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APPENDIX C RECREATIONAL PILOT FLIGHT TRAINING AND FAA PRACTICAL TEST STANDARDS

This book can also be used for your flight training to obtain a recreational pilot certificate. The Recreational Pilot Practical Test Standards (dated 2006) consists of 39 tasks versus the 47 tasks in the Private Pilot PTS. All of the recreational pilot tasks are covered in this book; some tasks differ from the private pilot tasks in completion standards. Below is a reconciliation of the 47 private PTS tasks with the 39 recreational PTS tasks, followed by a listing of the 39 recreational tasks and the page number for each in this book (plus any differences in the completion standards). Beginning on page 337, the Recreational Pilot PTS (airplane single-engine land) is reprinted verbatim. The following 9 private pilot tasks are NOT covered in the Recreational Pilot PTS: Task I.D., Cross-Country Flight Planning (p. 55) Task VII.B., Navigation Systems and Radar Services (p. 197) Chapter IX., Basic Instrument Maneuvers, Tasks A through F (p. 223) Chapter XI, Night Operations, Task A (p. 269) 1 1 6 1 9

The following is a list of recreational pilot tasks. The page number in this book is given for each similar private PTS task with differences in the tasks indicated as appropriate. You will notice that some tasks are skipped. This is because only airplane single-engine land tasks are presented. Seaplane tasks are omitted. I. PREFLIGHT PREPARATION A. CERTIFICATES AND DOCUMENTS B. AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS C. WEATHER INFORMATION The recreational pilot is only responsible for the following weather reports: METAR, TAF, FA, surface analysis charts, radar summary charts, significant weather prognostic charts, and automated reports from AWOS and ASOS stations. However, the recreational pilot must explain the importance of avoiding an encounter with instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) and the courses of action for safely exiting such conditions if they are encountered. That information can be found in this text beginning on page 223. D. NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM Recreational pilots are responsible for understanding their privileges and limitations while operating in all classes of U.S. airspace except Class A airspace. Recreational pilots are also responsible for understanding and explaining temporary flight restrictions (TFRs). E. PERFORMANCE AND LIMITATIONS F. OPERATION OF SYSTEMS I. AEROMEDICAL FACTORS SAME SAME SAME SAME SAME p. 41 p. 45 p. 50

p. 59

p. 65 p. 68 p. 72

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II.

PREFLIGHT PROCEDURES A. PREFLIGHT INSPECTION B. COCKPIT MANAGEMENT C. ENGINE STARTING D. TAXIING Recreational pilots are not tested on compliance with ATC clearances. F. BEFORE TAKEOFF CHECK SAME SAME SAME SAME p. 78 p. 83 p. 86 p. 90 p. 95

III. AIRPORT OPERATIONS A. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS This recreational task deals with radio communications at an airport without an operating control tower (uncontrolled airport). Additionally, there is no requirement for recreational pilots to understand ATC light signals. B. TRAFFIC PATTERNS Recreational pilots can disregard any discussion on airports with an operating control tower (controlled airports). C. AIRPORT, RUNWAY, AND TAXIWAY SIGNS, MARKINGS, AND LIGHTING IV. TAKEOFFS, LANDINGS, AND GO AROUNDS A. NORMAL AND CROSSWIND TAKEOFF AND CLIMB B. NORMAL AND CROSSWIND APPROACH AND LANDING C. SOFT-FIELD TAKEOFF AND CLIMB D. SOFT-FIELD APPROACH AND LANDING E. SHORT-FIELD TAKEOFF AND MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB F. SHORT-FIELD APPROACH AND LANDING M. FORWARD SLIP TO A LANDING N. GO-AROUND/REJECTED LANDING Recreational pilots are not responsible for understanding retractable landing gear systems. V. PERFORMANCE MANEUVER A. STEEP TURNS VI. GROUND REFERENCE MANEUVERS A. RECTANGULAR COURSE B. S-TURNS C. TURNS AROUND A POINT SAME SAME SAME p. 173 p. 181 p. 187 SAME p. 168 SAME SAME SAME SAME SAME SAME SAME p. 110 p. 118 p. 135 p. 141 p. 146 p. 152 p. 157 p. 162 SAME p. 99

