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HEALTHYLIFE

CHILL OUT

Diving into the gym without annoying the gym veterans takes some consideration and know-how. Bryan Stednitz, assistant director of Fitness and Wellness for Indiana University's Division of Campus Recreational Sports, and Chris Arvin, program director, offer these ironclad tips so you won't be one of these maddening weight room users:

® October 2007

Gym etiquette: Follow these ironclad rules

When bad weather causes electrical power outages, you can keep refrigerated and frozen foods from spoiling. Fill empty plastic milk jugs three-quarters with water and freeze them now. These homemade blocks of ice stashed inside your refrigerator can keep food colder longer (and safer) if the power goes out. A tip from food scientists at Saint Louis University.

Letter

Especially when the gym is crowded, be aware of your surroundings. Don't talk on your cell phone or just stand around. If you are going to the gym to work out, then work out.

Talkers.

Sweaters. Nobody wants to sit or lie down in a pool Grunters. If

you're really pushing yourself, some grunts on the last couple reps are to be expected. But don't let out a Tarzan-like scream every time you push the weight. And try not to drop the weights. Not only is it obnoxious, you can damage them and yourself.

of your sweat. Bring a towel and wipe down the equipment after you use it. Also, put weights back when the workout is complete.

It happens all the time; someone puts on way too much weight, can't do the exercise correctly, and looks foolish. Not only is this dangerous, it is counter-productive. Using the correct form, getting the full range of motion on your exercise while using less weight will give you a much better workout. Wait your turn. Many gyms have sign-up sheets for busy machines such as ellipticals, treadmills and other exercise equipment. Once signed up, don't be late.

Bad form lifters.

Cutters.

FAMILY LIFE

What are you looking for? An overstuffed backpack that weighs too much and can put your child at risk for back injury.

Time for a backpack inspection

"Parents should inspect their child's backpack from time to time. They often carry much more than they should with extra shoes, toys and other unnecessary items," said Dr. Joshua Hyman, associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

CHILDREN SHOULD WEAR A BACKPACK CORRECTLY OVER BOTH SHOULDERS SHOULD CONSIDER A EVENLY. TO SPREAD THE WEIGHT WHEELED BACKPACK.

TO PREVENT INJURY,

This is one of those incredible Web tools you'll want to bookmark and tell everyone about. Plot and calculate the distance of your walking route. Use the calorie converter to figure out how many calories you burned on your walk: www.webwalking.com/ googlemap.htm.

FREE GOOGLE MAP PEDOMETER.

OR THEY

Step on the scale ­ kid and backpack together. "A backpack shouldn't weigh more than 15 percent of the child's weight or about 7 pounds for a child who weighs 50 pounds. If it is textbooks that are making the bag too heavy, parents should speak with the teacher ­ sometimes these books can be left at school," said Dr. Hyman. Watch for signs of trouble: a child whose posture changes while wearing the backpack, a struggle to put it on, any pain, tingling or red marks from the backpack.

Copyright 2007, American Institute for Preventive Medicine. 30445 Northwestern Hwy., Ste. 350, Farmington Hills, MI 48334 248.539.1800 · 800.345.2476 www.HealthyLife.com All rights reserved.

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