advisories. ­ Define expected classroom behavior p g pager/cell p phones off, no talking ( g g) , g (signing) when anyone is speaking, remaining in your seat throughout the class, etc

Useful faculty Tools

­ Attendance, Lateness or early departure rules ­ Clearly identify all required assignments due over the course of the semester ­ Identify not just the weight of each assignment in the g g grading formula, but the g , quality and characteristics you will base the grading on (Rubric). ­ Academic dishonesty and penalties for such behavior.

Useful faculty Tools

­ Exam makeup policy. ­ Extra credit assignment policy. ­ Faculty grade adjustments for good attendance, work done correctly and on time, effective work with team members, and good , g class conduct. ­ Comprehensive schedule identifying what and when assignment are due.

Useful faculty Tools

2. 2 Having a supportive respectful and supportive, respectful, positive attitude toward students, colleagues, colleagues and your discipline/profession. 3. 3 Use articles speakers and returning articles, speakers, students to support your educational philosophy, pedagogy, philosophy pedagogy and standards standards.

Useful Faculty Tools

4. Never give assignments you either do not review in class or collect and grade. 5. Feedback! Grading homework and other assignments based on identified criteria y pp in the syllabus or supplemental documents will help students understand what they are doing right or wrong and what th need t d t i h t they d to do to improve performance.

Useful Faculty Tools

6. Know the university s policy and procedures on university's academic dishonesty and both student and faculty rights when an occasion dishonesty occurs 7. Know the university's on attendance and make sure your policy does not violate the university's policy and is supported by a valid student learning outcome (SLO) if attendance is part of the grading formula.

Useful Faculty Tools

8. 8 Know the university's policies and university s procedures when there is a disruptive or threatening student. Make sure you know student who to call when there is a crisis situation. situation

Useful Faculty Tools

9.Keep 9 Keep documentation of all grades and grading sheets for required assignments. Periodically provide students with updated grade reports so if you have made an error, error it can be corrected or if the students have not been completing assignments, they can see whether they are passing the course or not. Take advantage of Blackboard grade book

Useful Faculty Tools

10. 10 Ask students who are not performing at a passing level to come talk with you in your office so perhaps an intervention can help them change their work habits. 11. 11 Know what reasonable accommodations you must make for students with identified physical emotional or learning physical, disabilities.

Useful Faculty Tools

12. 12 Start and/or participate in campus discussions of academic standards, classroom management and student management, conduct issues.

Scenario 1

· Your Dean or Department chair person or director of FYE program has come in to your office to tell you a student team in your Financial Accounting class has filed a formal complaint about their grade on their financial analysis report. How can you prevent grade conflicts and how will you justify the grade given during the grievance review?

Prevention Techniques

· Provide detailed instructions of what must be included in the assignment (outline). · Provide detailed directions on how the report should look including title page, table of contents body of the report contents, report, graphs, tables, calculations, page numbers, spacing, numbers spacing and etc etc.

Prevention Techniques:

· Provide detailed instructions of what must be included in the assignment (outline). · Provide detailed directions on how the report should look including title page, table of contents body of the report contents, report, graphs, tables, calculations, page numbers, spacing, numbers spacing and etc etc.

Documentation and Justification of the Grade: f h G d

· Provide students with detailed comments and corrections written one the report itself · Return a completed grading sheet identifying where they earned or lost points based on the pre established pre-established criteria (the rubric).

Documentation and Justification of the Grade: f h G d

· Require submission in the report of leader logs and note taker logs to be completed for each meeting so you can see the process under which the team worked on the report report.

Scenario 2

· A four-student team (all males) has been having ( ) g difficulty putting the first project together. One member verbally assaults the other members p p p y y outside a campus computer lab and was physically menacing one team member has was accusing of not doing his fair share of the work. This angry y your office and begins g student immediately comes to y to physically menace and verbally assault you trying to get you to understand and support his behavior and frustration with his team. How would you handle y this extremely angry and agitated student?

Scenario 2

· Tell him unless he calms down and can speak in a non-threatening manner that you will call campus police to have him removed. · Once he calms down listen to his version down, of the situation, taking notes and reiterating what he has said for confirmation of the facts as given by him.

Scenario 2

· Talk with the other members getting their version in writing also. They confirm his behavior as being menacing and out of control just as you observed.