p. 103

p. 107

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VII. NAVIGATION A. PILOTAGE The Recreational PTS only requires navigation by use of pilotage. Disregard any elements referring to dead reckoning. B. DIVERSION The recreational task requires the ability to make a reasonable estimate of only the heading and fuel consumption to the alternate airport. C. LOST PROCEDURES Disregard the Private PTS element of using navigation systems/facilities and/or contacting an ATC facility for assistance. You should be able to plan a precautionary landing if deteriorating weather and/or fuel exhaustion is impending. VIII. SLOW FLIGHT AND STALLS A. MANEUVERING DURING SLOW FLIGHT B. POWER-OFF STALLS C. POWER-ON STALLS D. SPIN AWARENESS IX. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS A. EMERGENCY APPROACH AND LANDING (SIMULATED) The Recreational PTS stipulates that all go-arounds from this maneuver must be initiated no lower than 500 feet above ground level. B. SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT MALFUNCTIONS C. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND SURVIVAL GEAR X. POSTFLIGHT PROCEDURES A. AFTER LANDING, PARKING, AND SECURING SAME p. 284 SAME SAME p. 255 SAME SAME SAME SAME p. 206 p. 211 p. 216 p. 221 p. 193

p. 199

p. 202

p. 264 p. 266

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AIRPLANE SINGLE-ENGINE LAND (ASEL) Practical Test Standard

CONTENTS AREAS OF OPERATION: I. PREFLIGHT PREPARATION A. B. C. D. E. F. I. CERTIFICATES AND DOCUMENTS AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS WEATHER INFORMATION NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND LIMITATIONS OPERATION OF SYSTEMS AEROMEDICAL FACTORS

IV. TAKEOFFS, LANDINGS, AND GO-AROUNDS A. NORMAL AND CROSSWIND TAKEOFF AND CLIMB B. NORMAL AND CROSSWIND APPROACH AND LANDING C. SOFT-FIELD TAKEOFF AND CLIMB D. SOFT-FIELD APPROACH AND LANDING E. SHORT-FIELD TAKEOFF AND MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB F. SHORT-FIELD APPROACH AND LANDING M. FORWARD SLIP TO A LANDING N. GO-AROUND/REJECTED LANDING V. PERFORMANCE MANEUVER A. STEEP TURNS VI. GROUND REFERENCE MANEUVERS A. RECTANGULAR COURSE B. S-TURNS C. TURNS AROUND A POINT VII. NAVIGATION A. PILOTAGE B. DIVERSION C. LOST PROCEDURES VIII. SLOW FLIGHT AND STALLS A. B. C. D. MANEUVERING DURING SLOW FLIGHT POWER-OFF STALLS POWER-ON STALLS SPIN AWARENESS

II. PREFLIGHT PROCEDURES A. B. C. C. F. PREFLIGHT INSPECTION COCKPIT MANAGEMENT ENGINE STARTING TAXIING BEFORE TAKEOFF CHECK

III. AIRPORT OPERATIONS A. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS B. TRAFFIC PATTERNS C. AIRPORT, RUNWAY, AND TAXIWAY SIGNS, MARKINGS, AND LIGHTING

IX. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS A. EMERGENCY APPROACH AND LANDING (SIMULATED) A. SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT MALFUNCTIONS C. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND SURVIVAL GEAR X. POSTFLIGHT PROCEDURES A. AFTER LANDING, PARKING, AND SECURING

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I.

AREA OF OPERATION: PREFLIGHT PREPARATION

A. TASK: CERTIFICATES AND DOCUMENTS REFERENCE(S): 14 CFR parts 43, 61, 91; FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to certificates and documents by: 1. Explaining- a. recreational pilot certificate privileges, limitations, and recent flight experience requirements. b. medical certificate class and duration. c. pilot logbook or flight records. 2. Locating and explaining- a. airworthiness and registration certificates. b. operating limitations, placards, instrument markings, and POH/AFM. c. weight and balance data and equipment list. B. TASK: AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS REFERENCE(S): 14 CFR part 91; FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25. Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to airworthiness requirements by: 1. Explaining- a. required instruments and equipment for day VFR. b. procedures and limitations for determining airworthiness of the airplane with inoperative instruments and equipment with and without an MEL. c. requirements and procedures for obtaining a special flight permit. 2. Locating and explaining- a. b. c. d. airworthiness directives. compliance records. maintenance/inspection requirements. appropriate record keeping.

C. TASK: WEATHER INFORMATION NOTE: The examiner will use a variety of weather conditions to evaluate this TASK. REFERENCE(S): 14 CFR part 91; FAA-H-8083-25; AC 00-6, AC 00-45, AC 61-84; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to weather information by analyzing weather reports, surface analysis charts, and forecasts from aeronautical weather reporting sources. a. b. c. d. e. METAR, TAF, and FA. surface analysis charts. radar summary chart. significant weather prognostic charts. AWOS and ASOS reports.

2. Makes a competent "go/no-go" decision for the flight evaluation based on actual weather conditions. 3. Describes the importance of avoiding adverse weather and an inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) encounter. 4. Explains course of action to safety exit from an inadvertent IMC encounter. D. TASK: NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM REFERENCE(S): 14 CFR parts 71, 91; FAA-H-8083-25; Navigation Charts; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to the national airspace system by explaining: 1. Recreational pilot privileges and limitations applicable to the following classes of airspace: a. b. c. d. e. Class B. Class C. Class D. Class E. Class G.

2. Special use and other airspace areas. 3. Temporary flight restrictions (TFRs).

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E. TASK: PERFORMANCE AND LIMITATIONS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-1, FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; AC 61-84; POH/AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to performance and limitations by explaining the use of charts, tables, and data to determine performance and the adverse effects of exceeding limitations. 2. Computes weight and balance. Determines the computed weight and center of gravity is within the airplane's operating limitations and if the weight and center of gravity will remain within limits during all phases of flight. 3. Demonstrates use of the appropriate performance charts, tables, and data. 4. Describes the effects of atmospheric conditions on the airplane's performance. F. TASK: OPERATION OF SYSTEMS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to the operation of systems on the airplane provided for the flight test by explaining at least three (3) of the following systems: Primary flight controls and trim. Flaps, leading edge devices, and spoilers. Powerplant and propeller. Landing gear and brakes. Fuel, oil, and hydraulic. Electrical. Avionics. Pitot-static, vacuum/pressure, and associated flight instruments. 10. Environmental. 11. Deicing and anti-icing. I. TASK: AEROMEDICAL FACTORS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-25. Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to aeromedical factors by explaining: 1. The symptoms, causes, effects, and corrective actions of at least three (3) of the following: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. hypoxia. hyperventilation. middle ear and sinus problems. spatial disorientation. motion sickness. carbon monoxide poisoning. stress and fatigue. dehydration. 1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

II.

AREA OF OPERATION: PREFLIGHT PROCEDURES

A. TASK: PREFLIGHT INSPECTION REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to preflight inspection including which items must be inspected, the reasons for checking each item, and how to detect possible defects. 2. Inspects the airplane with reference to an appropriate checklist. 3. Verifies the airplane is in condition for safe flight. B. TASK: COCKPIT MANAGEMENT REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to cockpit management procedures. 2. Ensures all loose items in the cockpit and cabin are secured. 3. Organizes material and equipment in an efficient manner so they are readily available. 4. Briefs the occupant on the use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, doors, and emergency procedures. C. TASK: ENGINE STARTING REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; AC 91-13, AC 91-55; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to recommended engine starting procedures including the use of an external power source, hand propping safety, and starting under various atmospheric conditions. 2. Positions the airplane properly considering structures, surface conditions, other aircraft, and the safety of nearby persons and property. 3. Utilizes the appropriate checklist for starting procedure. D. TASK: TAXIING REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-25; AC 91-73; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to safe taxi procedures. 2. Performs a brake check immediately after the airplane begins moving. 3. Positions the flight controls properly for the existing wind conditions. 4. Controls direction and speed without excessive use of brakes. 5. Complies with airport/taxiway markings and signs. 6. Taxies so as to avoid other aircraft and hazards.

2. The effects of alcohol, drugs, and over-the-counter medication. 3. The effects of excess nitrogen during scuba dives upon a pilot or passenger in flight.