Scenario 2

· Call the party in the office of student affairs responsible for processing complaints about student conduct and set up a meeting as soon as possible. In this meeting, you find out this student has been attending Gallaudet University for years and has had numerous incidents of inappropriate behavior and threatening actions. Based on this information, you choose to exercise university policy which allows you t i i it li hi h ll to take action. (Some universities have policy that allows faculty to suspend students for two class meeting in such a situation).

Scenario 2

· Know your rights and have zero tolerance for unacceptable behavior · The resolution (with the support and approval of the other student team members) was to contract requiring the p y g g student attend psychological counseling sessions for the remainder of the semester, he could only communicate with team members in my presence, and all emails communication had to be routed through me. th h

Scenario 3

· Over the past several years, students have resisted and complained about the team projects required in my Production/operations Management class. Even a few of the faculty have voiced their view that team assignments are not appreciated because many of our students live off campus and some are working to earn income to pay for their apartment and other i t f th i t t d th school expenses. It is hard for the students to meet and do team work How do you respond work. to these criticisms?

Scenario 3

· Start right in the syllabus why collaborative projects are required i th course and j t i d in the d what student learning outcomes (SLOs) and skills th are i t d d t d d kill they intended to develop. l · Bring in a variety of articles talking about importance of developing team work and interpersonal skills for students who want to work in an organization today.

Scenario 3

· Bring business professionals and former students (alumni) to talk about what is needed for success in a professional position in business or accounting. · Measure and document the achievement of skills and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Scenario 4

· The end of semester assigned report is required to g p q be typed using word or some other software on the computer. When the reports are turned in at the end , of the semester, one student turns in a handwritten report stating they have a documented physical disability on record with the OSWD and hands the g instructor a letter from OSWD counselor telling the instructor they should accept this handwritten report in order to make a reasonable accommodation for this student's disability. How would y handle this y you situation?

Scenario 4

· Any assignment requires in a course should be linked to SLOs including require use of any technology that is used in a particular discipline. · The requirement that reports be done using computer must be clearly stated in the syllabus

Scenario 4

· If your colleagues believe knowledge of work processing software and the compute are an important part of the skill set needed in the discipline then waiving discipline, a student from fulfilling the same requirements as others students in the class is not a reasonable accommodation.

Scenario 4

· It is the student's responsibility to notify student s the faculty member long before the assignment was due and then work with OSWD to attain assistance in completing the work as required required.

Scenario 5

· A faculty member has an attendance policy whereby the student's grade I y y adversely affected by absences in excess of three and a formula has been provided in the syllabus to explain the point deductions for each absence over i t d d ti f h b three. The course uses collaborative assignments in every class meeting so being absent means students do not participate in the assignment. assignment

Scenario 5

· The class is Human Relations where collaborative activities and developing team skills is considered as important SLO. A student has missed 12 classes out of the 31 meetings during the semester and as a result, has received a failing grade in the course. course

Scenario 5

· In his appeal of his grade, the student grade informs the instructor and chairperson of the dept that he has been diagnosed dept. with Post-Traumatic stress Disorder which is documented with OSWD. This OSWD condition prevents him from leaving the dorm room (house) during episodes necessitating that he missed class.

Scenario 5

· He asks that his grade be changed because it is a reasonable accommodation to allow him excessive absences due to his disability. Or that and an incomplete grade should be given to him because he has right to be given more time to complete the course at his space. How would you respond to this grade appeal?

Scenario 5

· Verify with OSWD s record s to see OSWD's exactly what reasonable accommodation was requested of the instructor at the beginning of the semester. The only accommodation requested according to instructor and OSWD records was to allow more time to complete exams exams.

Scenario 5

· Make sure the grading policy is clearly identified on the syllabus. · If attendance is important for students to learn to p work collaboratively and has been identified as desired SLO, then it is not a reasonable accommodation to waive the absenteeism policy as it was clearly spelled out in the syllabus an no previous request to waive the attendance policy through OSWD was ever made.

In Summary

· Know the university's policy and university s procedures dealing with student conduct. · Know who to contact in an emergency · Do not give assignments that will not be reviewed i class or b you as th i d in l by the instructor otherwise

In Summary

· Clearly spell out the class requirements and expected student conduct in the syllabus · Never create a rule you do not intend to enforce. enforce If you state it then carry through! · Communicate and network with colleagues and mentor newer f ll d t faculty. lt

Scenario 5

Information

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