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F. TASK: BEFORE TAKEOFF CHECK REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to the before takeoff check including the reasons for checking each item and how to detect malfunctions. 2. Positions the airplane properly considering other aircraft/vessels, wind, and surface conditions. 3. Divides attention inside and outside the cockpit. 4. Ensures that engine temperature and pressure are suitable for runup and takeoff. 5. Accomplishes the before takeoff checklist and ensures the airplane is in safe operating condition. 6. Reviews takeoff performance airspeeds, takeoff distances, departure, and emergency procedures. 7. Avoids runway incursions and/or insures no conflict with traffic prior to taxiing into takeoff position.

C. TASK: AIRPORT, RUNWAY, AND TAXIWAY SIGNS, MARKINGS, AND LIGHTING REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-25; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to airport, runway, and taxiway operations with emphasis on runway incursion avoidance. 2. Properly identifies and interprets airport, runway, and taxiway signs, markings, and lighting.

IV.

AREA OF OPERATION: TAKEOFFS, LANDINGS, AND GO-AROUNDS

A. TASK: NORMAL AND CROSSWIND TAKEOFF AND CLIMB NOTE: If a crosswind condition does not exist, the applicant's knowledge of crosswind elements shall be evaluated through oral testing. REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a normal and crosswind takeoff, climb operations, and rejected takeoff procedures. 2. Positions the fight controls for the existing wind conditions. 3. Clears the area; taxies into the takeoff position and aligns the airplane on the runway center/takeoff path. 6. Lifts off at the recommended airspeed and accelerates to VY. 7. Establishes a pitch attitude that will maintain VY +10/-5 knots to a safe maneuvering altitude. 8. Retracts the flaps, if appropriate, after a positive rate of climb is established. 9. Maintains takeoff power and VY +10/-5 knots to a safe maneuvering altitude. 10. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the takeoff and climb. 11. Complies with noise abatement procedures. 12. Completes the appropriate checklist.

III.

AREA OF OPERATION: AIRPORT OPERATIONS

A. TASK: RADIO COMMUNICATIONS NOTE: If the aircraft is not radio equipped this TASK will be evaluated orally. REFERENCE(S): 14 CFR part 91; FAA-H-8083-25; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to radio communications at non-towered airports. 2. Selects appropriate frequencies. 3. Transmits using phraseology recommended in the AIM. 4. Acknowledges radio communications. B. TASK: TRAFFIC PATTERNS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23, FAA-H-8083-25; AC 90-66; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to traffic patterns including procedures at nontowered airports, prevention of runway incursions, collision avoidance, wake turbulence avoidance, and wind shear. 2. Complies with proper traffic pattern procedures. 3. Maintains proper spacing from other aircraft. 4. Corrects for wind drift to maintain the proper ground track. 5. Maintains orientation with the runway/landing area in use. 6. Maintains traffic pattern altitude, ±100 feet and the appropriate airspeed, ±10 knots.

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B. TASK: NORMAL AND CROSSWIND APPROACH AND LANDING NOTE: If a crosswind condition does not exist, the applicant's knowledge of crosswind elements shall be evaluated through oral testing. REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a normal and crosswind approach and landing. 3. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface, obstructions, and selects a suitable touchdown point. 4. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed, and adjusts pitch attitude and power as required. 5. Maintains a stabilized approach and recommended airspeed, or in its absence, not more than 1.3 VSO +10/-5 knots, with wind gust factor applied. 6. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the roundout and touchdown. 8. Touches down smoothly at approximately stalling speed. 9. Touches down at or within 400 feet beyond a specified point, with no drift, and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path. 10. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence. 11. Completes the appropriate checklist. C. TASK: SOFT-FIELD TAKEOFF AND CLIMB REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a soft-field takeoff and climb. 2. Positions the flight controls for existing wind conditions and to maximize lift as quickly as possible. 3. Clears the area; taxies onto the takeoff surface at a speed consistent with safety without stopping while advancing the throttle smoothly to takeoff power. 4. Establishes and maintains a pitch attitude that will transfer the weight of the airplane from the wheels to the wings as rapidly as possible. 5. Lifts off at the lowest possible airspeed and remains in ground effect while accelerating to VX or VY as appropriate. 6. Establishes a pitch attitude for VX or VY as appropriate, and maintains selected airspeed +10/---5 knots, during the climb. 7. Retracts the flaps, if appropriate, after clear of any obstacles or as recommended by the manufacturer. 8. Maintains takeoff power and VX or VY +10/---5 knots, to a safe maneuvering altitude. 9. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the takeoff and climb. 10. Completes the appropriate checklist.

D. TASK: SOFT-FIELD APPROACH AND LANDING REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a soft-field approach and landing. 2. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface and obstructions, and selects the most suitable touchdown area. 3. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration, and airspeed. 4. Maintains a stabilized approach and recommended airspeed, or in its absence not more than 1.3 VSO, +10/---5 knots, with wind gust factor applied. 5. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the roundout and touchdown. 6. Touches down softly with no drift, and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with the runway/landing path. 7. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence. 8. Maintains proper position of the flight controls and sufficient speed to taxi on the soft surface. 9. Completes the appropriate checklist. E. TASK: SHORT FIELD TAKEOFF AND MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a short-field takeoff and maximum performance climb. 2. Positions the flight controls for the existing wind conditions; sets the flaps as recommended. 3. Clears the area; taxies into takeoff position utilizing maximum available takeoff area and aligns the airplane on the runway center/takeoff path. 4. Applies brakes while advancing the throttle smoothly to takeoff power. 5. Lifts off at the recommended airspeed, and accelerates to the recommended obstacle clearance airspeed or VX. 6. Establishes a pitch attitude that will maintain the recommended obstacle clearance airspeed, or VX, +10/---5 knots, until the obstacle is cleared, or until the airplane is 50 feet above the surface. 7. After clearing the obstacle, establishes the pitch attitude for VY, accelerates to VY, and maintains VY, +10/---5 knots, during the climb. 8. Retracts the flaps, if appropriate. 9. Maintains takeoff power and VY +10/---5 knots to a safe maneuvering altitude. 10. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the takeoff and climb. 11. Completes the appropriate checklist.

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F. TASK: SHORT FIELD APPROACH AND LANDING REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a short-field approach and landing. 2. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface, obstructions, and selects the most suitable touchdown point. 3. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed; adjusts pitch attitude and power as required. 4. Maintains a stabilized approach and recommended approach airspeed, or in its absence, not more than 1.3 VSO, +10/---5 knots, with wind gust factor applied. 5. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control applications during the roundout and touchdown. 6. Touches down smoothly at minimum controllable airspeed. 7. Touches down at or within 200 feet beyond a specified point, with no side drift, minimum float and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path. 8. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence. 9. Applies brakes and or elevator control, as necessary, to stop in the shortest distance consistent with safety. 10. Completes the appropriate checklist. M. TASK: FORWARD SLIP TO A LANDING

N. TASK:

GO-AROUND/REJECTED LANDING

REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a go-around/rejected landing. 2. Makes a timely decision to discontinue the approach to landing. 3. Apples takeoff power immediately and transitions to climb pitch attitude for VY, and maintains VY, +10/---5 knots. 4. Retracts the flaps as appropriate. 5. Maneuvers to the side of the runway/landing area to clear and avoid conflicting traffic. 6. Maintains takeoff power and VY, +10/---5 to a safe maneuvering altitude. 7. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the climb. 8. Completes the appropriate checklist.

V.

AREA OF OPERATION: PERFORMANCE MANEUVER

A. TASK: STEEP TURNS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to steep turns. 2. Establishes the manufacturer's recommended airspeed or if one is not stated, a safe airspeed not to exceed VA. 3. Rolls into a coordinated 360° turn; maintains a 45° bank. 4. Performs the task in the opposite direction, as specified by the examiner. 5. Divides attention between airplane control and orientation. 6. Maintains the entry altitude, ±100 feet, airspeed, ±10 knots, bank, ±5°; and rolls out on the entry heading, ±10°.

REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to forward slip to a landing. 2. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface and obstructions, and selects the most suitable touchdown point. 3. Establishes the slipping attitude at the point from which a landing can be made using the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed; adjusts pitch attitude and power as required. 4. Maintains a ground track aligned with the runway center/landing path and an airspeed, which results in minimum float during the roundout. 5. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the recovery from the slip, the roundout, and the touchdown. 6. Touches down smoothly at the approximate stalling speed, at or within 400 feet beyond a specified point, with no side drift, and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path. 7. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence. 8. Completes the appropriate checklist.

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VI.

AREA OF OPERATION: GROUND REFERENCE MANEUVERS

NOTE: The examiner shall select at least one TASK. A. TASK: RECTANGULAR COURSE REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a rectangular course. 2. Selects a suitable reference area. 3. Plans the maneuver so as to enter a left or right pattern, 600 to 1,000 feet AGL at an appropriate distance from the selected reference area, 45° to the downwind leg. 4. Applies adequate wind-drift correction during straight-and-turning flight to maintain a constant ground track around the rectangular reference area. 5. Divides attention between airplane control and the ground track while maintaining coordinated flight. 6. Maintains altitude, ±100 feet; maintains airspeed, ±10 knots. B. TASK: S-TURNS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to S-Turns. 2. Selects a suitable ground reference line. 3. Plans the maneuver so as to enter at 600 to 1,000 feet AGL, perpendicular to the selected reference line. 4. Applies adequate wind-drift correction to track a constant radius turn on each side of the selected reference line. 5. Reverses the direction of turn directly over the selected reference line. 6. Divides attention between airplane control and the ground track while maintaining coordinated flight. 7. Maintains altitude, ±100 feet; maintains airspeed, ±10 knots. C. TASK: TURNS AROUND A POINT REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to turns around a point. 2. Selects a suitable ground reference point. 3. Plans the maneuver so as to enter at 600 to 1,000 feet AGL, at an appropriate distance from the reference point. 4. Applies adequate wind-drift correction to track a constant radius turn around the selected reference point. 5. Divides attention between airplane control and the ground track while maintaining coordinated flight. 6. Maintains altitude, ±100 feet; maintains airspeed, ±10 knots.

VII. AREA OF OPERATION: NAVIGATION

A. TASK: PILOTAGE REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-25. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to pilotage. 2. Follows the preplanned course by visual reference to landmarks, with the aid of a magnetic compass. 3. Identifies landmarks by relating the surface features to chart symbols. 4. Verifies the airplane's position within three (3) nautical miles of the flight-planned route. 5. Maintains the appropriate altitude, ±200 feet and headings, ±15°. B. TASK: DIVERSION REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-25; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to diversion. 2. Selects an appropriate alternate airport and route. 3. Makes a reasonable estimate of heading, and fuel consumption to the alternate airport. 4. Maintains the appropriate altitude, ±200 feet and heading, ±15°. C. TASK: LOST PROCEDURES REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-25; AIM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to lost procedures. 2. Selects an appropriate course of action. 3. Maintains an appropriate heading and climbs, if necessary. 4. Identifies prominent landmarks. 5. Plans a precautionary landing if deteriorating weather and/or fuel exhaustion is impending.

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VIII. AREA OF OPERATION: SLOW FLIGHT AND STALLS

A. TASK: MANEUVERING DURING SLOW FLIGHT REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to maneuvering during slow flight. 2. Selects an entry altitude that will allow the task to be completed no lower than 1,500 feet AGL. 3. Establishes and maintains an airspeed at which any further increase in angle of attack, increase in load factor, or reduction in power, would result in an immediate stall. 4. Accomplishes coordinated straight-and-level flight, turns, climbs, and descents with flap configurations specified by the examiner. 5. Divides attention between airplane control and orientation. 6. Maintains the specified altitude, ±100 feet; airspeed, +10/-0 knots; and specified angle of bank or heading, ±10°. B. TASK: POWER-OFF STALLS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-23; AC 61-67; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to power-off stalls. 2. Selects an entry altitude that allows the task to be completed no lower than 1,500 feet AGL. 3. Establishes a stabilized descent in the approach or landing configuration, as specified by the examiner. 4. Transitions smoothly from the approach or landing attitude to a pitch attitude that will induce a stall. 5. Maintains a specified heading, ±10°, in straight flight; maintains a specified angle of bank not to exceed 20°, ±10°; in turning flight, while inducing the stall. 6. Recognizes and recovers promptly after the stall occurs by simultaneously reducing the angle of attack, increasing power to maximum allowable, and leveling the wings to return to a straight-andlevel flight attitude with a minimum loss of altitude appropriate for the airplane. 7. Retracts the flaps to the recommended setting, if appropriate. 8. Accelerates to VX or VY speed before the final flap retraction; returns to the altitude, heading, and airspeed specified by the examiner.

B. TASK: POWER-ON STALLS NOTE: In some airplanes, the power setting may have to be reduced below the practical test standards power setting to prevent excessively high pitch attitudes (greater than 30 degrees nose up). REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; AC 61-67; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to power-on stalls. 2. Selects an entry altitude that allows the task to be completed no lower than 1,500 feet AGL. 3. Establishes the takeoff or departure configuration. Sets power to no less than 65 percent available power. 4. Transitions smoothly from the takeoff or departure attitude to the pitch attitude that will induce a stall. 5. Maintains a specified heading, ±10°, in straight flight; maintains a specified angle of bank not to exceed 20°, ±10°, in turning flight, while inducing the stall. 6. Recognizes and recovers promptly after the stall occurs by simultaneously reducing the angle of attack, increasing power as appropriate, and leveling the wings to return to a straight-and-level flight attitude with a minimum loss of altitude appropriate for the airplane. 7. Retracts the flaps to the recommended setting, if appropriate. 8. Accelerates to VX or VY speed before the final flap retraction; returns to the altitude, heading, and airspeed specified by the examiner. D. TASK: SPIN AWARENESS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; AC 61-67; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to spin awareness by explaining: 1. Aerodynamic factors related to spins. 2. Flight situations where unintentional spins may occur. 3. Procedures for recovery from spins.

Appendix C: Recreational Pilot Flight Training and FAA Practical Test Standards

345

IX.

AREA OF OPERATION: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS

A. TASK: EMERGENCY APPROACH AND LANDING (SIMULATED) REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to emergency approach and landing procedures. 2. Analyzes the situation and selects an appropriate course of action. 3. Establishes and maintains the recommended bestglide airspeed, ±10 knots. 4. Selects a suitable landing area. 5. Plans and follows a flight pattern to the selected landing area considering altitude, wind, terrain, and obstructions. 6. Prepares for landing, or go-around (if not at an airport the go-around will be initiated no lower than 500 feet AGL), as specified by the examiner. 7. Follows the appropriate checklist. B. TASK: SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT MALFUNCTIONS REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to system and equipment malfunctions appropriate to the airplane provided for the practical test. 2. Analyzes the situation and takes appropriate action for simulated emergencies appropriate to the airplane provided for the practical test for at least three (3) of the following- a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l. m. n. partial or complete power loss. engine roughness or overheat. carburetor or induction icing. loss of oil pressure. fuel starvation. electrical malfunction. vacuum/pressure, and associated flight instruments malfunction. pitot/static. landing gear or flap malfunction. inoperative trim. inadvertent door or window opening. structural icing. smoke/fire/engine compartment fire. any other emergency appropriate to the airplane.

C. TASK: EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND SURVIVAL GEAR REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to emergency equipment and survival gear appropriate to the airplane and environment encountered during flight. Identifies appropriate equipment that should be aboard the airplane.

X.

AREA OF OPERATION: POSTFLIGHT PROCEDURES

A. TASK: AFTER LANDING, PARKING, AND SECURING REFERENCE(S): FAA-H-8083-3, FAA-H-8083-25; POH/AFH. Objective. To determine that the applicant: 1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to after landing, parking and securing procedures. 2. Maintains directional control after touchdown while decelerating to an appropriate speed. 3. Observes runway hold lines and other surface control markings and lighting. 4. Parks in an appropriate area, considering the safety of nearby persons and property. 5. Follows the appropriate procedure for engine shutdown. 6. Completes the appropriate checklist. 7. Conducts an appropriate postflight inspection and secures the aircraft.

3. Follows the appropriate checklist or procedure.

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